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Sample records for alder alnus crispa

  1. Alder (alnus crispa) effects on soils in ecosystems of the Agashashok river valley, northwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhoades, C.; Oskarsson, H.; Binkley, D.; Stottlemyer, B.

    2001-01-01

    At the northern limit of the boreal forest biome, alder (Alnus crispa [Ait.] Pursh) shrubs occur in a variety of ecosystems. We assessed the effects of individual alder shrubs on soil properties and understory plant tissue nitrogen in floodplain terraces, valley slopes and tussock tundra ridges. The three ecosystems differed with respect to soil properties and abiotic conditions and supported distinct plant communities. Alder increased resin-exchangeable soil N and NO3 production significantly in each ecosystem. The greatest difference between alder canopy and surrounding soil NO3 measured both under field and laboratory conditions occured in floodplain sites. The shrub effect on soil pH and soil organic matter was greatest on tundra ridges. Alder shrubs also influenced the nitrogen nutrition of plants growing beneath their canopies. Plants growing below alder canopies had higher foliar nitrogen concentration and natural abundance 15N composition and lower carbon to nitrogen ratio than open-grown plants. Similar to soil N availability, understory plant leaf chemistry responded more to alder on floodplains than on slope or tundra ecosystems. This pattern suggests that understory plants rely more heavily on alder-fixed-N in this resource-poor ecosystem.

  2. Alternative statistical methods for interpreting airborne Alder ( Alnus glutimosa (L.) Gaertner) pollen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Parrado, Zulima; Valencia Barrera, Rosa M.; Fuertes Rodríguez, Carmen R.; Vega Maray, Ana M.; Pérez Romero, Rafael; Fraile, Roberto; Fernández González, Delia

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the behaviour of Alnus glutinosa (alder) pollen grains in the atmosphere of Ponferrada (León, NW Spain) from 1995 to 2006. The study, which sought to determine the effects of various weather-related parameters on Alnus pollen counts, was performed using a volumetric method. The main pollination period for this taxon is January-February. Alder pollen is one of the eight major airborne pollen allergens found in the study area. An analysis was made of the correlation between pollen counts and major weather-related parameters over each period. In general, the strongest positive correlation was with temperature, particularly maximum temperature. During each period, peak pollen counts occurred when the maximum temperature fell within the range 9°C-14°C. Finally, multivariate analysis showed that the parameter exerting the greatest influence was temperature, a finding confirmed by Spearman correlation tests. Principal components analysis suggested that periods with high pollen counts were characterised by high maximum temperature, low rainfall and an absolute humidity of around 6 g m-3. Use of this type of analysis in conjunction with other methods is essential for obtaining an accurate record of pollen-count variations over a given period.

  3. A Soil Moisture-Heat Based Early Establishment Model of Riparian White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablkowski, P.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2013-12-01

    Establishment of fluvially dispersed seeds on accreted gravel-sand bars is limited by water availability in streams. Past establishment models have used the stream/water table recession rate, and maximum root growth rate to determine the elevation limit of seedling establishment. This approach neglects the role of the saturated-unsaturated vadose zone in providing water to recently germinated seedlings, the physical processes that determine the soil moisture content, and the effect moisture deficit has on seedling root growth. This study combines a soil moisture-heat budget and a seedling root growth model that responds to soil moisture availability to find the elevation limit of establishment of white alder (Alnus rhombifolia) on vertically accreted bars along the south fork Eel River in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, California. To establish successfully, seedling roots must maintain a connection with sufficient moisture to avoid water stress. This will depend on the elevation of the bar, the stream recession rate, the root growth rate, and the diurnal cycle of soil moisture. A one-dimensional moisture-heat budget of the top 15 centimeters of sediment was validated at two locations characterized by sand and clay-gravel textures respectively, using soil moisture and temperature measurements at 5, 10 and 15 cm, net radiation, air temperature, humidity, wind velocity and precipitation measured during spring-summer stream recession. Two patterns in soil water content were apparent: an average daily moisture decrease at each depth driven by stream/water table recession, and a diurnal pattern of isothermal liquid and vapour flux increasing soil water content in the upper 15 cm between 12:00 pm and 5:00 pm PDT. To determine seedling root growth rates, white alder seedlings were grown in growth chambers under a range of reduced matric potentials using polyethylene glycol. Root length measurements were made at 4 hour intervals and a quadratic equation was fit to the root

  4. Factors for converting hazelnut (Corylus avellana L) into black alder (Alnus glutinosa Yalt.) plantations.

    PubMed

    Durkaya, Ali; Durkaya, Birsen

    2009-07-01

    Hazelnut plantations, which are a major source of income for the villagers in the eastern Black sea region are notable to provide sufficient income to the villagers due to price fluctuations and sudden falls witnessed in recent years. Alternative investments in place of hazelnut cultivation are being investigated in order to prevent migration to urban areas and to increase the welfare of the rural population in the region. Black alder plantation investments have been assessed as one of the most essential alternative investment tools within the framework of the study Assessment was carried out by comparing expected possible net present values (NPV). Although value increase occurs 12-18 years later more income can be obtained through black alder than hazelnut plantation. In hazelnut plantations, the best NPV emerged in the lower zone. NPV was positive in the moderate zone but values were close to zero. In upper zone, positive NPV couldn't emerge. As a result, it was understood that black alder plantation investment is an effective alternative for hazelnut plantations.

  5. Decrease of ruminal methane production in Rusitec fermenters through the addition of plant material from rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus).

    PubMed

    García-González, R; González, J S; López, S

    2010-08-01

    Roots of rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and bark of alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) were tested as feed additives for decreasing ruminal methane production released from anaerobic fermentation of a forage-based diet in a rumen-simulating fermenter (Rusitec). Sixteen fermentation units (vessels) were set up for the experiment lasting 19 d. Treated vessels were supplied with 1g/d of rhubarb or alder buckthorn (4 vessels per plant species); another 4 vessels received 12 microM sodium monensin (positive control), and the remaining 4 vessels were controls (no additive). Upon termination of the experimental period, batch cultures were inoculated with the liquid contents of the vessels for examining in vitro fermentation kinetics of cellulose, starch, barley straw, and the same substrate used in the Rusitec cultures. Monensin induced changes in fermentation in agreement with those reported in the literature, and inocula from those cultures decreased the fermentation rate and total gas produced in the gas kinetics study. Rhubarb decreased methane production, associated with limited changes in the profile of volatile fatty acids throughout the duration of the study, whereas digestibility and total volatile fatty acids production were not affected. Rhubarb inocula did not affect gas production kinetics except for cellulose. Alder buckthorn decreased only methane concentration in fermentation gas, and this effect was not always significant. The use of rhubarb (milled rhizomes of Rheum spp.) in the diets of ruminants may effectively modulate ruminal fermentation by abating methane production, thus potentially involving productive and environmental benefits.

  6. Nitrogen mineralization and gaseous nitrogen losses from waterlogged and drained organic soils in a black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, T.; Heinichen, J.; Augustin, J.; Freibauer, A.; Drösler, M.

    2014-06-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) forests on peat soils have been reported to be hotspots for high nitrous oxide (N2O) losses. High emissions may be attributed to alternating water tables of peatlands and to the incorporation of high amounts of easily decomposable nitrogen (N) into the ecosystem by symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixation of alder trees. Our study addressed the question to what extent drainage enhances the emissions of N2O from black alder forests and how N turnover processes and physical factors influence the production of N2O and total denitrification. The study was conducted in a drained black alder forest with variable groundwater tables at a southern German fen peatland. Fluxes of N2O were measured using the closed chamber method at two drained sites (D-1 and D-2) and one undrained site (U). Inorganic N contents and net N mineralization rates (NNM) were determined. Additionally a laboratory incubation experiment was carried out to investigate greenhouse gas and N2 fluxes at different temperature and soil moisture conditions. Significantly different inorganic N contents and NNM rates were observed, which however did not result in significantly different N2O fluxes in the field but did in the laboratory experiment. N2O fluxes measured were low for all sites, with total annual emissions of 0.51 ± 0.07 (U), 0.97 ± 0.13 (D-1) and 0.93 ± 0.08 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 (D-2). Only 37% of the spatiotemporal variation in field N2O fluxes could be explained by peat temperature and groundwater level, demonstrating the complex interlinking of the controlling factors for N2O emissions. However, temperature was one of the key variables of N2O fluxes in the incubation experiment conducted. Increasing soil moisture content was found to enhance total denitrification losses during the incubation experiment, whereas N2O fluxes remained constant. At the undrained site, permanently high groundwater level was found to prevent net nitrification, resulting in a

  7. Stem Photosynthesis not Pressurized Ventilation is Responsible for Light-enhanced Oxygen Supply to Submerged Roots of Alder (Alnus glutinosa)

    PubMed Central

    ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM; ARMSTRONG, JEAN

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Claims that submerged roots of alder and other wetland trees are aerated by pressurized gas flow generated in the stem by a light-induced thermo-osmosis have seemed inconsistent with root anatomy. Our aim was to seek a verification using physical root–stem models, stem segments with or without artificial roots, and rooted saplings. • Methods Radial O2 loss (ROL) from roots was monitored polarographically as the gas space system of the models, and stems were pressurized artificially. ROL and internal pressurization were also measured when stems were irradiated and the xylem stream was either CO2 enriched or not. Stem photosynthesis and respiration were measured polarographically. Stem and root anatomy were examined by light and fluorescence microscopy. • Key Results Pressurizing the models and stems to ≤10 kPa, values much higher than those reportedly generated by thermo-osmosis, created only a negligible density-induced increase in ROL, but ROL increased rapidly when ambient O2 concentrations were raised. Internal pressures rose by several kPa when shoots were exposed to high light flux and ROL increased substantially, but both were due to O2 accumulation from stem photosynthesis using internally sourced CO2. Increased stem pressures had little effect on O2 transport, which remained largely diffusive. Oxygen flux from stems in high light periods indicated a net C gain by stem photosynthesis. Chloroplasts were abundant in the secondary cortex and secondary phloem, and occurred throughout the secondary xylem rays and medulla of 3-year-old stems. Diurnal patterns of ROL, most marked when light reached submerged portions of the stem, were modified by minor variations in light flux and water level. Low root temperatures also helped improve root aeration. • Conclusions Pressurized gas flow to submerged roots does not occur to any significant degree in alder, but stem photosynthesis, using internally sourced CO2 from respiration and the

  8. Performance of ectomycorrhizal alders exposed to specific Canadian oil sands tailing stressors under in vivo bipartite symbiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Nadeau, Martin; Gagné, André; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Fortin, J André; Roy, Sébastien; Greer, Charles W; Khasa, Damase P

    2016-07-01

    Canadian oil sands tailings are predominately sodic residues contaminated by hydrocarbons such as naphthenic acids. These conditions are harsh for plant development. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inoculating roots of Alnus viridis ssp. crispa and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa with ectomycorrhizal fungi in the presence of tailings compounds. Seedlings were inoculated with 7 different strains of Paxillus involutus and Alpova diplophloeus and were grown under different treatments of NaCl, Na2SO4, and naphthenic acids in a growth chamber. Afterwards, seedling survival, height, dry biomass, leaf necrosis, and root mycorrhization rate were measured. Paxillus involutus Mai was the most successful strain in enhancing alder survival, health, and growth. Seedlings inoculated with this strain displayed a 25% increase in survival rate, 2-fold greater biomass, and 2-fold less leaf necrosis compared with controls. Contrary to our expectations, A. diplophloeus was not as effective as P. involutus in improving seedling fitness, likely because it did not form ectomycorrhizae on roots of either alder species. High intraspecific variation characterized strains of P. involutus in their ability to stimulate alder height and growth and to minimize leaf necrosis. We conclude that in vivo selection under bipartite symbiotic conditions is essential to select effective strains that will be of use for the revegetation and reclamation of derelict lands.

  9. Can an Alder Disease Influence the Controls of Ecosystem Water Flux?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrs-Richey, J. K.; Mulder, C. P.; Ruess, R. W.; Winton, L. M.; Stanosz, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    In Alaska, nitrogen-fixing shrubs (Alnus spp.) comprise a large component of the vegetation and are important for water and energy flux in the Alaskan tundra, the Interior boreal forest, and south-central Alaska. Recently there has been high incidence and severity of a canker disease on Alnus which alters small scale controls (e.g., leaves, branches) of water and carbon flux and may have ecosystem scale effects in severely diseased areas. The fungal pathogen, Valsa melanodiscus (anamorph =Cytospora umbrina), kills active xylem and phloem, causes long, girdling cankers on stems, and is frequently associated with stem mortality in the thin leaf alder (Alnus tenuifolia) and green alder (Alnus crispa). We are just beginning to understand how this canker disease affects the physiology of its host and the implications for water loss and carbon fixation. An inoculation experiment at the University of Alaska is currently being conducted on well-watered and water-limited green alders to: 1) monitor the response of the water transport system to infection and canker development; 2) assess the ability of colonized alders to adjust water use efficiency; and 3) measure the effect of canker development on photosynthesis. Only 4 weeks after inoculation, stems (3-5 mm diam.) with incipient cankers had an overall reduction in total daily water loss and up to 50 percent decrease in daily peak water loss. Stems with incipient cankers were also unable to attain the maximum photosynthetic rate of healthy stems, and had lower light saturation points and quantum efficiencies. Further quantification of these relationships is underway. This study, in combination with recent field measurements of sapflow, will allow us to estimate the impact of varying degrees of disease severity on stand-level water flux. Alders are a keystone species and are currently responding to climate change by expanding into the Alaska tundra, increasing abundance in northern Alaska, and migrating into river

  10. New nomenclature combinations in the green alder species complex (Betulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The name Alnus viridis (Chaix) DC., based on Betula viridis Chaix (1785), has traditionally been attributed to green alders although it is based on a later basionym. Alnus alnobetula (Ehrh.) K. Koch based on Betula alnobetula Ehrh. (1783) is the correct name for green alders. In light of the increasing use and recognition of the name Alnus alnobetula (Ehrh.) K. Koch in the literature. I herein propose new nomenclatural combinations to account for the Japanese and Chinese subspecies respectively: Alnus alnobetula subsp. maximowiczii (Callier ex C.K. Schneid.) J. Chery and Alnus alnobetula subsp. mandschurica (Callier ex C.K. Schneid.) J. Chery. Recent phylogenetic analyses place these two taxa in the green alder species complex, suggesting that they should be treated as infraspecific taxa under the polymorphic Alnus alnobetula. PMID:26491381

  11. Migration Patterns of Subgenus Alnus in Europe since the Last Glacial Maximum: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Douda, Jan; Doudová, Jana; Drašnarová, Alena; Kuneš, Petr; Hadincová, Věroslava; Krak, Karol; Zákravský, Petr; Mandák, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Recently, new palaeoecological records supported by molecular analyses and palaeodistributional modelling have provided more comprehensive insights into plant behaviour during the last Quaternary cycle. We reviewed the migration history of species of subgenus Alnus during the last 50,000 years in Europe with a focus on (1) a general revision of Alnus history since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), (2) evidence of northern refugia of Alnus populations during the LGM and (3) the specific history of Alnus in particular European regions. Methodology We determined changes in Alnus distribution on the basis of 811 and 68 radiocarbon-dated pollen and macrofossil sites, respectively. We compiled data from the European Pollen Database, the Czech Quaternary Palynological Database, the Eurasian Macrofossil Database and additional literature. Pollen percentage thresholds indicating expansions or retreats were used to describe patterns of past Alnus occurrence. Principal Findings An expansion of Alnus during the Late Glacial and early Holocene periods supports the presence of alders during the LGM in southern peninsulas and northerly areas in western Europe, the foothills of the Alps, the Carpathians and northeastern Europe. After glaciers withdrew, the ice-free area of Europe was likely colonized from several regional refugia; the deglaciated area of Scandinavia was likely colonized from a single refugium in northeastern Europe. In the more northerly parts of Europe, we found a scale-dependent pattern of Alnus expansion characterised by a synchronous increase of Alnus within individual regions, though with regional differences in the times of the expansion. In southern peninsulas, the Alps and the Carpathians, by contrast, it seems that Alnus expanded differently at individual sites rather than synchronously in whole regions. Conclusions Our synthesis supports the idea that northern LGM populations were important sources of postglacial Alnus expansion. The

  12. WATERSHED BIOGEOCHEMISTRY IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF RED ALDER AND SALMON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  13. Arthropod fauna of rolled alder leaves in Washington State, United States of America (Insecta: Arachnida)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alders, Alnus spp., growing on the eastern slopes and foothills of the Cascade Range in Washington State, are often infested with shelter-making (primarily leafrolling) Lepidoptera in the families Tortricidae, Gracillariidae, and Choreutidae. Over a 5 year survey period, 5,172 rolled leaves were ex...

  14. Seasonal changes in nodular nitrogenase activity of Alnus glutinosa and Elaeagnus angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Zitzer, S F; Dawson, J O

    1989-06-01

    Root nodule development, and seasonal patterns of nodular nitrogenase and hydrogenase activities were determined for 5- to 8-year old black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.) interplanted with black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) on bottomland and upland sites in central Illinois, USA. Black alder produced nodules at both sites, but Russian olive did so only at the bottomland site. Nodular nitrogenase activity was detectable in both species over a 220-day period. Maximum, midday rates of nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) of 15 to 20 micromoles C(2)H(4) per g dry nodule per hour were maintained by black alder for approximately 150 days at both the upland and bottomland sites. Near maximum rates of nodular nitrogenase activity were maintained for a similar period by Russian olive at the lowland site, although specific nitrogenase activity was approximately 25% lower than in black alder owing to a larger proportion of necrotic nodular tissue in Russian olive. In both species, nitrogenase activity increased exponentially with temperature between 10 degrees C and 20 to 25 degrees C. No net hydrogen evolution by nodules of either species was detected at any time during the assay period, indicating efficient hydrogenase systems were operating under the conditions of the field assay. Height of black walnut interplanted with nodulated black alder and Russian olive was greater than that of black walnut grown in pure stands.

  15. NITROGEN EXPORT FROM FORESTED WATERSHEDS IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF N2-FIXING RED ALDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  16. The patterns of Corylus and Alnus pollen seasons and pollination periods in two Polish cities located in different climatic regions.

    PubMed

    Puc, Małgorzata; Kasprzyk, Idalia

    2013-01-01

    This study compares phenological observations of Corylus (hazel) and Alnus (alder) flowering with airborne pollen counts of these taxa recorded using volumetric spore traps (2009-2011). The work was carried out in the Polish cities of Szczecin and Rzeszów that are located in different climatic regions. Correlations between pollen concentrations and meteorological data were investigated using Spearman's rank correlation analysis. The timings of hazel and alder pollination and the occurrence of airborne pollen varied greatly and were significantly influenced by meteorological conditions (p < 0.05). The flowering synchronization of hazel and alder pollination in Szczecin and Rzeszów varied over the study period. Hazel and alder trees flowered notably earlier in stands located in places that were exposed to sunlight (insolated) and sheltered from the wind. On the other hand, a delay in the timing of pollination was observed in quite sunny but very windy sites. In Rzeszów, maximum hazel pollen concentrations did not coincide with the period of full pollination (defined as between 25 % hazel and alder and 75 % of flowers open). Conversely, in Szczecin, the highest hazel pollen concentrations were recorded during phenophases of the full pollination period. The period when the highest alder pollen concentrations were recorded varied between sites, with Rzeszów recording the highest concentrations at the beginning of pollination and Szczecin recording alder pollen throughout the full pollination period. Substantial amounts of hazel and alder pollen grains were recorded in the air of Rzeszów (but not Szczecin) before the onset of the respective pollen seasons.

  17. Spatial and temporal controls on Alnus-derived nutrients and stream stoichiometry: Implications for aquatic ecosystem productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devotta, D.; Fraterrigo, J.; Walsh, P.; Hu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting how nutrient fluxes that cross ecosystem boundaries will respond to future climate change is one of the greatest challenges for ecology in the 21st century. In southwestern (SW) Alaska, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and nitrogen (N)-fixation by alder (Alnus spp.) provide key nutrient subsidies to freshwater systems. The importance of alder-derived nutrients (ADN) to aquatic systems will increase as alder cover expands under climate warming and salmon harvesting reduces marine-derived nutrients. We investigate broad-scale spatial and temporal drivers of ADN and stream N:P in 26 streams in SW Alaska. Alder cover and watershed features were measured using satellite images and topographic maps in ArcGIS. Stream water samples were collected in each spring and summer from 2010-2013 and analyzed for dissolved N and total phosphorus (TP). We obtained annual growing season length (AGSL) and sum of growing degree days (GDD) data from weather stations. Elevation was inversely related to alder cover, stream N, and N:P (ρ=-0.802, -0.65, and -0.71 resp., p<0.01, n=208). Alder cover had the largest influence on stream N (mean β estimate=0.402, 90% CIs). Stream N increased with alder cover, under longer AGSL, and lower GDD (interaction effect sizes between alder and stream N=0.196 and -0.185 resp., 90% CIs), suggesting that long growing seasons with minimal heat accumulation during the spring and fall increased ADN export. Higher P was associated with lower temperatures, possibly reflecting reduced P demand under low rates of metabolic activity. Structural equation modeling revealed significant causal relationships among elevation, alder cover, and stream N:P across multiple years (r2=0.94, X2=742.8, df=9, p<0.01). All paths in the model were significant (p<0.01) except between stream N:P and weather (p=0.165). These results demonstrate that spatial variation in alder cover associated with elevation is a stronger regulator of ADN fluxes and stream N:P than

  18. Localization of the porous partition responsible for pressurized gas transport in Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.

    PubMed

    Buchel, H B; Grosse, W

    1990-09-01

    The pressurized gas transport which improves the oxygen supply of the roots of the wetland tree black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.), is based on the existence of a thermo-osmotically active porous tissue partition in the lower part of the trunk with pore diameters in the range of, or smaller than, the mean free path length of the gas molecules (e.g., 70 nm for O(2) at 20 degrees C and 100 kPa). Anatomical studies have shown that only the cambial layer or the phellogen of the lenticels have intercellular spaces small enough to be responsible for thermo-osmotic activity. The final localization of the thermo-osmotically active partition and the determination of the pore sizes were done by diffusion and effusion experiments with basal trunk pieces of 3- to 4-year-old trees. The mean pore sizes of the intercellular system were not smaller than 100 nm in diameter in the cambial layer separating the bark from the wood, but 14 +/- 7 nm in diameter in the phellogen underlying the lenticels. Because of these small pores, the phellogen of the lenticels is the significant thermo-osmotically active partition for the transport of air to the root system in black alder.

  19. Morphological measurements and ITS sequences show that the new alder rust in Europe is conspecific with Melampsoridium hiratsukanum in eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Hantula, J; Kurkela, T; Hendry, S; Yamaguchi, T

    2009-01-01

    Three species of Melampsoridium have been reported to infect hosts in genus Alnus. An epidemic of foliar rust affecting A. glutinosa and A. incana began in Europe in the mid-1990s, and the associated pathogen was identified as Melampsoridium hiratsukanum based on morphology. In this investigation we analyzed the morphology and genetic variation of alder rusts from Europe and Japan and the host specificity of the European epidemic rust. Our results showed that two rusts occur on the leaves of alders native to northern Europe; in Scotland an endemic rust indistinguishable from M. betulinum occurs, whereas alders in areas of Europe affected by the current epidemic were infected by M. hiratsukanum. M. hiratsukanum from naturally infected alder in Finland produced aecia on all Larix species tested but did not infect Betula leaves.

  20. Absence of net long-term successional facilitation by alder in a boreal Alaska floodplain.

    PubMed

    Stuart Chapin, F; Conway, Alexandra J; Johnstone, Jill F; Hollingsworth, Teresa N; Hollingsworth, Jamie

    2016-11-01

    Long-term experiments provide a way to test presumed causes of successional or environmentally driven vegetation changes. Early-successional nitrogen (N)-fixing plants are widely thought to facilitate productivity and vegetation development on N-poor sites, thus accounting for observed vegetation patterns later in succession. We tested this facilitative impact on vegetation development in a 23-yr field experiment on an Interior Alaska (USA) floodplain. On three replicate early-successional silt bars, we planted late-successional white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings in the presence and absence of planted seedlings of an early-successional N-fixing shrub, thinleaf alder (Alnus incana). Alder initially facilitated survivorship and growth of white spruce. Within six years, however, after canopy closure, alder negatively affected spruce survivorship and growth. Our three replicate sites followed different successional trajectories. One site was eliminated by erosion and supported no vegetation development during our study. The other two sites, which differed in site moisture, diverged in vegetation composition. Structural equation modeling (SEM) suggested that, in the drier of these two sites, alder inhibited spruce growth directly (presumably by competition) and indirectly through effects mediated by competition with other woody species. However, at the wetter site, alder had both positive and negative effects on spruce growth, with negative effects predominating. Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) in alder thickets further reduced height growth of spruce in the wetter site. We conclude that net effects of alder on white spruce, the late-successional dominant, were primarily inhibitory and indirect, with the mechanisms depending on initial site moisture. Our results highlight the importance of long-term research showing that small differences among initial replicate sites can cause divergence in successional trajectories, consistent with individualistic distributions

  1. Headwater riparian invertebrate communities associated with red alder and conifer wood and leaf litter in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeSage, C.M.; Merritt, R.W.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    We examined how management of young upland forests in southeastern Alaska affect riparian invertebrate taxa richness, density, and biomass, in turn, potentially influencing food abundance for fish and wildlife. Southeastern Alaska forests are dominated by coniferous trees including Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), with mixed stands of red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn.). Red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) is hypothesized to influence the productivity of young-growth conifer forests and through forest management may provide increased riparian invertebrate abundance. To compare and contrast invertebrate densities between coniferous and alder riparian habitats, leaf litter and wood debris (early and late decay classes) samples were collected along eleven headwater streams on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, during the summers of 2000 and 2001. Members of Acarina and Collembola were the most abundant taxa collected in leaf litter with alder litter having significantly higher mean taxa richness than conifer litter. Members of Acarina were the most abundant group collected on wood debris and alder wood had significantly higher mean taxa richness and biomass than conifer wood. Alder wood debris in more advanced decay stages had the highest mean taxa richness and biomass, compared to other wood types, while conifer late decay wood debris had the highest densities of invertebrates. The inclusion of alder in young-growth conifer forests can benefit forest ecosystems by enhancing taxa richness and biomass of riparian forest invertebrates. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative phylogenies and host specialization in the alder ectomycorrhizal fungi Alnicola, Alpova and Lactarius (Basidiomycota) in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycorrhizal fungi form intimate associations with their host plants that constitute their carbon resource and habitat. Alnus spp. (Betulaceae) are known to host an exceptional species-poor and specialized ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal community compared to other tree species, but the host-specificity pattern and its significance in terms of fungal diversification and speciation remain poorly documented. The degree of parallel speciation, host switching, and patterns of biogeography were explored in the historical associations between alders and three ECM taxa of Basidiomycetes: Alnicola (Agaricales), Alpova (Boletales), and Lactarius (Russulales). The aim was to develop an evolutionary framework on host specificity and diversification of Basidiomycetes in this highly specialized plant-fungus symbiosis. Results Sporocarps of Alnicola (220), Lactarius (61) and Alpova (29) were collected from stands of the four European alder species (A. alnobetula including the endemic subsp. suaveolens in Corsica, A. cordata, A. glutinosa, A. incana) in Western Europe (mainly in France and Austria), from 1995 to 2009. Specimens were morphologically identified to the species level. From these, 402 sequences of four DNA regions (ITS, rpb2, gpd, and the V9 domain of the mit-SSU rDNA) were successfully obtained and analyzed in addition with 89 sequences available in GenBank and UNITE databases. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on all sequence data sets (individual and combined) using maximum likelihood reconstruction and Bayesian inference. Fungal phylogenies are compared and discussed in relation to the host, with a focus on species boundaries by associating taxonomic, systematic and molecular information. Conclusions Patterns of host specificity and phylogenies of Alnicola and Lactarius suggest coevolution as a basal factor of speciation in relation with the subgeneric diversification of Alnus, possibly due to the very selective pressure of the host. A second element of

  3. Ardisia crispa roots inhibit cyclooxygenase and suppress angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In our previous studies conducted on Ardisia crispa roots, it was shown that Ardisia crispa root inhibited inflammation-induced angiogenesis in vivo. The present study was conducted to identify whether the anti-angiogenic properties of Ardisia crispa roots was partly due to either cyclooxygenase (COX) or/and lipoxygenase (LOX) activity inhibition in separate in vitro studies. Methods Benzoquinonoid fraction (BQ) was isolated from hexane extract by column chromatography, and later analyzed by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Anti-angiogenic effect was studied on mouse sponge implantation assay. Ardisia crispa ethanolic rich fraction (ACRH), quinone-rich fraction (QRF) and BQ were screened for COX assay to evaluate their selectivity towards two isoforms (COX-1 and COX-2), The experiment on soy lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory assay was also performed to determine the inhibitory effect of ACRH, QRF and BQ on soy LOX. Results BQ was confirmed to consist of 2-methoxy-6-undecyl-1,4-benzoquinone, when compared with previous data. Antiangiogenesis study exhibited a reduction of mean vascular density (MVD) in both ACRH and QRF, compared to control. In vitro study showed that both ACRH and QRF inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2, despite COX-2 inhibition being slightly higher than COX-1 in BQ. On the other hand, both ACRH and QRF were shown to have poor LOX inhibitory activity, but not BQ. Conclusions In conclusion, ACRH and QRF might possibly exhibit its anti-angiogenic effect by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. However, both of them were shown to possess poor LOX inhibitory activity. On the other hand, BQ displayed selectivity to COX-2 inhibitory property as well as LOX inhibitory effect. PMID:24641961

  4. Toxic hepatitis induced by a herbal medicine: Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Langrand, J; Regnault, H; Cachet, X; Bouzidi, C; Villa, A F; Serfaty, L; Garnier, R; Michel, S

    2014-01-01

    Herbal remedies are becoming increasingly popular in many countries. Tinospora species (Menispermaceae) is commonly used as a herbal medicine in South Asia, but very few toxic effects have been described. We report a case of acute hepatitis associated with chronic use of high doses of Tinospora crispa. A 49-year-old male with chronic low back pain bought a herbal medicine at a market in Vietnam that was supposed to be Tinospora crispa, and started to take 10 pellets per day. He had no medical history and did not take any other drugs or toxins. Four weeks later; he developed dark urine and pale stools, associated with asthenia and right hypochondrial pain. Two months after starting treatment, he was referred to the hepatology department with jaundice. Blood tests showed aspartate aminotransferase: 1.169 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase: 2.029 IU/l, total bilirubin: 20.47 mg/dl, direct bilirubin: 13.29 mg/dl, and γ-glutamyltransferase: 243 IU/l. Viral and autoimmune hepatitis were eliminated. Upper abdominal ultrasound was normal. Histopathological findings were consistent with a toxic reaction. The herbal medicine was stopped on admission and the patient fully recovered without treatment, with normal liver function 2 months after the acute episode. Tinospora crispa was clearly identified in the pellets by microscopic analysis of the botanical characters combined with chromatographic fingerprints. The use of herbal medicines containing Tinospora crispa can induce toxic hepatitis. Recovery can be complete after discontinuation. This case highlights the risk associated with traditional herbal remedies.

  5. Alder Expansion as a Coastal Warming Signal - Linking Coastal Alaskan Carbon to Vegetation Change with Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peteet, D. M.; Nichols, J. E.; Moy, C. M.; McGeachy, A.

    2014-12-01

    Corser Bog (60.5296364oN, 145.453858oW), 21 km east of Cordova, AK is a sphagnum-dominated peatland 42 m asl. adjacent to Sheridan Glacier and the Copper River Delta. Deglaciation at 11.5 ka began with shallow pond deposition, reflecting regional warmth with the pioneers Alnus crispa subsp. sinuata, Salix, and ferns colonizing the fresh, mineral soils on the landscape. Continued early Holocene warming/melting of glaciers led to the foundation species Alnus dominance and peatland formation, surrounded by shrubs such as Rubus spectabilis, Sambucus racemosa, and wetland species such as Myrica gale and Potentilla palustris. As Sphagnum peat accumulated, the highest rates of carbon accumulation for a few centuries are represented at 50 g/m2/a, similar to short-term very high rates in the early Holocene throughout the circumboreal region but varying within the early Holocene due to development of local wet, bryophytic environments. A shift to sedge peat regionally along the South-Central Alaskan coast 7.6 - 3.7 ka is paralleled by a more evaporative, drier climate with Rhododendron groenlandicum presence, lower carbon accumulation (13 g/m2/a), and minimal macrofossil preservation, which is paralleled regionally in coastal muskegs both to the northwest and southeast and by a hiatus in a nearby lake record. A cooler, moister climate is evident in Corser Bog with the shift to Sphagnum peat at 3.7 ka, regional shifts from sedge to Sphagnum peat throughout the entire coastline from Yakutat to Girdwood, AK and the demonstration of glacial advances in the region. Alnus pollen markedly increases to 60% in the uppermost sample, indicative of a major signal for glacial recession in this region.

  6. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Katrina L.; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  7. Factors affecting distribution of wood, detritus, and sediment in headwater streams draining managed young-growth red alder - Conifer forests in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomi, T.; Johnson, A.C.; Deal, R.L.; Hennon, P.E.; Orlikowska, E.H.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Factors (riparian stand condition, management regimes, and channel properties) affecting distributions of wood, detritus (leaves and branches), and sediment were examined in headwater streams draining young-growth red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) - conifer riparian forests (40 years old) remained in channels and provided sites for sediment and organic matter storage. Despite various alder-conifer mixtures and past harvesting effects, the abundance of large wood, fine wood, and detritus accumulations significantly decreased with increasing channel bank-full width (0.5-3.5 m) along relatively short channel distances (up to 700 m). Changes in wood, detritus, and sediment accumulations together with changes in riparian stand characteristics create spatial and temporal variability of in-channel conditions in headwater systems. A component of alder within young-growth riparian forests may benefit both wood production and biological recovery in disturbed headwater stream channels. ?? 2006 NRC.

  8. Flavonoids from flowers of Malva crispa L. (Malvaceae).

    PubMed

    Matławska, Irena; Sikorska, Maria

    2004-01-01

    The following flavonoids were isolated and identified from the flowers of Malva crispa L.: kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside, 3-O-(6"-tran-p-coumaroyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside and 3,7-O-diglucoside as well as quercetin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->6) -beta-D-glucopyranoside and apigenin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Their structures were established by chemical analysis, UV, 1H and 13C NMR spectrometry.

  9. New Polybenzimidazole Architectures by Diels Alder Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-14

    REPORT New Polybenzimidazole Architectures By Diels Alder Polymerization. Final Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Due to their high...substituents to improve processability, are desirable. This project was a proof of principle study to determine if Diels - Alder polymerization of monomers...AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Polybenzimidazole, Diels Alder

  10. Economic considerations in establishing European alder in herbaceous cover on surface-mined land

    SciTech Connect

    Ringe, J.M.; Graves, D.H.

    1985-12-09

    Herbicides are a practical tool for selectively controlling vegetative competition during tree seedling establishment. A study to investigate the effects of eight herbicide treatments on the survival and height growth of European alder (Alnus glutinosa) seedlings established in herbaceous cover indicated a positive treatment effect, but very little difference between the herbicide treatments themselves. Since the costs of the herbicides varied considerably, similar results could be obtained using the different herbicides, but at substantially different costs. Biological data were combined with the economic data to derive a modified benefit/cost ratio. This ratio facilitates herbicide treatment choice by comparing the amount of added survival or growth obtained per dollar spent on herbicides. 5 references, 6 tables.

  11. Cytotoxic and apoptogenic effects of Strobilanthes crispa Blume extracts on nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Rhun Yian; Sim, Yi Chi; Toh, Hwee Jin; Liam, Liang Kuan; Ong, Rachael Sze Lynn; Yew, Mei Yeng; Tiong, Yee Lian; Ling, Anna Pick Kiong; Chye, Soi Moi; Ng, Khuen Yen

    2015-10-01

    The chemotherapeutic agents used to treat nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) exhibit low efficacy. Strobilanthes crispa Blume is widely used for its anticancer, diuretic and anti‑diabetic properties. The present study aimed to determine the cytotoxic and apoptogenic effects of S. crispa on CNE‑1 NPC cells. A 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of S. crispa against CNE‑1 cells. The rate of apoptosis was determined using propidium iodide staining and caspase assays. Ethyl acetate, hexane and chloroform extracts of S. crispa leaves all exhibited cytotoxic effects on CNE‑1 cells, at a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 119, 123.5 and 161.7 µg/ml, respectively. In addition, hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of S. crispa stems inhibited CNE‑1 cell proliferation, at a IC50 of 49.4, 148.3 and 163.5 µg/ml, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis revealed an increased proportion of cells in the sub G1 phase and a decreased proportion of cells in the G2/M phase, following treatment with the extracts. However, the extracts did not alter the activities of caspase ‑3/7, ‑8 and ‑9. No cytotoxic effect was observed when the cells were treated with the methanol and water extracts of S. crispa stems and leaves. In conclusion, the S. crispa extracts were cytotoxic against CNE‑1 cells and these extracts were able to induce apoptosis, independent of caspase activation.

  12. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of Mentha crispa in the treatment of giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Teles, Naracélia S B; Fechine, Francisco V; Viana, Fernando André C; Viana, Ismenia O L; Nascimento, Demétrius F; Leite, Ana Lourdes A S; Bezerra, Fernando Antônio Frota; Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Moraes, Maria Elisabete A

    2011-11-01

    It's estimated that around 200 million people are annually infected with Giardia lamblia, making the disease a major cause of morbidity worldwide. The current treatment of giardiasis includes the use of several drugs, among them, herbal medicines formulated with Mentha crispa. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of M. crispa in the treatment of giardiasis. The research consisted initially of a cross-sectional study for the selection of subjects with giardiasis. After that, there was a randomized, open, in parallel with active control study, in order to verify the therapeutic efficacy of M. crispa in the treatment of giardiasis. Coprology samples were collected from 1622 patients between May 2005 and May 2007 for a series of parasitological examinations. Ninety-six patients with G. lamblia were selected, which were then distributed randomly into two groups: Secnidazole, consisting of 50 patients treated with 2g of Secnidazole and M. crispa, containing 46 patients treated with 2g of M. crispa. After 7 days, healing was evaluated by enzyme immunoassay in a fresh fecal sample. Additionally, the subjects were questioned about possible adverse effects and answered a questionnaire covering socioeconomic and hydrosanitary issues. The analysis of the clinical trial data showed that the cure rate for the Secnidazole group (84.0%) was significantly higher (P=0.0002) as that verified in the M. crispa group (47.83%). Therefore, the study concludes that, in the dose used in this trial, the effect of M. crispa in the treatment of giardisis is less effective than that of Secnidazole.

  13. Extreme dehydration observed in Antarctic Turgidosculum complicatulum and in Prasiola crispa.

    PubMed

    Bacior, M; Nowak, P; Harańczyk, H; Patryas, S; Kijak, P; Ligęzowska, A; Olech, M A

    2017-03-01

    Gaseous phase hydration effect of extremely dehydrated thallus of the Antarctic lichenized fungus Turgidosculum complicatulum and of green alga Prasiola crispa was observed using hydration kinetics, sorption isotherm, (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and relaxometry. Three bound water fractions were distinguished: (1) very tightly bound water, (2) tightly bound water and (3) a loosely bound water fraction detected at higher levels of hydration. Sorption isotherm was sigmoidal in form and well fitted using Dent model. The relative mass of water saturating primary water binding sites was ΔM/m 0 = 0.055 for T. complicatulum and ΔM/m 0 = 0.131 for P. crispa. (1)H-NMR free induction decays (FIDs) for T. complicatulum and for P. crispa were superpositions of a solid signal component, and one averaged liquid signal component for P. crispa thallus ([Formula: see text] ≈ 80 µs) or two liquid signal components coming from a tightly bound ([Formula: see text]≈ 71 µs) and from a loosely bound water fraction ([Formula: see text]≈ 278 µs) for T. complicatulum. (1)H-NMR spectra recorded for T. complicatulum and for P. crispa thalli revealed one averaged mobile proton signal component L. The total liquid signal component expressed in units of solid (L 1 + L 2)/S suggests the presence of water soluble fraction in T. complicatulum thallus.

  14. Growth and photosynthesis of plants in response to environmental stress. [Raphanus sativus; Glycine max; Salix nigra; Alnus serrulata; Populus tremuloides

    SciTech Connect

    Greitner, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental stresses generally decrease photosynthetic rates and growth of plants, and alter biomass partitioning. Nutrient deficiency and drought cause root:shoot ratios to increase, whereas the air pollutant ozone (O[sub 3]) causes an opposite shift in carbon allocation. Plants in nature usually grow under suboptimal conditions; therefore plants were raised with O[sub 3] combined with other stresses to analyze the mechanisms whereby multiple stresses influence gas exchange and growth. Physiological and growth responses to stress were determined for radish (raphanus sativus), soybean (Glycine max) willow (Salix nigra), alder (Alnus serrulata) and aspen (Populus tremuloides) in laboratory and field trials. In willow, high-nutrient status plants had more visible injury, but a smaller decline in leaf area with O[sub 3] than did low-nutrient plants. Ultrastructure of host plant cells in alder root nodules was disrupted by O[sub 3], suggesting that this air pollutant can affect the ability of plants to acquire nutrients via symbiosis. Biomass and root:shoot ratios decreased with O[sub 3] in radish and soy-bean. Shifts in stable carbon isotope ratios were caused by O[sub 3], and this technique was used to integrate the effects of O[sub 3] on gas exchange over time. In aspen, O[sub 3] enhanced photosynthesis and foliar areas in young leaves of well-watered aspen, partially compensating for declines in older leaves. This effect was more pronounced in plants raised at a high nitrogen level than in N-deficient plants. Carboxylation efficiency decreased in older, but increased in younger leaves with O[sub 3]. Prior exposure to drought reduced effects of O[sub 3] on photosynthesis and leaf area.

  15. Short-term influence of nitrate on acetylene reduction, photosynthesis and nodule respiration of black alder seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cazell, B.H.; Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaernt.) has shown significant benefits in several silvicultural applications such as nurse-trees. However, little is known concerning the nitrate/N-fixing interactions. Our objections were to examine the effects of three nitrate levels on acetylene reduction (AR), net photosynthesis (Ps) and nodule respiration (NR). Fifteen month-old black alder rooted cuttings were inoculated with one strain of Frankia inoculum (ARgN22D) at six months, maintained under 16h photoperiod at ambient greenhouse conditions, and fertilized for two months prior to study with a modified Crone's N-free solution. At study initiation seedlings were fertilized for six days with 0, 7.5 or 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Measurements of AR, Ps and NR were collected on the second, fourth and sixth day of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} application. By day four AR was significantly lowered by 75% for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatment when compared with the controls. On day six, Ps and NR were lowered significantly by 29% and 59%, respectively, for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatments when compared to control values. Results suggest any benefit from black alder N-fixation might be negated by nitrate fertilization.

  16. Landscape genomics and a common garden trial reveal adaptive differentiation to temperature across Europe in the tree species Alnus glutinosa.

    PubMed

    De Kort, Hanne; Vandepitte, Katrien; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Closset-Kopp, Déborah; Honnay, Olivier; Mergeay, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The adaptive potential of tree species to cope with climate change has important ecological and economic implications. Many temperate tree species experience a wide range of environmental conditions, suggesting high adaptability to new environmental conditions. We investigated adaptation to regional climate in the drought-sensitive tree species Alnus glutinosa (Black alder), using a complementary approach that integrates genomic, phenotypic and landscape data. A total of 24 European populations were studied in a common garden and through landscape genomic approaches. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used to identify SNPs across the genome, resulting in 1990 SNPs. Although a relatively low percentage of putative adaptive SNPs was detected (2.86% outlier SNPs), we observed clear associations among outlier allele frequencies, temperature and plant traits. In line with the typical drought avoiding nature of A. glutinosa, leaf size varied according to a temperature gradient and significant associations with multiple outlier loci were observed, corroborating the ecological relevance of the observed outlier SNPs. Moreover, the lack of isolation by distance, the very low genetic differentiation among populations and the high intrapopulation genetic variation all support the notion that high gene exchange combined with strong environmental selection promotes adaptation to environmental cues.

  17. Ecotoxicological effects evoked in hydrophytes by leachates of invasive Acer negundo and autochthonous Alnus glutinosa fallen off leaves during their microbial decomposition.

    PubMed

    Krevš, Alina; Darginavičienė, Jūratė; Gylytė, Brigita; Grigutytė, Reda; Jurkonienė, Sigita; Karitonas, Rolandas; Kučinskienė, Alė; Pakalnis, Romas; Sadauskas, Kazys; Vitkus, Rimantas; Manusadžianas, Levonas

    2013-02-01

    Throughout 90-day biodegradation under microaerobic conditions, invasive to Lithuania species boxelder maple (Acer negundo) leaves lost 1.5-fold more biomass than that of autochthonous black alder (Alnus glutinosa), releasing higher contents of N(tot), ammonium and generating higher BOD(7). Boxelder maple leaf leachates were characterized by higher total bacterial numbers and colony numbers of heterotrophic and cellulose-decomposing bacteria than those of black alder. The higher toxicity of A. negundo aqueous extracts and leachates to charophyte cell (Nitellopsis obtusa), the inhabitant of clean lakes, were manifested at mortality and membrane depolarization levels, while the effect on H(+)-ATPase activity in membrane preparations from the same algae was stronger in case of A. glutinosa. Duckweed (Lemna minor), a bioindicator of eutrophic waters, was more sensitive to leaf leachates of A. glutinosa. Fallen leaves and leaf litter leachates from invasive and native species of trees, which enter water body, affect differently microbial biodestruction and aquatic vegetation in freshwater systems.

  18. Ecotoxicity effects triggered in aquatic organisms by invasive Acer negundo and native Alnus glutinosa leaf leachates obtained in the process of aerobic decomposition.

