Science.gov

Sample records for aldehydes ketones carboxylic

  1. Water chemical ionization mass spectrometry of aldehydes, ketones esters, and carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.

    1986-11-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI) of aliphatic and aromatic carbonyl compounds using water as the reagent gas provides intense pseudomolecular ions and class-specific fragmentation patterns that can be used to identify aliphatic aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters. The length of ester acyl and alkyl groups can easily be determined on the basis of loss of alcohols from the protonated parent. Water CI provides for an approximately 200:1 selectivity of carbonyl species over alkanes. No reagent ions are detected above 55 amu, allowing species as small as acetone, propanal, acetic acid, and methyl formate to be identified. When deuterate water was used as the reagent, only the carboxylic acids and ..beta..-diketones showed significant H/D exchange. The use of water CI to identify carbonyl compounds in a wastewater from the supercritical water extraction of lignite coal, in lemon oil, and in whiskey volatiles is discussed.

  2. 2-Iodoxybenzenesulfonic acid as an extremely active catalyst for the selective oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and enones with oxone.

    PubMed

    Uyanik, Muhammet; Akakura, Matsujiro; Ishihara, Kazuaki

    2009-01-14

    Electron-donating group-substituted 2-iodoxybenzoic acids (IBXs) such as 5-Me-IBX (1g), 5-MeO-IBX (1h), and 4,5-Me(2)-IBX (1i) were superior to IBX 1a as catalysts for the oxidation of alcohols with Oxone (a trademark of DuPont) under nonaqueous conditions, although Oxone was almost insoluble in most organic solvents. The catalytic oxidation proceeded more rapidly and cleanly in nitromethane. Furthermore, 2-iodoxybenzenesulfonic acid (IBS, 6a) was much more active than modified IBXs. Thus, we established a highly efficient and selective method for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols to carbonyl compounds such as aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and ketones with Oxone in nonaqueous nitromethane, acetonitrile, or ethyl acetate in the presence of 0.05-5 mol % of 6a, which was generated in situ from 2-iodobenzenesulfonic acid (7a) or its sodium salt. Cycloalkanones could be further oxidized to alpha,beta-cycloalkenones or lactones by controlling the amounts of Oxone under the same conditions as above. When Oxone was used under nonaqueous conditions, Oxone wastes could be removed by simple filtration. Based on theoretical calculations, we considered that the relatively ionic character of the intramolecular hypervalent iodine-OSO(2) bond of IBS might lower the twisting barrier of the alkoxyperiodinane intermediate 16.

  3. Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation and Hydrogen Production in the Ketonization of Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Lina M; Renz, Michael; Corma, Avelino

    2016-09-01

    Aldehydes possess relatively high chemical energy, which is the driving force for disproportionation reactions such as Cannizzaro and Tishchenko reactions. Generally, this energy is wasted if aldehydes are transformed into carboxylic acids with a sacrificial oxidant. Here, we describe a cascade reaction in which the surplus energy of the transformation is liberated as molecular hydrogen for the oxidation of heptanal to heptanoic acid by water, and the carboxylic acid is transformed into potentially industrially relevant symmetrical ketones by ketonic decarboxylation. The cascade reaction is catalyzed by monoclinic zirconium oxide (m-ZrO2 ). The reaction mechanism has been studied through cross-coupling experiments between different aldehydes and acids, and the final symmetrical ketones are formed by a reaction pathway that involves the previously formed carboxylic acids. Isotopic studies indicate that the carboxylic acid can be formed by a hydride shift from the adsorbed aldehyde on the metal oxide surface in the absence of noble metals. PMID:27539722

  4. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones is a useful chemical transformation with a long history. Several chemists have claimed that they discovered the conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones yet in fact the reaction is actually known for centuries.

  5. Diastereoselective synthesis of substituted diaziridines from simple ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Alexander W; Dohmeier, Emma F; Moura-Letts, Gustavo

    2015-09-11

    Diastereopure substituted diaziridines from simple ketones, aldehydes and amines are here reported. These important chemical scaffolds are obtained in the presence of a weak inorganic base and hydroxylamine O-sulfonic acid (HOSA). This method introduces three stereocenters in one step to provide a wide variety of substituted diaziridines with high yields and diastereoselectivities.

  6. [Pollution Characteristics of Aldehydes and Ketones Compounds in the Exhaust of Beijing Typical Restaurants].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-chen; Cui, Tong; He, Wan-qing; Nie, Lei; Wang, Jun-ling; Pan, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Aldehydes and ketones compounds, as one of the components in the exhaust of restaurants, are a class of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with strong chemical reactivity. However, there is no systematic study on aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of restaurants. To further clarify the food source emission levels of aldehydes and ketones compounds and controlling measures, to access city group catering VOCs emissions control decision-making basis, this study selected 8 Beijing restaurants with different types. The aldehydes and ketones compounds were sampled using DNPH-silica tube, and then ultra performance liquid chromatography was used for quantitative measurement. The aldehydes and ketones concentrations of reference volume condition from 8 restaurants in descending order were Roasted Duck restaurant, Chinese Style Barbecue, Home Dishes, Western Fast-food, School Canteen, Chinese Style Fast-food, Sichuan Cuisine, Huaiyang Cuisine. The results showed that the range of aldehydes and ketones compounds (C1-C9) concentrations of reference volume condition in the exhaust of restaurants was 115.47-1035.99 microg x m(-3). The composition of aldehydes and ketones compounds in the exhaust of sampled restaurants was obviously different. The percentages of C1-C3 were above 40% in the exhaust from Chinese style restaurants. Fast food might emit more C4-C9 aldehydes and ketones compounds. From the current situation of existing aldehydes and ketones compounds control, the removal efficiency of high voltage electrostatic purifiers widely used in Beijing is limited.

  7. Bioreduction of aldehydes and ketones using Manihot species.

    PubMed

    Machado, Luciana L; Souza, João Sammy N; de Mattos, Marcos Carlos; Sakata, Solange K; Cordell, Geoffrey A; Lemos, Telma L G

    2006-08-01

    Biocatalysis constitutes an important tool in organic synthesis, especially for the preparation of chiral molecules of biological interest. A series of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and two ketones were reduced using plant cell preparations from Manihot esculenta and Manihot dulcis roots. The reduced products were typically obtained in excellent yields (80-96%), and with excellent enantiomeric excess (94-98%), except for vanillin. Esters, a nitrile, and an amide were also examined, but were not reduced. Preliminary conversion rate studies are reported. This is the first attempt to perform the biotransformation of carbonyl compounds using Manihot species. PMID:16603212

  8. Beyond ketonization: selective conversion of carboxylic acids to olefins over balanced Lewis acid–base pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Baylon, Rebecca A. L.; Sun, Junming; Martin, Kevin J.; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Dwindling petroleum reserves combined with increased energy demand and political factors encouraging an increase in energy independence have led to a large amount of research on sustainable alternatives. To this end, biomass conversion has been recognized as themost readily viable technology to produce biofuel concerning our reliance on liquid fuels for transportation and has the advantage of being easily integrated into our heavy use of combustion engines. The interest in biomass conversion has also resulted in reduced costs and a greater abundance of bio-oil, a mixture of hundreds of oxygenates including alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and ketones. However, the presence of carboxylic acids in bio-oil derived from lignocellulose pyrolysis leads to low pH, instability, and corrosiveness. In addition, carboxylic acids (i.e. acetic acid) can also be produced via fermentation of sugars. This can be accomplished by a variety of homoacetogenic microorganisms that can produce acetic acid with 100% carbon yield.

  9. Studies of the condensation of sulfones with ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Garst, Michael E; Dolby, Lloyd J; Esfandiari, Shervin; Okrent, Rachel A; Avey, Alfred A

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] The condensation of ketones or aldehydes with sulfones was shown to give a variety of products. Condensation of 2-methylcyclohexanone with dimethyl sulfone using potassium t-butoxide as base gave useful yields of 1,2-dimethylenecyclohexane. Under the same conditions, cycloheptanone, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and 2-butanone were converted to dienes. Remarkably, these reaction conditions converted acetophenone into p-terphenyl (10%) and (E)-1,4-diphenyl-3-penten-1-one (44%). Propiophenone was converted to 2'-methyl-p-terphenyl (61%). Using alpha-tetralone produced 1-methynaphthalene and naphthalene. No reaction took place with beta-tetralone. Using diethyl sulfone with alpha-tetralone lead to pure naphthalene. Condensation of isobutyraldehyde and dimethyl sulfone using potassium t-butoxide gave isoprene in low yield. Using benzaldehyde and benzyl phenyl sulfone in N,N-dimethylacetamide gave 1,2-diphenyl-1-phenylsulfonylethylene, N,N-dimethylcinnamide, and a complex condensation product. Only 1,2-diphenyl-1-phenylsulfonylethylene was obtained when the solvent was THF. PMID:16408963

  10. Photoredox Activation for the Direct β-Arylation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Pirnot, Michael T.; Rankic, Danica A.; Martin, David B. C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The direct β-activation of saturated aldehydes and ketones has long been an elusive transformation. We found that photoredox catalysis in combination with organocatalysis can lead to the transient generation of 5π-electron β-enaminyl radicals from ketones and aldehydes that rapidly couple with cyano-substituted aryl rings at the carbonyl β-position. This mode of activation is suitable for a broad range of carbonyl β-functionalization reactions and is amenable to enantioselective catalysis. PMID:23539600

  11. Two-Carbon Homologation of Ketones to 3-Methyl Unsaturated Aldehydes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usual scheme of two-carbon homologation of ketones to 3-methyl unsaturated aldehydes by Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons condensations with phosphonate esters, such as triethyl-2-phosphonoacetate, involves three steps. The phosphonate condensation step results in extension of the carbon chain by two carb...

  12. Analysis of carbonaceous biomarkers with the Mars Organic Analyzer microchip capillary electrophoresis system: aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Stockton, Amanda M; Tjin, Caroline Chandra; Huang, Grace L; Benhabib, Merwan; Chiesl, Thomas N; Mathies, Richard A

    2010-11-01

    A microchip CE method is developed for the analysis of two oxidized forms of carbon, aldehydes and ketones, with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA). Fluorescent derivitization is achieved in ∼ 15 min by hydrazone formation with Cascade Blue hydrazide in 30 mM borate pH 5-6. The microchip CE separation and analysis method is optimized via separation in 30 mM borate buffer, pH 9.5, at 20°C. A carbonyl standard consisting of ten aldehydes and ketones found in extraterrestrial matter is successfully separated; the resulting LOD depends on the reactivity of the compound and range from 70 pM for formaldehyde to 2 μM for benzophenone. To explore the utility of this method for analyzing complex samples, analyses of several fermented beverages are conducted, identifying ten aldehydes and ketones ranging from 30 nM to 5 mM. A Martian regolith simulant sample, consisting of a basalt matrix spiked with soluble ions and acetone, is designed and analyzed, but acetone is found to have a limited detectable lifetime under simulant Martian conditions. This work establishes the capability of the MOA for studying aldehydes and ketones, a critical class of oxidized organic molecules of interest in planetary and in terrestrial environmental and health studies. PMID:20967779

  13. Reductions of aldehydes and ketones with a readily available N-heterocyclic carbene borane and acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Vladimir; Pan, Xiangcheng

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acetic acid promotes the reduction of aldehydes and ketones by the readily available N-heterocyclic carbene borane, 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene borane. Aldehydes are reduced over 1–24 h at room temperature with 1 equiv of acetic acid and 0.5 equiv of the NHC-borane. Ketone reductions are slower but can be accelerated by using 5 equiv of acetic acid. Aldehydes can be selectively reduced in the presence of ketones. On a small scale, products are isolated by evaporation of the reaction mixture and direct chromatography. PMID:23616812

  14. Beyond ketonization: selective conversion of carboxylic acids to olefins over balanced Lewis acid-base pairs.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Rebecca A L; Sun, Junming; Martin, Kevin J; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-04-11

    We report the direct conversion of mixed carboxylic acids to C-C olefins with up to 60 mol% carbon yield through cascade (cross) ketonization, (cross) aldolization and self-deoxygenation reactions. Co-feeding hydrogen provides an additional ketone hydrogenation/dehydration pathway to a wider range of olefins. PMID:26898532

  15. Beyond ketonization: selective conversion of carboxylic acids to olefins over balanced Lewis acid-base pairs.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Rebecca A L; Sun, Junming; Martin, Kevin J; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Wang, Yong

    2016-04-11

    We report the direct conversion of mixed carboxylic acids to C-C olefins with up to 60 mol% carbon yield through cascade (cross) ketonization, (cross) aldolization and self-deoxygenation reactions. Co-feeding hydrogen provides an additional ketone hydrogenation/dehydration pathway to a wider range of olefins.

  16. Practical methylenation reaction for aldehydes and ketones using new Julia-type reagents.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kaori; Kobayashi, Takahisa; Uchida, Nariaki

    2015-05-15

    A new Julia-type methylenation reagent, 1-methyl-2-(methylsulfonyl)benzimidazole (1e), reacts with a variety of aldehydes and ketones in the presence of either NaHMDS (-55 °C to rt) or t-BuOK (rt, 1 h) in DMF to give the corresponding terminal alkenes in high yields. The byproducts are easily removed, and the reaction conditions are mild and practical.

  17. Copper-catalyst-controlled site-selective allenylation of ketones and aldehydes with propargyl boronates.

    PubMed

    Fandrick, Keith R; Ogikubo, Junichi; Fandrick, Daniel R; Patel, Nitinchandra D; Saha, Jaideep; Lee, Heewon; Ma, Shengli; Grinberg, Nelu; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2013-03-15

    A practical and highly site-selective copper-PhBPE-catalyst-controlled allenylation with propargyl boronates has been developed. The methodology has shown to be tolerant of diverse ketones and aldehydes providing the allenyl adducts in high selectivity. The BPE ligand and boronate substituents were shown to direct the site selectivity for which either propargyl or allenyl adducts can be acquired in high selectivity. A model is proposed that explains the origin of the site selectivity. PMID:23438081

  18. Field validation of the dnph method for aldehydes and ketones. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, G.S.; Steger, J.L.

    1996-04-01

    A stationary source emission test method for selected aldehydes and ketones has been validated. The method employs a sampling train with impingers containing 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to derivatize the analytes. The resulting hydrazones are recovered and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Nine analytes were studied; the method was validated for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, acetophenone and isophorone. Acrolein, menthyl ethyl ketone, menthyl isobutyl ketone, and quinone did not meet the validation criteria. The study employed the validation techniques described in EPA method 301, which uses train spiking to determine bias, and collocated sampling trains to determine precision. The studies were carried out at a plywood veneer dryer and a polyester manufacturing plant.

  19. Enzymatic Chemoselective Aldehyde-Ketone Cross-Couplings through the Polarity Reversal of Methylacetoin.

    PubMed

    Bernacchia, Giovanni; Bortolini, Olga; De Bastiani, Morena; Lerin, Lindomar Alberto; Loschonsky, Sabrina; Massi, Alessandro; Müller, Michael; Giovannini, Pier Paolo

    2015-06-01

    The thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzyme acetoin:dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase (Ao:DCPIP OR) from Bacillus licheniformis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme shared close similarities with the acetylacetoin synthase (AAS) partially purified from Bacillus licheniformis suggesting that they could be the same enzyme. The product scope of the recombinant Ao:DCPIP OR was expanded to chiral tertiary α-hydroxy ketones through the rare aldehyde-ketone cross-carboligation reaction. Unprecedented is the use of methylacetoin as the acetyl anion donor in combination with a range of strongly to weakly activated ketones. In some cases, Ao:DCPIP OR produced the desired tertiary alcohols with stereochemistry opposite to that obtained with other ThDP-dependent enzymes. The combination of methylacetoin as acyl anion synthon and novel ThDP-dependent enzymes considerably expands the available range of C-C bond formations in asymmetric synthesis. PMID:25914187

  20. A Nitrogen-Assisted One-Pot Heteroaryl Ketone Synthesis from Carboxylic Acids and Heteroaryl Halides.

    PubMed

    Demkiw, Krystyna; Araki, Hirofumi; Elliott, Eric L; Franklin, Christopher L; Fukuzumi, Yoonjoo; Hicks, Frederick; Hosoi, Kazushi; Hukui, Tadashi; Ishimaru, Yoichiro; O'Brien, Erin; Omori, Yoshimasa; Mineno, Masahiro; Mizufune, Hideya; Sawada, Naotaka; Sawai, Yasuhiro; Zhu, Lei

    2016-04-15

    A practical and highly effective one-pot synthesis of versatile heteroaryl ketones directly from carboxylic acids and heteroaryl halides under mild conditions is reported. This method does not require derivatization of carboxylic acids (preparation of acid chlorides, Weinreb amides, etc.) or the use of any additives/catalysts. A wide substrate scope of carboxylic acids with high functional group tolerance has also been demonstrated. The results reveal that the presence of an α-nitrogen on the halide substrate greatly improves the desired ketone formation.

  1. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  2. Iron/ABNO-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Ambient Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianyue; Shang, SenSen; Li, Guosong; Ren, Lanhui; Lv, Ying; Gao, Shuang

    2016-03-01

    We report a new Fe(NO3)3·9H2O/9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-N-oxyl catalyst system that enables efficient aerobic oxidation of a broad range of primary and secondary alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. The catalyst system exhibits excellent activity and selectivity for primary aliphatic alcohol oxidation. This procedure can also be scaled up. Kinetic analysis demonstrates that C-H bond cleavage is the rate-determining step and that cationic species are involved in the reaction. PMID:26859251

  3. Fluoride-assisted activation of calcium carbide: a simple method for the ethynylation of aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Abolfazl; Seidel, Daniel; Miska, Andreas; Schreiner, Peter R

    2015-06-01

    The fluoride-assisted ethynylation of ketones and aldehydes is described using commercially available calcium carbide with typically 5 mol % of TBAF·3H2O as the catalyst in DMSO. Activation of calcium carbide by fluoride is thought to generate an acetylide "ate"-complex that readily adds to carbonyl groups. Aliphatic aldehydes and ketones generally provide high yields, whereas aromatic carbonyls afford propargylic alcohols with moderate to good yields. The use of calcium carbide as a safe acetylide ion source along with economic amounts of TBAF·3H2O make this procedure a cheap and operationally simple method for the preparation of propargylic alcohols.

  4. Target-Specific Capture of Environmentally Relevant Gaseous Aldehydes and Carboxylic Acids with Functional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, McKenzie L; Guerra, Fernanda D; Dhulekar, Jhilmil; Alexis, Frank; Whitehead, Daniel C

    2015-10-12

    Aldehyde and carboxylic acid volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present significant environmental concern due to their prevalence in the atmosphere. We developed biodegradable functional nanoparticles comprised of poly(d,l-lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ethyleneimine) (PDLLA-PEG-PEI) block co-polymers that capture these VOCs by chemical reaction. Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) preparation involved nanoprecipitation and surface functionalization with branched PEI. The PDLLA-PEG-PEI NPs were characterized by using TGA, IR, (1) H NMR, elemental analysis, and TEM. The materials feature 1°, 2°, and 3° amines on their surface, capable of capturing aldehydes and carboxylic acids from gaseous mixtures. Aldehydes were captured by a condensation reaction forming imines, whereas carboxylic acids were captured by acid/base reaction. These materials reacted selectively with target contaminants obviating off-target binding when challenged by other VOCs with orthogonal reactivity. The NPs outperformed conventional activated carbon sorbents.

  5. Sequential aldol condensation-transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions of aldehydes, methyl ketones, and arylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan-Xi; Xing, Chun-Hui; Israel, Matthew; Hu, Qiao-Sheng

    2011-04-15

    Sequential aldol condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones followed by transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions of arylboronic acids to form β-substituted ketones is described. By using the 1,1'-spirobiindane-7,7'-diol (SPINOL)-based phosphite, an asymmetric version of this type of sequential reaction, with up to 92% ee, was also realized. Our study provided an efficient method to access β-substituted ketones and might lead to the development of other sequential/tandem reactions with transition metal-catalyzed addition reactions as the key step.

  6. Catalytic asymmetric reductive coupling of alkynes and aldehydes: enantioselective synthesis of allylic alcohols and alpha-hydroxy ketones.

    PubMed

    Miller, Karen M; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Jamison, Timothy F

    2003-03-26

    A highly enantioselective method for catalytic reductive coupling of alkynes and aldehydes is described. Allylic alcohols are afforded with complete E/Z selectivity, generally >95:5 regioselectivity, and in up to 96% ee. In conjunction with ozonolysis, this process is complementary to existing methods of enantioselective alpha-hydroxy ketone synthesis. PMID:12643701

  7. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenations of Nitriles, Ketones, and Aldehydes by Well-Defined Manganese Pincer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Saravanakumar; Topf, Christoph; Fischer, Steffen; Jiao, Haijun; Spannenberg, Anke; Baumann, Wolfgang; Ludwig, Ralf; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2016-07-20

    Hydrogenations constitute fundamental processes in organic chemistry and allow for atom-efficient and clean functional group transformations. In fact, the selective reduction of nitriles, ketones, and aldehydes with molecular hydrogen permits access to a green synthesis of valuable amines and alcohols. Despite more than a century of developments in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, efforts toward the creation of new useful and broadly applicable catalyst systems are ongoing. Recently, Earth-abundant metals have attracted significant interest in this area. In the present study, we describe for the first time specific molecular-defined manganese complexes that allow for the hydrogenation of various polar functional groups. Under optimal conditions, we achieve good functional group tolerance, and industrially important substrates, e.g., for the flavor and fragrance industry, are selectively reduced. PMID:27219853

  8. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenations of Nitriles, Ketones, and Aldehydes by Well-Defined Manganese Pincer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Saravanakumar; Topf, Christoph; Fischer, Steffen; Jiao, Haijun; Spannenberg, Anke; Baumann, Wolfgang; Ludwig, Ralf; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2016-07-20

    Hydrogenations constitute fundamental processes in organic chemistry and allow for atom-efficient and clean functional group transformations. In fact, the selective reduction of nitriles, ketones, and aldehydes with molecular hydrogen permits access to a green synthesis of valuable amines and alcohols. Despite more than a century of developments in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, efforts toward the creation of new useful and broadly applicable catalyst systems are ongoing. Recently, Earth-abundant metals have attracted significant interest in this area. In the present study, we describe for the first time specific molecular-defined manganese complexes that allow for the hydrogenation of various polar functional groups. Under optimal conditions, we achieve good functional group tolerance, and industrially important substrates, e.g., for the flavor and fragrance industry, are selectively reduced.

  9. Aminosilica materials as adsorbents for the selective removal of aldehydes and ketones from simulated bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Drese, Jeffrey H; Talley, Anne D; Jones, Christopher W

    2011-03-21

    The fast pyrolysis of biomass is a potential route to the production of liquid biorenewable fuel sources. However, degradation of the bio-oil mixtures due to reaction of oxygenates, such as aldehydes and ketones, reduces the stability of the liquids and can impact long-term storage and shipping. Herein, solid aminosilica adsorbents are described for the selective adsorptive removal of reactive aldehyde and ketone species. Three aminosilica adsorbents are prepared through the reaction of amine-containing silanes with pore-expanded mesoporous silica. A fourth aminosilica adsorbent is prepared through the ring-opening polymerization of aziridine from pore-expanded mesoporous silica. Adsorption experiments with a representative mixture of bio-oil model compounds are presented using each adsorbent at room temperature and 45 °C. The adsorbent comprising only primary amines adsorbs the largest amount of aldehydes and ketones. The overall reactivity of this adsorbent increases with increasing temperature. Additional aldehyde screening experiments show that the reactivity of aldehydes with aminosilicas varies depending on their chemical functionality. Initial attempts to regenerate an aminosilica adsorbent by acid hydrolysis show that they can be at least partially regenerated for further use. PMID:21246749

  10. Leaf uptake of methyl ethyl ketone and croton aldehyde by Castanopsis sieboldii and Viburnum odoratissimum saplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Akira; Tobe, Seita; Shimizu, Sachie

    2013-05-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is an abundant ketone in the urban atmosphere and croton aldehyde (CA) is a strong irritant to eye, nose, and throat. The use of plants able to absorb these compounds is one suggested mitigation method. In order to investigate this method, we determined the uptake rate of these compounds by leaves of two tree species, Castanopsis sieboldii and Viburnum odoratissimum var. awabuki. Using a flow-through chamber method, we found that these species were capable of absorbing both compounds. We also confirmed that the uptake rate of these compounds normalized to the fumigated concentration (AN) was higher at higher light intensities and that there was a linear relationship between AN and stomatal conductance (gS) for both tree species. In concentration-varying experiments, the uptake of MEK and CA seemed to be restricted by partitioning of MEK between leaf water and air. The ratio of the intercellular VOC concentration (Ci) to the fumigated concentration (Ca) for CA was zero, and the ratio ranged from 0.63 to 0.76 for MEK. The more efficient CA uptake ability may be the result of higher partitioning of CA into leaf water. Our present and previous results also suggest that plant MEK uptake ability was different across plant species, depending on the VOC conversion speed inside leaves.

  11. Introduction of aldehyde vs. carboxylic groups to cellulose nanofibers using laccase/TEMPO mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jaušovec, Darja; Vogrinčič, Robert; Kokol, Vanja

    2015-02-13

    The chemo-enzymatic modification of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) using laccase as biocatalysts and TEMPO or 4-Amino-TEMPO as mediators under mild aqueous conditions (pH 5, 30 °C) has been investigated to introduce surface active aldehyde groups. 4-Amino TEMPO turned out to be kinetically 0.5-times (50%) more active mediator, resulting to oxoammonium cation intermediacy generated and its in situ regeneration during the modification of CNFs. Accordingly, beside of around 750 mmol/kg terminally-located aldehydes, originated during CNFs isolation, the reaction resulted to about 140% increase of C6-located aldehydes at optimal conditions, without reducing CNFs crystallinity. While only the C6-aldehydes were wholly transformed into the carboxyls after additional post-treatment using NaOH according to the Cannizzaro reaction, the post-oxidation with air-oxygen in EtOH/water medium or NaClO2 resulted to no- or very small amounts of carboxyls created, respectively, at a simultaneous loss of all C6- and some terminal-aldehydes in the latter due to the formation of highly-resistant hemiacetal covalent linkages with available cellulose hydroxyls. The results indicated a new way of preparing and stabilizing highly reactive C6-aldehydes on cellulose, and their exploitation in the development of new nanocellulose-based materials.

  12. Immobilization of DNA via oligonucleotides containing an aldehyde or carboxylic acid group at the 5' terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Kremsky, J N; Wooters, J L; Dougherty, J P; Meyers, R E; Collins, M; Brown, E L

    1987-01-01

    A general method for the immobilization of DNA through its 5'-end has been developed. A synthetic oligonucleotide, modified at its 5'-end with an aldehyde or carboxylic acid, was attached to latex microspheres containing hydrazide residues. Using T4 polynucleotide ligase and an oligonucleotide splint, a single stranded 98mer was efficiently joined to the immobilized synthetic fragment. After impregnation of the latex microspheres with the fluorescent dye, Nile Red and attachment of an aldehyde 16mer, 5 X 10(5) bead-DNA conjugates could be detected with a conventional fluorimeter. Images PMID:3562241

  13. Stereoselective synthesis of the dimethyl acetals of. beta. ,. gamma. -unsaturated aldehydes from alkyl trans-2-methoxypropyl ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Kulinkovich, O.G.; Tishchenko, I.G.; Sorokin, V.L.

    1986-01-10

    trans-(2-Methoxycyclopropyl)carbinols were obtained in the form of equimolar mixtures of diastereomers by the reaction of the respective alkyl trans-2-methoxy-cyclopropyl ketones with lithium aluminum hydride or organometallic compounds. Methanolysis of the products in an acidic medium leads to high yields of the dimethyl acetals of trans- and cis-..beta..,..gamma..-unsaturated aldehydes, in which the content of the trans isomer amounts to 55-70%. The dimethyl acetals of trans-..beta..-..gamma..-unsaturated aldehydes can be produced by this method with greater stereoselectivity by reduction in the degree of transformation of the initial carbinols.

  14. Catalyzed formation of α,β-unsaturated ketones or aldehydes from propargylic acetates by a recoverable and recyclable nanocluster catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man-Bo; Tian, Shi-Kai; Wu, Zhikun

    2014-05-01

    An active, recoverable, and recyclable nanocluster catalyst, Au25(SR)18-, has been developed to catalyze the formation of α,β-unsaturated ketones or aldehydes from propargylic acetates. The catalytic process has been proposed to be initialized by an SN2' addition of OH-. Moreover, a dramatic solvent effect was observed, for which a rational explanation was provided.An active, recoverable, and recyclable nanocluster catalyst, Au25(SR)18-, has been developed to catalyze the formation of α,β-unsaturated ketones or aldehydes from propargylic acetates. The catalytic process has been proposed to be initialized by an SN2' addition of OH-. Moreover, a dramatic solvent effect was observed, for which a rational explanation was provided. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, UV-Vis spectra and fluorescence spectra of catalysts, characterization data, and copies of MS spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00658e

  15. Direct Conversion of Aldehydes and Ketones to Allylic Halides by a NbX5-[3,3] Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Ravikumar, P. C.; Yao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    Sequential addition of vinylmagnesium bromide and NbCl5, or NbBr5, to a series of aldehydes and ketones directly provides homologated, allylic halides. Transposition of the intermediate vinyl alkoxide is envisaged through a metalla-halo-[3,3] rearrangement with concomitant delivery of the halogen to the terminal carbon. The [3,3] rearrangement is equally effective for the conversion of a propargyllic alcohol to the corresponding allenyl bromide. PMID:20046989

  16. Group Exchange between Ketones and Carboxylic Acids through Directing Group Assisted Rh-Catalyzed Reorganization of Carbon Skeletons.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhi-Quan; Pan, Fei; Li, Hu; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xi-Sha; Chen, Kang; Wang, Xin; Li, Yu-Xue; Sun, Jian; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2015-04-22

    The Rh(I)-catalyzed direct reorganization of organic frameworks and group exchanges between carboxylic acids and aryl ketones was developed with the assistance of directing group. Biaryls, alkenylarenes, and alkylarenes were produced in high efficiency from aryl ketones and the corresponding carboxylic acids by releasing the other molecule of carboxylic acids and carbon monoxide. A wide range of functional groups were well compatible. The exchanges between two partners were proposed to take place on the Rh-(III) center of key intermediates, supported by experimental mechanistic studies and computational calculations. The transformation unveiled the new catalytic pathway of the group transfer of two organic molecules.

  17. Group Exchange between Ketones and Carboxylic Acids through Directing Group Assisted Rh-Catalyzed Reorganization of Carbon Skeletons.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhi-Quan; Pan, Fei; Li, Hu; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xi-Sha; Chen, Kang; Wang, Xin; Li, Yu-Xue; Sun, Jian; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2015-04-22

    The Rh(I)-catalyzed direct reorganization of organic frameworks and group exchanges between carboxylic acids and aryl ketones was developed with the assistance of directing group. Biaryls, alkenylarenes, and alkylarenes were produced in high efficiency from aryl ketones and the corresponding carboxylic acids by releasing the other molecule of carboxylic acids and carbon monoxide. A wide range of functional groups were well compatible. The exchanges between two partners were proposed to take place on the Rh-(III) center of key intermediates, supported by experimental mechanistic studies and computational calculations. The transformation unveiled the new catalytic pathway of the group transfer of two organic molecules. PMID:25843169

  18. Consideration of reactivity to acute fish toxicity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Furuhama, A; Aoki, Y; Shiraishi, H

    2012-01-01

    To understand the key factor for fish toxicity of 11 α,β-unsaturated carbonyl aldehydes and ketones, we used quantum chemical calculations to investigate their Michael reactions with methanethiol or glutathione. We used two reaction schemes, with and without an explicit water molecule (Scheme-1wat and Scheme-0wat, respectively), to account for the effects of a catalytic water molecule on the reaction pathway. We determined the energies of the reactants, transition states (TS), and products, as well as the activation energies of the reactions. The acute fish toxicities of nine of the carbonyl compounds were evaluated to correlate with their hydrophobicities; no correlation was observed for acrolein and crotonaldehyde. The most toxic compound, acrolein, had the lowest activation energy. The activation energy of the reaction could be estimated with Scheme-1wat but not with Scheme-0wat. The complexity of the reaction pathways of the compounds was reflected in the difficulty of the TS structure searches when Scheme-1wat was used with the polarizable continuum model. The theoretical estimations of activation energies of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with catalytic molecules or groups including hydrogen-bond networks may complement traditional tools for predicting the acute aquatic toxicities of compounds that cannot be easily obtained experimentally. PMID:22150015

  19. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  20. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-04-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  1. [Determination of low-carbon alcohols, aldehydes and ketones in aqueous products of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Gai, Qingqing; Wu, Peng; Shi, Yulin; Bai, Yu; Long, Yinhua

    2015-01-01

    A method for the determination of low-carbon (C1-C8) alcohols, aldehydes and ketones in aqueous products of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was developed by gas chromatography. It included the optimization of separation conditions, the precision and accuracy of determination, and the use of correction factors of the analytes to ethanol for quantification. The aqueous products showed that the correlation coefficients for ethanol in different content ranges were above 0.99, which means it had good linear correlations. The spiked recoveries in the aqueous samples of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were from 93.4% to 109.6%. The accuracy of the method can satisfy the requirement for the analysis of the aqueous samples of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The results showed that the total mass fractions of the major low-carbon alcohols, aldehydes, ketones in aqueous products of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were about 3%-12%, and the contents of ethanol were the highest (about 1.7%-7.3%). The largest share of the total proportion was n-alcohols, followed by isomeric alcohols, aldehydes and ketones were the lowest. This method is simple, fast, and has great significance for the analysis of important components in aqueous products of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

  2. Ca(OH)2-Catalyzed Condensation of Aldehydes with Methyl ketones in Dilute Aqueous Ethanol: A Comprehensive Access to α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Han, Mengting; Luan, Jie; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yuanhua; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Cheap, abundant but seldom-employed Ca(OH)2 was found to be an excellent low-loading (5–10 mol%) catalyst for Claisen-Schmidt condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones under mild conditions. It was interesting that dilute aqueous ethanol (20 v/v%) was unexpectedly discovered to be the optimal solvent. The reaction was scalable at least to 100 mmol and calcium could be precipitated by CO2 and removed by filtration. Evaporation of solvent directly afforded the product in the excellent 96% yield with high purity, as confirmed by its 1H NMR spectrum. PMID:27443482

  3. Ca(OH)2-Catalyzed Condensation of Aldehydes with Methyl ketones in Dilute Aqueous Ethanol: A Comprehensive Access to α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Han, Mengting; Luan, Jie; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yuanhua; Xu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Cheap, abundant but seldom-employed Ca(OH)2 was found to be an excellent low-loading (5-10 mol%) catalyst for Claisen-Schmidt condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones under mild conditions. It was interesting that dilute aqueous ethanol (20 v/v%) was unexpectedly discovered to be the optimal solvent. The reaction was scalable at least to 100 mmol and calcium could be precipitated by CO2 and removed by filtration. Evaporation of solvent directly afforded the product in the excellent 96% yield with high purity, as confirmed by its 1H NMR spectrum.

  4. Ca(OH)2-Catalyzed Condensation of Aldehydes with Methyl ketones in Dilute Aqueous Ethanol: A Comprehensive Access to α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Han, Mengting; Luan, Jie; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yuanhua; Xu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Cheap, abundant but seldom-employed Ca(OH)2 was found to be an excellent low-loading (5–10 mol%) catalyst for Claisen-Schmidt condensation of aldehydes with methyl ketones under mild conditions. It was interesting that dilute aqueous ethanol (20 v/v%) was unexpectedly discovered to be the optimal solvent. The reaction was scalable at least to 100 mmol and calcium could be precipitated by CO2 and removed by filtration. Evaporation of solvent directly afforded the product in the excellent 96% yield with high purity, as confirmed by its 1H NMR spectrum.

  5. KetoABNO/NOx Cocatalytic Aerobic Oxidation of Aldehydes to Carboxylic Acids and Access to α-Chiral Carboxylic Acids via Sequential Asymmetric Hydroformylation/Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Miles, Kelsey C; Abrams, M Leigh; Landis, Clark R; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-08-01

    A method for aerobic oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids has been developed using organic nitroxyl and NOx cocatalysts. KetoABNO (9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-3-one N-oxyl) and NaNO2 were identified as the optimal nitroxyl and NOx sources, respectively. The mildness of the reaction conditions enables sequential asymmetric hydroformylation of alkenes/aerobic aldehyde oxidation to access α-chiral carboxylic acids without racemization. The scope, utility, and limitations of the oxidation method are further evaluated with a series of achiral aldehydes bearing diverse functional groups.

  6. Highly efficient hydrophosphonylation of aldehydes and unactivated ketones catalyzed by methylene-linked pyrrolyl rare earth metal amido complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangliu; Wu, Zhangshuan; Rong, Jiewei; Wang, Shaowu; Yang, Gaosheng; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhang, Lijun

    2012-02-27

    A series of rare earth metal amido complexes bearing methylene-linked pyrrolyl-amido ligands were prepared through silylamine elimination reactions and displayed high catalytic activities in hydrophosphonylations of aldehydes and unactivated ketones under solvent-free conditions for liquid substrates. Treatment of [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)Ln(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with 2-(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3)NHCH(2))C(4)H(3)NH (1, 1 equiv) in toluene afforded the corresponding trivalent rare earth metal amides of formula {(μ-η(5):η(1)):η(1)-2-[(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))NCH(2)](C(4)H(3)N)LnN(SiMe(3))(2)}(2) [Ln=Y (2), Nd (3), Sm (4), Dy (5), Yb (6)] in moderate to good yields. All compounds were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and elemental analyses. The yttrium complex was also characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The structures of complexes 2, 3, 4, and 6 were determined by single-crystal X-ray analyses. Study of the catalytic activities of the complexes showed that these rare earth metal amido complexes were excellent catalysts for hydrophosphonylations of aldehydes and unactivated ketones. The catalyzed reactions between diethyl phosphite and aldehydes in the presence of the rare earth metal amido complexes (0.1 mol%) afforded the products in high yields (up to 99%) at room temperature in short times of 5 to 10 min. Furthermore, the catalytic addition of diethyl phosphite to unactivated ketones also afforded the products in high yields of up to 99% with employment of low loadings (0.1 to 0.5 mol%) of the rare earth metal amido complexes at room temperature in short times of 20 min. The system works well for a wide range of unactivated aliphatic, aromatic or heteroaromatic ketones, especially for substituted benzophenones, giving the corresponding α-hydroxy diaryl phosphonates in moderate to high yields.

  7. Enantio- and diastereoselective Michael addition reactions of unmodified aldehydes and ketones with nitroolefins catalyzed by a pyrrolidine sulfonamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Hao; Lou, Bihshow; Zu, Liansuo; Guo, Hua; Wang, Wei

    2006-05-24

    Chiral (S)-pyrrolidine trifluoromethanesulfonamide has been shown to serve as an effective catalyst for direct Michael addition reactions of aldehydes and ketones with nitroolefins. A wide range of aldehydes and ketones as Michael donors and nitroolefins as acceptors participate in the process, which proceeds with high levels of enantioselectivity (up to 99 % ee) and diastereoselectivity (up to 50:1 d.r.). The methodology has been employed successfully in an efficient synthesis of the potent H(3) agonist Sch 50917. In addition, a practical three-step procedure for the preparation of (S)-pyrrolidine trifluoromethanesulfonamide has been developed. The high levels of stereochemical control attending Michael addition reactions catalyzed by this pyrrolidine sulfonamide, have been investigated by using ab initio and density functional methods. Transition state structures for the rate-limiting C--C bond-forming step, corresponding to re- and si-face addition to the reactive conformation of the key enamine intermediates have been calculated. Analysis of these structures indicates that hydrogen bonding plays an important role in catalysis and that the energy barrier for si-face attack in reactions of aldehydes to form 2R,3S products is lower than that for the re-face attack leading to 2S,3R products. In contrast, the energy barrier for re-face addition is lower than that for si-face addition in reactions of ketones. The computational results, which are in good agreement with the experimental observations, are discussed in the context of the stereochemical course of these Michael addition reactions.

  8. Selenium Catalyzed Oxidation of Aldehydes: Green Synthesis of Carboxylic Acids and Esters.

    PubMed

    Sancineto, Luca; Tidei, Caterina; Bagnoli, Luana; Marini, Francesca; Lenardão, Eder J; Santi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a selenium-containing catalyst in water is here reported as a new ecofriendly protocol for the synthesis of variously functionalized carboxylic acids and esters. The method affords the desired products in good to excellent yields under very mild conditions starting directly from commercially available aldehydes. Using benzaldehyde as a prototype the gram scale synthesis of benzoic acid is described, in which the aqueous medium and the catalyst could be recycled at last five times while achieving an 87% overall yield.

  9. Highly chemoselective and versatile method for direct conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones utilizing zinc ate complexes.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ryo; Hirano, Keiichi; Uchiyama, Masanobu

    2015-06-01

    Various carboxylic acids were directly transformed into the corresponding ketones by utilizing organozinc ate complexes, which provide high chemoselectivity without any overreaction to the undesired tertiary carbinol, owing to formation of a stable tetrahedral zincioketal intermediate. This method offers good overall atom/step/pot economy and operational simplicity.

  10. Tin Powder-Promoted One-Pot Construction of α-Methylene-γ-lactams and Spirolactams from Aldehydes or Ketones, Acylhydrazines, and 2-(Bromomethyl)acrylate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanli; Huang, Danfeng; Wang, Ke-Hu; Ma, Junyan; Su, Yingpeng; Fu, Ying; Hu, Yulai

    2015-12-18

    A concise and efficient method for the synthesis of α-methylene-γ-lactams is developed from multicomponent one-pot reactions of aldehydes or ketones, hydrazides, and ethyl 2-(bromomethyl)acrylate promoted by tin powder. The reaction proceeds smoothly under mild reaction conditions without using any catalyst to give the corresponding products in high yields. α-Methylene-γ-spirolactams can also be prepared from cyclic ketones. PMID:26577682

  11. Direct Aerobic α, β-Dehydrogenation of Aldehydes and Ketones with a Pd(TFA)(2)/4,5-Diazafluorenone Catalyst().

    PubMed

    Diao, Tianning; Wadzinski, Tyler J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2012-01-01

    The direct α, β-dehydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones represents an efficient alternative to stepwise methods to prepare enal and enone products. Here, we describe a new Pd(TFA)(2)/4,5-diazafluorenone dehydrogenation catalyst that overcomes key limitations of previous catalyst systems. The scope includes successful reactivity with pharmaceutically important cyclopentanone and flavanone substrates, as well as acyclic ketones. Preliminary mechanistic studies compare the reactivity of this catalyst to previously reported dehydrogenation catalysts and reveal that cleavage of the α-C-H bond of the ketone is the turnover-limiting step of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:22690316

  12. Direct Aerobic α, β-Dehydrogenation of Aldehydes and Ketones with a Pd(TFA)2/4,5-Diazafluorenone Catalyst†

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Tianning; Wadzinski, Tyler J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2011-01-01

    The direct α, β-dehydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones represents an efficient alternative to stepwise methods to prepare enal and enone products. Here, we describe a new Pd(TFA)2/4,5-diazafluorenone dehydrogenation catalyst that overcomes key limitations of previous catalyst systems. The scope includes successful reactivity with pharmaceutically important cyclopentanone and flavanone substrates, as well as acyclic ketones. Preliminary mechanistic studies compare the reactivity of this catalyst to previously reported dehydrogenation catalysts and reveal that cleavage of the α-C–H bond of the ketone is the turnover-limiting step of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:22690316

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Aldol Condensation Products from Unknown Aldehydes and Ketones: An Inquiry-Based Experiment in the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelo, Nicholas G.; Henchey, Laura K.; Waxman, Adam J.; Canary, James W.; Arora, Paramjit S.; Wink, Donald

    2007-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate chemistry laboratory in which students perform the aldol condensation on an unknown aldehyde and an unknown ketone is described. The experiment involves the use of techniques such as TLC, column chromatography, and recrystallization, and compounds are characterized by [to the first power]H NMR, GC-MS, and FTIR.…

  14. LDA-mediated selective addition reaction of vinylidenecyclopropanes with aldehydes, ketones, and enones: facile synthesis of vinylcyclopropenes, allenols, and 1,3-enynes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Mei; Shi, Min

    2008-05-15

    Highly selective addition reaction of vinylidenecyclopropanes 1 was realized by treatment with LDA in THF and quenching with aldehydes, ketones, and enones. A number of vinylcyclopropenes, allenols, and 1,3-enynes were obtained selectively in moderate to good yields depending on the nature of different electrophiles.

  15. Cu(I)-catalyzed transannulation of N-heteroaryl aldehydes or ketones with alkylamines via C(sp3)-H amination.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyang; Xie, Ying; Ye, Yong; Zou, Yong; Jiang, Huanfeng; Zeng, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A copper(I)-catalyzed direct transannulation of N-heteroaryl aldehydes or ketones with alkylamines via Csp(3)-H amination has been achieved using molecular oxygen as a sole oxidant. N-Heteroarenes are employed as the amine source. This transformation provides a rapid and concise access to multifunctional imidazo[1,5-a]pyridines.

  16. Emissions of aldehydes and ketones from a two-stroke engine using ethanol and ethanol-blended gasoline as fuel.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Roger; Nilsson, Calle; Andersson, Barbro

    2002-04-15

    Besides aliphatic gasoline, ethanol-blended gasoline intended for use in small utility engines was recently introduced on the Swedish market. For small utility engines, little data is available showing the effects of these fuels on exhaust emissions, especially concerning aldehydes and ketones (carbonyls). The objective of the present investigation was to study carbonyl emissions and regulated emissions from a two-stroke chain saw engine using ethanol, gasoline, and ethanol-blended gasoline as fuel (0%, 15%, 50%, 85%, and 100% ethanol). The effects of the ethanol-blending level and mechanical changes of the relative air/fuel ratio, lambda, on exhaust emissions was investigated, both for aliphatic and regular gasoline. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and aromatic aldehydes were the most abundant carbonyls in the exhaust. Acetaldehyde dominated for all ethanol-blended fuels (1.2-12 g/kWh, depending on the fuel and lambda), and formaldehyde dominated for gasoline (0.74-2.3 g/kWh, depending on the type of gasoline and lambda). The main effects of ethanol blending were increased acetaldehyde emissions (30-44 times for pure ethanol), reduced emissions of all other carbonyls exceptformaldehyde and acrolein (which showed a more complex relation to the ethanol content), reduced carbon monoxide (CO) and ntirogen oxide (NO) emissions, and increased hydrocarbon (HC) and nitrogen dixodie (NO2) emissions. The main effects of increasing lambda were increased emissions of carbonyls and nitrogen oxides (NOx) and reduced CO and HC emissions. When the two types of gasoline are considered, benzaldehyde and tolualdehyde could be directly related to the gasoline content of aromatics or olefins, but also acrolein, propanal, crotonaldehyde, and methyl ethyl ketone mainly originated from aromatics or olefins, while the main source for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, methacrolein, and butanal was saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

  17. Intermolecular C-O Addition of Carboxylic Acids to Arynes: Synthesis of o-Hydroxyaryl Ketones, Xanthones, 4-Chromanones, and Flavones

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovskiy, Anton V.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient and simple route to biologically and pharmaceutically important o-hydroxyaryl ketones, xanthones, 4-chromanones, and flavones has been developed utilizing readily available carboxylic acids and commercially available o-(trimethylsilyl)aryl triflates. PMID:23520410

  18. Formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids in ozonated surface water and wastewater: a clear relationship with fluorescence changes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Tang, Xiangyu; Kim, Jaeshin; Korshin, Gregory V

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids in ozonated surface water and municipal wastewater secondary effluent and addressed correlations between the generation of these compounds and concurrent changes of the fluorescence of natural/effluent organic matter (NOM/EfOM) substrates. Ozonation was effective in removing fluorophores in all excitation/emission matrix (EEM) regions, with those operationally assigned to humic- and protein-like species showing relatively higher reactivity than fulvic-like species. Examination of HO exposures and attendant changes of fluorescence-based parameters allows establishing strong linear relationships between formation of the aldehydes and carboxylic acids and the relative changes of integrated fluorescence (ΔIF/IF0). This demonstrates the feasibility of surrogate monitoring of the formation of biodegradable ozonation by-products via online measurements of water/wastewater EEM fluorescence.