    PubMed

    Manusadžianas, Levonas; Darginavičienė, Jūratė; Gylytė, Brigita; Jurkonienė, Sigita; Krevš, Alina; Kučinskienė, Alė; Mačkinaitė, Rimutė; Pakalnis, Romas; Sadauskas, Kazys; Sendžikaitė, Jūratė; Vitkus, Rimantas

    2014-10-15

    The replacement of autochthonous tree species by invasive ones in coastal zones of freshwater bodies induces additional alteration of hydrochemical and microbiological characteristics due to decomposition of fallen leaves of non-indigenous species, which can lead to ecotoxic response of the littoral biota. Leaves of invasive to Lithuania boxelder maple (Acer negundo) and autochthonous black alder (Alnus glutinosa) lost more than half of biomass and released stable amount of DOC (60-70 mg/L) throughout 90-day mesocosm experiment under aerobic conditions. This, along with the relatively small BOD7 values detected after some variation within the first month confirms effective biodegradation by fungi and bacteria. The ambient water was more enriched with different forms of N and P by decomposing boxelder maple than by alder leaves. During the first month, both leachates were more toxic to charophyte (Nitellopsis obtusa) at mortality and membrane depolarization levels, while later to two crustacean species. Biomarker response, H(+)-ATPase activity in membrane preparations from N. obtusa, was stronger for A. negundo. Generally, boxelder maple leaf leachates were more toxic to tested hydrobionts and this coincides with previous study on leaves of the same pair of tree species conducted under microaerobic conditions (Krevš et al., 2013).

  19. Can We Use Tree Rings of Black Alder to Reconstruct Lake Levels? A Case Study for the Mecklenburg Lake District, Northeastern Germany

    PubMed Central

    van der Maaten, Ernst; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Buras, Allan; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Kaiser, Knut; Lorenz, Sebastian; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential to reconstruct lake-level (and groundwater) fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.) for three study lakes in the Mecklenburg Lake District, northeastern Germany. As gauging records for lakes in this region are generally short, long-term reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations could provide valuable information on past hydrological conditions, which, in turn, are useful to assess dynamics of climate and landscape evolution. We selected black alder as our study species as alder typically thrives as riparian vegetation along lakeshores. For the study lakes, we tested whether a regional signal in lake-level fluctuations and in the growth of alder exists that could be used for long-term regional hydrological reconstructions, but found that local (i.e. site-specific) signals in lake level and tree-ring chronologies prevailed. Hence, we built lake/groundwater-level reconstruction models for the three study lakes individually. Two sets of models were considered based on (1) local tree-ring series of black alder, and (2) site-specific Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Indices (SPEI). Although the SPEI-based models performed statistically well, we critically reflect on the reliability of these reconstructions, as SPEI cannot account for human influence. Tree-ring based reconstruction models, on the other hand, performed poor. Combined, our results suggest that, for our study area, long-term regional reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations that consider both recent and ancient (e.g., archaeological) wood of black alder seem extremely challenging, if not impossible. PMID:26317768

  20. Draft Plastid and Mitochondrial Genome Sequences from Antarctic Alga Prasiola crispa

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Evelise Leis; Wallau, Gabriel da Luz; Rangel, Darlene Lopes; Machado, Laís Ceschini; da Silva, Alexandre Freitas; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Duarte; Macedo, Pablo Echeverria; Pereira, Antonio Batista; Victoria, Filipe de Carvalho; Boldo, Juliano Tomazzoni; Dal Belo, Cháriston André

    2015-01-01

    The organelle genomes of the Antarctic alga Prasiola crispa (Lightfoot) Kützing have been sequenced. The plastid and mitochondrial genomes have a total length of 196,502 bp and 89,819 bp, respectively. These genomes have 19 putative photosynthesis-related genes and 17 oxidative metabolism-related genes, respectively. PMID:26450727

  1. Unusual algal turfs associated with the rhodophyta Phyllophora crispa: Benthic assemblages along a depth gradient in the Central Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Andrea; Ventura, Daniele; Gravina, Maria Flavia; Lasinio, Giovanna Jona; Belluscio, Andrea; Ardizzone, Gian Domenico

    2017-02-01

    Macroalgal assemblages dominated by the turf-forming alga Phyllophora crispa are described in detail for the first time in the Central Mediterranean Sea. This particular form of algal growth, which comprises an upper mixed layer of multiple algal species with a basal stratum formed by entangled thalli of P. crispa, was observed for the first time in 2012 along the promontory of Punta del Lazzaretto (Giglio Island, Italy). In this study, this assemblage was analysed to document the diversity of macroalgae and invertebrate associated communities and assess their distribution along a depth gradient. The algae forming turfs grow directly on the rock at low depth up to 10-15 m depth, while they grow above P. crispa from 15 m to 35 m depth, resulting in luxuriant beds covering up to 100% of the substrate. Multivariate analysis revealed clear differences regarding algae and invertebrate species richness and abundance between shallow and deep strata because of the dominance of Phyllophora crispa at depths greater than 20 m. The long laminal thalli of P. crispa favoured sessile fauna colonization, while the vagile species were principally linked to the architectural complexity of the turf layer created by the P. crispa, which increased the microhabitat diversity and favoured sediment deposition within the turf layer. The complex structures of these turf assemblages and their widespread distribution along the whole coast of the island suggest a well-established condition of the communities linked to the high natural sedimentation rate observed in the area.

  2. Alder, Nitrogen, and Lake Ecology: Terrestrial-Aquatic Linkages in the Postglacial History of Lone Spruce Pond, Southwestern Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Axford, Yarrow; Kaufman, Darrell S.

    2017-01-01

    Diatoms, combined with a multiproxy study of lake sediments (organic matter, N, δ15N, δ13C, biogenic silica, grain size, Cladocera and chironomids, Alnus pollen) from Lone Spruce Pond, Alaska detail the late-glacial to Holocene history of the lake and its response to regional climate and landscape change over the last 14.5 cal ka BP. We show that the immigration of alder (Alnus viridis) in the early Holocene marks the rise of available reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the lake as well as the establishment of a primarily planktonic diatom community. The later establishment of diatom Discostella stelligera is coupled to a rise of sedimentary δ15N, indicating diminished competition for this nutrient. This terrestrial-aquatic linkage demonstrates how profoundly vegetation may affect soil geochemistry, lake development, and lake ecology over millennial timescales. Furthermore, the response of the diatom community to strengthened stratification and N levels in the past confirms the sensitivity of planktonic diatom communities to changing thermal and nutrient regimes. These past ecosystem dynamics serve as an analogue for the nature of threshold-type ecological responses to current climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (Nr) deposition, but also for the larger changes we should anticipate under future climate, pollution, and vegetation succession scenarios in high-latitude and high-elevation regions. PMID:28076393

  3. Antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of the essential oil of Nepeta crispa Willd. from Iran.

    PubMed

    Sonboli, Ali; Salehi, Peyman; Yousefzadi, Morteza

    2004-01-01

    The composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Nepeta crispa Willd., an endemic species from Iran, was studied. The oil was obtained from the aerial parts of the plant and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Twenty-three compounds, accounting for 99.8% of the total oil, were identified. The main constituents were 1,8-cineol (47.9%) and 4aalpha,7alpha,7abetanepetalactone (20.3%). The antimicrobial activity of essential oil of N. crispa was tested against seven gram-negative or gram-positive bacteria and four fungi. The results of the bioassays showed the interesting antimicrobial activity, in which the gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, were the most sensitive to the oil. Also, the oil exhibited a remarkable antifungal activity against all the tested fungi.

  4. Tinospora crispa (L.) Hook. f. & Thomson: A Review of Its Ethnobotanical, Phytochemical, and Pharmacological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waqas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Bukhari, Syed N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Tinospora crispa (L.) Hook. f. & Thomson (Menispermaceae), found in the rainforests or mixed deciduous forests in Asia and Africa, is used in traditional medicines to treat numerous health conditions. This review summarizes the up-to-date reports about the ethnobotany, phytochemistry, pharmacological activities, toxicology, and clinical trials of the plant. It also provides critical assessment about the present knowledge of the plant which could contribute toward improving its prospect as a source of lead molecules for drug discovery. The plant has been used traditionally in the treatment of jaundice, rheumatism, urinary disorders, fever, malaria, diabetes, internal inflammation, fracture, scabies, hypertension, reducing thirst, increasing appetite, cooling down the body temperature, and maintaining good health. Phytochemical analyses of T. crispa revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, and flavone glycosides, triterpenes, diterpenes and diterpene glycosides, cis clerodane-type furanoditerpenoids, lactones, sterols, lignans, and nucleosides. Studies showed that the crude extracts and isolated compounds of T. crispa possessed a broad range of pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, cytotoxic, antimalarial, cardioprotective, and anti-diabetic activities. Most pharmacological studies were based on crude extracts of the plant and the bioactive compounds responsible for the bioactivities have not been well identified. Further investigations are required to transform the experience-based claims on the use of T. crispa in traditional medicine practices into evidence-based information. The plant extract used in pharmacological and biological studies should be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed based on its biomarkers. There should be detail in vitro and in vivo studies on the mechanisms of action of the pure bioactive compounds and more elaborate toxicity study to ensure safety of the plant for human use. More

  5. Humus bacteria of Norway spruce stands: plant growth promoting properties and birch, red fescue and alder colonizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Elo; Maunuksela; Salkinoja-Salonen; Smolander; Haahtela

    2000-02-01

    We studied the potential of the humus layer of the Norway spruce stands to supply beneficial rhizobacteria to birch (Betula pendula), alder (Alnus incana) and fescue grass (Festuca rubra), representatives of pioneer vegetation after clear-cutting of the coniferous forest. Axenically grown seedlings of these species were inoculated with the acid spruce humus, pH 3.7-5.3. Actinorhizal propagules, capable of nodulating alder, were present in high density (10(3) g(-1)) in humus of long-term limed plots, whereas plots with nitrogen fertilization contained almost none (

  6. Control of endophytic Frankia sporulation by Alnus nodule metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hay De-Bettignies, Anne-Emmanuelle; Boubakri, Hasna; Buonomo, Antoine; Rey, Marjolaine; Meiffren, Guillaume; Cotin-Galvan, Laetitia; Comte, Gilles; Herrera-Belaroussi, Aude

    2017-01-10

    A unique case of microbial symbiont capable of dormancy within its living host cells has been reported in actinorhizal symbioses: some Frankia strains, named Sp+, are able to sporulate inside plant cells, contrarily to Sp- strains. The presence of metabolically slowed down bacterial structures in host cells alters our understanding of symbiosis based on reciprocal benefits between both partners, and its impact on the symbiotic processes remains unknown. The present work reports a metabolomic study of Sp+ and Sp- nodules (from Alnus glutinosa), in order to highlight variabilities associated with in-planta sporulation. A total of 21 amino acids (AA), 44 sugars and organic acids (SOA), and 213 secondary metabolites (M) were detected using UV and mass spectrometric-based profiling. Little change was observed in primary metabolites, suggesting that in-planta sporulation would not strongly affect the primary functionalities of the symbiosis. One secondary metabolite (M27) was detected only in Sp+ nodules. It was identified as Gentisic acid 5-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, previously reported as involved in plant defenses against microbial pathogens. This metabolite significantly increased Frankia in-vitro sporulation, unlike another metabolite significantly more abundant in Sp- nodules (M168 = (5R)-1,7-bis-(3,4-) dihydroxyphenyl)-heptane-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside). All these results suggest that the plant could play an important role in Frankia ability to sporulate in-planta, and allow us to discuss a possible sanction emitted by the host against less cooperative Sp+ symbionts.

  7. Controls on methane emissions from Alnus glutinosa saplings.

    PubMed

    Pangala, Sunitha R; Gowing, David J; Hornibrook, Edward R C; Gauci, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have confirmed significant tree-mediated methane emissions in wetlands; however, conditions and processes controlling such emissions are unclear. Here we identify factors that control the emission of methane from Alnus glutinosa. Methane fluxes from the soil surface, tree stem surfaces, leaf surfaces and whole mesocosms, pore water methane concentrations and physiological factors (assimilation rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration) were measured from 4-yr old A. glutinosa trees grown under two artificially controlled water-table positions. Up to 64% of methane emitted from the high water-table mesocosms was transported to the atmosphere through A. glutinosa. Stem emissions from 2 to 22 cm above the soil surface accounted for up to 42% of total tree-mediated methane emissions. Methane emissions were not detected from leaves and no relationship existed between leaf surface area and rates of tree-mediated methane emissions. Tree stem methane flux strength was controlled by the amount of methane dissolved in pore water and the density of stem lenticels. Our data show that stem surfaces dominate methane egress from A. glutinosa, suggesting that leaf area index is not a suitable approach for scaling tree-mediated methane emissions from all types of forested wetland.

  8. The impact of a pulsing groundwater table on greenhouse gas emissions in riparian grey alder stands.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ülo; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Teemusk, Alar; Kanal, Arno; Uri, Veiko; Truu, Jaak

    2015-02-01

    Floods control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in floodplains; however, there is a lack of data on the impact of short-term events on emissions. We studied the short-term effect of changing groundwater (GW) depth on the emission of (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in two riparian grey alder (Alnus incana) stands of different age in Kambja, southern Estonia, using the opaque static chamber (five replicates in each site) and gas chromatography methods. The average carbon and total nitrogen content in the soil of the old alder (OA) stand was significantly higher than in the young alder (YA) stand. In both stands, one part was chosen for water table manipulation (Manip) and another remained unchanged with a stable and deeper GW table. Groundwater table manipulation (flooding) significantly increases CH4 emission (average: YA-Dry 468, YA-Manip 8,374, OA-Dry 468, OA-Manip 4,187 μg C m(-2) h(-1)) and decreases both CO2 (average: OA-Dry 138, OA-Manip 80 mg C m(-2) h(-1)) and N2O emissions (average: OA-Dry 23.1, OA-Manip 11.8 μg N m(-2) h(-1)) in OA sites. There was no significant difference in CO2 and CH4 emissions between the OA and YA sites, whereas in OA sites with higher N concentration in the soil, the N2O emission was significantly higher than at the YA sites. The relative CO2 and CH4 emissions (the soil C stock-related share of gaseous losses) were higher in manipulated plots showing the highest values in the YA-Manip plot (0.03 and 0.0030 % C day(-1), respectively). The soil N stock-related N2O emission was very low achieving 0.000019 % N day(-1) in the OA-Dry plot. Methane emission shows a negative correlation with GW, whereas the 20 cm depth is a significant limit below which most of the produced CH4 is oxidized. In terms of CO2 and N2O, the deeper GW table significantly increases emission. In riparian zones of headwater streams, the short-term floods (e.g. those driven by extreme climate events) may significantly enhance

  9. Crispene A, B, C and D, Four New Clerodane Type Furanoid Diterpenes from Tinospora crispa (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hossen, Farhad; Ahasan, Rubaida; Haque, Mohammad Rashedul; Begum, Bilkis; Hasan, Choudhury Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tinospora crispa (L.) is used to alleviate the symptoms of diabetes mellitus in folk medicine. It is also used for hypertension and to treat malaria, remedy for diarrhea, and as vermifuge. Materials and Methods: Stems of T. crispa were collected, sun dried for several days followed by oven dried for 24 h at a considerably low temperature and then ground into coarse powder. The powdered stems were soaked in methanol at room temperature for 14 days with occasional shaking. The extract was collected by filtration, and the solvent was evaporated under reduced pressure in a rotary evaporator to obtain a solid residue which was then subjected to fractionation using the modified Kupchan partitioning method into n-hexane, CCl4, CHCl3 and aqueous soluble fractions. The n-hexane soluble fraction was chromatographed over sephadex (LH-20) and the column was eluted with n-hexane: CH2Cl2:MeOH (2:5:1) followed by CH2Cl2:MeOH (9:1) and MeOH (100%) in order to increase the polarities. The column fractions were then concentrated and subjected to thin layer chromatography screening and the fractions with a satisfactory resolution of compounds were rechromatographed over silica gel to isolate the pure compounds. Results: Four new furanoid diterpenes of clerodane types, Crispene A, B, C, and D (1–4), including one known furanoid diterpene glucoside, borapetoside E (5), were isolated from the stems of T. crispa. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by means of extensive spectroscopic analysis and by comparison of their spectral data with closely related compounds. Conclusion: We have reported four new furanoid diterpenes of clerodane types, including one known furanoid diterpene glucoside. This is the first report of any clerodane diterpene having olefinic bond between C-6 and C-7. SUMMARY Crispene A, B, C, and D, four new furanoid diterpenes of clerodane types from Tinospora crispaCrispene C, an unusual furanoid diterpene with olifinic bond between C-6 and C

  10. Immunomodulatory effect of an isolated fraction from Tinospora crispa on intracellular expression of INF-γ, IL-6 and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunomodulators are substances that modify immune system response to a threat. Immunomodulators modulate and potentiate the immune system, keeping it highly prepared for any threat. The immunomodulatory effect of the traditional medicine Tinospora crispa is investigated in this work. Methods T. crispa ethanol extract was fractionated by using different solvents. The ethanol extract and effective isolated fraction were used to investigate the potential immunomodulatory effect of different T. crispa doses ranging from 25 μg/mL to 1000 μg/mL on RAW 246.7 cells by detecting intracellular INF-γ, IL-6, and IL-8 expressions. The antioxidant activity of T. crispa was evaluated through FRAP and DPPH. The total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were also quantified. Results Results show that T. crispa extract has higher antioxidant potential than ascorbic acid. The FRAP value of T. crispa extract is 11011.11 ± 1145.42 μmol Fe+2/g, and its DPPH inhibition percentage is 55.79 ± 7.9, with 22 μg/mL IC50. The results also reveal that the total phenolic content of T. crispa extract is 213.16- ± 1.31 mg GAE/g dry stem weight, and the total flavonoid content is 62.07- ± 39.76 mg QE/g dry stem weight. T. crispa crude extract and its isolated fraction significantly stimulate RAW264.7 cell viability (P ≤ 0.05) and intracellular INF-γ, IL-6, and IL-8 expressions. The results of LC-MS show that four of the active compounds detected in the T. crispa isolated fraction are cordioside, quercetin, eicosenoic acid (paullinic acid), and boldine. Conclusions The results of this study obviously indicate that T. crispa has immunomodulatory effects through the stimulation of INF-γ, IL-6, and IL-8 expressions. LC-MS phytochemical analysis showed that the T. crispa fraction has cordioside, quercetin, eicosenoic acid (paullinic acid), and boldine, which may be responsible for the immunostimulator effect of T. crispa. PMID:24969238

  11. Hypocholesterolemic Effects of the Cauliflower Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom, Sparassis crispa (Higher Basidiomycetes), in Diet-Induced Hypercholesterolemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ki Bae; Hong, Sung-Yong; Joung, Eun Young; Kim, Byung Hee; Bae, Song-Hwan; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-01-01

    The cauliflower culinary-medicinal mushroom, Sparassis crispa, possesses various biological activities that have been widely reported to have therapeutic applications. We examined the effects of S. crispa on serum cholesterol, hepatic enzymes related to cholesterol metabolism, and fecal sterol excretion in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet for 4 weeks. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks old) were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 6 mice per group): normal diet (normal control [NC]), cholesterol-rich diet (cholesterol control [CC]), cholesterol-rich diet plus S. crispa fruiting body (SC), cholesterol-rich diet plus S. crispa extract (SCE), and cholesterol-rich diet plus S. crispa residue (SCR). SCE supplementation significantly enhanced hepatic cholesterol catabolism through the upregulation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression (2.55-fold compared with that in the NC group; P < 0.05) and the downregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA expression (0.57-fold compared with that in the NC group; P < 0.05). Additionally, the SCE diet resulted in the highest fecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acid in hypercholesterolemic rats. In conclusion, mRNA expression of CYP7A1 and HMG-CoA reductase were significantly modulated by the absorption of SCE samples. Also, SCE samples had a significant effect on fecal bile acid and cholesterol excretion. These results suggest that SCE samples can induce hypocholesterolic effects through cholesterol metabolism and the reduction of circulating cholesterol levels.

  12. Synthesis of Antitumor Lycorines by Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Dolores; Burés, Gema; Guitián, Enrique; Castedo, Luis

    1996-03-08

    Pharmacologically interesting lycorines were obtained by a short, efficient method based on an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction between an alpha-pyrone and an alkyne, followed by loss of CO(2) in a retro Diels-Alder reaction. The cyclization precursors (pyrones 9) were obtained in good yields in two or three steps from the corresponding homophthalic acid or anhydride.

  13. Occultocarpon, a new monotypic genus of Gnomoniaceae on Alnus nepalensis from China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new monotypic genus Occultocarpon and its species, O. ailaoshanense, was discovered on the bark of branches of Alnus nepalensis (Betulaceae) in Yunnan, China. A phylogeny based on three genes (LSU, rpb2, tef1-a) reveals that O. ailaoshanense belongs to the Gnomoniaceae (Diaporthales, Ascomycetes) ...

  14. Spatiotemporal models for predicting high pollen concentration level of Corylus, Alnus, and Betula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowosad, Jakub

    2016-06-01

    Corylus, Alnus, and Betula trees are among the most important sources of allergic pollen in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere and have a large impact on the quality of life and productivity of allergy sufferers. Therefore, it is important to predict high pollen concentrations, both in time and space. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate spatiotemporal models for predicting high Corylus, Alnus, and Betula pollen concentration levels, based on gridded meteorological data. Aerobiological monitoring was carried out in 11 cities in Poland and gathered, depending on the site, between 2 and 16 years of measurements. According to the first allergy symptoms during exposure, a high pollen count level was established for each taxon. An optimizing probability threshold technique was used for mitigation of the problem of imbalance in the pollen concentration levels. For each taxon, the model was built using a random forest method. The study revealed the possibility of moderately reliable prediction of Corylus and highly reliable prediction of Alnus and Betula high pollen concentration levels, using preprocessed gridded meteorological data. Cumulative growing degree days and potential evaporation proved to be two of the most important predictor variables in the models. The final models predicted not only for single locations but also for continuous areas. Furthermore, the proposed modeling framework could be used to predict high pollen concentrations of Corylus, Alnus, Betula, and other taxa, and in other countries.

  15. Spatiotemporal models for predicting high pollen concentration level of Corylus, Alnus, and Betula.

    PubMed

    Nowosad, Jakub

    2016-06-01

    Corylus, Alnus, and Betula trees are among the most important sources of allergic pollen in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere and have a large impact on the quality of life and productivity of allergy sufferers. Therefore, it is important to predict high pollen concentrations, both in time and space. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate spatiotemporal models for predicting high Corylus, Alnus, and Betula pollen concentration levels, based on gridded meteorological data. Aerobiological monitoring was carried out in 11 cities in Poland and gathered, depending on the site, between 2 and 16 years of measurements. According to the first allergy symptoms during exposure, a high pollen count level was established for each taxon. An optimizing probability threshold technique was used for mitigation of the problem of imbalance in the pollen concentration levels. For each taxon, the model was built using a random forest method. The study revealed the possibility of moderately reliable prediction of Corylus and highly reliable prediction of Alnus and Betula high pollen concentration levels, using preprocessed gridded meteorological data. Cumulative growing degree days and potential evaporation proved to be two of the most important predictor variables in the models. The final models predicted not only for single locations but also for continuous areas. Furthermore, the proposed modeling framework could be used to predict high pollen concentrations of Corylus, Alnus, Betula, and other taxa, and in other countries.

  16. Performance of an age series of Alnus-cardamom plantations in the Sikkim Himalaya: nutrient dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G; Sharma, R; Sharma, E; Singh, K K

    2002-03-01

    Nutrient cycling, nutrient use efficiency and nitrogen fixation in an age series of Alnus-cardamom plantations were studied in the eastern Himalaya. The impact of stand age (5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 years) on the nutrient dynamics of mixtures of N2-fixing (Alnus nepalensis) and non-N2-fixing (large cardamom) plants was assessed. Foliar nutrient concentrations of Alnus decreased with advancing age groups of plantations and showed an inverse relationship with stand age. Annual N fixation increased from the 5-year-old stand (52 kg ha(-1)), peaking in the 15-year-old stand (155 kg ha(-1)) and then decreased with increasing plantation age. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake was lowest in the 40-year-old stand, and highest in the 15- and 5-year-old stand, respectively. Nutrient storage in understorey cardamom was very high: up to 31 % N and 59 % P of the stand total in the 15-year-old stand. Nutrient use efficiency was higher (with faster turnover times) in younger stands and decreased (with slower turnover times) in older plantations. Nitrogen retranslocation showed a strong positive relationship with stand age, while that of P was inversely related to stand age. Nutrient standing stock, uptake and return were also highest in the 15-year-old stand. Nitrogen and P cycling in Alnus-cardamom plantations was functionally balanced. Nutrient cycling and dynamics indicated that Alnus-cardamom plantations performed sustainably up to 15-20 years. The management practice should be altered to incorporate replantation after this age.

  17. Effects of surface inactivation, high temperature drying and preservative treatment on surface roughness and colour of alder and beech wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ismail; Colakoglu, Gursel

    2005-10-01

    Although extensive research has been conducted in wood surface quality analysis, a unified approach to surface quality characterisation does not exist. Measurements of the variation in surface roughness and surface colour are used widely for the evaluation of wood surface quality. Colour is a basic visual feature for wood and wood-based products. Colour measurement is one of the quality control tests that should be carried out because the colour deviations are spotted easily by the consumers. On the other hand, a common problem faced by plywood manufacturers is panel delamination, for which a major cause is poor quality glue-bonds resulting from rough veneer. Rotary cut veneers with dimensions of 500 mm × 500 mm × 2 mm manufactured from alder ( Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata) and beech ( Fagus orientalis Lipsky) logs were used as materials in this study. Veneer sheets were oven-dried in a veneer dryer at 110 °C (normal drying temperature) and 180 °C (high drying temperature) after peeling process. The surfaces of some veneers were then exposed at indoor laboratory conditions to obtain inactive wood surfaces for glue bonds, and some veneers were treated with borax, boric acid and ammonium acetate solutions. After these treatments, surface roughness and colour measurements were made on veneer surfaces. High temperature drying process caused a darkening on the surfaces of alder and beech veneers. Total colour change value (Δ E*) increased linear with increasing exposure time. Among the treatment solutions, ammonium acetate caused the biggest colour change while treatment with borax caused the lowest changes in Δ E* values. Considerable changes in surface roughness after preservative treatment did not occur on veneer surfaces. Generally, no clear changes were obtained or the values mean roughness profile ( Ra) decreased slightly in Ra values after the natural inactivation process.

  18. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Christopher; Adzima, Brian J.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  19. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  20. The pentadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Teng; Naredla, Rajasekhar Reddy; Thompson, Severin K.; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    In the classic Diels–Alder (DA) [4+2] cycloaddition reaction1, the overall degree of unsaturation of the 4π (diene) and 2π (dienophile) pairs of reactants dictates the oxidation state of the newly formed six-membered carbocycle. For example, in the classic DA reaction, butadiene and ethylene combine to produce cyclohexene. More recent developments include variants in which the hydrogen atom count in the reactant pair and in the resulting product is reduced by2, for example, four in the tetradehydro-DA (TDDA) and by six in the hexadehydro-DA (HDDA3,4,5,6,7) reactions. Any oxidation state higher than tetradehydro leads to the production of a reactive intermediate that is more highly oxidized than benzene. This significantly increases the power of the overall process because trapping of the benzyne intermediate8,9 can be used to increase the structural complexity of the final product in a controllable and versatile manner. In this manuscript, we report an unprecedented net 4π+2π cycloaddition reaction that generates a different, highly reactive intermediate known as an α,3-dehydrotoluene. This species is at the same oxidation state as a benzyne. Like benzynes, α,3-dehydrotoluenes can be captured by various trapping agents to produce structurally diverse products that are complementary to those arising from the HDDA process. We call this new cycloisomerization reaction a pentadehydro-Diels–Alder (PDDA) reaction—a nomenclature chosen for chemical taxonomic rather than mechanistic reasons. In addition to alkynes, nitriles (RC≡N), although non-participants in aza-HDDA reactions, readily function as the 2π-component in PDDA cyclizations to produce, via trapping of the α,3-(5-aza)dehydrotoluene intermediates, pyridine-containing products. PMID:27088605

  1. A Diels-Alder Route to Angularly Functionalized Bicyclic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Han; Lee, Jun Hee; Aussedat, Baptiste; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    A Diels-Alder based route to trans-fused angularly functionalized bicyclic structures has been developed. This transformation features the use of a tetrasubstituted dienophile in the cycloaddition step. PMID:20717474

  2. The hetero-Diels-Alder approach to spiroketals.

    PubMed

    Rizzacasa, Mark A; Pollex, Annett

    2009-03-21

    The hetero-Diels-Alder reaction can provide spiroketal systems with excellent stereoselectivity. This perspective article will briefly outline the scope and limitations of this approach for the production of naturally occurring spiroketals and derivatives.

  3. Two new species of Lactarius associated with Alnus acuminata subsp. arguta in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Leticia; Bandala, Victor M; Garay, Edith

    2014-01-01

    In pure stands of Alnus acuminata subsp. arguta trees from Sierra Norte de Puebla (central Mexico) two undescribed ectomycorrhizal species of Lactarius were discovered. Distinction of the two new species is based on morphological characters and supported with phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS region and part of the gene that encodes for the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2). The phylogenies inferred recovered the two species in different clades strongly supported by posterior probabilities and bootstrap values. The new Lactarius species are recognized as part of the assemblage of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with Alnus acuminata. Information about these taxa includes the morphological variation achieved along 16 monitories 2010-2013. Descriptions are provided. They are accompanied by photos including SEM photomicrographs of basidiospores and information on differences between them and other related taxa from Europe and the United States.

  4. Evidence that some Frankia sp. strains are able to cross boundaries between Alnus and Elaeagnus host specificity groups.

    PubMed

    Bosco, M; Fernandez, M P; Simonet, P; Materassi, R; Normand, P

    1992-05-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to prove the existence of Frankia strains isolated from an Elaeagnus sp. that are able to cross the inoculation barriers and infect Alnus spp. also. Repeated cycles of inoculation, nodulation, and reisolation were performed under axenic conditions. Frankia wild-type strain UFI 13270257 and three of its coisolates did exhibit complete infectivity and effectiveness on Elaeagnus spp. and Hippophaë rhamnoides and variable infectivity on Alnus spp. Microscopical observation of host plant roots showed that these strains are able to infect Alnus spp. by penetrating deformed root hairs. Reisolates obtained from nodules induced on monoxenic Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, and Elaeagnus angustifolia resembled the parent strains in host infectivity range, in planta and in vitro morphophysiology, isoenzymes, and nif and rrn restriction fragment length polymorphisms, thus fulfilling Koch's postulates on both host plant genera. Alnus and Elaeagnus group-specific polymerase chain reaction DNA amplifications, DNA-DNA hybridizations, and partial gene sequences coding for 16S rRNA provided evidence for the genetic uniformity of wild-type strains and their inclusion into one and the same genomic species, clearly belonging to the Elaeagnus group of Frankia species.

  5. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of Nepeta crispa Willd. in experimental rat models.

    PubMed

    Ali, Taskina; Javan, Mohammad; Sonboli, Ali; Semnanian, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of Nepeta crispa. The study was done using the tail-flick and formalin test pain models and the paw oedema model of inflammation. Male Wistar rats were used as the animal model. The essential oil dose-dependently produced analgesia in the acute pain models, including the tail-flick (p < 0.001) and the first phase of the formalin test (p < 0.01). In the late phase of the formalin test, as a model of chronic pain, the essential oil significantly reduced the pain-induced behaviour (p < 0.01). Nepeta crispa essential oil caused potent anti-inflammatory effects in the formalin-induced paw inflammation model and significantly reduced the paw oedema in all applied doses (p < 0.01). Its effects on pain in both the acute and chronic pain models and its anti-inflammatory effect suggest both central and peripheral mechanisms of action for the essential oil obtained from N. crispa.

  6. Toxicity and antioxidant capacity of Frangula alnus Mill. bark and its active component emodin.

    PubMed

    Brkanac, Sandra Radić; Gerić, Marko; Gajski, Goran; Vujčić, Valerija; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Kremer, Dario; Domijan, Ana-Marija

    2015-12-01

    In the present study toxicity of Frangula alnus Mill. bark, widely used as laxative, was investigated. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) were treated with F. alnus bark extract or emodin (emodin is bark component with laxative property), and cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and parameters of oxidative stress were assessed. Also, polyphenol content of bark extract and antioxidant activity of the extract and emodin measured by DPPH, ABTS and FRAP methods were examined. The bark extract (500 μg/ml) produced cell death and DNA damage, while level of ROS changed at 250 μg/ml. Emodin induced cell death and DNA damage at 150 μg/ml and 200 μg/ml, respectively, and the increase of ROS was observed at 25 μg/ml. These results suggest that both, bark extract and emodin, are cyto/genotoxic to HPBLs and that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanism of their toxicity. The results on antioxidant activity showed that, unlike emodin, bark extract possess moderate antioxidant capacity (44.6%, 46.8% and 2.25 mmol Fe(2+)/g measured by DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assay, respectively) that can be related to relatively high phenolic content (116.07 mg/g). However, due to toxicological properties use of F. alnus bark as well as emodin-containing preparations should be taken with caution.

  7. The hexadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hoye, Thomas R.; Baire, Beeraiah; Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H.; Woods, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary o-Benzynes (arynes) are among the most versatile of all reactive (short-lived) intermediates in organic chemistry. These species can be trapped to give products that are valuable from the perspective of both fine (pharmaceuticals) and commodity (agrochemicals, dyes, polymers, etc.) chemicals. Here we show a fundamentally new strategy that unites a de novo generation of benzynes, through the title hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) reaction, with their in situ elaboration into structurally complex benzenoid products. In the HDDA reaction a 1,3-diyne is engaged in a [4+2] cycloisomerization with a third (pendant) alkyne–the diynophile–to produce the highly reactive benzyne intermediate. The metal- and reagent-free reaction conditions for this simple, thermal transformation are notable. The subsequent and highly efficient trapping reactions increase the power of the overall process. Finally, we provide examples of how this de novo benzyne generation approach allows new modes of intrinsic reactivity to be revealed. PMID:23060191

  8. Neuroanatomy of Halobiotus crispae (Eutardigrada: Hypsibiidae): Tardigrade brain structure supports the clade Panarthropoda.

    PubMed

    Persson, Dennis K; Halberg, Kenneth A; Jørgensen, Aslak; Møbjerg, Nadja; Kristensen, Reinhardt M

    2012-11-01

    The position of Tardigrada in the animal tree of life is a subject that has received much attention, but still remains controversial. Whereas some think tardigrades should be categorized as cycloneuralians, most authors argue in favor of a phylogenetic position within Panarthropoda as a sister group to Arthropoda or Arthropoda + Onychophora. Thus far, neither molecular nor morphological investigations have provided conclusive results as to the tardigrade sister group relationships. In this article, we present a detailed description of the nervous system of the eutardigrade Halobiotus crispae, using immunostainings, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and computer-aided three-dimensional reconstructions supported by transmission electron microscopy. We report details regarding the structure of the brain as well as the ganglia of the ventral nerve cord. In contrast to the newest investigation, we find transverse commissures in the ventral ganglia, and our data suggest that the brain is partitioned into at least three lobes. Additionally, we can confirm the existence of a subpharyngeal ganglion previously called subesophagal ganglion. According to our results, the original suggestion of a brain comprised of at least three parts cannot be rejected, and the data presented supports a sister group relationship of Tardigrada to 1) Arthropoda or 2) Onychophora or 3) Arthropoda + Onychophora.

  9. Phytochemical and biological activity studies of the Bhutanese medicinal plant Corydalis crispa.

    PubMed

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Keller, Paul A; Pyne, Stephen G; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Taweechotipatr, Malai; Rattanajak, Roonglawan; Tonsomboon, Aunchalee; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee

    2012-05-01

    The chemical constituents and biological activities of Corydalis crispa (Fumariaceae) were investigated for the first time. The phytochemical study resulted in the isolation of nine known isoquinoline alkaloids: protopine (1), 13-oxoprotopine (2), 13-oxocryptopine (3), stylopine (4), coreximine (5), rheagenine (6), ochrobirine (7), sibiricine (8) and bicuculline (9), with complete NMR data for 2 and 3 provided here for the first time. Crude extracts exhibitedsignificant anti-inflammatory (p < 0.01) activity against TNF-alpha production in LPS activated THP-1 cells. The acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of compounds 2, 4 and 7 and the antiplasmodial activity of compound 5 against P. falciparum strains TM4/8.2 and K1CB1 (multidrug resistant strain) are reported here for the first time. Stylopine (4) did not show antimalarial activity against the K1CB1 strain in contrast to a previous report. This study generated a scientific basis for the use of this plant in Bhutanese traditional medicine, either individually or in combination with other medicinal ingredients to treat a broad range of disorders. This study also identified compound 5 as potential new antimalarial lead compound.

  10. Change in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances.

    PubMed

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Delporte, Fabienne; Muhovski, Yordan; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Druart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization.

  11. Missing checkerboards? An absence of competitive signal in Alnus-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nhu; Cohen, Hannah; Peay, Kabir

    2014-01-01

    A number of recent studies suggest that interspecific competition plays a key role in determining the structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities. Despite this growing consensus, there has been limited study of ECM fungal community dynamics in abiotically stressful environments, which are often dominated by positive rather than antagonistic interactions. In this study, we examined the ECM fungal communities associated with the host genus Alnus, which live in soils high in both nitrate and acidity. The nature of ECM fungal species interactions (i.e., antagonistic, neutral, or positive) was assessed using taxon co-occurrence and DNA sequence abundance correlational analyses. ECM fungal communities were sampled from root tips or mesh in-growth bags in three monodominant A. rubra plots at a site in Oregon, USA and identified using Illumina-based amplification of the ITS1 gene region. We found a total of 175 ECM fungal taxa; 16 of which were closely related to known Alnus-associated ECM fungi. Contrary to previous studies of ECM fungal communities, taxon co-occurrence analyses on both the total and Alnus-associated ECM datasets indicated that the ECM fungal communities in this system were not structured by interspecific competition. Instead, the co-occurrence patterns were consistent with either random assembly or significant positive interactions. Pair-wise correlational analyses were also more consistent with neutral or positive interactions. Taken together, our results suggest that interspecific competition does not appear to determine the structure of all ECM fungal communities and that abiotic conditions may be important in determining the specific type of interaction occurring among ECM fungi. PMID:25548729

  12. Microwave-assisted isolation of essential oils from Nepeta crispa and N. racemosa and comparisons with the conventional method.

    PubMed

    Daryasari, Ameneh Porgham; Soleimani, Mojtaba; Ghorbani, Azam; Kheiri, Homayon; Daryasarie, Mohammad Porgham

    2012-11-01

    In this study microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) has been compared with the conventional method of hydrodistillation for the extraction of the essential oils from two Iranian Lamiaceae species: Nepeta crispa Willd and N. racemosa Lam. The essential oils extracted by MAHD for 40 min were quantitatively and qualitatively (aromatic profile) similar to those obtained by conventional hydrodistillation for 3.5 h. The MAHD method yields an essential oil with higher amounts of more valuable oxygenated compounds, and allows substantial savings of costs in terms of time, energy and plant material.

  13. Permuting Diels-Alder and Robinson Annulation Stereopatterns.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Dai, Mingji; Angeles, Angie R; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2012-01-01

    Controlled isomerization of the double bond of certain Diels-Alder reactions provides substrates that, upon oxidation, give rise to products whose gross structure corresponds to that of a Robinson annulation. In these cases, the stereochemistry of the Robinson annulation product reflects the fact that the initial combination occurred in a Diels-Alder mode. Using these principles, we have synthesized carissone and cosmosoic acid. In the latter case, our total synthesis raised serious questions as to the accuracy of the assigned structure of the natural product.

  14. Effect on tumor necrosis factor-α production and antioxidant ability of black alder, as factors related to its anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores

    2012-06-01

    Alders exhibit several uses in different areas and also offer some nutritional and medicinal values. The bark and leaves from black alder [Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn] are used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory processes and other health disorders. This study assessed if an extract of A. glutinosa stem bark exhibits some biological properties linked to improving the inflammatory state, which could partly justify its ethnopharmacological use. Therefore, various aspects of antioxidant activity as well as the effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production were evaluated. The phytochemical study revealed the presence of terpenes, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, and anthraquinones (by high-performance thin-layer chromatography). The betulinic acid content in the extract, determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (validated method), was 0.72±0.027%. In addition, high amounts for total phenols as well as flavonoids were determined. The extract exhibited a 2,2'-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity similar to that of ascorbic acid and had a significant effect on superoxide anion scavenging, superior to that of ascorbic acid. It was also able to protect HeLa cells from induced oxidative stress. In the TNF-α assay, levels of this citokine were depressed by the extract in HL-60 cells. To test the effect of the extract on cell proliferation, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed. According to the results, the antioxidant properties displayed by the extract of A. glutinosa stem bark, together with the effect on TNF-α levels, suggest that these activities, linked to a successful reduction in inflammatory processes, may support, in part, its ethnopharmacological use.

  15. Effect on Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production and Antioxidant Ability of Black Alder, as Factors Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Acero, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Alders exhibit several uses in different areas and also offer some nutritional and medicinal values. The bark and leaves from black alder [Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn] are used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory processes and other health disorders. This study assessed if an extract of A. glutinosa stem bark exhibits some biological properties linked to improving the inflammatory state, which could partly justify its ethnopharmacological use. Therefore, various aspects of antioxidant activity as well as the effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production were evaluated. The phytochemical study revealed the presence of terpenes, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, and anthraquinones (by high-performance thin-layer chromatography). The betulinic acid content in the extract, determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (validated method), was 0.72±0.027%. In addition, high amounts for total phenols as well as flavonoids were determined. The extract exhibited a 2,2′-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity similar to that of ascorbic acid and had a significant effect on superoxide anion scavenging, superior to that of ascorbic acid. It was also able to protect HeLa cells from induced oxidative stress. In the TNF-α assay, levels of this citokine were depressed by the extract in HL-60 cells. To test the effect of the extract on cell proliferation, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed. According to the results, the antioxidant properties displayed by the extract of A. glutinosa stem bark, together with the effect on TNF-α levels, suggest that these activities, linked to a successful reduction in inflammatory processes, may support, in part, its ethnopharmacological use. PMID:22424456

  16. Temporal and spatiotemporal autocorrelation of daily concentrations of Alnus, Betula, and Corylus pollen in Poland.

    PubMed

    Nowosad, J; Stach, A; Kasprzyk, I; Grewling, Ł; Latałowa, M; Puc, M; Myszkowska, D; Weryszko-Chmielewska, E; Piotrowska-Weryszko, K; Chłopek, K; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, B; Uruska, A

    The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of temporal and space-time autocorrelation of pollen counts of Alnus, Betula, and Corylus in the air of eight cities in Poland. Daily average pollen concentrations were monitored over 8 years (2001-2005 and 2009-2011) using Hirst-designed volumetric spore traps. The spatial and temporal coherence of data was investigated using the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions. The calculation and mathematical modelling of 61 correlograms were performed for up to 25 days back. The study revealed an association between temporal variations in Alnus, Betula, and Corylus pollen counts in Poland and three main groups of factors such as: (1) air mass exchange after the passage of a single weather front (30-40 % of pollen count variation); (2) long-lasting factors (50-60 %); and (3) random factors, including diurnal variations and measurements errors (10 %). These results can help to improve the quality of forecasting models.

  17. Incompatibility and pollen competition in Alnus glutinosa: Evidence from pollination experiments.

    PubMed

    Steiner, W; Gregorius, H R

    1999-03-01

    Different types of incompatibility systems were found to operate simultaneously in Alnus glutinosa in the course of numerous pollination experiments, including self-pollination and pollination with controlled pollen mixtures. Isozyme genetic markers were used to identify the pollen parent of each offspring from the mixed pollination experiments, thus allowing specification of the fertilization success of each pollen parent. In a first step, these results were compared with observations on in vitro pollen germination experiments. This comparison allows for exploration of the explanatory value of different germination media as models of germination conditions on stigmas. In most cases, the data suggest that the in vitro germination conditions resemble the fertilization conditions in vivo, at least in the sense that they favor the same pollen parents. By providing a generic and operable definition of the two basic types of incompatibility, eliminating (inability to fertilize ovules) and cryptic (resulting in lowered fertilization success of a pollen parent under competition), evidence was detected for the existence of both types of incompatibility in Alnus glutinosa, where eliminating incompatibility occurred as self-incompatibility only. However, since this incompatibility seems to act primarily via pollen elimination, seed production is not likely to be negatively affected in natural populations, even for comparatively large amounts of self-pollination.

  18. High stereoselectivity on low temperature Diels-Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Filho, Luiz Carlos; Lacerda Júnior, Valdemar; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; da Silva, Gil Valdo José; Invernize, Paulo Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We have found that some of the usually poor dienophiles (2-cycloenones) can undergo Diels-Alder reaction at -78°C with unusually high stereoselectivity in the presence of niobium pentachloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. A remarkable difference in reaction rates for unsubstituted and α- or β-methyl substituted 2-cycloenones was also observed. PMID:16542029

  19. 61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The Niagara Shipbuilding Corp. Engineering Department, Buffalo, New York. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-1604-10, dated February 1943; revised January 1963. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  20. N2-fixing red alder indirectly accelerates ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic N2-fixing tree species can accelerate ecosystem N dynamics through decomposition via direct pathways by producing readily decomposed leaf litter and increasing N supply to decomposers, as well as via indirect pathways by increasing tissue and detrital N in non-fixing vegetation. To evaluate the relative importance of these pathways, we compared three-year decomposition and N dynamics of N2-fixing red alder leaf litter (2.34 %N) to both low-N (0.68 %N) and high-N (1.21 %N) litter of non-fixing Douglas-fir, and decomposed each litter source in four forests dominated by either red alder or Douglas-fir. We also used experimental N fertilization of decomposition plots to assess elevated N availability as a potential mechanism of N2-fixer effects on litter mass loss and N dynamics. Direct effects of N2-fixing red alder on decomposition occurred primarily as faster N release from red alder than Douglas-fir litter, but direct increases in N supply to decomposers via fertilization did not stimulate decomposition of any litter. Fixed N indirectly influenced detrital dynamics by increasing Douglas-fir tissue and litter N concentrations, which accelerated litter N release without accelerating mass loss. By increasing soil N, tissue N, and the rate of N release from litter of non-fixers, we conclude that N2-fixing vegetation can indirectly foster plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to the persistence of elevated N availability in terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. Performance of an age series of alnus-cardamom plantations in the Sikkim Himalaya: productivity, energetics and efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G; Sharma, E; Sharma, R; Singh, K K

    2002-03-01

    Biomass, net primary productivity, energetics and energy efficiencies were estimated in an age series of Alnus-cardamom plantations in the eastern Himalaya. The impact of stand age (5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 years) on the performance of mixtures of N2-fixing (Alnus nepalensis) and non-N2-fixing (large cardamom) plants was studied. Large cardamom (Amomum subulatum) is the most important perennial cash crop in the region and is cultivated predominantly under Alnus trees. Net primary productivity was lowest (7 t ha(-1) per year) in the 40-year-old stand and was more than three times higher (22 t ha(-1) per year) in the 15-year-old stand. Agronomic yield of large cardamom peaked between 15 and 20 years of age. Cardamom productivity doubled from the 5- to the 15-year-old stand, and then decreased with plantation age to reach a minimum in the 40-year-old stand. Performance of cardamom in association of N2-fixing Alnus remained beneficial until 20 years of age. Annual net energy fixation was highest (444 x 10(6) kJ ha(-1) per year) in the 15-year-old stand, being 1.4 times that of the 5-year-old stand and 2.9-times that of the 40-year-old stand. Inverse relationships of production efficiency, energy conversion efficiency and energy utilized in N2-fixation against stand age, and a positive relationship between production efficiency and energy conversion efficiency suggest that the younger plantations are more productive. The Alnus-cardamom plantation system will be sustainable by adopting a rotational cycle of 15 to 20 years.

  2. Application of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction in the synthesis of natural products.

    PubMed

    Cao, Min-Hui; Green, Nicholas J; Xu, Sheng-Zhen

    2017-03-22

    The Diels-Alder reaction that involves a nitrogen atom in the diene or dienophile is termed the aza-Diels-Alder reaction. As well as the powerful all-carbon Diels-Alder reaction, the aza-Diels-Alder reaction has also played an important role in the total synthesis of natural products. Herein, we review various natural products using an aza-Diels-Alder reaction as a key step to their total synthesis, and divide the syntheses into inter- and intra-molecular aza-Diels-Alder reactions and a retro-aza-Diels-Alder reaction. Inter- and intra-molecular aza-Diels-Alder reactions involve an imine as an electron deficient dienophile and an imine as an electron deficient azadiene. The significance of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction for the construction of a six-membered ring containing nitrogen is tremendous, but the development of asymmetric, in particular catalytic enantioselective intramolecular aza-Diels-Alder reaction in the total synthesis of natural products remains highly challenging, and will no doubt see enormous advances in the future.

  3. Bioactivity guided isolation of anticancer constituents from leaves of Alnus sieboldiana (Betulaceae).

    PubMed

    Ludwiczuk, A; Saha, A; Kuzuhara, T; Asakawa, Y

    2011-04-15

    The leaves of the Japanese Alnus sieboldiana have been extracted with n-hexane and then with methanol. A bioactivity-guided approach based on MTT assay for growth inhibition and quantitative real-time PCR for TNF-α inhibitory activity was taken to identify the active compounds in EtOAc soluble fraction of the methanol extract. From this active fraction, seven compounds have been isolated and four compounds (pinosylvin, galangin, quercetin and methyl gallate) have been examined for their dose-response effect on the viability of A549 cells and on TNF-α inhibitory activity. Based on MTT assay, all of the four examined compounds inhibit growth of human lung cancer cells. Among four tested compounds only galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone) significantly inhibited TNF-α gene expression in A549 cells (IC₅₀ = 94 μM). Taken together, this finding suggests that galangin may be useful in cancer prevention.

  4. The ectomycorrhizas of Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae associated with Alnus acuminata in Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Leticia; Bandala, Victor M; Garay-Serrano, Edith

    2015-08-01

    Two pure Alnus acuminata stands established in a montane forest in central Mexico (Puebla State) were monitored between 2010 and 2013 to confirm and recognize the ectomycorrhizal (EcM) systems of A. acuminata with Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae, two recently described species. Through comparison of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizas sampled in the forest stands, we confirmed their ectomycorrhizal association. The phytobiont was corroborated by comparing ITS sequences obtained from EcM root tips and leaves collected in the study site and from other sequences of A. acuminata available in Genbank. Detailed morphological and anatomical descriptions of the ectomycorrhizal systems are presented and complemented with photographs.

  5. Forecasting model of Corylus, Alnus, and Betula pollen concentration levels using spatiotemporal correlation properties of pollen count.

    PubMed

    Nowosad, Jakub; Stach, Alfred; Kasprzyk, Idalia; Weryszko-Chmielewska, Elżbieta; Piotrowska-Weryszko, Krystyna; Puc, Małgorzata; Grewling, Łukasz; Pędziszewska, Anna; Uruska, Agnieszka; Myszkowska, Dorota; Chłopek, Kazimiera; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, Barbara

    The aim of the study was to create and evaluate models for predicting high levels of daily pollen concentration of Corylus, Alnus, and Betula using a spatiotemporal correlation of pollen count. For each taxon, a high pollen count level was established according to the first allergy symptoms during exposure. The dataset was divided into a training set and a test set, using a stratified random split. For each taxon and city, the model was built using a random forest method. Corylus models performed poorly. However, the study revealed the possibility of predicting with substantial accuracy the occurrence of days with high pollen concentrations of Alnus and Betula using past pollen count data from monitoring sites. These results can be used for building (1) simpler models, which require data only from aerobiological monitoring sites, and (2) combined meteorological and aerobiological models for predicting high levels of pollen concentration.

  6. Succession on subalpine placer mine spoil: Effects of revegetation with Alnus viridis, Alaska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    Alnus viridis seedlings were planted on placer mine spoil in an Alaskan subalpine watershed to bypass a seedling establishment bottleneck for A. viridis, and to evaluate the interaction between A. viridis and the dominant riparian woody plants, Salix alaxensis and Populus balsamifera. The study area was divided into 11 replicate blocks, each on a homogeneous recontoured spoil pile. Blocks were divided into two 0.01 ha plots, and treatments without (control) and with 84 planted A. viridis seedlings were randomly assigned to plots. After 10 years, the Alnus treatment had a dense stand of A. viridis 1–2 m tall, while the control had fewer, smaller seedlings. Compared to the control, planted A. viridis had a neutral effect on S. alaxensis and inhibited P. balsamifera at the seedling establishment stage, but facilitated the growth of established plants of both species, with many plants overtopping the A. viridis canopy. Compared to the control, S. alaxensis plants in the Alnus treatment had higher levels of foliar N and δ15N values closer to those of A. viridis, indicating the importance of N fixation by A. viridis. Planting A. viridis accelerated the rate of succession by stimulating growth of woody dominants.

  7. Leaf photosynthetic characteristics of seedlings of actinorhizal Alnus spp. and Elaeagnus spp.

    PubMed

    Côté, B; Carlson, R W; Dawson, J O

    1988-06-01

    Single leaf photosynthetic characteristics of Alnus glutinosa, A. incana, A. rubra, Elaeagnus angustifolia, and E. umbellata seedlings conditioned to ambient sunlight in a glasshouse were assessed. Light saturation occurred between 930 and 1400 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PAR for all species. Maximum rates of net photosynthesis (Pn) measured at 25°C ranged from 12.8 to 17.3 μmol CO2m(-2)s(-1) and rates of dark respiration ranged from 0.74 to 0.95 μmol CO2m(-2)s(-1). These values of leaf photosynthetic variables are typical of early to midsuccessional species. The rate of Pn measured at optimal temperature (20°C) and 530μmol m(-2)s(-1) PAR was significantly (p<0.01) correlated with leaf nitrogen concentration (r=0.69) and negatively correlated with the mean area of a leaf (r=-0.64). We suggest that the high leaf nitrogen concentration and rate of Pn observed for Elaeagnus umbellata and to a lesser degree for E. angustifolia are genetic adaptations related to their crown architecture.

  8. Enhancement of heavy metal phytoremediation by Alnus firma with endophytic Bacillus thuringiensis GDB-1.

    PubMed

    Babu, A Giridhar; Kim, Jong-Dae; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2013-04-15

    Phytoremediation shows potential for remediating mine tailing sites contaminated with heavy metals. Our aim was to isolate, characterize, and assess the potential of endophytic bacteria to enhance growth and metal accumulation by the hyperaccumulator Alnus firma. A bacterial strain isolated from roots of Pinus sylvestris had the capacity to remove heavy metals from mine tailing and was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis GDB-1 based on 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. GDB-1 exhibited plant growth-promoting traits, including 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, indole acetic acid (IAA) and siderophore production, and P solubilization. The efficiency of GDB-1 to remove heavy metals was influenced by pH and initial metal concentration. Removal capacity (mg/l) was 77% for Pb (100), 64% for Zn (50), 34% for As (50), 9% for Cd (10), 8% for Cu (10), and 8% for Ni (10) during the active growth cycle in heavy metal-amended, mine tailing extract medium. Inoculating soil with GDB-1 significantly increased biomass, chlorophyll content, nodule number, and heavy metal (As, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn) accumulation in A. firma seedlings. Results indicate that inoculating the native plant A. firma with B. thuringiensis GDB-1 improves its efficiency for phytoremediation of soil containing mine tailings contaminated with heavy metals.

  9. Is it true that polymerization of vegetable oil occurs through Diels-Alder reaction?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is known to be one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. However, our NMR study showed no evidence for Diels-Alder products. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ...

  10. Why a Proximity-Induced Diels–Alder Reaction is So Fast

    PubMed Central

    Krenske, Elizabeth H.; Perry, Emma W.; Jerome, Steven V.; Maimone, Thomas J.; Baran, Phil S.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike normal Diels–Alder reactions of acyclic alkadienes with alkenes, the vinylbicyclo[2.2.2]octene employed in the Baran total synthesis of vinigrol undergoes quantitative Diels–Alder reaction with a tethered alkene at room temperature. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this unprecedented reactivity originates from a combination of preorganization, diene strain, and tether stabilization. PMID:22630569

  11. A facile avenue to conductive polymer brushes via cyclopentadiene-maleimide Diels-Alder ligation.

    PubMed

    Yameen, Basit; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Preuss, Corinna M; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Trouillet, Vanessa; Rezek, Bohuslav; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2013-10-07

    Cyclopentadienyl end-capped poly(3-hexylthiophene) was employed to fabricate conductive surface tethered polymer brushes via a facile route based on cyclopentadiene-maleimide Diels-Alder ligation. The efficient nature of the Diels-Alder ligation was further combined with a biomimetic polydopamine-assisted functionalization of surfaces, making it an access route of choice for P3HT surface immobilization.

  12. Wood anatomical analysis of Alnus incana and Betula pendula injured by a debris-flow event.

    PubMed

    Arbellay, Estelle; Stoffel, Markus; Bollschweiler, Michelle

    2010-10-01

    Vessel chronologies in ring-porous species have been successfully employed in the past to extract the climate signal from tree rings. Environmental signals recorded in vessels of ring-porous species have also been used in previous studies to reconstruct discrete events of drought, flooding and insect defoliation. However, very little is known about the ability of diffuse-porous species to record environmental signals in their xylem cells. Moreover, time series of wood anatomical features have only rarely been used to reconstruct former geomorphic events. This study was therefore undertaken to characterize the wood anatomical response of diffuse-porous Alnus incana (L.) Moench and Betula pendula Roth to debris-flow-induced wounding. Tree microscopic response to wounding was assessed through the analysis of wood anatomical differences between injured rings formed in the debris-flow event year and uninjured rings formed in the previous year. The two ring types were examined close and opposite to the injury in order to determine whether wound effects on xylem cells decrease with increasing tangential distance from the injury. Image analysis was used to measure vessel parameters as well as fiber and parenchyma cell (FPC) parameters. The results of this study indicate that injured rings are characterized by smaller vessels as compared with uninjured rings. By contrast, FPC parameters were not found to significantly differ between injured and uninjured rings. Vessel and FPC parameters mainly remained constant with increasing tangential distance from the injury, except for a higher proportion of vessel lumen area opposite to the injury within A. incana. This study highlights the existence of anatomical tree-ring signatures-in the form of smaller vessels-related to past debris-flow activity and addresses a new methodological approach to date injuries inflicted on trees by geomorphic processes.

  13. High-Throughput Sequencing and De Novo Assembly of Red and Green Forms of the Perilla frutescens var. crispa Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Nakamura, Michimi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2015-01-01

    Perilla frutescens var. crispa (Labiatae) has two chemo-varietal forms, i.e. red and green forms of perilla, that differ in the production of anthocyanins. To facilitate molecular biological and biochemical studies in perilla-specialized metabolism we used Illumina RNA-sequencing technology in our comprehensive comparison of the transcriptome map of the leaves of red and green forms of perilla. Sequencing generated over 1.2 billion short reads with an average length of 101 nt. De novo transcriptome assembly yielded 47,788 and 47,840 unigenes in the red and green forms of perilla plants, respectively. Comparison of the assembled unigenes and existing perilla cDNA sequences showed highly reliable alignment. All unigenes were annotated with gene ontology (GO) and Enzyme Commission numbers and entered into the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. We identified 68 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in red and green forms of perilla. GO enrichment analysis of the DEGs showed that genes involved in the anthocyanin metabolic process were enriched. Differential expression analysis revealed that the transcript level of anthocyanin biosynthetic unigenes encoding flavonoid 3’-hydroxylase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, and anthocyanidin synthase was significantly higher in red perilla, while the transcript level of unigenes encoding limonene synthase was significantly higher in green perilla. Our data serve as a basis for future research on perilla bio-engineering and provide a shortcut for the characterization of new functional genes in P. frutescens. PMID:26070213

  14. Antidiabetic Effect of Oral Borapetol B Compound, Isolated from the Plant Tinospora crispa, by Stimulating Insulin Release

    PubMed Central

    Lokman, Faradianna E.; Gu, Harvest F.; Wan Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Chia, Keh Leong; Östenson, Claes-Göran

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To evaluate the antidiabetic properties of borapetol B known as compound 1 (C1) isolated from Tinospora crispa in normoglycemic control Wistar (W) and spontaneously type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. Methods. The effect of C1 on blood glucose and plasma insulin was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test. The effect of C1 on insulin secretion was assessed by batch incubation and perifusion experiments using isolated pancreatic islets. Results. An acute oral administration of C1 improved blood glucose levels in treated versus placebo groups with areas under glucose curves 0–120 min being 72 ± 17 versus 344 ± 10 mmol/L (P < 0.001) and 492 ± 63 versus 862 ± 55 mmol/L (P < 0.01) in W and GK rats, respectively. Plasma insulin levels were increased by 2-fold in treated W and GK rats versus placebo group at 30 min (P < 0.05). C1 dose-dependently increased insulin secretion from W and GK isolated islets at 3.3 mM and 16.7 mM glucose. The perifusions of isolated islets indicated that C1 did not cause leakage of insulin by damaging islet beta cells (P < 0.001). Conclusion. This study provides evidence that borapetol B (C1) has antidiabetic properties mainly due to its stimulation of insulin release. PMID:24319481

  15. Analgesic Compound from Sea Anemone Heteractis crispa Is the First Polypeptide Inhibitor of Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1)*

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Yaroslav A.; Kozlov, Sergey A.; Koshelev, Sergey G.; Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Monastyrnaya, Margarita M.; Kozlovskaya, Emma P.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2008-01-01

    Venomous animals from distinct phyla such as spiders, scorpions, snakes, cone snails, or sea anemones produce small toxic proteins interacting with a variety of cell targets. Their bites often cause pain. One of the ways of pain generation is the activation of TRPV1 channels. Screening of 30 different venoms from spiders and sea anemones for modulation of TRPV1 activity revealed inhibitors in tropical sea anemone Heteractis crispa venom. Several separation steps resulted in isolation of an inhibiting compound. This is a 56-residue-long polypeptide named APHC1 that has a Bos taurus trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)/Kunitz-type fold, mostly represented by serine protease inhibitors and ion channel blockers. APHC1 acted as a partial antagonist of capsaicin-induced currents (32 ± 9% inhibition) with half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) 54 ± 4 nm. In vivo, a 0.1 mg/kg dose of APHC1 significantly prolonged tail-flick latency and reduced capsaicin-induced acute pain. Therefore, our results can make an important contribution to the research into molecular mechanisms of TRPV1 modulation and help to solve the problem of overactivity of this receptor during a number of pathological processes in the organism. PMID:18579526

  16. Novel phthalide compounds from Sparassis crispa (Hanabiratake), Hanabiratakelide A-C, exhibiting anti-cancer related activity.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Kazuko; Kokudo, Naoki; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Inose, Toshiaki; Kimura, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Sparassis crispa (SC), known as Hanabiratake in Japanese, is an edible mushroom with various medicinal properties. We isolated 3 novel phthalides, designated hanabiratakelide A (1), B (2), and C (3), from the SC fruit body. In this investigation, 3 known phthalides (4-6), ubiquinone-9, and 2 known unsaturated fatty acids were also isolated. Their structures were elucidated primarily through extensive NMR experiments. The isolated compounds 1-6 were tested for their anti-oxidant activity. The in vitro superoxide dismutase-like activity of the 3 hanabiratakelides was stronger than that of vitamin C. The compounds also exerted inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production by a murine macrophage cell line, RAW264. In addition, the growth of the colon cancer cell lines Caco-2 and colon-26 was significantly inhibited by treatment with the 3 hanabiratakelides. In vivo, the frequency of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci was reduced in SC-fed F344/N rats compared to rats fed a standard diet. In conclusion, 3 novel phthalides, hanabiratakelides, derived from SC were shown to possess anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor activity.

  17. Toxicity induced by Prasiola crispa to fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea: evidence for bioinsecticide action.

    PubMed

    Zemolin, Ana Paula Pegoraro; Cruz, Litiele Cezar; Paula, Mariane Trindade; Pereira, Betina Kappel; Albuquerque, Margelli Pereira; Victoria, Filipe Carvalho; Pereira, Antônio Batista; Posser, Thaís; Franco, Jeferson Luis

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effects of the alga Prasiola crispa extract (PcE) were investigated in a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and cockroach (Nauphoeta cinerea) model. In flies, toxicity was assessed as mortality and biochemical alterations including acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and oxidative stress markers. The cardiotoxic action of PcE was also examined in a model of semi-isolated cockroach heart. The administration of PcE (2 mg/ml) to flies for 24 h resulted in a marked increase in mortality rate (7.6-fold rise compared to control). AChE activity, glutathione (GSH) levels, and hydroperoxide formation remained unchanged. Fly glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activity were significantly altered after PcE treatment. Fraction III (ethyl acetate) of PcE was significantly more toxic to flies compared to fractions I (methanol) and II (ethanol). A significant decrease was noted in cockroach semi-isolated heart function. The addition of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB), an oxidizing agent, concomitant with the extract significantly blocked this effect, suggesting that reduced compounds may be involved in the cardiotoxic action produced by PcE. Our results show for the first time the adverse effects of PcE in two insect models, Drosophila melanogaster and Nauphoetacinerea. The insecticidal properties of PcE may be related to changes in important antioxidant/detoxifying systems, as well as to changes in insect cardiac function.

  18. High-Throughput Sequencing and De Novo Assembly of Red and Green Forms of the Perilla frutescens var. crispa Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Nakamura, Michimi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2015-01-01

    Perilla frutescens var. crispa (Labiatae) has two chemo-varietal forms, i.e. red and green forms of perilla, that differ in the production of anthocyanins. To facilitate molecular biological and biochemical studies in perilla-specialized metabolism we used Illumina RNA-sequencing technology in our comprehensive comparison of the transcriptome map of the leaves of red and green forms of perilla. Sequencing generated over 1.2 billion short reads with an average length of 101 nt. De novo transcriptome assembly yielded 47,788 and 47,840 unigenes in the red and green forms of perilla plants, respectively. Comparison of the assembled unigenes and existing perilla cDNA sequences showed highly reliable alignment. All unigenes were annotated with gene ontology (GO) and Enzyme Commission numbers and entered into the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. We identified 68 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in red and green forms of perilla. GO enrichment analysis of the DEGs showed that genes involved in the anthocyanin metabolic process were enriched. Differential expression analysis revealed that the transcript level of anthocyanin biosynthetic unigenes encoding flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, and anthocyanidin synthase was significantly higher in red perilla, while the transcript level of unigenes encoding limonene synthase was significantly higher in green perilla. Our data serve as a basis for future research on perilla bio-engineering and provide a shortcut for the characterization of new functional genes in P. frutescens.

  19. Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Roy, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Alders have already demonstrated their potential for the revegetation of both mining and industrial sites. These actinorhizal trees and shrubs and the actinobacteria Frankia associate in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis which could however be negatively affected by the presence of heavy metals, and accumulate them. In our hydroponic assay with black alders, quantification of the roots and shoots metal concentrations showed that, in the absence of stress, symbiosis increases Mo and Ni root content and simultaneously decreases Mo shoot content. Interestingly, the Mo shoot content also decreases in the presence of Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd for symbiotic alders. In symbiotic alders, Pb shoot translocation was promoted in presence of Pb. On the other hand, Cd exclusion in symbiotic root tissues was observed with Pb and Cd. In the presence of symbiosis, only Cd and Pb showed translocation into aerial tissues when present in the nutrient solution. Moreover, the translocation of Ni to shoot was prevented by symbiosis in the presence of Cd, Ni and Pb. The hydroponic experiment demonstrated that alders benefit from the symbiosis, producing more biomass (total, root and shoot) than non nodulated alders in control condition, and in the presence of metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd). Heavy metals did not reduce the nodule numbers (SNN), but the presence of Zn or Cd did reduce nodule allocation. Our study suggests that the Frankia-alder symbiosis is a promising (and a compatible) plant-microorganism association for the revegetation of contaminated sites, with minimal risk of metal dispersion.

  20. Kunitz-Type Peptide HCRG21 from the Sea Anemone Heteractis crispa Is a Full Antagonist of the TRPV1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Monastyrnaya, Margarita; Peigneur, Steve; Zelepuga, Elena; Sintsova, Oksana; Gladkikh, Irina; Leychenko, Elena; Isaeva, Marina; Tytgat, Jan; Kozlovskaya, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Sea anemone venoms comprise multifarious peptides modulating biological targets such as ion channels or receptors. The sequence of a new Kunitz-type peptide, HCRG21, belonging to the Heteractis crispa RG (HCRG) peptide subfamily was deduced on the basis of the gene sequence obtained from the Heteractis crispa cDNA. HCRG21 shares high structural homology with Kunitz-type peptides APHC1–APHC3 from H. crispa, and clusters with the peptides from so named “analgesic cluster” of the HCGS peptide subfamily but forms a separate branch on the NJ-phylogenetic tree. Three unique point substitutions at the N-terminus of the molecule, Arg1, Gly2, and Ser5, distinguish HCRG21 from other peptides of this cluster. The trypsin inhibitory activity of recombinant HCRG21 (rHCRG21) was comparable with the activity of peptides from the same cluster. Inhibition constants for trypsin and α-chymotrypsin were 1.0 × 10−7 and 7.0 × 10−7 M, respectively. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that rHCRG21 inhibits 95% of the capsaicin-induced current through transient receptor potential family member vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and has a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 6.9 ± 0.4 μM. Moreover, rHCRG21 is the first full peptide TRPV1 inhibitor, although displaying lower affinity for its receptor in comparison with other known ligands. Macromolecular docking and full atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the rHCRG21–TRPV1 complex allow hypothesizing the existence of two feasible, intra- and extracellular, molecular mechanisms of blocking. These data provide valuable insights in the structural and functional relationships and pharmacological potential of bifunctional Kunitz-type peptides. PMID:27983679

  1. [Alder forests of Numidia (N.E. Algeria): floristic biodiversity, vulnerability and conservation].

    PubMed

    Belouahem-Abed, Djamila; Belouahem, Foudil; Benslama, Mohamed; de Bélair, Gérard; Muller, Serge D

    2011-01-01

    The phytoecological study of the alder forests of north-east Algeria shows that these habitats with boreal affinities harbour very high species richness (> 400 species) and complex structures, which suggest their ancient origin. They correspond phytosociologically to two syntaxa, the Campanulo alatae-Alnenion glutinosae (riparian alder forests) and the Rusco hypophylli-Alnetum glutinosae (peat-forming alder carrs), respectively. Their degraded state and their regressive dynamics, observed during the 14 years of the study, reveal their precarious situation and their rapid ongoing decline under the influence of human-induced uncontroled disturbances (cutting, burning, draining, dumping…). With regard to their ecological, historical and patrimonial importance, the alder forests of Algerian Numidia should be urgently protected, with the aim of assuring the perennity of their exceptional floristic corteges.

  2. Envisioning an enzymatic Diels-Alder reaction by in situ acid-base catalyzed diene generation.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Manta, Bianca; Olsson, Philip; Brinck, Tore

    2012-06-07

    We present and evaluate a new and potentially efficient route for enzyme-mediated Diels-Alder reactions, utilizing general acid-base catalysis. The viability of employing the active site of ketosteroid isomerase is demonstrated.

  3. Rheological and chemical analysis of reverse gelation in a covalently crosslinked Diels-Alder polymer network

    PubMed Central

    Adzima, Brian J.; Aguirre, H. Alan; Kloxin, Christopher J.; Scott, Timothy F.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    A network polymer, incorporating dynamic and reversible crosslinks, was synthesized using the Diels-Alder reaction. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the reaction rate and thermodynamic equilibrium over a broad temperature range. Equilibrium conversion of the furan and maleimide varied from 74% at 85°C to 24% at 155°C, demonstrating significant depolymerization via the retro-Diels-Alder reaction. The gel point temperature, as determined by rheometry using the Winter-Chambon criterion, was 92°C, corresponding to a gel-point conversion of 71%, consistent with the Flory-Stockmayer equation. The scaling exponents for the complex moduli, viscosity, and plateau modulus, in the vicinity of the gel-point, were determined and compared with experimental and theoretical literature values. Further, the material exhibited a low frequency relaxation owing to dynamic rearrangement of crosslinks by the Diels-Alder and retro-Diels-Alder reactions. PMID:20711364

  4. Drought-Induced Xylem Dysfunction in Petioles, Branches, and Roots of Populus balsamifera L. and Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.

    PubMed Central

    Hacke, U.; Sauter, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Variation in vulnerability to xylem cavitation was measured within individual organs of Populus balsamifera L. and Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. Cavitation was quantified by three different techniques: (a) measuring acoustic emissions, (b) measuring loss of hydraulic conductance while air-dehydrating a branch, and (c) measuring loss of hydraulic conductance as a function of positive air pressure injected into the xylem. All of these techniques gave similar results. In Populus, petioles were more resistant than branches, and branches were more resistant than roots. This corresponded to the pattern of vessel width: maximum vessel diameter in 1- to 2-year-old roots was 140 [mu]m, compared to 65 and 45 [mu]m in rapidly growing 1-year-old shoots and petioles, respectively. Cavitation in Populus petioles started at a threshold water potential of -1.1 MPa. The lowest leaf water potential observed was -0.9 MPa. In Alnus, there was no relationship between vessel diameter and the cavitation response of a plant organ. Although conduits were narrower in petioles than in branches, petioles were more vulnerable to cavitation. Cavitation in petioles was detected when water potential fell below -1.2 MPa. This value equaled midday leaf water potential in late June. As in Populus, roots were the most vulnerable organ. The significance of different cavitation thresholds in individual plant organs is discussed. PMID:12226296

  5. Mannich-Michael versus formal aza-Diels-Alder approaches to piperidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Girling, P Ricardo; Kiyoi, Takao; Whiting, Andrew

    2011-05-07

    A review into the aza-Diels-Alder reaction, mainly concentrating on literature examples that form piperidin-4-ones from the reaction of imines and electron rich dienes or enones, either through a Lewis acidic/Brønsted acid approach or through the use of an organocatalyst. This review questions whether the mechanism of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction is step wise as opposed to concerted when using oxygenated dienes.

  6. Looking beyond the endo Rule in a Diels-Alder Discovery Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarret, Ronald M.; New, Jamie; Hurley, Rebecca; Gillooly, Laura

    2001-09-01

    The commonly described reaction of maleic anhydride and cyclopentadiene generates a Diels-Alder product in accord with the endo rule. Replacing the dienophile with maleic acid or fumaric acid (with modified reaction conditions) allows students to discover or verify that the Diels-Alder reaction is stereospecific with respect to the stereochemistry of the alkene. The recording of NMR spectra is a particularly useful means of establishing cis-trans stereochemistry (symmetry) of the products.

  7. Diels–Alder reactions in confined spaces: the influence of catalyst structure and the nature of active sites for the retro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cantín, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diels–Alder cycloaddition between cyclopentadiene and p-benzoquinone has been studied in the confined space of a pure silica zeolite Beta and the impact on reaction rate due to the concentration effect within the pore and diffusion limitations are discussed. Introduction of Lewis or Brønsted acid sites on the walls of the zeolite strongly increases the reaction rate. However, contrary to what occurs with mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41), Beta zeolite does not catalyse the retro-Diels–Alder reaction, resulting in a highly selective catalyst for the cycloaddition reaction. PMID:27829925

  8. Tree Age Effects on Fine Root Biomass and Morphology over Chronosequences of Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur and Alnus glutinosa Stands

    PubMed Central

    Jagodzinski, Andrzej M.; Ziółkowski, Jędrzej; Warnkowska, Aleksandra; Prais, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    There are few data on fine root biomass and morphology change in relation to stand age. Based on chronosequences for beech (9–140 years old), oak (11–140 years) and alder (4–76 years old) we aimed to examine how stand age affects fine root biomass and morphology. Soil cores from depths of 0–15 cm and 16–30 cm were used for the study. In contrast to previously published studies that suggested that maximum fine root biomass is reached at the canopy closure stage of stand development, we found almost linear increases of fine root biomass over stand age within the chronosequences. We did not observe any fine root biomass peak in the canopy closure stage. However, we found statistically significant increases of mean fine root biomass for the average individual tree in each chronosequence. Mean fine root biomass (0–30 cm) differed significantly among tree species chronosequences studied and was 4.32 Mg ha-1, 3.71 Mg ha-1 and 1.53 Mg ha-1, for beech, oak and alder stands, respectively. The highest fine root length, surface area, volume and number of fine root tips (0–30 cm soil depth), expressed on a stand area basis, occurred in beech stands, with medium values for oak stands and the lowest for alder stands. In the alder chronosequence all these values increased with stand age, in the beech chronosequence they decreased and in the oak chronosequence they increased until ca. 50 year old stands and then reached steady-state. Our study has proved statistically significant negative relationships between stand age and specific root length (SRL) in 0–30 cm soil depth for beech and oak chronosequences. Mean SRLs for each chronosequence were not significantly different among species for either soil depth studied. The results of this study indicate high fine root plasticity. Although only limited datasets are currently available, these data have provided valuable insight into fine root biomass and morphology of beech, oak and alder stands. PMID:26859755

  9. Tree Age Effects on Fine Root Biomass and Morphology over Chronosequences of Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur and Alnus glutinosa Stands.

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, Andrzej M; Ziółkowski, Jędrzej; Warnkowska, Aleksandra; Prais, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    There are few data on fine root biomass and morphology change in relation to stand age. Based on chronosequences for beech (9-140 years old), oak (11-140 years) and alder (4-76 years old) we aimed to examine how stand age affects fine root biomass and morphology. Soil cores from depths of 0-15 cm and 16-30 cm were used for the study. In contrast to previously published studies that suggested that maximum fine root biomass is reached at the canopy closure stage of stand development, we found almost linear increases of fine root biomass over stand age within the chronosequences. We did not observe any fine root biomass peak in the canopy closure stage. However, we found statistically significant increases of mean fine root biomass for the average individual tree in each chronosequence. Mean fine root biomass (0-30 cm) differed significantly among tree species chronosequences studied and was 4.32 Mg ha(-1), 3.71 Mg ha(-1) and 1.53 Mg ha(-1), for beech, oak and alder stands, respectively. The highest fine root length, surface area, volume and number of fine root tips (0-30 cm soil depth), expressed on a stand area basis, occurred in beech stands, with medium values for oak stands and the lowest for alder stands. In the alder chronosequence all these values increased with stand age, in the beech chronosequence they decreased and in the oak chronosequence they increased until ca. 50 year old stands and then reached steady-state. Our study has proved statistically significant negative relationships between stand age and specific root length (SRL) in 0-30 cm soil depth for beech and oak chronosequences. Mean SRLs for each chronosequence were not significantly different among species for either soil depth studied. The results of this study indicate high fine root plasticity. Although only limited datasets are currently available, these data have provided valuable insight into fine root biomass and morphology of beech, oak and alder stands.

  10. Mitochondria Related Pathway Is Essential for Polysaccharides Purified from Sparassis crispa Mediated Neuro-Protection against Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Differentiated PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shuang; Wang, Di; Zhang, Junrong; Du, Mengyan; Cheng, Yingkun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Di; Wu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to explore the neuro-protective effects of purified Sparassis crispa polysaccharides against l-glutamic acid (l-Glu)-induced differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cell damages and its underlying mechanisms. The Sparassis crispa water extract was purified by a DEAE-52 cellulose anion exchange column and a Sepharose G-100 column. A fraction with a molecular weight of 75 kDa and a diameter of 88.9 nm, entitled SCWEA, was obtained. SCWEA was identified with a triple helix with (1→3)-linked Rha in the backbone, and (1→2) linkages and (1→6) linkages in the side bone. Our results indicated that the pre-treatment of DPC12 cells with SCWEA prior to l-Glu exposure effectively reversed the reduction on cell viability (by 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay) and reduced l-Glu-induced apoptosis (by Hoechst staining). SCWEA decreased the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, blocked Ca2+ influx and prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential in DPC12 cells. Furthermore, SCWEA normalized expression of anti-apoptotic proteins in l-Glu-explored DPC12 cells. These results suggested that SCWEA protects against l-Glu-induced neuronal apoptosis in DPC12 cells and may be a promising candidate for treatment against neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26821016

  11. The effect of re-dissolution solvents and HPLC columns on the analysis of mycosporine-like amino acids in the eulittoral macroalgae Prasiola crispa and Porphyra umbilicalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, Ulf; Escoubeyrou, Karine; Charles, François

    2009-09-01

    Many macroalgal species that are regularly exposed to high solar radiation such as the eulittoral green alga Prasiola crispa and the red alga Porphyra umbilicalis synthesize and accumulate high concentrations of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as UV-sunscreen compounds. These substances are typically extracted with a widely used standard protocol following quantification by various high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques. However, further preparation steps prior to HPLC analysis as well as different HPLC column types have not been systematically checked regarding separation quality and reproducibility. Therefore pure methanol, distilled water and HPLC eluent were evaluated as re-dissolution solvent for dried Prasiola and Porphyra extracts, which were subsequently analyzed on three reversed-phase C8 and C18 HPLC columns. The data indicate that distilled water and the HPLC eluent gave almost identical peak patterns and MAA contents on the C8 and C18 columns. In contrast, the application of the widely used methanol led to double peaks or even the loss of specific peaks as well as to a strong decline in total MAA amounts ranging from about 35% of the maximum in P. crispa to 80% of the maximum in P. umbilicalis. Consequently, methanol should be avoided as re-dissolution solvent for the HPLC sample preparation. An improved protocol for the MAA analysis in macroalgae in combination with a reliable C18 column is suggested.

  12. Cytotoxicity and Apoptosis Induction of Ardisia crispa and Its Solvent Partitions against Mus musculus Mammary Carcinoma Cell Line (4T1)

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Muhammad Luqman; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Othman, Fauziah; Abdullah, Muhammad Nazrul Hakim

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis effect of A. crispa extract and its solvent partition (ethyl acetate and aqueous extract) against Mus musculus mammary carcinoma cell line (4T1). The normal mouse fibroblast cell line (NIH3T3) was used as comparison for selective cytotoxicity properties. The cytotoxicity evaluation was assessed using MTT assay. AO/PI dual fluorescent staining assay and Annexin V-FITC were used for apoptosis analysis. Results showed that 80% methanol extract from leaves showed most promising antimammary cancer agent with IC50 value of 42.26 ± 1.82 μg/mL and selective index (SI) value of 10.22. Ethyl acetate was cytotoxic for both cancer and normal cell while aqueous extract exhibited poor cytotoxic effect. 4T1 cells labelled with AO/PI and Annexin V-FITC and treated with 80% methanol extract demonstrated that the extract induces apoptosis to 4T1 mammary cancer cells. In conclusion, 80% methanol extract of A. crispa was selectively cytotoxic towards 4T1 cells but less cytotoxic towards NIH3T3 cells and induced the cancerous cells into apoptotic stage as early as 6 hours.

  13. Environmental factors affecting the start of pollen season and concentrations of airborne Alnus pollen in two localities of Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rajo, Francisco Javier; Dopazo, Angeles; Jato, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Alnus pollen is an early component of the annual atmospheric aerosol of the north-west regions of Spain, which causes the first occurrence of allergic symptoms. Seasonal and intra-daily variation of Alnus pollination, and the influence that main meteorological parameters exert, was studied in this paper. Monitoring was carried out from 1993-2002, by using two Lanzoni VPPS 2000 volumetric samplers. Once the atmospheric behaviour of this pollen had been identified, the final objective was to elaborate predictive models to determine the onset of the Alnus pollen season and its concentrations during the pollination period in two localities of north-west Spain (Santiago and Ourense). Winter chilling required to overcome the bud-dormancy period was similar in both cities, with around 800 Chilling Hours (C.H.) and 5.5 degrees C threshold temperature. Calculation of heat requirement for bud growth was carried out with maximum temperature, with around 50 Growth Degree Days (G.D.D. degrees C) needed, with 6 degrees C threshold temperature. Data from 2002 were used in order to determine the real validity of the models. This year was not taken into account to establish the aforementioned models. The variation between the predicted start of the pollen season and the observed season was smallest in Ourense. Verifying the proposed models for predicting daily mean concentrations of Alnus pollen during the pollen season shows that the predicted curves fits the observed variations of daily mean concentrations.

  14. Draft Genome sequence of Frankia sp. Strain QA3, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from the root nodule of Alnus nitida

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Arnab; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Chen, Amy; Davenport, Karen W.; Deshpande, Shweta; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Gtari, Maher; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Markowitz, Victor; Mavromatis, K; Nolan, Matt; Nouioui, Imen; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Santos, Catarina; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Tavares, Fernando; Teshima, Hazuki; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Wishart, Jessie; Tisa, Louis S.

    2013-01-01

    Members of actinomycete genus Frankia form a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants. We report a high-quality draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. stain QA3, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from root nodules of Alnus nitida.

  15. Immunostimulatory effects of the standardized extract of Tinospora crispa on innate immune responses in Wistar Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waqas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Kumolosasi, Endang; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Tinospora crispa (TC) has been used in folkloric medicine for the treatment of various diseases and has been reported for several pharmacological activities. However, the effects of TC extract on the immune system are largely unknown. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of a standardized 80% ethanol extract of the stem of TC on innate immune responses. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were treated daily at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 400 mg/kg doses of the extract for 21 days by oral gavage. The immunomodulatory potential of TC was evaluated by determining its effect on chemotaxis and phagocytic activity of neutrophils isolated from the blood of rats. To further elucidate the mechanism of action, its effects on the proliferation of T- and B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) and on the secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines were also monitored. The main components of the extracts, syringin and magnoflorine, were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts by using a validated reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method. It was observed that the chemotactic activity of neutrophils obtained from extract-treated rats increased as compared to controls. A dose-dependent increase in the number of migrated cells and phagocytosis activity of neutrophils was observed. Dose-dependent increase was also observed in the T- and B-lymphocytes proliferation stimulated with concanavalin A (5 μg/mL) and lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/mL), and was statistically significant at 400 mg/kg (P>0.01). Apart from cell-mediated immune response, the concentrations of Th1 (TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines were significantly increased in sera of rats treated with different doses as compared with the control group. From these findings, it can be concluded that TC possesses immunostimulatory activity and has therapeutic potential for the prevention of immune diseases. PMID:26089645

  16. Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed) from the Anthozoa coral Heteractis crispa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi; Whitier, Jennifer E.; Werner, James H.; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the photophysical properties of a far-red intrinsic fluorescent protein by means of single molecule and ensemble spectroscopic methods. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria is a popular fluorescent marker with genetically encoded fluorescence and which can be fused to any biological structure without affecting its function. GFP and its variants provide emission colors from blue to yellowish green. Red intrinsic fluorescent proteins from Anthozoa species represent a recent addition to the emission color palette provided by GFPs. Red intrinsic fluorescent markers are on high demand in protein-protein interaction studies based on fluorescence-resonance energy transfer or in multicolor tracking studies or in cellular investigations where autofluorescence possesses a problem. Here we address the photophysical properties of a far-red fluorescent protein (HcRed), a mutant engineered from a chromoprotein cloned from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa, by using a combination of ensemble and single molecule spectroscopic methods. We show evidence for the presence of HcRed protein as an oligomer and for incomplete maturation of its chromophore. Incomplete maturation results in the presence of an immature (yellow) species absorbing/fluorescing at 490/530-nm. This yellow chromophore is involved in a fast resonance-energy transfer with the mature (purple) chromophore. The mature chromophore of HcRed is found to adopt two conformations, a Transoriented form absorbing and 565-nm and non-fluorescent in solution and a Cis-oriented form absorbing at 590-nm and emitting at 645-nm. These two forms co-exist in solution in thermal equilibrium. Excitation-power dependence fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of HcRed shows evidence for singlet-triplet transitions in the microseconds time scale and for cis-trans isomerization occurring in a time scale of tens of microseconds. Single molecule fluorescence data recorded from immobilized HcRed proteins, all

  17. Linking Landscape Characteristics and High Stream Nitrogen in the Oregon Coast Range: Red Alder Complicates Use of Nutrient Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Red alder (a nitrogen-fixing tree) and sea salt inputs can strongly influence stream nitrogen concentrations in western Oregon and Washington. We compiled a database of stream nitrogen and landscape characteristics in the Oregon Coast Range. Basal area of alder, expressed as a ...

  18. Diels-Alder reactions: The effects of catalyst on the addition reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Özgür; Kus, Nermin Simsek; Tunç, Tuncay; Sahin, Ertan

    2015-10-01

    The reaction between 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene and dimethyl 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene-2,3-dicarboxylate is efficiently achieved with small amounts of catalyst, i.e. phenol, AcOH, nafion, and β-cyclodextrin. Exo-diastereoselective cycloaddition reactions were observed both without catalyst and different catalysts for 48 days. As a result, different products (tricyclicmolecule 5, retro-Diels-Alder product 6, and oxidation product 7) were obtained with different catalysts. In addition, we synthesized Diels-Alders product 8 and tricyclocyclitol 10 via Diels-Alder reaction. The structures of these products were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and IR spectroscopy.

  19. Electrostatic catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Haworth, Naomi L; Darwish, Nadim; Ciampi, Simone; Bloomfield, Nathaniel J; Wallace, Gordon G; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-03-03

    It is often thought that the ability to control reaction rates with an applied electrical potential gradient is unique to redox systems. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that oriented electric fields could affect the outcomes of a range of chemical reactions, regardless of whether a redox system is involved. This possibility arises because many formally covalent species can be stabilized via minor charge-separated resonance contributors. When an applied electric field is aligned in such a way as to electrostatically stabilize one of these minor forms, the degree of resonance increases, resulting in the overall stabilization of the molecule or transition state. This means that it should be possible to manipulate the kinetics and thermodynamics of non-redox processes using an external electric field, as long as the orientation of the approaching reactants with respect to the field stimulus can be controlled. Here, we provide experimental evidence that the formation of carbon-carbon bonds is accelerated by an electric field. We have designed a surface model system to probe the Diels-Alder reaction, and coupled it with a scanning tunnelling microscopy break-junction approach. This technique, performed at the single-molecule level, is perfectly suited to deliver an electric-field stimulus across approaching reactants. We find a fivefold increase in the frequency of formation of single-molecule junctions, resulting from the reaction that occurs when the electric field is present and aligned so as to favour electron flow from the dienophile to the diene. Our results are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by quantum-chemical calculations in a theoretical model of this system, and herald a new approach to chemical catalysis.

  20. Validation of the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, B; Lancaster, G; Lawson, J; Williams, K; Daly, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To describe the validation and reliability of a new pain tool (the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score, AHTPS) for children at triage in the accident and emergency (A&E) setting. Methods: A new behavioural observational pain tool was developed because of dissatisfaction with available tools and a lack of confidence in self-assessment scores at triage. The study was conducted in a large paediatric A&E department; 575 children (aged 0–16 years) were included. Inter-rater reliability and various aspects of validity were assessed. In addition this tool was compared to the Wong-Baker self-assessment tool.1 The children were concurrently scored by a research nurse and triage nurses to assess inter-rater reliability. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's triage score with the research nurse reassessment score after intervention and/or analgesia. Known group construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's score at triage with the level of pain of the condition as judged by the discharge diagnosis. Predictive validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's AHTPS with the level of analgesia needed by each patient. The AHTPS was also compared to a self-assessment score. Results: A high level of inter-rater reliability, kappa statistic 0.84 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.88), was shown. Construct validity was well demonstrated; known group construct validity and predictive validity were also demonstrated to a varying degree. Conclusions: Results support the use of this observational pain scoring tool in the triage of children in A&E. PMID:15210492

  1. Symmetry-enthalpy correlations in Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Tuvi-Arad, Inbal; Avnir, David

    2012-08-06

    Woodward-Hoffmann (WH) rules provide strict symmetry selection rules: when they are obeyed, a reaction proceeds; when they are not obeyed, there is no reaction. However, the voluminous experimental literature provides ample evidence that strict compliance to symmetry requirements is not an obstacle for a concerted reaction to proceed, and therefore the idea has developed that it is enough to have a certain degree of the required symmetry to have reactivity. Here we provide quantitative evidence of that link, and show that as one deviates from the desired symmetry, the enthalpy of activation increases, that is, we show that concerted reactions slow down the further they are from the ideal symmetry. Specifically, we study the deviation from mirror symmetry (evaluated with the continuous symmetry measure (CSM)) of the [4+2] carbon skeleton of the transition state of a series of twelve Diels-Alder reactions in seven different solvents (and in the gas phase), in which the dienes are butadiene, cyclopentadiene, cyclohexadiene, and cycloheptadiene; the dienophiles are the 1-, 1,1-, and 1,1,2-cyanoethylene derivatives; the solvents were chosen to sample a range of dielectric constants from heptane to ethanol. These components provide twenty-four symmetry-enthalpy DFT-calculated correlation lines (out of which only one case is a relatively mild exception) that show the general trend of increase in enthalpy as symmetry decreases. The various combinations between the dienophiles, cyanoethylenes, and solvents provide all kinds of sources for symmetry deviations; it is therefore remarkable that although the enthalpy of activation is dictated by various parameters, symmetry emerges as a primary parameter. In our analysis we also bisected this overall picture into solvent effects and geometry variation effects to evaluate under which conditions the electronic effects are more dominant than symmetry effects.