  19. Targeted LC–MS derivatization for aldehydes and carboxylic acids with a new derivatization agent 4-APEBA

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Mark; Wijtmans, Maikel; Kretschmer, Ansgar; Kool, Jeroen; Lingeman, Henk; de Esch, Iwan J. P.; Irth, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    Based on the template of a recently introduced derivatization reagent for aldehydes, 4-(2-(trimethylammonio)ethoxy)benzeneaminium dibromide (4-APC), a new derivatization agent was designed with additional features for the analysis and screening of biomarkers of lipid peroxidation. The new derivatization reagent, 4-(2-((4-bromophenethyl)dimethylammonio)ethoxy)benzenaminium dibromide (4-APEBA) contains a bromophenethyl group to incorporate an isotopic signature to the derivatives and to add additional fragmentation identifiers, collectively enhancing the abilities for detection and screening of unknown aldehydes. Derivatization can be achieved under mild conditions (pH 5.7, 10 °C). By changing the secondary reagent (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide instead of sodium cyanoborohydride), 4-APEBA is also applicable to the selective derivatization of carboxylic acids. Synthesis of the new label, exploration of the derivatization conditions, characterization of the fragmentation of the aldehyde and carboxylic acid derivatives in MS/MS, and preliminary applications of the labeling strategy for the analysis of aldehydes in urine and plasma are described. Figure Structure and MS/MS fragmentation spectrum of 4-APEBA reagents derivatized with octanoic acid Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00216-010-3575-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20238107

  20. A Bio-Catalytic Approach to Aliphatic Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Mingyong; Deng, Jin; Woodruff, Adam P.; Zhu, Minshan; Zhou, Jun; Park, Sun Wook; Li, Hui; Fu, Yao; Zhang, Kechun

    2012-01-01

    Depleting oil reserves and growing environmental concerns have necessitated the development of sustainable processes to fuels and chemicals. Here we have developed a general metabolic platform in E. coli to biosynthesize carboxylic acids. By engineering selectivity of 2-ketoacid decarboxylases and screening for promiscuous aldehyde dehydrogenases, synthetic pathways were constructed to produce both C5 and C6 acids. In particular, the production of isovaleric acid reached 32 g/L (0.22 g/g glucose yield), which is 58% of the theoretical yield. Furthermore, we have developed solid base catalysts to efficiently ketonize the bio-derived carboxylic acids such as isovaleric acid and isocaproic acid into high volume industrial ketones: methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK, yield 84%), diisobutyl ketone (DIBK, yield 66%) and methyl isoamyl ketone (MIAK, yield 81%). This hybrid “Bio-Catalytic conversion” approach provides a general strategy to manufacture aliphatic ketones, and represents an alternate route to expanding the repertoire of renewable chemicals. PMID:22416247

  1. Uncatalyzed Meerwein-Ponndorf-Oppenauer-Verley reduction of aldehydes and ketones under supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sominsky, Lena; Rozental, Esther; Gottlieb, Hugo; Gedanken, Aharon; Hoz, Shmaryahu

    2004-03-01

    When a solution of a carbonyl compound in alcohol (primary or secondary) is heated to ca. 300 degrees C, a disproportionation reaction, in which a carbonyl compound is reduced to the corresponding alcohol and the alcohol is oxidized to the corresponding ketone, takes place. This uncatalyzed variation of the Meerwein-Ponndorf-Oppenauer-Verley reaction gives, in certain cases, e.g., reduction of acetophenone or benzaldehyde by i-PrOH, almost quantitative yields. Yields are higher with secondary alcohols such as i-PrOH than with a primary alcohol such as EtOH. The reactions were also performed in a flow system by passing at a slow rate the same solutions through a glass or a metal coil heated to elevated temperatures. Ab initio calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-31G* level show that thermodynamically i-PrOH is a more potent reducing agent than EtOH by ca. 4 kcal/mol. The computations also show that in cases of aromatic carbonyl compounds, part of the deriving force is obtained from the entropy change of the reaction. The major contributor to the high yield, however, is the excess alcohol used, which shifts the equilibrium to the right. Calculated entropy of activation as well as isotopic H/D labeling suggest a cyclic transition state. PMID:14987002

  2. Tungsten-Mediated Syntheses of Fused alpha-Methylenebutyrolactones from Propargyl Bromides Containing Tethered Aldehydes and Ketones.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Shwu-Ju; Chen, Chi-Chung; Liu, Rai-Shung

    1997-04-01

    The reaction of CpW(CO)(3)Na with a number of propargyl bromides with tethered aldehydes and ketones afforded eta(1)-propargyl species that were subsequently transformed into tungsten-eta(3)-2-(methoxycarbonyl)allyl compounds upon treatment with p-TSA/CH(3)OH; the overall yields exceeded 60%. Sequential treatment of these tungsten-eta(3)-allyl complexes with NOBF(4) and NaI in CH(3)CN led to intramolecular allyltungsten-carbonyl cyclization, yielding fused alpha-methylene butyrolactones of five-, six-, and seven-membered carbocyclic rings. All the reactions proceeded with high diastereoselectivities except for 9-methylene-7-oxabicyclo[4.3.0]nonan-8-one (22) and 10-methylene-8-oxabicyclo[5.3.0]decan-9-one (23). Modification of the metal center with a chloride ligand led to significant improvement of the trans-stereoselection of 22; the chloride modification did not significantly enhance stereoselection of 23. The stereochemical course of the reaction products is rationalized on the basis of a bicyclic transition-state mechanism.

  3. gem-Difluoroolefination of diaryl ketones and enolizable aldehydes with difluoromethyl 2-pyridyl sulfone: new insights into the Julia-Kocienski reaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bing; Zhao, Yanchuan; Hu, Mingyou; Ni, Chuanfa; Hu, Jinbo

    2014-06-16

    The direct conversion of diaryl ketones and enolizable aliphatic aldehydes into gem-difluoroalkenes has been a long-standing challenge in organofluorine chemistry. Herein, we report efficient strategies to tackle this problem by using difluoromethyl 2-pyridyl sulfone as a general gem-difluoroolefination reagent. The gem-difluoroolefination of diaryl ketones proceeds by acid-promoted Smiles rearrangement of the carbinol intermediate; the gem-difluoroolefination is otherwise difficult to achieve through a conventional Julia-Kocienski olefination protocol under basic conditions due to the retro-aldol type decomposition of the key intermediate. Efficient gem-difluoroolefination of aliphatic aldehydes was achieved by the use of an amide base generated in situ (from CsF and tris(trimethylsilyl)amine), which diminishes the undesired enolization of aliphatic aldehydes and provides a powerful synthetic method for chemoselective gem-difluoroolefination of multi-carbonyl compounds. Our results provide new insights into the mechanistic understanding of the classical Julia-Kocienski reaction.

  4. Copper-catalyzed retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes: chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-enones and (E)-acrylonitriles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Lin; Deng, Zhu-Qin

    2016-07-26

    A copper-catalyzed transfer aldol type reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes is reported, which enables chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones and (E)-acrylonitriles. A key step of the in situ copper(i)-promoted retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles is proposed to generate a reactive Cu(i) enolate or cyanomethyl intermediate, which undergoes ensuing aldol condensation with aldehydes to deliver the products. This reaction uses 1.2 mol% Cu(IPr)Cl (IPr denotes 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) as the catalyst in the presence of 6.0 mol% NaOtBu cocatalyst at room temperature or 70 °C. A range of aryl and heteroaryl aldehydes as well as acrylaldehydes are compatible with many useful functional groups being tolerated. Under the mild and weakly basic conditions, competitive Cannizzaro-type reaction of benzaldehydes and side reactions of base-sensitive functional groups can be effectively suppressed, which show synthetic advantages of this reaction compared to classic aldol reactions. The synthetic potential of this reaction is further demonstrated by the one-step synthesis of biologically active quinolines and 1,8-naphthyridine in excellent yields (up to 91%). Finally, a full catalytic cycle for this reaction has been constructed using DFT computational studies in the context of a retro-aldol/aldol two-stage mechanism. A rather flat reaction energy profile is found indicating that both stages are kinetically facile, which is consistent with the mild reaction conditions.

  5. Copper-catalyzed retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes: chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-enones and (E)-acrylonitriles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Lin; Deng, Zhu-Qin

    2016-07-26

    A copper-catalyzed transfer aldol type reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles with aldehydes is reported, which enables chemo- and stereoselective access to (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones and (E)-acrylonitriles. A key step of the in situ copper(i)-promoted retro-aldol reaction of β-hydroxy ketones or nitriles is proposed to generate a reactive Cu(i) enolate or cyanomethyl intermediate, which undergoes ensuing aldol condensation with aldehydes to deliver the products. This reaction uses 1.2 mol% Cu(IPr)Cl (IPr denotes 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) as the catalyst in the presence of 6.0 mol% NaOtBu cocatalyst at room temperature or 70 °C. A range of aryl and heteroaryl aldehydes as well as acrylaldehydes are compatible with many useful functional groups being tolerated. Under the mild and weakly basic conditions, competitive Cannizzaro-type reaction of benzaldehydes and side reactions of base-sensitive functional groups can be effectively suppressed, which show synthetic advantages of this reaction compared to classic aldol reactions. The synthetic potential of this reaction is further demonstrated by the one-step synthesis of biologically active quinolines and 1,8-naphthyridine in excellent yields (up to 91%). Finally, a full catalytic cycle for this reaction has been constructed using DFT computational studies in the context of a retro-aldol/aldol two-stage mechanism. A rather flat reaction energy profile is found indicating that both stages are kinetically facile, which is consistent with the mild reaction conditions. PMID:27397647

  6. Pyrrolidinyl-camphor derivatives as a new class of organocatalyst for direct asymmetric Michael addition of aldehydes and ketones to beta-nitroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Ting, Ying-Fang; Chang, Chihliang; Reddy, Raju Jannapu; Magar, Dhananjay R; Chen, Kwunmin

    2010-06-18

    Practical and convenient synthetic routes have been developed for the synthesis of a new class of pyrrolidinyl-camphor derivatives (7 a-h). These novel compounds were screened as catalysts for the direct Michael addition of symmetrical alpha,alpha-disubstituted aldehydes to beta-nitroalkenes. When this asymmetric transformation was catalyzed by organocatalyst 7 f, the desired Michael adducts were obtained in high chemical yields, with high to excellent stereoselectivities (up to 98:2 diastereomeric ratio (d.r.) and 99 % enantiomeric excess (ee)). The scope of the catalytic system was expanded to encompass various aldehydes and ketones as the donor sources. The synthetic application was demonstrated by the synthesis of a tetrasubstituted-cyclohexane derivative from (S)-citronellal, with high stereoselectivity.

  7. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics. PMID:27566686

  8. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics.

  9. Oxidation of N-Nitrosoalkylamines by human cytochrome P450 2A6: sequential oxidation to aldehydes and carboxylic acids and analysis of reaction steps.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Goutam; Calcutt, M Wade; Guengerich, F Peter

    2010-03-12

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 2A6 activates nitrosamines, including N,N-dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) and N,N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN), to alkyl diazohydroxides (which are DNA-alkylating agents) and also aldehydes (HCHO from DMN and CH(3)CHO from DEN). The N-dealkylation of DMN had a high intrinsic kinetic deuterium isotope effect ((D)k(app) approximately 10), which was highly expressed in a variety of competitive and non-competitive experiments. The (D)k(app) for DEN was approximately 3 and not expressed in non-competitive experiments. DMN and DEN were also oxidized to HCO(2)H and CH(3)CO(2)H, respectively. In neither case was a lag observed, which was unexpected considering the k(cat) and K(m) parameters measured for oxidation of DMN and DEN to the aldehydes and for oxidation of the aldehydes to the carboxylic acids. Spectral analysis did not indicate strong affinity of the aldehydes for P450 2A6, but pulse-chase experiments showed only limited exchange with added (unlabeled) aldehydes in the oxidations of DMN and DEN to carboxylic acids. Substoichiometric kinetic bursts were observed in the pre-steady-state oxidations of DMN and DEN to aldehydes. A minimal kinetic model was developed that was consistent with all of the observed phenomena and involves a conformational change of P450 2A6 following substrate binding, equilibrium of the P450-substrate complex with a non-productive form, and oxidation of the aldehydes to carboxylic acids in a process that avoids relaxation of the conformation following the first oxidation (i.e. of DMN or DEN to an aldehyde). PMID:20061389

  10. A novel approach in cinnamic acid synthesis: direct synthesis of cinnamic acids from aromatic aldehydes and aliphatic carboxylic acids in the presence of boron tribromide.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Constantin I; Tanasa, Fulga; Onciu, Marioara

    2005-02-28

    Cinnamic acids have been prepared in moderate to high yields by a new direct synthesis using aromatic aldehydes and aliphatic carboxylic acids, in the presence of boron tribromide as reagent, 4-dimethylaminopyridine (4-DMAP) and pyridine (Py) as bases and N-methyl-2-pyrolidinone (NMP) as solvent, at reflux (180-190 degrees C) for 8-12 hours.

  11. RESEARCH NOTE: INTERFERENCES DUE TO OZONE-SCAVENGING REAGENTS IN THE GC-ECD DETERMINATION OF ALDEHYDES AND KETONS AS THE O-(2,3,4,5,6-PENTAFLUOROBENZYL)OXIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six potential ozone-scavenging reagents were tested for possible interference in the GC-ECD determination of aldehydes and ketones after derivatization with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)oxylamine (PFBOA). All six-nitrite, cynaide, methanoate (formate), indigo-55'-disulfonate d...

  12. Evaluation of silica-gel cartridges coated in situ with acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine for sampling aldehydes and ketones in air

    SciTech Connect

    Tejada, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for coating in-situ silica in commercially available prepacked cartridges with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) acidified with hydrochloric acid is described. The coated cartridge was compared with a validated DNPH impinger method for sampling organic carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) in diluted automotive exhaust emissions and in ambient air for subsequent analysis of the DNPH derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the two sampling devices are equivalent. An unknown degradation product of acrolein has been tentatively identified as x-acrolein. The disappearance of acrolein in the analytical sample matrix correlated quantitatively almost on a mole-for-mole basis with the growth of x-acrolein. The sum of the concentration of acrolein and x-acrolein appears to be invariant with time. This sum could possibly be used as a more-accurate value of the concentration of acrolein in the integratated sample.

  13. Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionations in organic molecules. II: Linear alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols and ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Sessions, Alex L.; Nielsen, Robert J.; Goddard, William A., III

    2009-12-01

    Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionation factors (α eq) for various H positions in alkanes, alkenes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, alcohols, and ethers were calculated between 0 and 100 °C using vibrational frequencies from ab initio QM calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Results were then corrected using a temperature-dependent linear calibration curve based on experimental data for H α in ketones ( Wang et al., 2009). The total uncertainty in reported α eq values is estimated at 10-20‰. The effects of functional groups were found to increase the value of α eq for H next to electron-donating groups, e.g. sbnd OR, sbnd OH or sbnd O(C dbnd O)R, and to decrease the value of α eq for H next to electron-withdrawing groups, e.g. sbnd (C dbnd O)R or sbnd (C dbnd O)OR. Smaller but significant functional group effects are also observed for H β and sometimes H γ. By summing over individual H positions, we estimate the equilibrium fractionation relative to water to be -90‰ to -70‰ for n-alkanes and around -100‰ for pristane and phytane. The temperature dependence of these fractionations is very weak between 0 and 100 °C. Our estimates of α eq agree well with field data for thermally mature hydrocarbons (δ 2H values between -80‰ and -110‰ relative to water). Therefore the observed δ 2H increase of individual hydrocarbons and the disappearance of the biosynthetic δ 2H offset between n-alkyl and linear isoprenoid lipids during maturation of organic matter can be confidently attributed to H exchange towards an equilibrium state. Our results also indicate that many n-alkyl lipids are biosynthesized with δ 2H values that are close to equilibrium with water. In these cases, constant down-core δ 2H values for n-alkyl lipids cannot be reliably used to infer a lack of isotopic exchange.

  14. Carboxylic Acid Photochemistry is a Marine Source of Glyoxal and Other Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, R.; Gonzalez, L.; Tinel, L.; George, C.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Glyoxal is a highly water-soluble precursor in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Over land, glyoxal is known to be produced by the oxidation of volatile organic carbon (VOC) from both anthropogenic and natural sources. However, marine sources are still not well understood. Previous studies above the remote Pacific Ocean have detected typical glyoxal mixing ratios of 30-40 pptv, concentrations too high to be explained with current chemical understanding or atmospheric models. Because the lifetime of glyoxal is very short, the glyoxal found must have originated from, rather than been transported to, the open ocean. Furthermore, eddy covariance measurements indicate that an organic surface microlayer may be producing the glyoxal by as yet unknown processes. Here we present laboratory studies of the formation of glyoxal from carboxylic acids. Nonanoic, octanoic, and heptanoic acids floated on water and subjected to ultraviolet light are converted into their equivalent alkenals. Subsequent ozonolysis of the alkenals leads to the formation of glyoxal. We employ a PTR-MS to detect the alkenals, and a cavity-enhanced DOAS to detect the glyoxal. Considering the ubiquitous occurrence of carboxylic acids and their derivatives in the environment, this mechanism has the potential to be a significant source of glyoxal in the atmosphere.

  15. Efficient Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes Catalyzed by Well-Defined Iron(II) PNP Pincer Complexes: Evidence for an Insertion Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared and structurally characterized a new class of Fe(II) PNP pincer hydride complexes [Fe(PNP-iPr)(H)(CO)(L)]n (L = Br–, CH3CN, pyridine, PMe3, SCN–, CO, BH4–; n = 0, +1) based on the 2,6-diaminopyridine scaffold where the PiPr2 moieties of the PNP ligand are connected to the pyridine ring via NH and/or NMe spacers. Complexes [Fe(PNP-iPr)(H)(CO)(L)]n with labile ligands (L = Br–, CH3CN, BH4–) and NH spacers are efficient catalysts for the hydrogenation of both ketones and aldehydes to alcohols under mild conditions, while those containing inert ligands (L = pyridine, PMe3, SCN–, CO) are catalytically inactive. Interestingly, complex [Fe(PNPMe-iPr)(H)(CO)(Br)], featuring NMe spacers, is an efficient catalyst for the chemoselective hydrogenation of aldehydes. The first type of complexes involves deprotonation of the PNP ligand as well as heterolytic dihydrogen cleavage via metal-alkoxide cooperation, but no reversible aromatization/deprotonation of the PNP ligand. In the case of the N-methylated complex the mechanism remains unclear, but obviously does not allow bifunctional activation of dihydrogen. The experimental results complemented by DFT calculations strongly support an insertion of the C=O bond of the carbonyl compound into the Fe–H bond. PMID:27642211

  16. Efficient Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes Catalyzed by Well-Defined Iron(II) PNP Pincer Complexes: Evidence for an Insertion Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared and structurally characterized a new class of Fe(II) PNP pincer hydride complexes [Fe(PNP-iPr)(H)(CO)(L)]n (L = Br–, CH3CN, pyridine, PMe3, SCN–, CO, BH4–; n = 0, +1) based on the 2,6-diaminopyridine scaffold where the PiPr2 moieties of the PNP ligand are connected to the pyridine ring via NH and/or NMe spacers. Complexes [Fe(PNP-iPr)(H)(CO)(L)]n with labile ligands (L = Br–, CH3CN, BH4–) and NH spacers are efficient catalysts for the hydrogenation of both ketones and aldehydes to alcohols under mild conditions, while those containing inert ligands (L = pyridine, PMe3, SCN–, CO) are catalytically inactive. Interestingly, complex [Fe(PNPMe-iPr)(H)(CO)(Br)], featuring NMe spacers, is an efficient catalyst for the chemoselective hydrogenation of aldehydes. The first type of complexes involves deprotonation of the PNP ligand as well as heterolytic dihydrogen cleavage via metal-alkoxide cooperation, but no reversible aromatization/deprotonation of the PNP ligand. In the case of the N-methylated complex the mechanism remains unclear, but obviously does not allow bifunctional activation of dihydrogen. The experimental results complemented by DFT calculations strongly support an insertion of the C=O bond of the carbonyl compound into the Fe–H bond.

  17. Silver(I) as a widely applicable, homogeneous catalyst for aerobic oxidation of aldehydes toward carboxylic acids in water—“silver mirror”: From stoichiometric to catalytic

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingxin; Wang, Haining; Zeng, Huiying; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The first example of a homogeneous silver(I)-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of aldehydes in water is reported. More than 50 examples of different aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes, including natural products, were tested, and all of them successfully underwent aerobic oxidation to give the corresponding carboxylic acids in extremely high yields. The reaction conditions are very mild and greener, requiring only a very low silver(I) catalyst loading, using atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant and water as the solvent, and allowing gram-scale oxidation with only 2 mg of our catalyst. Chromatography is completely unnecessary for purification in most cases. PMID:26601150

  18. Microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum via its carboxyl-terminal 35 amino acids

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Rat microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase (msALDH) has no amino-terminal signal sequence, but instead it has a characteristic hydrophobic domain at the carboxyl terminus (Miyauchi, K., R. Masaki, S. Taketani, A. Yamamoto, A. Akayama, and Y. Tashiro. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:19536- 19542). This membrane-bound enzyme is a useful model protein for studying posttranslational localization to its final destination. When expressed from cDNA in COS-1 cells, wild-type msALDH is localized exclusively in the well-developed ER. The removal of the hydrophobic domain results in the cytosolic localization of truncated proteins, thus suggesting that the portion is responsible for membrane anchoring. The last 35 amino acids of msALDH, including the hydrophobic domain, are sufficient for targeting of E. coli beta-galactosidase to the ER membrane. Further studies using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion proteins suggest that two hydrophilic sequences on either side of the hydrophobic domain play an important role in ER targeting. PMID:8089174

  19. Mechanism of the Iron(II)-Catalyzed Hydrosilylation of Ketones: Activation of Iron Carboxylate Precatalysts and Reaction Pathways of the Active Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bleith, Tim; Gade, Lutz H

    2016-04-13

    A detailed mechanistic study of the catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones with the highly active and enantioselective iron(II) boxmi complexes as catalysts (up to >99% ee) was carried out to elucidate the pathways for precatalyst activation and the mechanism for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. Carboxylate precatalysts were found to be activated by reduction of the carboxylate ligand to the corresponding alkoxide followed by entering the catalytic cycle for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. An Eyring-type analysis of the temperature dependence of the enantiomeric ratio established a linear relationship of ln(S/R) and T(-1), indicating a single selectivity-determining step over the whole temperature range from -40 to +65 °C (ΔΔG(‡)sel, 233 K = 9 ± 1 kJ/mol). The rate law as well as activation parameters for the rate-determining step were derived and complemented by a Hammett analysis, radical clock experiments, kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements (kH/kD = 3.0 ± 0.2), the isolation of the catalytically active alkoxide intermediate, and DFT-modeling of the whole reaction sequence. The proposed reaction mechanism is characterized by a rate-determining σ-bond metathesis of an alkoxide complex with the silane, subsequent coordination of the ketone to the iron hydride complex, and insertion of the ketone into the Fe-H bond to regenerate the alkoxide complex. PMID:27013140

  20. Oxygenative and Dehydrogenative [3 + 3] Benzannulation Reactions of α,β-Unsaturated Aldehydes and γ-Phosphonyl Crotonates Mediated by Air: Regioselective Synthesis of 4-Hydroxybiaryl-2-carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Prabhakar Ramchandra; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Menon, Rajeev S

    2016-02-19

    Regioselective synthesis of 4-hydroxybiphenyl-2-carboxylates via the base-mediated oxygenative [3 + 3] benzannulation reaction of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and γ-phosphonyl crotonates is reported. A hydroxyl group is installed in the final product on the originally phosphorus-bound carbon via a novel oxygenative and dehydrogenative transformation. The reaction proceeds rapidly in an open flask, uses atmospheric oxygen as an oxidant, and affords good yields of substituted biaryl phenols. PMID:26859060

  1. Syntheses of [omega]-alkynyl aldehydes and ketones via oxidation of [omega]-alkynyl alcohols with pyridinium dichromate

    SciTech Connect

    Bierer, D.E.; Kabalka, G.W. )

    1988-01-01

    Pyridinium dichromate (PDC) is an effective reagent for the oxidation of alcohols and a number of modifications of the original procedure have been reported. Interestingly, PDC has never been used to oxidize non-conjugated acetylenic alcohols. As a part of a project involving the chemical preparation of a number of unsaturated amino acids, the authors investigated the synthesis of a series of [omega]-alkynyl aldehydes. The authors now report that the PDC oxidation of [omega]-alkynyl alcohols is an effective route to the corresponding [omega]-alkynyl carbonyl compounds.

  2. Asymmetric Ring-Opening of Cyclopropyl Ketones with Thiol, Alcohol, and Carboxylic Acid Nucleophiles Catalyzed by a Chiral N,N'-Dioxide-Scandium(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Lin, Lili; Chang, Fenzhen; Fu, Xuan; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A highly efficient asymmetric ring-opening reaction of cyclopropyl ketones with a broad range of thiols, alcohols and carboxylic acids has been first realized by using a chiral N,N'-dioxide-scandium(III) complex as catalyst. The corresponding sulfides, ethers, and esters were obtained in up to 99% yield and 95% ee. This is also the first example of one catalytic system working for the ring-opening reaction of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes with three different nucleophiles, let alone in an asymmetric version.

  3. Asymmetric Ring-Opening of Cyclopropyl Ketones with Thiol, Alcohol, and Carboxylic Acid Nucleophiles Catalyzed by a Chiral N,N'-Dioxide-Scandium(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Lin, Lili; Chang, Fenzhen; Fu, Xuan; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A highly efficient asymmetric ring-opening reaction of cyclopropyl ketones with a broad range of thiols, alcohols and carboxylic acids has been first realized by using a chiral N,N'-dioxide-scandium(III) complex as catalyst. The corresponding sulfides, ethers, and esters were obtained in up to 99% yield and 95% ee. This is also the first example of one catalytic system working for the ring-opening reaction of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes with three different nucleophiles, let alone in an asymmetric version. PMID:26398505

  4. Sustainable synthesis of aldehydes, ketones or acids from neat alcohols using nitrogen dioxide gas, and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Naimi-Jamal, M Reza; Hamzeali, Hamideh; Mokhtari, Javad; Boy, Jürgen; Kaupp, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Benzylic alcohols are quantitatively oxidized by gaseous nitrogen dioxide to give pure aromatic aldehydes. The reaction gas mixtures are transformed to nitric acid, which renders the processes free of waste. The exothermic gas-liquid or gas-solid reactions profit from the solubility of nitrogen dioxide in the neat benzylic alcohols. The acid formed impedes further oxidation of the benzaldehydes. The neat isolated benzaldehydes and nitrogen dioxide quantitatively give the benzoic acids. Solid long-chain primary alcohols are directly and quantitatively oxidized with nitrogen dioxide gas to give the fatty acids in the solid state. The oxidations with ubiquitous nitrogen dioxide are extended to solid heterocyclic thioamides, which gives disulfides, and to diphenylamine, which gives tetraphenylhydrazine. These sustainable (green) specific oxidation procedures produce no dangerous residues from the oxidizing agent or from auxiliaries. PMID:19115303

  5. Thermodynamics of the formation of atmospheric organic particulate matter by accretion reactions—Part 1: aldehydes and ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsanti, Kelley C.; Pankow, James F.

    The term "accretion reactions" is introduced here to refer to the large collection of reactions by which atmospheric organic molecules can add mass, especially as by combination with other organic molecules. A general thermodynamic approach is developed for evaluating the tendency of atmospheric constituents (e.g., C 10 aldehydes) to undergo accretion reactions (e.g., dimerization) and thereby form less volatile molecules (e.g., aldol condensation products) that may subsequently condense and so contribute to the levels of organic particulate matter (OPM) observed in the atmosphere. As an example, gaseous compounds A and B may contribute to OPM formation by the net overall reaction A g+B g=C liq. This reaction may occur according to any of three kinetic schemes. Scheme I: (1) A g+B g=C g (accretion in the gas phase): then (2) C g=C liq (condensation of the accretion product); Scheme II: (1) B g=B liq (condensation of B); then (2) A g+B liq=C liq (heterogeneous accretion reaction of gaseous A with condensed B); or Scheme III: (1) A g+B g=A liq+B liq (condensation of A and B); then (2) A liq+B liq=C liq (accretion of A with B within the PM phase). For all three schemes, the net overall reaction remains A g+B g=C liq. The overall thermodynamic tendency of the net reaction remains the same regardless of the actual predominating kinetic mechanism. If an accretion reaction between two atmospheric components is to produce significant new OPM, appreciable amounts of the product C must form, and the vapor pressure of C must be relatively low so that a significant proportion of C can condense into the multicomponent liquid OPM phase. This study considers the thermodynamics of accretion reactions of atmospheric aldehydes including: (a) hydration, polymerization (i.e., oligomer formation), hemiacetal/acetal formation; and (b) aldol condensation. It was concluded regarding OPM formation that: (1) the reactions in the first group are not thermodynamically favored, either in the

  6. Evaluation of silica gel cartridges coated in situ with acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine for sampling aldehydes and ketones in air.

    PubMed

    Tejada, S B

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for coating in situ silica gel in prepacked cartridges with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) acidified with hydrochloric acid is described. The coated cartridge was compared with a validated DNPH impinger method for sampling organic carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) in diluted automotive exhaust emissions and in ambient air for subsequent analysis of the DNPH derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography. Qualitative and quantitative data are presented that show that the two sampling devices are equivalent. The coated cartridge is ideal for long-term sampling of carbonyls at sub to low parts-per-billion level in ambient air or for short-term sampling of carbonyls at low ppb to parts-per-million level in diluted automotive exhaust emissions. An unknown degradation product of acrolein has been tentatively identified as x-acrolein. The disappearance of acrolein in the analytical sample matrix correlates quantitatively almost on a mole for mole basis with the growth of x-acrolein. The sum of the concentration of acrolein and x-acrolein appears to be invariant with time. PMID:3019907

  7. Remarkable effect of bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for aerobic oxidation of alcohols: combining metals changes the activities and the reaction pathways to aldehydes/carboxylic acids or esters.

    PubMed

    Kaizuka, Kosuke; Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Shū

    2010-11-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by novel carbon-stabilized polymer-incarcerated bimetallic nanocluster catalysts using molecular oxygen has been developed. The reactivity and the selectivity were strongly dependent on the combination of metals and solvent systems; aldehydes and ketones were obtained by the gold/platinum catalyst in benzotrifluoride, and esters were formed by the gold/palladium catalyst in methanol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example that the reaction pathway has been changed dramatically in gold catalysis by combining with a second metal. The differences in the activity and the selectivity are considered to be derived from the difference in the structure of the bimetallic clusters.

  8. Evaluation of human skin irritation by carboxylic acids, alcohols, esters and aldehydes, with nitrocellulose-replica method and closed patch testing.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Obata, K; Ikeda, Y; Ohkoshi, K; Okumura, H; Ozawa, N; Ogawa, T; Katsumura, Y; Kawai, J; Tatsumi, H; Honoki, S; Hiramatsu, I; Hiroyama, H; Okada, T; Kozuka, T

    1996-01-01

    Closed patch testing and the nitrocellulose-replica method are performed as useful clinical methods for the evaluation of human skin irritation by cosmetics and topical medicaments. Comparison of the sensitivity between microscopic scoring by nitrocellulose-replica method and visual scoring by closed patch test in the detection of skin irritation, however, has not been well studied with statistical analysis. Here, we evaluated human skin irritation by carboxylic acids, alcohols, esters and aldehydes, with different chain length (C8-C18), using both methods. The results of closed patch testing showed that, although the score of skin irritation for carboxylic acids (C8, C12), alcohols (C8) and aldehydes (C8), tested at a concentration of 0.5 m-2.0 m, significantly increased with increasing concentration of the test compounds, ester compounds scarcely caused any irritation on the surface of the skin occluded. In addition, an increase of carbon chain length in the test compounds made it impossible to detect skin irritation. In contrast, the nitrocellulose-replica method could evaluate skin reactions against very weak irritants that gave no macroscopic alterations on the skin surface in the closed patch test. However, the scoring system is somewhat subjective and should be improved to make the analysis more objective.

  9. Biaryl and aryl ketone synthesis via Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative coupling of carboxylate salts with aryl triflates.

    PubMed

    Goossen, Lukas J; Linder, Christophe; Rodríguez, Nuria; Lange, Paul P

    2009-09-21

    A bimetallic catalyst system has been developed that for the first time allows the decarboxylative cross-coupling of aryl and acyl carboxylates with aryl triflates. In contrast to aryl halides, these electrophiles give rise to non-coordinating anions as byproducts, which do not interfere with the decarboxylation step that leads to the generation of the carbon nucleophilic cross-coupling partner. As a result, the scope of carboxylate substrates usable in this transformation was extended from ortho-substituted or otherwise activated derivatives to a broad range of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted aromatic carboxylates. Two alternative protocols have been optimized, one involving heating the substrates in the presence of Cu(I)/1,10-phenanthroline (10-15 mol %) and PdI(2)/phosphine (2-3 mol %) in NMP for 1-24 h, the other involving Cu(I)/1,10-phenanthroline (6-15 mol %) and PdBr(2)/Tol-BINAP (2 mol %) in NMP using microwave heating for 5-10 min. While most products are accessible using standard heating, the use of microwave irradiation was found to be beneficial especially for the conversion of non-activated carboxylates with functionalized aryl triflates. The synthetic utility of the transformation is demonstrated with 48 examples showing the scope and limitations of both protocols. In mechanistic studies, the special role of microwave irradiation is elucidated, and further perspectives of decarboxylative cross-couplings are discussed.

  10. An organocatalytic Michael-cyclization cascade of 4-oxa-α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids with aldehydes: facile synthesis of chiral γ-lactols and trisubstituted γ-lactones.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun-Bing; Xu, Shi-Ming; Xie, Ji-Kang; Li, Hong-Yu; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2015-02-28

    An organocatalytic Michael-cyclization cascade of aldehydes with 4-oxa-α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids has been developed, giving functionalized γ-lactols with high yields and enantioselectivities. The products could be easily transformed into complex trisubstituted γ-lactones and γ-lactams. PMID:25633800

  11. Photo-induced cold vapor generation with low molecular weight alcohol, aldehyde, or carboxylic acid for atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of mercury.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunfang; Zheng, Chengbin; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Guanglei; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2007-06-01

    With UV irradiation, Hg(2+) in aqueous solution can be converted into Hg(0) cold vapor by low molecular weight alcohols, aldehydes, or carboxylic acids, e.g., methanol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glycol, 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, acetic acid, oxalic acid, or malonic acid. It was found that the presence of nano-TiO(2) more or less improved the efficiency of the photo-induced chemical/cold vapor generation (photo-CVG) with most of the organic reductants. The nano-TiO(2)-enhanced photo-CVG systems can be coupled to various analytical atomic spectrometric techniques for the determination of ultratrace mercury. In this work, we evaluated the application of this method to the atomic fluorescence spectrometric (AFS) determination of mercury in cold vapor mode. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the instrumental limits of detection (based on three times the standard deviation of 11 measurements of a blank solution) were around 0.02-0.04 microg L(-1), with linear dynamic ranges up to 15 microg L(-1). The interference of transition metals and the mechanism of the photo-CVG are briefly discussed. Real sample analysis using the photo-CVG-AFS method revealed that it was promising for water and geological analysis of ultralow levels of mercury.

  12. Metal-free catalytic enantioselective C-B bond formation: (pinacolato)boron conjugate additions to α,β-unsaturated ketones, esters, Weinreb amides, and aldehydes promoted by chiral N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Radomkit, Suttipol; O'Brien, Jeannette M; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2012-05-16

    The first broadly applicable metal-free enantioselective method for boron conjugate addition (BCA) to α,β-unsaturated carbonyls is presented. The C-B bond forming reactions are promoted in the presence of 2.5-7.5 mol % of a readily accessible C(1)-symmetric chiral imidazolinium salt, which is converted, in situ, to the catalytically active diastereo- and enantiomerically pure N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) by the common organic base 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (dbu). In addition to the commercially available bis(pinacolato)diboron [B(2)(pin)(2)], and in contrast to reactions with the less sterically demanding achiral NHCs, the presence of MeOH is required for high efficiency. Acyclic and cyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones, as well as acyclic esters, Weinreb amides, and aldehydes, can serve as suitable substrates; the desired β-boryl carbonyls are isolated in up to 94% yield and >98:2 enantiomer ratio (er). Transformations are often carried out at ambient temperature. In certain cases, such as when the relatively less reactive unsaturated amides are used, elevated temperatures are required (50-66 °C); nonetheless, reactions remain highly enantioselective. The utility of the NHC-catalyzed method is demonstrated through comparison with the alternative Cu-catalyzed protocols; in cases involving a polyfunctional substrate, unique profiles in chemoselectivity are exhibited by the metal-free approach (e.g., conjugate addition vs reaction with an alkyne, allene, or aldehyde). PMID:22559866

  13. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ∗ =0.23Σσ ∗ + 1.51; where H ∗ is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and Σσ ∗ is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ∗. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ∗⩾30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ⩾5 - 0.5 μM (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  14. Mechanism of Alcohol-Water Dehydrogenative Coupling into Carboxylic Acid Using Milstein's Catalyst: A Detailed Investigation of the Outer-Sphere PES in the Reaction of Aldehydes with an Octahedral Ruthenium Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Hasanayn, Faraj; Al-Assi, Lara M; Moussawi, Rasha N; Omar, Boushra Srour

    2016-08-15

    In aqueous basic media, the square-pyramidal complex [Ru(PNN)(CO)(H)] (1-Ru, where PNN is a dearomatized bipyridyl-CH-P(t)Bu2 pincer ligand) catalyzes the transformation of alcohols and water into carboxylates and H2. A previous theoretical investigation reported the following mechanism for the reaction: (i) metal-catalyzed dehydrogenation of the alcohol into an aldehyde, (ii) metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) addition of water to 1-Ru to give an octahedral ruthenium hydroxide (2-Ru-OH), (iii) concerted MLC hydration of the aldehyde by 2-Ru-OH to give separated 1-Ru and a gem-diol, and (iv) concerted MLC dehydrogenation of the gem-diol by 1-Ru into an octahedral ruthenium dihydride (2-Ru-H) and a carboxylic acid. We calculate the outer-sphere PES in the reaction between the aldehyde and 2-Ru-OH to start with a localized coupling step yielding an ion-pair minimum (7-ip-OH) in which the hydroxyl group of an α-hydroxyl-alkoxide (gem-diolate) is coordinated to the metal of a cationic square-pyramidal complex. From 7-ip-OH, we identify a route to carboxylic acid that circumvents ligand deprotonation involving (i) 1,1-rearrangement of the gem-diolate within the contact ion pair through an α-OH/O(-) slippage TS into the octahedral 2-Ru-OCH(OH)R and (ii) a second 1,1-rearrangement through an α-O(-)/H slippage TS that gives a new ion-pair minimum in which the α-hydrogen of the anion is coordinated to the metal, followed by a localized hydride-transfer TS that gives a carboxylic acid and the octahedral hydride complex (2-Ru-H). The net transformation from 2-Ru-OH and the aldehyde to the carboxylic acid and 2-Ru-H can be viewed as a H/OH metathesis in which a hydride and a hydroxide are exchanged between the acyl group of the aldehyde and the metal center of 2-Ru-OH. The MLC mechanism gives the same metathesis products through the intermediacy of a gem-diol. When the SMD solvent continuum model is applied during geometry optimization with water as the solvent, the Gibbs free

  15. Ligand-Promoted, Boron-Mediated Chemoselective Carboxylic Acid Aldol Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hideoki; Morita, Yuya; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-05-01

    The first carboxylic acid selective aldol reaction mediated by boron compounds and a mild organic base (DBU) was developed. Inclusion of electron-withdrawing groups in the amino acid derivative ligands reacted with BH3·SMe2 forms a boron promoter with increased Lewis acidity at the boron atom and facilitated the carboxylic acid selective enolate formation, even in the presence of other carbonyl groups such as amides, esters, ketones, or aliphatic aldehydes. The remarkable ligand effect led to the broad substrate scope including biologically relevant compounds. PMID:27104352

  16. Kinetic measurements of the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-05-01

    Free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds within the aqueous atmospheric environment. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of these substances (Tilgner and Herrmann, 2010). In this work, kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV / Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and stopped flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics to reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acid as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) with H2O2 and ozone at 298 K. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH • ~109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated first-order conversion rate constants change the picture towards H2O2 reactions becoming more important, especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions mechanistic suggestions are also given.

  17. Kinetic measurements on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2013-10-01

    Within the aqueous atmospheric environment free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants like hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of this substance group (Tilgner und Herrmann, 2010). In this work kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV/Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and Stopped Flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acids as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) towards H2O2 and ozone. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH· ~ 109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated turnovers change the picture to more important H2O2 reactions especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions also mechanistic suggestions are given.

  18. Raspberry Ketone

    MedlinePlus

    Raspberry ketone is a chemical from red raspberries, as well as kiwifruit, peaches, grapes, apples, other berries, vegetables such as rhubarb, and the bark of yew, maple, and pine trees. People take raspberry ketone by mouth for ...

  19. Systematic methodology for the development of biocatalytic hydrogen-borrowing cascades: application to the synthesis of chiral α-substituted carboxylic acids from α-substituted α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Tanja; Mutti, Francesco G; Humphreys, Luke D; Turner, Nicholas J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-01-01

    Ene-reductases (ERs) are flavin dependent enzymes that catalyze the asymmetric reduction of activated carbon-carbon double bonds. In particular, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (e.g. enals and enones) as well as nitroalkenes are rapidly reduced. Conversely, α,β-unsaturated esters are poorly accepted substrates whereas free carboxylic acids are not converted at all. The only exceptions are α,β-unsaturated diacids, diesters as well as esters bearing an electron-withdrawing group in α- or β-position. Here, we present an alternative approach that has a general applicability for directly obtaining diverse chiral α-substituted carboxylic acids. This approach combines two enzyme classes, namely ERs and aldehyde dehydrogenases (Ald-DHs), in a concurrent reductive-oxidative biocatalytic cascade. This strategy has several advantages as the starting material is an α-substituted α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, a class of compounds extremely reactive for the reduction of the alkene moiety. Furthermore no external hydride source from a sacrificial substrate (e.g. glucose, formate) is required since the hydride for the first reductive step is liberated in the second oxidative step. Such a process is defined as a hydrogen-borrowing cascade. This methodology has wide applicability as it was successfully applied to the synthesis of chiral substituted hydrocinnamic acids, aliphatic acids, heterocycles and even acetylated amino acids with elevated yield, chemo- and stereo-selectivity. A systematic methodology for optimizing the hydrogen-borrowing two-enzyme synthesis of α-chiral substituted carboxylic acids was developed. This systematic methodology has general applicability for the development of diverse hydrogen-borrowing processes that possess the highest atom efficiency and the lowest environmental impact.

  20. Fabrication of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)-based hybrid proton-conducting membranes containing carboxyl or amino acid-functionalized titania by in situ sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongheng; Xu, Tao; He, Guangwei; Jiang, Zhongyi; Wu, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized titania are used as fillers to modify the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane for improved proton conductivity and methanol barrier property. The functionalized titania sol which contains proton conductive carboxylic acid groups or amino acid groups are derived from a facile chelation method using different functional additives. Then the novel SPEEK/carboxylic acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TC) and SPEEK/amino acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TNC) hybrid membranes are fabricated via in situ sol-gel method. The anti-swelling property and thermal stability of hybrid membranes are enhanced owing to the formation of electrostatic force between SPEEK and titania nanoparticles. The hybrid membranes exhibit higher proton conductivity than plain SPEEK membrane because more proton transfer sites are provided by the functionalized titania nanoparticles. Particularly, the proton conductivity of SPEEK/TNC membrane with 15% filler content reaches up to 6.24 × 10-2 S cm-1, which is 3.5 times higher than that of the pure SPEEK membrane. For methanol permeability, the SPEEK/TNC membranes possess the lowest values because the acid-base interaction between sulfonic acid groups in SPEEK and amino groups in functionalized titania leads to a more compact membrane structure.

  1. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  2. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here

  3. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here.

  4. Ketones blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight ... there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  5. Spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) are less sensitive to the odor of aliphatic ketones than to the odor of other classes of aliphatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Moa; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Aliphatic ketones are widely present in body-borne and food odors of primates. Therefore, we used an operant conditioning paradigm and determined olfactory detection thresholds in four spider monkeys for a homologous series of aliphatic 2-ketones (2-butanone to 2-nonanone) and two of their isomers (3- and 4-heptanone). We found that, with the exception of the two shortest-chained ketones, all animals detected concentrations <1 ppm (parts per million), and with five odorants individual animals even reached threshold values <0.1 ppm. Further, we found a significant correlation between olfactory sensitivity of the spider monkeys and carbon chain length of the 2-ketones which can best be described as a U-shaped function. In contrast, no significant correlation was found between olfactory sensitivity and position of the functional carbonyl group. Across-odorant and across-species comparisons revealed the following: spider monkeys are significantly less sensitive to the odors of aliphatic ketones than to the odor of other classes of aliphatic compounds (1-alcohols, n-aldehydes, n-acetic esters, and n-carboxylic acids) sharing the same carbon length. Spider monkeys do not differ significantly in their olfactory sensitivity for aliphatic ketones from squirrel monkeys and pigtail macaques, but are significantly less sensitive to these odorants compared to human subjects and mice. These findings support the notion that neuroanatomical and genetic properties do not allow for reliable predictions with regard to a species' olfactory sensitivity. Further, we conclude that the frequency of occurrence of a class of odorants in a species' chemical environment does not allow for reliable predictions of the species' olfactory sensitivity. PMID:26055441

  6. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Dickson, T.J.