  2. [Effects of the decomposition of poplar and alder mixed leaf litters on soil microbial biomass].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Fang, Sheng-Zuo; Tian, Ye

    2012-08-01

    An incubation test was conducted to study the effects of the decomposition of poplar and trabeculate alder leaf litters with different mixed ratios and under different application ways on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN). The mixed ratio of the litters had significant effects on soil MBC and MBN. On the 30th day of incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significantly higher in the treatments with > or = 50% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. On the 75th day of incubation, the soil MBC in the treatments with > or = 40% of alder litter and the soil MBN in the treatments with > or = 30% of alder litter were significantly greater than those in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. After 135 days incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significant higher in the treatments with > or = 20% and > or = 40% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control, respectively. There was no significant difference in the soil MBC/MBN between the treatments with different mixed ratios of poplar and alder leaf litters and the control. Overall, soil MBC/MBN increased during the early period of incubation and decreased in the later period, suggesting that soil microflora changed during the decomposition of the litters. In the whole incubation period, the application ways of the litters had lesser effects on the soil MBC, MBN, and MBC/MBN, indicating that the addition ways of the litters did not affect soil microflora.

  3. Enantioselective Organocatalytic Diels–Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Hydroxy‐o‐Quinodimethanes

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Amico, Luca; Vega‐Peñaloza, Alberto; Cuadros, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The photoenolization/Diels–Alder strategy offers straightforward access to synthetically valuable benzannulated carbocyclic products. This historical light‐triggered process has never before succumbed to efforts to develop an enantioselective catalytic approach. Herein, we demonstrate how asymmetric organocatalysis provides simple yet effective catalytic tools to intercept photochemically generated hydroxy‐o‐quinodimethanes with high stereoselectivity. We used a chiral organic catalyst, derived from natural cinchona alkaloids, to activate maleimides toward highly stereoselective Diels–Alder reactions. An unconventional mechanism of stereocontrol is operative, wherein the organocatalyst is actively involved in both the photochemical pathway, by leveraging the formation of the reactive photoenol, and the stereoselectivity‐defining event. PMID:26797768

  4. Diels–Alder reactions of myrcene using intensified continuous-flow reactors

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Diéguez, Miguel Á; Kohl, Thomas M; Tsanaktsidis, John

    2017-01-01

    This work describes the Diels–Alder reaction of the naturally occurring substituted butadiene, myrcene, with a range of different naturally occurring and synthetic dienophiles. The synthesis of the Diels–Alder adduct from myrcene and acrylic acid, containing surfactant properties, was scaled-up in a plate-type continuous-flow reactor with a volume of 105 mL to a throughput of 2.79 kg of the final product per day. This continuous-flow approach provides a facile alternative scale-up route to conventional batch processing, and it helps to intensify the synthesis protocol by applying higher reaction temperatures and shorter reaction times. PMID:28228853

  5. Seepage study for unnamed tributary to Alder Creek, Stevens County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, P.J.; Drost, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of seepage measurements in the Alder Creek basin, Stevens County, Wash., shows that approximately 50% of 0.2 cubic foot per second taken from an unnamed tributary and used for the 1978 irrigation season would have reached Alder Creek as surface flow. Differences in discharge and specific conductance are explained by the basin geology, physical characteristics, climate, and water use. Only general conclusions could be made from data collected for five seepage measurements because irrigation activities could not be scheduled to allow the hydrologic system to reach equilibrium. (USGS)

  6. Tandem enyne metathesis-Diels-Alder reaction for construction of natural product frameworks.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, Marta; Domínguez, Gema; Casarrubios, Luis; Amador, Ulises; Pérez-Castells, Javier

    2004-03-19

    Enynes connected through aromatic rings are used as substrates for metathesis reactions. The reactivity of three ruthenium carbene complexes is compared. The resulting 1,3-dienes are suitable precursors of polycyclic structures via a Diels-Alder process. Some domino RCM-Diels-Alder reactions are performed, suggesting a possible beneficial effect of the ruthenium catalyst in the cycloaddition process. Other examples require Lewis acid cocatalyst. When applied to aromatic ynamines or enamines, a new synthesis of vinylindoles is achieved. Monitorization of several metathesis reactions with NMR shows the different behavior for ruthenium catalysts. New carbenic species are detected in some reactions with an important dependence on the solvent used.

  7. Stereoselection in Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of 2-Cyano-1-azadienes: Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tay, Gidget C; Sizemore, Nicholas; Rychnovsky, Scott D

    2016-07-01

    Progress toward understanding the scope and diastereoselectivity of intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions using 2-cyano-1-azadienes is described herein. The resulting cyanoenamine products are underutilized intermediates in organic synthesis. Assembly of the Diels-Alder precursors was achieved using an improved imine condensation/oxidative cyanation protocol. By this method, several highly substituted indolizidine and quinolizidine architectures were constructed. Quantum mechanical DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory were performed for these cyclizations and provide insights into the origins of the observed diastereoselectivities.

  8. The effect of limited availability of N or water on C allocation to fine roots and annual fine root turnover in Alnus incana and Salix viminalis.

    PubMed

    Rytter, Rose-Marie

    2013-09-01

    The effect of limited nitrogen (N) or water availability on fine root growth and turnover was examined in two deciduous species, Alnus incana L. and Salix viminalis L., grown under three different regimes: (i) supply of N and water in amounts which would not hamper growth, (ii) limited N supply and (iii) limited water supply. Plants were grown outdoors during three seasons in covered and buried lysimeters placed in a stand structure and filled with quartz sand. Computer-controlled irrigation and fertilization were supplied through drip tubes. Production and turnover of fine roots were estimated by combining minirhizotron observations and core sampling, or by sequential core sampling. Annual turnover rates of fine roots <1 mm (5-6 year(-1)) and 1-2 mm (0.9-2.8 year(-1)) were not affected by changes in N or water availability. Fine root production (<1 mm) differed between Alnus and Salix, and between treatments in Salix; i.e., absolute length and biomass production increased in the order: water limited < unlimited < N limited. Few treatment effects were detected for fine roots 1-2 mm. Proportionally more C was allocated to fine roots (≤2 mm) in N or water-limited Salix; 2.7 and 2.3 times the allocation to fine roots in the unlimited regime, respectively. Estimated input to soil organic carbon increased by ca. 20% at N limitation in Salix. However, future studies on fine root decomposition under various environmental conditions are required. Fine root growth responses to N or water limitation were less pronounced in Alnus, thus indicating species differences caused by N-fixing capacity and slower initial growth in Alnus, or higher fine root plasticity in Salix. A similar seasonal growth pattern across species and treatments suggested the influence of outer stimuli, such as temperature and light.

  9. What determines Alnus-associated ectomycorrhizal community diversity and specificity? A comparison of host and habitat effects at a regional scale.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mélanie; Rochet, Juliette; Manzi, Sophie; Jargeat, Patricia; Gryta, Hervé; Moreau, Pierre-Arthur; Gardes, Monique

    2013-06-01

    · Global-scale analyses of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi communities emphasize host plant families as the main drivers of diversity. This study aims to test, on Alnus-ECM communities, which fungi are said to be 'host-specific', to what extent host species, habitat and distance explain their alpha and beta diversity variations, and their specificity. · In France, ECM communities associated with two subgenera and five species of Alnus, were sampled on 165 trees from 39 lowland to subalpine sites. In all, 1178 internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of ECM fungi clustered in 86 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). · The species richness was low but still variable, and the evenness of communities was lower on organic soils and in Corsica. Similarity between communities was influenced both by host, soil parameters, altitude and longitude, but not by climate and distance. A large majority of 'specific' fungi were shared between host species within a subgenus, and showed habitat preferences within the subgenus distribution range. · Our study confirms that Alnus ECM communities are low in diversity, highly conserved at a regional scale, and partly shared between congeneric host species. A large part of alpha and beta diversity variations remained unexplained, and other processes may shape these communities.

  10. Total synthesis of (±)-epithuriferic acid methyl ester via Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Marek; Bałczewski, Piotr; Owsianik, Krzysztof; Różycka-Sokołowska, Ewa; Marciniak, Bernard

    2016-02-07

    In this paper, we have described the first total synthesis of (±)-epithuriferic acid methyl ester from non-natural sources, in four steps (20% overall yield). The key step involves the Diels-Alder reaction of isobenzofuran with methyl 3-(dimethoxyphosphoryl)acrylate which is controlled by "ortho" regio- and endo stereoselectivities due to the COOMe group.

  11. Synthesis and Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction of norbornadiene and benzonorbornadiene dimers.

    PubMed

    Nişanci, Bilal; Dalkiliç, Erdin; Güney, Murat; Daştan, Arif

    2009-08-11

    Dimeric forms of norbornadiene and benzonorbornadiene were synthesized starting with known monobromide derivatives. The Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction of dimers with TCNE and PTAD was investigated and new norbornenoid polycyclics were obtained. All compounds were characterized properly using NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Concerning the reactivity of PTAD with isomeric dienes: the mechanism of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Mariza N; Orfanopoulos, Michael

    2009-04-02

    Cyclopropyl substituted dienes are employed as mechanistic probes in the triazolinedione Diels-Alder (DA) reaction. In aprotic and protic solvents, apart from the DA adducts that bear an intact cyclopropyl group, complicated and rearranged products are also obtained. These results provide solid evidence for the involvement of an open intermediate with a lifetime greater than 2 x 10(-12) s.

  13. Oxazole as an electron-deficient diene in the Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Moreno, Galdina Vanessa; González-Zamora, Eduardo; Méndez, Francisco

    2011-12-16

    The Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction of oxazole with ethylene is facilitated by addition of an alkyl group or Brønsted or Lewis acids to the oxazole nitrogen atom. The efficacy consists of stabilizing the transition state, lowering the activation barrier and the HOMO(dienophile)-LUMO(diene) gap, and increasing the reaction exothermicity.

  14. Biotransformation of a cage-like diels-alder adduct and derivatives by Mucor ramosissimus samutsevitsch

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Felicia Megumi; Mena, Ana Elisa Maciel; Marques, Maria Rita; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Beatriz, Adilson

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the ability for biotransformation of the Diels-Alder adduct tricyclo[6.2.1.02,7]undeca-4,9-dien-3,6-dione (1) and two synthetic derivatives by the saprobe fungus Mucor ramosissimus Samutsevitsch. Products from oxidation, isomerization and, regioselective and enantioselective reduction were achieved. PMID:24031400

  15. Enantioselective Synthesis of (+)-Estrone Exploiting a Hydrogen Bond-Promoted Diels−Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Starting from Dane’s diene and methylcyclopentenedione, (+)-estrone is synthesized along the Quinkert−Dane route in 24% total yield. The key step is an enantioselective Diels−Alder reaction promoted by an amidinium catalyst as efficiently as by a traditional Ti-TADDOLate Lewis acid. PMID:20302330

  16. Scope of the Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder Reactions of 1,2,3-Triazine

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Erin D.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    An examination of the scope of the inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions of the parent unsubstituted 1,2,3-triazine is described including the first report of its unique capabilities for participating in previously unexplored [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with heterodienophiles. PMID:21488676

  17. High-pressure Diels-Alder approach to natural kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sushil K; Orellana, Arturo; Greene, Andrew E; Poisson, Jean-François

    2006-11-23

    The first Diels-Alder based synthesis of (-)-kainic acid is described. Danishefsky's diene and a vinylogous malonate derived from 4-hydroxyproline combine under high pressure to afford a key bicyclic intermediate with virtually no loss of enantiopurity. This adduct can be converted into the natural product with complete stereocontrol. [reaction: see text].

  18. A Computational Experiment of the Endo versus Exo Preference in a Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Christopher N.; Woo, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and tested a computational laboratory that investigates an endo versus exo Diels-Alder cycloaddition. This laboratory employed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the cycloaddition of N-phenylmaleimide to furan. The endo and exo stereoisomers of the product were distinguished by building the two isomers in a…

  19. Synthesis of isoquinuclidines from highly substituted dihydropyridines via the Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rhia M; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2013-02-01

    A stereo- and regioselective Diels-Alder reaction for the synthesis of highly substituted isoquinuclidines from dihydropyridines and electron-deficient alkenes has been developed. While reactions with activated dienophiles proceed readily under thermal conditions, the use of Lewis acid additives is necessary to facilitate cycloadditions for less reactive alkenes. This procedure affords the target compounds in high yields and diastereoselectivities.

  20. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family. PMID:25603394

  1. Preparative isolation and purification of antioxidative diarylheptanoid derivatives from Alnus japonica by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soon Sung; Lee, Min Young; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Choi, Soon Jung; Lee, Jae-Yong; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2011-12-01

    This study employed the online HPLC-2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS)(+) bioassay to rapidly determine the antioxidant compounds occurring in the crude extract of Alnus japonica. The negative peaks of the ABTS(+) radical scavenging detection system, which indicated the presence of antioxidant activity, were monitored by measuring the decrease in absorbance at 734 nm. The ABTS(+)-based antioxidant activity profile showed that three negative peaks exhibited antioxidant activity. High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was used for preparative scale separation of the three active peaks from the extract. The purity of the isolated compounds was analyzed by HPLC and their structures were identified by (1)H- and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC), and heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC). Two solvent systems composed of n-hexane/ethylacetate/methanol/water (4:6:4:6, v/v) and of ethyl acetate/methanol/water (1:0.1:1, v/v) were performed in high-speed counter-current chromatography. Consequently, a total of 527 mg of hirsutanonol 5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 80.04 mg of 3-deoxohirsutenonol 5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and 91.0 mg of hirsutenone were obtained with purity of 94.7, 90.5, and 98.6%, respectively.

  2. Changes in sediment volume in Alder Lake, Nisqually River Basin, Washington, 1945-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Gish, Casey C.

    2012-01-01

    The Nisqually River drains the southwest slopes of Mount Rainier, a glaciated stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of western Washington. The Nisqually River was impounded behind Alder Dam when the dam was completed in 1945 and formed Alder Lake. This report quantifies the volume of sediment deposited by the Nisqually and Little Nisqually Rivers in their respective deltas in Alder Lake since 1945. Four digital elevation surfaces were generated from historical contour maps from 1945, 1956, and 1985, and a bathymetric survey from 2011. These surfaces were used to compute changes in sediment volume since 1945. Estimates of the volume of sediment deposited in Alder Lake between 1945 and 2011 were focused in three areas: (1) the Nisqually River delta, (2) the main body of Alder Lake, along a 40-meter wide corridor of the pre-dam Nisqually River, and (3) the Little Nisqually River delta. In each of these areas the net deposition over the 66-year period was 42,000,000 ± 4,000,000 cubic meters (m3), 2,000,000 ± 600,000 m3, and 310,000 ± 110,000 m3, respectively. These volumes correspond to annual rates of accumulation of 630,000 ± 60,000 m3/yr, 33,000 ± 9,000 m3/yr, and 4,700 ± 1,600 m3/yr, respectively. The annual sediment yield of the Nisqually (1,100 ± 100 cubic meters per year per square kilometer [(m3/yr)/km2]) and Little Nisqually River basins [70 ± 24 (m3/yr)/km2] provides insight into the yield of two basins with different land cover and geomorphic processes. These estimates suggest that a basin draining a glaciated stratovolcano yields approximately 15 times more sediment than a basin draining forested uplands in the Cascade Range. Given the cumulative net change in sediment volume in the Nisqually River delta in Alder Lake, the total capacity of Alder Lake since 1945 decreased about 3 percent by 1956, 8 percent by 1985, and 15 percent by 2011.

  3. Effect of Counterion Structure on Rates and Diastereoselectivities in α,β-Unsaturated Iminium-Ion Diels-Alder Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Marcoux, David; Bindschädler, Pascal; Speed, Alexander W. H.; Chiu, Anna; Pero, Joseph E.; Borg, George A.; Evans, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of cyclic α,β-unsaturated iminium-ion dienophiles is documented in two highly diastereoselective Diels-Alder (DA) reactions. The dienophilic counterion was found to have a significant effect on reactivity. PMID:21678927

  4. New domino transposition/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction in monocyclic allenols: a general strategy for tricyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Aragoncillo, Cristina; Redondo, María C

    2002-07-21

    A novel and direct synthetic strategy to prepare fused tricycles has been developed from monocyclic allenols, masked functionalized dienes, which underwent a domino allenol transposition/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  5. Growth of fullerene fragments using the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction: first step towards a C60 synthesis by dimerization.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Martha; Méndez, Francisco; Alonso, Julio A

    2013-02-13

    Density Functional Theory has been used to model the Diels-Alder reactions of the fullerene fragments triindenetriphenilene and pentacyclopentacorannulene with ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. The purpose is to prove the feasibility of using Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions to grow fullerene fragments step by step, and to dimerize fullerene fragments, as a way to obtain C₆₀. The dienophile character of the fullerene fragments is dominant, and the reaction of butadiene with pentacyclopentacorannulene is favored.

  6. Diversity and Specificity of Frankia Strains in Nodules of Sympatric Myrica gale, Alnus incana, and Shepherdia canadensis Determined by rrs Gene Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Valerie; Batzli, Janet Mccray; Zimpfer, Jeff F.; Normand, Philippe; Dawson, Jeffrey O.; Fernandez, Maria P.

    2001-01-01

    The identity of Frankia strains from nodules of Myrica gale, Alnus incana subsp. rugosa, and Shepherdia canadensis was determined for a natural stand on a lake shore sand dune in Wisconsin, where the three actinorhizal plant species were growing in close proximity, and from two additional stands with M. gale as the sole actinorhizal component. Unisolated strains were compared by their 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction patterns using a direct PCR amplification protocol on nodules. Phylogenetic relationships among nodular Frankia strains were analyzed by comparing complete 16S rDNA sequences of study and reference strains. Where the three actinorhizal species occurred together, each host species was nodulated by a different phylogenetic group of Frankia strains. M. gale strains from all three sites belonged to an Alnus-Casuarina group, closely related to Frankia alni representative strains, and were low in diversity for a host genus considered promiscuous with respect to Frankia microsymbiont genotype. Frankia strains from A. incana nodules were also within the Alnus-Casuarina cluster, distinct from Frankia strains of M. gale nodules at the mixed actinorhizal site but not from Frankia strains from two M. gale nodules at a second site in Wisconsin. Frankia strains from nodules of S. canadensis belonged to a divergent subset of a cluster of Elaeagnaceae-infective strains and exhibited a high degree of diversity. The three closely related local Frankia populations in Myrica nodules could be distinguished from one another using our approach. In addition to geographic separation and host selectivity for Frankia microsymbionts, edaphic factors such as soil moisture and organic matter content, which varied among locales, may account for differences in Frankia populations found in Myrica nodules. PMID:11319089

  7. Polar Diels-Alder reactions using electrophilic nitrobenzothiophenes. A combined experimental and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Rosa, Claudia D.; Mancini, Pedro M. E.; Kneeteman, Maria N.; Lopez Baena, Anna F.; Suligoy, Melisa A.; Domingo, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    The reactions between 2- and 3-nitrobenzothiophenes with three dienes of different nucleophilicity, 1-methoxy-3-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene, 1-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene and isoprene developed in anhydrous benzene and alternative under microwave irradiation with molecular solvents or in free solvent conditions, respectively, for produce dibenzothiophenes permit to conclude that both nitroheterocycles act as electrophile with the cited dienes. In the cases of the dienes 1-methoxy-3-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene and 1-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene which posses major nucleophilicity the observed product is the normal cycloaddition one. However when the diene is isoprene the product with both electrophiles follow the hetero Diels-Alder way. These reactions are considered polar cycloaddition reactions and the yields are reasonables. Moreover the polar Diels-Alder reactions of nitrobenzothiophenes with electron rich dienes 1-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene have been theoretically studied using DFT methods.

  8. Use of wetlands for production of woody plants for fuels and petrochemical substitutes. [Alders, willows, poplars

    SciTech Connect

    Farnham, R.S.; Read, P.

    1981-03-01

    Work performed on this project in the past year has included the evaluations of natural stands productivity for wetland biomass species; propagation studies with alder, willow and poplar species; nursery establishment for production of cultivars and evaluation of wetland soils suitable for production of woody biomass species. Also a biomass research facility has been established in N. Minnesota suitable for long-term research and demonstration. Propagation research has included both micro and macro propagation techniques with native willows, selected willow clones from Sweden, alder seed selection from Finland and hybrid poplar clones from US Forest Service, Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Approximately 100,000 rooted plants will be available for field research by June 1, 1981.

  9. A possible role of an anthocyanin filter in low-intensity light stress-induced flowering in Perilla frutescens var. crispa.

    PubMed

    Miki, Satomi; Wada, Kaede C; Takeno, Kiyotoshi

    2015-03-01

    The red-leaved form of Perilla frutescens var. crispa was induced to flower by low-intensity light stress. The leaves of this form are normally red, but turned green under low-intensity light due to anthocyanin depletion in the epidermis. Flowering did not occur when plants were grown under light passed through a red-colored cellophane paper, which has an absorption spectrum similar to that of anthocyanins. High-concentration anthocyanins may play the role of a red-colored optical filter under normal light conditions, and this filter effect may be lost under low-intensity light, causing a change in the wavelength characteristics of the light with which the mesophyll cells are irradiated. This change may induce a photobiological effect leading to flowering. The gene expression and enzyme activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), the key enzyme for anthocyanin biosynthesis, decreased under low-intensity light. L-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP), which is widely used as a PAL inhibitor, inhibited low-intensity light stress-induced flowering and increased PAL activity and anthocyanin content. The inhibition of flowering by AOPP in P. frutescens may be through different mechanisms than PAL inhibition.

  10. Obligatory short-day plant, Perilla frutescens var. crispa can flower in response to low-intensity light stress under long-day conditions.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kaede C; Kondo, Hiroshi; Takeno, Kiyotoshi

    2010-03-01

    An obligatory short-day plant, Perilla frutescens var. crispa was induced to flower under long-day conditions when grown under low-intensity light (30 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Plant size was smaller under lower light intensity, indicating that the low-intensity light acted as a stress factor. The phenomenon is categorized as stress-induced flowering. Low-intensity light treatment for 4 weeks induced 100% flowering. The plants responded to low-intensity light immediately after the cotyledons expanded, and the flowering response decreased with increasing plant age. The induced plants produced fertile seeds, and the progeny developed normally. The plants that flowered under low-intensity light had greener leaves. This greening was because of the decrease in anthocyanin content, and there was a negative correlation between the anthocyanin content and percent flowering. Treatment with L-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), did not induce flowering under non-inductive light conditions and inhibited flowering under inductive low-intensity light conditions. The metabolic pathway regulated by PAL may be involved in the flowering induced by low-intensity light.

  11. Origins of Stereoselectivity in Diels-Alder Cycloadditions Catalyzed by Chiral Imidazolidinones

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Ruth; Houk, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory has been used to study Diels-Alder reactions of cyclopentadiene with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones organocatalyzed by MacMillan’s chiral imidazolidinones. Preferred conformations of transition structures and reaction intermediates have been located. The dramatically different reactivities and enantioselectivities exhibited by two similar chiral imidazolidinones are rationalized. PMID:16536527

  12. The unexpected product of Diels-Alder reaction between "indanocyclon" and maleimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, Michał A.; Roszkowski, Piotr; Struga, Marta; Szulczyk, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    A heterocyclic compound commonly known as "indanocyclon" undergoes an unexpected Diels-Alder addition with maleimide. The resulting product has been isolated and characterized in order to get an information about its structure and possible mechanism of the reaction. Extensive comparison of single crystal properties of 3-(2,8-dioxo-1,3-diphenyl-2,8-dihydrocyclopenta[a]inden-8a(1H)-yl)pyrrolidine-2,5-dione and favorable product of the reaction has been also performed.

  13. Control of femtosecond laser driven retro-Diels-Alder-like reaction of dicyclopentadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dipak Kumar; Goswami, Tapas; Goswami, Debabrata

    2010-12-01

    Using femtosecond time resolved degenerate pump-probe mass spectrometry coupled with simple linearly chirped frequency modulated pulse, we elucidate that the dynamics of retro-Diels-Alder reaction of diclopentadiene (DCPD) to cyclopentadiene (CPD) in supersonic molecular beam occurs in ultrafast time scale. Negatively chirped pulse enhances the ion yield of CPD, as compared to positively chirped pulse. This indicates that by changing the frequency (chirp) of the laser pulse we can control the ion yield of a chemical reaction.

  14. Intramolecular Diels–Alder Reactions of Cycloalkenones: Stereoselectivity, Lewis Acid Acceleration, and Halogen Substituent Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The intramolecular Diels–Alder reactions of cycloalkenones and terminal dienes occur with high endo stereoselectivity, both thermally and under Lewis-acidic conditions. Through computations, we show that steric repulsion and tether conformation govern the selectivity of the reaction, and incorporation of either BF3 or α-halogenation increases the rate of cycloaddition. With a longer tether, isomerization from a terminal diene to the more stable internal diene results in a more facile cycloaddition. PMID:24410341

  15. Diels-Alder reactions as an efficient route to high purity cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Glassner, Mathias; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2011-05-18

    A simple and efficient route for the synthesis of cyclic polymer systems is presented. Linear furan protected α-maleimide-ω-cyclopentadienyl functionalized precursors (poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(tert-butyl acrylate)) were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and subsequent substitution of the bromine end-group with cyclopentadiene. Upon heating at high dilution, deprotection of the dieneophile occurs followed by an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction yielding a high purity cyclic product.

  16. Acid-free aza Diels-Alder reaction of Danishefsky's diene with imines.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Li, Xin; Ding, Kuiling

    2002-09-19

    [reaction: see text] A highly efficient aza Diels-Alder reaction of Danishefsky's diene with imines was found to occur in methanol in the absence of any acids at room temperature to give corresponding 2-substituted dihydro-4-pyridone derivatives in high yields. This reaction can be also carried out in a three-component one-pot reaction manner. The reaction was found to proceed through a Mannich-type condensation mechanism.

  17. Biomass of Speckled Alder on an Air-Polluted Mountain Site and its Response to Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneš, Ivan; Baláš, Martin; Koňasová, Tereza; Špulák, Ondřej; Balcar, Vratislav; Millerová, Kateřina Bednářová; Kacálek, Dušan; Jakl, Michal; Zahradník, Daniel; Vítámvás, Jan; Š´astná, Jaroslava; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana

    2014-12-01

    The article summarizes outcomes of a biomass study conducted in a young speckled alder plantation on a cold mountain site. At this location, the previously existing old forest was clear felled because of damage from air pollution, and present-day surface humus is in need of restoration. The intention of this study was to quantify the biomass and nutrients accumulated by alders and their components and assess whether the initial fertilization resulted in increased biomass production and nutrient accumulation in the biomass. Besides the control, two fertilized treatments were installed. In the surface treatment (SUT), the amendment was applied as a base dressing in small circles around trees. In the planting-hole treatment (PHT), the amendment was incorporated into soil inside the planting holes. Five growth seasons after planting and fertilization, six alders from each treatment were harvested including roots. Their biomass was quantified and analyzed for macroelements. The greatest pool of dry mass (DM) was branches in the control and stem wood in the fertilized treatments. The greatest pools of macroelements were leaves and branches. The most pronounced effects of fertilization were recorded in the DM and consequently in the absolute quantities of nutrients. The DM of an average tree in the control, SUT, and PHT was 85, 226, and 231 g, respectively. The absolute contents of nutrients per tree in the fertilized treatments showed the following increases, as compared with the control: (N) 2.5-2.6 times; (P) 1.6-2.4 times; (K) 1.8-2.1 times; and (Mg) 1.8-2.0 times, respectively. Speckled alder responded positively to fertilization.

  18. Light-induced hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition: a facile and selective photoclick reaction.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2011-04-13

    2-Napthoquinone-3-methides (oNQMs) generated by efficient photodehydration (Φ=0.2) of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol undergo facile hetero-Diels-Alder addition (k(D-A)∼ 4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to electron-rich polarized olefins in an aqueous solution. The resulting photostable benzo[g]chromans are produced in high to quantitative yield. The unreacted oNQM is rapidly hydrated (k(H2O) ∼145 s(-1)) to regenerate the starting diol. This competition between hydration and cycloaddition makes oNQMs highly selective, since only vinyl ethers and enamines are reactive enough to form the Diels-Alder adduct in an aqueous solution; no cycloaddition was observed with other types of alkenes. To achieve photolabeling or photoligation of two substrates, one is derivatized with a vinyl ether moiety, while 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol is attached to the other via an appropriate linker. The light-induced Diels-Alder "click" strategy permits the formation of either a permanent or hydrolytically labile linkage. Rapid kinetics of this photoclick reaction (k=4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) is useful for time-resolved applications. The short lifetime (τ ∼7 ms in H(2)O) of the active form of the photoclick reagent prevents its migration from the site of irradiation, thus, allowing for spatial control of the ligation or labeling.

  19. Flash-flood impacts cause changes in wood anatomy of Alnus glutinosa, Fraxinus angustifolia and Quercus pyrenaica.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, J A; Stoffel, M; Bollschweiler, M; Bodoque, J M; Díez-Herrero, A

    2010-06-01

    Flash floods may influence the development of trees growing on channel bars and floodplains. In this study, we analyze and quantify anatomical reactions to wounding in diffuse-porous (Alnus glutinosa L.) and ring-porous (Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl. and Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) trees in a Mediterranean environment. A total of 54 cross-sections and wedges were collected from trees that had been injured by past flash floods. From each of the samples, micro-sections were prepared at a tangential distance of 1.5 cm from the injury to determine wounding-related changes in radial width, tangential width and lumen of earlywood vessels, and fibers and parenchyma cells (FPC). In diffuse-porous A. glutinosa, the lumen area of vessels shows a significant (non-parametric test, P-value <0.05) decrease by almost 39% after wounding. For ring-porous F. angustifolia and Q. pyrenaica, significant decreases in vessel lumen area are observed as well by 59 and 42%, respectively. Radial width of vessels was generally more sensitive to the decrease than tangential width, but statistically significant values were only observed in F. angustifolia. Changes in the dimensions of earlywood FPC largely differed between species. While in ring-porous F. angustifolia and Q. pyrenaica the lumen of FPC dropped by 22 and 34% after wounding, we observed an increase in FPC lumen area in diffuse-porous A. glutinosa of approximately 35%. Our data clearly show that A. glutinosa represents a valuable species for flash-flood research in vulnerable Mediterranean environments. For this species, it will be possible in the future to gather information on past flash floods with non-destructive sampling based on increment cores. In ring-porous F. angustifolia and Q. pyrenaica, flash floods leave less drastic, yet still recognizable, signatures of flash-flood activity through significant changes in vessel lumen area. In contrast, the use of changes in FPC dimensions appears less feasible for the determination of

  20. Changes in the pollen seasons of the early flowering trees Alnus spp. and Corylus spp. in Worcester, United Kingdom, 1996-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emberlin, Jean; Smith, Matt; Close, Rebecca; Adams-Groom, Beverley

    2007-01-01

    Previous work on Betula spp. (birch) in the UK and at five sites in Europe has shown that pollen seasons for this taxon have tended to become earlier by about 5-10 days per decade in most regions investigated over the last 30 years. This pattern has been linked to the trend to warmer winters and springs in recent years. However, little work has been done to investigate the changes in the pollen seasons for the early flowering trees. Several of these, such as Alnus spp. and Corylus spp., have allergens, which cross-react with those of Betula spp., and so have a priming effect on allergic people. This paper investigates pollen seasons for Alnus spp. and Corylus spp. for the years 1996-2005 at Worcester, in the West Midlands, United Kingdom. Pollen data for daily average counts were collected using a Burkard volumetric trap sited on the exposed roof of a three-storey building. The climate is western maritime. Meteorological data for daily temperatures (maximum and minimum) and rainfall were obtained from the local monitoring sites. The local area up to approximately 10 km surrounding the site is mostly level terrain with some undulating hills and valleys. The local vegetation is mixed farmland and deciduous woodland. The pollen seasons for the two taxa investigated are typically late December or early January to late March. Various ways of defining the start and end of the pollen seasons were considered for these taxa, but the most useful was the 1% method whereby the season is deemed to have started when 1% of the total catch is achieved and to have ended when 99% is reached. The cumulative catches (in grains/m3) for Alnus spp. varied from 698 (2001) to 3,467 (2004). For Corylus spp., they varied from 65 (2001) to 4,933 (2004). The start dates for Alnus spp. showed 39 days difference in the 10 years (earliest 2000 day 21, latest 1996 day 60). The end dates differed by 26 days and the length of season differed by 15 days. The last 4 years in the set had notably higher

  1. Changes in the pollen seasons of the early flowering trees Alnus spp. and Corylus spp. in Worcester, United Kingdom, 1996-2005.

    PubMed

    Emberlin, Jean; Smith, Matt; Close, Rebecca; Adams-Groom, Beverley

    2007-01-01

    Previous work on Betula spp. (birch) in the UK and at five sites in Europe has shown that pollen seasons for this taxon have tended to become earlier by about 5-10 days per decade in most regions investigated over the last 30 years. This pattern has been linked to the trend to warmer winters and springs in recent years. However, little work has been done to investigate the changes in the pollen seasons for the early flowering trees. Several of these, such as Alnus spp. and Corylus spp., have allergens, which cross-react with those of Betula spp., and so have a priming effect on allergic people. This paper investigates pollen seasons for Alnus spp. and Corylus spp. for the years 1996-2005 at Worcester, in the West Midlands, United Kingdom. Pollen data for daily average counts were collected using a Burkard volumetric trap sited on the exposed roof of a three-story building. The climate is western maritime. Meteorological data for daily temperatures (maximum and minimum) and rainfall were obtained from the local monitoring sites. The local area up to approximately 10 km surrounding the site is mostly level terrain with some undulating hills and valleys. The local vegetation is mixed farmland and deciduous woodland. The pollen seasons for the two taxa investigated are typically late December or early January to late March. Various ways of defining the start and end of the pollen seasons were considered for these taxa, but the most useful was the 1% method whereby the season is deemed to have started when 1% of the total catch is achieved and to have ended when 99% is reached. The cumulative catches (in grains/m(3)) for Alnus spp. varied from 698 (2001) to 3,467 (2004). For Corylus spp., they varied from 65 (2001) to 4,933 (2004). The start dates for Alnus spp. showed 39 days difference in the 10 years (earliest 2000 day 21, latest 1996 day 60). The end dates differed by 26 days and the length of season differed by 15 days. The last 4 years in the set had notably

  2. Use of potassium bicarbonate (Armicarb) on the control of powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae) of gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa).

    PubMed

    Wenneker, M; Kanne, J

    2010-01-01

    Powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae) severely infects young shoots, stems and fruits of gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa). Environmental friendly and biological control measures are being sought throughout the world. Especially in organic gooseberry growing effective control measures are needed, because powdery mildew infections may result in a total loss of the crop. In organic currant growing the number of adequate control methods is very limited. Sulphur as a fungicide against powdery mildew in e.g. gooseberry or table grape growing is not recommendable due to possible bleaching of berries and scorching of tender shoots. Various bicarbonate salts are suggested as a good option to control powdery mildew. In a field trial the effect of potassium bicarbonate (Armicarb) on the on the control of powdery mildew of gooseberry was evaluated. Four treatments; i.e. two preventive strategies and two curative strategies, were applied. PLants were sprayed until runoff. The percent of infected fruits and disease severity were assessed. In the unsprayed control plots very high disease incidences were observed; on average more than 90% of the berries were infected with powdery mildew. The weekly (preventive) spray applications with potassium carbonate reduced the disease incidences on fruits significantly. On average approximately 10% of the fruits were affected by powdery mildew. However, the number of spray applications was high. In conclusion, our results indicate that applications of potassium bicarbonate (as Armicarb) are effective in reducing the incidence and severity of American powdery mildew in gooseberry. Early spray applications are necessary to protect berries against powdery mildew infections. Future research will focus on reducing the number of applications, e.g. warning models based on powdery mildew of rose (Sphaerotheca pannosa).

  3. A Diels-Alder super diene breaking benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic polyene with six carbon atoms (benzene) is very stable, whereas cyclic polyene with four carbon atoms (cyclobutadiene) is extremely unstable. The electron-withdrawing pentafluorophenyl group of a substituted cyclobutadiene lowers the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, greatly increasing its reactivity as a diene in Diels-Alder reactions with acetylene, ethylene and even benzene. Here we show that the reaction with benzene occurs cleanly at the relatively low temperature of 120 °C and results in the formal fragmentation of benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units, via a unique Diels-Alder/retro-Diels-Alder reaction. This is a new example of the rare case where breaking the C-C bond of benzene is possible with no activation by a transition metal.

  4. A Diels–Alder super diene breaking benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic polyene with six carbon atoms (benzene) is very stable, whereas cyclic polyene with four carbon atoms (cyclobutadiene) is extremely unstable. The electron-withdrawing pentafluorophenyl group of a substituted cyclobutadiene lowers the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, greatly increasing its reactivity as a diene in Diels–Alder reactions with acetylene, ethylene and even benzene. Here we show that the reaction with benzene occurs cleanly at the relatively low temperature of 120 °C and results in the formal fragmentation of benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units, via a unique Diels–Alder/retro-Diels–Alder reaction. This is a new example of the rare case where breaking the C–C bond of benzene is possible with no activation by a transition metal. PMID:24398593

  5. Total Synthesis of the Galbulimima Alkaloids Himandravine and GB17 Using Biomimetic Diels–Alder Reactions of Double Diene Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Reed T.; Pemberton, Ryan P.; Franke, Jenna M.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Thomson, Regan J.

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective total syntheses of himandravine and GB17 were completed through a common biomimetic strategy involving Diels–Alder reactions of unusual double diene containing linear precursors. The double diene precursors, containing or lacking a C12 substituent as required to produce GB17 or himandravine, respectively, were found to undergo Diels–Alder reactions to afford mixtures of regioisomeric cycloadducts that map onto the alternative carbocyclic frameworks of both himandravine and GB17. Computational investigations revealed that these Diels–Alder reactions proceed via transition state structures of similar energy that have a high degree of bispericyclic character and that the low levels of regioselectivity observed in the reactions are a consequence of competing orbital interaction and distortion energies. The combined experimental and computational results provide valuable insights into the biosynthesis of the Galbulimima alkaloids. PMID:26305231

  6. Regiocontrol by remote substituents. An enantioselective total synthesis of frenolicin B via a highly regioselective Diels-Alder reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, G.A.; Li, J. ); Gordon, M.S.; Jensen, J.H. )

    1993-06-30

    The quinone subunit is contained in a broad range of biologically important natural products such as frenolicin B, which is a member of the pyranonaphthoquinone family. The diverse biological activity of quinones has led to the development of several new synthetic methods for quinones. Among the pathways featuring a cycloaddition reaction, one of the most general methods for the regiospecific synthesis of substituted quinones was pioneered by H.J. Rapoport and others. This method involves the Diels-Alder reaction of a substituted quinone. As part of a program to evaluate the directing effects of functional groups not directly attached to the atoms undergoing Diels-Alder cycloaddition, we now report that remote substituents on a dienophile can confer excellent regioselectivity in Diels-Alder reactions. This work has led to an extremely direct synthesis of the pyranonaphthoquinone framework and to the first synthesis of frenolicin B (1). 19 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Aqueous catalysis: Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as a homogeneous catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Espenson, J.H.

    1997-04-16

    The title compound proves to be an effective and efficient catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction when the dienophile is an {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone or aldehyde. It is especially effective in water. Equal amounts of any such dienophile and any of six representative dienes (isoprene, 2-methyl-1,3-pentadiene, 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene, cyclopentadiene, 1,2,3,4,5,-pentamethylcyclopentadiene, and 1,3-cyclohexadiene) were used, along with 1% MTO. The reactions gave usually > 90% isolated yield of the cycloaddition product except for the larger dienophiles. Nearly exclusively, there was formed one product isomer, the same one that usually predominates. The reactions were often run in chloroform (mostly) and in other organic solvents. A select number were carried out in water, where the reactions gave a greater product yield in a considerably shorter time. Water, itself, is known to enhance the rates of Diels-Alder reactions, but MTO exerts an additional accelerating effect. Kinetics studies were carried out to show that the rate is proportional to the catalyst concentration. The products do not inhibit the reaction. The desirability of MTO as a Diels-Alder catalyst stems from a combination of favorable properties: the inertness to air/oxygen, the tolerance for many substrates, the use of an aqueous medium, and the absence of product inhibition. The initial step appears to be the (weak) coordination of the carbonyl oxygen to the electropositive rhenium center. Steric crowding around rhenium inhibits reactions of the larger dienophiles. 26 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Insight on mendable resin made by combining Diels-Alder epoxy adducts with DGEBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Iacono, S.; Martone, A.; Filippone, G.; Acierno, D.; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.; Amendola, E.

    2016-05-01

    Formation of micro-cracks is a critical problem in polymers and polymer composites during their service in structural applications. In this context, materials endowed with self-healing features would lead to the next polymers generation. In the present paper, an epoxy system integrating Diels-Alder epoxy adducts is investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis. The direct and retro D-A reaction have been studied by FTIR and specific absorption bands have been identified. Finally, mechanical tests have been performed on the system. The polymer is able to heal fracture and micro-cracks recovering its stiffness after a thermal treatment.

  9. Asymmetric Syntheses of the Flavonoid Diels–Alder Natural Products Sanggenons C and O

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chao; Xiong, Yuan; Eschenbrenner-Lux, Vincent; Cong, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed, double Claisen rearrangement of a bis-allyloxyflavone has been utilized to enable a concise synthesis of the hydrobenzofuro[3,2-b]chromenone core structure of the natural products sanggenon A and sanggenol F. In addition, catalytic, enantioselective [4+2] cycloadditions of 2′-hydroxychalcones have been accomplished using B(OPh)3/BINOL complexes. Asymmetric syntheses of the flavonoid Diels–Alder natural products sanggenons C and O have been achieved employing a stereodivergent reaction of a racemic mixture (stereodivergent RRM) involving [4+2] cycloaddition. PMID:26735066

  10. Mechanistic insights into the stepwise Diels-Alder reaction of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore

    2012-01-06

    The stepwise Diels-Alder reaction between 1-trimethylsiloxy-1,3-butadiene and 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan is explored using state-of-the-art computational methods. The results support a stepwise mechanism via a persistent intermediate, however, not the one previously reported (Lakhdar et al., Chem. Eur. J.2007, 16, 5681) but a heterocyclic adduct. The novel DFT functional M062X and the SCS-MP2 method were essential to reproduce a reasonable potential energy surface for this challenging system.

  11. 1-Azadienes as regio- and chemoselective dienophiles in aminocatalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Gu, Jing; Teng, Bin; Zhou, Qing-Qing; Li, Rui; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2013-12-20

    Electron-deficient 1-aza-1,3-butadienes containing a 1,2-benzoisothiazole-1,1-dioxide or 1,2,3-benzoxathiazine-2,2-dioxide motif act as regio- and chemoselective dienophiles in normal-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions with HOMO-raised trienamines, rather than typical 4π-participation in inverse-electron-demand versions. The enantioenriched cycloadducts could be efficiently converted to spiro or fused frameworks with high structural and stereogenic complexity by a sequential aza-benzoin reaction or other transformations.

  12. Structural Modification of Sol-Gel Materials through Retro Diels-Alder Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    SHALTOUT,RAAFAT M.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCCLAIN,MARK D.; PRABAKAR,SHESHASAYANA; GREAVES,JOHN; SHEA,KENNETH J.

    1999-12-08

    Hydrolysis and condensation of organically bridged bis-triethoxysilanes, (EtO){sub 3}Si-R-Si(OEt){sub 3}, results in the formation of three dimensional organic/inorganic hybrid networks (Equation 1). Properties of these materials, including porosity, are dependent on the nature of the bridging group, R. Flexible groups (akylene-spacers longer than five carbons in length) polymerize under acidic conditions to give non-porous materials. Rigid groups (such as arylene-, alkynylene-, or alkenylene) form non-porous, microporous, and macroporous gels. In many cases the pore size distributions are quite narrow. One of the motivations for preparing hybrid organic-inorganic materials is to extend the range of properties available with sol-gel systems by incorporating organic groups into the inorganic network. For example, organically modified silica gels arc either prepared by co-polymerizing an organoalkoxysilane with a silica precursor or surface silylating the inorganic gel. This can serve to increase hydrophobicity or to introduce some reactive organic functionality. However, the type and orientation of these organic functionalities is difficult to control. Furthermore, many organoalkoxysilanes can act to inhibitor even prevent gelation, limiting the final density of organic functionalities. We have devised a new route for preparing highly functionalized pores in hybrid materials using bridging groups that are thermally converted into the desired functionalities after the gel has been obtained. In this paper, we present the preparation and characterization of bridged polysilsesquioxanes with Diels-Alder adducts as the bridging groups from the sol-gel polymerization of monomers 2 and 4. The bridging groups are constructed such that the retro Diela-Alder reaction releases the dienes and leaves the dienophiles as integral parts of the network polymers. In the rigid architecture of a xerogel, this loss of organic functionality should liberate sufficient space to modify the

  13. Diels-Alder cycloadditions in water for the straightforward preparation of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Marchán, Vicente; Ortega, Samuel; Pulido, Daniel; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between diene-modified oligonucleotides and maleimide-derivatized peptides afforded peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates with high purity and yield. Synthesis of the reagents was easily accomplished by on-column derivatization of the corresponding peptides and oligonucleotides. The cycloaddition reaction was carried out in mild conditions, in aqueous solution at 37°C. The speed of the reaction was found to vary depending on the size of the reagents, but it can be completed in 8–10 h by reacting the diene-oligonucleotide with a small excess of maleimide-peptide. PMID:16478710

  14. Diels-Alder reactions of five-membered heterocycles containing one heteroatom.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyuan; Nguyen, Son T; Williams, John D; Peet, Norton P

    2014-12-17

    Diels-Alder reactions of five-membered heterocycles containing one heteroatom with an N-arylmaleimide were studied. Cycloaddition of 2,5-dimethylfuran (4) with 2-(4-methylphenyl)maleimide (3) in toluene at 60 °C gave bicyclic adduct 5. Cycloadditions of 3 with 2,5-dimethylthiophene (11) and 1,2,5-trimethylpyrrole (14) were also studied. Interestingly, the bicyclic compound 5 cleanly rearranged, with loss of water, when treated with p-toluenesulfonic acid in toluene at 80 °C to give 4,7-dimethyl-2-p-tolylisoindoline-1,3-dione (6).

  15. Stereo- and regioselectivity of the hetero-Diels–Alder reaction of nitroso derivatives with conjugated dienes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marvin J

    2016-01-01

    Summary The hetero-Diels–Alder reaction between a nitroso dienophile and a conjugated diene to give the 3,6-dihydro-2H-1,2-oxazine scaffold is useful for the synthesis of many biologically interesting molecules due to the diverse opportunities created by subsequent transformations of the resulting 1,2-oxazine ring. This review discusses the rationale for the observed regio- and stereoselectivity and the methods developed in recent years used to control and improve the stereo- and regioselectivity for the synthesis of 1,2-oxazine scaffolds. PMID:27829901

  16. Highly enantioselective access to cannabinoid-type tricyles by organocatalytic Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Nicole; Gläser, Franziska; Nieger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Summary After prosperous domino reactions towards benzopyrans, the products were used as the starting material in Lewis acid catalyzed and organocatalytic Diels–Alder reactions to build up a tricyclic system. Herein, an asymmetric induction up to 96% enantiomeric excess was obtained by the use of imidazolidinone catalysts. This approach can be utilized to construct the tricyclic system in numerous natural products, in particular the scaffold of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being the most representative one. Compared with other published methods, condensation with a preexisting cyclohexane moiety in the precursor is needed to gain the heterogenic tricycle systems, whereas we present a novel strategy towards cannabinoid derivatives based on a flexible modular synthesis. PMID:23019475

  17. Highly enantioselective access to cannabinoid-type tricyles by organocatalytic Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Bräse, Stefan; Volz, Nicole; Gläser, Franziska; Nieger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    After prosperous domino reactions towards benzopyrans, the products were used as the starting material in Lewis acid catalyzed and organocatalytic Diels-Alder reactions to build up a tricyclic system. Herein, an asymmetric induction up to 96% enantiomeric excess was obtained by the use of imidazolidinone catalysts. This approach can be utilized to construct the tricyclic system in numerous natural products, in particular the scaffold of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being the most representative one. Compared with other published methods, condensation with a preexisting cyclohexane moiety in the precursor is needed to gain the heterogenic tricycle systems, whereas we present a novel strategy towards cannabinoid derivatives based on a flexible modular synthesis.

  18. Thiourea-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of a naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Carsten S; Bräse, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A variety of organocatalysts were screened for the catalysis of the naphthoquinone monoketal Diels-Alder reaction. In this study we found that Schreiner's thiourea catalyst 10 and Jacobson's thiourea catalyst 12 facilitate the cycloaddition of the sterically hindered naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile 3 with diene 4. The use of thiourea catalysis allowed for the first time the highly selective synthesis of the exo-product 2a in up to 63% yield. In this reaction a new quaternary center was built. The so formed cycloaddition product 2a represents the ABC tricycle of beticolin 0 (1) and is also a valuable model substrate for the total synthesis of related natural products.

  19. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  20. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  1. New Insights into the Diels-Alder Reaction of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Patrick P; Kuss, Christian; Schougaard, Steen B; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Siaj, Mohamed

    2016-04-18

    Graphene oxide is regarded as a major precursor for graphene-based materials. The development of graphene oxide based derivatives with new functionalities requires a thorough understanding of its chemical reactivity, especially for canonical synthetic methods such as the Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Diels-Alder reaction has been successfully extended with graphene oxide as a source of diene by using maleic anhydride as a dienophile, thereby outlining the presence of the cis diene present in the graphene oxide framework. This reaction provides fundamental information for understanding the exact structure and chemical nature of graphene oxide. On the basis of high-resolution (13) C-SS NMR spectra, we show evidence for the formation of new sp(3) carbon centers covalently bonded to graphene oxide following hydrolysis of the reaction product. DFT calculations are also used to show that the presence of a cis dihydroxyl and C vacancy on the surface of graphene oxide are promoting the reaction with significant negative reaction enthalpies.

  2. Diels-Alder reactions of 4-halo masked o-benzoquinones. Experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Surasani, Seshi Reddy; Parumala, Santosh Kumar Reddy; Peddinti, Rama Krishna

    2014-08-14

    The studies on [4 + 2] cycloaddition of 4-halo derivatives of 6,6-dimethoxycyclohexa-2,4-dienones known as orthoquinone monoketals/masked o-benzoquinones are described. The 4-fluoro, 4-chloro- and 4-iodo-masked o-benzoquinones were stable enough for their isolation and characterization. These conjugated dienones cycloadded with several electron-deficient and electron-rich dienophiles in a highly regio- and stereo-selective manner to afford the corresponding halo bicyclo[2.2.2]octenone derivatives in high to excellent chemical yields. The halo masked o-benzoquinones did not undergo dimerization under the reaction conditions. To evaluate the observed selectivities of these Diels-Alder reactions, we have performed quantum mechanical calculations for the reactions between halo masked o-benzoquinones and methyl vinyl ketone and ethyl vinyl ether at the B3LYP/6-31G** theory level. The differences in HOMO and LUMO energy gaps suggest that these reactions can be classified as inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions. The calculated transition state energies and global electronic indexes supported the experimentally observed selectivities of the reaction in many cases.

  3. Liquid phase thermochemical energy conversion systems - An application of Diels-Alder chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, T. G.; Hegedus, L. S.; Vaughan, J. D.

    1982-12-01

    A method of thermochemical energy conversion, transport, and storage research involving moderate and low temperature liquid phase systems employing Diels-Alder cycloaddition chemistry is described. Proposed as a heat storage system for solar and industrial waste heat, the system involves the meeting, in a reactor, of energy-depleted and energy-rich fluids. The poor fluid gains energy and goes through a chemical, endothermic dissociative change. The use of Diels-Alder reactions provides completely reversible chemical reactions for this application. The heated fluid can be retransported for storage or implementation as a heat source. The return reaction, releasing the stored heat, can be done spontaneously or in the presence of a catalyst such as Lewis acids. Attention is recommended for the Wentworth-Chen temperature of 250-300 C to minimize the system thermal degradation. Research in the synthesis of diene and dienophile candidate chemicals, into sealed tube and reaction kinetic techniques, and into NMR techniques for identifying further reaction candidates are discussed.

  4. Stepwise Diels-Alder: more than just an oddity? A computational mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2012-08-03

    We have employed hybrid DFT and SCS-MP2 calculations at the SMD-PCM-6-311++G(2d,2p)//6-31+G(d) level to investigate the relationship between three possible channels for forming a Diels-Alder adduct from a highly nucleophilic diene and moderately to highly electrophilic dienophiles. We discuss geometries optimized using the B3LYP and M06-2X functionals with the 6-31+(d) basis set. The transition states and intermediates are characterized on the basis of geometric and electronic properties, and we also address the possibility of predicting detectability of a zwitterionic intermediate based on its relative stability. Our results show that a conventional Diels-Alder transition state conformation yields intermediates in all four investigated cases, but that these are too short-lived to be detected experimentally for the less activated reactants. The stepwise trans pathway, beginning with a conjugate addition-like transition state, becomes increasingly competitive with more activated reactants and is indeed favored for the most electrophilic dienophiles. Addition of a trans diene leads to a dead-end as the trans intermediates have insurmountable rotation barriers that prohibit formation of the second bond, unless another, heterocyclic intermediate is formed. We also show that introduction of a hydrogen bond donating catalyst favors a stepwise pathway even for less activated dienophiles.

  5. Reconfigurable biodegradable shape-memory elastomers via Diels-Alder coupling.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Chi; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2013-07-08

    Synthetic biodegradable elastomers are a class of polymers that have demonstrated far-reaching utility as biomaterials for use in many medical applications. Biodegradable elastomers can be broadly classified into networks prepared by either step-growth or chain-growth polymerization. Each processing strategy affords distinct advantages in terms of capabilities and resulting properties of the network. This work describes the synthesis, processing, and characterization of cross-linked polyester networks based on Diels-Alder coupling reactions. Hyperbranched furan-modified polyester precursors based on poly(glycerol-co-sebacate) are coupled with bifunctional maleimide cross-linking agents. The chemical and thermomechanical properties of the elastomers are characterized at various stages of network formation. Experimental observations of gel formation are compared to theoretical predictions derived from Flory-Stockmayer relationships. This cross-linking strategy confers unique advantages in processing and properties including the ability to fabricate biodegradable reconfigurable covalent networks without additional catalysts or reaction byproducts. Reconfigurable biodegradable networks using Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions permit the fabrication of shape-memory polymers with complex permanent geometries. Biodegradable elastomers based on polyester networks with molecular reconfigurability achieve vastly expanded properties and processing capabilities for potential applications in medicine and beyond.

  6. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction. PMID:27731360

  7. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction.

  8. Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

  9. Investigation of the possibility of functionalization of C20 fullerene by benzene via Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadati, Seyyed Amir; Nami, Navabeh

    2016-10-01

    C20 fullerene, this novel species with all its pentagonal faces has displayed some unique operations in making fast pericyclic reactions. As an example, the high dienophile character of the C20 fullerene and the ability of this species in making an ultra-fast Diels-Alder reaction with 1,3-butadiene, has been recently reported. Moreover, new experimental reports claim that the C60 fullerene, one of the fullerene family, could make a Diels-Alder reaction with the central ring of anthracene and make the ring non-aromatic. These reports may encourage researchers to do more studies on the properties of this small carbon cage. To address this question, the present research has discussed all the reaction channels of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition of benzene molecule as a 1,3-diene with the C20 fullerene in order to answer this question: "Is C20fullerene able to make a Diels-Alder reaction with this molecule?".

  10. Sorocenols G and H, Anti-MRSA Oxygen Heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type Adducts from Sorocea muriculata Roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a root extract of Sorocea muriculata led to the isolation and identification of two new oxygen heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type adducts, sorocenols G (1) and H (2), along with lupeol-3-(3'R-hydroxytetradecanoate) and oxyresveratrol. The structures of 1 and 2 were eluci...

  11. Organocatalytic sequential hetero-Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reaction: constructions of fused heterocycles with scaffold diversity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Li; Li, Jun-Long; Dong, Lin; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2011-11-04

    A highly enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reaction sequence of N-sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes and aliphatic aldehydes tethered to an arene motif has been developed, affording the fused chiral piperidine frameworks with a versatile scaffold diversity. A similar strategy has been applied for the construction of complex chiral tetrahydroquinoxaline structures.

  12. A Counterion‐Directed Approach to the Diels–Alder Paradigm: Cascade Synthesis of Tricyclic Fused Cyclopropanes

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Emily; Campbell, Craig D.; Driver, Russell W.; Jolliffe, John D.; Lang, Rosemary; Sergeieva, Tetiana; Okovytyy, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An approach to the intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction has led to a cascade synthesis of complex carbocycles composed of three fused rings and up to five stereocenters with complete stereocontrol. Computational analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds by a Michael/Michael/cyclopropanation/epimerization cascade in which size and coordination of the counterion is key. PMID:27714921

  13. A 11-Steps Total Synthesis of Magellanine through a Gold(I)-Catalyzed Dehydro Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    McGee, Philippe; Bétournay, Geneviève; Barabé, Francis; Barriault, Louis

    2017-01-12

    We have developed an innovative strategy for the formation of angular carbocycles via a gold(I)-catalyzed dehydro Diels-Alder reaction. This transformation provides rapid access to a variety of complex angular cores in excellent diastereoselectivities and high yields. The usefulness of this Au(I) -catalyzed cycloaddition was further demonstrated by accomplishing a 11-steps total synthesis of (±)-magellanine.

  14. Biosynthesis inspired Diels-Alder route to pyridines: synthesis of the 2,3-dithiazolylpyridine core of the thiopeptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moody, Christopher J; Hughes, Rachael A; Thompson, Stewart P; Alcaraz, Lilian

    2002-08-21

    Reaction of serine derived 1-alkoxy-2-azadienes with dehydroalanine derived dienophiles results in Diels-Alder reaction and aromatisation to give 2,3,6-trisubstituted pyridines, thereby establishing the viability of the proposed biosynthetic route to the pyridine ring of the thiopeptide antibiotics originally proposed by Bycroft and Gowland.

  15. Silver-Catalyzed Formal Inverse Electron-Demand Diels-Alder Reaction of 1,2-Diazines and Siloxy Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Türkmen, Yunus E.; Montavon, Timothy J.; Kozmin, Sergey A.; Rawal, Viresh H.

    2012-01-01

    A highly effective silver-catalyzed formal inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-diazines and siloxy alkynes has been developed. The reactions provide ready access to a wide range of siloxy naphthalenes and anthracenes, which are formed in good to high yields, under mild reaction conditions, using low catalyst loadings. PMID:22607029

  16. Highly enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction of 1-azadienes with enecarbamates catalyzed by chiral phosphoric acids.

    PubMed

    He, Long; Laurent, Gregory; Retailleau, Pascal; Folléas, Benoît; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Masson, Géraldine

    2013-10-11

    On demand: A highly enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of 6-amino- trisubstituted tetrahydropyridine compounds has been developed through the inverse-electron-demand aza-Diels-Alder reaction of N-aryl α,β-unsaturated ketimines with enecarbamates (E)-1. Chiral phosphoric acid catalysts achieve simultaneous activation of both the 1-azadiene and dienophile partners.

  17. Strong counteranion effects on the catalytic activity of cationic silicon Lewis acids in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenji; Akiyama, Ryuto; Sawamura, Masaya

    2005-12-08

    [chemical reaction: see text]. A toluene-coordinated silyl borate, [Et3Si(toluene)]B(C6F5)4, demonstrated catalytic activities significantly higher than those of Me3SiOTf and Me3SiNTf2 in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

  18. Diversity-Oriented Approaches to Polycyclics and Bioinspired Molecules via the Diels-Alder Strategy: Green Chemistry, Synthetic Economy, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Chavan, Arjun S; Goyal, Deepti

    2015-05-11

    We describe diverse approaches to various dienes and their utilization in the Diels-Alder reaction to produce a variety of polycycles. The dienes covered here are prepared by simple alkylation reaction or via the Claisen rearrangement or by enyne metathesis of alkyne or enyne building blocks. Here, we have also included the Diels-Alder chemistry of dendralenes, a higher analog of cross-conjugated dienes. The present article is inclusive of o-xylylene derivatives that are generated in situ starting with benzosultine or benzosulfone derivatives. The Diels-Alder reaction of these dienes with various dienophiles gave diverse polycyclic systems and biologically important targets.

  19. Synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes and chemistry beyond Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xijian; Peng, Siyu; Li, Li; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Electron-rich dienes have revolutionized the synthesis of complex compounds since the discovery of the legendary Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. This highly efficient bond-forming process has served as a fundamental strategy to assemble many structurally formidable molecules. Amino silyloxy butadienes are arguably the most reactive diene species that are isolable and bottleable. Since the pioneering discovery by Rawal, 1-amino-3-silyloxybutadienes have been found to undergo cycloaddition reactions with unparalleled mildness, leading to significant advances in both asymmetric catalysis and total synthesis of biologically active natural products. In sharp contrast, this class of highly electron-rich conjugated olefins has not been studied in non-cycloaddition reactions. Here we report a simple synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes, a complementarily substituted Rawal's diene. This family of molecules is found to undergo a series of intriguing chemical transformations orthogonal to cycloaddition reactions. Structurally diverse polysubstituted ring architectures are established in one step from these dienes. PMID:25898310

  20. Click and Patterned Functionalization of Graphene by Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Meng; Zhou, Li-Li; Lang, Shuang-Yan; Lu, Hai-Yan; Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-06-22

    Chemical functionalization is a promising approach to controllably manipulate the characteristics of graphene. Here, we designed cis-dienes, featuring two dihydronaphthalene backbones, to decorate a graphene surface via Diels-Alder (DA) click reaction. The installation of a diene moiety into a nonplanar molecular structure to form cis-conformation enables a rapid (∼5 min) DA reaction between graphene and diene groups. Patterned graphene of sub-micrometer resolution can be obtained by easily soaking poly(methyl methacrylate)-masked graphene in solution of hydroxyl-substituted cis-diene at room temperature. The functionalization degree can be further controlled by carrying out the reaction at higher temperature. The present result gives important insight into the effect of molecular conformation on the graphene functionalization process, and provides an effective and facile method for graphene functionalization.

  1. (18)F-Based Pretargeted PET Imaging Based on Bioorthogonal Diels-Alder Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jan-Philip; Houghton, Jacob L; Kozlowski, Paul; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Reiner, Thomas; Pillarsetty, Naga Vara Kishore; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Zeglis, Brian M; Lewis, Jason S

    2016-02-17

    A first-of-its-kind (18)F pretargeted PET imaging approach based on the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction between tetrazine (Tz) and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) is presented. As proof-of-principle, a TCO-bearing immunoconjugate of the anti-CA19.9 antibody 5B1 and an Al[(18)F]NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand were harnessed for the visualization of CA19.9-expressing BxPC3 pancreatic cancer xenografts. Biodistribution and (18)F-PET imaging data clearly demonstrate that this methodology effectively delineates tumor mass with activity concentrations up to 6.4 %ID/g at 4 h after injection of the radioligand.

  2. Impact of Lewis acids on Diels-Alder reaction reactivity: a conceptual density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yue; Yin, Dulin; Rong, Chunying; Xu, Qiong; Yin, Donghong; Liu, Shubin

    2008-10-09

    Density functional theory (DFT) and conceptual/chemical DFT studies are carried out in this work for the normal electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between isoprene and acrolein to compare chemical reactivity and regioselectivity of the reactants in the absence and presence of Lewis acid (LA) catalysts. A cyclic coplanar structure of acrolein-LA complex has been observed and the natural bond orbital analysis has been employed to interpret the interaction between acrolein and LAs. Reactivity indices from frontier molecular orbital energies are proved to be adequate and efficient to evaluate the catalytic property of LAs. Linear relationships have been discovered among the bond order, bond length, catalytic activation, and chemical reactivity for the systems concerned. The validity and applicability of maximum hardness principle, minimum polarizability principle, and minimum electrophilicity principle are examined and discussed in the prediction of the major regioselective isomer and the preferred reaction pathway for the reactions in the present study.

  3. Bio‐orthogonal Fluorescent Labelling of Biopolymers through Inverse‐Electron‐Demand Diels–Alder Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Demeter, Orsolya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bio‐orthogonal labelling schemes based on inverse‐electron‐demand Diels–Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition have attracted much attention in chemical biology recently. The appealing features of this reaction, such as the fast reaction kinetics, fully bio‐orthogonal nature and high selectivity, have helped chemical biologists gain deeper understanding of biochemical processes at the molecular level. Listing the components and discussing the possibilities and limitations of these reagents, we provide a recent snapshot of the field of IEDDA‐based biomolecular manipulation with special focus on fluorescent modulation approaches through the use of bio‐orthogonalized building blocks. At the end, we discuss challenges that need to be addressed for further developments in order to overcome recent limitations and to enable researchers to answer biomolecular questions in more detail. PMID:28070925

  4. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; ...

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that themore » diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.« less

  5. Carbocations as Lewis acid catalysts in Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Bah, Juho; Franzén, Johan

    2014-01-20

    In general, Lewis acid catalysts are metal-based compounds that owe their reactivity to a low-lying empty orbital. However, one potential Lewis acid that has received negligible attention as a catalyst is the carbocation. We have demonstrated the potential of the carbocation as a highly powerful Lewis acid catalyst for organic reactions. The stable and easily available triphenylmethyl (trityl) cation was found to be a highly efficient catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction for a range of substrates. Catalyst loadings as low as 500 ppm, excellent yields, and good endo/exo selectivities were achieved. Furthermore, by changing the electronic properties of the substituents on the tritylium ion, the Lewis acidity of the catalyst could be tuned to control the outcome of the reaction. The ability of this carbocation as a Lewis acid catalyst was also further extended to the Michael reaction.

  6. Effect of Diels-Alder Reaction in C60-Tetracene Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Proudian, Andrew P; Jaskot, Matthew B; Lyiza, Christelle; Diercks, David R; Gorman, Brian P; Zimmerman, Jeramy D

    2016-10-12

    Developing organic photovoltaic materials systems requires a detailed understanding of the heterojunction interface, as it is the foundation for photovoltaic device performance. The bilayer fullerene/acene system is one of the most studied models for testing our understanding of this interface. We demonstrate that the fullerene and acene molecules chemically react at the heterojunction interface, creating a partial monolayer of a Diels-Alder cycloadduct species. Furthermore, we show that the reaction occurs during standard deposition conditions and that thermal annealing increases the concentration of the cycloadduct. The cycloaddition reaction reduces the number of sites available at the interface for charge transfer exciton recombination and decreases the charge transfer state reorganization energy, increasing the open circuit voltage. The submonolayer quantity of the cycloadduct renders it difficult to identify with conventional characterization techniques; we use atom probe tomography to overcome this limitation while also measuring the spatial distribution of each chemical species.

  7. Poly /Diels-Alder/ matrix resins. [high temperature resistant graphite reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A poly (Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high-temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication conditions. The results of the study were highly promising and program objectives were achieved. Low-void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepreg prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 400 F and 100 psi for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 600 F, the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 550 F. The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term (over 1000 hours) use at 500 F and shorter-term use at 550 F.

  8. Total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine via an organocatalytic Diels–Alder approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoming; Duan, Shengguo; Tao, Cheng; Zhai, Hongbin; Qiu, Fayang G.

    2015-01-01

    The structurally complex alkaloid gelsemine was previously thought to have no significant biological activities, but a recent study has shown that it has potent and specific antinociception in chronic pain. While this molecule has attracted significant interests from the synthetic community, an efficient synthetic strategy is still the goal of many synthetic chemists. Here we report the asymmetric total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine, including a highly diastereoselective and enantioselective organocatalytic Diels–Alder reaction, an efficient intramolecular trans-annular aldol condensation furnishing the prolidine ring and establishing the configuration of the C20 quaternary carbon stereochemical centre. The entire gelsemine skeleton was constructed through a late-stage intramolecular SN2 substitution. The enantiomeric excess of this total synthesis is over 99%, and the overall yield is around 5%. PMID:25995149

  9. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  10. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that the diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.

  11. Thiourea-catalyzed Diels–Alder reaction of a naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Carsten S

    2013-01-01

    Summary A variety of organocatalysts were screened for the catalysis of the naphthoquinone monoketal Diels–Alder reaction. In this study we found that Schreiner's thiourea catalyst 10 and Jacobson's thiourea catalyst 12 facilitate the cycloaddition of the sterically hindered naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile 3 with diene 4. The use of thiourea catalysis allowed for the first time the highly selective synthesis of the exo-product 2a in up to 63% yield. In this reaction a new quaternary center was built. The so formed cycloaddition product 2a represents the ABC tricycle of beticolin 0 (1) and is also a valuable model substrate for the total synthesis of related natural products. PMID:23946836

  12. The inverse electron demand Diels-Alder click reaction in radiochemistry.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Zeglis, Brian M

    2014-04-01

    The inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition between 1,2,4,5-tetrazines and strained alkene dienophiles is an emergent variety of catalyst-free 'click' chemistry that has the potential to have a transformational impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. The ligation is selective, rapid, high-yielding, clean, and bioorthogonal and, since its advent in 2008, has been employed in a wide variety of chemical settings. In radiochemistry, the reaction has proven particularly useful with (18)  F and has already been utilized to create a number of (18)  F-labeled agents, including the PARP1-targeting small molecule (18)  F-AZD2281, the αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide (18)  F-RGD, and the GLP-1-targeting peptide (18)  F-exendin. The inherent flexibility of the ligation has also been applied to the construction of radiometal-based probes, specifically the development of a modular strategy for the synthesis of radioimmunoconjugates that effectively eliminates variability in the construction of these agents. Further, the exceptional speed and biorthogonality of the reaction have made it especially promising in the realm of in vivo pretargeted imaging and therapy, and pretargeted imaging strategies based on the isotopes (111) In, (18)  F, and (64) Cu have already proven capable of producing images with high tumor contrast and low levels of uptake in background, nontarget organs. Ultimately, the characteristics of inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder click chemistry make it almost uniquely well-suited for radiochemistry, and although the field is young, this ligation has the potential to make a tremendous impact on the synthesis, development, and study of novel radiopharmaceuticals.

  13. Development and applications of Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Huan

    Single electron transfer (SET)-initiated formal [4+2] cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones have been achieved employing a combination of Lewis acid and electron donor as catalyst. Mechanistic studies using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and deuterium labeling experiments suggested a radical anion-mediated stepwise mechanism. The utility of this methodology was established in the first total synthesis of natural product nicolaioidesin C. A novel silica-supported silver nanoparticle (AgNP) catalyst has been developed as a highly active, reusable, and user-friendly catalyst for Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones, as showcased by the first total synthesis of natural product panduratin A. Our work demonstrates results from an interdisciplinary research project involving synthetic methodology development, nanometric material preparation, heterogeneous catalysis, natural product synthesis, and mechanistic studies using various instrumental techniques. Biomimetic, dehydrogenative cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones have been achieved using a mixture of platinum on activated carbon (Pt/C) and silica-supported silver nanoparticles (AgNP's) catalysts. This heterogeneous multicatalytic protocol converts a prenyl subunit in situ to diene which subsequently reacts with a 2'-hyroxychalcone dienophile to provide Diels-Alder cycloadducts in a single step. Using this methodology, a concise synthesis of the core structure of the natural product brosimone B has been accomplished. Enantioselective cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones have been established with excellent yields and enantioselectivity. Two optimized catalytic conditions have been developed: the first method utilizes a catalyst system comprised of chiral rare earth metal complex and electron donor; the second approach involves a chiral borate catalyst. The asymmetric total synthesis of natural product (+)-sorocenol B has been pursued.

  14. Tyrosine-lipid peroxide adducts from radical termination: para coupling and intramolecular Diels-Alder cyclization.

    PubMed

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N; Kim, Hye-young H; Hatch, Duane M; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael; Porter, Ned A

    2010-12-15

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogues of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry (MS). The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic (13)C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl (13)C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All of the NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignments of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision-induced dissociation data. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined, and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion to give a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found in either the primary or cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts, which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein cross-links via interprotein Michael adducts.

  15. Bisoxazoline-Lewis acid-catalyzed direct-electron demand oxo-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of N-oxy-pyridine aldehyde and ketone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Landa, Aitor; Richter, Bo; Johansen, Rasmus Lyng; Minkkilä, Anna; Jørgensen, Karl Anker

    2007-01-05

    A general catalytic oxo-hetero-Diels-Alder reaction for pro-chiral aldehyde and ketone N-oxy-pyridines is presented. The catalytic and asymmetric oxo-hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of electron-rich dienes with N-oxy-pyridine-2-carbaldehyde and ketone derivatives, catalyzed by chiral copper(II)-bisoxazoline complexes, gives optically active six-membered oxygen heterocycles in moderate to good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities.

  16. Synthesis of Isochromene-Type Scaffolds via Single-Flask Diels–Alder-[4 + 2]-Annulation Sequence of a Silyl-Substituted Diene with Menadione

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A sequential Diels–Alder reaction/silicon-directed [4 + 2]-annulation was developed to assemble hydroisochromene-type ring systems from menadione 2. In the first step, a Diels–Alder of the 1-silyl-substituted butadiene 1 with 2 furnished an intermediate cyclic allylsilane. Subsequently, TMSOTf promoted a [4 + 2]-annulation through trapping of an oxonium, generated by condensation between an aldehyde and the TBS protected alcohol resulted in the formation of a cis-fused hydroisochromene 13. PMID:24918110

  17. Synthesis of isochromene-type scaffolds via single-flask Diels-Alder-[4 + 2]-annulation sequence of a silyl-substituted diene with menadione.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoon; Panek, James S

    2014-06-20

    A sequential Diels-Alder reaction/silicon-directed [4 + 2]-annulation was developed to assemble hydroisochromene-type ring systems from menadione 2. In the first step, a Diels-Alder of the 1-silyl-substituted butadiene 1 with 2 furnished an intermediate cyclic allylsilane. Subsequently, TMSOTf promoted a [4 + 2]-annulation through trapping of an oxonium, generated by condensation between an aldehyde and the TBS protected alcohol resulted in the formation of a cis-fused hydroisochromene 13.

  18. Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Nitroso-Diels-Alder Reaction of 1,3-Diene-1-carbamates Catalyzed by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Pous, Jonathan; Courant, Thibaut; Bernadat, Guillaume; Iorga, Bogdan I; Blanchard, Florent; Masson, Géraldine

    2015-09-23

    Chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction of nitrosoarenes with carbamate-dienes afforded cis-3,6-disubstituted dihydro-1,2-oxazines in high yields with excellent regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivities. Interestingly, we observed that the catalyst is able not only to control the enantioselectivity but also to reverse the regioselectivity of the noncatalyzed nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction. The regiochemistry reversal and asynchronous concerted mechanism were confirmed by DFT calculations.

  19. Stream and floodplain restoration in a riparian ecosystem disturbed by placer mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karle, Kenneth F.; Densmore, Roseann V.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques for the hydrologic restoration of placer-mined streams and floodplains were developed in Denali National Park and Preserve Alaska, USA. The hydrologic study focused on a design of stream and floodplain geometry using hydraulic capacity and shear stress equations. Slope and sinuosity values were based on regional relationships. Design requirements include a channel capacity for a 1.5-year (bankfull) discharge and a floodplain capacity for a 1.5- to 100-year discharge. Concern for potential damage to the project from annual flooding before natural revegetation occurs led to development of alder (Alnus crispa) brush bars to dissipate floodwater energy and encourage sediment deposition. The brush bars, constructed of alder bundles tied together and anchored laterally adjacent to the channel, were installed on the floodplain in several configurations to test their effectiveness. A moderate flood near the end of the two-year construction phase of the project provided data on channel design, stability, floodplain erosion, and brush bar effectiveness. The brush bars provided substantial protection, but unconsolidated bank material and a lack of bed armour for a new channel segment led to some bank erosion, slope changes and an increase in sinuosity in several reaches of the study area.

  20. Stable Isotope Probing of Peat and Forest Floor Amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quideau, Sylvie; Béasse, Mark

    2013-04-01

    In Alberta, Canada, land reclamation efforts utilize peat as an organic amendment to help reclaim decommissioned oil sands mine sites to upland boreal forests. This study investigates the rhizosphere microbial communities of two pioneer species, aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), a species not known for strong associations with the soil microbial community, and alder (Alnus crispa Ait.), a species well known for mutualism with actinomycetes. Specifically, the objective was to determine how different organic amendments (peat versus forest floor) influenced the rhizosphere microbial communities and how this could be linked to plant growth. Seedlings were grown for 20 weeks in forest floor material, peat, and a combination of both. They were pulse labelled with 13CO2 (g) and subsequently harvested for plant growth measurements. While analysis of plant growth attributes did not indicate any effect of the organic amendment on aspen growth, alder reported significantly less growth in peat treatments. The rhizosphere soils were extracted for compound-specific analysis of δ13C in microbial phospholipid fatty acids. Stable isotope probing showed greater carbon flow between trees and their rhizosphere communities when seedlings were grown in forest floor material.

  1. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Dienes with Acrylic Esters: A Novel Approach to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilhan, Faysal; Tyson, Daniel S.; Smith, Deedee; Meador, Mary Ann; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloadditions have often been utilized in polymer synthesis as an alternative to condensation reactions. In our earlier efforts, we developed a new method for the preparation of linear aromatic polyimides, which employs o-quionodimethanes (o-QDMs), generated by a well-known photochemical reaction: the photoenolization of o-methylphenyl ketones. Photolysis of o-methylbenzophenone 1 produces hydroxy-o-quino- diemthane 2, which can be trapped with dienophiles, such as dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate, to efficiently yield the corresponding cycloadduct (Scheme 1). Here we extend this approach to a novel photocuring process for development of polymer films. We synthesized a series of molecules with multi o-mehtylphenyl ketone functionalities. We further investigated these molecules as photoreactive monomers to obtain polyester films through Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

  2. Expanding the scope of cyclopropene reporters for the detection of metabolically engineered glycoproteins by Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Späte, Anne-Katrin; Schart, Verena F; Häfner, Julia; Niederwieser, Andrea; Mayer, Thomas U

    2014-01-01

    Summary Monitoring glycoconjugates has been tremendously facilitated by the development of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. Recently, the inverse-electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction between methylcyclopropene tags and tetrazines has become a popular ligation reaction due to the small size and high reactivity of cyclopropene tags. Attaching the cyclopropene tag to mannosamine via a carbamate linkage has made the reaction even more efficient. Here, we expand the application of cyclopropene tags to N-acylgalactosamine and N-acylglucosamine derivatives enabling the visualization of mucin-type O-glycoproteins and O-GlcNAcylated proteins through Diels–Alder chemistry. Whereas the previously reported cyclopropene-labeled N-acylmannosamine derivative leads to significantly higher fluorescence staining of cell-surface glycoconjugates, the glucosamine derivative gave higher labeling efficiency with protein preparations containing also intracellular proteins. PMID:25298790

  3. Quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship modeling for Diels-Alder ligations utilizing quantum chemical structural descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show the correlation of quantum chemical structural descriptors with the activation barriers of the Diels-Alder ligations. A set of 72 non-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions were subjected to quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) under the framework of theoretical quantum chemical descriptors calculated solely from the structures of diene and dienophile reactants. Experimental activation barrier data were obtained from literature. Descriptors were computed using Hartree-Fock theory using 6-31G(d) basis set as implemented in Gaussian 09 software. Results Variable selection and model development were carried out by stepwise multiple linear regression methodology. Predictive performance of the quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) model was assessed by training and test set concept and by calculating leave-one-out cross-validated Q2 and predictive R2 values. The QSABR model can explain and predict 86.5% and 80% of the variances, respectively, in the activation energy barrier training data. Alternatively, a neural network model based on back propagation of errors was developed to assess the nonlinearity of the sought correlations between theoretical descriptors and experimental reaction barriers. Conclusions A reasonable predictability for the activation barrier of the test set reactions was obtained, which enabled an exploration and interpretation of the significant variables responsible for Diels-Alder interaction between dienes and dienophiles. Thus, studies in the direction of QSABR modelling that provide efficient and fast prediction of activation barriers of the Diels-Alder reactions turn out to be a meaningful alternative to transition state theory based computation. PMID:24171724

  4. Synthesis of polysubstituted 3-hydroxypyridines via the revisited hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of 5-alkoxyoxazoles with dienophiles.

    PubMed

    Sabot, Cyrille; Oueis, Emilia; Brune, Xavier; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-18

    A general and single-step access to polysubstituted 3-hydroxypyridine scaffolds via hetero-Diels-Alder (HDA) reactions between readily prepared 5-ethoxyoxazoles and dienophiles is reported. The HDA reaction, run in the presence of Nd(OTf)(3) at room temperature, was successfully applied to various 5-ethoxyoxazoles showing good functional group tolerance, and led to a straightforward process to obtain useful building-blocks.

  5. Controlled spacing of 60-carbon spheres with 1,4-cyclohexadienyl ladders by pairwise Diels-Alder cycloaddition to buckminsterfullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, L.A.; Graham, R.J.

    1995-05-19

    This article focuses on the synthesis of Buckminsterfullerenes using a pair of Diels-Alder reactions involving C{sub 60} and the multiply unsaturated bisdienes 1 - 3. The achievement of a dumbbell-like structure may not be desirable for solubility, but controlled spacing of the spheres using 1,4-cyclohexadienyl in this manner will lead to other structure-function insights. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Chiral GAP catalysts of phosphonylated imidazolidinones and their applications in asymmetric Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reactions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuo; Mo, Junming; Wilcox, Cody B; Jiang, Bo; Li, Guigen

    2017-02-21

    The design and synthesis of recyclable imidazolidinone catalysts using GAP chemistry/technique was described. Their applications in asymmetric Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reactions with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes resulted in excellent yields and higher enantioselectivities than previous processes. As recyclable small molecular catalysts, phosphonylated imidazolidinones can be recovered and reused for up to three runs without costing significant decrease in catalytic activity.

  7. Enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-dihydropyridines with aldehydes using β-amino alcohol organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kohari, Yoshihito; Okuyama, Yuko; Kwon, Eunsang; Furuyama, Taniyuki; Kobayashi, Nagao; Otuki, Teppei; Kumagai, Jun; Seki, Chigusa; Uwai, Koji; Dai, Gang; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Nakano, Hiroto

    2014-10-17

    The enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-dihydropyridines with aldehydes using an easily prepared optically active β-amino alcohol catalyst was found to provide optically active isoquinuclidines, an efficient synthetic intermediate of pharmaceutically important compounds such as oseltamivir phosphate, with a satisfactory chemical yield and enantioselectivity (up to 96%, up to 98% ee). In addition, the obtained highly optically pure isoquinuclidine was easily converted to an optically active piperidine having four successive carbon centers.

  8. A new approach to the synthesis of monomers and polymers incorporating furan/maleimide Diels-Alder adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banella, Maria Barbara; Gioia, Claudio; Vannini, Micaela; Colonna, Martino; Celli, Annamaria; Gandini, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between furan and maleimide moieties is a well-known and widely used strategy to build bio-based macromolecular structures with peculiar properties. The furan-maleimide adducts are thermally reversible because they can be broken above about 120°C and recombined at lower temperatures. At the moment only the monomers exhibiting the furan or the maleimide moieties on their extremity are used in order to get linear or cross-linked polymeric structures. The innovative idea described here consists in using a monomer bearing two carboxylic acidic groups on its extremities and a furan-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct within its structure. This monomer can give rise to classical polycondensation reactions leading to polymers. These polymers (which are polyesters in the present case) can be broken at high temperatures in correspondence of the furane-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct leading to segments exhibiting furan or maleimide moieties at their extremities, which at lower temperature recombine leading to random or block copolymers.

  9. Design Paradigm Utilizing Reversible Diels-Alder Reactions to Enhance the Mechanical Properties of 3D Printed Materials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joshua R; Appuhamillage, Gayan A; Thompson, Christina M; Voit, Walter; Smaldone, Ronald A

    2016-07-06

    A design paradigm is demonstrated that enables new functional 3D printed materials made by fused filament fabrication (FFF) utilizing a thermally reversible dynamic covalent Diels-Alder reaction to dramatically improve both strength and toughness via self-healing mechanisms. To achieve this, we used as a mending agent a partially cross-linked terpolymer consisting of furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) adducts that exhibit reversibility at temperatures typically used for FFF printing. When this mending agent is blended with commercially available polylactic acid (PLA) and printed, the resulting materials demonstrate an increase in the interfilament adhesion strength along the z-axis of up to 130%, with ultimate tensile strength increasing from 10 MPa in neat PLA to 24 MPa in fmDA-enhanced PLA. Toughness in the z-axis aligned prints increases by up to 460% from 0.05 MJ/m(3) for unmodified PLA to 0.28 MJ/m(3) for the remendable PLA. Importantly, it is demonstrated that a thermally reversible cross-linking paradigm based on the furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) reaction can be more broadly applied to engineer property enhancements and remending abilities to a host of other 3D printable materials with superior mechanical properties.

  10. Silylium ion-catalyzed challenging Diels-Alder reactions: the danger of hidden proton catalysis with strong Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Müther, Kristine; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Grimme, Stefan; Oestreich, Martin

    2012-03-07

    The pronounced Lewis acidity of tricoordinate silicon cations brings about unusual reactivity in Lewis acid catalysis. The downside of catalysis with strong Lewis acids is, though, that these do have the potential to mediate the formation of protons by various mechanisms, and the thus released Brønsted acid might even outcompete the Lewis acid as the true catalyst. That is an often ignored point. One way of eliminating a hidden proton-catalyzed pathway is to add a proton scavenger. The low-temperature Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by our ferrocene-stabilized silicon cation are such a case where the possibility of proton catalysis must be meticulously examined. Addition of the common hindered base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine resulted, however, in slow decomposition along with formation of the corresponding pyridinium ion. Quantitative deprotonation of the silicon cation was observed with more basic (Mes)(3)P to yield the phosphonium ion. A deuterium-labeling experiment verified that the proton is abstracted from the ferrocene backbone. A reasonable mechanism of the proton formation is proposed on the basis of quantum-chemical calculations. This is, admittedly, a particular case but suggests that the use of proton scavengers must be carefully scrutinized, as proton formation might be provoked rather than prevented. Proton-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions are not well-documented in the literature, and a representative survey employing TfOH is included here. The outcome of these catalyses is compared with our silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions, thereby clearly corroborating that hidden Brønsted acid catalysis is not operating with our Lewis acid. Several simple-looking but challenging Diels-Alder reactions with exceptionally rare dienophile/enophile combinations are reported. Another indication is obtained from the chemoselectivity of the catalyses. The silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction is general with regard to the oxidation level of the

  11. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; ...

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediatemore » ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.« less

  12. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediate ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

  13. On the method-dependence of transition state asynchronicity in Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2013-04-14

    This work discusses the dependence of transition state geometries on the choice of quantum chemical optimization method for the extensively studied Diels-Alder reaction. Rather significant differences are observed between post-Hartree-Fock methods and (hybrid) density functional theory, where the latter predicts larger asynchronicities. The results show that the low MP2 asynchronicity observed is likely artificial. Still, there are significant discrepancies between hybrid and pure density functionals. The role of the exchange functional seems to be most prominent in less activated reacting systems, while the importance of the correlation functional seems to increase as they become more activated by, e.g., an electron-donating group on the diene. To correct the dubious MP2 geometries, we employed the SCS-MP2 protocol for transition state optimization, which leads to significantly better results with respect to CCSD/6-31+G(d) level calculations. We conclude that in order for hybrid functionals to give descriptions consistent with the sample post-Hartree-Fock methods, a balanced combination of both Hartree-Fock exchange (with a couple of exceptions) and a well-behaved correlation functional is required. Given that the benchmark CCSD/6-31+G(d) geometries are sufficient representations, the best geometries were obtained using ωB97X(D), B2PLYP(D) and M06-2X.

  14. Vanadium redox flow battery efficiency and durability studies of sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene)s

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Kim, Soowhan; Stains, Ronald; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    Sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP) was examined for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) use. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied from 1.4, 1.6 and 2.0 meq/g in order to tune the proton conductivity and vanadium permeability. Coulombic efficiencies between 92 to 99% were observed, depending on IEC (lower IEC, higher coulombic efficiencies). In all cases the SDAPP displayed comparable energy efficiencies (88 - 90%) to Nafion 117 (88%) at 50mA/cm2. Membrane durability also was dependent on IEC; SDAPP with the highest IEC lasted slightly over 50 cycles while SDAPP with the lowest IEC lasted over 400 cycles and testing was discontinued only due to time constraints. Accelerated vanadium lifetime studies were initialed with SDAPP, by soaking films in a 0.1 M V5+ and 5.0 M total SO4-2 solution. The rate of degradation was also proportional with IEC; the 2 meq/g sample dissolved within 376 hours, the 1.6 meq/g sample dissolved after 860 hours, while the 1.4 meq/g sample broke apart after 1527 hours.

  15. A Single Molecular Diels-Alder Crosslinker for Achieving Recyclable Cross-Linked Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Wang, Fenfen; Peng, Yongjin; Chen, Tiehong; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Pingchuan

    2015-09-01

    A triol-functional crosslinker combining the thermoreversible properties of Diels-Alder (DA) adducts in one molecule is designed, synthesized, and used as an ideal substitute of a traditional crosslinker to prepare thermal recyclable cross-linked polyurethanes with excellent mechanical properties and recyclability in a very simple and efficient way. The recycle property of these materials achieved by the DA/retro-DA reaction at a suitable temperature is verified by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ variable temperature solid-state NMR experiments during the cyclic heating and cooling processes. The thermal recyclability and remending ability of the bulk polyurethanes is demonstrated by three polymer processing methods, including hot-press molding, injection molding, and solution casting. It is notable that all the recycled cross-linked polymers display nearly invariable elongation/stress at break compared to the as-synthesized samples. Further end-group functionalization of this single molecular DA crosslinker provides the potential in preparing a wide range of recyclable cross-linked polymers.

  16. Combinatorial Synthesis of Linearly Condensed Polycyclic Compounds, Including Anthracyclinones, Through Tandem Diels-Alder Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Pierre

    Double exocyclic 1,3-dienes such as 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane and its 1-substituted derivatives undergo two successive Diels-Alder additions with large reactivity difference between the addition of the first equivalent (k 1) and the second equivalent (k 2) of dienophile. This allows one to prepare, through parallel synthesis, a large number of linearly condensed polycyclic systems containing three annulated six-membered rings, including naphthacenyl systems and anthracyclinones. The large k 1/k 2 rate constant ratio is a consequence of the Dimroth principle, the first cycloaddition being significantly more exothermic then the second one. Control of regio- and stereoselectivity of the two successive cycloadditions is possible by 1-substitution of the 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane, for instance by a 1-(dimethoxymethyl) group, or by stereoselective disubstitution of the double diene by arenesulfenyl substituents. Enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones and analogues are obtained using enantiomerically pure dienophiles such as 3-oxo-but-2-en-2-yl esters. The chemistry so-developed has allowed the preparation of enantiomerically pure 6-((aminoalkoxy)oxy)methyl-6,7-dideoxyidarubicinones that are DNA intercalators and inhibitors of topoisomerase II-induced DNA strained religation.

  17. Liquid-Crystalline Ionic Liquids as Ordered Reaction Media for the Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Duncan W; Gao, Yanan; Canongia Lopes, José Nuno; Shimizu, Karina; Slattery, John M

    2016-11-02

    Liquid-crystalline ionic liquids (LCILs) are ordered materials that have untapped potential to be used as reaction media for synthetic chemistry. This paper investigates the potential for the ordered structures of LCILs to influence the stereochemical outcome of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and methyl acrylate. The ratio of endo- to exo-product from this reaction was monitored for a range of ionic liquids (ILs) and LCILs. Comparison of the endo:exo ratios in these reactions as a function of cation, anion and liquid crystallinity of the reaction media, allowed for the effects of liquid crystallinity to be distinguished from anion effects or cation alkyl chain length effects. These data strongly suggest that the proportion of exo-product increases as the reaction media is changed from an isotropic IL to a LCIL. A detailed molecular dynamics (MD) study suggests that this effect is related to different hydrogen bonding interactions between the reaction media and the exo- and endo-transition states in solvents with layered, smectic ordering compared to those that are isotropic.