    1998-04-28

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0 and 80 C in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  7. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Dickson, Todd Jay

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0.degree. and 80.degree. C. in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Aldehyde Toxicity: A Chemical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are electrophilic compounds to which humans are pervasively exposed. Despite a significant health risk due to exposure, the mechanisms of aldehyde toxicity are poorly understood. This ambiguity is likely due to the structural diversity of aldehyde derivatives and corresponding differences in chemical reactions and biological targets. To gain mechanistic insight, we have used parameters based on the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) theory to profile the different aldehyde subclasses with respect to electronic character (softness, hardness), electrophilic reactivity (electrophilic index), and biological nucleophilic targets. Our analyses indicate that short chain aldehydes and longer chain saturated alkanals are hard electrophiles that cause toxicity by forming adducts with hard biological nucleophiles, e.g., primary nitrogen groups on lysine residues. In contrast, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives, alkenals, and the α-oxoaldehydes are soft electrophiles that preferentially react with soft nucleophilic thiolate groups on cysteine residues. The aldehydes can therefore be grouped into subclasses according to common electronic characteristics (softness/hardness) and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. As we will discuss, the toxic potencies of these subgroups are generally related to corresponding electrophilicities. For some aldehydes, however, predictions of toxicity based on electrophilicity are less accurate due to inherent physicochemical variables that limit target accessibility, e.g., steric hindrance and solubility. The unsaturated aldehydes are also members of the conjugated type-2 alkene chemical class that includes α,β-unsaturated amide, ketone, and ester derivatives. Type-2 alkenes are electrophiles of varying softness and electrophilicity that share a common mechanism of toxicity. Therefore, exposure to an environmental mixture of unsaturated carbonyl derivatives could cause “type-2 alkene toxicity” through additive interactions

  9. Molecular mechanisms of aldehyde toxicity: a chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    LoPachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence

    2014-07-21

    Aldehydes are electrophilic compounds to which humans are pervasively exposed. Despite a significant health risk due to exposure, the mechanisms of aldehyde toxicity are poorly understood. This ambiguity is likely due to the structural diversity of aldehyde derivatives and corresponding differences in chemical reactions and biological targets. To gain mechanistic insight, we have used parameters based on the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) theory to profile the different aldehyde subclasses with respect to electronic character (softness, hardness), electrophilic reactivity (electrophilic index), and biological nucleophilic targets. Our analyses indicate that short chain aldehydes and longer chain saturated alkanals are hard electrophiles that cause toxicity by forming adducts with hard biological nucleophiles, e.g., primary nitrogen groups on lysine residues. In contrast, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives, alkenals, and the α-oxoaldehydes are soft electrophiles that preferentially react with soft nucleophilic thiolate groups on cysteine residues. The aldehydes can therefore be grouped into subclasses according to common electronic characteristics (softness/hardness) and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. As we will discuss, the toxic potencies of these subgroups are generally related to corresponding electrophilicities. For some aldehydes, however, predictions of toxicity based on electrophilicity are less accurate due to inherent physicochemical variables that limit target accessibility, e.g., steric hindrance and solubility. The unsaturated aldehydes are also members of the conjugated type-2 alkene chemical class that includes α,β-unsaturated amide, ketone, and ester derivatives. Type-2 alkenes are electrophiles of varying softness and electrophilicity that share a common mechanism of toxicity. Therefore, exposure to an environmental mixture of unsaturated carbonyl derivatives could cause "type-2 alkene toxicity" through additive interactions

  10. RuHCl(CO)(PPh3)3-catalyzed α-alkylation of ketones with primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Fukuyama, Takahide; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2012-09-21

    The α-alkylation reaction of ketones with primary alcohols to give α-alkylated ketones was achieved using RuHCl(CO)(PPh(3))(3) as a catalyst in the presence of Cs(2)CO(3) as a base. This reaction proceeds via an aldol condensation of ketones with aldehydes, formed via transfer dehydrogenation of alcohols, to give α,β-unsaturated ketones, which then undergo transfer hydrogenation with primary alcohols to give α-alkylated ketones and aldehydes, the latter of which participate in the next catalytic cycle. While the reaction of aliphatic primary alcohols was sluggish compared with that of benzylic alcohols, a catalytic amount of 1,10-phenanthroline was found to promote the alkylation dramatically. PMID:22931460

  11. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 002 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE ( CAS No . 108 - 10 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) March 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordan

  12. Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl ethyl ketone ( MEK ) ( CASRN 78 - 93 - 3 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  13. Fragrance material review on methyl hexyl oxo cyclopentanone carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Jones, L; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-10-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of methyl hexyl oxo cyclopentanone carboxylate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Methyl hexyl oxo cyclopentanone carboxylate is a member of the fragrance structural group ketones cyclopentanones and cyclopentenones. The common characteristic structural element of the group members is a cyclopentanone or cyclopentenone ring with a straight or branched chain alkane or alkene substituent. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for methyl hexyl oxo cyclopentanone carboxylate were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, skin sensitization, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire ketones cyclopentanones and cyclopentenones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (this issue) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all ketones cyclopentanones and cyclopentenones in fragrances.

  14. Highly efficient and direct heterocyclization of dipyridyl ketone to N,N-bidentate ligands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jie; Dyers, Leon Jr; Mason, Richard Jr; Amoyaw, Prince; Bu, Xiu R.

    2005-01-01

    [reaction: see text] Reaction of various aromatic aldehydes with 2,2'-dipyridyl ketone and ammonium acetate in hot acetic acid provides ready access to a series of substituted 1-pyridylimidazo[1,5-a]pyridines, a class of ligands possessing an N,N-bidentate feature, in good yields.

  15. A HIGHLY STEREOSELECTIVE, NOVEL COUPLING REACTION BETWEEN ALKYNES WITH ALDEHYDES. (R828129)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of indium triflate or gallium chloride, a novel coupling between internal alkynes and aldehydes occurred to give unsaturated ketones and [4+1] annulation products.


    Graphical Abstrac...

  16. Microbial Engineering for Aldehyde Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kunjapur, Aditya M.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are a class of chemicals with many industrial uses. Several aldehydes are responsible for flavors and fragrances present in plants, but aldehydes are not known to accumulate in most natural microorganisms. In many cases, microbial production of aldehydes presents an attractive alternative to extraction from plants or chemical synthesis. During the past 2 decades, a variety of aldehyde biosynthetic enzymes have undergone detailed characterization. Although metabolic pathways that result in alcohol synthesis via aldehyde intermediates were long known, only recent investigations in model microbes such as Escherichia coli have succeeded in minimizing the rapid endogenous conversion of aldehydes into their corresponding alcohols. Such efforts have provided a foundation for microbial aldehyde synthesis and broader utilization of aldehydes as intermediates for other synthetically challenging biochemical classes. However, aldehyde toxicity imposes a practical limit on achievable aldehyde titers and remains an issue of academic and commercial interest. In this minireview, we summarize published efforts of microbial engineering for aldehyde synthesis, with an emphasis on de novo synthesis, engineered aldehyde accumulation in E. coli, and the challenge of aldehyde toxicity. PMID:25576610

  17. Copper-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Aryl Iodides with Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Tran-Vu, Hung; Daugulis, Olafs

    2013-10-01

    A method for carboxylation of aryl iodides with carbon dioxide has been developed. The reaction employs low loadings of copper iodide/TMEDA or DMEDA catalyst, 1 atm of CO2, DMSO or DMA solvent, and proceeds at 25-70 °C. Good functional group tolerance is observed, with ester, bromide, chloride, fluoride, ether, hydroxy, amino, and ketone functionalities tolerated. Additionally, hindered aryl iodides such as iodomesitylene can also be carboxylated. PMID:24288654

  18. Fluorescence lifetime analysis and effect of magnesium ions on binding of NADH to human aldehyde dehydrogenase 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence ALDH1 activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity to the enzyme thus reducing activity. By using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we have resolved t...

  19. SAXS fingerprints of aldehyde dehydrogenase oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily catalyze the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDHs are important in detoxification of aldehydes, amino acid metabolism, embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and cancer. Mutations in genes encoding ALDHs cause metabolic disorders, including alcohol flush reaction (ALDH2), Sjögren–Larsson syndrome (ALDH3A2), hyperprolinemia type II (ALDH4A1), γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria (ALDH5A1), methylmalonic aciduria (ALDH6A1), pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1), and hyperammonemia (ALDH18A1). We previously reported crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses of ALDHs exhibiting dimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric oligomeric states (Luo et al., Biochemistry 54 (2015) 5513–5522; Luo et al., J. Mol. Biol. 425 (2013) 3106–3120). Herein I provide the SAXS curves, radii of gyration, and distance distribution functions for the three types of ALDH oligomer. The SAXS curves and associated analysis provide diagnostic fingerprints that allow rapid identification of the type of ALDH oligomer that is present in solution. The data sets provided here serve as a benchmark for characterizing oligomerization of ALDHs. PMID:26693506

  20. SAXS fingerprints of aldehyde dehydrogenase oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily catalyze the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDHs are important in detoxification of aldehydes, amino acid metabolism, embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and cancer. Mutations in genes encoding ALDHs cause metabolic disorders, including alcohol flush reaction (ALDH2), Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (ALDH3A2), hyperprolinemia type II (ALDH4A1), γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria (ALDH5A1), methylmalonic aciduria (ALDH6A1), pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1), and hyperammonemia (ALDH18A1). We previously reported crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses of ALDHs exhibiting dimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric oligomeric states (Luo et al., Biochemistry 54 (2015) 5513-5522; Luo et al., J. Mol. Biol. 425 (2013) 3106-3120). Herein I provide the SAXS curves, radii of gyration, and distance distribution functions for the three types of ALDH oligomer. The SAXS curves and associated analysis provide diagnostic fingerprints that allow rapid identification of the type of ALDH oligomer that is present in solution. The data sets provided here serve as a benchmark for characterizing oligomerization of ALDHs. PMID:26693506

  1. Quantification of the electrophilic reactivities of aldehydes, imines, and enones.

    PubMed

    Appel, Roland; Mayr, Herbert

    2011-06-01

    The rates of the epoxidation reactions of aldehydes, of the aziridination reactions of aldimines, and of the cyclopropanation reactions of α,β-unsaturated ketones with aryl-stabilized dimethylsulfonium ylides have been determined photometrically in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). All of these sulfur ylide-mediated cyclization reactions as well as the addition reactions of stabilized carbanions to N-tosyl-activated aldimines have been shown to follow a second-order rate law, where the rate constants reflect the (initial) CC bond formation between nucleophile and electrophile. The derived second-order rate constants (log k(2)) have been combined with the known nucleophilicity parameters (N, s(N)) of the aryl-stabilized sulfur ylides 4a,b and of the acceptor-substituted carbanions 4c-h to calculate the electrophilicity parameters E of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes (1a-i), N-acceptor-substituted aromatic aldimines (2a-e), and α,β-unsaturated ketones (3a-f) according to the linear free-energy relationship log k(2) = s(N)(N + E) as defined in J. Am. Chem. Soc.2001, 123, 9500-9512. The data reported in this work provide the first quantitative comparison of the electrophilic reactivities of aldehydes, imines, and simple Michael acceptors in DMSO with carbocations and cationic metal-π complexes within our comprehensive electrophilicity scale. PMID:21553901

  2. Copper(II)-Promoted Cyclization/Difunctionalization of Allenols and Allenylsulfonamides: Synthesis of Heterocycle-Functionalized Vinyl Carboxylate Esters.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Barbara J; Khoder, Zainab M; Berhane, Ilyas A; Chemler, Sherry R

    2015-12-18

    A unique method to affect intramolecular aminooxygenation and dioxygenation of allenols and allenylsulfonamides is described. These operationally simple reactions occur under neutral or basic conditions where copper(II) carboxylates serve as reaction promoter, oxidant, and carboxylate source. Moderate to high yields of heterocycle-functionalized vinyl carboxylate esters are formed with moderate to high levels of diastereoselectivity. Such vinyl carboxylate esters could serve as precursors to α-amino and α-oxy ketones and derivatives thereof. PMID:26624861

  3. One-pot synthesis of β-acetamido ketones using boric acid at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed; Mohammadi, Korosh

    2012-01-01

    β-acetamido ketones were synthesized in excellent yields through one-pot condensation reaction of aldehydes, acetophenones, acetyl chloride, and acetonitrile in the presence of boric acid as a solid heterogeneous catalyst at room temperature. It is the first successful report of boric acid that has been used as solid acid catalyst for the preparation of β-acetamido ketones. The remarkable advantages offered by this method are green catalyst, mild reaction conditions, simple procedure, short reaction times, and good-to-excellent yields of products.

  4. Ketone bodies as signaling metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John C.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) has been looked upon as a carrier of energy from liver to peripheral tissues during fasting or exercise. However, βOHB also signals via extracellular receptors and acts as an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). These recent findings support a model in which βOHB functions to link the environment, in this case the diet, and gene expression via chromatin modifications. Here, we review the regulation and functions of ketone bodies, the relationship between ketone bodies and calorie restriction, and the implications of HDAC inhibition by the ketone body βOHB in the modulation of metabolism, and diseases of aging. PMID:24140022

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenases: From eye crystallins to metabolic disease and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Thompson, David C.; Smith, Clay; Fujita, Mayumi; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily is composed of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)+)-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. To date, 24 ALDH gene families have been identified in the eukaryotic genome. In addition to aldehyde metabolizing capacity, ALDHs have additional catalytic (e.g. esterase and reductase) and non-catalytic activities. The latter include functioning as structural elements in the eye (crystallins) and as binding molecules to endobiotics and xenobiotics. Mutations in human ALDH genes and subsequent inborn errors in aldehyde metabolism are the molecular basis of several diseases. Most recently ALDH polymorphisms have been associated with gout and osteoporosis. Aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes also play important roles in embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress and cancer. This article serves as a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge regarding the ALDH superfamily and the contribution of ALDHs to various physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:23159885

  6. Scope and mechanism of the highly stereoselective metal-mediated domino aldol reactions of enolates with aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Bernward; Panthöfer, Martin; Deiseroth, Hans-Jörg; Schlirf, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Summary A one-pot transformation, which involves the reaction of ketones with aldehydes in the presence of metal halides to furnish tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2,4-diols in a highly diastereoselective manner, is investigated thoroughly by experiments and computations. The reaction was also successfully implemented on a flow micro reactor system. PMID:27340472

  7. Aldehyde-stabilized cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Robert L; Fahy, Gregory M

    2015-12-01

    We describe here a new cryobiological and neurobiological technique, aldehyde-stabilized cryopreservation (ASC), which demonstrates the relevance and utility of advanced cryopreservation science for the neurobiological research community. ASC is a new brain-banking technique designed to facilitate neuroanatomic research such as connectomics research, and has the unique ability to combine stable long term ice-free sample storage with excellent anatomical resolution. To demonstrate the feasibility of ASC, we perfuse-fixed rabbit and pig brains with a glutaraldehyde-based fixative, then slowly perfused increasing concentrations of ethylene glycol over several hours in a manner similar to techniques used for whole organ cryopreservation. Once 65% w/v ethylene glycol was reached, we vitrified brains at -135 °C for indefinite long-term storage. Vitrified brains were rewarmed and the cryoprotectant removed either by perfusion or gradual diffusion from brain slices. We evaluated ASC-processed brains by electron microscopy of multiple regions across the whole brain and by Focused Ion Beam Milling and Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM) imaging of selected brain volumes. Preservation was uniformly excellent: processes were easily traceable and synapses were crisp in both species. Aldehyde-stabilized cryopreservation has many advantages over other brain-banking techniques: chemicals are delivered via perfusion, which enables easy scaling to brains of any size; vitrification ensures that the ultrastructure of the brain will not degrade even over very long storage times; and the cryoprotectant can be removed, yielding a perfusable aldehyde-preserved brain which is suitable for a wide variety of brain assays. PMID:26408851

  8. Trimethylsilylethynyl ketones as surrogates for ethynyl ketones in the double Michael reaction.

    PubMed

    Holeman, Derrick S; Rasne, Ravindra M; Grossman, Robert B

    2002-05-01

    Trimethylsilylethynyl ketones can be desilylated in the presence of a tethered carbon diacid and induced to undergo a double Michael reaction in situ. The trimethylsilylethynyl ketones can serve as surrogates of ethynyl ketones that are difficult to prepare or isolate.

  9. The central role of ketones in reversible and irreversible hydrothermal organic functional group transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ziming; Gould, Ian R.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Shock, Everett L.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of hydrothermal reactions involving organic compounds suggest complex, possibly reversible, reaction pathways that link functional groups from reduced alkanes all the way to oxidized carboxylic acids. Ketones represent a critical functional group because they occupy a central position in the reaction pathway, at the point where Csbnd C bond cleavage is required for the formation of the more oxidized carboxylic acids. The mechanisms for the critical bond cleavage reactions in ketones, and how they compete with other reactions are the focus of this experimental study. We studied a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK), in H2O at 300 °C and 70 MPa for up to 528 h. Product analysis was performed as a function of time at low DBK conversions to reveal the primary reaction pathways. Reversible interconversion between ketone, alcohol, alkene and alkane functional groups is observed in addition to formation of radical coupling products derived from irreversible Csbnd C and Csbnd H homolytic bond cleavage. The product distributions are time-dependent but the bond cleavage products dominate. The major products that accumulate at longer reaction times are toluene and larger, dehydrogenated structures that are initially formed by radical coupling. The hydrogen atoms generated by dehydrogenation of the coupling products are predominantly consumed in the formation of toluene. Even though bond cleavage products dominate, no carboxylic acids were observed on the timescale of the reactions under the chosen experimental conditions.

  10. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-02-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  11. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  12. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    SciTech Connect

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D. )

    1990-02-25

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, (3H)(Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes.

  13. The C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase determines the substrate and inhibitor specificity.

    PubMed

    Barski, O A; Gabbay, K H; Bohren, K M

    1996-11-12

    Human aldehyde reductase has a preference for carboxyl group-containing negatively charged substrates. It belongs to the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase superfamily whose members are in part distinguished by unique C-terminal loops. To probe the role of the C-terminal loops in determining substrate specificities in these enzymes, two arginine residues, Arg308 and Arg311, located in the C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase, and not found in any other C-terminal loop, were replaced with alanine residues. The catalytic efficiency of the R311A mutant for aldehydes containing a carboxyl group is reduced 150-250-fold in comparison to that of the wild-type enzyme, while substrates not containing a negative charge are unaffected. The R311A mutant is also significantly less sensitive to inhibition by dicarboxylic acids, indicating that Arg311 interacts with one of the carboxyl groups. The inhibition pattern indicates that the other carboxyl group binds to the anion binding site formed by Tyr49, His112, and the nicotinamide moiety of NADP+. The correlation between inhibitor potency and the length of the dicarboxylic acid molecules suggests a distance of approximately 10 A between the amino group of Arg311 and the anion binding site in the aldehyde reductase molecule. The sensitivity of inhibition of the R311A mutant by several commercially available aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) was variable, with tolrestat and zopolrestat becoming more potent inhibitors (30- and 5-fold, respectively), while others remained the same or became less potent. The catalytic properties, substrate specificity, and susceptibility to inhibition of the R308A mutant remained similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The data provide direct evidence for C-terminal loop participation in determining substrate and inhibitor specificity of aldo-keto reductases and specifically identifies Arg311 as the basis for the carboxyl-containing substrate preference of aldehyde reductase. PMID:8916913

  14. Highly enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes via rhodium catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jong Uk; Krische, Michael J

    2006-08-23

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetylenic aldehydes 1a-12a using chirally modified cationic rhodium catalysts enables highly enantioselective reductive cyclization to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 1b-12b. Using an achiral hydrogenation catalyst, the chiral racemic acetylenic aldehydes 13a-15a engage in highly syn-diastereoselective reductive cyclizations to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 13b-15b. Ozonolysis of cyclization products 7b and 9b allows access to optically enriched alpha-hydroxy ketones 7c and 9c. Reductive cyclization of enyne 7a under a deuterium atmosphere provides the monodeuterated product deuterio-7b, consistent with a catalytic mechanism involving alkyne-carbonyl oxidative coupling followed by hydrogenolytic cleavage of the resulting oxametallacycle. These hydrogen-mediated transformations represent the first examples of the enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes. PMID:16910650

  15. A molecularly defined iron-catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wienhöfer, Gerrit; Westerhaus, Felix A; Junge, Kathrin; Ludwig, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2013-06-10

    A selective iron-based catalyst system for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes to allylic alcohols is presented. Applying the defined iron-tetraphos complex [FeF(L)][BF4] (L = P(PhPPh2)3) in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid a broad range of aldehydes are reduced in high yields using low catalyst loadings (0.05-1 mol %). Excellent chemoselectivity for the reduction of aldehydes in the presence of other reducible moieties, for example, ketones, olefins, esters, etc. is achieved. Based on the in situ detected hydride species [FeH(H2)(L)](+) a catalytic cycle is proposed that is supported by computational calculations. PMID:23649662

  16. A molecularly defined iron-catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wienhöfer, Gerrit; Westerhaus, Felix A; Junge, Kathrin; Ludwig, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2013-06-10

    A selective iron-based catalyst system for the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes to allylic alcohols is presented. Applying the defined iron-tetraphos complex [FeF(L)][BF4] (L = P(PhPPh2)3) in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid a broad range of aldehydes are reduced in high yields using low catalyst loadings (0.05-1 mol %). Excellent chemoselectivity for the reduction of aldehydes in the presence of other reducible moieties, for example, ketones, olefins, esters, etc. is achieved. Based on the in situ detected hydride species [FeH(H2)(L)](+) a catalytic cycle is proposed that is supported by computational calculations.

  17. Alcohol, Aldehydes, Adducts and Airways.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Muna; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-11-05

    Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes results in the formation of reactive aldehydes in the lung, which are capable of forming adducts with several proteins and DNA. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde are the major aldehydes generated in high levels in the lung of subjects with alcohol use disorder who smoke cigarettes. In addition to the above aldehydes, several other aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal, formaldehyde and acrolein are also detected in the lung due to exposure to toxic gases, vapors and chemicals. These aldehydes react with nucleophilic targets in cells such as DNA, lipids and proteins to form both stable and unstable adducts. This adduction may disturb cellular functions as well as damage proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Among several adducts formed in the lung, malondialdehyde DNA (MDA-DNA) adduct and hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) protein adducts have been shown to initiate several pathological conditions in the lung. MDA-DNA adducts are pre-mutagenic in mammalian cells and induce frame shift and base-pair substitution mutations, whereas MAA protein adducts have been shown to induce inflammation and inhibit wound healing. This review provides an insight into different reactive aldehyde adducts and their role in the pathogenesis of lung disease.

  18. Alcohol, Aldehydes, Adducts and Airways.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Muna; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-01-01

    Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes results in the formation of reactive aldehydes in the lung, which are capable of forming adducts with several proteins and DNA. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde are the major aldehydes generated in high levels in the lung of subjects with alcohol use disorder who smoke cigarettes. In addition to the above aldehydes, several other aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal, formaldehyde and acrolein are also detected in the lung due to exposure to toxic gases, vapors and chemicals. These aldehydes react with nucleophilic targets in cells such as DNA, lipids and proteins to form both stable and unstable adducts. This adduction may disturb cellular functions as well as damage proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Among several adducts formed in the lung, malondialdehyde DNA (MDA-DNA) adduct and hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) protein adducts have been shown to initiate several pathological conditions in the lung. MDA-DNA adducts are pre-mutagenic in mammalian cells and induce frame shift and base-pair substitution mutations, whereas MAA protein adducts have been shown to induce inflammation and inhibit wound healing. This review provides an insight into different reactive aldehyde adducts and their role in the pathogenesis of lung disease. PMID:26556381

  19. Densely Substituted L-Proline Esters as Catalysts for Asymmetric Michael Additions of Ketones to Nitroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Olalla, Andrea; Retamosa, María de Gracia; Cossío, Fernando P

    2015-06-01

    Homochiral methyl 4-aminopyrrolidine-2-carboxylates are readily obtained by means of asymmetric (3 + 2) cycloadditions between azomethine ylides and nitroalkenes, followed by catalytic hydrogenation of the intermediate 4-nitro cycloadducts. These 4-aminopyrrolidine-2-carboxylate esters belong to the L-series of natural amino acids and catalyze asymmetric Michael additions of ketones to nitroalkenes. However, the enantioselectivity observed with these novel unnatural organocatalysts is opposite to that obtained with L-proline. Since both 4-nitro and 4-amino L-proline esters are efficient organocatalysts of aldol reactions, these results permit to modulate asymmetric quimioselective aldol and conjugate addition reactions.

  20. Diastereoselective Radical Hydroacylation of Alkylidenemalonates with Aliphatic Aldehydes Initiated by Photolysis of Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Sakamoto, Ryu; Maruoka, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    Diastereoselective radical hydroacylation of chiral alkylidenemalonates with aliphatic aldehydes is realized by the combination of a hypervalent iodine(III) reagent and UV-light irradiation. The reaction is initiated by the photolysis of hypervalent iodine(III) reagents under mild, metal-free conditions, and is the first example of diastereoselective addition of acyl radicals to olefins to afford chiral ketones in a highly stereoselective fashion. The obtained optically active ketones are useful chiral synthons, as exemplified by the short formal synthesis of (-)-methyleneolactocin.

  1. Ketone body metabolism and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Schugar, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Ketone bodies are metabolized through evolutionarily conserved pathways that support bioenergetic homeostasis, particularly in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle when carbohydrates are in short supply. The metabolism of ketone bodies interfaces with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, de novo lipogenesis, sterol biosynthesis, glucose metabolism, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, hormonal signaling, intracellular signal transduction pathways, and the microbiome. Here we review the mechanisms through which ketone bodies are metabolized and how their signals are transmitted. We focus on the roles this metabolic pathway may play in cardiovascular disease states, the bioenergetic benefits of myocardial ketone body oxidation, and prospective interactions among ketone body metabolism, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Ketone body metabolism is noninvasively quantifiable in humans and is responsive to nutritional interventions. Therefore, further investigation of this pathway in disease models and in humans may ultimately yield tailored diagnostic strategies and therapies for specific pathological states. PMID:23396451

  2. Carboxyl formation from methyl via triple hydroxylations by XiaM in xiamycin A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingbo; Li, Huixian; Li, Sumei; Zhu, Yiguang; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Wenjun; Shi, Rong; Zhang, Changsheng

    2012-12-21

    The P450 enzyme XiaM was identified as a candidate to form the C-24 carboxyl group in xiamycin A (1). Alteration of medium composition led to the discovery of four new compounds from the ΔxiaM and the ΔxiaK (encoding an aromatic ring hydroxylase) mutants. Biotransformation experiments revealed that XiaM was capable of converting a methyl group to a carboxyl group through diol and aldehyde intermediates.

  3. Diastereo- and Enantioselective Reductive Aldol Addition of Vinyl Ketones via Catalytic Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo Bong; Hassan, Abbas; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    An overview of studies on hydrogenative reductive aldol addition is presented. By simply hydrogenating enones in the presence of aldehydes at ambient temperature and pressure, aldol adducts are generated under neutral conditions in the absence of any stoichiometric byproducts. Using cationic rhodium complexes modified by tri(2-furyl)phosphine, highly syn-diastereoselective reductive aldol additions of vinyl ketones are achieved. Finally, using novel monodentate TADDOL-like phosphonite ligands, the first highly diastereo- and enantioselective reductive aldol couplings of vinyl ketones were devised. These studies, along with other works from our laboratory, demonstrate that organometallics arising transiently in the course of catalytic hydrogenation offer byproduct-free alternatives to preformed organometallic reagents employed in classical carbonyl addition processes. PMID:21866204

  4. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  5. Manganese-catalyzed selective oxidation of aliphatic C-H groups and secondary alcohols to ketones with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jia Jia; Unjaroen, Duenpen; Mecozzi, Francesco; Harvey, Emma C; Saisaha, Pattama; Pijper, Dirk; de Boer, Johannes W; Alsters, Paul; Feringa, Ben L; Browne, Wesley R

    2013-09-01

    An efficient and simple method for selective oxidation of secondary alcohols and oxidation of alkanes to ketones is reported. An in situ prepared catalyst is employed based on manganese(II) salts, pyridine-2-carboxylic acid, and butanedione, which provides good-to-excellent conversions and yields with high turnover numbers (up to 10 000) with H2 O2 as oxidant at ambient temperatures. In substrates bearing multiple alcohol groups, secondary alcohols are converted to ketones selectively and, in general, benzyl C-H oxidation proceeds in preference to aliphatic C-H oxidation.

  6. Fueling Performance: Ketones Enter the Mix.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brendan; D'Agostino, Dominic P

    2016-09-13

    Ketone body metabolites serve as alternative energy substrates during prolonged fasting, calorie restriction, or reduced carbohydrate (CHO) availability. Using a ketone ester supplement, Cox et al. (2016) demonstrate that acute nutritional ketosis alters substrate utilization patterns during exercise, reduces lactate production, and improves time-trial performance in elite cyclists. PMID:27626197

  7. NaHSO4-SiO2 as an efficient and chemoselective catalyst, for the synthesis of acylal from aldehydes under, solvent-free conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Structurally diverse aldehydes are successfully converted into acylals (1,1-diacetates) with acetic anhydride using NaHSO4-SiO2 as a mild, convenient and inexpensive catalyst under solvent-free conditions. The noteworthy features of the present system are shorter reaction times, and mild and solvent-free conditions. Furthermore, it offers chemoselective protection of aldehydes. Results Both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes reacts smoothly with acetic anhydride in presence of silica supported sodium hydrogen sulphate to afford the corresponding 1,1-diacetates in good to excellent yields. We studied competitive reactions for the acylation of aldehydes in the presence of ketones using silica supported sodium hydrogen sulphate as a catalyst. Using this catalytic system, the highly selective conversion of an aldehyde in the presence of ketone was observed. Conclusions NaHSO4-SiO2 is a chemoselective and highly efficient catalyst for acylal formation from aldehydes. The advantages of this methodology over the reported methods is the availability of the starting materials, simplicity of acylation procedure, a clean work-up, a short reaction time, high yields and reusability. PMID:23148682

  8. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  9. Synthesis of 5'-Aldehyde Oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Lartia, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of oligonucleotide ending with an aldehyde functional group at their 5'-end (5'-AON) is possible for both DNA (5'-AODN) and RNA (5'-AORN) series irrespectively of the nature of the last nucleobase. The 5'-alcohol of on-support ODN is mildly oxidized under Moffat conditions. Transient protection of the resulting aldehyde by N,N'-diphenylethylenediamine derivatives allows cleavage, deprotection, and RP-HPLC purification of the protected 5'-AON. Finally, 5'-AON is deprotected by usual acetic acid treatment. In the aggregates, 5'-AON can be now synthesized and purified as routinely as non-modified ODNs, following procedures similar to the well-known "DMT-On" strategy. PMID:26967469

  10. Discovery of a novel class of covalent inhibitor for aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, Mary; Chen, Che-Hong; Kimble-Hill, Ann; Parajuli, Bibek; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Kim, Jeewon; Dria, Karl; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-10-23

    Human aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) comprise a family of 17 homologous enzymes that metabolize different biogenic and exogenic aldehydes. To date, there are relatively few general ALDH inhibitors that can be used to probe the contribution of this class of enzymes to particular metabolic pathways. Here, we report the discovery of a general class of ALDH inhibitors with a common mechanism of action. The combined data from kinetic studies, mass spectrometric measurements, and crystallographic analyses demonstrate that these inhibitors undergo an enzyme-mediated {beta}-elimination reaction generating a vinyl ketone intermediate that covalently modifies the active site cysteine residue present in these enzymes. The studies described here can provide the basis for rational approach to design ALDH isoenzyme-specific inhibitors as research tools and perhaps as drugs, to address diseases such as cancer where increased ALDH activity is associated with a cellular phenotype.

  11. Titanocene(III)-Catalyzed Three-Component Reaction of Secondary Amides, Aldehydes, and Electrophilic Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; He, Jiang; Li, Heng-Hui; Wang, Ao; Dai, Xi-Jie; Wang, Ai-E; Huang, Pei-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    An umpolung Mannich-type reaction of secondary amides, aliphatic aldehydes, and electrophilic alkenes has been disclosed. This reaction features the one-pot formation of C-N and C-C bonds by a titanocene-catalyzed radical coupling of the condensation products, from secondary amides and aldehydes, with electrophilic alkenes. N-substituted γ-amido-acid derivatives and γ-amido ketones can be efficiently prepared by the current method. Extension to the reaction between ketoamides and electrophilic alkenes allows rapid assembly of piperidine skeletons with α-amino quaternary carbon centers. Its synthetic utility has been demonstrated by a facile construction of the tricyclic core of marine alkaloids such as cylindricine C and polycitorol A.

  12. Bifunctional Ligand-Assisted Catalytic Ketone α-Alkenylation with Internal Alkynes: Controlled Synthesis of Enones and Mechanistic Studies.

    PubMed

    Mo, Fanyang; Lim, Hee Nam; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-12-16

    Here, we describe a detailed study of the rhodium(I)-catalyzed, bifunctional ligand-assisted ketone α-C-H alkenylation using internal alkynes. Through controlling the reaction conditions, conjugated enamines, α,β- or β,γ-unsaturated ketones, can be selectively accessed. Both aromatic and aliphatic alkynes can be employed as coupling partners. The reaction conditions also tolerate a broad range of functional groups, including carboxylic esters, malonates, secondary amides, thioethers, and free alcohols. In addition, excellent E-selectivity was observed for the tetra-substituted alkene when forming the α,β-unsaturated ketone products. The mechanism of this transformation was explored through control experiments, kinetic monitoring, synthesizing the rhodium-hydride intermediates and their reactions with alkynes, deuterium-labeling experiments, and identification of the resting states of the catalyst. PMID:26565679

  13. Asymmetric intramolecular α-cyclopropanation of aldehydes using a donor/acceptor carbene mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chaosheng; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Enantioselective α-alkylation of carbonyl is considered as one of the most important processes for asymmetric synthesis. Common alkylation agents, that is, alkyl halides, are notorious substrates for both Lewis acids and organocatalysts. Recently, olefins emerged as a benign alkylating species via photo/radical mechanisms. However, examples of enantioselective alkylation of aldehydes/ketones are scarce and direct asymmetric dialkylation remains elusive. Here we report an intramolecular α-cyclopropanation reaction of olefinic aldehydes to form chiral cyclopropane aldehydes. We demonstrate that an α-iodo aldehyde can function as a donor/acceptor carbene equivalent, which engages in a formal [2+1] annulation with a tethered double bond. Privileged bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-type scaffolds are prepared in good optical purity using a chiral amine. The synthetic utility of the products is demonstrated by versatile transformations of the bridgehead formyl functionality. We expect the concept of using α-iodo iminium as a donor/acceptor carbene surrogate will find wide applications in chemical reaction development. PMID:26644194

  14. Evaluation of the toxicity of stress-related aldehydes to photosynthesis in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Mano, Jun'ichi; Miyatake, Fumitaka; Hiraoka, Eiji; Tamoi, Masahiro

    2009-09-01

    Aldehydes produced under various environmental stresses can cause cellular injury in plants, but their toxicology in photosynthesis has been scarcely investigated. We here evaluated their effects on photosynthetic reactions in chloroplasts isolated from Spinacia oleracea L. leaves. Aldehydes that are known to stem from lipid peroxides inactivated the CO(2) photoreduction to various extents, while their corresponding alcohols and carboxylic acids did not affect photosynthesis. alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes (2-alkenals) showed greater inactivation than the saturated aliphatic aldehydes. The oxygenated short aldehydes malondialdehyde, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde showed only weak toxicity to photosynthesis. Among tested 2-alkenals, 2-propenal (acrolein) was the most toxic, and then followed 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and (E)-2-hexenal. While the CO(2)-photoreduction was inactivated, envelope intactness and photosynthetic electron transport activity (H(2)O --> ferredoxin) were only slightly affected. In the acrolein-treated chloroplasts, the Calvin cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-1,6-bisphophatase, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, aldolase, and Rubisco were irreversibly inactivated. Acrolein treatment caused a rapid drop of the glutathione pool, prior to the inactivation of photosynthesis. GSH exogenously added to chloroplasts suppressed the acrolein-induced inactivation of photosynthesis, but ascorbic acid did not show such a protective effect. Thus, lipid peroxide-derived 2-alkenals can inhibit photosynthesis by depleting GSH in chloroplasts and then inactivating multiple enzymes in the Calvin cycle.

  15. Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Evans, R.J.

    1987-04-06

    A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof as disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

  16. Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Evans, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof is disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

  17. Microsphere coated substrate containing reactive aldehyde groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic organic resin is coated with a continuous layer of contiguous, tangential, individual microspheres having a uniform diameter preferably between 100 Angstroms and 2000 Angstroms. The microspheres are an addition polymerized polymer of an unsaturated aldehyde containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms and are covalently bonded to the substrate by means of high energy radiation grafting. The microspheres contain reactive aldehyde groups and can form conjugates with proteins such as enzymes or other aldehyde reactive materials.

  18. Multicomponent reactions of methyl substituted all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexane aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Bykova, Tetiana; Al-Maharik, Nawaf; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; O'Hagan, David

    2016-01-21

    This paper reports the preparation of methyl substituted all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexanes prepared from a Birch reduction of benzoic acid, worked up with a methyl iodide quench. The resultant methylcyclohexadiene carboxylic acid was reduced to the alcohol, protected as an ether and then a sequence of functional group manipulations carried out to introduce four fluorines. The cyclohexadienyl ring was then epoxidised and the C-O bonds sequentially converted through deoxyfluorination reactions to two sets of isomers of all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexane isomers. The blocking methyl group renders the ring safe to hydrogen fluoride elimination. Deprotection of the benzylic ether and then oxidation gave aldehydes which were then used in Ugi and Passerini multicomponent reactions, allowing this facially polarised cyclohexane to be incorporated into peptidic structural motifs. PMID:26646211

  19. Mechanism of the formation of carboxylate from alcohols and water catalyzed by a bipyridine-based ruthenium complex: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixia; Hall, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism for oxidizing alcohols to carboxylate in basic aqueous solution by the bipyridine-based ruthenium complex 2 (BIPY-PNN)Ru(H)(Cl)(CO) (Nat. Chem. 2013, 5, 122) is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) with the ωB97X-D functional. Using water as the oxygen donor with liberation of dihydrogen represents a safe and clean process for such oxidations. Under NaOH, the active catalyst is 3 (BIPY-PNN)Ru(H)(CO). Four steps are involved: dehydrogenation of alcohol to aldehyde (Step 1); coupling of aldehyde and water to form the gem-diol (Step 2); dehydrogenation of gem-diol to carboxylic acid (Step 3); and deprotonation of carboxylic acid to carboxylate anion under base (Step 4). The dehydrogenations of alcohol (Step 1) and gem-diol (Step 3) prefer the double hydrogen transfer mechanism to the β-H elimination mechanism. The coupling of aldehyde and water (Step 2) proceeds through cleavage of water by catalyst 3 followed by concerted hydroxyl and hydrogen transfer to the aldehyde. The formation of the carboxylate anion occurs via direct deprotonation of the carboxylic acid under base (Step 4), while in the absence of base a stable carboxylic acid-addition complex 6 was formed. Added base was found to play important roles in the generation of catalyst 3 from both the stable carboxylic acid-addition complex 6 and its chloride precursor complex 2. The chemoselectivity for the formation of carboxylic acid rather than ester is ascribed to the favorable cleavage of water and the subsequent generation of the stable carboxylate anion that leads to carboxylic acid upon acidification. PMID:24328295

  20. Synthesis of biaryl imino/keto carboxylic acids via aryl amide directed C-H activation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nana; Yu, Qingzhen; Chen, Ruixue; Huang, Jianhui; Xia, Yeqing; Zhao, Kang

    2013-10-21

    A novel Pd-catalysed C-H activation reaction for the synthesis of biaryl imino/keto carboxylic acids is developed. This reaction underwent aryl amide directed C-H activation ortho-acylation followed by ring closing and ring opening processes to give a range of biaryl imino/keto carboxylic acids. Our methodology features the utilization of a cheap and green oxidant (TBHP) as well as readily available aldehydes.

  1. DIFFERENTIATING THE TOXICITY OF CARCINOGENIC ALDEHYDES FROM NONCARCINOGENIC ALDEHYDES IN THE RAT NOSE USING CDNA ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differentiating the Toxicity of Carcinogenic Aldehydes from Noncarcinogenic Aldehydes in the Rat Nose Using cDNA Arrays.

    Formaldehyde is a widely used aldehyde in many industrial settings, the tanning process, household products, and is a contaminant in cigarette smoke. H...

  2. Synthesis of o-(Dimethylamino)aryl Ketones, Acridones, Acridinium Salts, and 1H-Indazoles by the Reaction of Hydrazones and Arynes

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovskiy, Anton V.; Larock, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    A novel, efficient route to biologically and pharmaceutically important o-(dimethylamino)aryl ketones, acridones, acridinium salts, and 1H-indazoles has been developed starting from readily available hydrazones of aldehydes and o-(trimethylsilyl)aryl triflates. The reaction proceeds through arynes under mild conditions, tolerates a wide range of functional groups, and provides the final products in good to excellent yields. PMID:23206164

  3. Gaseous aliphatic aldehydes in Chinese incense smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.M.; Wang, L.H. )

    1994-09-01

    Aliphatic aldehydes were found during the combustion of materials. Tobacco smoke contains aldehydes. Fire fighters were exposed to aldehydes when they conducted firefighting. Aldehydes in ambient air come mainly from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons and from photochemical reaction. Most aldehydes in ambient air are formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde were found in the atmosphere in Los Angeles. Burning Chinese incense for worshipping deities is a Chinese daily routine. It was suspected to be a factor causing nasopharynegeal cancer. Epidemiological studies correlated it with the high risk of childhood brain tumor and the high risk of childhood leukemia. Ames test identified the mutagenic effect of the smoke from burning Chinese incense. The smoke had bee proved to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aromatic aldehydes. Suspicion about formaldehyde and other alphatic aldehydes was evoked, when a survey of indoor air pollution was conducted in Taipei city. This study determined the presence of aliphatic aldehydes in the smoke from burning Chinese incense under a controlled atmosphere. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Aldehyde-containing urea-absorbing polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A novel aldehyde containing polymer (ACP) is prepared by reaction of a polysaccharide with periodate to introduce aldehyde groups onto the C2 - C3 carbon atoms. By introduction of ether and ester groups onto the pendant primary hydroxyl solubility characteristics are modified. The ACP is utilized to absorb nitrogen bases such as urea in vitro or in vivo.

  5. EMISSIONS OF ODOROUS ALDEHYDES FROM ALKYD PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehyde emissions are widely held responsible for the acrid after-odor of drying alkyd-based paint films. The aldehyde emissions from three different alkyd paints were measured in small environmental chambers. It was found that, for each alkyd paint applied, more than 2 mg of ...

  6. Microbial production of natural raspberry ketone.

    PubMed

    Beekwilder, Jules; van der Meer, Ingrid M; Sibbesen, Ole; Broekgaarden, Mans; Qvist, Ingmar; Mikkelsen, Joern D; Hall, Robert D

    2007-10-01

    Raspberry ketone is an important compound for the flavour industry. It is frequently used in products such as soft drinks, sweets, puddings and ice creams. The compound can be produced by organic synthesis. Demand for "natural" raspberry ketone is growing considerably. However, this product is extremely expensive. Consequently, there is a remaining desire to better understand how raspberry ketone is synthesized in vivo, and which genes and enzymes are involved. With this information we will then be in a better position to design alternative production strategies such as microbial fermentation. This article focuses on the identification and application of genes potentially linked to raspberry ketone synthesis. We have isolated candidate genes from both raspberry and other plants, and these have been introduced into bacterial and yeast expression systems. Conditions have been determined that result in significant levels of raspberry ketone, up to 5 mg/L. These results therefore lay a strong foundation for a potentially renewable source of "natural" flavour compounds making use of plant genes.

  7. Emissions of odorous aldehydes from alkyd paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, John C. S.; Guo, Zhishi

    Aldehyde emissions are widely held responsible for the acrid after-odor of drying alkyd-based paint films. The aldehyde emissions from three different alkyd paints were measured in small environ-mental chambers. It was found that, for each gram of alkyd paint applied, more than 2 mg of aldehydes (mainly hexanal) were emitted during the curing (drying) period. Since no measurable hexanal was found in the original paint, it is suspected that the aldehydes emitted were produced by autoxidation of the unsaturated fatty acid esters in the alkyd resins. The hexanal emission rate was simulated by a model assuming that the autoxidation process was controlled by a consecutive first-order reaction mechanism. Using the emission rate model, indoor air quality simulation indicated that the hexanal emissions can result in prolonged (several days) exposure risk to occupants. The occupant exposure to aldehydes emitted from alkyd paint also could cause sensory irritation and other health concerns.

  8. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

    1995-05-02

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

  9. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Poole, Loree J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  10. π-Expanded α,β-unsaturated ketones: synthesis, optical properties, and two-photon-induced polymerization.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Rashid; Bourquard, Florent; Balčiūnas, Evaldas; Smoleń, Sabina; Gray, David; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Farsari, Maria; Gryko, Daniel T

    2015-02-23

    A library of π-expanded α,β-unsaturated ketones was designed and synthesized. They were prepared by a combination of Wittig reaction, Sonogashira reaction, and aldol condensation. It was further demonstrated that the double aldol condensation can be performed effectively for highly polarized styrene- and diphenylacetylene-derived aldehydes. The strategic placement of two dialkylamino groups at the periphery of D-π-A-π-D molecules resulted in dyes with excellent solubility. These ketones absorb light in the region 400-550 nm. Many of them display strong solvatochromism so that the emission ranges from 530-580 nm in toluene to the near-IR region in benzonitrile. Ketones based on cyclobutanone as central moieties display very high fluorescence quantum yields in nonpolar solvents, which decrease drastically in polar media. Photophysical studies of these new functional dyes revealed that they possess an enhanced two-photon absorption cross section when compared with simpler ketone derivatives. Due to strong polarization of the resulting dyes, values of two-photon absorption cross sections on the level of 200-300 GM at 800 nm were achieved, and thanks to that as well as the presence of the keto group, these new two-photon initiators display excellent performance so that the operating region is 5-75 mW in some cases. PMID:25504985

  11. Carbene-catalysed reductive coupling of nitrobenzyl bromides and activated ketones or imines via single-electron-transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Proctor, Rupert S. J.; Zhang, Yuexia; Webster, Richard D.; Yang, Song; Song, Baoan; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2016-09-01

    Benzyl bromides and related molecules are among the most common substrates in organic synthesis. They are typically used as electrophiles in nucleophilic substitution reactions. These molecules can also be activated via single-electron-transfer (SET) process for radical reactions. Representative recent progress includes α-carbon benzylation of ketones and aldehydes via photoredox catalysis. Here we disclose the generation of (nitro)benzyl radicals via N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis under reductive conditions. The radical intermediates generated via NHC catalysis undergo formal 1,2-addition with ketones to eventually afford tertiary alcohol products. The overall process constitutes a formal polarity-inversion of benzyl bromide, allowing a direct coupling of two initially electrophilic carbons. Our study provides a new carbene-catalysed reaction mode that should enable unconventional transformation of (nitro)benzyl bromides under mild organocatalytic conditions.

  12. Carbene-catalysed reductive coupling of nitrobenzyl bromides and activated ketones or imines via single-electron-transfer process

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Proctor, Rupert S. J.; Zhang, Yuexia; Webster, Richard D.; Yang, Song; Song, Baoan; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2016-01-01

    Benzyl bromides and related molecules are among the most common substrates in organic synthesis. They are typically used as electrophiles in nucleophilic substitution reactions. These molecules can also be activated via single-electron-transfer (SET) process for radical reactions. Representative recent progress includes α-carbon benzylation of ketones and aldehydes via photoredox catalysis. Here we disclose the generation of (nitro)benzyl radicals via N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis under reductive conditions. The radical intermediates generated via NHC catalysis undergo formal 1,2-addition with ketones to eventually afford tertiary alcohol products. The overall process constitutes a formal polarity-inversion of benzyl bromide, allowing a direct coupling of two initially electrophilic carbons. Our study provides a new carbene-catalysed reaction mode that should enable unconventional transformation of (nitro)benzyl bromides under mild organocatalytic conditions. PMID:27671606

  13. Stereoselective Formation of Fully Substituted Ketone Enolates.

    PubMed

    Haimov, Elvira; Nairoukh, Zackaria; Shterenberg, Alexander; Berkovitz, Tiran; Jamison, Timothy F; Marek, Ilan

    2016-04-25

    The application of stereochemically defined acyclic fully substituted enolates of ketones to the enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocenters would be highly valuable. Herein, we describe an approach leading to the formation of several new stereogenic centers through a combined metalation-addition of a carbonyl-carbamoyl transfer to reveal in situ stereodefined α,α-disubstituted enolates of ketone as a single stereoisomer. This approach could produce a series of aldol and Mannich products from enol carbamate with excellent diastereomeric ratios. PMID:27027778

  14. Stereoselective Formation of Fully Substituted Ketone Enolates.

    PubMed

    Haimov, Elvira; Nairoukh, Zackaria; Shterenberg, Alexander; Berkovitz, Tiran; Jamison, Timothy F; Marek, Ilan

    2016-04-25

    The application of stereochemically defined acyclic fully substituted enolates of ketones to the enantioselective synthesis of quaternary carbon stereocenters would be highly valuable. Herein, we describe an approach leading to the formation of several new stereogenic centers through a combined metalation-addition of a carbonyl-carbamoyl transfer to reveal in situ stereodefined α,α-disubstituted enolates of ketone as a single stereoisomer. This approach could produce a series of aldol and Mannich products from enol carbamate with excellent diastereomeric ratios.