  18. Returning to the Alder Hey report and its reporting: addressing confusions and improving inquiries.

    PubMed

    Dewar, S; Boddington, P

    2004-10-01

    The Royal Liverpool Children's Inquiry investigated the circumstances leading to the removal, retention, and disposal of human tissue, including children's organs, at the Royal Liverpool Children's NHS Trust (the Alder Hey Hospital). It recommended changes to procedures for obtaining consent for postmortems and retaining organs and tissues for research or education. However, the report contains five areas of confusion. Firstly, it allowed the cultural and historical traditions of horror over the use and misuse of body parts to suffuse the logical analysis of past wrongs and future rights. Secondly, it makes an inappropriate conflation between seeking redress for past wrongs and shaping future policy. Thirdly, the report takes a muddled stance over the value of bodily integrity at burial. Fourthly, the report is inconsistent over the justification for future organ and tissue collections. Fifthly, the notion of "respect" is used with troublesome looseness. The extent to which subsequent policy work has furthered the search for greater ethical clarity over these difficult issues is discussed, together with reflection on three particular improvements that could be made to the process of such an inquiry.

  19. Quantitative rate determination by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced NMR of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Lee, Youngbok; Hilty, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Emerging techniques for hyperpolarization of nuclear spins, foremost dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), lend unprecedented sensitivity to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sufficient signal can be obtained from a single scan, and reactions even far from equilibrium can be studied in real-time. When following the progress of a reaction by nuclear magnetic resonance, however, spin relaxation occurs concomitantly with the reaction to alter resonance line intensities. Here, we present a model for accounting for spin-relaxation in such reactions studied by hyperpolarized NMR. The model takes into account auto- and cross-relaxation in dipole-dipole coupled spin systems and is therefore applicable to NMR of hyperpolarized protons, the most abundant NMR-active nuclei. Applied to the Diels-Alder reaction of 1,4-dipheneylbutadiene (DPBD) with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione (PTD), reaction rates could be obtained accurately and reproducibly. Additional parameters available from the same experiment include relaxation rates of the reaction product, which may yield further information about the molecular properties of the product. The method presented is also compatible with an experiment where a single spin in the reactant is labeled in its spin-state by a selective radio frequency pulse for subsequent tracking through the reaction, allowing the unambiguous identification of its position in the product molecule. In this case, the chemical shift specificity of high-resolution NMR can allow for the simultaneous determination of reaction rates and mechanistic information in one experiment.

  20. Diastereoselective Diels–Alder Reactions of N-Sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes With Optically Active Enol Ethers: An Asymmetric Variant of the 1-Azadiene Diels–Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ryan C.; Pfeiffer, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    The first detailed study of a room temperature asymmetric Diels–Alder reaction of N-sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes enlisting a series of nineteen enol ethers bearing chiral auxilaries is reported with many providing highly diastereoselective (endo and facial diastereoselection) reactions largely the result of an exquisitely organized [4 + 2] cycloaddition transition state. Three new, readily accessible, and previously unexplored auxilaries (18a, 19a and 37a) rationally emerged from the studies and provide remarkable selectivities (for 19a and 37a: 49:1 endo:exo and 48:1 facial selectivity) that promise to be useful in systems beyond those detailed. PMID:16492042

  1. Synthesis of novel dendritic 2,2'-bipyridine ligands and their application to Lewis acid-catalyzed diels-alder and three-component condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takahito; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kujime, Masato

    2007-10-12

    A series of dendritic ligands with a 2,2'-bipyridine core was synthesized through the coupling of 4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine with poly(aryl ether) dendrons. The corresponding dendritic Cu(OTf)2 catalysts were used for Diels-Alder and three-component condensation reactions. The dendritic Cu(OTf)2-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction proceeded smoothly, and these dendritic catalysts could be recycled without deactivation by reprecipitation. Three-component condensation reactions such as Mannich-type reactions also proceeded not only in dichloromethane but also in water. Furthermore, a positive dendritic effect on chemical yields was observed in both Diels-Alder reactions and aqueous-media three-component condensation reactions.

  2. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, and the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males.

  3. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru?? during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, nd the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males. ?? The Neotropical Ornithological Society.

  4. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  5. Computational design of a lipase for catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Hermansson, Anders; Liebeschuetz, John; Brinck, Tore

    2011-04-01

    Combined molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) studies have been employed to study catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction by a modified lipase. Six variants of the versatile enzyme Candida Antarctica lipase B (CALB) have been rationally engineered in silico based on the specific characteristics of the pericyclic addition. A kinetic analysis reveals that hydrogen bond stabilization of the transition state and substrate binding are key components of the catalytic process. In the case of substrate binding, which has the greater potential for optimization, both binding strength and positioning of the substrates are important for catalytic efficiency. The binding strength is determined by hydrophobic interactions and can be tuned by careful selection of solvent and substrates. The MD simulations show that substrate positioning is sensitive to cavity shape and size, and can be controlled by a few rational mutations. The well-documented S105A mutation is essential to enable sufficient space in the vicinity of the oxyanion hole. Moreover, bulky residues on the edge of the active site hinders the formation of a sandwich-like nearattack conformer (NAC), and the I189A mutation is needed to obtain enough space above the face of the α,β-double bond on the dienophile. The double mutant S105A/I189A performs quite well for two of three dienophiles. Based on binding constants and NAC energies obtained from MD simulations combined with activation energies from DFT computations, relative catalytic rates (v(cat)/v(uncat)) of up to 103 are predicted.

  6. Harnessing the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition for pretargeted PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2015-02-03

    Due to their exquisite affinity and specificity, antibodies have become extremely promising vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes to cancer cells for PET imaging. However, the necessity of labeling antibodies with radionuclides with long physical half-lives often results in high background radiation dose rates to non-target tissues. In order to circumvent this issue, we have employed a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The methodology decouples the antibody from the radioactivity and thus exploits the positive characteristics of antibodies, while eschewing their pharmacokinetic drawbacks. The system is composed of four steps: (1) the injection of a mAb-trans-cyclooctene (TCO) conjugate; (2) a localization time period during which the antibody accumulates in the tumor and clears from the blood; (3) the injection of the radiolabeled tetrazine; and (4) the in vivo click ligation of the components followed by the clearance of excess radioligand. In the example presented in the work at hand, a (64)Cu-NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand and a trans-cyclooctene-conjugated humanized antibody (huA33) were successfully used to delineate SW1222 colorectal cancer tumors with high tumor-to-background contrast. Further, the pretargeting methodology produces high quality images at only a fraction of the radiation dose to non-target tissue created by radioimmunoconjugates directly labeled with (64)Cu or (89)Zr. Ultimately, the modularity of this protocol is one of its greatest assets, as the trans-cyclooctene moiety can be appended to any non-internalizing antibody, and the tetrazine can be attached to a wide variety of radioisotopes.

  7. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed.

  8. Nitroso Diels-Alder (NDA) Reaction as an Efficient Tool for the Functionalization of Diene-Containing Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Carosso, Serena; Miller, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the use of nitroso Diels-Alder reactions for the functionalization of complex diene-containing natural products in order to generate libraries of compounds with potential biological activity. The application of this methodology to the structural modification of a series of natural products (thebaine, steroidal dienes, rapamycin, leucomycin, colchicine, isocolchicine and piperine) is discussed using relevant examples from the literature from 1973 onwards. The biological activity of the resulting compounds is also discussed. Additional comments are provided that evaluate the methodology as a useful tool in organic, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry. PMID:25119424

  9. A Minimal, Unstrained S‐Allyl Handle for Pre‐Targeting Diels–Alder Bioorthogonal Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Bruno L.; Guo, Zijian; Boutureira, Omar; Guerreiro, Ana; Jiménez‐Osés, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The unstrained S‐allyl cysteine amino acid was site‐specifically installed on apoptosis protein biomarkers and was further used as a chemical handle and ligation partner for 1,2,4,5‐tetrazines by means of an inverse‐electron‐demand Diels–Alder reaction. We demonstrate the utility of this minimal handle for the efficient labeling of apoptotic cells using a fluorogenic tetrazine dye in a pre‐targeting approach. The small size, easy chemical installation, and selective reactivity of the S‐allyl handle towards tetrazines should be readily extendable to other proteins and biomolecules, which could facilitate their labeling within live cells. PMID:27763724

  10. Diels-Alder Reactions of α-Amido Acrylates with N-Cbz-1,2-dihydropyridine and Cyclopentadiene.

    PubMed

    Abas, Hossay; Frampton, Christopher S; Spivey, Alan C

    2016-10-21

    Thermal Diels-Alder reactions of α-amido acrylates with N-Cbz-1,2-dihydropyridine and cyclopentadiene have been explored to investigate the factors influencing the endo/exo selectivity. For the dihydropyridine, steric factors allowed the diastereoselectivity to be modulated to favor either endo- or exo-ester adducts. For cyclopentadiene, the endo-ester adducts were favored regardless of steric perturbation, although catalysis by bulky Lewis acids increased the proportion of exo-ester adducts in some cases. These Lewis acids were incompatible with the dihydropyridine diene as they induced its decomposition.

  11. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Phuong T. M.; McAtee, Jesse R.; Watson, Donald A.; Lobo, Raul F.

    2012-12-12

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structures of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst have been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed, demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels–Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions.

  12. Bidentate Lewis Acid Catalyzed Domino Diels-Alder Reaction of Phthalazine for the Synthesis of Bridged Oligocyclic Tetrahydronaphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Schweighauser, Luca; Bodoky, Ina; Kessler, Simon N; Häussinger, Daniel; Donsbach, Carsten; Wegner, Hermann A

    2016-03-18

    A domino process consisting of an inverse and a normal electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction is presented for the formation of bridged tri- and tetracyclic 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalenes catalyzed by a bidentate Lewis acid. The products were synthesized in a one-pot reaction from commercially available starting materials and contain up to six stereogenic centers. The tetrahydronaphthalenes were isolated as single diastereomers and are derivatives of phenylethylamine, which is well-known as a scaffold of amphetamine or dopamine.

  13. Tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR). An easy entry to linear bicyclic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Javier; Sánchez-Roselló, María; Sanz, Álvaro; Rabasa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Summary A new tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR) has been carried out. It involves conjugated ketones, esters or amides bearing a remote olefin and aromatic alkynes as the starting materials. The overall process enables the preparation of a small family of linear bicyclic scaffolds in a very simple manner with moderate to good levels of diastereoselectivity. This methodology constitutes one of the few examples that employ olefins differently than ethylene in tandem CEYM–IMDAR protocols. PMID:26425205

  14. Hybrid metal/organo relay catalysis enables enynes to be latent dienes for asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Dian-Feng; Wang, Ya-Yi; Guo, Rui; Wang, Pu-Sheng; Wang, Chao; Gong, Liu-Zhu

    2012-04-18

    The hybrid Au(I)/Brønsted acid binary catalyst system enables enynes to serve as latent 1,3-silyloxydienes capable of participating in the first cascade hydrosiloxylation of an enynyl silanol/asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction. A variety of polycyclic compounds bearing multistereogenic centers were obtained in high yields and excellent enantioselectivities from the relay catalytic cascade reaction between (2-(but-3-en-1-ynyl)phenyl) silanols and quinones catalyzed by the combined achiral gold complex and chiral N-triflyl phosphoramide.

  15. One-pot cross-enyne metathesis (CEYM)-Diels-Alder reaction of gem-difluoropropargylic alkynes.

    PubMed

    Fustero, Santos; Bello, Paula; Miró, Javier; Sánchez-Roselló, María; Haufe, Günter; Del Pozo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Propargylic difluorides 1 were used as starting substrates in a combination of cross-enyne metathesis and Diels-Alder reactions. Thus, the reaction of 1 with ethylene in the presence of 2(nd) generation Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst generates a diene moiety which in situ reacts with a wide variety of dienophiles giving rise to a small family of new fluorinated carbo- and heterocyclic derivatives in moderate to good yields. This is a complementary protocol to the one previously described by our research group, which involved the use of 1,7-octadiene as an internal source of ethylene.

  16. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Analysis of Diels-Alder Reactions of Alkene Gases to Functional Ionic Liquids on Chips.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Hsuan; Chiang, Shu-Jen; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2016-11-15

    We demonstrated here a successful development of the use of functional ionic liquids FIL 1 and FIL 3 for chemoselective detection of alkene gases measured by quartz crystal microbalance. This detection of gaseous alkenes was achieved by the Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloadditions with FIL 1 and FIL 3 thin-coated on quartz chips. Our functional ionic liquids could be prepared by straightforward synthetic chemistry in short steps and are superior in alkene gas detection. The QCM platform developed in this work is chemoselective with fast gas diffusion into ionic liquids, readily applicable to low molecular weight alkene gases and insensitive to moisture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report based upon the Diels-Alder reactions demonstrating sensitive alkene gas detection in ionic liquids on a QCM. This work is a proof-of-concept inspection of the promising use of a QCM-based sensor method for reaction-directed detection of gas samples, which is part of an ongoing program aimed at studying diseases.

  17. Synergistic activation of the Diels-Alder reaction by an organic catalyst and substituents: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2009-04-07

    Density functional theory (DFT), using the hybrid functionals B3LYP and B2PLYP, has been employed to investigate the activation of the acrolein-butadiene Diels-Alder reaction, mediated by a thiourea catalyst. Effects due to electron-donating groups (EDGs) on the diene, as well as electron-withdrawing groups (EWGs) on the dienophile, have also been studied. Organic catalysts such as thioureas are known to lower the activation energy through hydrogen-bonding to the carbonyl oxygen, in a way that mimics the oxyanion holes of hydrolytic enzymes. EDGs and EWGs were found to further activate the reaction, and the catalyst showed a synergistic behavior towards the EDGs. Polar solvents were found to reduce the overall activation energy, but also the relative catalytic effect of the thiourea, in accordance with experimental studies. The substituent-mediated reactions displayed more asynchronous transition structures with lower activation energy, which led us to investigate the possibility of an alternative two-step, Michael-type route, similar to what has been found in macrophomate synthase. Although the concerted Diels-Alder route was found to be favored over the Michael route, the calculated activation energy difference is less than 1 kcal mol(-1), which suggests that the two mechanisms compete, and could be responsible for the particular stereochemical outcome of an experiment.

  18. Magnetic hyaluronic acid nanospheres via aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry to deliver dexamethasone for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yang; Fan, Ming; Chen, Huinan; Miao, Yuting; Xing, Lian; Jiang, Bohong; Cheng, Qifan; Liu, Dongwei; Bao, Weikang; Qian, Bin; Wang, Jionglu; Xing, Xiaodong; Tan, Huaping; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-11-15

    Biopolymer-based nanospheres have great potential in the field of drug delivery and tissue regenerative medicine. In this work, we present a flexible way to conjugate a magnetic hyaluronic acid (HA) nanosphere system that are capable of vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor, e.g. dexamethasone, for adipose tissue engineering. Conjugation of nanospheres was established by aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry between furan and maleimide of HA derivatives. Simultaneously, a furan functionalized dexamethasone peptide, GQPGK, was synthesized and covalently immobilized into the nanospheres. The magnetic HA nanospheres were fabricated by encapsulating super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which exhibited quick magnetic sensitivity. The aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry made nanospheres high binding efficiency of dexamethasone, and the vectoring delivery of dexamethasone could be easily controlled by a external magnetic field. The potential application of the magnetic HA nanospheres on vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor was confirmed by co-culture of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). In vitro cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that incorporation of dexamethasone into magnetic HA nanospheres showed high efficiency to promote ASCs viabilities, in particular under a magnetic field, which suggested a promising future for adipose regeneration applications.

  19. Employing Arynes in Diels-Alder Reactions and Transition-Metal-Free Multicomponent Coupling and Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhojgude, Sachin Suresh; Bhunia, Anup; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-09-20

    Arynes are highly reactive intermediates having several applications in organic synthesis for the construction of various ortho-disubstituted arenes. Traditionally, arynes are generated in solution from haloarenes under strongly basic conditions. However, the scopes of many of the aryne reactions are limited because of the harsh conditions used for their generation. The renaissance of interest in aryne chemistry is mainly due to the mild conditions for their generation by the fluoride-induced 1,2-elimination of 2-(trimethylsilyl)aryl triflates. This Account is focused on the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes and their transition-metal-free application in multicomponent couplings as well as arylation reactions. The Diels-Alder reaction of arynes is a powerful tool for constructing benzo-fused carbocycles and heterocycles. In 2012, we developed an efficient, broad-scope, and scalable Diels-Alder reaction of pentafulvenes with arynes affording benzonorbornadiene derivatives. Subsequently, we accomplished the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes with dienes such as 1,2-benzoquinones and tropones. Moreover, we uncovered a transition-metal-free protocol for the synthesis of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes by the reaction of arynes with styrenes that proceeds via a Diels-Alder/ene-reaction cascade. In addition, we demonstrated the reaction of arynes with indene/benzofurans, which proceeds via a tandem [4 + 2]/[2 + 2] sequence. Multicomponent coupling (MCC) involving arynes mainly comprises the initial addition of a nucleophile to the aryne followed by interception of the aryl anion intermediate with an electrophile (provided the nucleophilic and electrophilic moieties do not belong to the same molecule). We have disclosed aryne MCCs initiated by N-heterocycles such as (iso)quinoline, pyridine, and aziridines. When (iso)quinoline is used as the nucleophilic trigger and N-substituted isatin as the third component, the reaction affords spirooxazino(iso)quinolines via 1,4-dipolar

  20. Diels-Alder Cycloadditions: A MORE Experiment in the Organic Laboratory Including a Diene Identification Exercise Involving NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Roosevelt; Severin, Ashika; Balfour, Miguel; Nettles, Columbus

    2005-01-01

    Two Diels-Alder reactions are described that are suitable for a MORE (microwave-induced organic reaction enhanced) experiment in the organic chemistry laboratory course. A second experiment in which the splitting patterns of the vinyl protons in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two MORE adducts are used in conjunction with molecular…

  1. Illustrating the Utility of X-Ray Crystallography for Structure Elucidation through a Tandem Aldol Condensation/Diels-Alder Reaction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang T.; Kubo, Tomohiro; Young, Victor G., Jr.; Kautzky, Jacob A.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Two introductory organic chemistry laboratory experiments are described based on the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenylcyclopentadienone, which is synthesized prior to or in a one-pot reaction, with styrene. Students are presented with three possible products, the "endo" and "exo" diastereomers and the decarbonylated…

  2. Fast Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions Using 4-Phenyl-1,2,4-Triazoline-3,5-Dione (PTAD) as the Dienophile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celius, Tevye C.

    2010-01-01

    A hetero-Diels-Alder reaction that proceeds rapidly and only requires a simple filtration to purify the product is presented. The dienophile, 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD), is prepared by the heterogeneous oxidation of 4-phenylurazole by the bromenium ion, Br[superscript +], generated in situ by the oxidation of potassium bromide by…

  3. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  4. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  5. The Synthesis of "N"-Benzyl-2-Azanorbornene via Aqueous Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction: An Undergraduate Project in Organic Synthesis and Structural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvage, Xavier; Delaude, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of "N"-benzyl-2-azanorbornene via aqueous hetero Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and benzyliminium chloride formed in situ from benzylamine hydrochloride and formaldehyde is described. Characterization of the product was achieved by IR and NMR spectroscopies. The spectral data acquired are thoroughly discussed. Numerous…

  6. Transformation of D-(-)-ribose into a natural product-like scaffold via a Lewis acid catalyzed intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Messer, Roland; Fuhrer, Cyril A; Häner, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Starting from D-(-)-ribose, a tricyclic natural product-like scaffold suitable for combinatorial derivatization was synthesized via an intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reaction. Lithium perchlorate was found to enhance the reaction rate and, at the same time, had a pronounced influence on the chemoselectivity of the reaction. The stereochemical course of the reaction, however, was not influenced by the Lewis acid.

  7. Diels-Alder Synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Wustholz, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    A study investigated the Diels-Alder synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo [2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide. The amount of time taken by a reaction between the 1,3-cyclohexadiene and N-phenylmaleimide at room temperature and also whether the desired cycloadduct would precipitate directly from the reaction mixture was examined.

  8. Combination of inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction with highly efficient oxime ligation expands the toolbox of site-selective peptide conjugations.

    PubMed

    Hörner, S; Uth, C; Avrutina, O; Frauendorf, H; Wiessler, M; Kolmar, H

    2015-07-14

    A modular approach combining inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder coupling (DARinv) and oxime ligation expands the toolbox of bioorthogonal peptide chemistry. Applicability of versatile site-specific bifunctional building blocks is demonstrated by generation of defined conjugates comprising linear, cystine-bridged and multi-disulfide functional peptides as well as their conjugation with hybrid silsesquioxane nanoparticles.

  9. First kinetic evidence for the CH/π and π/π solute-solvent interaction of C60 in the Diels-Alder reaction with cyclohexadiene.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takumi; Mikie, Tsubasa; Ikuma, Naohiko; Yakuma, Hajime

    2012-03-07

    The first CH/π solute-solvent interaction of C(60) was evidenced by the kinetic solvent effects in the Diels-Alder reaction with 1,3-cyclohexadiene based on the evaluation of linear free energy relationship of log k(2) with empirical solvent polarity and basicity parameters, E(T)(30) and D(π), respectively.

  10. A π-electronic covalent organic framework catalyst: π-walls as catalytic beds for Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-25

    We report a strategy for developing π-electronic covalent organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts that enable the use of columnar π-walls as catalytic beds to facilitate organic transformations in their one-dimensional open channels. The π-frameworks exhibit outstanding catalytic activity, promote Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions and are robust for cycle use.

  11. Formal Alder-ene reaction of a bicyclo[1.1.0]butane in the synthesis of the tricyclic quaternary ammonium core of daphniglaucins

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Masafumi; Walczak, Maciej A. A.; Wipf, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A tricyclic substructure of the tetracyclic nitrogen core of the daphniglaucins was formed by an oxidative activation of the allyl side chain of a bicyclo[1.1.0]butylmethylamine, a spontaneous intramolecular formal Alder-ene reaction, and a selective cyclization of a triol intermediate. PMID:19129907

  12. Reactivity of N-Phenyl-1-Aza-2-Cyano-1,3-Butadienes in the Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Nicholas J.; Motorina, Irina A.; Tran Huu Dau, Marie-Elise; Riche, Claude; Fowler, Frank W.; Grierson, David S.

    1996-05-31

    It is found that N-phenyl-2-cyano-1-azadiene 4, prepared via a two-step, one-pot, sequence from acrylanilide, undergoes efficient [4 + 2] cycloaddition with a complete range of electron rich, electron poor, and neutral dienophiles under remarkably mild thermal conditions (90-120 degrees C for 20-48 h). Regiospecific formation of the alpha-cycloadduct wherein the dienophile substituent is alpha to nitrogen is observed for vinyl ethers and styrene, whereas the Diels-Alder reactions with methyl acrylate and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) produce alpha/beta mixtures in which the alpha-cycloadduct is the major regioisomer (approximately 4-5:1). An essentially identical reaction pattern was observed in the Diels-Alder reaction of N-(p-methoxyphenyl)-2-cyano-1-azadiene 18 and the 4-methyl-substituted azadiene 27. For compound 19 derived from cycloaddition of 18 with ethyl vinyl ether, facile conversion to the dihydropyridine 21 through loss of EtOH on brief acid treatment was also noted. The 2,4-cis-disubstitution pattern confirmed by X-ray diffraction for the major cycloadduct 29 isolated from the reaction of 27 with styrene provides evidence for the endo mode of cycloaddition in the Diels-Alder reaction of N-phenyl(aryl)-2-cyano-1-azadienes. Calculation of the frontier orbital energies and coefficients, as well as the transition state geometries for the [4 + 2] cycloaddition of N-phenyl-2-cyano-1-azadiene 4 with methyl vinyl ether, styrene, and MVK were carried out at the RHF AM1 level (MOPAC, Version 5.0). The FMO treatment indicates that the reaction of 4 with methyl vinyl ether occurs under LUMO(diene) control, whereas in contrast, the corresponding cycloaddition with MVK occurs preferably under HOMO(diene) control. A high degree of asynchronicity is observed in the calculated transition states for reaction of 4 with the three representative dienophiles. In all cases the transition states leading to the alpha-cycloadducts are lower in energy than those giving the beta

  13. Asymmetric Lewis acid organocatalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction by a silylated C-H acid.

    PubMed

    Gatzenmeier, Tim; van Gemmeren, Manuel; Xie, Youwei; Höfler, Denis; Leutzsch, Markus; List, Benjamin

    2016-02-26

    Silylium ion equivalents have shown promise as Lewis acid catalysts for a range of important C-C bond-forming reactions. Here we describe chiral C-H acids that upon in situ silylation, generate silylium-carbanion pairs, which are extremely active Lewis acid catalysts for enantioselective Diels-Alder reactions of cinnamates with cyclopentadiene. Enantiomeric ratios of up to 97:3 and diastereomeric ratios of more than 20:1 are observed across a diverse set of substitution patterns with 1 mole percent (mol %) of C-H acid catalyst and 10 mol % of a silylating reagent. The results show promise for broad applications of such C-H acid-derived silylium ion equivalents in asymmetric Lewis acid catalysis.

  14. Three biscembranoids and their monomeric counterpart cembranoid, a biogenetic Diels-Alder precursor, from the soft coral Sarcophyton elegans.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Ashgan; Rudi, Amira; Benayahu, Yehuda; Kashman, Yoel

    2007-12-01

    Two new cembranoids, methyl tetrahydrosarcoate ( 1) and methyl tetrahydroisosarcoate ( 2), were isolated from the soft coral Sarcophyton elegans, collected at Kitangambwe Kenya, together with four biscembranoids, the known nyalolide ( 3) and the unprecedented desacetylnyalolide ( 4), diepoxynyalolide ( 5), and dioxanyalolide ( 6). The structures and relative stereochemistry of the compounds were elucidated by interpretation of MS, 1D NMR, COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY experiments. Compound 1 is most likely the dienophile affording, by a Diels-Alder reaction, the four biscembranoids. Dioxanyalolide ( 6) possesses antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli at a concentration of 1.25 microg/mL. Methyl tetrahydrosarcoate ( 1) and diepoxynyalolide ( 5) exhibited LC 50 values of 1.5 microM in a brine shrimp bioassay, while desacetylnyalolide ( 4) was only mildly active.

  15. The hetero-Diels-Alder addition of sulfur dioxide: the pseudo-chair conformation of a 4,5-dialkylsultine.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Dean; Roversi, Elena; Scoppelliti, Rosario; Vogel, Pierre; Meana, Rubén; Sordo, José A

    2003-10-17

    Even unsubstituted butadiene adds to sulfur dioxide in the hetero-Diels-Alder mode more rapidly than in the chelotropic mode. The sultine can be observed in equilibrium with the diene and the sulfur dioxide only at low temperature and in the presence of CF(3)COOH. Crystals of 4,5-dialkyl-sultine resulting from the SO(2) addition to 1,2-dimethylidenecyclohexane have been obtained at -100 degrees C and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Quantum chemical calculations have shown that hyperconjugative interactions within the sulfinyl moiety are responsible for the anomeric effects observed in sultines that prefer pseudo-chair conformations with pseudo-axial Sdbond;O bonds.

  16. Discovery of TNF inhibitors from a DNA-encoded chemical library based on diels-alder cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Buller, Fabian; Zhang, Yixin; Scheuermann, Jörg; Schäfer, Juliane; Bühlmann, Peter; Neri, Dario

    2009-10-30

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries are promising tools for the discovery of ligands toward protein targets of pharmaceutical relevance. DNA-encoded small molecules can be enriched in affinity-based selections and their unique DNA "barcode" allows the amplification and identification by high-throughput sequencing. We describe selection experiments using a DNA-encoded 4000-compound library generated by Diels-Alder cycloadditions. High-throughput sequencing enabled the identification and relative quantification of library members before and after selection. Sequence enrichment profiles corresponding to the "bar-coded" library members were validated by affinity measurements of single compounds. We were able to affinity mature trypsin inhibitors and identify a series of albumin binders for the conjugation of pharmaceuticals. Furthermore, we discovered a ligand for the antiapoptotic Bcl-xL protein and a class of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binders that completely inhibited TNF-mediated killing of L-M fibroblasts in vitro.

  17. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated o-Quinodimethane Intermediates: An Alternative Route to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, Daniel S.; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Smith, Dee Dee; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Photolysis of o-methylphenyl ketones generates bis-o-quinodimethane intermediates that can be trapped in situ by dienophiles through Diels-Alder cycloadditions. This well-known photochemical process is applied to a series of six new photoreactive monomers containing bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone) functionalities combined with diacrylate and triacrylate ester monomers for the development of acrylic ester copolymer blends. Irradiation of cyclohexanone solutions of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s and acrylate esters produce thin polymer films. Solid state 13C NMR data indicated 47- 100% reaction of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s, depending on experimental conditions, to yield the desired products. DSC and TGA analyses were performed to determine the glass transition temperature, T,, and onset of decomposition, Td, of the resulting polymer films. A statistical Design of Experiments approach was used to obtain a systematic understanding of the effects of experimental variables on the extent of polymerization and the final polymer properties.

  18. Dextran-based self-healing hydrogels formed by reversible diels-alder reaction under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhao; Yang, Jian Hai; Du, Xiao Jing; Xu, Feng; Zrinyi, Miklos; Osada, Yoshihito; Li, Fei; Chen, Yong Mei

    2013-09-01

    A dextran-based self-healing hydrogel is prepared by reversible Diels-Alder reaction under physiological conditions. Cytocompatible fulvene-modified dextran as main polymer chains and dichloromaleic-acid-modified poly(ethylene glycol) as cross-linkers are used. Both macro- and microscopic observation as well as the rheological recovery test confirm the self-healing property of the dextran-l-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels ("l" means "linked-by"). In addition, scanning electrochemical microscopy is used to qualitatively and quantitatively in situ track the self-healing process of the hydrogel for the first time. It is found that the longitudinal depth of scratch on hydrogel surface almost completely healed at 37 °C after 7 h. This work represents a facile approach for fabrication of polysaccharide self-healing hydrogel, which can be potentially used in several biomedical fields.

  19. Enantioselective Diels-Alder approach to C-3-oxygenated angucyclinones from (SS)-2-(p-tolysulfinyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone.

    PubMed

    Carreño, M C; Urbano, A; Di Vitta, C

    2000-03-03

    Chiral racemic vinylcyclohexenes 2, bearing oxygenated substituents and/or a methyl group at the C-5 position of the cyclohexene ring, were submitted to Diels-Alder reactions with enantiomerically pure (SS)-(2-p-tolylsulfinyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone [(+)-1]. The domino cycloaddition/pyrolytic sulfoxide elimination process led to the formation of enantiomerically enriched angularly tetracyclic quinones anti-6 and syn-7, which were obtained from the kinetic resolution of the racemic diene. In all cases, (SS)-(2-p-tolylsulfinyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone reacted from the less hindered face of the more reactive s-cis conformation, to form products in good enantiomeric excesses. Steric effects and torsional interactions in the corresponding approaches account for the observed pi-facial diastereoselectivities at both partners. The usefulness of this methodology is illustrated with the four-step totally asymmetric synthesis of the C-3-oxygenated angucyclinone derivative (-)-8-deoxytetrangomycin 10 in 26% overall yield and with 50% enantiomeric purity.

  20. Catalytic Effects of Oxide Surfaces on Diels-Alder Cycloaddition between Furan and Methyl Acrylate: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-Fard, Taha; Jenness, Glen; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas

    Using density functional theory with periodic boundary conditions, we study the catalytic effects of oxide surfaces such as ZrO_2 and HfO_2 on Diels-Alder reaction between furan and methyl acrylate. The cycloadduct can be dehydrated later to produce methyl benzoic which is an important step toward benzoic acid production. The gas-phase and on-surface reaction mechanisms are studied in detail. The surface hydration effects on the reaction mechanism and energy profile are studied as well. Our calculations show that the oxide surfaces catalyze the reaction significantly through the interaction of metal sites with methyl acrylate. The calculations are interpreted by making use of electronic density of states and band structure of the catalyst.

  1. Theoretical study of the regioselectivity of successive 1,3-butadiene Diels-Alder cycloadditions to C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, M.; Duran, M.; Mestres, J.

    1996-09-18

    The possibility of successive Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 1,3-butadiene to C{sub 60} has been studied theoretically by means of the AM1 semiempirical method. The nine unique possible reaction pathways leading to the experimentally observed T{sub h}-symmetric hexakisadduct have been described, and the most thermodynamically favored has been analyzed in more detail. The enthalpy barrier for the cycloaddition changes from 16.2 kcal/mol in the formation of the monoadduct to 17.8 kcal/mol for the hexakisadduct, increasing slightly with successive attacks. However, once the hexakisadduct is reached, addition of a new 1,3-butadiene has an enthalpy barrier as high as 35.5 kcal/mol, in agreement with the fact that experimentally the heptakisadduct has not yet been observed. 26 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Amaral, M.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Colaço, B.; Gama, A.; Paiva, M. C.; Gomes, P. S.; Silva, R. F.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT

  3. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not play a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.

  4. Regioselective Synthesis of C-3-Functionalized Quinolines via Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloaddition of Azadienes with Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Saunthwal, Rakesh K; Patel, Monika; Verma, Akhilesh K

    2016-08-05

    A highly efficient metal and protection-free approach for the regioselective synthesis of C-3-functionalized quinolines from azadienes (in situ generated from 2-aminobenzyl alcohol) and terminal alkynes through [4 + 2] cycloaddition has been developed. An unprecedented reaction of 2-aminobenzyl alcohol with 1,3- and 1,4-diethynylbenzene provided the C-3 tolylquinolines via [4 + 2] HDA and oxidative decarboxylation. The -NH2 group directed mechanistic approach was well supported by the control experiments and deuterium-labeling studies and by isolating the azadiene intermediate. The reactivity and selectivity of unprotected azadiene in metal-free base-assisted hetero-Diels-Alder reaction is exploited to quickly assemble an important class of C-3-functionalized quinolines, which are difficult to access.

  5. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; ...

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not playmore » a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.« less

  6. Solid lipid nanoparticles affect microbial colonization and enzymatic activity throughout the decomposition of alder leaves in freshwater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, A C; Mendes, R J; Castro, P G; Silva, A M

    2017-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are used as carriers for drug delivery, and are high biocompatible and designed to endure in the host organism. Despite its current industrial production is low, many of these substances are available on the market, and much more are in the production pipeline. As a result, many of them will end in aquatic systems raising the question whether they can pose a risk to aquatic biota and the associated ecological processes. Microbial decomposers of plant litter, play a key role in forested streams being responsible for the energy flow between terrestrial and aquatic environments. Here, we investigated the effects of SLNs on alder leaf litter decomposition by aquatic microbes. Alder leaves were immersed in a stream of Northeast Portugal to allow microbial colonization before being exposed in microcosms of two types of SLNs at two concentrations for 42 days. Results showed that rates of leaf decomposition decreased with exposure to SLNs. Bacterial biomass was not inhibited by SLNs, and cultivable fungi densities remained constant (SLN-A) or increased (SLN-C) compared with control microcosms. The type and concentration of SLNs influenced differently the leaf colonization by fungi as well as fungal sporulation rate. These effects were accompanied by changes in the community extraenzymatic profile: the activities of alkaline phosphatase, acidic phosphatase, Naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase (P cycle) and lipases increased in the SLNs microcosms. This study provided the first evidence of the adverse effects of the release of SLNs to streams on leaf litter decomposition. Those effects seem to depend on the composition and concentration of SLNs, as well on the microbial target group, or enzyme. Thus, prior to massive industrial production of these nanomaterials, some measures should be taken to avoid environmental impact affecting the microbial communities responsible for detritus decomposition.

  7. B(C6F5)3: A New Class of Strong and Bulky Lewis Acid for Exo-Selective Intermolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of Unreactive Acyclic Dienes with α,β-Enals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Hui; Jiang, Bing; Meng, Fei-Fan; Xu, Yun-He; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2015-09-18

    Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 catalyzed the Diels-Alder reactions of multisubstituted open-chain dienes and α,β-enals to afford the desired products with high exo-selectivities are reported. The substituent effect of the dienes and dienophiles on the product's stereoselectivity was thoroughly investigated, and it was found that most of the desired exo-Diels-Alder products could be obtained in good yields and with high exo-stereoselectivities.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: Age of the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, Brent D.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Carter Hearn, B., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ±0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The new age is statistically older (α = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ±0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, we propose that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard.

  9. Highly Regio- and Stereoselective Diels-Alder Cycloadditions via Two-Step and Multicomponent Reactions Promoted by Infrared Irradiation under Solvent-Free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Conde, Maria Ines; Reyes, Leonor; Herrera, Rafael; Rios, Hulme; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Miranda, Rene; Tamariz, Joaquin; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Infrared irradiation promoted the Diels-Alder cycloadditions of exo-2-oxazolidinone dienes 1–3 with the Knoevenagel adducts 4–6, as dienophiles, leading to the synthesis of new 3,5-diphenyltetrahydrobenzo[d]oxazol-2-one derivatives (7, 9, 11 and 13–17), under solvent-free conditions. These cycloadditions were performed with good regio- and stereoselectivity, favoring the para-endo cycloadducts. We also evaluated the one-pot three-component reaction of active methylene compounds 20, benzaldehydes 21 and exo-2-oxazolidinone diene 2 under the same reaction conditions. A cascade Knoevenagel condensation/Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction was observed, resulting in the final adducts 13–16 in similar yields. These procedures are environmentally benign, because no solvent and no catalyst were employed in these processes. The regioselectivity of these reactions was rationalized by Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) calculations. PMID:22489113

  10. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  11. Origins of the Unfavorable Activation and Reaction Energies of 1-Azadiene Heterocycles Compared to 2-Azadiene Heterocycles in Diels-Alder Reactions.

    PubMed

    Fell, Jason S; Martin, Blanton N; Houk, K N

    2017-02-17

    The reactivities of butadiene, cyclopentadiene, furan, thiophene, pyrrole, and their 1-aza- and 2-aza-derivatives in Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and fumaronitrile were investigated with density functional theory (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p)). The activation free energies for the Diels-Alder reactions of cyclic 1-azadienes are 10-14 kcal mol(-1) higher than those of cyclic 2-azadienes, and the reaction free energies are 17-20 kcal mol(-1) more endergonic. The distortion/interaction model shows that the increased activation energies of cyclic 1-azadienes originate from increased transition state distortion energies and unfavorable interaction energies, arising from addition to the nitrogen terminus of the C═N bond.

  12. Synthesis of Complex Hexacyclic Compounds via a Tandem Rh(II)-Catalyzed Double-Cyclopropanation/Cope Rearrangement/Diels–Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of (E)-1-(methoxymethylene)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene with styryl diazoacetates in the presence of catalytic amounts of the dirhodium complex Rh2(S-DOSP)4 provides a highly enantioenriched hexacyclic product with 10 new stereogenic centers. The transformation proceeds by a cascade sequence starting with a double cyclopropanation of a benzene ring, followed by a Cope rearrangement of a divinylcyclopropane and then an intramolecular Diels–Alder cycloaddition. PMID:25208337

  13. Remarkably high asymmetric amplification in the chiral lanthanide complex-catalyzed hetero-Diels-Alder reaction: first example of the nonlinear effect in ML3 system

    PubMed

    Furuno; Hanamoto; Sugimoto; Inanaga

    2000-01-01

    [reaction: see text] A remarkably high asymmetric amplification was realized in the Yb[(R)-BNP]3-catalyzed hetero-Diels-Alder reaction as the first example in the metal/chiral ligand 1:3 system. The mechanism may be explained by the autogenetic formation of the enantiopure complex as the most active catalyst. The enantiomer-discriminative formation of homochiral ML3 complexes is quite general within the lanthanide metal ions with similar ionic radii to that of the ytterbium ion.

  14. Synthesis of aza polycyclic compounds derived from pyrrolidine, indolizidine, and indole via intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions of neutral 2-azadienes.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Francisco; Alonso, Concepción; Amezua, Patricia; Rubiales, Gloria

    2002-03-22

    A method for the preparation of novel oxaza and diaza polycyclic 9-oxa-4-azaphenanthrene, 5H-pyrido[2,3-a]pyrrolizine, 5H,6H-pyrido[3,2-g]indolizine, and 5H,6H-indeno[2,1-a]indole is described, based on tandem reactions: aza-Wittig reaction of N-vinylic phosphazenes with functionalized aldehydes and an intramolecular aza-Diels-Alder reaction.

  15. An enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-dihydropyridines with α-acyloxyacroleins catalyzed by a chiral primary ammonium salt.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Kazuaki; Yamada, Hiroki; Akakura, Matsujiro

    2014-06-18

    The first enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-dihydropyridines with α-acyloxyacroleins catalyzed by a chiral primary ammonium salt has been developed and it offers more efficient routes to key synthetic intermediates of alkaloids, for which the direct preparations were unavailable before. The asymmetric induction can be understood through the optimized geometry of an iminium salt aqua complex derived from the catalyst and the dienophile.

  16. Simultaneous analysis of 70 pesticides using HPlc/MS/MS: a comparison of the multiresidue method of Klein and Alder and the QuEChERS method.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Melanie; Speer, Karl; Stuke, Sven; Schmeer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, two new multipesticide residue methods for screening crops for a large number of pesticides, developed by Klein and Alder and Anastassiades et al. (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe; QuEChERS), have been published. Our intention was to compare these two important methods on the basis of their extraction efficiency, reproducibility, ruggedness, ease of use, and speed. In total, 70 pesticides belonging to numerous different substance classes were analyzed at two concentration levels by applying both methods, using five different representative matrixes. In the case of the QuEChERS method, the results of the three sample preparation steps (crude extract, extract after SPE, and extract after SPE and acidification) were compared with each other and with the results obtained with the Klein and Alder method. The extraction efficiencies of the QuEChERS method were far higher, and the sample preparation was much quicker when the last two steps were omitted. In most cases, the extraction efficiencies after the first step were approximately 100%. With extraction efficiencies of mostly less than 70%, the Klein and Alder method did not compare favorably. Some analytes caused problems during evaluation, mostly due to matrix influences.

  17. Frictional Properties of Sand Collected from the 1906 Rupture Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Alder Creek, CA}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. D.; Cashman, S.; Marone, C.; Carpenter, B.; Baldwin, J.

    2006-12-01

    For the purpose of determining fault frictional properties of unconsolidated late Holocene fluvial sediments, samples were collected from trenches excavated across the 1906 rupture trace of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Alder Creek, CA. Two fault perpendicular ~2.5m deep trenches cut into late Holocene fluvial sand and gravel exposed a narrow (<1m) steeply dipping, branching, and anastomosing fault zone. Fault strands are defined by abrupt contacts and 0.5-2.0cm wide deformation bands. Samples of sand were collected several meters from the fault zone and enclosed in airtight bags to retain their original moisture content. We sheared layers of the sand in a servocontrolled, double direct shear testing machine at room temperature. A leveling jig prepared 5 mm thick layers of sand that were sheared between rough forcing blocks (5cm x 5cm nominal contact). Normal stress was constant during shear and varied over the suite of experiments from 75KPa to 900KPa, to a corresponding burial of ~3-40 meters. Shear loading was accomplished via a displacement rate boundary condition, which was set initially at 20μm/s and then subject to step changes to 200 and 2000μm/s for a cumulative total shear displacement of 25mm. Velocity stepping procedures are used to measure the velocity dependence of friction where the friction rate parameter, a-b, is the change in steady state sliding friction normalized by the log of velocity. In fault gouge it has been demonstrated that stable frictional behavior (a-b>0) is associated with pervasive shearing and velocity strengthening, while unstable velocity weakening frictional behavior (a-b<0) has been correlated with localized shear. The a-b values for the Alder Creek sands decrease steadily from 0.11 at 75KPa normal stress to less than 0.005 at 900KPa normal stress. If this rate can be extrapolated, it would imply a transition to velocity weakening at ~1Mpa normal stress or a burial of ~45m. The average measured and calculated steady

  18. Self-healable interfaces based on thermo-reversible Diels-Alder reactions in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Duchet, J; Gérard, J F

    2014-09-15

    Thermo-reversible Diels-Alder (DA) bonds formed between maleimide and furan groups have been used to generate an interphase between carbon fiber surface and an epoxy matrix leading to the ability of interfacial self-healing in carbon:epoxy composite materials. The maleimide groups were grafted on an untreated T700 carbon fiber from a three step surface treatment: (i) nitric acid oxidization, (ii) tetraethylenepentamine amination, and (iii) bismaleimide grafting. The furan groups were introduced in the reactive epoxy system from furfuryl glycidyl ether. The interface between untreated carbon fiber and epoxy matrix was considered as a reference. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was evaluated by single fiber micro-debonding test. The debonding force was shown to have a linear dependence with embedded length. The highest healing efficiency calculated from the debonding force was found to be about 82% more compared to the value for the reference interface. All the interphases designed with reversible DA bonds have a repeatable self-healing ability. As after the fourth healing, they can recover a relatively high healing efficiency (58% for the interphase formed by T700-BMI which is oxidized for 60 min during the first treatment step).

  19. Diels-Alder derivatization for sensitive detection and characterization of conjugated linoleic acids using LC/ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Takekawa, Mioko; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2012-04-01

    The utility of Diels-Alder derivatization with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) for liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) was examined. PTAD rapidly reacted with the CLAs, and the resulting derivatives were highly responsive in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry operating in the positive-ion mode. The derivatives produced characteristic product ions during tandem mass spectrometry, which enabled the sensitive detection [limit of detection 18 fmol (signal-to-noise ratio of 5)] and the identification of the conjugated diene position. The PTAD derivatization also significantly increased the reversed-phase liquid chromatography separation selectivity for the most biologically active CLA isomers: cis-9,trans-11-CLA and trans-10,cis-12-CLA. The PTAD derivatization was applied to analyses of food and biological samples; the major CLAs in milk and beef fat samples were successfully identified, and trace amounts of CLAs in human saliva were detected with a simple pretreatment and short analysis time.

  20. Spiroketals of Pestalotiopsis fici provide evidence for a biosynthetic hypothesis involving diversified Diels-Alder reaction cascades.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Li, Yan; Li, Li; Cao, Ya; Guo, Liangdong; Liu, Gang; Che, Yongsheng

    2013-04-05

    Chloropestolides B-G (1-6), six new metabolites featuring the chlorinated spiro[benzo[d][1,3]dioxine-2,7'-bicyclo[2.2.2]octane]-4,8'-dione (1-3) and spiro[benzo[d][1,3]dioxine-2,1'-naphthalene]-2',4-dione (4-6) skeletons, and their putative biosynthetic precursor dechloromaldoxin (7) were isolated from the scale-up fermentation cultures of the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici . The structures of 1-7 were determined mainly by NMR experiments. The absolute configurations of 1-3 were deduced by analogy to the previously isolated metabolites from the same fungus (9 and 13-18), whereas those of 4, 5, and 7 were assigned by electronic circular dichroism (ECD) calculations. Structurally, the spiroketal skeletons found in 1-3 and 4-6 could be derived from 2,6-dihydroxy-4-methylbenzoic acid with chlorinated bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-en-5-one and 4a,5,8,8a-tetrahydronaphthalen-2(1H)-one, respectively. Biogenetically, compounds 1-6 were derived from the same Diels-Alder precursors as the previously isolated 9 and 12-18. In addition, compounds 2 and 3 were proposed as the biosynthetic intermediates of 17 and 16, respectively. Compound 1 was cytotoxic to three human tumor cell lines.

  1. Face-selective Diels-Alder reactions between unsymmetrical cyclohexadienes and symmetric trans-dienophile: an experimental and computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Saswati; Yadav, Somnath; Banerjee, Srirupa; Patil, Mahendra P; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2008-01-18

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the Diels-Alder reactions between 2-trimethylsiloxy-1,3-cyclohexadienes (2-11) and (E)-1,4-diphenylbut-2-ene-1,4-dione (1) is reported. Two diastereomeric products, 5-endo-6-exo- (nx) and 5-exo-6-endo- (xn) dibenzoyl derivatives, are possible with symmetric trans-dienophile (1). While in many cases 5-endo-6-exo product is preferred over the corresponding 5-exo-6-endo product, the product ratio nx:xn is found to vary with the position of substituents on the diene. The density functional theory studies with the mPW1PW91/6-31G* as well as the B3LYP/6-31G* levels reveal that the electrostatic repulsion between the oxygen lone pairs on the diene and the dienophile is critical to the observed product selectivities. The optimized transition state geometries though appeared to involve secondary orbital interactions, careful examination of the frontier Kohn-Sham orbitals as well as calculations with the natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses confirm the absence of SOI in these transition states. In the case of methyl-substituted dienes, a cumulative effect of steric and electrostatic interactions between the diene and the dienophile is found to be the controlling element toward the observed selectivity.

  2. Surface patterning with natural and synthetic polymers via an inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction employing microcontact chemistry.

    PubMed

    Roling, Oliver; Mardyukov, Artur; Lamping, Sebastian; Vonhören, Benjamin; Rinnen, Stefan; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Studer, Armido; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-10-21

    Bioorthogonal ligation methods are the focus of current research due to their versatile applications in biotechnology and materials science for post-functionalization and immobilization of biomolecules. Recently, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (iEDDA) reactions employing 1,2,4,5-tetrazines as electron deficient dienes emerged as powerful tools in this field. We adapted iEDDA in microcontact chemistry (μCC) in order to create enhanced surface functions. μCC is a straightforward soft-lithography technique which enables fast and large area patterning with high pattern resolutions. In this work, tetrazine functionalized surfaces were reacted with carbohydrates conjugated with norbornene or cyclooctyne acting as strained electron rich dienophiles employing μCC. It was possible to create monofunctional as well as bifunctional substrates which were specifically addressable by proteins. Furthermore we structured glass supported alkene terminated self-assembled monolayers with a tetrazine conjugated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator enabling surface grafted polymerizations of poly(methylacrylate) brushes. The success of the surface initiated iEDDA via μCC as well as the functionalization with natural and synthetic polymers was verified via fluorescence and optical microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

  3. N-(furfural) chitosan hydrogels based on Diels-Alder cycloadditions and application as microspheres for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Herrera, Marcelino; Gandini, Alessandro; Goycoolea, Francisco M; Jacobsen, Neil E; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Recillas-Mota, Maricarmen; Argüelles-Monal, Waldo M

    2015-09-05

    In this study, chitosan was chemically modified by reductive amination in a two-step process. The synthesis of N-(furfural) chitosan (FC) was confirmed by FT-IR and (1)H NMR analysis, and the degrees of substitution were estimated as 8.3 and 23.8%. The cross-linkable system of bismaleimide (BM) and FC shows that FC shared properties of furan-maleimide chemistry. This system produced non-reversible hydrogel networks by Diels-Alder cycloadditions at 85 °C. The system composed of BM and FC (23.8% substitution) generated stronger hydrogel networks than those of FC with an 8.3% degree of substitution. Moreover, the FC-BM system was able to produce hydrogel microspheres. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed the surface of the microspheres to be non-porous with small protuberances. In water, the microspheres swelled, increasing their volume by 30%. Finally, microspheres loaded with methylene blue were able to release the dye gradually, obeying second-order kinetics for times less than 600 min. This behavior suggests that diffusion is governed by the relaxation of polymer chains in the swelled state, thus facilitating drug release outside the microspheres.

  4. Root-Associated Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Shared by Various Boreal Forest Seedlings Naturally Regenerating after a Fire in Interior Alaska and Correlation of Different Fungi with Host Growth Responses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Elizabeth; Kiekel, Preston; Brenton, Rebecca; Taylor, D. Lee

    2011-01-01

    The role of common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) in postfire boreal forest successional trajectories is unknown. We investigated this issue by sampling a 50-m by 40-m area of naturally regenerating black spruce (Picea mariana), trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), and paper birch (Betula papyrifera) seedlings at various distances from alder (Alnus viridis subsp. crispa), a nitrogen-fixing shrub, 5 years after wildfire in an Alaskan interior boreal forest. Shoot biomasses and stem diameters of 4-year-old seedlings were recorded, and the fungal community associated with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root tips from each seedling was profiled using molecular techniques. We found distinct assemblages of fungi associated with alder compared with those associated with the other tree species, making the formation of CMNs between them unlikely. However, among the spruce, aspen, and birch seedlings, there were many shared fungi (including members of the Pezoloma ericae [Hymenoscyphus ericae] species aggregate, Thelephora terrestris, and Russula spp.), raising the possibility that these regenerating seedlings may form interspecies CMNs. Distance between samples did not influence how similar ECM root tip-associated fungal communities were, and of the fungal groups identified, only one of them was more likely to be shared between seedlings that were closer together, suggesting that the majority of fungi surveyed did not have a clumped distribution across the small scale of this study. The presence of some fungal ribotypes was associated with larger or smaller seedlings, suggesting that these fungi may play a role in the promotion or inhibition of seedling growth. The fungal ribotypes associated with larger seedlings were different between spruce, aspen, and birch, suggesting differential impacts of some host-fungus combinations. One may speculate that wildfire-induced shifts in a given soil fungal community could result in variation in the growth response of different plant species

  5. A new insight on the gas phase retro-Diels-Alder reaction of bicyclic compounds: density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Jose R.; Lezama, Jesús; Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Chuchani, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of the gas-phase thermal decomposition of bicyclo[2.2.1]heptadiene and 3,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene were examined by density functional theory calculations with the hybrid functionals: B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP, MPW1PW91, and PBEPBE. Reasonable agreements were found between theoretical and experimental values with the B3LYP hybrid functional. Three molecular concerted pathways for bicyclo[2.2.1]heptadiene decomposition are proposed. The retro-Diels-Alder (retro-DA) pathway yields cyclopentadiene and acetylene through a nearly synchronous transition state structure (Sy = 0.97). The other two reaction channels are stepwise with a common step with the formation of the intermediate bicyclo[4.1.0] heptadiene. This reaction is dominated by C-C bond breaking leading to the methylene migration by an early transition state in the reaction coordinate (Sy = 0.91). The rearrangements of the latter intermediate producing toluene were also studied. The retro-DA elimination of 3,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene gives 1,5,5-trimethyl-cyclopenta-1,3-diene in a less synchronous process (Sy = 0.77). This fact may be due to the electronic effects of the methyl substituent. The latter product is unstable and undergoes methyl migrations to give a more stable isomer 1,2,3-trimethylcyclopenta-1,3-diene. The stepwise mechanism for the retro-DA reaction through a biradical intermediate appears to be unfavourable because the barrier is bigger than that for the concerted reaction.

  6. A new biopesticide from a local Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis (Xd3) against alder leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Eski, Ardahan; Demir, İsmail; Sezen, Kazım; Demirbağ, Zihni

    2017-05-01

    Use of chemical pesticides in agriculture harms humans, non-target organisms and environments, and causes increase resistance against chemicals. In order to develop an effective bio-pesticide against coleopterans, particularly against Agelastica alni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) which is one of the serious pests of alder leaf and hazelnut, we tested the insecticidal effect of 21 Bacillus isolates against the larvae and adults of the pest. Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis-Xd3 (Btt-Xd3) showed the highest insecticidal effect based on screening tests. For toxin protein production and high sporulation of Xd3, the most suitable medium, pH and temperature conditions were determined as nutrient broth medium enriched with salts, pH 7 and 30 °C, respectively. Sporulated Btt-Xd3 in nutrient broth medium enriched with salts transferred to fermentation medium containing soybean flour, glucose and salts. After fermentation, the mixture was dried in a spray dryer, and spore count of the powder product was determined as 1.6 × 10(10) c.f.u. g(-1). Moisture content, suspensibility and wettability of the formulation were determined as 8.3, 86% and 21 s, respectively. Lethal concentrations (LC50) of formulated Btt-Xd3 were determined as 0.15 × 10(5) c.f.u. ml(-1) for larvae at laboratory conditions. LC50 values were also determined as 0.45 × 10(6) c.f.u. ml(-1) at the field condition on larval stage. Our results showed that a new bio-pesticide developed from B. thuringiensis tenebrionis (Xd3) (Btt-Xd3) may be valuable as a biological control agent for coleopteran pests.

  7. Copper(I)-Catalyzed Asymmetric Desymmetrization through Inverse-Electron-Demand aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Efficient Access to Tetrahydropyridazines Bearing a Unique α-Chiral Silane Moiety.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liang; Zhou, Yu; Song, Zhi-Min; Tao, Hai-Yan; Lin, Zhenyang; Wang, Chun-Jiang

    2017-04-11

    An unprecedented copper(I)-catalyzed asymmetric desymmetrization of 5-silylcyclopentadienes with in situ formed azoalkene was realized through an inverse-electron-demand aza-Diels-Alder reaction (IEDDA) pathway, in which 5-silylcyclopentadienes served as efficient enophiles. This new protocol provides a facile access to the biologically important heterocyclic tetrahydropyridazines containing a unique α-chiral silane motif and three adjoining stereogenic centers in generally good yield (up to 92 %) with exclusive regioselectivity, high diastereoselectivity (>20:1 diastereomeric ratio), and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 98 % enantiomeric excess). DFT calculations and control experiments further confirmed the proposed reaction mechanism.

  8. Bisadducts from the Diels-Alder Trapping of Bis(o-Xylenols) Photochemically Generated from 2,5-Dibenzoyl-p-xylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.; Kinder, James D.; Kirby, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Photolysis of 2,5-dibenzoyl-p-xylene produces two discrete o-xylenols which undergo Diels-Alder cycloadditions with standard dienophiles, such as methyl acrylate, to produce 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5-diphenyl-l,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydroanthracenes, 2a, in good yield (greater than 80%). The anti bisadduct crystallizes into hydrogen bonded stacks. Conversion of both syn- and anti-bisadducts to the corresponding anthracenes was achieved through the use of standard dehydration and aromatization chemistry.

  9. Ultra-high precision 40Ar/39Ar ages for Fish Canyon Tuff and Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine: New dating standards required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D.; Matchan, E. L.

    2013-11-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique is a high precision (<0.1%) method with wide application to geological samples. However, the method is predicated on the availability of natural mineral standards of known age. Widely used 40Ar/39Ar standards include sanidine from the (ca. 28 Ma) Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) and the (ca. 1.2 Ma) Alder Creek Rhyolite (ACR). Despite common usage, the ages of FCT and ACR sanidine have proven contentious, with reported values varying by >2%; well outside the ±0.1% aspiration of EARTHTIME (http://www.earth-time.org).

  10. Enantioselective synthesis of allenylenol silyl ethers via chiral lithium amide mediated reduction of ynenoyl silanes and their Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michiko; Kondo, Yasuhiro; Moto-ishi, Ta-ichi; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Takeda, Kei

    2015-03-06

    An enantioselective Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley-type reduction of ynenoylsilanes by a chiral lithium amide followed by a Brook rearrangement and anti-mode protonation across conjugated 1,3-enynes provides allene derivatives bearing a 2-siloxyvinyl moiety in high enantioselectivity. The E/Z geometry of enol silyl ethers is controlled by the geometry of the starting enyne moiety. Thus, (E)- and (Z)-enol silyl ethers are obtained from (Z)- and (E)-ynenoylsilans, respectively. The 2-siloxyvinylallene products can participate in Diels-Alder reactions with reactive dienophiles such as PTAD, which can be achieved in a one-pot operation from ynenoylsilanes.

  11. The acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate derivatives: an X-ray and 15N NMR study with an application to amino-acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bollans, Lee; Bacsa, John; Iggo, Jonathan A; Morris, Gareth A; Stachulski, Andrew V

    2009-11-07

    We present a study of the acyl nitroso Diels-Alder (ANDA) reaction of sorbate esters and sorbic alcohol derivatives, using alkoxycarbonyl nitroso dienophiles. An optimisation of the reaction conditions for ethyl sorbate is first presented, and the product is used in an efficient synthesis of 5-methylornithine. Structure-reactivity trends in sorbic alcohol (E,E-2,4-hexadien-1-ol) and its acylated analogues are then discussed. We present single-crystal X-ray structural proof for key adducts in both series and present in detail a novel HMBC/HSQC ((1)H-(15)N) criterion for ready distinction of regioisomers arising from such ANDA reactions.

  12. Lanthanide (III)-catalyzed enantioselective Diels-Alder reactions. Stereoselective synthesis of both enantiomers by using a single chiral source and a choice of achiral ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Shu; Ishitani, Haruro )

    1994-05-04

    In this paper, we disclose a conceptually different approach to obtaining both enantiomers; choice of enatiofacial selectivity by use of the enatiomerically same chiral source and different achiral ligands. Both enantiomers of the Diels-Alder adducts between e-acyl-1,3-oxazolidin-2-ones and cyclopentadiene were prepared by chiral lanthanides(III)-catalyzed reactions using the same chiral source, (R)-(+)-binaphthol. It is noted that the chiral catalysts with reverse enantiofacial selectivities could be prepared by using the same chiral source and a choice of achiral ligands. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. From enantiopure hydroxyaldehydes to complex heterocyclic scaffolds: development of domino Petasis/Diels-Alder and cross-metathesis/Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Cannillo, Alexandre; Norsikian, Stéphanie; Tran Huu Dau, Marie-Elise; Retailleau, Pascal; Iorga, Bogdan I; Beau, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-15

    One-step assembly of hexahydroisoindole scaffolds by a sequence that combines the Petasis (borono-Mannich) and Diels-Alder reactions is described. The unique selectivity observed experimentally was confirmed by quantum calculations. The current method is applicable to a broad range of substrates, including free sugars, and holds significant potential to efficiently and stereoselectively build new heterocyclic structures. This easy and fast entry to functionalized polycyclic compounds can be pursued by further transformations, for example, additional ring closure by a cross-metathesis/Michael addition domino sequence.

  14. Tandem one-pot synthesis of flavans by recyclable silica-HClO4 catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation and [4 + 2]-Diels-Alder cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sandip B; Mudududdla, Ramesh; Bharate, Jaideep B; Battini, Narsaiah; Battula, Satyanarayana; Yadav, Rammohan R; Singh, Baldev; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2012-07-14

    An efficient one-pot multi-component synthesis of flavans using perchloric acid supported on silica as a recyclable heterogeneous catalyst has been described. This is the first report of direct one-step construction of a flavan skeleton from a phenolic precursor. The method involves a Knoevenagel-type condensation leading to in situ formation of transient O-quinone methide which further undergoes [4 + 2]-Diels-Alder cycloaddition with styrene to yield a flavan skeleton. The method provides easy access to a wide range of bio-active natural products viz. flavonoids, anthocyanins and catechins.

  15. Liquid-crystalline and electron-deficient coronene oligocarboxylic esters and imides by twofold benzogenic Diels-Alder reactions on perylenes.

    PubMed

    Alibert-Fouet, Sonia; Seguy, Isabelle; Bobo, Jean-François; Destruel, Pierre; Bock, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Alkyl esters, imides and imido-esters of coronene-tri-, -tetra- and -octacarboxylic acids are accessible by a twofold oxidative benzogenic Diels-Alder reaction. Alkyl acrylates add to perylene, and maleic alkyl imides react twice with perylene as well as with perylene-tetracarboxylic tetraesters. Coronenes substituted with a greatly variable number of electron-withdrawing substituents are thus accessible, and di- and tetraimide derivatives are shown to be very pronounced electron-acceptor materials. The tri- and tetraalkyl esters and imidoesters self-assemble into columnar liquid-crystalline phases.

  16. Molecular Design of a Chiral Brønsted Acid with Two Different Acidic Sites: Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Hetero-Diels-Alder Reaction of Azopyridinecarboxylate with Amidodienes Catalyzed by Chiral Carboxylic Acid-Monophosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, Norie; Tabuse, Hideaki; Noda, Hirofumi; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Katsunori; Izumiseki, Atsuto; Funayama, Kosuke; Egawa, Fuyuki; Okada, Shino; Adachi, Hiroaki; Terada, Masahiro

    2016-09-07

    A chiral Brønsted acid containing two different acidic sites, chiral carboxylic acid-monophosphoric acid 1a, was designed to be a new and effective concept in catalytic asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of azopyridinecarboxylate with amidodienes. The multipoint hydrogen-bonding interactions among the carboxylic acid, monophosphoric acid, azopyridinecarboxylate, and amidodiene achieved high catalytic and chiral efficiency, producing substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridazines with excellent stereocontrol in a single step. This constitutes the first example of regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective azo-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions by chiral Brønsted acid catalysis.

  17. Hardwood price reporting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Sohngen, B.L.; Haynes, R.W.

    1994-02-01

    The prices for red alder (Alnus rubra) hardwood logs are published and analyzed for reliability, consistency, and robustness. Timberland managers can use these prices to make decisions about land management. They show that values for red alder logs have been increasing steadily for the last 11 years.

  18. Reactivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: Distortion-Interaction Analysis along the Reaction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzi; Osuna, Sílvia; Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Song; Houk, Kendall N; Lan, Yu

    2016-08-26

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition is one of the most powerful tools for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Density functional theory at the B3-LYP level of theory has been used to investigate the reactivity of different-diameter SWCNTs (4-9,5) in Diels-Alder reactions with 1,3-butadiene; the reactivity was found to decrease with increasing SWCNT diameter. Distortion/interaction analysis along the whole reaction pathway was found to be a better way to explore the reactivity of this type of reaction. The difference in interaction energy along the reaction pathway is larger than that of the corresponding distortion energy. However, the distortion energy plots for these reactions show the same trend. Therefore, the formation of the transition state can be determined from the interaction energy. A lower interaction energy leads to an earlier transition state, which indicates a lower activation energy. The computational results also indicate that the original distortion of the SWCNTs leads to an increase in the reactivity of the SWCNTs.

  19. Inverse Electron Demand Diels–Alder Reactions of 1,2,3-Triazines: Pronounced Substituent Effects on Reactivity and Cycloaddition Scope

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Erin D.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic study of the inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions of 1,2,3-triazines is disclosed, including an examination of the impact of a C5 substituent. Such substituents were found to exhibit a remarkable impact on the cycloaddition reactivity of the 1,2,3-triazine without altering, and perhaps even enhancing, the intrinsic cycloaddition regioselectivity. The study revealed that not only may the reactivity be predictably modulated by a C5 substituent (R = CO2Me > Ph > H), but that the impact is of a magnitude to convert 1,2,3-triazine (1) and its modest cycloaddition scope into a heterocyclic azadiene system with a reaction scope that portends extensive synthetic utility, expanding the range of participating dienophiles. Significantly, the studies define a now powerful additional heterocyclic azadiene, complementary to the isomeric 1,2,4-triazines and 1,3,5-triazines, capable of dependable participation in inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions, extending the number of complementary heterocyclic ring systems accessible with implementation of the methodology. PMID:21736324

  20. A Diels-Alder modulated approach to control and sustain the release of dexamethasone and induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kenneth C; Alge, Daniel L; Anseth, Kristi S; Bowman, Christopher N

    2013-05-01

    We report a new approach to controlled drug release based upon exploiting the dynamic equilibrium that exists between Diels-Alder reactants and products, demonstrating the release of a furan containing dexamethasone peptide (dex-KGPQG-furan) from a maleimide containing hydrogel. Using a reaction-diffusion model, the release kinetics were tuned to achieve sustained concentrations conducive to osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Efficacy was first demonstrated in a 2D culture model, in which dexamethasone release induced significant increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineral deposition in hMSCs compared to a dexamethasone-free treatment. The results were similar to that observed with a soluble dexamethasone treatment. More dramatic differences were observed in 3D culture, where co-encapsulation of a dexamethasone releasing hydrogel depot within an hMSC-laden extracellular matrix mimetic poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel resulted in a local and robust osteogenic differentiation. ALP activity reached levels that were up to six times higher than the dexamethasone free treatment. Interestingly, at 5 and 10 day time points, the ALP activity exceeded the dexamethasone positive control, suggesting a potential benefit of sustained release in 3D culture. After 21 days, substantial mineralization comparable to the positive control was also observed in the hydrogels. Collectively, these results demonstrate Diels-Alder modulated release as an effective and versatile new platform for controlled drug delivery that may prove especially beneficial for sustaining the release of low molecular weight molecules in hydrogel systems.

  1. Regioselective Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder Reactions of N-Acyl 6-Amino-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazines.

    PubMed

    Boger, Dale L.; Schaum, Robert P.; Garbaccio, Robert M.

    1998-09-04

    The regioselective inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reactions of 6-[(tert-butyloxycarbonyl)amino]-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (2), 6-(acetylamino)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (3), and 6-(benzyloxycarbonyl)amino-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (4) are disclosed. All three underwent regioselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition with electron-rich dienophiles to form the corresponding functionalized 1,2-diazines in excellent yields. An order of reactivity with electron-rich dienophiles was observed with both 2 and 3 being more reactive than 3,6-bis(methylthio)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (1, i.e. 3 > 2 > 1), and both 3 and 4 were shown to be more robust than 2 at the higher temperatures necessary for [4 + 2] cycloaddition with less reactive dienophiles. The cycloaddition regioselectivity is consistent with the polarization of the diene and the ability of the methylthio group to stabilize a partial negative charge at C-3, and the N-acylamino group to stabilize a partial positive charge at C-6. While intermolecular reactions of unactivated alkynes either did not proceed or required high temperatures and long reaction times, intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions utilizing tethered unactivated acetylenes led to five- and six-membered bicyclic 1,2-diazines under mild conditions.

  2. QM/MM Modeling Finds Diels-Alder Reactions are Accelerated Less On the Surface of Water than In Water

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Laura L.; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations for the Diels-Alder reactions of cyclopentadiene with 1,4-naphthoquinone, methyl vinyl ketone, and acrylonitrile have been carried out at the vacuum-water interface and in the gas phase. In conjunction with previous studies of these cycloadditions in dilute solution, a more complete picture of aqueous environmental effects emerges with implications for the origin of observed rate accelerations using heterogeneous aqueous suspensions, “on water” conditions. The pure TIP4P water slab maintains bulk density and hydrogen bonding properties in central water layers. The bulk region merges to vacuum over a ca. 5-Å band with progressive diminution of density and hydrogen bonding. The relative free energies of activation and transition structures for the reactions at the interface are found to be intermediate between those calculated in the gas phase and in bulk water, i.e., for the reaction with 1,4-naphthoquinone, the ΔΔG ‡’s relative to the gas phase are −3.6 and −7.3 kcal/mol at the interface and in bulk water, respectively. Thus, the results do not support the notion that a water surface is more effective than bulk water for catalysis of such pericyclic reactions. The trend is in qualitative agreement with expectations based on density considerations and estimates of experimental rate constants for the gas phase, a heterogeneous aqueous suspension, and dilute aqueous solution for the reaction of cyclopentadiene with methyl vinyl ketone. Computed energy pair distributions reveal a uniform loss of 0.5 – 1.0 hydrogen bond for the reactants and transition states in progressing from bulk water to the vacuum-water interface. Orientational effects are apparent at the surface, e.g., the carbonyl group in the methyl vinyl ketone transition structure is preferentially oriented into the surface. Also, the transition structure for the 1,4-naphthoquinone case is buried more in the surface, and the free energy of

  3. An efficient Ugi-3CR/aza Diels-Alder/Pomeranz-Fritsch protocol towards novel aza-analogues of (±)-nuevamine, (±)-lennoxamine and magallanesine: a diversity oriented synthesis approach.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Vera, Óscar; Sánchez-Badillo, Jorge S; Islas-Jácome, Alejandro; Rentería-Gómez, Manuel A; Pharande, Shrikant G; Cortes-García, Carlos J; Rincón-Guevara, Mónica A; Ibarra, Ilich A; Gámez-Montaño, Rocío; González-Zamora, Eduardo

    2017-03-15

    A rapid and efficient synthesis of a series of (±)-nuevamine, (±)-lennoxamine and magallanesine aza analogues is described. The synthetic strategy involves Ugi-3CR and two further condensation processes, aza-Diels-Alder cycloaddition and the Pomeranz-Fritsch reaction. The variation of the chain-size in aldehyde moieties provided structural diversity in only two operational reaction steps.

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 105 Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Mark A.

    2002-08-22

    Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and 115kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 7/17. Corridor width varies. The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 30 miles of access roads will be cleared using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Tower sites will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposal.

  5. Novel N-allyl/propargyl tetrahydroquinolines: Synthesis via Three-component Cationic Imino Diels-Alder Reaction, Binding Prediction, and Evaluation as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Yeray A; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Ramírez, David; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bernal, Cristian C; Güiza, Fausto M; Romero Bohórquez, Arnold R

    2016-10-01

    New N-allyl/propargyl 4-substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines derivatives were efficiently synthesized using acid-catalyzed three components cationic imino Diels-Alder reaction (70-95%). All compounds were tested in vitro as dual acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase inhibitors and their potential binding modes, and affinity, were predicted by molecular docking and binding free energy calculations (∆G) respectively. The compound 4af (IC50 = 72 μm) presented the most effective inhibition against acetylcholinesterase despite its poor selectivity (SI = 2), while the best inhibitory activity on butyryl-cholinesterase was exhibited by compound 4ae (IC50 = 25.58 μm) with considerable selectivity (SI = 0.15). Molecular docking studies indicated that the most active compounds fit in the reported acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase active sites. Moreover, our computational data indicated a high correlation between the calculated ∆G and the experimental activity values in both targets.

  6. Manifestations of the Alder-Rickert reaction in the structures of bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene and bicyclo[2.2.2]octene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yit Wooi; Danczak, Stephen M; Lim, Tang Kuan; White, Jonathan M

    2007-04-13

    The Alder-Rickert ethylene extrusion reaction manifests in the ground state structures of compounds 9-12 which contain the bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene moiety and compounds 13, 14, and 17-20 which contain the bicyclo[2.2.2]octene moiety. A significant decrease of the 13C-13C one-bond coupling constants for the C-C bonds, which break in this fragmentation reaction, suggests lengthening, and hence weakening of these bonds. In the unsymmetrical systems these effects are also shown to be associated with strengthening of the CH2-CH2 bond, which is ultimately lost from the molecule as ethylene. Low-temperature crystal structures of compounds 9-12 and 16 provide evidence for similar crystal packing requirements of the CH2-CH2 and CH=CH moieties.

  7. The Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction of Substituted Hemifullerenes with 1,3-Butadiene: Effect of Electron-Donating and Electron-Withdrawing Substituents.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Martha; Méndez, Francisco; Alonso, Julio A

    2016-02-12

    The Diels-Alder (DA) reaction provides an attractive route to increase the number of six member rings in substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). The density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method has been used in this work to inquire if the substitution of H over the edge of triindenetriphenylene (pristine hemifullerene 1) and pentacyclopentacorannulene (pristine hemifullerene 2), could improve the DA cycloaddition reaction with 1,3-butadiene. The substituents tested include electron-donating (NH₂, OMe, OH, Me, i-Pr) and electron-withdrawing groups (F, COOH, CF₃, CHO, CN, NO₂). The electronic, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the DA reactions of the substituted hemifullerenes with 1,3-butadiene have been analyzed. The most promising results were obtained for the NO₂ substituent; the activation energy barriers for reactions using this substituent were lower than the barriers for the pristine hemifullerenes. This leads us to expect that the cycloadditions to a starting fullerene fragment will be possible.

  8. Multifunctional Hydrogel with Good Structure Integrity, Self-Healing, and Tissue-Adhesive Property Formed by Combining Diels-Alder Click Reaction and Acylhydrazone Bond.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Du, Jie; Wang, Gang; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-04

    Hydrogel, as a good cartilage tissue-engineered scaffold, not only has to possess robust mechanical property but also has to have an intrinsic self-healing property to integrate itself or the surrounding host cartilage. In this work a double cross-linked network (DN) was designed and prepared by combining Diels-Alder click reaction and acylhydrazone bond. The DA reaction maintained the hydrogel's structural integrity and mechanical strength in physiological environment, while the dynamic covalent acylhydrazone bond resulted in hydrogel's self-healing property and controlled the on-off switch of network cross-link density. At the same time, the aldehyde groups contained in hydrogel further promote good integration of the hydrogel to surrounding tissue based on aldehyde-amine Schiff-base reaction. This kind of hydrogel has good structural integrity, autonomous self-healing, and tissue-adhesive property and simultaneously will have a good application in tissue engineering and tissue repair field.

  9. Influence of diene substitution on Diels-Alder reactions between vinyl dihydronaphthalenes and (SS)-2-(p-tolylsulfinyl)-1,4-benzoquinone.

    PubMed

    Carreño, M Carmen; García-Cerrada, Susana; Sanz-Cuesta, M Jesús; Urbano, Antonio

    2003-05-30

    The asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction between 2-(E-2-acetoxyvinyl)-8-tert-butyl-3,4-dihydronaphthalene (8) and enantiopure (SS)-2-(p-tolylsulfinyl)-1,4-benzoquinone (1) takes place exclusively on the unsubstituted C(5)-C(6) double bond of (SS)-1 with a very high control of the chemo-, regio-, and diastereoselectivity of the process affording tetracyclic sulfinyl derivative 13a possessing five stereogenic centers. The analogue diene 9, lacking the tert-butyl group, gave a less chemoselective reaction (C(2)-C(3)/C(5)-C(6): 60/40) in favor of reaction through the sulfoxide-substituted double bond C(2)-C(3) of 1. Steric effects of the remote tert-butyl group and electronic factors due to the OAc substituent are controlling the process.

  10. Enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction of aldimines with "Danishefsky-type diene" catalyzed by chiral scandium(III)-N,N'-dioxide complexes.

    PubMed

    Shang, Deju; Xin, Junguo; Liu, Yanling; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2008-01-18

    A new kind of complex prepared from scandium(III) triflate and l-proline-derived N,N'-dioxides has been developed to catalyze the enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction between 1,3-butadiene (diene 1) and aldimines 2, affording the corresponding 2,5-disubstituted dihydropyridinones in moderate to high yields (up to 92%) with good enantioselectivities (up to 90% ee) at room temperature. A variety of aldimines including aromatic, heteroaromatic, conjugated, and aliphatic imines were found to be suitable substrates. Enantiopure samples (up to 99% ee) were obtained for some products by a single recrystallization. The absolute configuration of the products was determined by X-ray diffraction and CD analysis. On the basis of the investigation of 1H NMR spectra and the positive nonlinear effect, the catalyst structure was carefully discussed.

  11. Two Novel 1,2,4,5-Tetrazines that Participate in Inverse Electron Demand Diels–Alder Reactions with an Unexpected Regioselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Akiyuki; Ducray, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Two new unsymmetrical 1,2,4,5-tetrazines, 3-methylsulfinyl-6-methylthio-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (4) and 3-(benzyloxycarbonyl)amino-6-methylsulfinyl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (5), were prepared and scope of their participation in intermolecular inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions defined. As anticipated, sulfoxides 4 and 5 (4 > 5) display a reactivity that is substantially greater than that of their corresponding sulfides (2 and 3) being derived from their enhanced electron-deficient character and resulting in a wider range of potential dienophile choices or the use of milder reaction conditions. The cycloaddition reactions were expectedly regioselective typically producing a single cycloadduct ensuring their synthetic utility, but both were found to proceed with a regioselectivity opposite what would be anticipated and complementary to that observed with 2 and 3. PMID:16388634

  12. Solvent effects in acid-catalyzed dehydration of the Diels-Alder cycloadduct between 2,5-dimethylfuran and maleic anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-fard, Taha; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas J.

    2017-03-01

    Dehydration of the cycloadduct produced from the Diels-Alder reaction between 2,5-dimethylfuran and maleic anhydride to 3,6-dimethylphthalic anhydride exemplifies an important step in producing platform chemicals from biomass. The mechanisms of dehydration and catalytic effects of Lewis and Brønsted acids are investigated with density functional theory. The uncatalyzed reaction has a very high activation barrier (68.7 kcal/mol) in the gas phase and it is not significantly affected by solvation. With a Lewis acid catalyst, modeled as an alkali ion, the activation barriers are reduced, but intermediates are also stabilized. The net effect in vacuum is that the energetic span, or apparent activation energy of the catalytic cycle, is 77.9 kcal/mol, even higher than the barrier in the uncatalyzed case. In solution, however, the energetic span is reduced by as much as 20 kcal/mol, due to differences in the solvation energy of the transition states and intermediates. In the case of a Brønsted acid catalyst, modeled as a proton, the gas phase transition state energies are reduced even more than in the Lewis acid case, and there is no strong stabilization of the intermediates. The energetic span in vacuum is only 13.8 kcal/mol and is reduced even further in solution. Brønsted acid catalysis appears to be the preferred mechanism for dehydration of this cycloadduct. Since the Diels-Alder reaction that produced the molecule has previously been shown to be catalyzed by Brønsted acids, this suggests that a single catalyst could be used to accelerate both steps.

  13. Theoretical study of Diels-Alder cycloadditions of butadiene to C{sub 70}. An insight into the chemical reactivity of C{sub 70} as compared to C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Mestres, J.; Duran, M.; Sola, M.

    1996-05-02

    The eight unique Diels-Alder cycloadditions of butadiene to C{sub 70} are analyzed theoretically and compared with the well-established, two possible Diels-Alder cycloadditions of butadiene to C{sub 60}. Full geometry optimizations of reactants, adducts, and transition states are performed using the AMI semiempirical method followed by single-point ab initio energy calculations. The results show that the cycloaddition of butadiene to the C{sub 70} fullerene in the gas phase is slightly more reactive than that to C{sub 60}. However, in toluene solution calculations yield that the different solvent effects on C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} cause a significant decrease of the energy barrier in the C{sub 60} cycloaddition, thus predicting a larger reactivity for C{sub 60} as compared to the C{sub 70} fullerene. 36 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Useful dual Diels-Alder behavior of 2-azetidinone-tethered aryl imines as azadienophiles or azadienes: a beta-lactam-based stereocontrolled access to optically pure highly functionalized indolizidine systems.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Alonso, Jose M; Aly, Moustafa F

    2003-07-21

    Imines derived from 4-oxoazetidine-2-carbaldehydes have been found to be versatile Diels-Alder reagents in that they exhibit two reactivity patterns. 2-Azetidinone-tethered imines undergo diastereoselective reaction with Danishefsky's diene in the presence of different Lewis acids. The effect of the amount of catalyst on the conversion rate as well as on the product ratio has been studied. Under standard reaction conditions, indium(III) chloride and zinc(II) iodide provided the best yields, and indium(III) triflate the highest diastereoselectivity in the Lewis acid promoted aza-Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Treatment of the aforementioned imines with cyclopentadiene, 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene or 3,4-dihydro-2 H-pyran led to cycloadducts arising from inverse electron-demand condensation involving the beta-lactam-tethered aryl imine as the heterodiene component. In addition, the first methodology for preparing indolizidines from beta-lactams has been developed. This process involves amide bond cleavage of the beta-lactam ring in the aza-Diels-Alder cycloadducts with concomitant cyclization. Full chirality transfer occurs when the reaction is performed with an enantiomerically pure substrate.

  15. Late Quaternary vegetation and climate history of the central Bering land bridge from St. Michael Island, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ager, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Pollen analysis of a sediment core from Zagoskin Lake on St. Michael Island, northeast Bering Sea, provides a history of vegetation and climate for the central Bering land bridge and adjacent western Alaska for the past ???30,000 14C yr B.P. During the late middle Wisconsin interstadial (???30,000-26,000 14C yr B.P.) vegetation was dominated by graminoid-herb tundra with willows (Salix) and minor dwarf birch (Betula nana) and Ericales. During the late Wisconsin glacial interval (26,000-15,000 14C yr B.P.) vegetation was graminoid-herb tundra with willows, but with fewer dwarf birch and Ericales, and more herb types associated with dry habitats and disturbed soils. Grasses (Poaceae) dominated during the peak of this glacial interval. Graminoid-herb tundra suggests that central Beringia had a cold, arid climate from ???30,000 to 15,000 14C yr B.P. Between 15,000 and 13,000 14C yr B.P., birch shrub-Ericales-sedge-moss tundra began to spread rapidly across the land bridge and Alaska. This major vegetation change suggests moister, warmer summer climates and deeper winter snows. A brief invasion of Populus (poplar, aspen) occurred ca. 11,000-9500 14C yr B.P., overlapping with the Younger Dryas interval of dry, cooler(?) climate. During the latest Wisconsin to middle Holocene the Bering land bridge was flooded by rising seas. Alder shrubs (Alnus crispa) colonized the St. Michael Island area ca. 8000 14C yr B.P. Boreal forests dominated by spruce (Picea) spread from interior Alaska into the eastern Norton Sound area in middle Holocene time, but have not spread as far west as St. Michael Island. ?? 2003 University of Washington. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Late Quaternary vegetation and climate history of the central Bering land bridge from St. Michael Island, western Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, Thomas A.

    2003-07-01

    Pollen analysis of a sediment core from Zagoskin Lake on St. Michael Island, northeast Bering Sea, provides a history of vegetation and climate for the central Bering land bridge and adjacent western Alaska for the past ≥30,000 14C yr B.P. During the late middle Wisconsin interstadial (≥30,000-26,000 14C yr B.P.) vegetation was dominated by graminoid-herb tundra with willows ( Salix) and minor dwarf birch ( Betula nana) and Ericales. During the late Wisconsin glacial interval (26,000-15,000 14C yr B.P.) vegetation was graminoid-herb tundra with willows, but with fewer dwarf birch and Ericales, and more herb types associated with dry habitats and disturbed soils. Grasses (Poaceae) dominated during the peak of this glacial interval. Graminoid-herb tundra suggests that central Beringia had a cold, arid climate from ≥30,000 to 15,000 14C yr B.P. Between 15,000 and 13,000 14C yr B.P., birch shrub-Ericales-sedge-moss tundra began to spread rapidly across the land bridge and Alaska. This major vegetation change suggests moister, warmer summer climates and deeper winter snows. A brief invasion of Populus (poplar, aspen) occurred ca.11,000-9500 14C yr B.P., overlapping with the Younger Dryas interval of dry, cooler(?) climate. During the latest Wisconsin to middle Holocene the Bering land bridge was flooded by rising seas. Alder shrubs ( Alnus crispa) colonized the St. Michael Island area ca. 8000 14C yr B.P. Boreal forests dominated by spruce ( Picea) spread from interior Alaska into the eastern Norton Sound area in middle Holocene time, but have not spread as far west as St. Michael Island.

  17. The Diels-Alder-Reaction with inverse-Electron-Demand, a very efficient versatile Click-Reaction Concept for proper Ligation of variable molecular Partners

    PubMed Central

    Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Kliem, Christian; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The ligation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) for working with image processing systems in diagnostics (MRT) attracts increasing notice and scientific interest. The Diels-Alder ligation Reaction with inverse electron demand (DARinv) turns out to be an appropriate candidate. The DARinv is characterized by a specific distribution of electrons of the diene and the corresponding dienophile counterpart. Whereas the reactants in the classical Diels-Alder Reaction feature electron-rich diene and electron-poor dienophile compounds, the DARinv exhibits exactly the opposite distribution of electrons. Substituents with pushing electrones increase and, with pulling electrons reduce the electron density of the dienes as used in the DARinv. We report here that the DARinv is an efficient route for coupling of multifunctional molecules like active peptides, re-formulated drugs or small molecules like the alkyalting agent temozolomide (TMZ). This is an example of our contribution to the "Click chemistry" technology. In this case TMZ is ligated by DARinv as a cargo to transporter molecules facilitating the passage across the cell membranes into cells and subsequently into subcellular components like the cell nucleus by using address molecules. With such constructs we achieved high local concentrations at the desired target site of pharmacological action. The DARinv ligation was carried out using the combination of several technologies, namely: the organic chemistry and the solid phase peptide synthesis which can produce 'tailored' solutions for questions not solely restricted to the medical diagnostics or therapy, but also result in functionalizations of various surfaces qualified amongst others also for array development. We like to acquaint you with the DARinv and we like to exemplify that all ligation products were generated after a rapid and complete reaction in organic solutions at room temperature, in high purity, but also, hurdles and difficulties on the way to the

  18. Metabolic profiling of major vitamin D metabolites using Diels-Alder derivatization and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aronov, Pavel A; Hall, Laura M; Dettmer, Katja; Stephensen, Charles B; Hammock, Bruce D

    2008-07-01

    Biologically active forms of vitamin D are important analytical targets in both research and clinical practice. The current technology is such that each of the vitamin D metabolites is usually analyzed by individual assay. However, current LC-MS technologies allow the simultaneous metabolic profiling of entire biochemical pathways. The impediment to the metabolic profiling of vitamin D metabolites is the low level of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) in human serum (15-60 pg/mL). Here, we demonstrate that liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction of vitamin D metabolites in combination with Diels-Alder derivatization with the commercially available reagent 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) followed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-electrospray/tandem mass spectrometry analysis provides rapid and simultaneous quantification of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(2), 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D(2) in 0.5 mL human serum at a lower limit of quantification of 25 pg/mL. Precision ranged from 1.6-4.8 % and 5-16 % for 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) and 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), respectively, using solid-phase extraction.

  19. Polar hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 4-alkenylthiazoles with 1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-diones: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Alajarín, Mateo; Cabrera, José; Pastor, Aurelia; Sanchez-Andrada, Pilar; Bautista, Delia

    2008-02-01

    The hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 4-alkenylthiazoles with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) lead to new heteropolycyclic systems in excellent yields and high levels of stereocontrol through an exclusively suprafacial approach. 4-Alkenylthiazoles with a stereogenic center placed at the alkenylic substituent react with PTAD giving the corresponding chiral cycloadducts in moderate diastereomeric excesses. The stereochemical course is dominated by the steric interactions at the two diastereomeric transition states. A computational study of these processes with structurally simpler reagents has been carried out. A concerted pathway via a highly asynchronous transition state is preferred for 2-unsubstituted 4-vinyl and 4-styrylthiazoles. However, two alternative and equally likely pathways, concerted and stepwise, have been found to be followed by 2-methyl- or 2-phenyl-substituted 4-styrylthiazoles. The concerted pathway features a highly asynchronous transition state. For the stepwise pathway, the rate-determining step is the first one, as the energy barrier for the second step is virtually nonexistent.

  20. The Diels-Alder reaction of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan with 1-trimethylsilyloxybuta-1,3-diene: a case example of a stepwise cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, Sami; Terrier, François; Vichard, Dominique; Berionni, Guillaume; El Guesmi, Nizar; Goumont, Régis; Boubaker, Taoufik

    2010-05-17

    The reaction of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan (DNBF) with 1-trimethylsilyloxybuta-1,3-diene (8) is shown to afford a mixture of [2+4] diastereomeric cycloadducts (10, 11) through stepwise addition-cyclization pathways. Zwitterionic intermediate sigma-adduct 9, which is involved in the processes, has been successfully characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and UV/visible spectrophotometry in acetonitrile. A kinetic study has been carried out in this solvent that revealed that the rate of formation of 9 nicely fits the three-parameter equation log k=s(E+N) developed by Mayr to describe the feasibility of nucleophile-electrophile combinations. This significantly adds to the NMR spectroscopic evidence that the overall cycloadditions take place through a stepwise mechanism. The reaction has also been studied in dichloromethane and toluene. In these less polar solvents, the stability of 9 is not sufficient to allow direct characterization by spectroscopic methods, but a kinetic investigation supports the view that stepwise processes are still operating. An informative comparison of our reaction with previous interactions firmly identified as prototype stepwise cycloadditions is made on the basis of the global electrophilicity index, omega, defined by Parr within the density functional theory, and highlighted by Domingo et al. as a powerful tool for understanding Diels-Alder reactions.

  1. Electronic fluxes during Diels-Alder reactions involving 1,2-benzoquinones: mechanistic insights from the analysis of electron localization function and catastrophe theory.

    PubMed

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Domingo, Luis R; Andrés, Juan; Berski, Slawomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2012-11-15

    By means of the joint use of electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory, a theoretical analysis of the energy profile for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of 4-methoxy-1,2-benzoquinone 1 and methoxyethylene 2 has been carried out. The 12 different structural stability domains obtained by the bonding evolution theory have been identified as well as the bifurcation catastrophes (fold and cusp) responsible for the changes in the topology of the system. This analysis permits finding a relationship between the ELF topology and the evolution of the bond breaking/forming processes and electron pair rearrangements through the reaction progress in terms of the different ways of pairing up the electrons. The reaction mechanism corresponds to an asynchronous electronic flux; first, the O1-C5 bond is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the C5 carbon of the electron rich ethylene 2 on the most electrophilically activated carbonyl O1 oxygen of 1, and once the σ bond has been completed, the formation process of the second O4C6 bond takes place. In addition, the values of the local electrophilicity and local nucleophilcity indices in the framework of conceptual density functional theory accounts for the asychronicity of the process as well as for the observed regioselectivity.