  15. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group. PMID:27102012

  16. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M.; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90–99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2–C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production. PMID:25108218

  17. Enzymatic conversion of atmospheric aldehydes into alcohol in a phospholipid polymer film.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoki; Watari, Akihiro; Tada, Tomoko; Asada, Tomoko; Kunugi, Shigeru; Lee, Yin-Fai; Yamada, Satoshi; Shuto, Kenshiro; Sakaki, Shujiro

    2009-02-01

    We developed a unique method for converting atmospheric aldehyde into alcohol using formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida (PFDH) doped in a polymer film. A film of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB), which has a chemical structure similar to that of a biological membrane, was employed for its biocompatibility. A water-incorporated polymer film entrapping PFDH and its cofactor NAD(+) was obtained by drying a buffered solution of PMB, PFDH, and NAD(+). The aldehydes in the air were absorbed into the polymer film and then enzymatically oxidized by PFDH doped in the PMB film. Interestingly, alcohol and carboxylic acid were produced by the enzymatic reaction, indicating that PFDH catalyzes dismutation of aldehyde in the PMB film. Importantly, a PFDH-PMB film catalyzes aldehyde degradation without consuming the nucleotide cofactor, thereby allowing repeated use of the film. The activity of PFDH in the PMB film was higher than that in other common water-soluble polymers, suggesting that the hydrational state in a phospholipid polymer matrix is suitable for enzymatic activity.

  18. [Synthesis and anti-proliferative activity of fluoroquinolone (rhodanine unsaturated ketone) amide derivatives].

    PubMed

    Gao, Liu-zhou; Xie, Yu-suo; Yan, Qiang; Wu, Shu-min; Ni, Li-li; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Wen-long; Hu, Guo-qiang

    2015-08-01

    To discover novel antitumor rhodanine unsaturated ketones, a series of fluoroquinolone (rhodanine α, β-unsaturated ketone) amine derivatives (5a-5r) were designed and synthesized with fluoroquinolone amide scaffold as a carrier. The structures of eighteen title compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H NMR and MS. The in vitro anti-proliferative activity against Hep-3B, Capan-1 and HL60 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. The results showed that the title compounds not only had more significant anti-proliferative activity against three tested cancer cell lines than that of the parent ciprofloxacin 1, but also exhibited the highest activity against Capan-1 cells. The SAR revealed that some compounds carrying aromatic heterocyclic rings or phenyl attached to an electron-withdrawing carboxyl or sulfonamide substituent were comparable to or better than comparison doxorubicin against Capan-1 cells. As such, it suggests that fluoroquinolone (rhodanine α, β-unsaturated ketone) amines are promising leads for the development of novel antitumor fluoroquinolones or rhodanine analogues. PMID:26669001

  19. Vapor pressures and gas-film coefficients for ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of handbook vapor pressures for seven ketones with more recent literature data showed large differences for four of the ketones. Gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of these ketones from water determined by two different methods were in reasonable agreement. ?? 1987.

  20. Rh-Catalyzed arylation of fluorinated ketones with arylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Luca S; Pattison, Graham

    2016-09-25

    The Rh-catalyzed arylation of fluorinated ketones with boronic acids is reported. This efficient process allows access to fluorinated alcohols in high yields under mild conditions. Competition experiments suggest that difluoromethyl ketones are more reactive than trifluoromethyl ketones in this process, despite their decreased electronic activation, an effect we postulate to be steric in origin.

  1. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4925 - Methyl n-butyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl n-butyl ketone. 721.4925... Substances § 721.4925 Methyl n-butyl ketone. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance methyl n-butyl ketone, CAS Number 591-78-6, is subject to...

  3. Stereoselective borylative ketone-diene coupling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Yeon; Yu, Zhiyong; Morken, James P

    2011-10-01

    In the presence of catalytic Ni(cod)(2) and P(t-Bu)(3), ketones, dienes, and B(2)(pin)(2) undergo a stereoselective multicomponent coupling reaction. Upon oxidation, the reaction furnishes 1,3-diols as the major reaction product.

  4. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Sun, Lihan; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Numerous conditions promote oxidative stress, leading to the build-up of reactive aldehydes that cause cell damage and contribute to cardiac diseases. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important enzymes that eliminate toxic aldehydes by catalysing their oxidation to non-reactive acids. The review will discuss evidence indicating a role for a specific ALDH enzyme, the mitochondrial ALDH2, in combating oxidative stress by reducing the cellular ‘aldehydic load’. Epidemiological studies in humans carrying an inactive ALDH2, genetic models in mice with altered ALDH2 levels, and small molecule activators of ALDH2 all highlight the role of ALDH2 in cardioprotection and suggest a promising new direction in cardiovascular research and the development of new treatments for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20558439

  5. A sequential Pd/norbornene-catalyzed process generates o-biaryl carbaldehydes or ketones via a redox reaction or 6H-dibenzopyrans by C-O ring closure.

    PubMed

    Motti, Elena; Della Ca', Nicola; Xu, Di; Piersimoni, Anna; Bedogni, Elena; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Catellani, Marta

    2012-11-16

    o-Biaryl carbaldeydes and ketones are obtained through the one-pot reaction of o-aryl iodides with o-bromobenzyl alcohols under the catalytic action of Pd and norbornene, in the presence of a base. The same reaction can also give dibenzopyrans by Pd and norbornene catalysis with a different termination, leading to C-O ring closure. In both cases the process first leads to a five-membered palladacycle, which controls C-C coupling, then to a seven-membered oxapalladacycle, which gives aldehydes and ketones or dibenzopyrans. PMID:23134173

  6. Incorporation of metabolically stable ketones into a small molecule probe to increase potency and water solubility.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Marie-Helene; Yang, Wan Seok; Jiang, Elise; Thomas, Ajit G; Slusher, Barbara S; Stockwell, Brent R

    2015-11-01

    Introducing a reactive carbonyl to a scaffold that does not otherwise have an electrophilic functionality to create a reversible covalent inhibitor is a potentially useful strategy for enhancing compound potency. However, aldehydes are metabolically unstable, which precludes the use of this strategy for compounds to be tested in animal models or in human clinical studies. To overcome this limitation, we designed ketone-based functionalities capable of forming reversible covalent adducts, while displaying high metabolic stability, and imparting improved water solubility to their pendant scaffold. We tested this strategy on the ferroptosis inducer and experimental therapeutic erastin, and observed substantial increases in compound potency. In particular, a new carbonyl erastin analog, termed IKE, displayed improved potency, solubility and metabolic stability, thus representing an ideal candidate for future in vivo cancer therapeutic applications. PMID:26231156

  7. An Enantio- and Diastereoselective Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of α-Fluoro β-Hydroxy Carboxylic Esters.

    PubMed

    Howard, James K; Müller, Marion; Berry, Alan; Nelson, Adam

    2016-06-01

    The trans-o-hydroxybenzylidene pyruvate aldolase-catalysed reactions between fluoropyruvate and many (hetero)aromatic aldehydes yield aldol adducts without subsequent dehydration. Treatment of the reaction products with hydrogen peroxide yields the corresponding syn-configured α-fluoro β-hydroxy carboxylic acids which have >98 % ee. The overall chemoenzymatic approach, in which fluoropyruvate serves as a fluoroacetate equivalent, may be exploited in the synthesis of polar building blocks and fragments with potential value in drug discovery. PMID:27090612

  8. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  9. Electrochemical reduction of aromatic ketones in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids in the presence of carbon dioxide: the influence of the ketone substituent and the ionic liquid anion on bulk electrolysis product distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shu-Feng; Horne, Mike; Bond, Alan M; Zhang, Jie

    2015-07-15

    Electrochemical reduction of aromatic ketones, including acetophenone, benzophenone and 4-phenylbenzophenone, has been undertaken in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids containing tetrafluoroborate ([BF4](-)), trifluoromethanesulfonate ([TfO](-)) and tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([FAP](-)) anions in the presence of carbon dioxide in order to investigate the ketone substituent effect and the influence of the acidic proton on the imidazolium cation (C2-H) on bulk electrolysis product distribution. For acetophenone, the minor products were dimers (<10%) in all ionic liquids, which are the result of acetophenone radical anion coupling. For benzophenone and 4-phenylbenzophenone, no dimers were formed due to steric hindrance. In these cases, even though carboxylic acids were obtained, the main products generated were alcohols (>50%) derived from proton coupled electron transfer reactions involving the electrogenerated radical anions and C2-H. In the cases of both acetophenone and benzophenone, the product distribution is essentially independent of the ionic liquid anion. By contrast, 4-phenylbenzophenone shows a product distribution that is dependent on the ionic liquid anion. Higher yields of carboxylic acids (∼40%) are obtained with [TfO](-) and [FAP](-) anions because in these ionic liquids the C2-H is less acidic, making the formation of alcohol less favourable. In comparison with benzophenone, a higher yield of carboxylic acid (>30% versus ∼15%) was obtained with 4-phenylbenzophenone in all ionic liquids due to the weaker basicity of 4-phenylbenzophenone radical anion.

  10. Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 7A1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) is part of lysine catabolism and catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of α-aminoadipate semialdehyde to α-aminoadipate. Herein, we describe a structural study of human ALDH7A1 focused on substrate recognition. Five crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering data are reported, including the first crystal structure of any ALDH7 family member complexed with α-aminoadipate. The product binds with the ε-carboxylate in the oxyanion hole, the aliphatic chain packed into an aromatic box, and the distal end of the product anchored by electrostatic interactions with five conserved residues. This binding mode resembles that of glutamate bound to the proline catabolic enzyme ALDH4A1. Analysis of ALDH7A1 and ALDH4A1 structures suggests key interactions that underlie substrate discrimination. Structures of apo ALDH7A1 reveal dramatic conformational differences from the product complex. Product binding is associated with a 16 Å movement of the C-terminus into the active site, which stabilizes the active conformation of the aldehyde substrate anchor loop. The fact that the C-terminus is part of the active site was hitherto unknown. Interestingly, the C-terminus and aldehyde anchor loop are disordered in a new tetragonal crystal form of the apoenzyme, implying that these parts of the enzyme are highly flexible. Our results suggest that the active site of ALDH7A1 is disassembled when the aldehyde site is vacant, and the C-terminus is a mobile element that forms quaternary structural interactions that aid aldehyde binding. These results are relevant to the c.1512delG genetic deletion associated with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, which alters the C-terminus of ALDH7A1. PMID:26260980

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Wood, Andrew J; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried out genome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species-including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Wood, Andrew J.; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD+- or NADP+-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as ‘aldehyde scavengers’ by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried outgenome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species—including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  13. Friedel-Crafts Fluoroacetylation of Indoles with Fluorinated Acetic Acids for the Synthesis of Fluoromethyl Indol-3-yl Ketones under Catalyst- and Additive-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shun-Jiang; Ren, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Yao-Yu; Guan, Zheng-Hui

    2016-05-20

    A simple and efficient protocol for the fluoroacetylation of indoles is reported. The reaction uses fluorinated acetic acids as the fluoroacetylation reagents to synthesize diverse fluoromethyl indol-3-yl ketones in good yields under catalyst- and additive-free conditions. In addition, the only byproduct is water in this transformation. The synthetic utility of this reaction was also demonstrated by the concise synthesis of α-(trifluoromethyl)(indol-3-yl)methanol and indole-3-carboxylic acid. PMID:27101475

  14. A Metallacycle Fragmentation Strategy for Vinyl Transfer from Enol Carboxylates to Secondary Alcohol C-H Bonds via Osmium- or Ruthenium-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Park, Boyoung Y; Luong, Tom; Sato, Hiroki; Krische, Michael J

    2015-06-24

    A strategy for catalytic vinyl transfer from enol carboxylates to activated secondary alcohol C-H bonds is described. Using XPhos-modified ruthenium(0) or osmium(0) complexes, enol carboxylate-carbonyl oxidative coupling forms transient β-acyloxy-oxametallacycles, which eliminate carboxylate to deliver allylic ruthenium(II) or osmium(II) alkoxides. Reduction of the metal(II) salt via hydrogen transfer from the secondary alcohol reactant releases the product of carbinol C-H vinylation and regenerates ketone and zero-valent catalyst.

  15. Scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, S; Murakami, M; Takata, K; Morino, Y

    1986-04-15

    This paper describes an unexpectedly broad ligand specificity of a scavenger receptor of sinusoidal liver cells that is responsible for endocytic uptake of formaldehyde-treated bovine serum albumin (f-Alb). Binding of 125I-f-Alb to the isolated cells was effectively inhibited by bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with aliphatic aldehydes such as glycolaldehye, DL-glyceraldehyde, and propionaldehyde whereas albumin preparations modified by aromatic aldehydes such as pyridoxal, pyridoxal phosphate, salicylaldehyde, and benzaldehyde did not affect this binding process. Binding of 125I-glycolaldehyde-treated BSA to the cells exhibited a saturation kinetics with an apparent Kd = 3.3 micrograms of the ligand/ml. This binding process was inhibited by unlabeled f-Alb as well as by the antibody raised against the f-Alb receptor. Indeed, 125I-glycolaldehyde-treated BSA underwent a rapid plasma clearance (t1/2 approximately 2 min) which was markedly retarded by unlabeled f-Alb. Upon treatment by these aldehydes, other proteins such as ovalbumin, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and hemoglobin were also converted to active ligands for the f-Alb receptor, while no ligand activity was generated with gamma-globulin and RNase A. These results clearly show that the f-Alb receptor, originally described as being specific for f-Alb, exhibits a broad ligand specificity in terms of both aldehydes and proteins and, hence, should be described as a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins.

  16. Pendant dual sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) proton exchange membranes for fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh Dat Thinh; Yang, Sungwoo; Kim, Dukjoon

    2016-10-01

    Poly(arylene ether ketone) (PAEK) possessing carboxylic groups at the pendant position is synthesized, and the substitution degree of pendant carboxylic groups is controlled by adjusting the ratio of 4,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)valeric acid and 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane. Dual sulfonated 3,3-diphenylpropylamine (SDPA) is grafted onto PAEK as a proton-conducting moiety via the amidation reaction with carboxylic groups. The transparent and flexible membranes with different degrees of sulfonation are fabricated so that we can test and compare their structure and properties with a commercial Nafion® 115 membrane for PEMFC applications. All prepared PAEK-SDPA membranes exhibit good oxidative and hydrolytic stability from Fenton's and high temperature water immersion test. SAXS analysis illustrates an excellent phase separation between the hydrophobic backbone and hydrophilic pendant groups, resulting in big ionic clusters. The proton conductivity was measured at different relative humidity, and its behavior was analyzed by hydration number of the membrane. Among a series of membranes, some samples (including B20V80-SDPA) show not only higher proton conductivity, but also higher integrated cell performance than those of Nafion® 115 at 100% relative humidity, and thus we expect these to be good candidate membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

  17. (+/-)-1-Tetralone-3-carboxylic acid and (+/-)-1-tetralone-2-acetic acid: hydrogen bonding in two gamma-keto acids.

    PubMed

    Barcon, A; Brunskill, A P; Lalancette, R A; Thompson, H W; Miller, A J

    2001-03-01

    The crystal structure of (+/-)-4-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid (C(11)H(10)O(3)) involves projection of the carboxyl group nearly orthogonal to the aromatic plane and hydrogen bonding of the acid groups by centrosymmetric pairing across the a edge and the center of the chosen cell [O...O = 2.705 (2) A]. Intermolecular C--H...O==C close contacts to translationally related molecules are found for both the ketone (2.55 A) and the acid (2.67 A). In (+/-)-1-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-acetic acid (C(12)H(12)O(3)), the aggregation involves centrosymmetric carboxyl dimers mutually hydrogen bonded across the bc face and the a edge of the chosen cell [O...O = 2.674 (2) A]. A 2.60 A close C--H...O==C contact is found to the carboxyl group of centrosymmetrically related molecule. PMID:11250596

  18. Synthesis and characterization of poly(ether ketone)s containing phosphorus and fluorine

    SciTech Connect

    Youngman, P.W.; Fitch, J.W.; Cassidy, P.E. |

    1996-10-01

    Because of the excellent properties exhibited by fluorinated poly(ether ketone)s, modifications were sought to further improve this polymer toward atomic oxygen resistance. For this purpose a phosphorous-containing monomer [bis(4-fluorophenyl)phenyl phosphine oxide] was synthesized and incorporated into a poly(ether ketone) backbone by reaction with 2,2-bis[4-(4-fluorobenzoyl)phenyl]hexafluoropropane in varying proportions with bisphenol AF to produce polymers with different amounts of the phosphine oxide repeating unit in the backbone. Colorless, film-forming materials were produced with a slight increase in Tg due to the phosphine oxide function. The incorporation of this moiety also resulted in a very small increase in the dielectric constant and an improved resistance to atomic oxygen ablation.

  19. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  20. Iron Catalysis for Room-Temperature Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingguo; Zhang, Jiasheng; Ma, Shengming

    2016-07-13

    Oxidation from alcohols to carboxylic acids, a class of essential chemicals in daily life, academic laboratories, and industry, is a fundamental reaction, usually using at least a stoichiometric amount of an expensive and toxic oxidant. Here, an efficient and practical sustainable oxidation technology of alcohols to carboxylic acids using pure O2 or even O2 in air as the oxidant has been developed: utilizing a catalytic amount each of Fe(NO3)3·9H2O/TEMPO/MCl, a series of carboxylic acids were obtained from alcohols (also aldehydes) in high yields at room temperature. A 55 g-scale reaction was demonstrated using air. As a synthetic application, the first total synthesis of a naturally occurring allene, i.e., phlomic acid, was accomplished.

  1. Copper(II)-catalyzed silylation of activated alkynes in water: diastereodivergent access to E- or Z-β-silyl-α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and carboxyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Calderone, Joseph A; Santos, Webster L

    2014-04-14

    Copper(II)-catalyzed silylation of substituted alkynylcarbonyl compounds was investigated. Through the activation of Me2 PhSiBpin in water at room temperature and open atmosphere, vinylsilanes conjugated to carbonyl groups are synthesized in high yield. A surprising diastereodivergent access to olefin geometry was discovered using a silyl conjugate addition strategy: aldehydes and ketones were Z selective while esters and amides were exclusively transformed into the E products.

  2. Characterization of Two Distinct Structural Classes of Selective Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cynthia A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) catalyze the irreversible oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acid. Alterations in ALDH1A1 activity are associated with such diverse diseases as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, obesity, and cataracts. Inhibitors of ALDH1A1 could aid in illuminating the role of this enzyme in disease processes. However, there are no commercially available selective inhibitors for ALDH1A1. Here we characterize two distinct chemical classes of inhibitors that are selective for human ALDH1A1 compared to eight other ALDH isoenzymes. The prototypical members of each structural class, CM026 and CM037, exhibit sub-micromolar inhibition constants, but have different mechanisms of inhibition. The crystal structures of these compounds bound to ALDH1A1 demonstrate that they bind within the aldehyde binding pocket of ALDH1A1 and exploit the presence of a unique Glycine residue to achieve their selectivity. These two novel and selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors may serve as chemical tools to better understand the contributions of ALDH1A1 to normal biology and to disease states. PMID:25634381

  3. Intercalation of cyclic ketones into vanadyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zima, Vitezslav . E-mail: vitezslav.zima@upce.cz; Melanova, Klara; Benes, Ludvik; Trchova, Miroslava; Dybal, Jiri

    2005-01-15

    Intercalation compounds of vanadyl phosphate with cyclic ketones (cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, 4-methylcyclohexanone, and 1,4-cyclohexanedione) were prepared from corresponding propanol or ethanol intercalates by a molecular exchange. The intercalates prepared were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The intercalates are stable in dry environment and decompose slowly in humid air. Infrared and Raman spectra indicate that carbonyl oxygens of the guest molecules are coordinated to the vanadium atoms of the host layers. The local structure and interactions in the cyclopentanone intercalate have been suggested on the basis of quantum chemical calculations.

  4. Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Ann; Strlič, Matija; Kralj Cigić, Irena; Levart, Alenka; Gibson, Lorraine T.; de Bruin, Gerrit; Ntanos, Konstantinos; Kolar, Jana; Cassar, May

    2010-06-01

    Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.

  5. Oxidation of Aromatic Aldehydes Using Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandhari, Rajani; Maddukuri, Padma P.; Thottumkara, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using water as a solvent for organic reactions which highlights the cost and environmental benefits of its use is presented. The experiment encourages students to think in terms of the reaction mechanism of the oxidation of aldehydes knowing that potassium persulfate is the active oxidant in Oxone…

  6. Breaking the Carboxyl Rule

    PubMed Central

    Balashov, Sergei P.; Petrovskaya, Lada E.; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Lukashev, Evgeniy P.; Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Wang, Jennifer M.; Sychev, Sergey V.; Dolgikh, Dmitriy A.; Rubin, Andrei B.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2013-01-01

    A lysine instead of the usual carboxyl group is in place of the internal proton donor to the retinal Schiff base in the light-driven proton pump of Exiguobacterium sibiricum (ESR). The involvement of this lysine in proton transfer is indicated by the finding that its substitution with alanine or other residues slows reprotonation of the Schiff base (decay of the M intermediate) by more than 2 orders of magnitude. In these mutants, the rate constant of the M decay linearly decreases with a decrease in proton concentration, as expected if reprotonation is limited by the uptake of a proton from the bulk. In wild type ESR, M decay is biphasic, and the rate constants are nearly pH-independent between pH 6 and 9. Proton uptake occurs after M formation but before M decay, which is especially evident in D2O and at high pH. Proton uptake is biphasic; the amplitude of the fast phase decreases with a pKa of 8.5 ± 0.3, which reflects the pKa of the donor during proton uptake. Similarly, the fraction of the faster component of M decay decreases and the slower one increases, with a pKa of 8.1 ± 0.2. The data therefore suggest that the reprotonation of the Schiff base in ESR is preceded by transient protonation of an initially unprotonated donor, which is probably the ϵ-amino group of Lys-96 or a water molecule in its vicinity, and it facilitates proton delivery from the bulk to the reaction center of the protein. PMID:23696649

  7. Aldehyde Reduction by Cytochrome P450

    PubMed Central

    Amunom, Immaculate; Srivastava, Sanjay; Prough, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedure for measuring the relative rates of metabolism of the α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, 9-anthracene aldehyde (9-AA) and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (4-HNE); specifically the aldehyde reduction reactions of cytochrome P450s (CYPs). These assays can be performed using either liver microsomal or other tissue fractions, spherosome preparations of recombinant CYPs, or recombinant CYPs from other sources. The method used here to study the reduction of a model α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 9-AA, by CYPs was adapted from the assay used to investigate 9-anthracene oxidation as reported by Marini et al. (Marini et al., 2003). For experiments measuring reduction of the endogenous aldehyde, 4-HNE, the substrate was incubated with CYP in the presence of oxygen and NADPH and the metabolites were separated by High Pressure Liquid Chromatograpy (HPLC), using an adaptation of the method of Srivastava et al. (Srivastava et al., 2010). For study of 9-AA and 4-HNE reduction, the first step involves incubation of the substrate with the CYP in appropriate media, followed by quantification of metabolites through either spectrofluorimetry or analysis by HPLC coupled with a radiometric assay, respectively. Metabolite identification can be achieved by HPLC GC-mass spectrometric analysis. Inhibitors of cytochrome P450 function can be utilized to show the role of the hemoprotein or other enzymes in these reduction reactions. The reduction reactions for CYP’s were not inhibited by either anaerobiosis or inclusion of CO in the gaseous phase of the reaction mixture. These character of these reactions are similar to those reported for some cytochrome P450-catalyzed azo reduction reactions. PMID:21553396

  8. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amine aldehyde condensate. 721.639... Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2E1 and 2A6 by aldehydes: structure and activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Kandagatla, Suneel K; Mack, Todd; Simpson, Sean; Sollenberger, Jill; Helton, Eric; Raner, Gregory M

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe active site structure and dynamics of human cytochrome P4502E1 and P4502A6 using a series of related short chain fatty aldehydes. Binding efficiency of the aldehydes was monitored via their ability to inhibit the binding and activation of the probe substrates p-nitrophenol (2E1) and coumarin (2A6). Oxidation of the aldehydes was observed in reactions with individually expressed 2E1, but not 2A6, suggesting alternate binding modes. For saturated aldehydes the optimum chain length for inhibition of 2E1 was 9 carbons (KI=7.8 ± 0.3 μM), whereas for 2A6 heptanal was most potent (KI=15.8 ± 1.1 μM). A double bond in the 2-position of the aldehyde significantly decreased the observed KI relative to the corresponding saturated compound in most cases. A clear difference in the effect of the double bond was observed between the two isoforms. With 2E1, the double bond appeared to remove steric constraints on aldehyde binding with KI values for the 5-12 carbon compounds ranging between 2.6 ± 0.1 μM and 12.8 ± 0.5 μM, whereas steric effects remained the dominant factor in the binding of the unsaturated aldehydes to 2A6 (observed KI values between 7.0 ± 0.5 μM and >1000 μM). The aldehyde function was essential for effective inhibition, as the corresponding carboxylic acids had very little effect on enzyme activity over the same range of concentrations, and branching at the 3-position of the aldehydes increased the corresponding KI value in all cases examined. The results suggest that a conjugated π-system may be a key structural determinant in the binding of these compounds to both enzymes, and may also be an important feature for the expansion of the active site volume in 2E1.

  16. Inhibition of human Cytochrome P450 2E1 and 2A6 by aldehydes: Structure and activity relationships

    PubMed Central

    Kandagatla, Suneel K.; Mack, Todd; Simpson, Sean; Sollenberger, Jill; Helton, Eric; Raner, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe active site structure and dynamics of human cytochrome P4502E1 and P4502A6 using a series of related short chain fatty aldehydes. Binding efficiency of the aldehydes was monitored via their ability to inhibit the binding and activation of the probe substrates p-nitrophenol (2E1) and coumarin (2A6). Oxidation of the aldehydes was observed in reactions with individually expressed 2E1, but not 2A6, suggesting alternate binding modes. For saturated aldehydes the optimum chain length for inhibition of 2E1 was 9 carbons (KI=7.8 ±0.3 μM), whereas for 2A6 heptanal was most potent (KI=15.8 ±1.1 μM). A double bond in the 2-position of the aldehyde significantly decreased the observed KI relative to the corresponding saturated compound in most cases. A clear difference in the effect of the double bond was observed between the two isoforms. With 2E1, the double bond appeared to remove steric constraints on aldehyde binding with KI values for the 5–12 carbon compounds ranging between 2.6 ± 0.1 μM and 12.8± 0.5 μM, whereas steric effects remained the dominant factor in the binding of the unsaturated aldehydes to 2A6 (observed KI values between 7.0± 0.5 μM and >1000 μM). The aldehyde function was essential for effective inhibition, as the corresponding carboxylic acids had very little effect on enzyme activity over the same range of concentrations, and branching at the 3-position of the aldehydes increased the corresponding KI value in all cases examined. The results suggest that a conjugated π-system may be a key structural determinant in the binding of these compounds to both enzymes, and may also be an important feature for the expansion of the active site volume in 2E1. PMID:24924949

  17. Mild and efficient strategy for site-selective aldehyde modification of glycosaminoglycans: tailoring hydrogels with tunable release of growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujiang; Oommen, Oommen P; Yan, Hongji; Varghese, Oommen P

    2013-07-01

    Aldehydes have been used as an important bioorthogonal chemical reporter for conjugation of large polymers and bioactive substances. However, generating aldehyde functionality on carbohydrate-based biopolymers without changing its native chemical structure has always persisted as a challenging task. The common methods employed to achieve this require harsh reaction conditions, which often compromise the structural integrity and biological function of these sensitive molecules. Here we report a mild and simple method to graft aldehydes groups on glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in a site-selective manner without compromising the structural integrity of the biopolymer. This regio-selective modification was achieved by conjugating the amino-glycerol moiety on the carboxylate residue of the polymer, which allowed selective cleavage of pendent diol groups without interfering with the C2-C3 diol groups of the native glucopyranose residue. Kinetic evaluation of this reaction demonstrated significant differences in second-order reaction rate for periodate oxidation (by four-orders of magnitude) between the two types of vicinal diols. We employed this chemistry to develop aldehyde modifications of sulfated and nonsulfated GAGs such as hyaluronic acid (HA), heparin (HP), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). We further utilized these aldehyde grafted GAGs to tailor extracellular matrix mimetic injectable hydrogels and evaluated its rheological properties. The composition of the hydrogels was also found to modulate release of therapeutic protein such as FGF-2, demonstrating controlled release (60%) for over 14 days. In short, our result clearly demonstrates a versatile strategy to graft aldehyde groups on sensitive biopolymers under mild conditions that could be applied for various bioconjugation and biomedical applications such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine. PMID:23721079

  18. Mild and efficient strategy for site-selective aldehyde modification of glycosaminoglycans: tailoring hydrogels with tunable release of growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujiang; Oommen, Oommen P; Yan, Hongji; Varghese, Oommen P

    2013-07-01

    Aldehydes have been used as an important bioorthogonal chemical reporter for conjugation of large polymers and bioactive substances. However, generating aldehyde functionality on carbohydrate-based biopolymers without changing its native chemical structure has always persisted as a challenging task. The common methods employed to achieve this require harsh reaction conditions, which often compromise the structural integrity and biological function of these sensitive molecules. Here we report a mild and simple method to graft aldehydes groups on glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in a site-selective manner without compromising the structural integrity of the biopolymer. This regio-selective modification was achieved by conjugating the amino-glycerol moiety on the carboxylate residue of the polymer, which allowed selective cleavage of pendent diol groups without interfering with the C2-C3 diol groups of the native glucopyranose residue. Kinetic evaluation of this reaction demonstrated significant differences in second-order reaction rate for periodate oxidation (by four-orders of magnitude) between the two types of vicinal diols. We employed this chemistry to develop aldehyde modifications of sulfated and nonsulfated GAGs such as hyaluronic acid (HA), heparin (HP), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). We further utilized these aldehyde grafted GAGs to tailor extracellular matrix mimetic injectable hydrogels and evaluated its rheological properties. The composition of the hydrogels was also found to modulate release of therapeutic protein such as FGF-2, demonstrating controlled release (60%) for over 14 days. In short, our result clearly demonstrates a versatile strategy to graft aldehyde groups on sensitive biopolymers under mild conditions that could be applied for various bioconjugation and biomedical applications such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  19. The rotational spectrum of diethyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2011-07-11

    We report on the rotational spectrum of diethyl ketone, C(2)H(5)-C(=O)-C(2)H(5), as observed by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy under pulsed molecular beam conditions. Almost all lines were split into narrow quartets in a range from 10 kHz up to 2 MHz, arising from the hindered rotation of the two equivalent terminal methyl groups. In a global analysis using the xiam code, which is based on the rho axis method, three rotational constants, five quartic centrifugal distortion constants, the torsional barrier of the terminal methyl groups, and the angles between the principal inertial axes and the internal rotor axes were determined. The methyl torsional barrier was found to be 771.93(27) cm(-1). In total, 199 lines were fitted to a standard deviation of 3.5 kHz. The experimental work was supplemented by quantum chemical calculations. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces describing the rotation of both ethyl groups against the C=O frame were calculated with the MP2 method as well as the DFT method using the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and the B3LYP functional, respectively. Combining the experimental and theoretical results, an effective structure with C(2v) symmetry was deduced for the diethyl ketone molecule. Moreover, the torsional barrier of the methyl groups was determined by ab initio methods.

  20. Inborn errors of ketone body utilization.

    PubMed

    Hori, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Shinkaku, Haruo; Horikawa, Reiko; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Takayanagi, Masaki; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency and mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (beta-ketothiolase or T2) deficiency are classified as autosomal recessive disorders of ketone body utilization characterized by intermittent ketoacidosis. Patients with mutations retaining no residual activity on analysis of expression of mutant cDNA are designated as severe genotype, and patients with at least one mutation retaining significant residual activity, as mild genotype. Permanent ketosis is a pathognomonic characteristic of SCOT-deficient patients with severe genotype. Patients with mild genotype, however, may not have permanent ketosis, although they may develop severe ketoacidotic episodes similar to patients with severe genotype. Permanent ketosis has not been reported in T2 deficiency. In T2-deficient patients with severe genotype, biochemical diagnosis is done on urinary organic acid analysis and blood acylcarnitine analysis to observe characteristic findings during both ketoacidosis and non-episodic conditions. In Japan, however, it was found that T2-deficient patients with mild genotype are common, and typical profiles were not identified on these analyses. Based on a clinical study of ketone body utilization disorders both in Japan and worldwide, we have developed guidelines for disease diagnosis and treatment. These diseases are treatable by avoiding fasting and by providing early infusion of glucose, which enable the patients to grow without sequelae. PMID:25559898

  1. Carboxylic acid free novel isocyanide-based reactions.

    PubMed

    Soeta, Takahiro; Ukaji, Yutaka

    2014-02-01

    In order to develop a practical method for the construction of drug-like and heterocyclic compounds, we have designed a novel Passerini- or Ugi-type reaction system where a compound (which we write in the general form as Z-X) composed of an electrophilic (Z) and a nucleophilic group (X) could essentially perform the same function as the carboxylic acid. Based on this concept, we have developed the O-silylative Passerini reaction and the borinic acid catalyzed α-addition of isocyanides to aldehydes and water. In addition, we have designed and demonstrated the addition reaction of isocyanides to nitrones in the presence of TMSCl to afford the corresponding 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-1-carboxyamides. Furthermore, a novel [5 + 1] cycloaddition of isocyanide was explored with C,N-cyclic N'-acyl azomethine imines as a "1,5-dipole" via a strategy involving intramolecular trapping of the isocyanide.

  2. Purification, characterization, and properties of an aryl aldehyde oxidoreductase from Nocardia sp. strain NRRL 5646.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Rosazza, J P

    1997-06-01

    An aryl aldehyde oxidoreductase from Nocardia sp. strain NRRL 5646 was purified 196-fold by a combination of Mono-Q, Reactive Green 19 agarose affinity, and hydroxyapatite chromatographies. The purified enzyme runs as a single band of 140 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular mass was estimated to be 163 +/- 3.8 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that this enzyme is a monomeric protein. The binding of the enzyme to Reactive Green 19 agarose was Mg2+ dependent. The binding capacity was estimated to be about 0.2 mg of Reactive Green agarose per ml in the presence of 10 mM MgCl2. This enzyme can catalyze the reduction of a wide range of aryl carboxylic acids, including substituted benzoic acids, phenyl-substituted aliphatic acids, heterocyclic carboxylic acids, and polyaromatic ring carboxylic acids, to produce the corresponding aldehydes. The Km values for benzoate, ATP, and NADPH were determined to be 645 +/- 75, 29.3 +/- 3.1, and 57.3 +/- 12.5 microM, respectively. The Vmax was determined to be 0.902 +/- 0.04 micromol/min/mg of protein. Km values for (S)-(+)-alpha-methyl-4-(2-methylpropyl)-benzeneacetic acid (ibuprofen) and its (R)-(-) isomer were determined to be 155 +/- 18 and 34.5 +/- 2.5 microM, respectively. The Vmax for the (S)-(+) and (R)-(-) isomers were 1.33 and 0.15 micromol/min/mg of protein, respectively. Anthranilic acid is a competitive inhibitor with benzoic acid as a substrate, with a Ki of 261 +/- 30 microM. The N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of a 76-kDa peptide from limited alpha-chymotrypsin digestion were determined.

  3. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a)...

  4. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a)...

  5. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methyl isobutyl ketone. 21.117 Section 21.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a)...

  6. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL ETHYL KETONE (2003 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, "Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)". The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  7. Production of methyl-vinyl ketone from levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; West; Ryan M.

    2011-06-14

    A method for converting levulinic acid to methyl vinyl ketone is described. The method includes the steps of reacting an aqueous solution of levulinic acid, over an acid catalyst, at a temperature of from room temperature to about 1100 K. Methyl vinyl ketone is thereby formed.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) test system is a device intended to identify ketones in urine and other body fluids. Identification of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  12. Reduction of aldehydes and ketones by transition-metal hydrides. 1. Reaction of trans,trans-WH(CO){sub 2}(NO)(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2} with simple and phenoxy-functionalized aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    van der Zeijden, A.A.H.; Bosch, H.W.; Berke, H.

    1992-06-01

    The tungsten complex, trans, trans-WH(CO){sub 2}(NO)(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2} reacts with propanol, benzaldehyde, salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, methyl salicylate, and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde to yield insertion products. The reactions and their products were studied by IR, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Structures of selected products were discussed. 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  13. Artificial photosynthesis of. beta. -ketocarboxylic acids from carbon dioxide and ketones via enolate complexes of aluminum porphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Yasuhiro; Aida, Takuzo; Inoue, Shohei )

    1989-04-12

    Photochemical fixation of carbon dioxide is of much interest in connection with biological photosynthesis by green plants as well as from the viewpoint of carbon resource utilization. One of the important steps in the assimilation of carbon dioxide is the carboxylation of a carbonyl compound into ketocarboxylic acid, where the reaction proceeds via an enolate species as reactive intermediate. For example, in four carbon (C{sub 4}) pathway and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) processes, pyruvate is converted with the aid of ATP into phosphoenolpyruvate, which is subsequently carboxylated to give oxaloacetate by the action of pyruvate carboxylase. In relation to this interesting biological process, some artificial systems have been exploited for the synthesis of {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid derivatives from carbon dioxide and ketones using nucleophiles such as metal carbonates, thiazolates, phenolates, alkoxides, and strong organic as well as inorganic basis, which promote the enolization of ketones in the intermediate step. We wish to report here a novel, visible light-induced fixation of carbon dioxide with the enolate complex of aluminum porphyrin, giving {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid under mild conditions.

  14. Organic and petroleum chemistry for nonchemists

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerling, L.

    1981-01-01

    A nontechnical book dealing with organic and petroleum chemistry is presented. The contents include: elements and compounds; hydrocarbons; equations; alcohols and phenols; aldehydes; ketones; carboxylic acids; esters; acid halides; amides, and anhydrides; petroleum; and a glossary of compounds. (JMT)

  15. ALCOHOL OXIDATION - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alco...

  16. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS - COMPARING DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alc...

  17. A sulfonated poly (aryl ether ether ketone ketone) isomer: synthesis and DMFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Liu, Baijun; Hu, Wei; Jiang, Zhenhua; Robertson, Gilles; Guiver, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A sulfonated poly(aryl ether ether ketone ketone) (PEEKK) having a well-defined rigid homopolymer-like chemical structure was synthesized from a readily-prepared PEEKK post-sulfonation with concentrated sulfuric acid at room temperature within several hours. The polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) cast from the resulting polymer exhibited an excellent combination of thermal resistance, oxidative and dimensional stability, low methanol fuel permeability and high proton conductivity. Furthermore, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were successfully fabricated and good direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance was observed. At 2 M MeOH feed, the current density at 0.5 V reached 165 mA/cm, which outperformed our reported analogues and eveluated Nafion membranes.

  18. Reversible Interconversion between Alkanes, Alkenes, Alcohols and Ketones under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, J.; Hartnett, H. E.; Gould, I. R.; Shock, E.; Williams, L. B.

    2011-12-01

    Many transformation reactions involving hydrocarbons that occur in deep sedimentary systems and determine petroleum compositions occur in the presence of H2O. Hydrothermal transformations of organic material are thought to provide carbon sources for microbes in deep ocean sediments. Hydrothermal conditions may also mimic the conditions where life developed on an early Earth. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of hydrothermal organic reactions, including ways in which various reactions are interrelated and how reactions compete with each other. It can be argued that metastable equilibrium states develop over geological timescales and at geochemically relevant temperatures, suggesting that reactions occur under thermodynamic rather than kinetic control. The extent to which reactions are reversible, and how product distributions are determined, are primary tests of the metastable equilibrium model. Seewald (2001, GCA 65, 1641-1664) showed that under hydrothermal conditions and in the presence of a redox buffer, simple alkanes and alkenes undergo oxidation, reduction, and hydration reactions. He proposed a reaction scheme where alkanes interconvert with alkenes, followed by stepwise hydration of alkenes to alcohols, oxidation to ketones, and finally conversion to carboxylic acids, which can undergo decarboxylation. Here we describe experiments that further develop the scope of these functional group interconversions, determine relative reaction kinetics, and provide insight into competing reactions. Hydrothermal experiments were performed at 300°C and 100 MPa in gold capsules for 12 to 144 hours. The reactant structures were based on cyclohexane with one and two methyl groups that served as regio- and stereochemical markers for the reactions. Starting with the alkanes, the observed products include the corresponding alkenes, alcohols, ketones and enones, in support of the Seewald reaction scheme. Our experiments add a branch to this scheme

  19. Metal-Catalysed Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Štefane, Bogdan; Požgan, Franc

    2016-04-01

    We highlight recent developments of catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketones promoted by transition metals, while placing it within its historical context. Since optically active secondary alcohols are important building blocks in fine chemicals synthesis, the focus of this review is devoted to chiral catalyst types which are capable of inducing high stereoselectivities. Ruthenium complexes still represent the largest part of the catalysts, but other metals (e.g. Fe) are rapidly penetrating this field. While homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts in some cases approach enzymatic performance, the interest in heterogeneous catalysts is constantly growing because of their reusability. Despite excellent activity, selectivity and compatibility of metal complexes with a variety of functional groups, no universal catalysts exist. Development of future catalyst systems is directed towards reaching as high as possible activity with low catalyst loadings, using "greener" conditions, and being able to operate under mild conditions and in a highly selective manner for a broad range of substrates. PMID:27573143

  20. Revisiting the Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley Reduction: A Sustainable Protocol for Transfer Hydrogenation of Aldehydes and Ketones

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metal-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds has received much interest because of the immense number of opportunities that exist to prepare high-value products. This reaction is featured in numerous multi-step organic syntheses and is arguably the most import...

  1. Determination of aldehydes and ketones with high atmospheric reactivity on diesel exhaust using a biofuel from animal fats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, R.; Monedero, E.; Guillén-Flores, J.

    2011-05-01

    Biodiesel from animal fats appears as an alternative for conventional diesel in automotive consumption. Animal fats are classified into three categories, although only one of them can be used for biodiesel production, according to regulation. Due to its novelty, researchers testing animal-fat biodiesel on diesel engines focus only on regulated emissions. In this paper, the experiments carried out analyze carbonyl compounds emissions, due to its highly atmospheric reactivity, to complete the characterization of the total emissions in this kind of biofuel. Two fuels, a reference petro-diesel and a pure animal-fat biodiesel, were tested in a 4-cylinder, direct injection, diesel engine Nissan Euro 5 M1D-Bk. Samples were collected in 4 different operating modes and 3 points along the exhaust line. The analyses of samples were made in a high performance liquid chromatography, following the method recommended by the CARB to analyze air quality. Results show, on the one hand, a significant rise in carbonyl emissions, almost three times at the mode with highest hydrocarbon emissions, when biodiesel is used. On the other hand, on average, a reduction of 90% of carbonyl emissions when exhaust gases go through the different post-treatment systems installed. Despite this reduction, specific reactivity does not decrease substantially.

  2. Neurotoxicity of reactive aldehydes: the concept of "aldehyde load" as demonstrated by neuroprotection with hydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Wood, Paul L; Khan, M Amin; Kulow, Sarah R; Mahmood, Siddique A; Moskal, Joseph R

    2006-06-20

    The concept of "oxidative stress" has become a mainstay in the field of neurodegeneration but has failed to differentiate critical events from epiphenomena and sequalae. Furthermore, the translation of current concepts of neurodegenerative mechanisms into effective therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases has been meager and disappointing. A corollary of current concepts of "oxidative stress" is that of "aldehyde load". This relates to the production of reactive aldehydes that covalently modify proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates and activate apoptotic pathways. However, reactive aldehydes can also be generated by mechanisms other than "oxidative stress". We therefore hypothesized that agents that can chemically neutralize reactive aldehydes should demonstrate superior neuroprotective actions to those of free radical scavengers. To this end, we evaluated hydroxylamines as aldehyde-trapping agents in an in vitro model of neurodegeneration induced by the reactive aldehyde, 3-aminopropanal (3-AP), a product of polyamine oxidase metabolism of spermine and spermidine. In this model, the hydroxylamines N-benzylhydroxylamine, cyclohexylhydroxylamine and t-butylhydroxylamine were shown to protect, in a concentration-dependent manner, against 3-AP neurotoxicity. Additionally, a therapeutic window of 3 h was demonstrated for delayed administration of the hydroxylamines. In contrast, the free radical scavengers TEMPO and TEMPONE and the anti-oxidant ascorbic acid were ineffective in this model. Extending these tissue culture findings in vivo, we examined the actions of N-benzylhydroxylamine in the trimethyltin (TMT) rat model of hippocampal CA3 neurodegeneration. This model involves augmented polyamine metabolism resulting in the generation of reactive aldehydes that compromise mitochondrial integrity. In the rat TMT model, NBHA (50 mg/kg, sc, daily) provided 100% protection against neurodegeneration, as reflected by measurements of KCl-evoked glutamate

  3. 1-Azaniumylcyclobutane-1-carboxylate monohydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butcher, Ray J.; Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S.; Dworkin, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, C5H9NO2H2O, the amino acid is in the usual zwitterionic form involving the carboxylate group. The cyclobutane backbone of the amino acid is disordered over two conformations, with occupancies of 0.882 (7) and0.118 (7). In the crystal, NH O and OH O hydrogen bonds link the zwitterions [with the water molecule involved as both acceptor (with the NH3+) and donor (through a single carboxylate O from two different aminocyclobutane carboxylatemoities)], resulting in a two-dimensional layered structure lying parallel to (100).

  4. Engineering of Bacterial Methyl Ketone Synthesis for Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Ee-Been; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered Escherichia coli to overproduce saturated and monounsaturated aliphatic methyl ketones in the C11 to C15 (diesel) range; this group of methyl ketones includes 2-undecanone and 2-tridecanone, which are of importance to the flavor and fragrance industry and also have favorable cetane numbers (as we report here). We describe specific improvements that resulted in a 700-fold enhancement in methyl ketone titer relative to that of a fatty acid-overproducing E. coli strain, including the following: (i) overproduction of β-ketoacyl coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters achieved by modification of the β-oxidation pathway (specifically, overexpression of a heterologous acyl-CoA oxidase and native FadB and chromosomal deletion of fadA) and (ii) overexpression of a native thioesterase (FadM). FadM was previously associated with oleic acid degradation, not methyl ketone synthesis, but outperformed a recently identified methyl ketone synthase (Solanum habrochaites MKS2 [ShMKS2], a thioesterase from wild tomato) in β-ketoacyl-CoA-overproducing strains tested. Whole-genome transcriptional (microarray) studies led to the discovery that FadM is a valuable catalyst for enhancing methyl ketone production. The use of a two-phase system with decane enhanced methyl ketone production by 4- to 7-fold in addition to increases from genetic modifications. PMID:22038610

  5. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst.

  6. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-01

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  7. One-Pot Amide Bond Formation from Aldehydes and Amines via a Photoorganocatalytic Activation of Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Giorgos N; Kokotos, Christoforos G

    2016-08-19

    A mild, one-pot, and environmentally friendly synthesis of amides from aldehydes and amines is described. Initially, a photoorganocatalytic reaction of aldehydes with di-isopropyl azodicarboxylate leads to an intermediate carbonyl imide, which can react with a variety of amines to afford the desired amides. The initial visible light-mediated activation of a variety of monosubstituted or disubstituted aldehydes is usually fast, occurring in a few hours. Following the photocatalytic reaction, addition of the primary amine at room temperature or the secondary amine at elevated temperatures leads to the corresponding amide from moderate to excellent yields without epimerization. This methodology was applied in the synthesis of Moclobemide, a drug against depression and social anxiety. PMID:27227271

  8. Point-of-Care Glucose and Ketone Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chong, Siew Kim; Reineke, Erica L

    2016-03-01

    Early and rapid identification of hypo- and hyperglycemia as well as ketosis is essential for the practicing veterinarian as these conditions can be life threatening and require emergent treatment. Point-of-care testing for both glucose and ketone is available for clinical use and it is important for the veterinarian to understand the limitations and potential sources of error with these tests. This article discusses the devices used to monitor blood glucose including portable blood glucose meters, point-of-care blood gas analyzers and continuous glucose monitoring systems. Ketone monitoring options discussed include the nitroprusside reagent test strips and the 3-β-hydroxybutyrate ketone meter. PMID:27451045

  9. Field investigations on the snow chemistry in central and southern california—II. Carbonyls and carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunz, Dieter W.; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    Snow samples from central and southern California were collected during the winter of 1987-1988 from there storms and analyzed for carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids. Approximately 90% of the samples contained total aldehyde concentrations up to 40 μM. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant aldehydes observed; secondary aldehydes included glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and benzaldehyde. The highest aldehyde concentrations were observed in snow collected in areas where deciduous and coniferous forests are widespread. However, these aldehydes can be attributed also in part to primary and secondary products of anthropogenic activities. Formic and acetic were analyzed in all measured samples with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 4.9 μM for HCOOH and from <0.3 to 13.4 μM for CH 3COOH. Maximum contribution of organic acids to precipitation-free acidity, calculated by assuming that the only sources of the measured formate and acetate were their respective acid forms, averaged 43.1% for samples with a pH⩽5. A consistent correlation between NH 4+ and acetate was found. [CH 3COOH] exceeded [HCOOH] in about 50% of the samples with the highest levels for CH 3COOH measured in cores collected from lower elevated locations adjacent to the Los Angeles basin. Results presented in this paper suggest that dry deposition and/or scavenging of carbonyl compounds and organic acids to snow may be important sinks for these compounds.

  10. Oxidative acetoxylation of the silyl ethers of ketone enols

    SciTech Connect

    Brunovlenskaya, I.I.; Kusainova, K.M.; Kashin, A.K.

    1988-07-20

    The authors studied the reaction of (dicarboxyiodo)benzenes with the trimethylsilyl ethers of ketone enols having various structures. They also undertook a comparative investigation of the oxidation of these compounds with lead tetraacetate. The reaction of (diacetoxyiodo)benzene with the trimethylsilyl ethers of ketone enols takes place with retention of the (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si group in two directions, i.e., substitution of the vinylic hydrogen or diacetoxylation of the double bond. The reaction can be used for the regioselective synthesis of /alpha/-acetoxy ketones, since the trimethylsilyl group is readily eliminated from the obtained products by the action of fluoride ion or boron trifluoride etherate with the formation of the corresponding substituted ketones.

  11. 27 CFR 21.117 - Methyl isobutyl ketone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.117 Methyl isobutyl ketone. (a) Acidity (as acetic acid). 0.02 percent by weight, maximum. (b)...

  12. Synthesis of Normorphans through an Efficient Intramolecular Carbamoylation of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Diaba, Faïza; Montiel, Juan A; Serban, Georgeta; Bonjoch, Josep

    2015-08-01

    An unexpected C-C bond cleavage was observed in trichloroacetamide-tethered ketones under amine treatment and exploited to develop a new synthesis of normophans from 4-amidocyclohexanones. The reaction involves an unprecedented intramolecular haloform-type reaction of trichloroacetamides promoted by enamines (generated in situ from ketones) as counter-reagents. The methodology was applied to the synthesis of compounds embodying the 6-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane framework.

  13. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  14. Rotational Spectroscopy of Methyl Vinyl Ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Motiyenko, R. A.; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.

    2015-06-01

    Methyl vinyl ketone, MVK, along with previously studied by our team methacrolein, is a major oxidation product of isoprene, which is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. In this talk we present the analysis of the rotational spectrum of MVK recorded at room temperature in the 50 -- 650 GHz region using the Lille spectrometer. The spectroscopic characterization of MVK ground state will be useful in the detailed analysis of high resolution infrared spectra. Our study is supported by high level quantum chemical calculations to model the structure of the two stable s-trans and s-cis conformers and to obtain the harmonic force field parameters, internal rotation barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. In the Doppler-limited spectra the splittings due to the internal rotation of methyl group are resolved, therefore for analysis of this molecule we used the Rho-Axis-Method Hamiltonian and RAM36 code to fit the rotational transitions. At the present time the ground state of two conformers is analyzed. Also we intend to study some low lying excited states. The analysis is in progress and the latest results will be presented. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged.

  15. Toward the Complete Characterization of Atmospheric Organic Particulate Matter: Derivatization and Two-Dimensional Comprehensive Gas Chromatography/Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry as a Method for the Determination of Carboxylic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, Alexandra Jeanne

    Understanding the composition of atmospheric organic particulate matter (OPM) is essential for predicting its effects on climate, air quality, and health. However, the polar oxygenated fraction (PO-OPM), which includes a significant mass contribution from carboxylic acids, is difficult to speciate and quantitatively determine by current analytical methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The method of chemical derivatization and two-dimensional GC with time of flight MS (GCxGC/TOF-MS) was examined in this study for its efficacy in: 1) quantifying a high percentage of the total organic carbon (TOC) mass of a sample containing PO-OPM; 2) quantitatively determining PO-OPM components including carboxylic acids at atmospherically relevant concentrations; and 3) tentatively identifying PO-OPM components. Two derivatization reagent systems were used in this study: BF3/butanol for the butylation of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, and acidic ketones, and BSTFA for the trimethylsilylation (TMS) of carboxylic acids and alcohols. Three alpha-pinene ozonolysis OPM filter samples and a set of background filter samples were collected by collaborators in a University of California, Riverside environmental chamber. Derivatization/GCxGC TOF-MS was used to tentatively identify some previously unidentified α-pinene ozonolysis products, and also to show the characteristics of all oxidation products determined. Derivatization efficiencies as measured were 40-70% for most butyl derivatives, and 50-58% for most trimethylsilyl derivatives. A thermal optical method was used to measure the TOC on each filter, and a value of the quantifiable TOC mass using a gas chromatograph was calculated for each sample using GCxGC separation and the mass-sensitive response of a flame ionization detector (FID). The TOC quantified using TMS and GCxGC-FID (TMS/TOCGCxGC FID) accounted for 15-23% of the TOC measured by the thermal-optical method. Using TMS and GCxGC/TOF-MS, 8.85% of the

  16. β-Keto esters from ketones and ethyl chloroformate: a rapid, general, efficient synthesis of pyrazolones and their antimicrobial, in silico and in vitro cytotoxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pyrazolones are traditionally synthesized by the reaction of β-keto esters with hydrazine and its derivatives. There are methods to synthesize β-keto esters from esters and aldehydes, but these methods have main limitation in varying the substituents. Often, there are a number of methods such as acylation of enolates in which a chelating effect has been employed to lock the enolate anion using lithium and magnesium salts; however, these methods suffer from inconsistent yields in the case of aliphatic acylation. There are methods to synthesize β-keto esters from ketones like caboxylation of ketone enolates using carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide sources in the presence of palladium or transition metal catalysts. Currently, the most general and simple method to synthesize β-keto ester is the reaction of dimethyl or ethyl carbonate with ketone in the presence of strong bases which also requires long reaction time, use of excessive amount of reagent and inconsistent yield. These factors lead us to develop a simple method to synthesize β-keto esters by changing the base and reagent. Results A series of β-keto esters were synthesized from ketones and ethyl chloroformate in the presence of base which in turn are converted to pyrazolones and then subjected to cytotoxicity studies towards various cancer cell lines and antimicrobial activity studies towards various bacterial and fungal strains. Conclusion The β-keto esters from ethyl chloroformate was successfully attempted, and the developed method is simple, fast and applicable to the ketones having the alkyl halogens, protecting groups like Boc and Cbz that were tolerated and proved to be useful in the synthesis of fused bicyclic and tricyclic pyrazolones efficiently using cyclic ketones. Since this method is successful for different ketones, it can be useful for the synthesis of pharmaceutically important pyrazolones also. The synthesized pyrazolones were subjected to antimicrobial, docking and

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Functional Classification of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) Gene Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Valverde, Francisco J.; Robles-Bolivar, Paula; Lima-Cabello, Elena; Gachomo, Emma W.; Kotchoni, Simeon O.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) is a protein superfamily that catalyzes the oxidation of aldehyde molecules into their corresponding non-toxic carboxylic acids, and responding to different environmental stresses, offering promising genetic approaches for improving plant adaptation. The aim of the current study is the functional analysis for systematic identification of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily. We performed genome-based ALDH genes identification and functional classification, phylogenetic relationship, structure and catalytic domains analysis, and microarray based gene expression. Twenty nine unique tomato ALDH sequences encoding 11 ALDH families were identified, including a unique member of the family 19 ALDH. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 13 groups, with a conserved relationship among ALDH families. Functional structure analysis of ALDH2 showed a catalytic mechanism involving Cys-Glu couple. However, the analysis of ALDH3 showed no functional gene duplication or potential neo-functionalities. Gene expression analysis reveals that particular ALDH genes might respond to wounding stress increasing the expression as ALDH2B7. Overall, this study reveals the complexity of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily and offers new insights into the structure-functional features and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. The functional characterization of ALDHs is valuable and promoting molecular breeding in tomato for the improvement of stress tolerance and signaling. PMID:27755582

  18. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  19. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed

    Perozich, J; Nicholas, H; Wang, B C; Lindahl, R; Hempel, J

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project.

  20. Catalyst-free dehydrative α-alkylation of ketones with alcohols: green and selective autocatalyzed synthesis of alcohols and ketones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Chen, Jianhui; Tian, Haiwen; Yuan, Xueqin; Li, Shuangyan; Zhou, Chongkuan; Liu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Direct dehydrative α-alkylation reactions of ketones with alcohols are now realized under simple, practical, and green conditions without using external catalysts. These catalyst-free autocatalyzed alkylation methods can efficiently afford useful alkylated ketone or alcohol products in a one-pot manner and on a large scale by CC bond formation of the in situ generated intermediates with subsequent controllable and selective Meerwein-Pondorf-Verley-Oppenauer-type redox processes.

  1. Aromatic aldehyde-catalyzed gas-phase decarboxylation of amino acid anion via imine intermediate: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zhang

    2013-10-01

    It is generally appreciated that carbonyl compound can promote the decarboxylation of the amino acid. In this paper, we have performed the experimental and theoretical investigation into the gas-phase decarboxylation of the amino acid anion catalyzed by the aromatic aldehyde via the imine intermediate on the basis of the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) technique and density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The results show that the aromatic aldehyde can achieve a remarkable catalytic effect. Moreover, the catalytic mechanism varies according to the type of amino acid: (i) The decarboxylation of α-amino acid anion is determined by the direct dissociation of the Csbnd C bond adjacent to the carboxylate, for the resulting carbanion can be well stabilized by the conjugation between α-carbon, Cdbnd N bond and benzene ring. (ii) The decarboxylation of non-α-amino acid anion proceeds via a SN2-like transition state, in which the dissociation of the Csbnd C bond adjacent to the carboxylate and attacking of the resulting carbanion to the Cdbnd N bond or benzene ring take place at the same time. Specifically, for β-alanine, the resulting carbanion preferentially attacks the benzene ring leading to the benzene anion, because attacking the Cdbnd N bond in the decarboxylation can produce the unstable three or four-membered ring anion. For the other non-α-amino acid anion, the Cdbnd N bond preferentially participates in the decarboxylation, which leads to the pediocratic nitrogen anion.

  2. Appearance of aldehydes in the surface layer of lake waters.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Agata; Nawrocki, Jacek; Szeląg-Wasielewska, Elżbieta

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents results concerning the changes in the content of aldehydes in samples of lake water collected near the lake surface. The study of lake waters was undertaken to explain which physicochemical parameters of the environment have the greatest influence on the level of aldehydes, which of the aldehydes are most often met in surface water and in what concentrations. We observed that formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and acetone were commonly present in surface water samples, while semi-volatile and poorly soluble aldehydes such as nonanal and decanal were observed seasonally. The contents of total aldehydes varied in a wide range, from 55 to 670 μg/l, and the concentration of total organic carbon varied significantly from 3 to 18 mg /l, but there was no evident correlation between them in all of samples. The total content of aldehydes did not depend on the meteorological parameters such as air temperature, UV radiation and ozone concentration; however, it was noted that the level of carbonyl concentration is related to the period of intense precipitation: in the period of very low precipitations, the highest contents of total aldehydes were determined in all of the water samples, and in the periods of intense precipitations, the content of total aldehydes was drastically smaller.

  3. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.639 - Amine aldehyde condensate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.639 Amine aldehyde condensate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an amine aldehyde condensate (PMN...

  5. Ketone body utilization drives tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously proposed that catabolic fibroblasts generate mitochondrial fuels (such as ketone bodies) to promote the anabolic growth of human cancer cells and their metastasic dissemination. We have termed this new paradigm “two-compartment tumor metabolism.” Here, we further tested this hypothesis by using a genetic approach. For this purpose, we generated hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts overexpressing the rate-limiting enzymes that promote ketone body production, namely BDH1 and HMGCS2. Similarly, we generated MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells overexpressing the key enzyme(s) that allow ketone body re-utilization, OXCT1/2 and ACAT1/2. Interestingly, our results directly show that ketogenic fibroblasts are catabolic and undergo autophagy, with a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) protein expression. Moreover, ketogenic fibroblasts increase the mitochondrial mass and growth of adjacent breast cancer cells. However, most importantly, ketogenic fibroblasts also effectively promote tumor growth, without a significant increase in tumor angiogenesis. Finally, MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing the enzyme(s) required for ketone re-utilization show dramatic increases in tumor growth and metastatic capacity. Our data provide the necessary genetic evidence that ketone body production and re-utilization drive tumor progression and metastasis. As such, ketone inhibitors should be designed as novel therapeutics to effectively treat advanced cancer patients, with tumor recurrence and metastatic disease. In summary, ketone bodies behave as onco-metabolites, and we directly show that the enzymes HMGCS2, ACAT1/2 and OXCT1/2 are bona fide metabolic oncogenes. PMID:23082722

  6. Ketone body utilization drives tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-11-01

    We have previously proposed that catabolic fibroblasts generate mitochondrial fuels (such as ketone bodies) to promote the anabolic growth of human cancer cells and their metastasic dissemination. We have termed this new paradigm "two-compartment tumor metabolism." Here, we further tested this hypothesis by using a genetic approach. For this purpose, we generated hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts overexpressing the rate-limiting enzymes that promote ketone body production, namely BDH1 and HMGCS2. Similarly, we generated MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells overexpressing the key enzyme(s) that allow ketone body re-utilization, OXCT1/2 and ACAT1/2. Interestingly, our results directly show that ketogenic fibroblasts are catabolic and undergo autophagy, with a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) protein expression. Moreover, ketogenic fibroblasts increase the mitochondrial mass and growth of adjacent breast cancer cells. However, most importantly, ketogenic fibroblasts also effectively promote tumor growth, without a significant increase in tumor angiogenesis. Finally, MDA-MB-231 cells overexpressing the enzyme(s) required for ketone re-utilization show dramatic increases in tumor growth and metastatic capacity. Our data provide the necessary genetic evidence that ketone body production and re-utilization drive tumor progression and metastasis. As such, ketone inhibitors should be designed as novel therapeutics to effectively treat advanced cancer patients, with tumor recurrence and metastatic disease. In summary, ketone bodies behave as onco-metabolites, and we directly show that the enzymes HMGCS2, ACAT1/2 and OXCT1/2 are bona fide metabolic oncogenes. PMID:23082722

  7. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE IN RAT: A COMPARISON OF LIVER AND LUNG DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism is one of the major determinants for age-related susceptibility changes to chemicals. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are important in aldehyd...

  8. Early stage composition of SOA produced by α-pinene/ozone reaction: α-Acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes and acidic dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Bartłomiej; Gierczak, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    Composition of the freshly formed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated by ozonolysis of cyclohexene, cyclohexene-d10 (model precursors) and α-pinene was studied using liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS2). SOA was generated in the flow-tube reactor under the following conditions: 22 ± 2 °C, 1 atm and reaction time was approx. 30 s. In an attempt to resolve the current ambiguities, regarding the structure of α-pinene SOA nucleating agents, analytical methods for analysis of α-acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes and oligomers containing carboxylic group were developed to study the potential nucleating agents. Negatively charged m/z 351, 341, 337, 357 and 367 ions corresponding to the acidic oligomers were detected in freshly formed α-pinene SOA. For the first time, structures and formation mechanism for compounds detected as m/z 337 and 351 ions were proposed. Based on the model precursor analysis (cyclohexene and cyclohexene-d10) it was concluded that these compounds were most likely formed via aldol reaction of the lower molecular weight aerosol components. α-Acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes were studied in the SOA samples using previously developed, novel method, based on the prediction of fragmentation spectrum for the compounds of interest. It was concluded that α-acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes were not formed in significant quantities. Based on the obtained results, possible SOA formation and growth mechanism is discussed.

  9. The Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The website http://www.aldh.org is a publicly available database for nomenclature and functional and molecular sequence information for members of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily for animals, plants, fungi and bacteria. The site has organised gene-specific records. It provides synopses of ALDH gene records, marries trivial terms to correct nomenclature and links global accession identifiers with source data. Server-side alignment software characterises the integrity of each sequence relative to the latest genomic assembly and provides identifier-specific detail reports, including a graphical presentation of the transcript's exon - intron structure, its size, coding sequence, genomic strand and locus. Also included are a summary of substrates, inhibitors and enzyme kinetics. The site provides reference lists and is designed to facilitate data mining by interested investigators. PMID:20038501

  10. New tyrosinase inhibitors, (+)-catechin-aldehyde polycondensates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Chung, Joo Eun; Kurisawa, Motoichi; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2004-01-01

    In this study, new tyrosinase inhibitors, (+)-catechin-aldehyde polycondensates, have been developed. Tyrosinase is a copper-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of a monophenol (monophenolase activity) and the oxidation of an o-diphenol (diphenolase activity). In the measurement of tyrosinase inhibition activity, (+)-catechin acted as substrate and cofactor of tyrosinase. On the other hand, the polycondensates inhibited the tyrosine hydroxylation and L-DOPA oxidation by chelation to the active site of tyrosinase. The UV-visible spectrum of a mixture of tyrosinase and the polycondensate exhibited a characteristic shoulder peak ascribed to the chelation of the polycondensate to the active site of tyrosinase. Furthermore, circular dichroism measurement showed a small red shift of the band due to the interaction between tyrosinase and the polycondensate. These data support that the polycondensate acts as an inhibitor of tyrosinase. PMID:15003008

  11. Reversible, partial inactivation of plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase by betaine aldehyde: mechanism and possible physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Murillo-Melo, Darío S; Mújica-Jiménez, Carlos; Montiel, Carmina; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2016-04-01

    In plants, the last step in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB) is the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of betaine aldehyde (BAL) catalysed by some aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 10 enzymes that exhibit betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity. Given the irreversibility of the reaction, the short-term regulation of these enzymes is of great physiological relevance to avoid adverse decreases in the NAD(+):NADH ratio. In the present study, we report that the Spinacia oleracea BADH (SoBADH) is reversibly and partially inactivated by BAL in the absence of NAD(+)in a time- and concentration-dependent mode. Crystallographic evidence indicates that the non-essential Cys(450)(SoBADH numbering) forms a thiohemiacetal with BAL, totally blocking the productive binding of the aldehyde. It is of interest that, in contrast to Cys(450), the catalytic cysteine (Cys(291)) did not react with BAL in the absence of NAD(+) The trimethylammonium group of BAL binds in the same position in the inactivating or productive modes. Accordingly, BAL does not inactivate the C(450)SSoBADH mutant and the degree of inactivation of the A(441)I and A(441)C mutants corresponds to their very different abilities to bind the trimethylammonium group. Cys(450)and the neighbouring residues that participate in stabilizing the thiohemiacetal are strictly conserved in plant ALDH10 enzymes with proven or predicted BADH activity, suggesting that inactivation by BAL is their common feature. Under osmotic stress conditions, this novel partial and reversible covalent regulatory mechanism may contribute to preventing NAD(+)exhaustion, while still permitting the synthesis of high amounts of GB and avoiding the accumulation of the toxic BAL.

  12. Stereoselective Reduction of Prochiral Ketones by Plant and Microbial Biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Javidnia, K; Faghih-Mirzaei, E; Miri, R; Attarroshan, M; Zomorodian, K

    2016-01-01

    Chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. The biocatalytic approach in asymmetric reduction of corresponding prochiral ketones to the preparation of these optically pure substances is one of the most promising routes. The stereoselective reduction of different kinds of prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants and microorganisms was studied in this work. Benzyl acetoacetate, methyl 3-oxopentanoate, ethyl 3-oxopentanoate, and ethyl butyryl acetate were chosen as the model substrates for β-ketoesters. Benzoyl acetonitrile, 3-chloro propiophenone, and 1-acetyl naphthalene were chosen as aromatic aliphatic ketones. Finally, 2-methyl benzophenone and 4-chloro benzophenone were selected as diaryl ketones. Plant catalysis was conducted by Daucus carota, Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, Pastinaca sativa, and Raphnus sativus. For microbial catalysis, Aspergillus foetidus, Penicillum citrinum, Saccharomyces carlbergensis, Pichia fermentans, and Rhodotrula glutinis were chosen. Chiral alcohols were obtained in high yields and with optical purity. A superiority in the microorganisms' performance in the bioreduction of prochiral ketones was detected. Among microorganisms, Rhodotrula glutinis showed remarkable results with nearly all substrates and is proposed for future studies.

  13. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  14. Stereoselective Reduction of Prochiral Ketones by Plant and Microbial Biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Javidnia, K; Faghih-Mirzaei, E; Miri, R; Attarroshan, M; Zomorodian, K

    2016-01-01

    Chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. The biocatalytic approach in asymmetric reduction of corresponding prochiral ketones to the preparation of these optically pure substances is one of the most promising routes. The stereoselective reduction of different kinds of prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants and microorganisms was studied in this work. Benzyl acetoacetate, methyl 3-oxopentanoate, ethyl 3-oxopentanoate, and ethyl butyryl acetate were chosen as the model substrates for β-ketoesters. Benzoyl acetonitrile, 3-chloro propiophenone, and 1-acetyl naphthalene were chosen as aromatic aliphatic ketones. Finally, 2-methyl benzophenone and 4-chloro benzophenone were selected as diaryl ketones. Plant catalysis was conducted by Daucus carota, Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, Pastinaca sativa, and Raphnus sativus. For microbial catalysis, Aspergillus foetidus, Penicillum citrinum, Saccharomyces carlbergensis, Pichia fermentans, and Rhodotrula glutinis were chosen. Chiral alcohols were obtained in high yields and with optical purity. A superiority in the microorganisms' performance in the bioreduction of prochiral ketones was detected. Among microorganisms, Rhodotrula glutinis showed remarkable results with nearly all substrates and is proposed for future studies. PMID:27168684

  15. Stereoselective Reduction of Prochiral Ketones by Plant and Microbial Biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Javidnia, K.; Faghih-Mirzaei, E.; Miri, R.; Attarroshan, M.; Zomorodian, K.

    2016-01-01

    Chiral alcohols are the key chiral building blocks to many enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. The biocatalytic approach in asymmetric reduction of corresponding prochiral ketones to the preparation of these optically pure substances is one of the most promising routes. The stereoselective reduction of different kinds of prochiral ketones catalyzed by various plants and microorganisms was studied in this work. Benzyl acetoacetate, methyl 3-oxopentanoate, ethyl 3-oxopentanoate, and ethyl butyryl acetate were chosen as the model substrates for β-ketoesters. Benzoyl acetonitrile, 3-chloro propiophenone, and 1-acetyl naphthalene were chosen as aromatic aliphatic ketones. Finally, 2-methyl benzophenone and 4-chloro benzophenone were selected as diaryl ketones. Plant catalysis was conducted by Daucus carota, Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, Pastinaca sativa, and Raphnus sativus. For microbial catalysis, Aspergillus foetidus, Penicillum citrinum, Saccharomyces carlbergensis, Pichia fermentans, and Rhodotrula glutinis were chosen. Chiral alcohols were obtained in high yields and with optical purity. A superiority in the microorganisms' performance in the bioreduction of prochiral ketones was detected. Among microorganisms, Rhodotrula glutinis showed remarkable results with nearly all substrates and is proposed for future studies. PMID:27168684

  16. Measurements of Oxygenated Organic Chemicals In the Pacific Troposphere During TRACE-P: Higher Aldehydes (less than C(sub 1)), Their Sources, and Potential Role In Atmospheric Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Viezee, W.; Fried, A.; Jackob, D.; Blake, D.; Heikes, B.; Talbot, R.; Sachse, G.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Airborne measurements of a large number of oxygenated organics were carried out in the Pacific troposphere (to 12 km) in the Spring of 2001 (Feb. 24-April 10). Specifically these measurements included acetaldehyde, propanaldehyde, acetone, methylethyl ketone, methanol, ethanol, PAM and organic nitrates. Independent measurements of formaldehyde, peroxides, and tracers were also available. Highly polluted as well as pristine air masses were sampled. Oxygenated organics were abundant in the clean In troposphere and were greatly enhanced in the outflow regions from Asia. Extremely high concentrations of aldehydes could be measured in the troposphere. It is not possible to explain the large abundances of aldehydes in the background troposphere without invoking significant oceanic sources. A strong correlation between the observed mixing ratios of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde is present. We infer that higher aldehydes (such as acetaldehyde and propanaldehyde) may provide a large source of formaldehyde and sequester Cox throughout the troposphere. The atmospheric behavior of acetone, methylethyl ketone, and methanol is generally indicative of their common terrestrial sources with a Image contribution from biomass/biofuel burning. A vast body of data has been collected and it is being analyzed both statistically and with the help of models to better understand the role that oxygenated organics play in the atmosphere and to unravel their sources and sinks. These results will be presented.

  17. HS-SPME determination of volatile carbonyl and carboxylic compounds in different matrices.

    PubMed

    Stashenko, Elena E; Mora, Amanda L; Cervantes, Martha E; Martínez, Jairo R

    2006-07-01

    Specific chromatographic methodologies are developed for the analysis of carboxylic acids (C(2)-C(6), benzoic) and aldehydes (C(2)-C(10)) of low molecular weight in diverse matrices, such as air, automotive exhaust gases, human breath, and aqueous matrices. For carboxylic acids, the method is based on their reaction with pentafluorobenzyl bromide in aqueous solution, followed by the separation and identification of the resultant pentafluorobenzyl esters by means of headspace (HS)-solid-phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography (GC) and electron capture detection (ECD). Detection limits in the microg/m(3) range are reached, with relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 10% and linear response (R(2) > 0.99) over two orders of magnitude. The analytical methodology for aldehydes is based on SPME with simultaneous derivatization of the analytes on the fiber, by reaction with pentafluorophenylhydrazine. The derivatization reagent is previously deposited on the SPME fiber, which is then exposed to the gaseous matrix or the HS of the sample solution. The pentafluorophenyl hydrazones formed on the fiber are analyzed selectively by means of GC-ECD, with detection limits in the ng/m(3) range, RSD less than 10%, and linear response (R(2) > 0.99) over two orders of magnitude.

  18. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  19. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  20. Synthesis and Applications of iso-Hajos–Parrish Ketones**

    PubMed Central

    Eagan, James M.; Hori, Masahiro; Wu, Jianbin; Kanyiva, Kyalo Stephen; Snyder, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous natural products possess ring systems and functionality for which “iso-Hajos–Parrish” ketones would be of value, such building blocks have not been exploited to the same degree as the more typical Hajos–Parrish hydrindane. Herein we outline an efficient three-step synthesis of such materials fueled by a simple method for the rapid preparation of highly functionalized cyclopentenones, several of which are new chemical entities that would be challenging to access through other approaches. We then show how one iso-Hajos–Parrish ketone can be converted into two distinct natural product analogs as well as one natural product. As one indication of the value of these new building blocks, that latter target was obtained in 10 steps, having previously been accessed in 18 steps using the Hajos–Parrish ketone. PMID:25974879

  1. Expressional studies of the aldehyde oxidase (AOX1) gene during myogenic differentiation in C2C12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kamli, Majid Rasool; Kim, Jihoe; Pokharel, Smritee; Jan, Arif Tasleem; Lee, Eun Ju; Choi, Inho

    2014-08-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs), which catalyze the hydroxylation of heterocycles and oxidation of a wide variety of aldehydic compounds, have been present throughout evolution from bacteria to humans. While humans have only a single functional aldehyde oxidase (AOX1) gene, rodents are endowed with four AOXs; AOX1 and three aldehyde oxidase homologs (AOH1, AOH2 and AOH3). In continuation of our previous study conducted to identify genes differentially expressed during myogenesis using a microarray approach, we investigated AOX1 with respect to its role in myogenesis to conceptualize how it is regulated in C2C12 cells. The results obtained were validated by silencing of the AOX1 gene. Analysis of their fusion index revealed that formation of myotubes showed a marked reduction of up to 40% in AOX1kd cells. Expression of myogenin (MYOG), one of the marker genes used to study myogenesis, was also found to be reduced in AOX1kd cells. AOX1 is an enzyme of pharmacological and toxicological importance that metabolizes numerous xenobiotics to their respective carboxylic acids. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced as a by-product in this reaction is considered to be involved as a part of the signaling mechanism during differentiation. An observed reduction in the level of H2O2 among AOX1kd cells confirmed production of H2O2 in the reaction catalyzed by AOX1. Taken together, these findings suggest that AOX1 acts as a contributor to the process of myogenesis by influencing the level of H2O2.

  2. Expressional studies of the aldehyde oxidase (AOX1) gene during myogenic differentiation in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamli, Majid Rasool; Kim, Jihoe; Pokharel, Smritee; Jan, Arif Tasleem; Lee, Eun Ju; Choi, Inho

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • AOX1 contributes to the formation of myotube. • Silencing of AOX1 reduces myotube formation. • AOX1 regulates MyoG gene expression. • AOX1 contributes to myogenesis via H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Abstract: Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs), which catalyze the hydroxylation of heterocycles and oxidation of a wide variety of aldehydic compounds, have been present throughout evolution from bacteria to humans. While humans have only a single functional aldehyde oxidase (AOX1) gene, rodents are endowed with four AOXs; AOX1 and three aldehyde oxidase homologs (AOH1, AOH2 and AOH3). In continuation of our previous study conducted to identify genes differentially expressed during myogenesis using a microarray approach, we investigated AOX1 with respect to its role in myogenesis to conceptualize how it is regulated in C2C12 cells. The results obtained were validated by silencing of the AOX1 gene. Analysis of their fusion index revealed that formation of myotubes showed a marked reduction of up to 40% in AOX1{sub kd} cells. Expression of myogenin (MYOG), one of the marker genes used to study myogenesis, was also found to be reduced in AOX1{sub kd} cells. AOX1 is an enzyme of pharmacological and toxicological importance that metabolizes numerous xenobiotics to their respective carboxylic acids. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) produced as a by-product in this reaction is considered to be involved as a part of the signaling mechanism during differentiation. An observed reduction in the level of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} among AOX1{sub kd} cells confirmed production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the reaction catalyzed by AOX1. Taken together, these findings suggest that AOX1 acts as a contributor to the process of myogenesis by influencing the level of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  3. Possible role of alteration of aldehyde's scavenger enzymes during aging.

    PubMed

    Davydov, Vadim V; Dobaeva, Nataly M; Bozhkov, Anatoly I

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis in tissues is induced by different kind of signals including endogenous aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxy-2, 3-nonenal. The accumulation rate of aldehydes in the cell is affected by conditions of oxidative stress. In the cell, aldehydes can be metabolized by various isoforms of aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase. There is evidence suggesting that the catalytic properties of these enzymes change during ontogenesis, and that aging is accompanied by their reduced activities. These functional changes may contribute substantially to the alteration in the organism sensitivity to damaging action of stress factors during aging, to age-related modulation of the action of endogenous aldehydes as a signal for apoptosis, and finally, to the origin of diseases associated with aging. In this context, the stimulation of enzymes' expression, and the activation of the catalytic properties of enzymes responsible for catabolism of endogenous aldehydes could become a perspective direction in increasing the organism resistance to the action of damaging factors during aging.

  4. Obligate role for ketone body oxidation in neonatal metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cotter, David G; d'Avignon, D André; Wentz, Anna E; Weber, Mary L; Crawford, Peter A

    2011-03-01

    To compensate for the energetic deficit elicited by reduced carbohydrate intake, mammals convert energy stored in ketone bodies to high energy phosphates. Ketone bodies provide fuel particularly to brain, heart, and skeletal muscle in states that include starvation, adherence to low carbohydrate diets, and the neonatal period. Here, we use novel Oxct1(-/-) mice, which lack the ketolytic enzyme succinyl-CoA:3-oxo-acid CoA-transferase (SCOT), to demonstrate that ketone body oxidation is required for postnatal survival in mice. Although Oxct1(-/-) mice exhibit normal prenatal development, all develop ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, and reduced plasma lactate concentrations within the first 48 h of birth. In vivo oxidation of (13)C-labeled β-hydroxybutyrate in neonatal Oxct1(-/-) mice, measured using NMR, reveals intact oxidation to acetoacetate but no contribution of ketone bodies to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Accumulation of acetoacetate yields a markedly reduced β-hydroxybutyrate:acetoacetate ratio of 1:3, compared with 3:1 in Oxct1(+) littermates. Frequent exogenous glucose administration to actively suckling Oxct1(-/-) mice delayed, but could not prevent, lethality. Brains of newborn SCOT-deficient mice demonstrate evidence of adaptive energy acquisition, with increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase α, increased autophagy, and 2.4-fold increased in vivo oxidative metabolism of [(13)C]glucose. Furthermore, [(13)C]lactate oxidation is increased 1.7-fold in skeletal muscle of Oxct1(-/-) mice but not in brain. These results indicate the critical metabolic roles of ketone bodies in neonatal metabolism and suggest that distinct tissues exhibit specific metabolic responses to loss of ketone body oxidation. PMID:21209089

  5. Enantioselective Organocatalytic α-Fluorination of Cyclic Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Beeson, Teresa D.; Conrad, Jay C.

    2011-01-01

    The first highly enantioselective α-fluorination of ketones using organocatalysis has been accomplished. The long-standing problem of enantioselective ketone α-fluorination via enamine activation has been overcome via high-throughput evaluation of a new library of amine catalysts. The optimal system, a primary amine functionalized Cinchona alkaloid, allows the direct and asymmetric α-fluorination of a variety of carbo- and heterocyclic substrates. Furthermore, this protocol also provides diastereo-, regio- and chemoselective catalyst control in fluorinations involving complex carbonyl systems. PMID:21247133

  6. Catalytic Intramolecular Ketone Alkylation with Olefins by Dual Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee Nam; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-12-01

    Two complementary methods for catalytic intramolecular ketone alkylation reactions with unactivated olefins, resulting in Conia-ene-type reactions, are reported. The transformations are enabled by dual activation of both the ketone and the olefin and are atom-economical as stoichiometric oxidants or reductants are not required. Assisted by Kool's aniline catalyst, the reaction conditions can be both pH- and redox-neutral. A broad range of functional groups are thus tolerated. Whereas the rhodium catalysts are effective for the formation of five-membered rings, a ruthenium-based system that affords the six-membered ring products was also developed.

  7. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities.

  8. A novel sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and cross-linked membranes for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongtao; Zhang, Gang; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Chengji; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Ke; Han, Miaomiao; Lin, Haidan; Zhu, Jing; Na, Hui

    A novel poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) containing pendant carboxyl groups has been synthesized by a nucleophilic polycondensation reaction. Sulfonated polymers (SPEEKs) with different ion exchange capacity are then obtained by post-sulfonation process. The structures of PEEK and SPEEKs are characterized by both FT-IR and 1H NMR. The properties of SPEEKs as candidates for proton exchange membranes are studied. The cross-linking reaction is performed at 140 °C using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as the cross-linker. In comparison with the non-cross-linked membranes, some properties of the cross-linked membranes are significantly improved, such as water uptake, methanol resistance, mechanical and oxidative stabilities, while the proton conductivity decreases. The effect of PVA content on proton conductivity, water uptake, swelling ratio, and methanol permeability is also investigated. Among all the membranes, SPEEK-C-8 shows the highest selectivity of 50.5 × 10 4 S s cm -3, which indicates that it is a suitable candidate for applications in direct methanol fuel cells.

  9. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  10. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  11. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  12. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  13. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  14. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  15. Molecular Structure and Reactivity in the Pyrolysis of Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sias, Eric; Cole, Sarah; Sowards, John; Warner, Brian; Wright, Emily; McCunn, Laura R.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of alkyl chain structure on pyrolysis mechanisms has been investigated in a series of aldehydes. Isovaleraldehyde, CH_3CH(CH_3)CH_2CHO, and pivaldehyde, (CH_3)_3CCHO, were subject to thermal decomposition in a resistively heated SiC tubular reactor at 800-1200 °C. Matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify pyrolysis products. Carbon monoxide and isobutene were major products from each of the aldehydes, which is consistent with what is known from previous studies of unbranched alkyl-chain aldehydes. Other products observed include vinyl alcohol, propene, acetylene, and ethylene, revealing complexities to be considered in the pyrolysis of large, branched-chain aldehydes.

  16. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  17. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10417 - Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10417 Biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (generic) (P-11-338). (a... generically as biphenyl alkyl morpholino ketone (PMN P-11-338) is subject to reporting under this section...

  20. Extractive recovery of phenol and p-alkylphenols from aqueous solutions with hydrophobic ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Korenman, Ya.I.; Ermolaeva, T.N.; Podolina, E.A.

    1994-03-10

    Aliphatic and cyclic hydrophobic ketones were used for extractive recovery of phenol and p-alkylphenols from aqueous solutions, giving a 95-98% extraction of toxicants under the recommended conditions. The extracting agents were cyclohexanone, methylcyclohexanone, butyl methyl ketone, and isobutyl methyl ketone.

  1. Utility of ketone measurement in the prevention, diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Misra, S; Oliver, N S

    2015-01-01

    Ketone measurement is advocated for the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and assessment of its severity. Assessing the evidence base for ketone measurement in clinical practice is challenging because multiple methods are available but there is a lack of consensus about which is preferable. Evaluating the utility of ketone measurement is additionally problematic because of variability in the biochemical definition of ketoacidosis internationally and in the proposed thresholds for ketone measures. This has led to conflicting guidance from expert bodies on how ketone measurement should be used in the management of ketoacidosis. The development of point-of-care devices that can reliably measure the capillary blood ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) has widened the spectrum of applications of ketone measurement, but whether the evidence base supporting these applications is robust enough to warrant their incorporation into routine clinical practice remains unclear. The imprecision of capillary blood ketone measures at higher values, the lack of availability of routine laboratory-based assays for BOHB and the continued cost-effectiveness of urine ketone assessment prompt further discussion on the role of capillary blood ketone assessment in ketoacidosis. In the present article, we review the various existing methods of ketone measurement, the precision of capillary blood ketone as compared with other measures, its diagnostic accuracy in predicting ketoacidosis and other clinical applications including prevention, assessment of severity and resolution of ketoacidosis.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1435 - Ketones (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketones (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1435 Section 862.1435 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... such as acetone) and for monitoring patients on ketogenic diets and patients with diabetes....

  3. Ketone body metabolism in the mother and fetus.

    PubMed

    Shambaugh, G E

    1985-04-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by a rapid accumulation of lipid stores during the first half of gestation and a utilization of these stores during the latter half of gestation. Lipogenesis results from dietary intake, an exaggerated insulin response, and an intensified inhibition of glucagon release. Increasing levels of placental lactogen and a heightened response of adipose tissue to additional lipolytic hormones balance lipogenesis in the fed state. Maternal starvation in late gestation lowers insulin, and lipolysis supervenes. The continued glucose drain by the conceptus aids in converting the maternal liver to a ketogenic organ, and ketone bodies produced from incoming fatty acids are not only utilized by the mother but cross the placenta where they are utilized in several ways by the fetus: as a fuel in lieu of glucose; as an inhibitor of glucose and lactate oxidation with sparing of glucose for biosynthetic disposition; and for inhibition of branched-chain ketoacid oxidation, thereby maximizing formation of their parent amino acids. Ketone bodies are widely incorporated into several classes of lipids including structural lipids as well as lipids for energy stores in fetal tissues, and may inhibit protein catabolism. Finally, it has recently been shown that ketone bodies inhibit the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidines in fetal rat brain slices. Thus during maternal starvation ketone bodies may maximize chances for survival both in utero and during neonatal life by restraining cell replication and sustaining protein and lipid stores in fetal tissues.

  4. Ketone body metabolism and sleep homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Séi, Hiroyoshi

    2014-04-01

    A link has been established between energy metabolism and sleep homeostasis. The ketone bodies acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, generated from the breakdown of fatty acids, are major metabolic fuels for the brain under conditions of low glucose availability. Ketogenesis is modulated by the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and treatment with a PPAR activator has been shown to induce a marked increase in plasma acetoacetate and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate in mice, accompanied by increased slow-wave activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The present study investigated the role of ketone bodies in sleep regulation. Six-hour sleep deprivation increased plasma ketone bodies and their ratio (acetoacetate/β-hydroxybutyrate) in 10-week-old male mice. Moreover, sleep deprivation increased mRNA expression of ketogenic genes such as PPARα and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarate-CoA synthase 2 in the brain and decreased ketolytic enzymes such as succinyl-CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase. In addition, central injection of acetoacetate, but not β-hydroxybutyrate, markedly increased slow-wave activity during NREM sleep and suppressed glutamate release. Central metabolism of ketone bodies, especially acetoacetate, appears to play a role in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  5. Direct Catalytic Enantio- and Diastereoselective Ketone Aldol Reactions of Isocyanoacetates**

    PubMed Central

    delaCampa, Raquel; Ortín, Irene; Dixon, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    A catalytic asymmetric aldol addition/cyclization reaction of unactivated ketones with isocyanoacetate pronucleophiles has been developed. A quinine-derived aminophosphine precatalyst and silver oxide were found to be an effective binary catalyst system and promoted the reaction to afford chiral oxazolines possessing a fully substituted stereocenter with good diastereoselectivities and excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:25735645

  6. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Garzón, Camilo S; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids such as citric, lactic, succinic and itaconic acids are useful products and are obtained on large scale by fermentation. This review describes the options for recovering these and other fermentative carboxylic acids. After cell removal, often a primary recovery step is performed, using liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, precipitation or conventional electrodialysis. If the carboxylate is formed rather than the carboxylic acid, the recovery process involves a step for removing the cation of the formed carboxylate. Then, bipolar electrodialysis and thermal methods for salt splitting can prevent that waste inorganic salts are co-produced. Final carboxylic acid purification requires either distillation or crystallization, usually involving evaporation of water. Process steps can often be combined synergistically. In-situ removal of carboxylic acid by extraction during fermentation is the most popular approach. Recovery of the extractant can easily lead to waste inorganic salt formation, which counteracts the advantage of the in-situ removal. For industrial production, various recovery principles and configurations are used, because the fermentation conditions and physical properties of specific carboxylic acids differ.

  7. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Garzón, Camilo S; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids such as citric, lactic, succinic and itaconic acids are useful products and are obtained on large scale by fermentation. This review describes the options for recovering these and other fermentative carboxylic acids. After cell removal, often a primary recovery step is performed, using liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, precipitation or conventional electrodialysis. If the carboxylate is formed rather than the carboxylic acid, the recovery process involves a step for removing the cation of the formed carboxylate. Then, bipolar electrodialysis and thermal methods for salt splitting can prevent that waste inorganic salts are co-produced. Final carboxylic acid purification requires either distillation or crystallization, usually involving evaporation of water. Process steps can often be combined synergistically. In-situ removal of carboxylic acid by extraction during fermentation is the most popular approach. Recovery of the extractant can easily lead to waste inorganic salt formation, which counteracts the advantage of the in-situ removal. For industrial production, various recovery principles and configurations are used, because the fermentation conditions and physical properties of specific carboxylic acids differ. PMID:24751382

  8. Dielectric behavior of some small ketones as ideal polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Nao

    2012-05-17

    The dielectric behaviors of some small symmetric ketone molecules, including acetone, 3-pentanone, cyclopentanone, 4-heptanone, and cyclohexanone, were investigated as a function of temperature (T) over a wide frequency range from 50 MHz (3.14 × 10(8) s(-1), in angular frequency) to 3 THz (1.88 × 10(13) s(-1)). The temperature dependencies of the rotational diffusion times (τ(r)) determined using (17)O NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) measurements and viscosities of the ketones were also examined. The obtained temperature dependencies of the parameters for the ketones were compared with those of ideal polar molecules, which obey the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relationship without the formation of intermolecular dimeric associations and without orientational correlations between dipoles (molecular axes), that is, free rotation. Kirkwood correlation factors (g(K)) of only acetone and 3-pentanone were close to unity over a wide temperature range, whereas those of other ketones were obviously less than unity. These results revealed that no correlations exist between the rotational motions of dipoles in acetone and 3-pentanone, as expected in ideal polar molecules. However, other ketones exhibited orientational correlations in their dipoles because of dipole-dipole interactions via antiparallel configurations. Furthermore, because acetone and 3-pentanone satisfied the SED relationship and because their microscopic dielectric relaxation times (τ(μ)), which were calculated from the determined dielectric relaxation times (τ(D)) via the relationship τ(μ) = τ(D)g(K)(-1), were identical to 3τ(r) and were proportional to Vη(k(B)T)(-1) over the wide temperature range examined, where V, k(B), and η represent the effective molecular volume, Boltzmann's constant, and the viscosity of the liquid molecules, respectively, these two ketone molecules behave as ideal polar molecules. In addition, other ketones not significantly larger than acetone and 3-pentanone in

  9. Enantioselective nucleophilic difluoromethylation of aromatic aldehydes with Me3SiCF2SO2Ph and PhSO2CF2H reagents catalyzed by chiral quaternary ammonium salts

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Chuanfa; Wang, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Although the nucleophilic difluoromethylation of aldehydes, ketones, and imines has been realized with PhSO2CF2H and related reagents, there are still no reports on the enantioselective nucleophilic reactions. Results With a chiral quaternary ammonium salt as the catalyst and KOH as the base, we describe the first enantioselective difluoromethylation of aromatic aldehydes with PhSO2CF2H or Me3SiCF2SO2Ph. The enantioselectivity is substrate-dependent and for 2-chlorinated benzaldehyde an ee up to 64% was obtained. Conclusion These results provide some insights into the enantioselective nucleophilic difluoromethylation chemistry, which will stimulate further progress in this field. PMID:18941491

  10. The tungsten-containing aldehyde oxidoreductase from Clostridium thermoaceticum and its complex with a viologen-accepting NADPH oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Strobl, G; Feicht, R; White, H; Lottspeich, F; Simon, H

    1992-03-01

    Purification of aldehyde oxidoreductase from C. thermoaceticum, the first detected enzyme able to reduce reversibly non-activated carboxylic acids to the corresponding aldehydes (White, H., Strobl, G., Feicht, R. & Simon, H. (1989) Eur. J. Biochem. 184, 89-96), results in the generation of multiple forms of the enzyme. The specific activities for the viologen-mediated dehydrogenation of butyraldehyde for the two main forms of the purification procedure are 530 and 450 U/mg. Two forms of the enzyme composed of alpha,beta- and alpha,beta,gamma-subunits, can be differentiated. The latter binds to red-Sepharose and can be eluted very specifically with NADPH. In contrast to the alpha,beta-types the trimeric forms also catalyse the reversible reduction of oxidised viologen with NADPH (VAPOR activity). The dimer alpha,beta can oligomerize and the alpha,beta,gamma-trimer can easily form various oligomers or split off the gamma-subunit. The apparent molecular masses of the subunits alpha,beta and gamma are 64, 14 and 43 kDa. The alpha,beta-form reveals an apparent molecular mass of 86 kDa containing about 29 iron, 25 acid-labile sulphur, 0.8 tungsten and forms about 1 mol pterine-6-carboxylic acid by permanganate oxidation. The corresponding values of the trimer showing a mass of 300 kDa, are about 82 Fe, 54 S, 3.4 W and 2.5 pterine-6-carboxylic acid. In addition, 1.7 mol of FAD could be found which seems to be a component of the gamma-subunit. The aldehyde oxidoreductase from C. thermoaceticum and that from C. formicoaceticum (White, H., Feicht, R., Huber, C., Lottspeich, F. & Simon, H. (1991) Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 372, 999-1005) show qualitative similarities as far as the Fe, S, W and pterin content and the broad substrate specificity are concerned. However, there are also surprisingly marked differences with respect to composition and amino-acid sequence.

  11. Catalytic ionic hydrogenation of ketones using tungsten or molybdenum catalysts with increased lifetimes

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, R. Morris; Kimmich, Barbara F. M.; Fagan, Paul J.; Hauptman, Elisabeth

    2003-09-02

    The present invention is a process for the catalytic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols at low temperatures and pressures using organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes and the catalyst used in the process. The reactants include a functional group which is selected from groups represented by the formulas R*(C.dbd.O)R' and R*(C.dbd.O)H, wherein R* and R' are selected from hydrogen or any alkyl or aryl group. The process includes reacting the organic compound in the presence of hydrogen and a catalyst to form a reaction mixture. The catalyst is prepared by reacting Ph.sub.3 C.sup.+ A.sup.- with a metal hydride. A.sup.- represents an anion and can be BF.sub.4.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, CF.sub.3 SO.sub.3.sup.- or Bar'.sub.4.sup.-, wherein Ar'=3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl. The metal hydride is represented by the formula: HM(CO).sub.2 [.eta..sup.5 :.eta..sup.1 --C.sub.5 H.sub.4 (XH.sub.2).sub.n PR.sub.2 ] wherein M represents a molybdenum (Mo) atom or a tungsten (W) atom; X is a carbon atom, a silicon atom or a combination of carbon (C) and silicon (Si) atoms; n is any positive integer; R represents two hydrocarbon groups selected from H, an aryl group and an alkyl group, wherein both R groups can be the same or different. The metal hydride is reacted with Ph.sub.3 C.sup.+ A.sup.- either before reacting with the organic compound or in the reaction mixture.

  12. Catalytic ionic hydrogenation of ketones using tungsten or molybdenum organometallic species

    DOEpatents

    Voges, Mark; Bullock, R. Morris

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process for the catalytic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols at low temperatures and pressures using organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes. The functional group is selected from groups represented by the formulas R(C.dbd.O)R' and R(C.dbd.O)H, wherein R and R' are selected from hydrogen or any alkyl or aryl group. The active catalyst for the process has the form: [CpM(CO).sub.2 (PR*.sub.3) L].sup.+ A.sup.-, where Cp=.eta..sup.5 -R.sup..tangle-solidup..sub.m C.sub.5 H.sub.5-m and R.sup..tangle-solidup. represents an alkyl group or a halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =OR' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =CO.sub.2 R' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) and m=0 to 5; M represents a molybdenum atom or a tungsten atom; R*.sub.3 represents three hydrocarbon groups selected from a cyclohexyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.11), a methyl group (CH.sub.3), and a phenyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.5) and all three R* groups can be the same or different or two of the three groups can be the same; L represents a ligand; and A.sup.- represents an anion. In another embodiment, one, two or three of the R* groups can be an OR*.

  13. Synthesis of α,β-unsaturated esters via a chemo-enzymatic chain elongation approach by combining carboxylic acid reduction and Wittig reaction

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yitao; Yao, Peiyuan; Du, Yuncheng; Feng, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Summary α,β-Unsaturated esters are versatile building blocks for organic synthesis and of significant importance for industrial applications. A great variety of synthetic methods have been developed, and quite a number of them use aldehydes as precursors. Herein we report a chemo-enzymatic chain elongation approach to access α,β-unsaturated esters by combining an enzymatic carboxylic acid reduction and Wittig reaction. Recently, we have found that Mycobacterium sp. was able to reduce phenylacetic acid (1a) to 2-phenyl-1-ethanol (1c) and two sequences in the Mycobacterium sp. genome had high identity with the carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) gene from Nocardia iowensis. These two putative CAR genes were cloned, overexpressed in E. coli and one of two proteins could reduce 1a. The recombinant CAR was purified and characterized. The enzyme exhibited high activity toward a variety of aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids, including ibuprofen. The Mycobacterium CAR catalyzed carboxylic acid reduction to give aldehydes, followed by a Wittig reaction to afford the products α,β-unsaturated esters with extension of two carbon atoms, demonstrating a new chemo-enzymatic method for the synthesis of these important compounds. PMID:26664647

  14. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. PMID:25909656

  15. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  16. Identification of the functional groups on the surface of nanoparticles formed in photonucleation of aldehydes generated during forest fire events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultsev, Fedor N.; Mik, Ivan A.; Dubtsov, Sergei N.; Dultseva, Galina G.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the new procedure developed to determine the functional groups on the surface of nanoparticles formed in photonucleation of furfural, one of the aldehydes generated during forest fire events. The procedure is based on the detection of nanoparticle rupture from chemically modified surface of the quartz crystal microbalance oscillating in the thickness shear mode under voltage sweep. The rupture force is determined from the voltage at which the rupture occurs. It depends on particle mass and on the affinity of the surface functional groups of the particle to the groups that are present on the modified QCM surface. It was demonstrated with the amine modification of the surface that the nanoparticles formed in furfural photonucleation contain carbonyl and carboxyl groups. The applicability of the method for the investigation of functional groups on the surface of the nanoparticles of atmospheric aerosol is demonstrated.

  17. Contribution of ozone to airborne aldehyde formation in Paris homes.

    PubMed

    Rancière, Fanny; Dassonville, Claire; Roda, Célina; Laurent, Anne-Marie; Le Moullec, Yvon; Momas, Isabelle

    2011-09-15

    Indoor aldehydes may result from ozone-initiated chemistry, mainly documented by experimental studies. As part of an environmental investigation included in the PARIS birth cohort, the aim of this study was to examine ozone contribution to airborne aldehyde formation in Paris homes. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexaldehyde levels, as well as styrene, nitrogen dioxide and nicotine concentrations, comfort parameters and carbon dioxide levels, were measured twice during the first year of life of the babies. Ambient ozone concentrations were collected from the closest background station of the regional air monitoring network. Traffic-related nitrogen oxide concentrations in front of the dwellings were estimated by an air pollution dispersion model. Home characteristics and families' way of life were described by questionnaires. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to link aldehyde levels with ambient ozone concentrations and a few aldehyde precursors involved in oxidation reactions, adjusting for other indoor aldehyde sources, comfort parameters and traffic-related nitrogen oxides. A 4 and 11% increase in formaldehyde and hexaldehyde levels was pointed out when 8-hour ozone concentrations increased by 20 μg/m(3). The influence of potential precursors such as indoor styrene level and frequent use of air fresheners, containing unsaturated volatile organic compounds as terpenes, was also found. Thus, our results suggest that ambient ozone can significantly impact indoor air quality, especially with regard to formaldehyde and hexaldehyde levels.

  18. Kinetic properties of aldehyde dehydrogenase from sheep liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, G J; Dickinson, F M

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of the NAD+-dependent oxidation of aldehydes, catalysed by aldehyde dehydrogenase purified from sheep liver mitochondria, were studied in detail. Lag phases were observed in the assays, the length of which were dependent on the enzyme concentration. The measured rates after the lag phase was over were directly proportional to the enzyme concentration. If enzyme was preincubated with NAD+, the lag phase was eliminated. Double-reciprocal plots with aldehyde as the variable substrate were non-linear, showing marked substrate activation. With NAD+ as the variable substrate, double-reciprocal plots were linear, and apparently parallel. Double-reciprocal plots with enzyme modified with disulfiram (tetraethylthiuram disulphide) or iodoacetamide, such that at pH 8.0 the activity was decreased to 50% of the control value, showed no substrate activation, and the plots were linear. At pH 7.0, the kinetic parameters Vmax. and Km NAD+- for the oxidation of acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde by the native enzyme are almost identical. Formaldehyde and propionaldehyde show the same apparent maximum rate. Aldehyde dehydrogenase is able to catalyse the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters. This esterase activity was stimulated by both NAD+ and NADH, the maximum rate for the NAD+ stimulated esterase reaction being roughly equal to the maximum rate for the oxidation of aldehydes. The mechanistic implications of the above behaviour are discussed. PMID:217355

  19. Arterial ketone body ratio during and after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, S; Shimahara, Y; Kumada, K; Ogino, H; Okamoto, Y; Ban, T

    1992-06-01

    This study is the first to investigate the alteration in hepatic function during and after cardiopulmonary bypass in 30 patients by measuring the arterial ketone body ratio, an index of mitochondrial redox potential (oxidized nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide/reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide). Although the preoperative arterial ketone body ratio was within normal limits (1.24 +/- 0.63), it decreased markedly 5 minutes after the start of cardiopulmonary bypass to 0.35 +/- 0.12 and remained at this low level throughout bypass. After bypass it continued to rise in a time-dependent fashion, returning to its preoperative level by the morning of the second postoperative day in normal convalescent patients. However, the ratio recovered more slowly in patients who required prolonged circulatory or respiratory support than in other patients. Thus we suggest that cardiopulmonary bypass had deleterious effects on the hepatic mitochondrial redox potential, which may contribute to homeostatic derangements and metabolic abnormalities.

  20. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  1. A constitutive model of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK).

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Ou, Hengan; Lu, Bin; Long, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A modified Johnson-Cook (JC) model was proposed to describe the flow behaviour of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) with the consideration of coupled effects of strain, strain rate and temperature. As compared to traditional JC model, the modified one has better ability to predict the flow behaviour at elevated temperature conditions. In particular, the yield stress was found to be inversely proportional to temperature from the predictions of the proposed model. PMID:26409233

  2. A novel ketone monooxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia. Purification and properties.

    PubMed

    Britton, L N; Markovetz, A J

    1977-12-10

    A ketone monooxygenase was purified from cells of Pseudomonas cepacia grown on 2-tridecanone as sole carbon source. Enzyme stability is maintained by the addition of ethanol, EDTA, and dithiothreitol. Stoichiometric studies show that for 1 mol of undecyl acetate formed, 1 mol of O2 is consumed and 1 mol of NADPH is oxidized. The monooxygenase, purified to homogeneity, has a molecular weight of approximately 123,000 and consists of two equal subunits with molecular weights of 55,000. The enzyme contains FAD and exhibits absorption maxima at 375 and 488 nm. Enzyme activity is inhibited by thiol-active reagents and the inhibition by the cations, cadmium, copper, zinc, and mercury, is reversed by dithiothreitol, indicating the presence of essential sulfhydryl groups. Substrate specificity tests show that acetate esters are formed from methyl ketones from C-7 through C-14. The oxygenase is also active on isomers of 2-tridecanone forming esters from 3- through 7-tridecanone. With 6-tridecanone, two esters are formed, heptyl hexanoate and pentyl octanoate, indicating that oxygen is inserted on either side of the carbonyl group. In addition, the enzyme catalyzes the lactonization of the cyclic ketone, cyclopentanone, with the formation of 5-valerolactone. PMID:925012

  3. Mechanistic Insight into Ketone α-Alkylation with Unactivated Olefins via C-H Activation Promoted by Metal-Organic Cooperative Catalysis (MOCC): Enriching the MOCC Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanfeng; Qu, Shuanglin; Tao, Yuan; Deng, Xi; Wang, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-05-20

    Metal-organic cooperative catalysis (MOCC) has been successfully applied for hydroacylation of olefins with aldehydes via directed C(sp(2))-H functionalization. Most recently, it was reported that an elaborated MOCC system, containing Rh(I) catalyst and 7-azaindoline (L1) cocatalyst, could even catalyze ketone α-alkylation with unactivated olefins via C(sp(3))-H activation. Herein we present a density functional theory study to understand the mechanism of the challenging ketone α-alkylation. The transformation uses IMesRh(I)Cl(L1)(CH2═CH2) as an active catalyst and proceeds via sequential seven steps, including ketone condensation with L1, giving enamine 1b; 1b coordination to Rh(I) active catalyst, generating Rh(I)-1b intermediate; C(sp(2))-H oxidative addition, leading to a Rh(III)-H hydride; olefin migratory insertion into Rh(III)-H bond; reductive elimination, generating Rh(I)-1c(alkylated 1b) intermediate; decoordination of 1c, liberating 1c and regenerating Rh(I) active catalyst; and hydrolysis of 1c, furnishing the final α-alkylation product 1d and regenerating L1. Among the seven steps, reductive elimination is the rate-determining step. The C-H bond preactivation via agostic interaction is crucial for the bond activation. The mechanism rationalizes the experimental puzzles: why only L1 among several candidates performed perfectly, whereas others failed, and why Wilkinson's catalyst commonly used in MOCC systems performed poorly. Based on the established mechanism and stimulated by other relevant experimental reactions, we attempted to enrich MOCC chemistry computationally, exemplifying how to develop new organic catalysts and proposing L7 to be an alternative for L1 and demonstrating the great potential of expanding the hitherto exclusive use of Rh(I)/Rh(III) manifold to Co(0)/Co(II) redox cycling in developing MOCC systems.

  4. Me2(CH2Cl)SiCN: Bifunctional Cyanating Reagent for the Synthesis of Tertiary Alcohols with a Chloromethyl Ketone Moiety via Ketone Cyanosilylation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing-Ping; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-20

    We report a novel bifunctional cyanating reagent, Me2(CH2Cl)SiCN, which paves the way to a one-pot sequential synthesis of tertiary alcohols featuring a chloromethyl ketone moiety via enantioselective ketone cyanosilylation. This method contributes to gram-scale enantioselective total synthesis of the aggregation pheromone of the Colorado potato beetle, (S)-CPB. PMID:27399262

  5. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Jarboe, Laura R.; Royce, Liam A.; Liu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance. PMID:24027566

  6. Carboxylic acids as substrates in homogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Goossen, Lukas J; Rodríguez, Nuria; Goossen, Käthe

    2008-01-01

    In organic molecules carboxylic acid groups are among the most common functionalities. Activated derivatives of carboxylic acids have long served as versatile connection points in derivatizations and in the construction of carbon frameworks. In more recent years numerous catalytic transformations have been discovered which have made it possible for carboxylic acids to be used as building blocks without the need for additional activation steps. A large number of different product classes have become accessible from this single functionality along multifaceted reaction pathways. The frontispiece illustrates an important reason for this: In the catalytic cycles carbon monoxide gas can be released from acyl metal complexes, and gaseous carbon dioxide from carboxylate complexes, with different organometallic species being formed in each case. Thus, carboxylic acids can be used as synthetic equivalents of acyl, aryl, or alkyl halides, as well as organometallic reagents. This review provides an overview of interesting catalytic transformations of carboxylic acids and a number of derivatives accessible from them in situ. It serves to provide an invitation to complement, refine, and use these new methods in organic synthesis.

  7. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  8. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-09-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  9. Maternal aldehyde elimination during pregnancy preserves the fetal genome.

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, Nina; Langevin, Frédéric; King, Gareth; de Wind, Niels; Crossan, Gerry P; Patel, Ketan J

    2014-09-18

    Maternal metabolism provides essential nutrients to enable embryonic development. However, both mother and embryo produce reactive metabolites that can damage DNA. Here we discover how the embryo is protected from these genotoxins. Pregnant mice lacking Aldh2, a key enzyme that detoxifies reactive aldehydes, cannot support the development of embryos lacking the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway gene Fanca. Remarkably, transferring Aldh2(-/-)Fanca(-/-) embryos into wild-type mothers suppresses developmental defects and rescues embryonic lethality. These rescued neonates have severely depleted hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, indicating that despite intact maternal aldehyde catabolism, fetal Aldh2 is essential for hematopoiesis. Hence, maternal and fetal aldehyde detoxification protects the developing embryo from DNA damage. Failure of this genome preservation mechanism might explain why birth defects and bone marrow failure occur in Fanconi anemia, and may have implications for fetal well-being in the many women in Southeast Asia that are genetically deficient in ALDH2. PMID:25155611

  10. Polyvinyl alcohol cross-linked with two aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Rieker, L. L.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A film forming polyvinyl alcohol resin is admixed, in aqueous solution, with a dialdehyde crosslinking agent which is capable of crosslinking the polyvinyl alcohol resin and a water soluble acid aldehyde containing a reactive aldehyde group capable of reacting with hydroxyl groups in the polyvinyl alcohol resin and an ionizable acid hydrogen atom. The dialdehyde is present in an amount sufficient to react with from 1 to 20% by weight of the theoretical amount required to react with all of the hydroxyl groups of the polyvinyl alcohol. The amount of acid aldehyde is from 1 to 50% by weight, same basis, and is sufficient to reduce the pH of the aqueous admixture to 5 or less. The admixture is then formed into a desired physical shape, such as by casting a sheet or film, and the shaped material is then heated to simultaneously dry and crosslink the article.

  11. RP-HPLC-fluorescence analysis of aliphatic aldehydes: application to aldehyde-generating enzymes HACL1 and SGPL1.

    PubMed

    Mezzar, Serena; de Schryver, Evelyn; Van Veldhoven, Paul P

    2014-03-01

    Long-chain aldehydes are commonly produced in various processes, such as peroxisomal α-oxidation of long-chain 3-methyl-branched and 2-hydroxy fatty acids and microsomal breakdown of phosphorylated sphingoid bases. The enzymes involved in the aldehyde-generating steps of these processes are 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HACL1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1), respectively. In the present work, nonradioactive assays for these enzymes were developed employing the Hantzsch reaction. Tridecanal (C13-al) and heptadecanal (C17-al) were selected as model compounds and cyclohexane-1,3-dione as 1,3-diketone, and the fluorescent derivatives were analyzed by reversed phase (RP)-HPLC. Assay mixture composition, as well as pH and heating, were optimized for C13-al and C17-al. Under optimized conditions, these aldehydes could be quantified in picomolar range and different long-chain aldehyde derivatives were well resolved with a linear gradient elution by RP-HPLC. Aldehydes generated by recombinant enzymes could easily be detected via this method. Moreover, the assay allowed to document activity or deficiency in tissue homogenates and fibroblast lysates without an extraction step. In conclusion, a simple, quick, and cheap assay for the study of HACL1 and SGPL1 activities was developed, without relying on expensive mass spectrometric detectors or radioactive substrates.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600..., carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface of...) For the purpose of this section, carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins consist of basic...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600..., carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface of...) For the purpose of this section, carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins consist of basic...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified... paragraph (b) of this section are not applicable to carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins used in...

  15. Direct β-Alkylation of Aldehydes via Photoredox Organocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Direct β-alkylation of saturated aldehydes has been accomplished by synergistically combining photoredox catalysis and organocatalysis. Photon-induced enamine oxidation provides an activated β-enaminyl radical intermediate, which readily combines with a wide range of Michael acceptors to produce β-alkyl aldehydes in a highly efficient manner. Furthermore, this redox-neutral, atom-economical C–H functionalization protocol can be achieved both inter- and intramolecularly. Mechanistic studies by various spectroscopic methods suggest that a reductive quenching pathway is operable. PMID:24754456

  16. Tunable Ether Production via Coupling of Aldehydes or Aldehyde/Alcohol over Hydrogen-Modified Gold Catalysts at Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Brush, Adrian J; Dong, Guangbin; Mullins, C Buddie

    2012-09-01

    Ethers are an important group of organic compounds that are primarily prepared via homogeneous catalysis, which can lead to operational and environmental issues. Here we demonstrate the production of ethers via heterogeneous catalysis over H adatom-covered gold at temperatures lower than 250 K. Symmetrical ethers can be formed via a self-coupling reaction of corresponding aldehydes; for example, homocoupling of acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde yields diethyl ether and di-n-propyl ether, respectively. In addition, coupling reactions between alcohols and aldehydes, with different carbon chain lengths, are observed via the production of the corresponding unsymmetrical ethers. A reaction mechanism is proposed, suggesting that an alcohol-like intermediate via partial hydrogenation of aldehydes on the surface plays a key role in these reactions. These surface chemical reactions suggest possible heterogeneous routes to low-temperature production of ethers. PMID:26292142

  17. Aldehydic load and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 profile during the progression of post-myocardial infarction cardiomyopathy: benefits of Alda-1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Lima, Vanessa M.; Ribeiro, Márcio A.C.; Campos, Juliane C.; Dourado, Paulo M.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives We previously demonstrated that reducing cardiac aldehydic load by aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for metabolizing the major lipid peroxidation product, protects against acute ischemia/reperfusion injury and chronic heart failure. However, time-dependent changes in ALDH2 profile, aldehydic load and mitochondrial bioenergetics during progression of post-myocardial infarction (post-MI) cardiomyopathy is unknown and should be established to determine the optimal time window for drug treatment. Methods Here we characterized cardiac ALDH2 activity and expression, lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) adduct formation, glutathione pool and mitochondrial energy metabolism and H2O2 release during the 4 weeks after permanent left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion in rats. Results We observed a sustained disruption of cardiac mitochondrial function during the progression of post-MI cardiomyopathy, characterized by >50% reduced mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and up to 2 fold increase in H2O2 release. Mitochondrial dysfunction was accompanied by accumulation of cardiac and circulating lipid peroxides and 4-HNE protein adducts and down-regulation of electron transport chain complexes I and V. Moreover, increased aldehydic load was associated with a 90% reduction in cardiac ALDH2 activity and increased glutathione pool. Further supporting an ALDH2 mechanism, sustained Alda-1 treatment (starting 24hrs after permanent LAD occlusion surgery) prevented aldehydic overload, mitochondrial dysfunction and improved ventricular function in post-MI cardiomyopathy rats. Conclusion Taken together, our findings demonstrate a disrupted mitochondrial metabolism along with an insufficient cardiac ALDH2-mediated aldehyde clearance during the progression of ventricular dysfunction, suggesting a potential therapeutic value of ALDH2 activators during the progression of post-myocardial infarction

  18. Advanced selective non-invasive ketone body detection sensors based on new ionophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyapalan, A.; Sarswat, P. K.; Zhu, Y.; Free, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    New molecules and methods were examined that can be used to detect trace level ketone bodies. Diseases such as type 1 diabetes, childhood hypo-glycaemia-growth hormone deficiency, toxic inhalation, and body metabolism changes are linked with ketone bodies concentration. Here we introduce, selective ketone body detection sensors based on small, environmentally friendly organic molecules with Lewis acid additives. Density functional theory (DFT) simulation of the sensor molecules (Bromo-acetonaphthone tungstate (BANT) and acetonaphthophenyl ether propiono hydroxyl tungstate (APPHT)), indicated a fully relaxed geometry without symmetry attributes and specific coordination which enhances ketone bodies sensitivity. A portable sensing unit was made in which detection media containing ketone bodies at low concentration and new molecules show color change in visible light as well as unique irradiance during UV illumination. RGB analysis, electrochemical tests, SEM characterization, FTIR, absorbance and emission spectroscopy were also performed in order to validate the ketone sensitivity of these new molecules.

  19. Applicability of the theory of thermodynamic similarity to predict the enthalpies of vaporization of aliphatic aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esina, Z. N.; Korchuganova, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    The theory of thermodynamic similarity is used to predict the enthalpies of vaporization of aliphatic aldehydes. The predicted data allow us to calculate the phase diagrams of liquid-vapor equilibrium in a binary water-aliphatic aldehyde system.

  20. Aerobic dehydrogenative α-diarylation of benzyl ketones with aromatics through carbon-carbon bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    More, Nagnath Yadav; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2014-02-01

    Substituted benzyl ketones reacted with aromatics in the presence of K2S2O8 in CF3COOH at room temperature, yielding α-diaryl benzyl ketones through a carbon-carbon bond cleavage. In the reaction, two new carbon-carbon bonds were formed and one carbon-carbon bond was cleaved. It is very interesting that two different nucleophiles such as benzyl ketones and aromatics were coupled together without metal, which is unusual in organic synthesis.

  1. Rhodium-Catalyzed Ketone Methylation Using Methanol Under Mild Conditions: Formation of α-Branched Products**

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Louis K M; Poole, Darren L; Shen, Di; Healy, Mark P; Donohoe, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed methylation of ketones has been accomplished using methanol as the methylating agent and the hydrogen-borrowing method. The sequence is notable for the relatively low temperatures that are required and for the ability of the reaction system to form α-branched products with ease. Doubly alkylated ketones can be prepared from methyl ketones and two different alcohols by using a sequential one-pot iridium- and rhodium-catalyzed process. PMID:24288297

  2. NHC-catalysed highly selective aerobic oxidation of nonactivated aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Möhlmann, Lennart; Ludwig, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Summary This publication describes a highly selective oxidation of aldehydes to the corresponding acids or esters. The reaction proceeds under metal-free conditions by using N-heterocyclic carbenes as organocatalysts in combination with environmentally friendly oxygen as the terminal oxidation agent. PMID:23616801

  3. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). 721.5762 Section 721.5762 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762...

  4. A thermostable transketolase evolved for aliphatic aldehyde acceptors.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dong; Saravanan, Thangavelu; Devamani, Titu; Charmantray, Franck; Hecquet, Laurence; Fessner, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-01-11

    Directed evolution of the thermostable transketolase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus based on a pH-based colorimetric screening of smart libraries yielded several mutants with up to 16-fold higher activity for aliphatic aldehydes and high enantioselectivity (>95% ee) in the asymmetric carboligation step. PMID:25415647

  5. Antibiotics from basidiomycetes. 26. Phlebiakauranol aldehyde an antifungal and cytotoxic metabolite from Punctularia atropurpurascens.

    PubMed

    Anke, H; Casser, I; Steglich, W; Pommer, E H

    1987-04-01

    Phlebiakauranol aldehyde and the corresponding alcohol were isolated from cultures of Punctularia atropurpurascens. The aldehyde but not the alcohol exhibited strong antifungal activity against several phytopathogens as well as antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Two acetylated derivatives prepared from the aldehyde showed only very weak antifungal and antibacterial and moderate cytotoxic activities. We therefore assume, that the aldehyde group together with the high number of hydroxyl groups are responsible for the biological activity of the compound.

  6. Optimizing P,N-Bidentate Ligands for Oxidative Gold Catalysis: Highly Efficient Intermolecular Trapping of α-Oxo Gold Carbenes by Carboxylic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Kegong; Zhao, Yulong; Zhang, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Steric Bulk or Conformation Control? Optimization of P,N-bidentate ligands reveals the importance of conformation control in the development of highly efficient intermolecular trapping of reactive α-oxo gold carbene intermediates. While a pendant piperidine ring offers suitable steric bulk, fixing its conformation to provide better shielding to the highly electrophilic carbene center turned out to be crucial for the excellent reaction efficiency. A generally highly efficient and broadly applicable synthesis of carboxymethyl ketones from readily available carboxylic acids and terminal alkynes is developed under exceptionally mild reaction conditions. PMID:23640818

  7. Functional Specialization of Maize Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenases1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2002-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) rf2a and rf2b genes both encode homotetrameric aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs). The RF2A protein was shown previously to accumulate in the mitochondria. In vitro import experiments and ALDH assays on mitochondrial extracts from rf2a mutant plants established that the RF2B protein also accumulates in the mitochondria. RNA gel-blot analyses and immunohistolocation experiments revealed that these two proteins have only partially redundant expression patterns in organs and cell types. For example, RF2A, but not RF2B, accumulates to high levels in the tapetal cells of anthers. Kinetic analyses established that RF2A and RF2B have quite different substrate specificities; although RF2A can oxidize a broad range of aldehydes, including aliphatic aldehydes and aromatic aldehydes, RF2B can oxidize only short-chain aliphatic aldehydes. These two enzymes also have different pH optima and responses to changes in substrate concentration. In addition, RF2A, but not RF2B or any other natural ALDHs, exhibits positive cooperativity. These functional specializations may explain why many species have two mitochondrial ALDHs. This study provides data that serve as a basis for identifying the physiological pathway by which the rf2a gene participates in normal anther development and the restoration of Texas cytoplasm-based male sterility. For example, the observations that Texas cytoplasm anthers do not accumulate elevated levels of reactive oxygen species or lipid peroxidation and the kinetic features of RF2A make it unlikely that rf2a restores fertility by preventing premature programmed cell death. PMID:12481049

  8. Derivatization Strategy for the Comprehensive Characterization of Endogenous Fatty Aldehydes Using HPLC-Multiple Reaction Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tie, Cai; Hu, Ting; Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2016-08-01

    Fatty aldehydes are crucial substances that mediate a wide range of vital physiological functions, particularly lipid peroxidation. Fatty aldehydes such as acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) are considered potential biomarkers of myocardial ischemia and dementia, but analytical techniques for fatty aldehydes are lacking. In the present study, a comprehensive characterization strategy with high sensitivity and facility for fatty aldehydes based on derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (HPLC-MRM) was developed. The fatty aldehydes of a biosample were derivatized using 2,4-bis(diethylamino)-6-hydrazino-1,3,5-triazine under mild and efficient reaction conditions at 37 °C for 15 min. The limit of detection (LOD) of the fatty aldehydes varied from 0.1 to 1 pg/mL, depending on the structures of these molecules. General MRM parameters were forged for the analysis of endogenous fatty aldehydes. "Heavy" derivatization reagents with 20 deuterium atoms were synthesized for both the discovery and comprehensive characterization of fatty aldehydes. More than 80 fatty aldehydes were detected in the biosamples. The new strategy was successfully implemented in global fatty aldehyde profiling of plasma and brain tissue of the bilateral common carotid artery (2VO) dementia rat model. Dozens of fatty aldehydes were significantly changed between the control and model groups. These findings further highlight the importance of endogenous fatty aldehydes. PMID:27397858

  9. The effect of ketone bodies on renal ammoniogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Guy; Vinay, Patrick; Robitaille, Pierre; Plante, Gérard E.; Lussier, Yolande; Martin, Pierre

    1971-01-01

    Infusion of ketone bodies to ammonium chloride-loaded acidotic dogs was found to induce significant reduction in urinary excretion of ammonia. This effect could not be attributed to urinary pH variations. Total ammonia production by the left kidney was measured in 25 animals infused during 90 min with the sodium salt of D,L-β-hydroxybutyric acid adjusted to pH 6.0 or 4.2. Ketonemia averaged 4.5 mM/liter. In all experiments the ammonia content of both urine and renal venous blood fell markedly so that ammoniogenesis was depressed by 60% or more within 60 min after the onset of infusion. Administration of equimolar quantities of sodium acetoacetate adjusted to pH 6.0 resulted in a 50% decrease in renal ammonia production. Infusion of ketone bodies adjusted to pH 6.0 is usually accompanied by a small increase in extracellular bicarbonate (3.7 mM/liter). However infusion of D,L-sodium lactate or sodium bicarbonate in amounts sufficient to induce a similar rise in plasma bicarbonate resulted in only a slight decrement in ammonia production (15%). The continuous infusion of 5% mannitol alone during 90-150 min failed to influence renal ammoniogenesis. Infusion of pure sodium-free β-hydroxybutyric acid prepared by ion exchange (pH 2.2) resulted in a 50% decrease in renal ammoniogenesis in spite of the fact that both urinary pH and plasma bicarbonate fell significantly. During all experiments where ketones were infused, the renal extraction of glutamine became negligible as the renal glutamine arteriovenous difference was abolished. Renal hemodynamics did not vary significantly. Infusion of β-hydroxybutyrate into the left renal artery resulted in a rapid decrease in ammoniogenesis by the perfused kidney. The present study indicates that ketone bodies exert their inhibitory influence within the renal tubular cell. Since their effect is independent of urinary or systemic acid-base changes, it is suggested that they depress renal ammoniogenesis by preventing the

  10. Asymmetric Propargylation of Ketones using Allenylboronates Catalyzed by Chiral Biphenols

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, David S.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Chiral biphenols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric propargylation of ketones using allenylboronates. The reaction uses 10 mol % of 3,3′-Br2-BINOL as the catalyst and allenyldioxoborolane as the nucleophile, in the absence of solvent, and under microwave irradiation to afford the homopropargylic alcohol. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (60 – 98%) and high enantiomeric ratios (3:1 – 99:1). Diastereoselective propargylations using chiral racemic allenylboronates result in good diastereoselectivities (dr > 86:14) and enantioselectivities (er > 92:8) under the catalytic conditions. PMID:21732609

  11. Asymmetric propargylation of ketones using allenylboronates catalyzed by chiral biphenols.

    PubMed

    Barnett, David S; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-01

    Chiral biphenols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric propargylation of ketones using allenylboronates. The reaction uses 10 mol % of 3,3'-Br(2)-BINOL as the catalyst and allenyldioxoborolane as the nucleophile, in the absence of solvent, and under microwave irradiation to afford the homopropargylic alcohol. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (60-98%) and high enantiomeric ratios (3:1-99:1). Diastereoselective propargylations using chiral racemic allenylboronates result in good diastereoselectivities (dr >86:14) and enantioselectivities (er >92:8) under the catalytic conditions. PMID:21732609

  12. Methyl isobutyl ketone as a solvent for wax deoiling

    SciTech Connect

    Larikov, V.I.; Pereverzev, A.N.; Roshchin, Y.N.; Sokolova, S.P.

    1983-09-01

    The solvency of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) for use in deoiling and cold-fractionation of solid paraffin waxes is investigated by a visual polytherm method in the temperature interval 0-36 C. The capability of MIBK for precipitating solid hydrocarbons from solution was found to be greater than acetone/toluene or MEK/toluene, with only MEK better in this respect than MIBK. The quantity of wax remaining in the filtrate is examined. The critical solution temperatures are investigated and it is shown that MIBK surpasses MEK. The results obtained indicate that MIBK is extremely promising for use in processes of deoiling and cold fractionation of waxes.

  13. Catalytic enantioselective peroxidation of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaojie; Liu, Yan; Sun, Bingfeng; Cindric, Brittany; Deng, Li

    2008-07-01

    Despite the potential of chiral peroxides as biologically interesting or even clinically important compounds, no catalytic enantioselective peroxidation has been reported. With a chiral catalyst not only to induce enantioselectivity but also to convert a well established epoxidation pathway into a peroxidation pathway, the first efficient catalytic peroxidation has been successfully developed. Employing readily available alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones and hydroperoxides and an easily accessible cinchona alkaloid catalyst, this novel reaction will open new possibilities in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral peroxides. Under different conditions a highly enantioselective epoxidation with the same starting materials, reagents, and catalyst has was also established.

  14. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of aryl and heteroaryl ketones.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Scott W; Hatcher, Mark A; Bowman, Roy K; Mitchell, Mark B; McClure, Michael S; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2013-09-01

    High throughput screening enabled the development of a Cu-based catalyst system for the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral aryl and heteroaryl ketones that operates at H2 pressures as low as 5 bar. A ligand combination of (R,S)-N-Me-3,5-xylyl-BoPhoz and tris(3,5-xylyl)phosphine provided benzylic alcohols in good yields and enantioselectivities. The electronic and steric characteristics of the ancillary triarylphosphine were important in determining both reactivity and selectivity. PMID:23980941

  15. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Herckes, P.

    2013-05-01

    Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and, thus, modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~ 10 mgC L-1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i) the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g., photolysis of aldehydes) and (ii) the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g., dicarboxylic acids). We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds at a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada) and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA). Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤ 2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions) in the aqueous phase of clouds or fogs, respectively, comprises 2-~ 40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidised and, thus, more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC) increases by an order of magnitude from 7 × 103 M atm-1 to 7 × 104 M atm-1 during the ageing of air masses. The measurements are accompanied by photochemical box model simulations. These simulations are used to contrast two

  16. Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Palasz, Peter D.

    1986-01-01

    A process for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems comprising: adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8-9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids; oxidizing the solution to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes; removing said aldehydes as they are generated; and converting said aldehydes to peracids.

  17. Hygroscopic Characteristics of Alkylaminium Carboxylate Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; McKeown, Megan; Secrest, Jeremiah; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Lavi, Avi; Rudich, Yinon; Collins, Don R; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-03-01

    The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a series of alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols have been measured using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter and a CCN counter. The particles, consisting of the mixtures of mono- (acetic, propanoic, p-toluic, and cis-pinonic acid) and dicarboxylic (oxalic, succinic, malic, adipic, and azelaic acid) acid with alkylamine (mono-, di-, and trimethylamines), represent those commonly found under diverse environmental conditions. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of the alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols was derived from the HGF and CCN results and theoretically calculated. The HGF at 90% RH is in the range of 1.3 to 1.8 for alkylaminium monocarboxylates and 1.1 to 2.2 for alkylaminium dicarboxylates, dependent on the molecular functionality (i.e., the carboxylic or OH functional group in organic acids and methyl substitution in alkylamines). The κ value for all alkylaminium carboxylates is in the range of 0.06-1.37 derived from the HGF measurements at 90% RH, 0.05-0.49 derived from the CCN measurements, and 0.22-0.66 theoretically calculated. The measured hygroscopicity of the alkylaminium carboxylates increases with decreasing acid to base ratio. The deliquescence point is apparent for several of the alkylaminium dicarboxylates but not for the alkylaminium monocarboxylates. Our results reveal that alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols exhibit distinct hygroscopic and deliquescent characteristics that are dependent on their molecular functionality, hence regulating their impacts on human health, air quality, and direct and indirect radiative forcing on climate. PMID:26794419

  18. High Lipophilicty of Perfluoroalkyl Carboxylate and Sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ping; Rodgers, Patrick J.; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    Here we report on remarkably high lipophilicity of perfluoroalkyl carboxylate and sulfonate. A lipophilic nature of this emerging class of organic pollutants has been hypothesized as an origin of their bioaccumulation and toxicity. Both carboxylate and sulfonate, however, are considered hydrophilic while perfluroalkyl groups are not only hydrophobic but also oleophobic. Partition coefficients of homologous series of perfluoroalkyl and alkyl carboxylates between water and n-octanol were determined as a measure of their lipophilicity by ion-transfer cyclic voltammetry. Very similar lipophilicity of perfluoroalkyl and alkyl chains with the same length is demonstrated experimentally for the first time by fragment analysis of the partition coefficients. This finding is important for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of perfluoroalkyl compounds. Interestingly, ∼2 orders of magnitude higher lipophilicity of a perfluoroalkyl carboxylate or sulfonate in comparison to its alkyl counterpart is ascribed nearly exclusively to their oxoanion groups. The higher lipophilicity originates from a strong electron-withdrawing effect of the perfluoroalkyl group on the adjacent oxoanion group, which is weakly hydrated to decrease its hydrophilicity. In fact, the inductive effect is dramatically reduced for a fluorotelomer with an ethylene spacer between perfluorohexyl and carboxylate groups, which is only as lipophilic as its alkyl counterpart, nonanoate, and is 400 times less lipophilic than perfluorononanoate. The high lipophilicity of perfluoroalkyl carboxylate and sulfonate implies that their permeation across such a thin lipophilic membrane as a bilayer lipid membrane is limited by their transfer at a membrane/water interface. The limiting permeability is lower and less dependent on their lipophilicity than the permeability controlled by their diffusion in the membrane interior as assumed in the classical solubility-diffusion model. PMID:19170492

  19. GPR109A, GPR109B and GPR81, a family of hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kashan; Tunaru, Sorin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most versatile receptor family as they have the ability to respond to chemically diverse ligands. Despite intensive efforts during the past two decades, there are still more than 100 orphan GPCRs for which endogenous ligands are unknown. Recently, GPR109A, GPR109B and GPR81, which form a GPCR subfamily, have been deorphanized. The physiological ligands of these receptors are the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyrate, the metabolite 2-hydroxy-propanoate (lactate) as well as the beta-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoate. Thus, this receptor subfamily is activated by hydroxy-carboxylic acid ligands which are intermediates of energy metabolism. All three receptors are predominantly expressed in adipocytes and mediate antilipolytic effects. In this article, we propose that the hydroxy-carboxylic acid structure of their endogenous ligands is the defining property of this receptor subfamily and that hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptors function as metabolic sensors which fine-tune the regulation of metabolic pathways.

  20. GRE2 from Scheffersomyces stipitis as an aldehyde reductase contributes tolerance to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis is one of the most promising yeasts for industrial bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. S. stipitis is able to in situ detoxify aldehyde inhibitors [such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)] to less toxic corresponding alcohols. However, the...

  1. Mass spectrometric behaviour of carboxylated polyethylene glycols and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates.

    PubMed

    Frańska, Magdalena; Zgoła, Agnieszka; Rychłowska, Joanna; Szymański, Andrzej; Łukaszewski, Zenon; Frański, Rafał

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometric behaviour of mono- and di-carboxylated polyethylene glycols (PEGCs and CPEGCs) and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates (OPECs) are discussed. The tendency for ionisation (deprotonation, protonation and cationisation by alkali metal cations) of carboxylated PEGs was compared with that of non-carboxylated correspondents by using both secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrospray ionisation (ESI). The fragmentation of the PEGCs and CPEGCs is discussed and also compared with their neutral correspondents, PEGs. The B/E mass spectra were recorded, using secondary ion mass spectrometry as a method for generation, for deprotonated and protonated molecules and molecules cationised by alkali metal cations. The fragmentation behaviour of PEGs is found to be different from that of CPEGCs, The presence of carboxylic groups may be confirmed not only by the determination of molecular weights of the ethoxylates studied, but also on the basis of the fragment ions formed. The metastable decomposition of the [OPEC-H](-) ions proceed through the cleavage of the bond between the octylphenol moiety and the ethoxylene chain leading to the octylphenoxy anions. It permits determination of the mass of the hydrophobic moiety of the studied carboxylated alkylphenol ethoxylate. ESI mass spectra recorded in the negative ion mode were found to be more suitable for the determination of the average molecular weight of carboxylated ethoxylates than SI mass spectra. PMID:12939494

  2. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J.; Jones, Patrik R.

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C6–C18) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C8–C16) or fatty alkanes (C7–C15) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L−1 was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C8–C18). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  3. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) attenuates reactive aldehyde and oxidative stress induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Chad; Cantore, Miriam; Failli, Paola; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) is homologous to plant ALDH7B1 which protects against various forms of stress such as increased salinity, dehydration and treatment with oxidants or pesticides. Deleterious mutations in human ALDH7A1 are responsible for pyridoxine-dependent and folinic acid-responsive seizures. In previous studies, we have shown that human ALDH7A1 protects against hyperosmotic stress presumably through the generation of betaine, an important cellular osmolyte, formed from betaine aldehyde. Hyperosmotic stress is coupled to an increase in oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation (LPO). In this study, cell viability assays revealed that stable expression of mitochondrial ALDH7A1 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells provides significant protection against treatment with the LPO-derived aldehydes hexanal and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) implicating a protective function for the enzyme during oxidative stress. A significant increase in cell survival was also observed in CHO cells expressing either mitochondrial or cytosolic ALDH7A1 treated with increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or 4HNE, providing further evidence for anti-oxidant activity. In vitro enzyme activity assays indicate that human ALDH7A1 is sensitive to oxidation and that efficiency can be at least partially restored by incubating recombinant protein with the thiol reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol (BME). We also show that after reactivation with BME, recombinant ALDH7A1 is capable of metabolizing the reactive aldehyde 4HNE. In conclusion, ALDH7A1 mechanistically appears to provide cells protection through multiple pathways including the removal of toxic LPO-derived aldehydes in addition to osmolyte generation. PMID:21338592

  5. Synthesis, conformational parameters and packing considerations of methyl bispyridyl ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weck, Christian; Katzsch, Felix; Gruber, Tobias

    2015-10-01

    The crystal structures of two bispyridyl ketones featuring either two methyl residues or one methyl and one bromomethyl residue, respectively, are presented. In order to elucidate the influence of the substituents, a comprehensive comparison with the non-methylated mother compound has been performed. A special focus lies thereby on the relative position of the heteroatoms and their free electron pairs. The two methyl groups at the bispyridyl ketone result in two molecules in the asymmetric unit adopting rather different conformations. Due to the fast crystallization conditions and a melting point differing from the literature, a polymorph close to a local minimum in the energy hypersurface seems possible. After introducing a bromine atom to one of the two methyl groups, the molecular conformation is very similar to the unsubstituted molecule. The packing of both title compounds is dominated by weak contacts of the C-H⋯π and C-H⋯Y type (Y = O, N) and C-H⋯Br- and Br⋯π-contacts for the brominated molecule.

  6. Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production in Melanoma and Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Grabacka, Maja M; Wilk, Anna; Antonczyk, Anna; Banks, Paula; Walczyk-Tytko, Emilia; Dean, Matthew; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. PMID:26869992

  7. Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production in Melanoma and Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Wilk, Anna; Antonczyk, Anna; Banks, Paula; Walczyk-Tytko, Emilia; Dean, Matthew; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. PMID:26869992

  8. Ketone bodies protection against HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Liang; Chen, Xuesong; Bhatt, Dhaval; Geiger, Nicholas H.; Rosenberger, Thad A.; Haughey, Norman J.; Masino, Susan A.; Geiger, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is a syndrome that ranges clinically from subtle neuropsychological impairments to profoundly disabling HIV-associated dementia. Not only is the pathogenesis of HAND unclear, but also effective treatments are unavailable. The HIV-1 transactivator of transcription protein (HIV-1 Tat) is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, in part, because of its well-characterized ability to directly excite neurons and cause neurotoxicity. Consistent with previous findings from others, we demonstrate here that HIV-1 Tat induced neurotoxicity, increased intracellular calcium, and disrupted a variety of mitochondria functions, such as reducing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing levels of reactive oxygen species, and decreasing bioenergetic efficiency. Of therapeutic importance, we show that treatment of cultured neurons with ketone bodies normalized HIV-1 Tat induced changes in levels of intracellular calcium, mitochondrial function, and neuronal cell death. Ketone bodies are normally produced in the body and serve as alternative energy substrates in tissues including brain and can cross the blood-brain barrier. Ketogenic strategies have been used clinically for treatment of neurological disorders and our current results suggest that similar strategies may also provide clinical benefits in the treatment of HAND. PMID:22524563

  9. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  10. Nitric Acid Dehydration Using Perfluoro Carboxylate and Mixed Sulfonate/Carboxylate Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Richard L.

    2004-09-01

    Perfluoro ionomer membranes are tetrafluoro ethylene-based materials with microheterogeneous structures consisting of a hydrophobic polymer backbone and a hydrophilic side-chain cluster region. Due to the ionomer cluster morphology, these films exhibit unique transport properties. Recent investigations with perfluoro sulfonate and perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate composite polymers have demonstrated their value in the dehydration of nitric acid and they show potential as an alternative to conventional, energy intensive unit operations in the concentration of acid feeds. As a result, investigations were conducted to determine the feasibility of using pure perfluoro carboxylate and mixed perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate films for the dehydration of nitric acid because of the speculation of improved water selectivity of the carboxylate pendant chain. During the first phase of these investigations the effort was focused on generating a thin, solution cast perfluoro carboxylate ionomer film, to evaluate the general, chemical and physical characteristics of the polymer, and to assess the material's aqueous transport performance (flux and nitrate separation efficiencies) in pervaporation and high-pressure environments. Results demonstrated that generating robust solution-cast films was difficult yet a number of membranes survived high trans-membrane pressures up to 700 psig. General characterization of the solution cast product showed reduced ion exchange capacities when compared with thicker, ''as received'' perfluoro carboxylate and similar sulfonate films. Small angle x-ray scattering analysis results suggested that the solution cast carboxylate films contained a small fraction of sulfonate terminated side-chains. Aqueous transport experimentation showed that permeate fluxes for both pure water and nitric acid were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller for the carboxylate solution cast membranes when compared to their sulfonate counterparts of similar thickness

  11. Characterization of synthetic routes to 'Bromo-DragonFLY' and benzodifuranyl isopropylamine homologues utilizing ketone intermediates. Part 1: synthesis of ketone precursors.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Richard E; Keating, John J

    2014-01-01

    Bromo-DragonFLY (BDF) and many of its analogues are misused as recreational drugs due to their potency as psychoactive substances. To date, none of the published routes to these designer amphetamines have exploited a ketone intermediate. It is well known that benzyl methyl ketone (BMK) can be employed as a precursor in the synthesis of amphetamine. Similarly, it is reasonable to assume that ketone precursors may potentially be utilized in the clandestine synthesis of BDF and its homologues. This paper describes the multifaceted synthesis of novel precursor ketones structurally related to BDF, namely benzodifuranyl propanone 16, its tetrahydrobenzodifuranyl homologue 8, and their brominated analogues 12 and 20. Their characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13) C-NMR), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) is also described. PMID:23794359

  12. Carboxylic acids in secondary aerosols from oxidation of cyclic monoterpenes by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Glasius, M.; Lahaniati, M.; Calogirou, A.; Di Bella, D.; Jensen, N.R.; Hjorth, J.; Kotzias, D.; Larsen, B.R.

    2000-03-15

    A series of smog chamber experiments have been conducted in which five cyclic monoterpenes were oxidized by ozone. The evolved secondary aerosol was analyzed by GC-MS and HPLC-MS for nonvolatile polar oxidation products with emphasis on the identification of carboxylic acids. Three classes of compounds were determined at concentration levels corresponding to low percentage molar yields: i.e., dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and hydroxyketocarboxylic acids. Carboxylic acids are highly polar and have lower vapor pressures than their corresponding aldehydes and may thus play an important role in secondary organic aerosol formation processes. The most abundant carboxylic acids were the following: cis-pinic acid AB1(cis-3-carboxy-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) from {alpha} and {beta}-pinene; cis-pinonic acid A3 (cis-3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) and cis-10-hydroxypinonic acid Ab6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxyacetylcyclobutyl-ethanoic acid) from {alpha}-pinene and {beta}-pinene; cis-3-caric acid C1 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-cyclopropyldiethanoic acid), cis-3-caronic acid C3 (2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid), and cis-10-hydroxy-3-caronic acid C6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3(hydroxy-2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid) from 3-carene; cis-sabinic acid S1 (cis-2-carboxy-1-isopropylcyclopropylethanoic acid) from sabinene; limonic acid L1 (3-isopropenylhexanedioic acid), limononic acid L3 (3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanoic acid), 7-hydroxy-limononic acid L6 (3-isopropenyl-7-hydroxy-6-oxoheptanoic acid), and 7-hydroxylimononic acid Lg{prime} (7-hydroxy-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoic acid) from limonene.

  13. Aldehyde sources, metabolism, molecular toxicity mechanisms, and possible effects on human health.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Peter J; Siraki, Arno G; Shangari, Nandita

    2005-08-01

    Aldehydes are organic compounds that are widespread in nature. They can be formed endogenously by lipid peroxidation (LPO), carbohydrate or metabolism ascorbate autoxidation, amine oxidases, cytochrome P-450s, or myeloperoxidase-catalyzed metabolic activation. This review compares the reactivity of many aldehydes towards biomolecules particularly macromolecules. Furthermore, it includes not only aldehydes of environmental or occupational concerns but also dietary aldehydes and aldehydes formed endogenously by intermediary metabolism. Drugs that are aldehydes or form reactive aldehyde metabolites that cause side-effect toxicity are also included. The effects of these aldehydes on biological function, their contribution to human diseases, and the role of nucleic acid and protein carbonylation/oxidation in mutagenicity and cytotoxicity mechanisms, respectively, as well as carbonyl signal transduction and gene expression, are reviewed. Aldehyde metabolic activation and detoxication by metabolizing enzymes are also reviewed, as well as the toxicological and anticancer therapeutic effects of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors. The human health risks from clinical and animal research studies are reviewed, including aldehydes as haptens in allergenic hypersensitivity diseases, respiratory allergies, and idiosyncratic drug toxicity; the potential carcinogenic risks of the carbonyl body burden; and the toxic effects of aldehydes in liver disease, embryo toxicity/teratogenicity, diabetes/hypertension, sclerosing peritonitis, cerebral ischemia/neurodegenerative diseases, and other aging-associated diseases.

  14. Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a new attractant for the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt))

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni, Q-fly) is a major agricultural pest in eastern Australia. The deployment of male lures comprises an important component of several control and detection strategies for this pest. A novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroac...

  15. Further research on the biological activities and the safety of raspberry ketone are needed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry ketone supplements have grabbed consumer attention with the possibility they might help burn fat and aid weight loss. While raspberry ketone occurs naturally, and is found in raspberry fruit, most is synthetically produced for use in commercial products as flavorings, fragrances, or dietar...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10413 - Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) (P-10-135). 721.10413 Section 721.10413 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10413 Fluorinated dialkyl ketone (generic) (P-10-135). (a) Chemical... as fluorinated dialkyl ketone (PMN P-10-135) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. Interfacial interactions of poly(ether ketone ketone) polymer coatings onto oxide-free phosphate films on an aluminum surface

    SciTech Connect

    Asunskis, A. L.; Sherwood, P. M. A.

    2007-07-15

    This article continues a series of papers that shows how thin (10 nm or less) oxide-free phosphate films can be formed on a number of metals. The films formed have potential as corrosion resistant films. Previous papers have shown that it is possible to extend the range of the surface coatings that can be formed by placing a thin polymer layer over the phosphate layer. In this work it is shown how the water insoluble polymer poly(ether ketone ketone) (PEKK) can be placed over a thin oxide-free phosphate film on aluminum metal. The surface and the interfaces involved were studied by valence band and core level x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Difference spectra in the valence band region were used to show that there is a chemical interaction between the PEKK and phosphate thin films on the aluminum metal. Three different phosphate film compositions were studied using different phosphorous containing acids, H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, H{sub 3}PO{sub 3}, and H{sub 3}PO{sub 2}. This type of interaction illustrates the potential of phosphates to act as adhesion promoters. The valence band spectra are interpreted by calculations.

  20. Nucleophilic Iododifluoromethylation of Aldehydes Using Bromine/Iodine Exchange.

    PubMed

    Levin, Vitalij V; Smirnov, Vladimir O; Struchkova, Marina I; Dilman, Alexander D

    2015-09-18

    A method for the iododifluoromethylation of aromatic aldehydes using (bromodifluoromethyl)trimethylsilane (Me3SiCF2Br) is described. The selective formation of the CF2I group is based on using sodium iodide, with the sodium serving as a scavenger of bromide and iodide serving as a nucleophile with respect to difluorocarbene. The primary CF2I-addition products can undergo HI-elimination or iodine/zinc exchange followed by allylation in a one-pot manner.

  1. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors like dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an ‘aldehyde scavenger’ during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Up-regulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation) and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that significantly contributes to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, underscoring the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  3. Phenazinium salt-catalyzed aerobic oxidative amidation of aromatic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Leow, Dasheng

    2014-11-01

    Amides are prevalent in organic synthesis. Developing an efficient synthesis that avoids expensive oxidants and heating is highly desirable. Here the oxidative amidation of aromatic aldehydes is reported using an inexpensive metal-free visible light photocatalyst, phenazine ethosulfate, at low catalytic loading (1-2 mol %). The reaction proceeds at ambient temperature and uses air as the sole oxidant. The operationally easy procedure provides an economical, green, and mild alternative for the formation of amide bonds.

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes.

  5. Enantioselective α-Benzylation of Aldehydes via Photoredox Organocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hui-Wen; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Grange, Rebecca L.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2011-01-01

    The first enantioselective aldehyde α-benzylation using electron-deficient aryl and heteroaryl substrates has been accomplished. The productive merger of a chiral imidazolidinone organocatalyst and a commercially available iridium photoredox catalyst in the presence of household fluorescent light directly affords the desired homobenzylic stereogenicity in good to excellent yield and enantioselectivity. The utility of this methodology has been demonstrated via rapid access to an enantioen-riched drug target for angiogenesis suppression. PMID:20831195

  6. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)]+) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru–H]+, which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources. PMID:26314266

  7. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)](+)) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru-H](+), which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources. PMID:26314266

  8. γ-Unsaturated aldehydes as potential Lilial replacers.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Martin; Mathys, Marion; Ehrensperger, Nadja; Büchel, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    A series of Claisen rearrangements was undertaken in order to find a replacement for Lilial (=3-(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)-2-methylpropanal), a high-tonnage perfumery ingredient with a lily-of-the-valley odour, which is a CMR2 material [1]. 5,7,7-Trimethyl-4-methyleneoctanal (10), the synthesis of which is described, became the main lead. It possesses an odour which is very close to that of Lilial but lacks its substantivity. Aldehydes with higher molecular weights than that of 10 were, therefore, synthesised in order to boost substantivity and to understand the structural requirements for a 'Lilial' odour. The aldehydes were obtained via Claisen rearrangements of 'exo-methylidene' vinyl ethers, allenyl vinyl ethers, or allenyl allyl ethers. Alternatively, coupling of terminal alkynes with allyl alcohols led to the desired aldehydes. Derivatives of 10 and their sila analogues were also synthesised. The olfactory properties of all synthesised molecules were evaluated for possible structure-odour relationships (SOR).

  9. Volatile aldehydes in the mainstream smoke of the narghile waterpipe.

    PubMed

    Al Rashidi, M; Shihadeh, A; Saliba, N A

    2008-11-01

    Very little is known about the quality and quantity of toxicants yielded by the narghile, a subject of increasing importance as this method of tobacco smoking has become popular all over the world. This study is concerned with the identification and quantification of volatile aldehydes in the gas and particle phases of mainstream narghile smoke generated using a popular type of flavored ma'ssel tobacco mixture. These compounds were analyzed based on a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency compendium method TO-11A. Using a standardized smoking machine protocol consisting of 171 puffs, 2.6s puff duration and 17s inter puff interval, the average yields of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propionaldehyde and methacrolein were 630, 2520, 892, 403, and 106 microg/smoking session, respectively. The results showed that none of the aldehydes identified in this study are found in the particulate phase of the smoke, except for formaldehyde for which the partitioning coefficient was estimated as Kp = 3.3 x 10(-8) microg/m3. Given previously reported lung absorption fractions of circa 90% for volatile aldehydes, the yields measured in this study are sufficient to induce various diseases depending on the extent of exposure, and on the breathing patterns of the smokers. PMID:18834915

  10. Henry's law constants of some environmentally important aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Betterton, E.A.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1988-12-01

    The Henry's law constants of seven aldehydes have been determined as a function of temperature by bubble-column and by head-space techniques. The compounds were chosen for their potential importance in the polluted troposphere and to allow structure-reactivity patterns to be investigated. The results (at 25/degree/C) are as follows (in units of M atm/sup /minus/1/): chloral, 3.44 /times/ 10/sup 5/; glyoxal, greater than or equal to3 /times/ 10/sup 5/; methylglyoxal, 3.71 /times/ 10/sup 3/; formaldehyde, 2.97 /times/ 10/sup 3/; benzaldehyde, 3.74 /times/ 10/sup 1/; hydroxyacetaldehyde, 4.14 /times/ 10/sup 4/; acetaldehyde, 1.14 /times/ 10/sup 1/. A plot of Taft's parameter, ..sigma..sigma*, vs log H* (the apparent Henry's law constant) gives a straight line with a slope of 1.72. H* for formaldehyde is anomalously high, as expected, but the extremely high value for hydroxyacetaldehyde was unexpected and may indicate that ..cap alpha..-hydroxy-substituted aldehydes could have an usually high affinity for the aqueous phase. The intrinsic Henry's law constants, H, corrected for hydration, do not show a clear structure-reactivity pattern for this series of aldehydes.

  11. Structural increments in UV spectra of conjugated carbonyl compounds. Part II. CNDO/S-CI calculations of electronic spectra of enamino aldehydes, enamino ketones and enamino amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, L.; Kamieńska-Trela, K.; Witanowski, M.

    1984-06-01

    The semiempirical molecular orbital CNDO/S-CI spectral parameterization is used in order to evaluate structural increments in UV spectra of a series of β-amino-α,β-un- saturated carbonyl compounds. For most of the compounds, theoretical values of con formational and configurational spectral effects are lower than the experimental ones. It is suggested that a substantial part of the discrepancy is associated with the neglect by the CNDO/S-CI approximation of the changes in the nonbonded interaction energies caused by conformational and configurational isomerizaticns. We show that the applica tion of due corrections based on simple electrostatic and van der Waals interactions according to the Lennard-Jones potentials leads to a good agreement in magnitude and sign between the experimental and theoretical increments.

  12. On the possibility of conversion of alcohols to ketones and aldehydes by phosphinoboranes R2PBR'R'': a computational study.

    PubMed

    Privalov, Timofei

    2009-01-01

    Can phosphinoboranes promote hydrogenation of carbonyl moieties? By means of B3LYP and MPW1K density functional calculations the likelihood of the oxidation of alcohols by phosphinoboranes R(2)PBR'(2) (1) was explored. As a proof-of-principle, a theoretical study that tests the reversibility of the alcohol oxidation is reported. The potential of 1 as a metal-free hydrogenation mediator is discussed for a series of hydrogen sources such as primary and secondary alcohols. PMID:19123227

  13. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  3. Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2014-09-09

    This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

  4. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. Experimental study on the enhancement of the neurotoxicity of methyl n-butyl ketone by non-neurotoxic aliphatic monoketones.

    PubMed Central

    Misumi, J; Nagano, M

    1985-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of methyl n-butyl ketone is known to be enhanced by combination with methyl ethyl ketone. This study was conducted to clarify the potentiating effect of aliphatic monoketones on the neurotoxicity of methyl n-butyl ketone. Rats were subcutaneously injected in the back with 4 mmol/kg/day of methyl ethyl ketone, methyl n-propyl ketone, methyl n-amyl ketone, or methyl n-hexyl ketone mixed with an equimolar dose of methyl n-butyl ketone five days a week for 20 weeks. The maximum motor fibre conduction velocity and the distal latency were measured every two weeks in the tail nerves of the treated animals and controls. All the monoketones tested enhanced the neurotoxicity of methyl n-butyl ketone. Of the compounds tested, methyl n-hexyl ketone, which had the longest carbon chain, enhanced the neurotoxicity of methyl n-butyl ketone most strongly. These results suggest that the length of the carbon chain of the aliphatic monoketones combined with methyl n-butyl ketone was related to the enhancement of the neurotoxicity of the neurotoxic compound. PMID:3970879

  10. Carboxylated, heteroaryl-substituted chalcones as inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression for use in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q; Ni, Liming; Worsencroft, Kimberly J; Ye, Zhihong; Weingarten, M David; Simpson, Jacob E; Skudlarek, Jason W; Marino, Elaine M; Suen, Ki-Ling; Kunsch, Charles; Souder, Amy; Howard, Randy B; Sundell, Cynthia L; Wasserman, Martin A; Sikorski, James A

    2007-03-22

    Starting from a simple chalcone template, structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to a series of carboxylated, heteroaryl-substituted chalcone derivatives as novel, potent inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression. Correlations between lipophilicity determined by calculated logP values and inhibitory efficacy were observed among structurally similar compounds of the series. Various substituents were found to be tolerated at several positions of the chalcone backbone as long as the compounds fell into the right range of lipophilicity. The chalcone alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone moiety seemed to be the pharmacophore required for inhibition of VCAM-1 expression. Compound 19 showed significant antiinflammatory effects in a mouse model of allergic inflammation, indicating that this series of compounds might have therapeutic value for human asthma and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:17323940

  11. Evaluation of health risks caused by musk ketone.

    PubMed

    Schmeiser, H H; Gminski, R; Mersch-Sundermann, V

    2001-05-01

    Among the nitro musks, musk ketone (MK) as a synthetic compound with a typical musk odor is widely used in cosmetics. In the European Community the total amount used in fragrances has been reported to be 110 tons/a. Additionally, relevant amounts of MK are used in Indian joss sticks. As a result of its inherently low biodegradability MK has been detected in the aquatic environment (surface water, sediments, edible fish). Moreover, it has been shown that MK concentrates in human fatty tissue and breast milk, indicating that humans are constantly exposed. Several studies provided convincing evidence of lack of a genotoxic potential for MK. However, MK was identified as a strong inducer of phase I enzymes in rodents and a cogenotoxicant in vitro in human derived cells in rather low doses, suggesting that exposure to MK might increase the susceptibility to health hazards caused by carcinogens in humans.

  12. Effects of acetone on methyl ethyl ketone peroxide runaway reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Fu; Tseng, Jo-Ming; Wu, Tsung-Chih; Shu, Chi-Min

    2008-05-30

    Runaway reactions by methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKPO) are an important issue in Asia, due to its unstable structure and extensive heat release during upset situations. This study employed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to draw the experimental data for MEKPO 31 mass% and with acetone 99 mass% on three types of heating rate of 2, 4, and 10 degrees C/min; the kinetic and safety parameters were then evaluated via curve fitting. Through the reproducible tests in each condition, the results show that acetone is not a contaminant, because it could increase the activation energy (Ea) and onset temperature (To) when combined with MEKPO, which differs from the hazard information of the material safety data sheet (MSDS).

  13. Structural and Kinetic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase NahF, a Broad Substrate Specificity Enzyme for Aldehyde Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Coitinho, Juliana B; Pereira, Mozart S; Costa, Débora M A; Guimarães, Samuel L; Araújo, Simara S; Hengge, Alvan C; Brandão, Tiago A S; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-09-27

    The salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (NahF) catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate using NAD(+) as a cofactor, the last reaction of the upper degradation pathway of naphthalene in Pseudomonas putida G7. The naphthalene is an abundant and toxic compound in oil and has been used as a model for bioremediation studies. The steady-state kinetic parameters for oxidation of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by 6xHis-NahF are presented. The 6xHis-NahF catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes with large kcat/Km values close to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The active site of NahF is highly hydrophobic, and the enzyme shows higher specificity for less polar substrates than for polar substrates, e.g., acetaldehyde. The enzyme shows α/β folding with three well-defined domains: the oligomerization domain, which is responsible for the interlacement between the two monomers; the Rossmann-like fold domain, essential for nucleotide binding; and the catalytic domain. A salicylaldehyde molecule was observed in a deep pocket in the crystal structure of NahF where the catalytic C284 and E250 are present. Moreover, the residues G150, R157, W96, F99, F274, F279, and Y446 were thought to be important for catalysis and specificity for aromatic aldehydes. Understanding the molecular features responsible for NahF activity allows for comparisons with other aldehyde dehydrogenases and, together with structural information, provides the information needed for future mutational studies aimed to enhance its stability and specificity and further its use in biotechnological processes. PMID:27580341

  14. Structural and Kinetic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase NahF, a Broad Substrate Specificity Enzyme for Aldehyde Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Coitinho, Juliana B; Pereira, Mozart S; Costa, Débora M A; Guimarães, Samuel L; Araújo, Simara S; Hengge, Alvan C; Brandão, Tiago A S; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-09-27

    The salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (NahF) catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate using NAD(+) as a cofactor, the last reaction of the upper degradation pathway of naphthalene in Pseudomonas putida G7. The naphthalene is an abundant and toxic compound in oil and has been used as a model for bioremediation studies. The steady-state kinetic parameters for oxidation of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by 6xHis-NahF are presented. The 6xHis-NahF catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes with large kcat/Km values close to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The active site of NahF is highly hydrophobic, and the enzyme shows higher specificity for less polar substrates than for polar substrates, e.g., acetaldehyde. The enzyme shows α/β folding with three well-defined domains: the oligomerization domain, which is responsible for the interlacement between the two monomers; the Rossmann-like fold domain, essential for nucleotide binding; and the catalytic domain. A salicylaldehyde molecule was observed in a deep pocket in the crystal structure of NahF where the catalytic C284 and E250 are present. Moreover, the residues G150, R157, W96, F99, F274, F279, and Y446 were thought to be important for catalysis and specificity for aromatic aldehydes. Understanding the molecular features responsible for NahF activity allows for comparisons with other aldehyde dehydrogenases and, together with structural information, provides the information needed for future mutational studies aimed to enhance its stability and specificity and further its use in biotechnological processes.

  15. GRE2 from Scheffersomyces stipitis as an aldehyde reductase contributes tolerance to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Menggen; Liu, Z Lewis; Xiang, Quanju; Li, Xi; Liu, Na; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-08-01

    Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis is one of the most promising yeasts for industrial bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. S. stipitis is able to in situ detoxify aldehyde inhibitors (such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)) to less toxic corresponding alcohols. However, the reduction enzymes involved in this reaction remain largely unknown. In this study, we reported that an uncharacterized open reading frame PICST_72153 (putative GRE2) from S. stipitis was highly induced in response to furfural and HMF stresses. Overexpression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae improved yeast tolerance to furfural and HMF. GRE2 was identified as an aldehyde reductase which can reduce furfural to FM with either NADH or NADPH as the co-factor and reduce HMF to FDM with NADPH as the co-factor. This enzyme can also reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that it is a member of the subclass "intermediate" of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Although GRE2 from S. stipitis is similar to GRE2 from S. cerevisiae in a three-dimensional structure, some differences were predicted. GRE2 from S. stipitis forms loops at D133-E137 and T143-N145 locations with two α-helices at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations, different GRE2 from S. cerevisiae with an α-helix at D133-E137 and a β-sheet at T143-N145 locations, and two loops at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations. This research provided guidelines for the study of other SDR enzymes from S. stipitis and other yeasts on tolerant mechanisms to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:27003269

  16. Copper-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Alkenylzirconocenes with Carbon Dioxide Leading to α,β-Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Shao, Peng; Chen, Chao; Xi, Chanjuan

    2015-10-16

    A variety of alkenylzirconocenes were efficiently carboxylated by CO2 utilizing the (IMes)CuCl catalyst yielding the corresponding α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids in good yields. This reaction could be carried out in a one-pot operation via sequential carbozirconation of alkynes and carboxylation using CO2 as starting materials under room temperature. PMID:26406296

  17. Pyrolysis Mechanisms of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.; Eskay, T.P.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-12-31

    Although decarboxylation of carboxylic acids is widely used in organic synthesis, there is limited mechanistic information on the uncatalyzed reaction pathways of aromatic carboxylic acids at 300-400 {degrees} C. The pyrolysis mechanisms of 1,2-(3,3-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane, 1,2-(4,4-dicarboxylphenyl)ethane, 1-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4- biphenyl)ethane, and substituted benzoic acids have been investigated at 325-425 {degrees} C neat and diluted in an inert solvent. Decarboxylation is the dominant pyrolysis path. Arrhenius parameters, substituent effects, and deuterium isotope effects are consistent with decarboxylation by an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. Pyrolysis of benzoic acid in naphthalene, as a solvent, produces significant amounts of 1- and 2-phenylnaphthalenes. The mechanistic pathways for decarboxylation and arylation with be presented.

  18. Enhancing proton conduction under low humidity by incorporating core-shell polymeric phosphonic acid submicrospheres into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Lingli; Wang, Jingtao; Xu, Tao; Dong, Hao; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2012-09-01

    Polymeric phosphonic acid submicrospheres (PPASs) with carboxylic acid cores and phosphonic acid shells are synthesized by distillation-precipitation polymerization. The structure and composition of PPASs are confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The PPASs are then incorporated into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) to fabricate composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The incorporated PPASs enlarge the ion-channel size of the composite membranes as testified by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), affording significantly enhanced water uptake and water retention. Compared with the membrane containing the polymeric carboxylic acid submicrospheres (PCASs), the PPASs-filled membrane exhibits higher proton conductivity owing to the higher water uptake and water retention of the PPASs and stronger acidity of phosphonic acid. The composite membrane with 15 wt.% PPASs displays the highest proton conductivity of 0.0187 S cm-1 at room temperature and 100% relative humidity (RH). At the RH as low as 20%, this membrane acquires a proton conductivity of 0.0066 S cm-1, 5 times higher than that of the SPEEK control membrane (0.0011 S cm-1) after 90 min testing, at 40 °C.

  19. Hypothalamic sensing of ketone bodies after prolonged cerebral exposure leads to metabolic control dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Lionel; Geller, Sarah; Hébert, Audrey; Repond, Cendrine; Fioramonti, Xavier; Leloup, Corinne; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies have been shown to transiently stimulate food intake and modify energy homeostasis regulatory systems following cerebral infusion for a moderate period of time (<6 hours). As ketone bodies are usually enhanced during episodes of fasting, this effect might correspond to a physiological regulation. In contrast, ketone bodies levels remain elevated for prolonged periods during obesity, and thus could play an important role in the development of this pathology. In order to understand this transition, ketone bodies were infused through a catheter inserted in the carotid to directly stimulate the brain for a period of 24 hours. Food ingested and blood circulating parameters involved in metabolic control as well as glucose homeostasis were determined. Results show that ketone bodies infusion for 24 hours increased food intake associated with a stimulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides. Moreover, insulinemia was increased and caused a decrease in glucose production despite an increased resistance to insulin. The present study confirms that ketone bodies reaching the brain stimulates food intake. Moreover, we provide evidence that a prolonged hyperketonemia leads to a dysregulation of energy homeostasis control mechanisms. Finally, this study shows that brain exposure to ketone bodies alters insulin signaling and consequently glucose homeostasis. PMID:27708432

  20. Omega-3-carboxylic acid (Epanova) for hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Alan; Lam, Sum

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a prevalent yet under-addressed condition, often seen in association with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, obesity, and physical inactivity. The control of triglyceride (TG) levels is essential to prevent the development of coronary artery disease and pancreatitis associated with hypertriglyceridemia. Omega-3-carboxylic acid (Epanova) is the third prescription omega-3 fatty acid product approved in the United States as an adjunct to diet for treating severe hypertriglyceridemia (≥ 500 mg/dL). At the approved dosage, it reduced baseline serum TG levels by 25-30% in a placebo-controlled study. It reduced serum TG levels by an additional 8-15% in patients who were already taking statin therapy. It appeared to have a better bioavailability profile compared with an equivalent dose of omega-3-acid ethyl ester (Lovaza) in both low-fat and high-fat diets. However, evidence behind the effects of omega-3-carboxylic acid on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and pancreatitis risk, is lacking. Overall, it is well tolerated, but may induce common gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea. At this time, omega-3-carboxylic acid is an alternative adjunct therapy (in addition to diet) for hypertriglyceridemia. Its potential clinical benefits over other omega-3 formulations have yet to be evaluated.

  1. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective.

  2. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective

  3. Asymmetric anti-selective Michael reaction of imidazole-modified ketones with trans-β-nitroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongxu; Wang, Linqing; Li, Dan; Han, Fengxia; Zhao, Depeng; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-19

    The successful application of imidazole-modified ketones in asymmetric anti-selective Michael reactions with trans-β-nitroalkenes is presented by employing a newly developed 3-bromothiophene-modified chiral diamine ligand. The corresponding conjugate adduct was submitted to further transformations with Grignard reagents to solve the problem of α-site selectivity of simple linear ketones. Additionally, the syn-selective product was obtained by treating the anti-selective adduct with a simple base. In this way, the site-specific products for both diastereomers in the asymmetric conjugate addition of simple ketones to nitroalkenes can be obtained. PMID:25446668

  4. Continuous flow synthesis of ketones from carbon dioxide and organolithium or Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Yang, Xiaoqing; He, Zhi; Mao, Xianwen; Hatton, T Alan; Jamison, Timothy F

    2014-08-01

    We describe an efficient continuous flow synthesis of ketones from CO2 and organolithium or Grignard reagents that exhibits significant advantages over conventional batch conditions in suppressing undesired symmetric ketone and tertiary alcohol byproducts. We observed an unprecedented solvent-dependence of the organolithium reactivity, the key factor in governing selectivity during the flow process. A facile, telescoped three-step-one-flow process for the preparation of ketones in a modular fashion through the in-line generation of organometallic reagents is also established. PMID:24961600

  5. A highly catalytic and selective conversion of carboxylic acids to 1-alkenes of one less carbon atom

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Nelson, J.A.; Byrne, M.P. )

    1993-01-01

    An equimolar mixture of a carboxylic acid and acetic anhydride produces a reagent combination that undergoes a highly efficient decarbonylation/dehydration at 250[degrees]C using either Pd- or Rh-based catalyst systems, affording excellent yields of the corresponding 1-alkenes and one less carbon atom. The stoichiometric and catalytic decarbonylation of aliphatic aldehydes and acid chlorides to alkanes and alkenes, respectively, by transition-metal complexes are well-known and synthetically useful transformations. Relatively little, however, has been reported concerning the analogous decarbonylation/dehydration of aliphatic carboxylic acids to olefins, with generally poor results achieved in terms of catalyst efficiency and selectivity toward terminal olefin formation in the product. For example, the decarbonylation/dehydration of stearic acid to heptadecane using a Rh-based catalyst was reported to proceed with a maximum catalyst turnover number (TON; moles of olefin product formed per mole of catalyst used) of ca. 250, with selectivities toward 1-heptadecene formation typically below 50%. Interestingly, results were presented in this work which suggested that the decarbonylation of stearic acid proceeded via intermediate formation of stearic anhydride. Use of a preformed, symmetrical anhydride is not desirable from an economic or synthetic viewpoint, particularly since its decarbonylation should result in the formation of equal amounts of olefin and carboxylic acid coproducts. The authors now report here that the use of a carboxylic acid substrate as an equimolar mixture with acetic anhydride (Ac[sub 2]O) produces a mixed anhydride system which undergoes an extremely facile decarbonylation reaction to provide a general and highly selective route to the corresponding 1-alkenes of one less carbon atom. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Extraction chemistry of fermentation product carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kertes, A.S.; King, C.J.

    1986-02-01

    Within the framework of a program aiming to improve the existing extractive recovery technology of fermentation products, the state of the art is critically reviewed. The acids under consideration are propionic, lactic, pyruvic, succinic, fumaric, maleic, malic, itaconic, tartaric, citric, and isocitric, all obtained by the aerobic fermentation of glucose via the glycolytic pathway and glyoxylate bypass. With no exception, it is the undissociated monomeric acid that is extracted into carbon-bonded and phosphorus-bonded oxygen donor extractants. In the organic phase, the acids are usually dimerized. The extractive transfer process obeys the Nernst law, and the measured partition coefficients range from about 0.003 for aliphatic hydrocarbons to about 2 to 3 for aliphatic alcohols and ketones to about 10 or more for organophosphates. Equally high distribution ratios are measured when long-chain tertiary amines are employed as extractants, forming bulky salts preferentially soluble in the organic phase. 123 references.

  7. New scavenger resin for the reversible linking and monoprotection of functionalized aromatic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingzhao; Ruijter, Eelco; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2004-10-28

    [reaction: see text] Polymer-supported benzylhydrazines were synthesized using poly(ethylene glycol) acrylamide (PEGA) resin. They can be used to scavenge electrophiles reactive with hydrazine. Especially aromatic aldehydes can be captured selectively, monoprotected, and reversibly linked in the presence of other functional groups, including electrophilic ones. Various reactions can be performed on these protectively linked aldehydes, which afterward can be released either with full restoration of the aldehyde function or, alternatively, with simultaneous conversion.

  8. Ionic liquid-supported aldehyde: a highly efficient scavenger for primary amines.

    PubMed

    Muthayala, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Novel aldehyde-functionalized ionic liquids have been synthesized and used as scavengers for primary amines in the synthesis of secondary amines. The yields of secondary amines are high (82-90%) with high purity. The advantages of the protocol over that with a polymer-supported aldehyde scavenger are the shorter reaction time, the homogeneous reaction medium, the high level of loading of the aldehyde group, easy monitoring of reaction, and characterization of intermediates.

  9. Ni-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling: Direct Transformation of Aldehydes to Esters and Amides

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Aaron M.; Dong, Vy M.

    2015-01-01

    By exploring a new mode of Ni-catalyzed cross-coupling, we have developed a protocol to transform both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into either esters or amides directly. The success of this oxidative coupling depends on the appropriate choice of catalyst and organic oxidant, including the use of either α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone or excess aldehyde. We present mechanistic data that supports a catalytic cycle involving oxidative addition into the aldehyde C–H bond. PMID:25424967

  10. Nickel-catalyzed dehydrogenative cross-coupling: direct transformation of aldehydes into esters and amides.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Aaron M; Dong, Vy M

    2015-01-19

    By exploring a new mode of nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling, a method to directly transform both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into either esters or amides has been developed. The success of this oxidative coupling depends on the appropriate choice of catalyst and organic oxidant, including the use of either α,α,α-trifluoroacetophenone or excess aldehyde. Mechanistic data that supports a catalytic cycle involving oxidative addition into the aldehyde C-H bond is also presented. PMID:25424967

  11. Betaine aldehyde, betaine, and choline levels in rat livers during ethanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chern, M K; Gage, D A; Pietruszko, R

    2000-12-01

    Betaine aldehyde levels were determined in rat livers following 4 weeks of ethanol feeding, employing the Lieber-De Carli liquid diet. The results showed that the levels of betaine aldehyde are unaffected by alcohol feeding to rats. These levels in both experimental and control animals were found to be quite low, 5.5 nmol/g liver. Betaine aldehyde levels have not been determined previously in mammalian liver because of methodological difficulties. This investigation employed fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy to determine the levels of betaine aldehyde, betaine, and choline. The decrease in betaine levels following ethanol administration confirmed the results of other investigators. Choline levels determined during this investigation were lower than previously reported. The reason for starting this investigation was the fact that the enzyme that catalyzes betaine aldehyde dehydrogenation to betaine, which is distributed in both mitochondria and the cytoplasm, was found to also metabolize acetaldehyde with K(m) and V(max) values lower than those for betaine aldehyde. Thus, it appeared likely that the metabolism of acetaldehyde during ethanol metabolism might inhibit betaine aldehyde conversion to betaine and thereby result in decreased betaine levels (Barak et al., Alcohol 13: 395-398, 1996). The fact that betaine aldehyde levels in alcohol-fed animals were similar to those in controls demonstrates that competition between acetaldehyde and betaine aldehyde for the same enzyme does not occur. This complete lack of competition suggests that betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mitochondrial matrix may totally metabolize betaine aldehyde to betaine without any involvement of cytoplasmic betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. PMID:11077045

  12. Development of soluble ester-linked aldehyde polymers for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Beaudette, Patrick; Rossi, Nicholas A A; Huesgen, Pitter F; Yu, Xifei; Shenoi, Rajesh A; Doucet, Alain; Overall, Christopher M; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2011-09-01

    High molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) was selected for development as a soluble polymer support for the targeted selection and release of primary-amine containing peptides from a complex mixture. HPG has been functionalized with ester-linked aldehyde groups that can bind primary-amine containing peptides via a reductive alkylation reaction. Once bound, the high molecular weight of the polymer facilitates separation from a complex peptide mixture by employing either a 30 kDa molecular weight cutoff membrane or precipitation in acetonitrile. Following the removal of unbound peptides and reagents, subsequent hydrolysis of the ester linker releases the bound peptide into solution for analysis by mass spectrometry. Released peptides retain the linker moiety and are therefore characteristically mass-shifted. Four water-soluble cleavable aldehyde polymers (CAP1, CAP2, CAP3, and CAP4) ranging in types of linker groups, length of the linker groups, have been prepared and characterized, each demonstrating the ability to selectively enrich and sequence primary-amine peptides from a complex human proteome containing blocked (dimethylated amine) and unblocked (primary amine) peptides. The polymers have very low nonspecific peptide-binding properties while possessing significantly more reactive groups per milligram of the support than commercially available resins. The polymers exhibit a range of reactivities and binding capacities that depend on the type of linker group between the aldehyde group and the polymer. Using various linker structures, we also probed the mechanism of the observed dehydration of hydrolyzed peptides during matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis.

  13. Interstellar Aldehydes and their corresponding Reduced Alcohols: Interstellar Propanol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    There is a well-defined trend of aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols among the known interstellar molecules; methanal (CH_2O) and methanol (CH_3OH); ethenone (C_2H_2O) and vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH); ethanal (C_2H_4O) and ethanol(C_2H_5OH); glycolaldehyde (C_2H_4O_2) and ethylene glycol(C_2H_6O_2). The reduced alcohol of propanal (CH_3CH_2CHO) which is propanol (CH_3CH_2CH_2OH) has not yet been observed but its isomer; ethyl methyl ether (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) is a known interstellar molecule. In this article, different studies are carried out in investigating the trend between aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols and the deviation from the trend. Kinetically and with respect to the formation route, alcohols could have been produced from their corresponding reduced aldehydes via two successive hydrogen additions. This is plausible because of (a) the unquestionable high abundance of hydrogen, (b) presence of energy sources within some of the molecular clouds and (c) the ease at which successive hydrogen addition reaction occurs. In terms of stability, the observed alcohols are thermodynamically favorable as compared to their isomers. Regarding the formation process, the hydrogen addition reactions are believed to proceed on the surface of the interstellar grains which leads to the effect of interstellar hydrogen bonding. From the studies, propanol and propan-2-ol are found to be more strongly attached to the surface of the interstellar dust grains which affects its overall gas phase abundance as compared to its isomer ethyl methyl ether which has been observed.

  14. 1-Aza-niumyl-cyclo-butane-1-carboxyl-ate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Ray J; Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P

    2014-02-01

    In the title compound, C5H9NO2·H2O, the amino acid is in the usual zwitterionic form involving the α-carboxyl-ate group. The cyclo-butane backbone of the amino acid is disordered over two conformations, with occupancies of 0.882 (7) and 0.118 (7). In the crystal, N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the zwitterions [with the water molecule involved as both acceptor (with the NH3 (+)) and donor (through a single carboxylate O from two different aminocyclobutane carb-oxylate moities)], resulting in a two-dimensional layered structure lying parallel to (100). PMID:24764920

  15. Carboxylates and sulfated carboxylates as inhibitors of steel corrosion in neutral media

    SciTech Connect

    Podobaev, N.I.; Larionov, E.A.

    1995-03-01

    Effects of carboxylates and sulfocarboxylates as well as their mixtures with o-nitrobenzoate on the corrosion of St3 steel in freely aerated distilled water and 0.01 - 0.04 M NaCl solutions (pH 7) are studied electrochemically and by the gravimetric technique. A noticeable improvement of the protective properties of sulfated mustard soap and sulfated castor oil is observed after the addition of 20 mg/l o-nitrobenzoate. Armco iron spontaneously passivates in 0.25 M CH{sub 3}COONa solution at a certain content of inhibitors and under a hydrodynamical regime. Sulfated carboxylates suppress the anodic process more strongly than do nonsulfated carboxylates.

  16. Biological roles and therapeutic potential of hydroxy-carboxylic Acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kashan

    2011-01-01

    In the recent past, deorphanization studies have described intermediates of energy metabolism to activate G protein-coupled receptors and to thereby regulate metabolic functions. GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B, formerly known as the nicotinic acid receptor family, are encoded by clustered genes and share a high degree of sequence homology. Recently, hydroxy-carboxylic acids were identified as endogenous ligands of GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B, and therefore these receptors have been placed into a novel receptor family of hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA) receptors. The HCA(1) receptor (GPR81) is activated by the glycolytic metabolite 2-hydroxy-propionic acid (lactate), the HCA(2) receptor is activated by the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, and the HCA(3) receptor (GPR109B) is a receptor for the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. While HCA(1) and HCA(2) receptors are present in most mammalian species, the HCA(3) receptor is exclusively found in humans and higher primates. HCA receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and mediate anti-lipolytic effects in adipocytes through G(i)-type G protein-dependent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. HCA(2) and HCA(3) inhibit lipolysis during conditions of increased β-oxidation such as prolonged fasting, whereas HCA(1) mediates the anti-lipolytic effects of insulin in the fed state. As HCA(2) is a receptor for the established anti-dyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid, HCA(1) and HCA(3) also represent promising drug targets and several synthetic ligands for HCA receptors have been developed. In this article, we will summarize the deorphanization and pharmacological characterization of HCA receptors. Moreover, we will discuss recent progress in elucidating the physiological and pathophysiological role to further evaluate the therapeutic potential of the HCA receptor family for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  17. Some properties of aldehyde dehydrogenase from sheep liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, G J; Dickinson, F M

    1977-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase from sheep liver mitochondria was purified to homogeneity as judged by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels, and by sedimentation-equilibrium experiments in the analytical ultracentrifuge. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 198000 and a subunit size of 48000, indicating that the molecule is a tetramer. Fluorescence and spectrophotometric titrations indicate that each subunit can bind 1 molecule of NADH. Enzymic activity is completely blocked by reaction of 4mol of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoate)/mol of enzyme. Excess of disulfiram or iodoacetamide decreases activity to only 50% of the control value, and only two thiol groups per molecule are apparently modified by these reagents. PMID:194582

  18. [Activity of aldehyde scavenger enzymes in the heart of rats of different age during immobilized stress].

    PubMed

    Grabovetskaia, E R; Davydov, V V

    2009-01-01

    This study was made to determine the activity of aldehyde scavenger enzymes in the heart's postmitochondrial fraction of rats of different age during immobilization stress. Our study demonstrated, that immobilization of 1.5-, 2- and 12-month rats was accompanied by inhibiting activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase. At the same time we observed an increase in glutathione transferase activity in immobilized 1.5-month-old rats and that in reductase activity in 24-month-old rats. The revealed changes can lead to a decrease in the rate of endogenous aldehyde utilization in the heart during stress at puberty.

  19. Investigation and identification of protein γ-glutamyl carboxylation sites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Carboxylation is a modification of glutamate (Glu) residues which occurs post-translation that is catalyzed by γ-glutamyl carboxylase in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Vitamin K is a critical co-factor in the post-translational conversion of Glu residues to γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla) residues. It has been shown that the process of carboxylation is involved in the blood clotting cascade, bone growth, and extraosseous calcification. However, studies in this field have been limited by the difficulty of experimentally studying substrate site specificity in γ-glutamyl carboxylation. In silico investigations have the potential for characterizing carboxylated sites before experiments are carried out. Results Because of the importance of γ-glutamyl carboxylation in biological mechanisms, this study investigates the substrate site specificity in carboxylation sites. It considers not only the composition of amino acids that surround carboxylation sites, but also the structural characteristics of these sites, including secondary structure and solvent-accessible surface area (ASA). The explored features are used to establish a predictive model for differentiating between carboxylation sites and non-carboxylation sites. A support vector machine (SVM) is employed to establish a predictive model with various features. A five-fold cross-validation evaluation reveals that the SVM model, trained with the combined features of positional weighted matrix (PWM), amino acid composition (AAC), and ASA, yields the highest accuracy (0.892). Furthermore, an independent testing set is constructed to evaluate whether the predictive model is over-fitted to the training set. Conclusions Independent testing data that did not undergo the cross-validation process shows that the proposed model can differentiate between carboxylation sites and non-carboxylation sites. This investigation is the first to study carboxylation sites and to develop a system for identifying them. The

  20. Structural Studies of Yeast Δ1-Pyrroline-5-carboxylate Dehydrogenase (ALDH4A1): Active Site Flexibility and Oligomeric State

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The proline catabolic enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (ALDH4A1) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of γ-glutamate semialdehyde to l-glutamate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ALDH4A1 is encoded by the PUT2 gene and known as Put2p. Here we report the steady-state kinetic parameters of the purified recombinant enzyme, two crystal structures of Put2p, and the determination of the oligomeric state and quaternary structure from small-angle X-ray scattering and sedimentation velocity. Using Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate as the substrate, catalytic parameters kcat and Km were determined to be 1.5 s–1 and 104 μM, respectively, with a catalytic efficiency of 14000 M–1 s–1. Although Put2p exhibits the expected aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily fold, a large portion of the active site is disordered in the crystal structure. Electron density for the 23-residue aldehyde substrate-binding loop is absent, implying substantial conformational flexibility in solution. We furthermore report a new crystal form of human ALDH4A1 (42% identical to Put2p) that also shows disorder in this loop. The crystal structures provide evidence of multiple active site conformations in the substrate-free form of the enzyme, which is consistent with a conformational selection mechanism of substrate binding. We also show that Put2p forms a trimer-of-dimers hexamer in solution. This result is unexpected because human ALDH4A1 is dimeric, whereas some bacterial ALDH4A1s are hexameric. Thus, global sequence identity and domain of life are poor predictors of the oligomeric states of ALDH4A1. Mutation of a single Trp residue that forms knob-in-hole interactions across the dimer–dimer interface abrogates hexamer formation, suggesting that this residue is the center of a protein–protein association hot spot. PMID:24502590

  1. Comparison of capillary blood ketone measurement by electrochemical method and urinary ketone in treatment of diabetic ketosis and ketoacidosis in children.

    PubMed

    Turan, Serap; Omar, Anjumanara; Bereket, Abdullah

    2008-06-01

    We aimed to compare the recent practical method of capillary beta-hydroxy butyrate (betaOHB) measurement with the widely used urinary ketone measurement in monitoring metabolic status of the patient during treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetic ketosis (DK). Patients with DKA and DK admitted to the hospital were followed with simultaneous measurements of capillary betaOHB by electrochemical method (Medisense Optium, Abbott), and urinary ketone by semi-quantitative method. Blood gases were measured in 2-4 h intervals. Fourteen patients with DKA/DK (7 males and 7 females, age: 9.2 +/- 4.2 years) were included with 50 simultaneous measurements of capillary and urinary ketone. No correlation was detected between urinary ketone and blood pH (P = 0.06) and HCO3 (P = 0.79), whereas a significant negative correlation was found between capillary betaOHB and blood pH (r = -0.41, P < 0.05) and HCO3 (r = -0.35, P < 0.05). Capillary betaOHB and urinary ketone levels did not correlate at the beginning and 3.3 +/- 1.4 h after treatment, but did correlate in the third samples taken 7.8 +/- 2.0 h after treatment (r = 0.8, P < 0.05). Capillary betaOHB levels show good correlation with the degree of acidosis (pH and HCO3). Capillary betaOHB measurement is more sensitive than urinary ketone measurement in reflecting the patient's metabolic status and improvement during treatment.

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rescues myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury: role of autophagy paradox and toxic aldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heng; Guo, Rui; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Aims The present study was designed to examine the mechanism involved in mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2)-induced cardioprotection against ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury with a focus on autophagy. Methods Wild-type (WT), ALDH2 overexpression, and knockout (KO) mice (n = 4–6 for each index measured) were subjected to I/R, and myocardial function was assessed using echocardiographic, Langendroff, and edge-detection systems. Western blotting was used to evaluate AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, autophagy, and the AMPK/Akt upstream signalling LKB1 and PTEN. Results ALDH2 overexpression and KO significantly attenuated and accentuated, respectively, infarct size, factional shortening, and recovery of post-ischaemic left ventricular function following I/R as well as hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Autophagy was induced during ischaemia and remained elevated during reperfusion. ALDH2 significantly promoted autophagy during ischaemia, which was accompanied by AMPK activation and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition. On the contrary, ALDH2 overtly inhibited autophagy during reperfusion accompanied by the activation of Akt and mTOR. Inhibition and induction of autophagy mitigated ALDH2-induced protection against cell death in hypoxia and reoxygenation, respectively. In addition, levels of the endogenous toxic aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) were elevated by ischaemia and reperfusion, which was abrogated by ALDH2. Furthermore, ALDH2 ablated 4-HNE-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction and protein damage, whereas 4-HNE directly decreased pan and phosphorylated LKB1 and PTEN expression. Conclusion Our data suggest a myocardial protective effect of ALDH2 against I/R injury possibly through detoxification of toxic aldehyde and a differential regulation of autophagy through AMPK- and Akt-mTOR signalling during ischaemia and reperfusion, respectively. PMID:20705694

  3. L-tryptophan reacts with naturally occurring and food-occurring phenolic aldehydes to give phenolic tetrahydro-beta-carboline alkaloids: activity as antioxidants and free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomas; Galisteo, Juan; Chamorro, Cristina

    2003-04-01

    The reaction between the essential amino acid l-tryptophan and flavoring or naturally occurring phenyl and phenolic aldehydes was studied, and the alkaloidal reaction products were characterized by NMR and HPLC-MS. Benzaldehyde, vanillin, syringaldehyde, salicylaldehyde, and anisaldehyde condensed with l-tryptophan in aqueous-acidic media affording the corresponding phenolic tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid as two diastereoisomers, 1S,3S-cis and 1R,3S-trans. With the exception of benzaldehyde, the rest of the aldehydes needed heating conditions (70 degrees C) to significantly form tetrahydro-beta-carbolines over time with the cyclization highly favored at low pH. This suggests a likely formation of these compounds under conditions that may occur in foods, food processing, or cooking. The new phenolic tetrahydro-beta-carboline alkaloids were assayed, for the first time, for their activity as free radical scavengers and antioxidants and showed good antioxidant properties with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values much higher than those of ascorbic acid and the water soluble vitamin E analogue, Trolox, in the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) assay.

  4. Synthesis of cyclic enones via direct palladium-catalyzed aerobic dehydrogenation of ketones.

    PubMed

    Diao, Tianning; Stahl, Shannon S

    2011-09-21

    α,β-Unsaturated carbonyl compounds are versatile intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and biologically active compounds. Here, we report the discovery and application of Pd(DMSO)(2)(TFA)(2) as a catalyst for direct dehydrogenation of cyclohexanones and other cyclic ketones to the corresponding enones, using O(2) as the oxidant. The substrate scope includes heterocyclic ketones and several natural-product precursors. PMID:21851123

  5. Synthesis of Cyclic Enones via Direct Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Dehydrogenation of Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Tianning

    2011-01-01

    α,β-Unsaturated carbonyl compounds are versatile intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and biologically active compounds. Here, we report the discovery and application of Pd(DMSO)2(TFA)2 as a catalyst for direct dehydrogenation of cyclohexanones and other cyclic ketones to the corresponding enones, using O2 as the oxidant. The substrate scope includes heterocyclic ketones and several natural-product precursors. PMID:21851123

  6. Evidence for an effect of insulin on the peripheral utilization of ketone bodies in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Balasse, E. O.; Havel, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The rates of transport and oxidation of acetoacetate have been measured in seven anesthetized, pancreatectomized, ketotic dogs using a constant infusion of acetoacetate-3-14C. Control experiments were performed in 14 normal dogs. In addition to the acetoacetate-14C, the latter were infused at a constant rate with varying amounts of unlabeled acetoacetate so as to obtain a range of ketone transport (26-65 μmoles/min·kg) comparable with that observed in the diabetic dogs (21-41 μmoles/min·kg). The specific activities of acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate in blood became equal during the infusion of labeled acetoacetate, indicating that the net transport of acetoacetate represents that of total ketones. In each group, the concentration of ketones was an exponential function of the rate of transport, but for any value below 30 μmoles/min·kg, ketone concentration in the diabetic dogs was about 3 times that in normal dogs, indicating an impairment of mechanisms for utilizing ketones in insulin deficient animals. Maximal capacity to utilize ketones in diabetic dogs was slightly more than half that of normal ones. A similar fraction (32-63%) of the infused 14C appeared in respiratory CO2 in the two groups and was independent of the rate of transport. In seven of the normal dogs, administration of insulin and glucose increased removal of the infused ketones and increased the fraction of 14C appearing in respiratory CO2. These results demonstrate that utilization of ketones in extrahepatic tissues is influenced by insulin; impaired utilization contributes to diabetic ketosis and is probably essential to the production of severe ketoacidosis. PMID:4993858

  7. Using positron emission tomography to study human ketone body metabolism: a review.

    PubMed

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Andersen, Lone Thing; Møller, Niels; Gormsen, Lars Christian

    2014-11-01

    Ketone bodies - 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate - are important fuel substrates, which can be oxidized by most tissues in the body. They are synthesized in the liver and are derived from fatty acids released from adipose tissue. Intriguingly, under conditions of stress such as fasting, arterio-venous catheterization studies have shown that the brain switches from the use of almost 100% glucose to the use of >50-60% ketone bodies. A similar adaptive mechanism is observed in the heart, where fasting induces a shift toward ketone body uptake that provides the myocardium with an alternate fuel source and also favorably affects myocardial contractility. Within the past years there has been a renewed interest in ketone bodies and the possible beneficial effects of fasting/semi-fasting/exercising and other "ketogenic" regimens have received much attention. In this perspective, it is promising that positron emission tomography (PET) techniques with isotopically labeled ketone bodies, fatty acids and glucose offer an opportunity to study interactions between ketone body, fatty acid and glucose metabolism in tissues such as the brain and heart. PET scans are non-invasive and thus eliminates the need to place catheters in vascular territories not easily accessible. The short half-life of e.g. 11C-labeled PET tracers even allows multiple scans on the same study day and reduces the total radiation burden associated with the procedure. This short review aims to give an overview of current knowledge on ketone body metabolism obtained by PET studies and discusses the methodological challenges and perspectives involved in PET ketone body research. PMID:25195069

  8. Preparation of aliphatic ketones through a ruthenium-catalyzed tandem cross-metathesis/allylic alcohol isomerization.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, David; Seigal, Benjamin A; Snapper, Marc L

    2006-06-01

    Grubbs' 2nd generation and Hoveyda-Grubbs' ruthenium alkylidenes are shown to be effective catalysts for cross-metatheses of allylic alcohols with cyclic and acyclic olefins, as well as isomerization of the resulting allylic alcohols to alkyl ketones. The net result of this new tandem methodology is a single-flask process that provides highly functionalized, ketone-containing products from simple allylic alcohol precursors. [reaction: see text

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 in stem cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tanaka, Takuji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains 19 putatively functional aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, which encode enzymes critical for detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehyde substrates through NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation. ALDH1 has three main isotypes, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3, and is a marker of normal tissue stem cells (SC) and cancer stem cells (CSC), where it is involved in self-renewal, differentiation and self-protection. Experiments with murine and human cells indicate that ALDH1 activity, predominantly attributed to isotype ALDH1A1, is tissue- and cancer-specific. High ALDH1 activity and ALDH1A1 overexpression are associated with poor cancer prognosis, though high ALDH1 and ALDH1A1 levels do not always correlate with highly malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome. In cancer therapy, ALDH1A1 provides a useful therapeutic CSC target in tissue types that normally do not express high levels of ALDH1A1, including breast, lung, esophagus, colon and stomach. Here we review the functions and mechanisms of ALDH1A1, the key ALDH isozyme linked to SC populations and an important contributor to CSC function in cancers, and we outline its potential in future anticancer strategies. PMID:26783961

  10. Volatile aldehydes are promising broad-spectrum postharvest insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hammond, D G; Rangel, S; Kubo, I

    2000-09-01

    A variety of naturally occurring aldehydes common in plants have been evaluated for their insecticidal activity and for phytotoxicity to postharvest fruits, vegetables, and grains. Twenty-nine compounds were initially screened for their activity against aphids on fava bean leaf disks. Application under reduced pressure (partial vacuum) for the first quarter of fumigation increased insecticidal activity severalfold. The 11 best aldehydes were assayed against aphids placed under the third leaf of whole heads of iceberg lettuce using the same two-tier reduced-pressure regime, which caused no additional detriment to the commodity over fumigation at atmospheric pressure. Phytotoxicity to naked and wrapped iceburg lettuce, green and red table grapes, lemon, grapefruit, orange, broccoli, avocado, cabbage, pinto bean, and rice at doses that killed 100% of aphids was recorded for three promising fumigants: propanal, (E)-2-pentenal, and 2-methyl-(E)-2-butenal. These three compounds have excellent potential as affordable postharvest insect control agents, killing 100% of the aphids with little or no detectable harm to a majority of the commodities tested. Preliminary assays indicate that similar doses are also effective against mealybugs, thrips, and whitefly. PMID:10995371

  11. Modulation of therapy-induced senescence by reactive lipid aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Flor, A C; Doshi, A P; Kron, S J

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding points to unrepairable chromosomal damage as the critical determinant of accelerated senescence in cancer cells treated with radiation or chemotherapy. Nonetheless, the potent senescence inducer etoposide not only targets topoisomerase II to induce DNA damage but also produces abundant free radicals, increasing cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Toward examining roles for DNA damage and oxidative stress in therapy-induced senescence, we developed a quantitative flow cytometric senescence assay and screened 36 redox-active agents as enhancers of an otherwise ineffective dose of radiation. While senescence failed to correlate with total ROS, the radiation enhancers, etoposide and the other effective topoisomerase inhibitors each produced high levels of lipid peroxidation. The reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, a lipid peroxidation end product, was sufficient to induce senescence in irradiated cells. In turn, sequestering aldehydes with hydralazine blocked effects of etoposide and other senescence inducers. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation potentiates DNA damage from radiation and chemotherapy to drive therapy-induced senescence. PMID:27453792

  12. Toxic Diatom Aldehydes Affect Defence Gene Networks in Sea Urchins

    PubMed Central

    Varrella, Stefano; Ruocco, Nadia; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G.; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms possess a series of cellular strategies to counteract the negative effects of toxic compounds, including the massive reorganization of gene expression networks. Here we report the modulated dose-dependent response of activated genes by diatom polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. PUAs are secondary metabolites deriving from the oxidation of fatty acids, inducing deleterious effects on the reproduction and development of planktonic and benthic organisms that feed on these unicellular algae and with anti-cancer activity. Our previous results showed that PUAs target several genes, implicated in different functional processes in this sea urchin. Using interactomic Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we now show that the genes targeted by PUAs are correlated with four HUB genes, NF-κB, p53, δ-2-catenin and HIF1A, which have not been previously reported for P. lividus. We propose a working model describing hypothetical pathways potentially involved in toxic aldehyde stress response in sea urchins. This represents the first report on gene networks affected by PUAs, opening new perspectives in understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the response of benthic organisms to diatom exposure. PMID:26914213

  13. Direct electrochemistry of the Desulfovibrio gigas aldehyde oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Correia dos Santos, Margarida M; Sousa, Patrícia M P; Gonçalves, M Lurdes S; Romão, M João; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2004-04-01

    This work reports on the direct electrochemistry of the Desulfovibrio gigas aldehyde oxidoreductase (DgAOR), a molybdenum enzyme of the xanthine oxidase family that contains three redox-active cofactors: two [2Fe-2S] centers and a molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor. The voltammetric behavior of the enzyme was analyzed at gold and carbon (pyrolytic graphite and glassy carbon) electrodes. Two different strategies were used: one with the molecules confined to the electrode surface and a second with DgAOR in solution. In all of the cases studied, electron transfer took place, although different redox reactions were responsible for the voltammetric signal. From a thorough analysis of the voltammetric responses and the structural properties of the molecular surface of DgAOR, the redox reaction at the carbon electrodes could be assigned to the reduction of the more exposed iron cluster, [2Fe-2S] II, whereas reduction of the molybdopterin cofactor occurs at the gold electrode. Voltammetric results in the presence of aldehydes are also reported and discussed.

  14. Residual Particle Sizes of Evaporating Droplets: Ammonium Sulfate and Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, N.; Galloway, M. M.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    The reactions of carbonyls like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde, with ammonium salts have been proposed as significant sources of atmospheric organic aerosol. Aerosol containing these compounds was generated in the laboratory using the Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG). The particles were completely dried before they were measured using a SMPS system. The nonvolatile fraction of the resulting aerosol was measured. The drying times were varied between two and twenty minutes, and for ammonium sulfate and glyoxal reactions, minimum residual particle sizes were reached after 3.5 minutes. Reactions of glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate appeared to have lower non-volatile fractions remaining at higher starting concentrations, suggesting that a constant 'excess volume,' likely water, was present in the residual particles that could not be evaporated even after 20 minutes of drying. These excess volumes were not observed in our previous experiments with aldehydes but no ammonium sulfate present. At the highest concentrations tested (100 uM), non-volatile fractions of aldehydes present in residual particles were 16 (±17) %, 41 (±28) %, and 17(±32) % for glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal, respectively.

  15. Indoor air chemistry: Formation of organic acids and aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Lioy, P.J. ||; Wilson, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    Laying emphasis on the formation of aldehydes and organic acids, the study has examined the gas-phase reactions of ozone with unsaturated VOCs. The formation of formaldehyde and formic acid was observed for all the three selected unsaturated VOCs: styrene, limonene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. In addition, benzaldehyde was detected in the styrene-ozone-air reaction system, and acetic acid was also found in limonene-ozone-air system. The study has also examined the gas-phase reactions among formaldehyde, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide and found the formation of formic acid. The nitrate radical was suggested to play an important role in converting formaldehyde into formic acid. Experiments for all the reactions were conducted by using a 4.3 m{sup 3} Teflon chamber. Since the conditions for the reactions were similar to those for indoor environments, the results from the study can be implicated to real indoor situations and can be employed to support the findings and suggestions from the previous studies: certain aldehydes and organic acids could be generated by indoor chemistry.

  16. Spotting optimization for oligo microarrays on aldehyde-glass.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Erica D; Reppert, Amy E; Rowlen, Kathy L; Kuck, Laura R

    2005-06-15

    Low-density microarrays that utilize short oligos (<100 nt) for capture are highly attractive for use in diagnostic applications, yet these experiments require strict quality control and meticulous reproducibility. However, a survey of current literature indicates vast inconsistencies in the spotting and processing procedures. In this study, spotting and processing protocols were optimized for aldehyde-functionalized glass substrates. Figures of merit were developed for quantitative comparison of spot quality and reproducibility. Experimental variables examined included oligo concentration in the spotting buffer, composition of the spotting buffer, postspotting "curing" conditions, and postspotting wash conditions. Optimized conditions included the use of 3-4 microM oligo in a 3x standard saline citrate/0.05% sodium dodecyl sulfate/0.001% (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonia]-1-propane sulfonate) spotting buffer, 24-h postspotting reaction at 100% relative humidity, and a four-step wash procedure. Evaluation of six types of aldehyde-functionalized glass substrates indicated that those manufactured by CEL Associates, Inc. yield the highest oligo coverage.

  17. Toxic Diatom Aldehydes Affect Defence Gene Networks in Sea Urchins.

    PubMed

    Varrella, Stefano; Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Susan; Ruocco, Nadia; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms possess a series of cellular strategies to counteract the negative effects of toxic compounds, including the massive reorganization of gene expression networks. Here we report the modulated dose-dependent response of activated genes by diatom polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. PUAs are secondary metabolites deriving from the oxidation of fatty acids, inducing deleterious effects on the reproduction and development of planktonic and benthic organisms that feed on these unicellular algae and with anti-cancer activity. Our previous results showed that PUAs target several genes, implicated in different functional processes in this sea urchin. Using interactomic Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we now show that the genes targeted by PUAs are correlated with four HUB genes, NF-κB, p53, δ-2-catenin and HIF1A, which have not been previously reported for P. lividus. We propose a working model describing hypothetical pathways potentially involved in toxic aldehyde stress response in sea urchins. This represents the first report on gene networks affected by PUAs, opening new perspectives in understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the response of benthic organisms to diatom exposure. PMID:26914213

  18. Flow-Induced Crystallization of Poly(ether ether ketone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Behzad; Rhoades, Alicyn; Colby, Ralph

    The effects of an interval of shear above the melting temperature Tm on subsequent isothermal crystallization below Tm is reported for the premier engineering thermoplastic, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK). The effect of shear on the crystallization rate of PEEK is investigated by means of rheological techniques and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under a protocol of imposing shear in a rotational cone and plate rheometer and monitoring crystallization after quenching. The rate of crystallization at 320 °C was not affected by shear for shear rates <7 s-1 at 350 °C, whereas intervals of adequate shear at higher shear rates prior to the quench to 320 °C accelerated crystallization significantly. As the duration of the interval of shear above 7 s-1 is increased, the crystallization time decreases but at each shear rate eventually saturates once the applied specific work exceeds ~120 MPa. The annealing of the flow-induced precursors was also investigated. The nuclei were fairly persistent at temperatures close to 350 °C, however very unstable at temperatures above 375 °C. This suggests that the nanostructures formed under shear might be akin to crystalline lamellae of greater thickness, compared to quiescently crystallized lamellae.

  19. Determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tai, D.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical procedures for the determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water samples were developed. Concentrations in the milligram-per-liter range were determined by injecting an aqueous sample into the analysis system through an injection port, trapping the organics on Tenax-GC at room temperature, and thermally desorbing the organics into a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector for analysis. Concentrations in the microgram-per-liter range were determined by sweeping the headspace vapors over a water sample at 50C, trapping on Tenax-GC, and thermally desorbing the organics into the gas chromatograph. The precision for two operators of the milligram-per-liter concentration procedure, expressed as the coefficient of variation, was generally less than 2 percent for concentrations ranging from 16 to 160 milligrams per liter. The precision from two operators of the microgram-per-liter concentration procedure was between 2 and 4 percent for concentrations of 20 and 60 micrograms per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Catalytic, Enantioselective Sulfenylation of Ketone-Derived Enoxysilanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A catalytic, enantioselective, Lewis base-catalyzed α-sulfenylation of silyl enol ethers has been developed. To avoid acidic hydrolysis of the silyl enol ether substrates, a sulfenylating agent that did not require additional Brønsted acid activation, namely N-phenylthiosaccharin, was developed. Three classes of Lewis bases—tertiary amines, sulfides, and selenophosphoramides—were identified as active catalysts for the α-sulfenylation reaction. Among a wide variety of chiral Lewis bases in all three classes, only chiral selenophosphoramides afforded α-phenylthio ketones in generally high yield and with good enantioselectivity. The selectivity of the reaction does not depend on the size of the silyl group but is highly sensitive to the double bond geometry and the bulk of the substituents on the double bond. The most selective substrates are those containing a geminal bulky substituent on the enoxysilane. Computational analysis revealed that the enantioselectivity arises from an intriguing interplay among sterically guided approach, distortion energy, and orbital interactions. PMID:25192220

  1. Vibrational Study Of Poly(Ether Ether Ketone).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiere, M.

    1989-12-01

    The medium infrared region (4000-400cm-1) has been widely used to study crystallinity because differences could be observed in the vibrational spectrum of several polymers which could be related to crystallinity as determined by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and density measurements. However, as crystallinity is concerned with packing of chains and interactions between neighboor chains, the absorption bands arising from such vibrations appear therefore at wavenumbers below 400 cm -1. Poly-(oxy-1,4-phenyleneoxy-1,4-phenylenecarbonyl-1,4-phenylene) or poly(aryl ether ether ketone) (PEEK),commercially introduced by ICI1, has been attracting increasing interest. It is a semicrystalline polymer with an unusual combination of properties such as high chemical resistance, excellent thermal stability as good mechanical properties. Taking into account of its high temperature high strength characteristics and melt processability, PEEK is generating interest for applications such as reinforced composites, coatings, electrical connectors, impeller housings... Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a quick and powerful tool to investigate orientation and/or crystallinity in polymeric materials.

  2. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α modulates systemic ketone body homeostasis and ameliorates diabetic hyperketonemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Kristoffer; Albert, Verena; Cardel, Bettina; Salatino, Silvia; Handschin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies are crucial energy substrates during states of low carbohydrate availability. However, an aberrant regulation of ketone body homeostasis can lead to complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Exercise and diabetes affect systemic ketone body homeostasis, but the regulation of ketone body metabolism is still enigmatic. Using mice with either a knockout or overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in skeletal muscle, we show that PGC-1α regulates ketolytic gene transcription in muscle. Furthermore, ketone body homeostasis of these mice was investigated during fasting, exercise, ketogenic diet feeding and after streptozotocin injection. In response to these ketogenic stimuli, we show that modulation of PGC-1α levels in muscle affects systemic ketone body homeostasis. Moreover, our data demonstrate that skeletal muscle PGC-1α is necessary for the enhanced ketolytic capacity in response to exercise training and overexpression of PGC-1α in muscle enhances systemic ketolytic capacity and is sufficient to ameliorate diabetic hyperketonemia in mice. Using cultured myotubes, we also show that the transcription factor estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) is a partner of PGC-1α in the regulation of ketolytic gene transcription. Collectively, these results demonstrate a central role of skeletal muscle PGC-1α in the transcriptional regulation of systemic ketolytic capacity. PMID:26849960

  3. Studies on the interaction between ethanol and two industrial solvents (methyl isobutyl ketone) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granvil, C.P.; Sharkawi, M.; Plaa, G.L. )

    1991-03-11

    Methyl n-butyl ketone (MnBK) and methyl isobutyl ketone (MiBK) prolong the duration of ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex (EILRR) in mice. MnBK was almost twice as potent in this regard. To explain this difference, the metabolism of both ketones was studied in male CD-1 mice using GC. MiBK was converted to 4-methyl-2-pentanol (4MPOL) and 4-hydroxy methyl isobutyl ketone (HMP). MnBK metabolites were 2-hexanol (2HOL) and 2,5-hexanedione (2,5HD). The effects of both ketones and metabolites on EILRR and ethanol (E) elimination were studied in mice. The ketones and their metabolites were dissolved in corn oil and injected intraperitoneally 30 min before E 4g/kg for EILRR and 2g/kg for E elimination. In the following doses: MnBK, 5; MiBK, 5; 2HOL, 2.5; 4MPOL, 2.5; and HMP 2.5, significantly prolonged EILRR. Concentrations of E in blood and brain upon return of the righting reflex were similar in solvent-treated and control animals. The mean elimination rate of E was slower in groups given MnBK or 2HOL than in control animals. No change in E elimination was observed with MiBK, HMP, 4MPOL, or 2, 5HD.

  4. Effect of exercise on the disposal of infused ketone bodies in humans.

    PubMed

    Féry, F; Balasse, E O

    1988-08-01

    We previously reported that the stimulatory effect of exercise on the metabolic clearance of ketone bodies in postabsorptive subjects is abolished when plasma ketone body concentrations are elevated above 4 mmol/L by prior fasting. In this study we determined whether this process is related to fasting or to hyperketonemia itself. Eight normal postabsorptive subjects were rendered artificially hyperketonemic (approximately 6 mmol/L) by a constant infusion of acetoacetate and exercised moderately for 2 h. The kinetics of ketone bodies were determined with [14C]acetoacetate or beta-[14C]hydroxybutyrate. The metabolic clearance was slightly increased (approximately 25%) at the beginning of exercise, but this phenomenon was subsequently amplified by the progressive fall in ketonemia, which decreased to about 4 mmol/L at the end of exercise. Taking into account the fact that the metabolic clearance of ketones is inversely related to their concentration, it could be estimated that the direct effect of exercise on the metabolic clearance is negligible. Thus, the inability of exercise to enhance the metabolic clearance of ketones at high physiological plasma ketone levels is a general phenomenon that applies to both endogenous and exogenous ketosis. PMID:3392162

  5. Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Palasz, P.D.; Ratcliff, M.A.

    1984-12-20

    A process is described for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems. It consists of adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8 to 9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids. The solution is oxidized to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes. The aldehydes are removed as they are generated and converted to peracids.

  6. Direct Ruthenium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Carboxylic Acids to Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinjiang; Li, Yuehui; Topf, Christoph; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    The "green" reduction of carboxylic acids to alcohols is a challenging task in organic chemistry. Herein, we describe a general protocol for generation of alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. Key to success is the use of a combination of Ru(acac)3, triphos and Lewis acids. The novel method showed broad substrate tolerance and a variety of aliphatic carboxylic acids including biomass-derived compounds can be smoothly reduced.

  7. A Novel NADPH-Dependent Aldehyde Reductase Gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-12632 Involved in the Detoxification of Aldehyde Inhibitors Derived from Lignocellulosic Biomass Conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), anisaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and phenylaldehyde are commonly generated during lignocellulosic biomass conversion process for low-cost cellulosic ethanol production that interferes with subsequent microbial growth and...

  8. Pd(II)-catalyzed ligand controlled synthesis of methyl 1-benzyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylates and bis(1-benzyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methanones.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rong; Kusakabe, Taichi; Takahashi, Keisuke; Kato, Keisuke

    2014-07-14

    A simple change of ligand and solvent allows controlled, effective switching between cyclization-carbonylation and cyclization-carbonylation-cyclization-coupling (CCC-coupling) reactions of 2-alkynylanilines catalyzed by palladium(II). The use of a [Pd(tfa)2(box)] catalyst in iPrOH afforded symmetrical ketones bearing two indoles in good yields; replacing the catalyst and solvent with Pd(tfa)2 and DMSO-MeOH led to the formation of methyl 1-benzyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylates in good yields.

  9. Decarboxylative Fluorination of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids via Photoredox Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Sandrine; Petronijevic, Filip R.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2016-01-01

    The direct conversion of aliphatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alkyl fluorides has been achieved via visible light-promoted photoredox catalysis. This operationally simple, redox-neutral fluorination method is amenable to a wide variety of carboxylic acids. Photon-induced oxidation of carboxylates leads to the formation of carboxyl radicals, which upon rapid CO2-extrusion and F• transfer from a fluorinating reagent yield the desired fluoroalkanes with high efficiency. Experimental evidence indicates that an oxidative quenching pathway is operable in this broadly applicable fluorination protocol. PMID:25881929

  10. Acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity: the role of the acyclovir aldehyde metabolite.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Patrina; Aleksa, Katarina; Bend, John; Koren, Gideon

    2011-11-01

    For decades, acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity was believed to be secondary to crystalluria. Clinical evidence of nephrotoxicity in the absence of crystalluria suggests that acyclovir induces direct insult to renal tubular cells. We postulated that acyclovir is metabolized by the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme to acyclovir aldehyde, which is metabolized by the aldehyde dehydrognase 2 (ALDH2) enzyme to 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine (CMMG). We hypothesized that acyclovir aldehyde plays a role in acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity. Human renal proximal tubular (HK-2) cells were used as our in vitro model. Western blot and enzymes activities assays were performed to determine whether the HK-2 cells express ADH and ALDH2 isozymes, respectively. Cytotoxicity (measured as a function of cell viability) assays were conducted to determine (1) whether the acyclovir aldehyde plays a role in acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity and (2) whether CMMG induces cell death. A colorimetric assay was performed to determine whether acyclovir was metabolized to an aldehyde in vitro. Our results illustrated that (1) HK-2 cells express ADH and ALDH2 isozymes, (2) 4-methylpyrazole rendered significant protection against cell death, (3) CMMG does not induce cell death, and (4) acyclovir was metabolized to an aldehyde in tubular cells. These data indicate that acyclovir aldehyde is produced in HK-2 cells and that inhibition of its production by 4-methylpyrazole offers significant protection from cell death in vitro, suggesting that acyclovir aldehyde may cause the direct renal tubular insult associated with acyclovir.

  11. Metal-Free Direct Oxidation of Aldehydes to Esters Using TCCA.

    PubMed

    Gaspa, Silvia; Porcheddu, Andrea; De Luca, Lidia

    2015-08-01

    Aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes are simply converted into esters by an efficient oxidative esterification carried out under mild conditions. The aldehydes are converted in situ into their corresponding acyl chlorides, which are then reacted with primary and secondary aliphatic, benzylic, allylic, and propargylic alcohols and phenols. A variety of esters are obtained in high yields.

  12. Threshold responses in cinnamic-aldehyde-sensitive subjects: results and methodological aspects.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, K E; Rastogi, S C; Menne, T

    1996-03-01

    Cinnamic aldehyde is an important fragrance material and contact allergen. The present study was performed to provide quantitative data on the eliciting capacity of cinnamic aldehyde, to be considered in assessment of clinical relevance and health hazard. The skin response to serial dilution patch tests and 6-week graded use tests with 0.02, 0.1 and 0.8% cinnamic aldehyde in ethanol was studied in a group of cinnamic-aldehyde-sensitive eczema patients. The minimum effect level demonstrated was 0.02% cinnamic aldehyde on patch testing and 0.1% cinnamic aldehyde on use testing, which are allowed usage concentrations in different kind of cosmetics. 72% (13/18) developed eczema in the use test performed with an alcoholic solution of cinnamic aldehyde on healthy upper arm skin. 6 of the 13 use-test-positive subjects (46%) reacted later than day 7, indicating that the standard exposure period of 7 days in use testing may not be sufficient, if low concentrations or volatile substances are used. A significant correlation between patch test sensitivity and the outcome of use testing was found (1,<0.001), which should be considered in designing future use test studies and advising patients. Detailed exposure information is needed to evaluate more fully the consequences of cinnamic aldehyde sensitivity.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Aldehyde-Degrading Strain Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Ren, Chong; Shan, Xiexie

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8, a deep-sea strain isolated from the South China Sea, has the ability to degrade aldehydes. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of this species, which could provide fundamental molecular information on the aldehydes-degrading mechanism. PMID:27081145

  14. Peptide-catalyzed 1,4-addition reactions of aldehydes to nitroolefins.

    PubMed

    Kastl, Robert; Arakawa, Yukihiro; Duschmalé, Jörg; Wiesner, Markus; Wennemers, Helma

    2013-01-01

    Conjugate addition reactions of aldehydes to nitroolefins provide synthetically useful gamma-nitroaldehydes. Here we summarize our research on peptide-catalyzed conjugate addition reactions of aldehydes to differently substituted nitroolefins. We show that peptides of the general type Pro-Pro-Xaa (Xaa = acidic amino acid) are not only highly active, robust and stereoselective catalysts but have also remarkable chemoselectivities.

  15. Catalytic Fehling's Reaction: An Efficient Aerobic Oxidation of Aldehyde Catalyzed by Copper in Water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxin; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-08-26

    The first example of homogeneous copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of aldehydes is reported. This method utilizes atmospheric oxygen as the sole oxidant, proceeds under extremely mild aqueous conditions, and covers a wide range of various functionalized aldehydes. Chromatography is generally not necessary for product purification. PMID:27505714

  16. Cu-NHC-TEMPO catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolong; Xia, Qinqin; Zhang, Yuejiao; Chen, Congyan; Chen, Wanzhi

    2013-09-01

    Imidazolium salts bearing TEMPO groups react with commercially available copper powder affording Cu-NHC complexes. The in situ generated Cu-NHC-TEMPO complexes are quite efficient catalysts for aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols into aldehydes. The catalyst is easily available, and various primary alcohols were selectively converted to aldehydes in excellent yields. PMID:23944937

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Aldehyde-Degrading Strain Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Ren, Chong; Shan, Xiexie; Zeng, Runying

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas axialensisACH-L-8, a deep-sea strain isolated from the South China Sea, has the ability to degrade aldehydes. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of this species, which could provide fundamental molecular information on the aldehydes-degrading mechanism.

  18. Ab initio insight into ultrafast nonadiabatic decay of hypoxanthine: keto-N7H and keto-N9H tautomers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xugeng; Lan, Zhenggang; Cao, Zexing

    2013-07-14

    Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations at the SA-CASSCF level were performed for the two most stable keto-N7H and keto-N9H tautomers of hypoxanthine in order to obtain deep insight into the lifetime of the optically bright S1((1)ππ*) excited state and the relevant decay mechanisms. Supporting calculations on the ground-state (S0) equilibrium structures and minima on the crossing seams of both tautomers were carried out at the MR-CIS and CASSCF levels. These studies indicate that there are four slightly different kinds of conical intersections in each tautomer, exhibiting a chiral character, each of which dominates a barrierless reaction pathway. Moreover, both tautomers reveal the ultrafast S1→ S0 decay, in which the S1 state of keto-N9H in the gas phase has a lifetime of 85.5 fs, whereas that of keto-N7H has a longer lifetime of 137.7 fs. An excellent agreement is found between the present results and the experimental value of 130 ± 20 fs in aqueous solution (Chen and Kohler, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 10677-10689).

  19. Chromatographic approaches for determination of low-molecular mass aldehydes in bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Tessini, Catherine; Müller, Niels; Mardones, Claudia; Meier, Dietrich; Berg, Alex; von Baer, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    HPLC-UV and GC/MS determination of aldehydes in bio-oil were evaluated. HPLC-UV preceded by derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine allows separation and detection of bio-oil aldehydes, but the derivatization affected the bio-oil stability reducing their quantitative applicability. GC/MS determination of aldehydes was reached by derivatization with o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride. Two approaches for this reaction were evaluated. The first: "in solution derivatization and head space extraction" and the second: "on fiber derivatization SPME", the latter through an automatic procedure. Both sample treatments allows the quantification of most important aliphatic aldehydes in bio-oil, being the SPME approach more efficient. The aldehyde concentrations in bio-oil were ~2% formaldehyde, ~!0.1% acetaldehyde and ~0.05% propionaldehyde.

  20. Synthesis of bio-based aldehyde from seaweed polysaccharide and its interaction with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Kholiya, Faisal; Chaudhary, Jai Prakash; Vadodariya, Nilesh; Meena, Ramavatar

    2016-10-01

    Here, we demonstrate a successful synthesis of bio-based aldehyde namely dialdehyde-carboxymethylagarose (DCMA) using carboxymethyagarose (CMA). Further reaction parameters (i.e. reaction temperature, pH and periodate concentration) were optimized to achieve maximum aldehyde content and product yield. The synthesis of DCMA was confirmed by employing FTIR, (1)H NMR, XRD, SEM, AFM, TGA, DSC, EA and GPC techniques. To investigate the aldehyde functionality, DCMA was allowed to interact with BSA and obtained results were found to be comparable with that of synthetic aldehyde (Formaldehyde). Further interaction of DCMA with BSA was confirmed by using UV-vis, FTIR, fluorescent spectroscopy, CD and DLS analysis. Results of this study revealed that bio-based aldehyde behaves like formaldehyde. This study adds value to abundant marine biopolymers and opens the new research area for polymer researchers. PMID:27312639

  1. [Characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase gene fragment from mung bean Vigna radiata using the polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, A G; Bubiakina, V V; Tatarinova, T D; Zelenin, S M

    1998-01-01

    Two degenerate oligonucleotide sequence primers and polymerase chain reactions on total DNA have been utilized to clone on 651--bp gene fragment coding the central part of amino acid sequence of an earlier unknown aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) from mung bean. The deduced partial amino acid sequence for this aldehyde dehydrogenase shows about 65% sequence identity to ALDHs of Vibrio cholerae Rhodococcus sp., Alcaligenes eutrophus and about 45% sequence identity to mammalian ALDHs 1 and 2, ALDHs of Aspergillus niger and A, nidulans, the betain aldehyde dehydrogenase from spinach. Alignment of the mung bean aldehyde dehydrogenase partial amino acid sequence with the sequence of 16 NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases has demonstrated that all strictly conserved amino acid residues and all three conservative regions are identical. PMID:9778740

  2. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) for C3 to C8 Aliphatic Saturated Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Shannon D.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for C3 to C8, straight-chain, aliphatic aldehydes have been previously assessed and have been documented in volume 4 of Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants (James, 2000). These aldehydes as well as associated physical properties are shown in Table 1. The C3 to C8 aliphatic aldehydes can enter the habitable compartments and contaminate breathing air of spacecraft by several routes including incomplete oxidation of alcohols in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) air revitalization subsystem, as a byproduct of human metabolism, through materials off-gassing, or during food preparation. These aldehydes have been detected in the atmosphere of manned space vehicles in the past. Analysis performed by NASA of crew cabin air samples from the Russian Mir Space Station revealed the presence of C3 to C8 aldehydes at concentrations peaking at approximately 0.1 mg/cu m.

  3. Fatty Aldehydes in Cyanobacteria Are a Metabolically Flexible Precursor for a Diversity of Biofuel Products

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Brett K.; Carleton, Michael; Hickman, Jason W.; Miller, Cameron; Lawson, David; Budde, Mark; Warrener, Paul; Paredes, Angel; Mullapudi, Srinivas; Navarro, Patricia; Cross, Fred; Roberts, James M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe how pathway engineering can be used to convert a single intermediate derived from lipid biosynthesis, fatty aldehydes, into a variety of biofuel precursors including alkanes, free fatty acids and wax esters. In cyanobacteria, long-chain acyl-ACPs can be reduced to fatty aldehydes, and then decarbonylated to alkanes. We discovered a cyanobacteria class-3 aldehyde-dehydrogenase, AldE, that was necessary and sufficient to instead oxidize fatty aldehyde precursors into fatty acids. Overexpression of enzymes in this pathway resulted in production of 50 to 100 fold more fatty acids than alkanes, and the fatty acids were secreted from the cell. Co-expression of acyl-ACP reductase, an alcohol-dehydrogenase and a wax-ester-synthase resulted in a third fate for fatty aldehydes: conversion to wax esters, which accumulated as intracellular lipid bodies. Conversion of acyl-ACP to fatty acids using endogenous cyanobacterial enzymes may allow biofuel production without transgenesis. PMID:23505484

  4. Tagging the Untaggable: A Difluoroalkyl-Sulfinate Ketone-Based Reagent for Direct C-H Functionalization of Bioactive Heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Gnaim, Samer; Scomparin, Anna; Li, Xiuling; Baran, Phil S; Rader, Christoph; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit; Shabat, Doron

    2016-09-21

    We have developed a new difluoroalkyl ketal sulfinate salt reagent suitable for direct derivatization of heteroarene C-H bonds. The reagent is capable of introducing a ketone functional group on heteroarene bioactive compounds via a one-pot reaction. Remarkably, in three examples the ketone analog and its parent drug had almost identical cytotoxicity. In a representative example, the ketone analog was bioconjugated with a delivery vehicle via an acid-labile semicarbazone linkage and with a photolabile protecting group to produce the corresponding prodrug. Controlled release of the drug-ketone analog was demonstrated in vitro for both systems. This study provides a general approach to obtain taggable ketone analogs directly from bioactive heteroarene compounds with limited options for conjugation. We anticipate that this sodium ketal-sulfinate reagent will be useful for derivatization of other heteroarene-based drugs to obtain ketone-taggable analogs with retained efficacy. PMID:27494153

  5. Possible prebiotic catalysts formed from adenine and aldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Dumas, L.; Décout, J.-L.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2000-09-01

    Careful examination of the present metabolism and in vitro selection of various catalytic RNAs strongly support the "RNA World" hypothesis of the origin of life. However, in this scenario, the difficult prebiotic synthesis of ribose and consequently of nucleotides remain a major problem. In order to overcome this problem and obtain nucleoside analogs, we are investigating reactions of the nucleic acid base, adenine 1, with different aldehydes under presumably prebiotic conditions. In the reaction of adenine and pyruvaldehyde 2 in water, we report here the formation in high yield of two isomeric products. These compounds possessing alcohols functions as nucleosides result from condensation of two molecules of pyruvaldehyde on the 6-amino group of one adenine molecule. Their catalytic activities in the model hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylesters appeared interesting in the search of prebiotic catalysts.

  6. Studies on organic indole-3-aldehyde single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Ravi, G.; Dhanasekaran, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    Indole-3-aldehyde (IA) is a new organic nonlinear material for which its solubility in methanol and acetone was found out using the apparatus fabricated by the authors. In order to get the good-quality crystals, methods of evaporation of solvent at room temperature and slow cooling of saturated solution at boiling temperature were adopted. Simulated lattice parameter values were found out using experimentally known " d" values. The etching and mechanical strength studies on different planes of the crystal were carried out. Decomposition temperature, weight loss and different functional bond frequencies associated with the crystal were also found out from differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis, respectively.

  7. Pharmacological activities of cilantro's aliphatic aldehydes against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Donega, Mateus A; Mello, Simone C; Moraes, Rita M; Jain, Surendra K; Tekwani, Babu L; Cantrell, Charles L

    2014-12-01

    Leishmaniasis is a chronic infectious disease caused by different Leishmania species. Global occurrences of this disease are primarily limited to tropical and subtropical regions. Treatments are available; however, patients complain of side effects. Different species of plants have been screened as a potential source of new drugs against leishmaniasis. In this study, we investigated the antileishmanial activity of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) essential oil and its main components: (E)-2-undecenal, (E)-2-decenal, (E)-2-dodecenal, decanal, dodecanal, and tetradecanal. The essential oil of C. sativum leaves inhibits growth of Leishmani donovani promastigotes in culture with an IC50 of 26.58 ± 6.11 µg/mL. The aliphatic aldehydes (E)-2-decenal (7.85 ± 0.28 µg/mL), (E)-2-undecenal (2.81 ± 0.21 µg/mL), and (E)-2-dodecenal (4.35 ± 0.15 µg/mL), all isolated from C. sativum essential oil, are effective inhibitors of in vitro cultures of L. donovani promastigotes. Aldehydes (E)-2-decenal, (E)-2-undecenal, and (E)-2-dodecenal were also evaluated against axenic amastigotes and IC50 values were determined to be 2.47 ± 0.25 µg/mL, 1.25 ± 0.11 µg/mL, and 4.78 ± 1.12 µg/mL, respectively. (E)-2-Undecenal and (E)-2-dodecenal demonstrated IC50 values of 5.65 ± 0.19 µg/mL and 9.60 ± 0.89 µg/mL, respectively, against macrophage amastigotes. These cilantro compounds showed no cytotoxicity against THP-1 macrophages. PMID:25340465

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity promotes survival of human muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Elise; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Notarnicola, Cécile; Rouger, Karl; Serratrice, Nicolas; Bonnieu, Anne; Gay, Stéphanie; Bacou, Francis; Duret, Cédric; Carnac, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a family of enzymes that efficiently detoxify aldehydic products generated by reactive oxygen species and might therefore participate in cell survival. Because ALDH activity has been used to identify normal and malignant cells with stem cell properties, we asked whether human myogenic precursor cells (myoblasts) could be identified and isolated based on their levels of ALDH activity. Human muscle explant-derived cells were incubated with ALDEFLUOR, a fluorescent substrate for ALDH, and we determined by flow cytometry the level of enzyme activity. We found that ALDH activity positively correlated with the myoblast-CD56+ fraction in those cells, but, we also observed heterogeneity of ALDH activity levels within CD56-purified myoblasts. Using lentiviral mediated expression of shRNA we demonstrated that ALDH activity was associated with expression of Aldh1a1 protein. Surprisingly, ALDH activity and Aldh1a1 expression levels were very low in mouse, rat, rabbit and non-human primate myoblasts. Using different approaches, from pharmacological inhibition of ALDH activity by diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of class I ALDH, to cell fractionation by flow cytometry using the ALDEFLUOR assay, we characterized human myoblasts expressing low or high levels of ALDH. We correlated high ALDH activity ex vivo to resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxic effect and in vivo to improved cell viability when human myoblasts were transplanted into host muscle of immune deficient scid mice. Therefore detection of ALDH activity, as a purification strategy, could allow non-toxic and efficient isolation of a fraction of human myoblasts resistant to cytotoxic damage. PMID:19840193

  9. Aliphatic C-C Bond Cleavage of α-Hydroxy Ketones by Non-Heme Iron(II) Complexes: Mechanistic Insight into the Reaction Catalyzed by 2,4'-Dihydroxyacetophenone Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Rubina; Paria, Sayantan; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-11-16

    2,4'-Dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) is a bacterial non-heme enzyme that carries out oxygenative aliphatic C-C bond cleavage of 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone (an α-hydroxy ketone) with the incorporation of both the oxygen atoms of dioxygen into the cleavage products. The crystal structure of the iron enzyme DAD has recently been determined, but very little is known about the mechanism of the C-C bond cleavage reaction. With the objective of gaining insights into the mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by DAD, six new biomimetic iron(II)-α-hydroxy ketone complexes, [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(PHAP)] (1), [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(HCH)] (2), [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(HBME)] (3), [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(CHPE)] (4), [(6-Me3-TPA)Fe(II)(PHAP)](+) (5), and [(6-Me3-TPA)Fe(II)(HCH)](+) (6) (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate, 6-Me3-TPA = tris(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)amine, PHAP-H = 2-phenyl-2-hydroxyacetophenone, HCH-H = 2-hydroxycyclohexanone, HBME-H = 2-hydroxy-1,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethanone, and CHPE-H = 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-2-phenylethanone), have been isolated and characterized. The single-crystal X-ray structure of 2 shows a five-coordinate iron(II) complex with one tridentate facial ligand and a monoanionic bidentate α-hydroxy ketone, resulting in a distorted-square-pyramidal coordination geometry at the iron center. The iron(II) complexes react with dioxygen to oxidatively cleave the aliphatic C-C bonds of the coordinated α-hydroxy ketones to afford 2 equiv of carboxylic acids. Mechanistic studies reveal that the C-C bond cleavage reaction proceeds through an intradiol pathway. Additionally, the coordinated α-hydroxy ketones in all of the complexes, except in complex 4, undergo two-electron oxidation to form the corresponding 1,2-diketones. However, the yields of 1,2-diketones are higher with the iron complexes of the tripodal N4 ligand (6-Me3-TPA) in comparison to the facial N3 ligand (Tp(Ph2)). These results strongly support the natural selection of a facial N3

  10. Photoinduced biochemical activity of fullerene carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuyama, Hidetoshi; Yamago, Shigeru; Nakamura, Eiichi; Shiraki, Takashi; Sugiura, Yukio

    1993-08-25

    Here we report the preparation of a water-miscible fullerene carboxylic acid (2) and its biological activity-cytotoxicity and G-selective DNA cleaving ability. What is truly remarkable is that the biological activity of C{sub 60} was observed only under irradiation with visible light and not in the dark, suggesting that fullerenes may serve as useful photosensitive biochemical probes. We have found, for the first time, that even low-energy visible light is surfficient to induce biological activity in fullerene derivatives. Among the numerous implications of the present findings, the most exciting prospect includes the use of fullerene derivatives for photodynamic therapy. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. [Effects of panthenol and carnitine on aldehyde metabolic enzymes in rats with tetrachloromethane-induced liver injury].

    PubMed

    Satanovskaia, V I; Pron'ko, P S; Gaĭshmanova, A V; Miskevich, D A

    2009-01-01

    Tetrachloromethane (2 g/kg, intragastric) produced a decrease in the activity of NAD- and NADH- dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases with high Km for aldehydes in rat liver. Panthenol and L-carnitine administered separately normalized the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases, while a combination of the drugs did not produce any significant effect. PMID:19441727

  12. The Stereoselective Reductions of Ketones to the Most Thermodynamically Stable Alcohols Using Lithium and Hydrated Salts of Common Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicole; Cohen, Theodore

    2015-08-21

    A simple method is presented for the highly stereoselective reductions of ketones to the most thermodynamically stable alcohols. In this procedure, the ketone is treated with lithium dispersion and either FeCl2·4H2O or CuCl2·2H2O in THF at room temperature. This protocol is applied to a large number and variety of ketones and is both more convenient and efficient than those commonly reported for the diastereoselective reduction of five- and six-membered cyclic ketones. PMID:26226182

  13. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A computational method for the prediction of lysine carboxylation (KCX) in protein structures is described. The method accurately identifies misreported KCXs and predicts previously unknown KCX sites. The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxylation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation.

  14. Preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters

    DOEpatents

    Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J.; Zoeller, J.R.

    1998-09-15

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic acid, ester or anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising an oxide of niobium.

  15. Preparation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides

    DOEpatents

    Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Tustin, G.C.

    1998-01-20

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising mixed oxides of vanadium, phosphorus and, optionally, a third component selected from titanium, aluminum or, preferably silicon.

  16. Preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters

    DOEpatents

    Gogate, Makarand Ratnakar; Spivey, James Jerry; Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic acid, ester or anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising an oxide of niobium.

  17. Preparation of .alpha., .beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides

    DOEpatents

    Spivey, James Jerry; Gogate, Makarand Ratnakav; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Tustin, Gerald Charles

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising mixed oxides of vanadium, phosphorus and, optionally, a third component selected from titanium, aluminum or, preferably silicon.

  18. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W.; Srivastava, Rajiv R.

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  19. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Kunz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m = 2–10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m = 2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m = 8,10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m > 8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes. PMID:25444662

  20. Aqueous infrared carboxylate absorbances: Aliphatic di-acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabaniss, S.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; McVey, I.F.

    1998-01-01

    Aqueous attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra of 18 aliphatic di-carboxylic acids are reported as a function of pH. The spectra show isosbestic points and intensity changes which indicate that Beer's law is obeyed, and peak frequencies lie within previously reported ranges for aqueous carboxylates and pure carboxylic acids. Intensity sharing from the symmetric carboxylate stretch is evident in many cases, so that bands which are nominally due to alkyl groups show increased intensity at higher pH. The asymmetric stretch of the HA- species is linearly related to the microscopic acidity constant of the H2A species, with ??pK 2 intervening atoms). The results suggest that aqueous ATR-FTIR may be able to estimate 'intrinsic' pKa values of carboxylic acids, in addition to providing quantitative estimates of ionization. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.