  2. Activation-strain analysis reveals unexpected origin of fast reactivity in heteroaromatic azadiene inverse-electron-demand diels-alder cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Austin; Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J; Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Ess, Daniel H

    2015-01-02

    Heteroaromatic azadienes, especially 1,2,4,5-tetrazines, are extremely reactive partners with alkenes in inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions. Azadiene cycloaddition reactions are used to construct heterocycles in synthesis and are popular as bioorthogonal reactions. The origin of fast azadiene cycloaddition reactivity is classically attributed to the inverse frontier molecular orbital (FMO) interaction between the azadiene LUMO and alkene HOMO. Here, we use a combination of ab initio, density functional theory, and activation-strain model calculations to analyze physical interactions in heteroaromatic azadiene-alkene cycloaddition transition states. We find that FMO interactions do not control reactivity because, while the inverse FMO interaction becomes more stabilizing, there is a decrease in the forward FMO interaction that is offsetting. Rather, fast cycloadditions are due to a decrease in closed-shell Pauli repulsion between cycloaddition partners. The kinetic-thermodynamic relationship found for these inverse-electron-demand cycloadditions is also due to the trend in closed-shell repulsion in the cycloadducts. Cycloaddition regioselectivity, however, is the result of differences in occupied-unoccupied orbital interactions due to orbital overlap. These results provide a new predictive model and correct physical basis for heteroaromatic azadiene reactivity and regioselectivity with alkene dieneophiles.

  3. Synthesis and Properties of a Novel Pyridineoxazoline Containing Optically Active Helical Polymer as a Catalyst Ligand for Asymmetric Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Li, Na; Zhang, Jie; Wan, Xinhua

    2015-08-01

    A novel pyridineoxazoline (PyOx) containing helical polymer, poly{(-)-(S)-4-tert-butyl-2-[5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-vinylpyridin-2-yl]-oxazoline} (PA), was designed and synthesized to approach the effect of chain conformation on the catalytic property. Its complex with Cu(OTf)(2) , i.e., Cu(II)-PA, was employed to catalyze the homogeneous Diels-Alder (D-A) reaction of alkenoyl pyridine N-oxides with cyclopentadiene in tetrahydrofuran. Compared with the previously reported copper complex, Cu(II)-P1 (RSC Advances, 2015, 5, 2882), which was derived from a nonhelical poly[(-)-(S)-4-tert-butyl-2-(3-vinylpyridin-2-yl)-oxazoline], Cu(II)-PA exhibited a remarkably enhanced enantioselectivity and reaction rate. However, its enantioselectivity was lower than the Cu(II) complex of (-)-(S)-4-tert-butyl-2-[5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-vinylpyridin-2-yl]-oxazoline (Cu(II)-A), a low molar mass model compound.

  4. Healable capacitive touch screen sensors based on transparent composite electrodes comprising silver nanowires and a furan/maleimide diels-alder cycloaddition polymer.

    PubMed

    Li, Junpeng; Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Ren, Fengbo; Hu, Wei; Li, Juan; Qi, Shuhua; Pei, Qibing

    2014-12-23

    A healable transparent capacitive touch screen sensor has been fabricated based on a healable silver nanowire-polymer composite electrode. The composite electrode features a layer of silver nanowire percolation network embedded into the surface layer of a polymer substrate comprising an ultrathin soldering polymer layer to confine the nanowires to the surface of a healable Diels-Alder cycloaddition copolymer and to attain low contact resistance between the nanowires. The composite electrode has a figure-of-merit sheet resistance of 18 Ω/sq with 80% transmittance at 550 nm. A surface crack cut on the conductive surface with 18 Ω is healed by heating at 100 °C, and the sheet resistance recovers to 21 Ω in 6 min. A healable touch screen sensor with an array of 8×8 capacitive sensing points is prepared by stacking two composite films patterned with 8 rows and 8 columns of coupling electrodes at 90° angle. After deliberate damage, the coupling electrodes recover touch sensing function upon heating at 80 °C for 30 s. A capacitive touch screen based on Arduino is demonstrated capable of performing quick recovery from malfunction caused by a razor blade cutting. After four cycles of cutting and healing, the sensor array remains functional.

  5. Pi-face-selective Diels-Alder reactions of 3,4-di-tert-butylthiophene 1-oxide and 1-imide and formation of 1,2-thiazetidines.

    PubMed

    Otani, Takashi; Takayama, Jun; Sugihara, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Akihiko; Nakayama, Juzo

    2003-07-09

    3,4-Di-tert-butylthiophene 1-oxide (1a) reacted with a series of electron-deficient alkenic dienophiles at its syn-pi-face relating to the S=O bond to give [4+2] adducts in excellent yields. The 1-oxide 1a also reacted even with angle-strained dienophiles acenaphthylene and norbornene at its syn-pi-face to afford [4+2] adducts; in the latter case, norbornene reacted exclusively at its exo-pi-face. The oxide 1a reacted with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate to produce dimethyl 4,5-di-tert-butylphthalate in high yield with spontaneous extrusion of SO from the initial adduct even at room temperature. Similarly, 3,4-di-tert-butylthiophene 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)imide (3a) reacted with alkenic dienophiles at its syn-pi-face relating to the S=N bond to give [4+2] adducts in good yields. The reaction of 3a with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) afforded a 1,2-thiazetidine 12a, the first example of S-unoxidized 1,2-thiazetidine, in good yield, through rearrangement of the initial [4+2] adduct. The molecular structure of 12a is discussed on the basis of the X-ray crystallographic analysis. Comparison of the foregoing reactions leads to the conclusion that the 1-oxide 1a is more reactive as a diene than the 1-imide 3a, which is more reactive than 3,4-di-tert-butylthiophene 1,1-dioxide. The origin of the syn-pi-face selectivities of 1a and 3a in Diels-Alder reactions is discussed in terms of the orbital mixing rule and steric effect and also based on B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculations.

  6. Dependence of the rate of an interfacial Diels-Alder reaction on the steric environment of the immobilized dienophile: an example of enthalpy-entropy compensation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Youngeun; Mrksich, Milan

    2002-02-06

    This paper describes a physical organic study of the relationship between the rate for an interfacial Diels-Alder reaction and the steric environment around the reacting molecules. The study used as a model reaction the cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) presenting benzoquinone groups surrounded by hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiolates. The accessibility of the quinone was varied by preparing monolayers from hydroquinone-terminated alkanethiols of different lengths [HS(CH(2))(n)-HQ, n = 6-14] and a hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol [HS(CH(2))(11)-OH] of constant length. Cyclic voltammetry was used to measure the rate of the reaction by monitoring the decay of the redox-active quinone. The second-order rate constant showed a modest change as the position of quinone was varied relative to the hydroxyl groups of the monolayer. For monolayers wherein the quinone groups were extended from the interface, the rate constants oscillated near 0.20 M(-1) s(-1) with an even-odd dependence on the length of the alkanethiol. For monolayers that positioned the quinone groups below the surrounding hydroxyl groups, the rate constants decreased by approximately 8-fold. Examination of the activation parameters revealed that the quinone groups that were positioned below the interface (and in a crowded environment) reacted with an enthalpy of activation that was 4 kcal/mol greater than did the quinones that were accessible at the interface. The reaction of the buried quinone, however, proceeded with an entropy of activation that was more favorable by 13 eu, and therefore with a similar free energy of activation. The combination of SAMs for preparing model interfaces and cyclic voltammetry for measuring rates provides a new opportunity for physical organic studies of interfacial reactions.

  7. A complete guide on the influence of metal clusters in the Diels-Alder regioselectivity of I(h)-C80 endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Osuna, Sílvia; Luis, Josep M; Swart, Marcel; Solà, Miquel

    2013-10-25

    The chemical functionalization of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) has aroused considerable interest due to the possibility of synthesizing new species with potential applications in materials science and medicine. Experimental and theoretical studies on the reactivity of endohedral metallofullerenes are scarce. To improve our understanding of the endohedral metallofullerene reactivity, we have systematically studied with DFT methods the Diels-Alder cycloaddition between s-cis-1,3-butadiene and practically all X@I(h)-C80 EMFs synthesized to date: X=Sc3N, Lu3N, Y3N, La2, Y3, Sc3C2, Sc4C2, Sc3CH, Sc3NC, Sc4O2 and Sc4O3. We have studied both the thermodynamic and kinetic regioselectivity, taking into account the free rotation of the metallic cluster inside the fullerene. This systematic study has been made possible through the use of the frozen cage model (FCM), a computationally cheap approach to accurately predicting the exohedral regioselectivity of cycloaddition reactions in EMFs. Our results show that the EMFs are less reactive than the hollow I(h)-C80 cage. Except for the Y3 cluster, the additions occur predominantly at the [5,6] bond. In many cases, however, a mixture of the two possible regioisomers is predicted. In general, [6,6] addition is favored in EMFs that have a larger charge transfer from the metal cluster to the cage or a voluminous metal cluster inside. The present guide represents the first complete and exhaustive investigation of the reactivity of I(h)-C80-based EMFs.

  8. An unexpected double Diels-Alder reaction of (E)-2-bromo-4-aryl-1,3-pentadiene involving [1,5]-hydrogen migration and HBr elimination: synthesis of bicyclo[2.2.2]octene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pingping; Liu, Lingyan; Chang, Weixing; Li, Jing

    2015-03-01

    An unexpected double Diels-Alder (DDA) reaction of (E)-2-bromo-4-aryl-1,3-pentadiene was developed and resulted in a series of "butterfly-like" bicyclo[2.2.2]octene derivatives in moderate to good yields without the need for a metal catalyst. The proposed mechanism involves a [1,5]-sigmatropic hydrogen migration and HBr elimination. Through this decisive [1,5]-hydrogen shift step, the electronic properties and steric hindrance of the conjugated diene substrate are completely altered and the DDA reaction of this potential diene synthon is successfully achieved.

  9. Domino 6pi-electrocyclization/Diels-Alder reactions on 1,6-disubstituted (E,Z,E)-1,3,5-hexatrienes: versatile access to highly substituted tri- and tetracyclic systems.

    PubMed

    von Essen, Regina; Frank, Daniel; Sünnemann, Hans Wolf; Vidović, Denis; Magull, Jörg; de Meijere, Armin

    2005-11-04

    The (E,Z,E)-1,3,5-hexatrienes 1a, 2a,b and 3b undergo 6pi-electrocyclization within 15-30 min upon heating to 200-215 degrees C. While the cyclohexene-annelated products 8a,b were stable, the analogous cyclopentene- and cycloheptene-annelated derivatives 7a and 9b easily underwent dehydrogenation to the corresponding aromatic compounds 10a and 12b during the work-up. The cyclohexadiene derivatives 8a,b were employed in thermal Diels-Alder reactions with 4-phenyl-3H-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) to give the expected [4+2] cycloadducts 13a and 14a in good yields (60 and 78%). The initially formed cycloadduct of 8a and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) underwent a subsequent retro-Diels-Alder reaction to give the tetrahydronaphthalene 11b (47%). Under high pressure (10 kbar), the cycloadduct 15a was formed at room temperature and could be isolated in 44% yield. TCNE and N-phenylmaleimide with 8a under high pressure also led to the [4+2] cycloadducts 14a and 16a in good yields (60 and 77%). The 6pi-electrocyclization and subsequent Diels-Alder reaction, when performed as a one-pot domino process, provided direct access to Diels-Alder products of intermediately formed 6pi-electrocyclization products, for example from the 1,3,5-hexatrienes 1a,b, 2a,b, 3b and TCNE to the corresponding tricyclic products 17a,b, 14a,b, 18b in moderate to good yields (27-80%) depending on the nature of the alkoxycarbonyl group. Such sequential reactions with N-phenylmaleimide, maleic anhydride, dimethyl maleate and fumarodinitrile, the latter two under high pressure (10 kbar), worked as well to yield 16b (70%), 19a,b (19, 32%) and 20b (39%) and 21b (76%), respectively. With PTAD, however, the hexatrienes 2a,b reacted at ambient temperature without 6pi-electrocyclization to give the formal [4+2] cycloadducts 27a,b (48 and 46%), most probably via zwitterionic intermediates 23a,b and 25a,b.

  10. The [2 + 2] Cycloaddition-Retroelectrocyclization and [4 + 2] Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of 2-(Dicyanomethylene)indan-1,3-dione with Electron-Rich Alkynes: Influence of Lewis Acids on Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Donckele, Etienne J; Finke, Aaron D; Ruhlmann, Laurent; Boudon, Corinne; Trapp, Nils; Diederich, François

    2015-07-17

    The reaction of electrophilic 2-(dicyanomethylene)indan-1,3-dione (DCID) with substituted, electron-rich alkynes provides two classes of push-pull chromophores with interesting optoelectronic properties. The formal [2 + 2] cycloaddition-retroelectrocyclization reaction at the exocyclic double bond of DCID gives cyanobuta-1,3-dienes, and the formal [4 + 2] hetero-Diels-Alder (HDA) reaction at an enone moiety of DCID generates fused 4H-pyran heterocycles. Both products can be obtained in good yield and excellent selectivity by carefully tuning the reaction conditions; in particular, the use of Lewis acids dramatically enhances formation of the HDA adduct.

  11. Hydrogenase in actinorhizal root nodules and root nodule homogenates.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, D R; Arp, D J; Burris, R H

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogenases were measured in intact actinorhizal root nodules and from disrupted nodules of Alnus glutinosa, Alnus rhombifolia, Alnus rubra, and Myrica pensylvanica. Whole nodules took up H2 in an O2-dependent reaction. Endophyte preparations oxidized H2 through the oxyhydrogen reaction, but rates were enhanced when hydrogen uptake was coupled to artificial electron acceptors. Oxygen inhibited artifical acceptor-dependent H2 uptake. The hydrogenase system from M. pensylvanica had a different pattern of coupling to various electron acceptors than the hydrogenase systems from the alders; only the bayberry system evolved H2 from reduced viologen dyes. PMID:6989799

  12. Insights into the Diels-Alder Reaction between 3-Vinylindoles and Methyleneindolinone without and with the Assistance of Hydrogen-Bonding Catalyst Bisthiourea: Mechanism, Origin of Stereoselectivity, and Role of Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chao-Xian; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xing; Zhou, Da-Gang; Zhou, Pan-Pan

    2017-03-17

    The Diels-Alder reaction between 3-vinylindoles and methyleneindolinone can proceed both under catalyst-free conditions and with bisthiourea as the catalyst. The reaction with bisthiourea is much faster and results in higher stereoselectivity of the product. The reaction mechanism, origin of stereoselectivity, and role of the catalyst were elaborated based on quantum mechanical calculations and theoretical methods of reactivity indices, NCI, QTAIM, and distortion/interaction models. In the uncatalyzed reaction, the two C-C bonds that are formed undergo conversion from noncovalent to covalent bonding via a concerted asynchronous mechanism. The weak intermolecular interactions formed in the transition state play important roles. The difference between the interaction and distortion energies is responsible for the stereoselectivity. In the catalyzed reaction, bisthiourea induces both the diene and dienophile to approach it via weak intermolecular interactions, which greatly lowers the energy barrier of the reaction and leads to the product with excellent stereoselectivity. The possible pathways of this reaction were explored, which suggested that the formation of the two C-C bonds goes through either a stepwise or concerted asynchronous mechanism. These results detail the reaction mechanism and shed light on both the significant role of the bisthiourea catalyst and the origin of stereoselectivity for this type of Diels-Alder reaction and related ones.

  13. Tandem Intramolecular Diels-Alder/1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Cascade of 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles: Initial Scope and Applications.

    PubMed

    Sears, Justin E; Boger, Dale L

    2016-02-16

    impressive range of additional natural products illustrate the power of the methodology. Alternative tethering strategies for the cascade cycloaddition reaction, combined intramolecular and intermolecular variants of either the initiating Diels-Alder reaction or the subsequent carbonyl ylide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, an expanded examination of the tethered dipolarophile scope, and applications to additional natural product classes represent attractive areas for future work.

  14. Linear-dendritic supramolecular complexes as nanoscale reaction vessels for "green" chemistry. Diels-Alder reactions between fullerene C60 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Arsen; Gitsov, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This study describes the first Diels-Alder (DA) reaction performed in aqueous medium with highly hydrophobic compounds-fullerene (C 60) as the dienophile and anthracene (An) or tetracene (Tet) as the dienes, respectively. The reactions are performed in nanocontainers, constructed by self-assembly of linear-dendritic amphiphilic copolymers with poly(ethylene glycol), PEG or poly(ethylene oxide), PEO as the hydrophilic blocks and poly(benzyl ether) monodendrons as the hydrophobic fragments: G3PEO13k, dG3 and dG2. Comparative studies under identical conditions are carried out with an amphiphilic linear-linear copolymer, poly(styrene)1800- block-PEO2100, PSt-PEO, and the nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-720, IP720. The binding affinity of supermolecules built of these amphiphiles toward the DA reagents decreases in the following order: G3PEO13k > dG3 > PSt-PEO > dG2 > IP720. The kinetic constant of binding is evaluated for tetracene and decreases in a similar fashion: 5 x 10 (-7) M/min (G3PEO13k), through 4 x 10 (-7) M/min (PSt-PEO) down to 1.5 x 10 (-7) M/min for IP720. The mobility of substrates encapsulated in the micellar core, estimated by pyrene fluorescence decay, is 95-121 ns for the micelles of the linear-dendritic copolymers and notably higher for PSt-PEO (152 ns), revealing the much denser interior of the linear analogue. The apparent kinetic constant for the DA reaction of C 60 and Tet within the G3PEO13k supermolecule in aqueous medium is markedly higher than in organic solvent (toluene), 208 vs 1.82 M /min. With G3PEO13k the conversions reach 49% for the DA reaction between C 60 and An, and 55% for C 60 and Tet. Besides the monoadduct (26.5% yield) the reaction with An produces exclusively increasing amounts of D 2 h -symmetric antipodal bis-adduct, whose yield reaches up to 22.5% after 48 h. In addition to the environmentally friendly conditions notable advantages of the synthetic strategy described are the extended stability of the linear

  15. Tandem Intramolecular Diels–Alder/1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Cascade of 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles: Initial Scope and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Justin E.

    2016-01-01

    total synthesis of an impressive range of additional natural products illustrate the power of the methodology. Alternative tethering strategies for the cascade cycloaddition reaction, combined intramolecular and intermolecular variants of either the initiating Diels–Alder reaction or the subsequent carbonyl ylide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, an expanded examination of the tethered dipolarophile scope, and applications to additional natural product classes represent attractive areas for future work. PMID:26813287

  16. Direct and Indirect Determinations of Elementary Rate Constants H + O2: Chain Branching; the Dehydration of tertiary-Butanol; the Retro Diels-Alder Reaction of Cyclohexene; the Dehydration of Isopropanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyne, Joshua S.

    Due to growing environmental concern over the continued use of fossil fuels, methods to limit emissions and partially replace fossil fuel use with renewable biofuels are of considerable interest. Developing chemical kinetic models for the chemistry that affects combustion properties is important to understanding how new fuels affect combustion energy conversion processes in transportation devices. This thesis reports the experimental study of several important reactions (the H + O2 branching reaction, the key decomposition reactions of tertiary-butanol, the dehydration reaction of isopropanol, and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene) and develops robust analysis methods to estimate the absolute uncertainties of specific elementary rate constants derived from the experimental data. In the study of the above reactions, both a direct and indirect rate constant determination technique with associated uncertainty estimation methodologies are developed. In the study of the decomposition reactions, a direct determination technique is applied to experimental data gathered in preparation of this thesis. In the case of the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, both of which are used as internal standards for relative rate studies (Herzler et al. 1997) and chemical thermometry (Rosado-Reyes et al. 2013) , analysis showed an ˜20 K difference in the reaction rate between the reported results and the previous recommendations. In light of these discrepancies, an uncertainty estimation of previous recommendations illuminated an uncertainty of at least 20 K for the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, thus resolving the discrepancies. The determination of the H + O2 branching reaction and decomposition reactions of isopropanol used an indirect determination technique. The uncertainty of the H + O2 branching reaction rate is shown to be underestimated by previous

  17. Root tensile strength of grey alder and mountain maple grown on a coarse grained eco-engineered slope in the Swiss Alps related to wood anatomical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kink, Dimitri; Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Egli, Markus; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    . In order to confirm this assumption and possibly find more important root properties which have an influence on soil stabilization, the root systems of seven trees (three grey alder, four mountain maple) were excavated and analyzed. The study site is a catchment, where shallow landslides are common. It is located in the Prättigau valley in the Eastern Swiss Alps and was eco-engineered in 1997. The substrate is coarse-grained morainic material, mean annual air temperature reaches 4.64°C, average precipitation is 1170 mm, and the altitude is about 1000 m a.s.l.. The root system of each tree was uncovered carefully by hand to keep the roots undamaged, before removal it was photographed in situ to document the root distribution. The root systems were then cut into single root pieces of about 20 cm length and the position of each sample was documented. The root samples were then hierarchically classified in several root classes. The tensile strength of more than 500 samples was determined. In addition, the values for age, diameter, and root moisture were ascertained. Since it was assumed, that the cellular structure of the roots has an influence on the tensile strength, two microscopic thin-sections were prepared from all successfully tested root samples. The microscopic analysis focused on anatomical parameters such as the size and number of vessels, their distribution as well as their conductivity. The results for the final correlation between the anatomical characteristics and the root's tensile strength are presented for both tree species.

  18. TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE SOURCES OF NUTRIENTS TO AN OREGON COASTAL RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Pacific Northwest of North America, anadromous fish can transport significant quantities of nutrients and energy from the ocean to the watersheds where they return, reproduce and die. In addition, the widespread distribution of N2-fixing alders (Alnus spp.) can influence ...

  19. Bounding salt marsh nitrogen fluxes: development of an ecohydrological salt marsh model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass-balance approach to characterize nitrogen flux in a 2-hectare, meso-haline saltmarsh yielded extensive flow and water chemistry data. However, a significant, unevenly distributed population of the nitrogen fixer Alnus rubra (red alder) in the 20-hectare upland catchment l...

  20. From the forest to the sea and back again: Biogeochemistry in the Oregon Coast Range

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. A...

  1. Linking landscape characteristics and stream nitrogen in the Oregon Coast Range: Empirical modeling of water quality monitoring data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background sources of nitrogen (N) provide a challenge for setting stream nutrient criteria in the Pacific Northwest US. Red alder (Alnus rubra), an early successional nitrogen fixing tree, and sea salt inputs can strongly influence stream N concentrations observed in individual...

  2. High performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) - Evidence for the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material and a bismaleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.; Soucek, M. D.; Chang, A. C.; Partos, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept and demonstration of a new versatile synthetic reaction for making a large number of high-performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) were reported. The synthesis shows promise for providing polymers having an attractive combination of easy processability, good toughness, respectable high temperature mechanical performance, and excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The new chemistry involves the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material with a bismaleimide or benzoquinone. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism, model compound studies were undertaken in solutions as well as in the solid state. The reaction products were purified by flash chromatography and characterized by conventional analytical techniques including NMR, FT-IR, UV-visible, mass spectroscopy, and high pressure liquid chromatography. The results are presented of the model compound studies which strongly support the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated compound and a bismaleimide or benzoquinone.

  3. Multilocus sequence typing confirms the close genetic interrelatedness of three distinct flavescence dorée phytoplasma strain clusters and group 16SrV phytoplasmas infecting grapevine and alder in Europe.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Guillaume; Malembic-Maher, Sylvie; Salar, Pascal; Bonnet, Patrick; Maixner, Michael; Marcone, Carmine; Boudon-Padieu, Elisabeth; Foissac, Xavier

    2007-06-01

    Vineyards of southern France and northern Italy are affected by the flavescence dorée (FD) phytoplasma, a quarantine pathogen transmitted by the leafhopper of Nearctic origin Scaphoideus titanus. To better trace propagation of FD strains and identify possible passage between the vineyard and wild plant compartments, molecular typing of phytoplasma strains was applied. The sequences of the two genetic loci map and uvrB-degV, along with the sequence of the secY gene, were determined among a collection of FD and FD-related phytoplasmas infecting grapevine, alder, elm, blackberry, and Spanish broom in Europe. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses consistently indicated the existence of three FD phytoplasma strain clusters. Strain cluster FD1 (comprising isolate FD70) displayed low variability and represented 17% of the disease cases in the French vineyard, with a higher incidence of the cases in southwestern France. Strain cluster FD2 (comprising isolates FD92 and FD-D) displayed no variability and was detected both in France (83% of the cases) and in Italy, whereas the more-variable strain cluster FD3 (comprising isolate FD-C) was detected only in Italy. The clonal property of FD2 and its wide distribution are consistent with diffusion through propagation of infected-plant material. German Palatinate grapevine yellows phytoplasmas (PGY) appeared variable and were often related to some of the alder phytoplasmas (AldY) detected in Italy and France. Finally, phylogenetic analyses concluded that FD, PGY, and AldY were members of the same phylogenetic subclade, which may have originated in Europe.

  4. Density functional theory and atoms-in-molecule study on the role of two-electron stabilizing interactions in retro Diels-Alder reaction of cycloadducts derived from substituted cyclopentadiene and p-benzoquinone.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mahendra P; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2006-11-07

    A systematic investigation on the cycloreversion reaction of the cycloadduct formed between substituted cyclopentadiene and p-benzoquinone (1-19) is reported at the B3LYP/6-311+G**//B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. The computed activation barrier exhibits a fairly high sensitivity to the nature of substituents at the C7-position. Gibbs free energy of activation for 1 and 19 are found to be 20.3 and 30.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively, compared to 7, which is estimated to be 24.7 kcal mol(-1). Quantitative analysis of the electronic effects operating in both the cycloadduct as well as the corresponding transition state for the retro Diels-Alder (rDA) reaction performed using the natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecule (AIM) methods have identified important two-electron stabilizing interactions. Among four major delocalizations, sigma(C7-X) to sigma*(C1-C5) [and to sigma*(C2-C6)] is identified as the key contributing factor responsible for ground state C1-C5 bond elongation, which in turn is found to be crucial in promoting the rDA reaction. A good correlation between the population of antibonding orbital [sigma*(C1-C5)] of the ground state cycloadduct and Gibbs free energy of activation is observed. The importance of factors that modulate ground state structural features in controlling the energetics of rDA reaction is described.

  5. N-O chemistry for antibiotics: discovery of N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine scaffolds as selective antibacterial agents using nitroso Diels-Alder and ene chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wencewicz, Timothy A; Yang, Baiyuan; Rudloff, James R; Oliver, Allen G; Miller, Marvin J

    2011-10-13

    The discovery, syntheses, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a new family of heterocyclic antibacterial compounds based on N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine scaffolds are described. A structurally diverse library of ∼100 heterocyclic molecules generated from Lewis acid-mediated nucleophilic ring-opening reactions with nitroso Diels-Alder cycloadducts and nitroso ene reactions with substituted alkenes was evaluated in whole cell antibacterial assays. Compounds containing the N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine structure demonstrated selective and potent antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 (MIC(90) = 2.0 μM or 0.41 μg/mL) and moderate activity against other Gram-positive strains including antibiotic resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). A new synthetic route to the active core was developed using palladium-catalyzed Buchwald-Hartwig amination reactions of N-alkyl-O-(4-methoxybenzyl)hydroxylamines with 2-halo-pyridines that facilitated SAR studies and revealed the simplest active structural fragment. This work shows the value of using a combination of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) and parallel synthesis for identifying new antibacterial scaffolds.

  6. Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reaction of N-Alkyl-2-cyano-1-azadienes: A Study of the Eschenmoser Cycloreversion of Dihydrooxazines as a Route to N-Alkyl-2-cyano-1-azadienes.

    PubMed

    Motorina, Irina A.; Fowler, Frank W.; Grierson, David S.

    1997-04-04

    In connection with the development of the intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction (IMDA) of 1-azadienes, the 5,6-dihydro-4H-1,2-oxazine 12has been evaluated as a synthon equivalent of the 2-cyano-1-azadiene system. It was found that the dihydrooxazonium salt 27, generated in situ from the cyclic hydroxamic acid derivative 26, is converted directly to azadiene 4a via tautomerization to the corresponding enamine and a particularly facile Eschenmoser type cycloreversion process. Conditions were subsequently found for the preparation of synthon 12. N-Alkylation of this intermediate with alkyl bromides in the presence of Ag(+) ion also resulted in direct formation of the 2-cyano-1-azadiene products 38a-dand 4a. Microwave irradiation of a benzene solution of azadiene 4a proved to be a convenient means to effect its IMDA conversion to indolizidine 5a. To avoid decomposition of azadiene 38c, its intramolecular cycloaddition giving 40 (60%) was achieved by flash vacuum thermolysis.

  7. Lipase-catalyzed domino kinetic resolution/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction: one-pot synthesis of optically active 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptenes from furfuryl alcohols and beta-substituted acrylic acids.

    PubMed

    Akai, Shuji; Naka, Tadaatsu; Omura, Sohei; Tanimoto, Kouichi; Imanishi, Masashi; Takebe, Yasushi; Matsugi, Masato; Kita, Yasuyuki

    2002-09-16

    The first lipase-catalyzed domino reaction is described in which the acyl moiety formed during the enzymatic kinetic resolution of furfuryl alcohols (+/-)-3 with a 1-ethoxyvinyl ester 2 was utilized as a part of the constituent structure for the subsequent Diels-Alder reaction. The preparation of ester 2 from carboxylic acid 1 and the subsequent domino reaction were carried out in a one-pot reaction. Therefore, this procedure provides a convenient preparation of the optically active 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptene derivatives 5, which has five chiral, non-racemic carbon centers, from achiral 1 and racemic 3. The overall efficiency of this process was dependent on the substituent at the C-3 position of 3, and the use of the 3-methylfurfuryl derivatives, (+/-)-3 b and (+/-)-3 f, exclusively produced diastereoselectivity with excellent enantioselectivity to give (2R)-syn-5 (91->/=99 % ee) and (S)-3 (96->/=99 % ee). Similar procedures starting from the 3-bromofurfuryl alcohols (+/-)-3 h-j provided the cycloadducts (2R)-syn-5 j-q (93->/=99 % ee), in which the bromo group was utilized for the installation of bulky substituents to the 7-oxabicycloheptene core.

  8. Proposal of a type strain for Frankia alni (Woronin 1866) Von Tubeuf 1895, emended description of Frankia alni, and recognition of Frankia casuarinae sp. nov. and Frankia elaeagni sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Nouioui, Imen; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Montero-Calasanz, Maria Del Carmen; Göker, Markus; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Schumann, Peter; Rohde, Manfred; Goodfellow, Michael; Fernandez, Maria P; Normand, Philippe; Tisa, Louis S; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Gtari, Maher

    2016-12-01

    Before the establishment of pure cultures, the species Frankia alni, 'Frankia casuarinae' and 'Frankia elaeagni' were proposed to encompass all causal agents of the nitrogen-fixing root nodules of dicotyledonous plants from the genera Alnus, Casuarina or Elaeagnus. The sole Frankia species with a validly published name, the type species F. alni, was described by Woronin (1866) as present in the root of alder. Until now no type strain has been designated for F. alni, even though the absence of a type strain has seriously inhibited the application of modern taxonomic methods to the genus Frankia. Thus, we propose that strain ACN14aT, isolated in pure culture from Alnus viridis ssp. crispa with morphological properties matching the original description of F. alni, be recognized as the type strain of this species according to Rule 18f of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. We compared ACN14aT to two strains, CcI3T and BMG5.12T, isolated from Casuarina cunninghamiana and Elaeagnus angustifolia, respectively, based on chemotaxonomy, phenotype microarray data and molecular data retrieved from genome sequences. All three tested strains grew as branched hyphae, produced vesicles and multilocular sporangia containing non-motile spores and metabolized short fatty acids, TCA-cycle intermediates and carbohydrates. Chemotaxonomically, the three strains were indistinguishable with respect to phospholipids (phosphatidylinositol, diphosphatidylglycerol, glycophospholipids and phosphatidylglycerol) and cell-sugar composition (glucose, mannose, ribose, rhamnose, galactose and xylose, with the latter two being diagnostic for the genus). The major fatty acids identified in all three strains were iso-C16 : 0, C17 : 1ω8c, C15 : 0, C17 : 0 and C16 : 0. ACN14aT and BMG5.12T also shared C15 : 1ω6c, while C18 : 1ω9c was found to be unique to BMG5.12T. The major menaquinones identified in all three novel type strains were MK-9(H8), MK-9(H6) and

  9. Predicting crown weight and bole volume of five western hardwoods. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, J.A.K.; Little, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    Regression equations are presented for estimating biomass of five western hardwoods: red alder (Alnus rubra), giant chinkapin (Castanopsis chrysophylla), big leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), Pacific madrone (Arbutus memziesii), and tan oak (Lithocarpus densiflorus). Estimators are given for total crown biomass, cumulative proportions for separating crown weight into foliage and four timelag fuel diameter classes, bark weight, and bole volume (inside bark) to any specified top diameter. With one exception, the equation uses diameter at breast height as the only independent variable.

  10. Succession on regraded placer mine spoil in Alaska, USA, in relation to initial site characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the rate and pattern of natural succession on regraded placer mine spoil in relation to initial substrate characteristics. The study site was the Glen Creek watershed of the Kantishna mining area of Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. After regrading, twelve 0.01-ha plots were established and substrate characteristics were measured. Natural plant succession was evaluated after five growing seasons. Three successional patterns were identified on the basis of plant community characteristics using cluster analysis, and were related to substrate characteristics. First, a riparian plant community with vigorous Salix alaxensis and Alnus crispa grew rapidly on topsoil that had been spread over the regraded spoil. Second, a similar plant community with less vigorous S. alaxensis developed more slowly on unprocessed spoil and spoil amended with a small amount of topsoil. Third, processed spoil remained almost bare of vegetation, although S. alaxensis was able to establish and persist in a stunted growth form. In contrast, Alnus crispa had difficulty establishing on processed spoil, but the few established seedlings grew well. Several substrate variables, including the proportion of silt and clay vs. sand, total nitrogen, and water retention capacity, were good predictors of the rate and pattern of succession. Total nitrogen was the best single predictor for the number of vigorous S. alaxensis.

  11. Effects of invasive European bird cherry (Prunus padus) on leaf litter processing by aquatic invertebrate shredder communities in urban Alaskan streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roon, David A.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Wurtz, Tricia L.

    2014-01-01

    European bird cherry (Prunus padus) (EBC) is an invasive ornamental tree that is spreading rapidly in riparian forests of urban Alaska. To determine how the spread of EBC affects leaf litter processing by aquatic invertebrate shredders, we conducted complementary leaf pack experiments in two streams located in Anchorage, Alaska. The first experiment contrasted invasive EBC with three native tree species—thin-leaf alder (Alnus tenuifolia), paper birch (Betula neoalaskana), and black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)—in one reach of Chester Creek; finding that EBC leaf litter broke down significantly faster than birch and cottonwood, but at a similar rate to alder. The second experiment contrasted EBC with alder in four reaches of Campbell and Chester creeks; finding that while EBC leaf litter broke down significantly faster than alder in Chester Creek, EBC broke down at a similar rate to alder in Campbell Creek. Although EBC sometimes supported fewer shredders by both count and mass, shredder communities did not differ significantly between EBC and native plants. Collectively, these data suggest that invasive EBC is not currently exhibiting strong negative impacts on leaf litter processing in these streams, but could if it continues to spread and further displaces native species over time.

  12. Holocene vegetation histories from three sites in the Tundra of Northwestern Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, K. ); Garralla, S.

    1992-11-01

    Two pollen diagrams from lakes north of treeline in northwestern Quebec indicate that Picea never extended north of its present-day limit during the past 6000 yr BP. Alnus crispa was slightly more abundant around 5000 BP, but there are few major changes in the vegetation of the region during the Holocene. A third site in the tundra along Hudson Bay has a slightly longer sequence (7000 yr BP) which indicates more open conditions in the early and recent part of the record. Picea may have been more abundant locally around 3000 BP. Few major changes in these diagrams can be unequivocally attributed to local changes in plant abundance; changes in tree and shrub pollen abundance parallel those seen south of treeline.

  13. Comparative Study of the Volatile Components of Fresh and Fermented Flowers of Alnus sieboldiana (Betulaceae).

    PubMed

    Ab Ghani, Nurunajah; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of the volatile components present in the fresh male and female flowers and young leaves shows that 2-phenylethanol is the major component in all these three organs, which play a significant role in the strong resinous aromatic odor. The male flowers contained styrene as a second major compound. The level of styrene does not affect the male flowers odor concentration. The level of β-phenylethyl cinnamate and trans-methyl cinnamate in the fermented male flowers decreased as the fermentation time increased. This was due to the Penicillium enzymatic action on the fermented male flowers.

  14. Do Invertebrate Activity and Current Velocity Affect Fungal Assemblage Structure in Leaves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Verónica; Graça, Manuel A. S.

    2006-02-01

    In this study we assessed the effect of current velocity and shredder presence, manipulated in artificial channels, on the structure of the fungal assemblage colonizing alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertner) leaves incubated in coarse and fine mesh bags. Fungal sporulation rates, cumulative conidial production and number of species of aquatic hyphomycetes were higher in leaves exposed to high rather than to low current velocity. The opposite was observed regarding Simpson's index (D) on the fungal assemblage. Some species of aquatic hyphomycetes were consistently stimulated in high current channels. No effect of shredders or of mesh type was observed.

  15. The exohedral Diels-Alder reactivity of the titanium carbide endohedral metallofullerene Ti2C2@D(3h)-C78: comparison with D(3h)-C78 and M3N@D(3h)-C78 (M=Sc and Y) reactivity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Osuna, Sílvia; Luis, Josep M; Swart, Marcel; Solà, Miquel

    2012-06-04

    The chemical functionalization of endohedral (metallo)fullerenes has become a main focus of research in the last few years. It has been found that the reactivity of endohedral (metallo)fullerenes may be quite different from that of the empty fullerenes. Encapsulated species have an enormous influence on the thermodynamics, kinetics, and regiochemistry of the exohedral addition reactions undergone by these species. A detailed understanding of the changes in chemical reactivity due to incarceration of atoms or clusters of atoms is essential to assist the synthesis of new functionalized endohedral fullerenes with specific properties. Herein, we report the study of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition between 1,3-butadiene and all nonequivalent bonds of the Ti(2)C(2)@D(3h)-C(78) metallic carbide endohedral metallofullerene (EMF) at the BP86/TZP//BP86/DZP level of theory. The results obtained are compared with those found by some of us at the same level of theory for the D(3h)-C(78) free cage and the M(3)N@D(3h)-C(78) (M=Sc and Y) metallic nitride EMFs. It is found that the free cage is more reactive than the Ti(2)C(2)@D(3h)-C(78) EMF and this, in turn, has a higher reactivity than M(3)N@D(3h)-C(78). The results indicate that, for Ti(2)C(2)@D(3h)-C(78), the corannulene-type [5,6] bonds c and f, and the type B [6,6] bond 3 are those thermodynamically and kinetically preferred. In contrast, the D(3h)-C(78) free cage has a preference for addition to the [6,6] 1 and 6 bonds and the [5,6] b bond, whereas M(3)N@D(3h)-C(78) favors additions to the [6,6] 6 (M=Sc) and [5,6] d (M=Y) bonds. The reasons for the regioselectivity found in Ti(2)C(2)@D(3h)-C(78) are discussed.

  16. Paleoecology of late-glacial terrestrial deposits with in situ conifers from the submerged continental shelf of western canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, Terri; Mathewes, Rolf W.; Fedje, Daryl W.

    2003-09-01

    Extensive portions of the continental shelf off the coast of British Columbia were subaerially exposed during Late Wisconsinan deglaciation due to lowering of relative sea level by as much as 150 m. Paleoecological analyses were conducted at two sites on the emergent continental shelf where terrestrial surfaces with in situ conifers are preserved. The woody plant remains confirm that, during the latest period of subaerial exposure, terrestrial vegetation was established on the continental shelf. Microscopic identification of fossil wood, and analyses of pollen and plant macrofossils from the associated paleosols and overlying shallow pond sediments indicate that productive Pinus contorta-dominated communities with abundant Alnus crispa and ferns grew on the shelf adjacent to and on the Queen Charlotte Islands around 12,200 14C yr B.P. Dwarf shrubs including Salix and Empetrum, and herbaceous plants such as Heracleum lanatum and Hippuris vulgaris, were also important components of the shelf vegetation. Near northern Vancouver Island, mixed coniferous forests dominated by Pinus contorta with Picea, Tsuga spp., Alnus spp., and ferns occupied the shelf at 10,500 14C yr B.P.

  17. Recent and Holocene climate change controls on vegetation and carbon accumulation in Alaskan coastal muskegs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peteet, Dorothy M.; Nichols, Jonathan E.; Moy, Christopher M.; McGeachy, Alicia; Perez, Max

    2016-01-01

    Pollen, spore, macrofossil and carbon data from a peatland near Cordova, Alaska, reveal insights into the climate-vegetation-carbon interactions from the initiation of the Holocene, c. the last 11.5 ka, to the present (1 ka = 1000 calibrated years before present where 0 = 1950 CE). The Holocene period is characterized by early deposition of gyttja in a pond environment with aquatics such as Nuphar polysepalum and Potamogeton, and a significant regional presence of Alnus crispa subsp. sinuata. Carbon accumulation (50 g/m2/a) was high for a short interval in the early Holocene when Sphagnum peat accumulated, but was followed by a major decline to 13 g/m2/a from 7 to 3.7 ka when Cyperaceae and ericads such as Rhododendron (formerly Ledum) groenlandicum expanded. This shift to sedge growth is representative of many peatlands throughout the south-central region of Alaska, and indicates a drier, more evaporative environment with a large decline in carbon storage. The subsequent return to Sphagnum peat after 4 ka in the Neoglacial represents a widespread shift to moister, cooler conditions, which favored a resurgence of ericads, such as Andromeda polifolia, and increased carbon accumulation rate. The sustained Alnus expansion visible in the top 10 cm of the peat profile is correlative with glacial retreat and warming of the region in the last century, and suggests this colonization will continue as temperature increases and ice melts.

  18. Geographic variation in red alder. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, D.T.; DeBell, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    A test of 10 provenances was established in 1969 on the central coast of Oregon. The provenances tested included Juneau, Alaska, and Sandpoint, Idaho, in addition to eight well-spaced locations in Oregon, Washington, and in the southern end of Vancouver island, British Columbia. Periodic measurements through 15 years of plantation development revealed differences among provenances in height, diameter, and height/diameter ratio. The calculated variables, bole volume and aboveground biomass, showed large differences among provenances. Two provenances from northwestern Washington consistently were the most vigorous, two (Juneau, Alaska, and Sandpoint, Idaho) were the least vigorous, and the remaining six provenances shifted somewhat in ranking over time.

  19. Presumed consent for transplantation: a dead issue after Alder Hey?

    PubMed Central

    English, V; Sommerville, A

    2003-01-01

    In the wake of scandals about the unauthorised retention of organs following postmortem examination, the issue of valid consent (or the lack of it) has returned to the forefront. Emphasis is put on obtaining explicit authorisation from the patient or family prior to any medical intervention, including those involving the dead. Although the controversies in the UK arose from the retention of human material for education or research rather than therapy, concern has been expressed that public mistrust could also adversely affect organ donation for transplantation. At the same time, however, the British Medical Association (BMA) continues to call for a shift to a system of presumed consent for organ transplantation. This apparent inconsistency can be justified because valid distinctions exist between the reasons requiring explicit consent for retention and the acceptability of presumed consent for transplantation. This paper argues for introducing a system of presumed consent for organ donation, given the overwhelming expressions of public support for transplantation. Ongoing legislative review in the UK provides an ideal chance to alter the default position to one where potential donors can simply acquiesce or opt out of donation. Combined with consultation with their relatives, this could be a much better method of realising individuals' wishes. It would also achieve a better balance between the duties owed to the deceased and those owed to people awaiting a transplant. PMID:12796433

  20. Effect of polypeptides from sea anemone Heteractis crispa on the rodent blood pressure, heart rate, and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Skobtsova, L A; Dyachenko, I A; Andreev, Ya A; Logashina, Yu A; Murashev, A N; Grishin, E V

    2016-09-01

    АРНС1-3 peptides, modulators of TRPV1 receptors, have been administered to SD rats to study their influence on the animal hemostatic system, heart rate, and blood pressure. None of АЗРС1-3 polypeptides have any effect on the hemostatic system. Both АРНС1 and АРНС2 polypeptides increased significantly the heart rate, but they did not affect blood pressure, which was probably caused by an ability of these polypeptides to modify animal thermoregulation.

  1. Crystal structures and conformations of two Diels-Alder adduct derivatives: 1,8-bis-(thio-phen-2-yl)-14-oxa-tetra-cyclo-[6.5.1.0(2,7).0(9,13)]tetra-deca-2(7),3,5-trien-10-one and 1,8-diphenyl-14-oxa-tetra-cyclo[6.5.1.0(2,7).0(9,13)] tetra-deca-2,4,6-trien-10-one.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, S; Narayanan, P; Sethusankar, K; Nandakumar, Meganathan; Mohanakrishnan, Arasambattu K

    2015-02-01

    The title compounds, C21H16O2S2 (I) and C25H20O2 (II), are products of a tandem 'pincer' Diels-Alder reaction consisting of [2 + 2] cyclo-additions between benzo[c]furan and cyclo-penta-none. Each comprises a fused tetra-cyclic ring system containing two five-membered rings (in envelope conformations with the O atom as the flap) and six-membered rings (in boat conformations). In addition, two thio-phene rings in (I) and two phenyl rings in (II) are attached to the tetra-cyclic ring system. The cyclo-penta-none ring adopts a twisted conformation in (I) and an envelope conformation in (II). In (I), the thio-phene rings are positionally disordered over two sets of sites, with occupancy ratios of 0.901 (2):0.099 (2) and 0.666 (2):0.334 (2). In (II), the oxygen atom of the cyclo-penta-none ring is rotationally disordered over two sites with an occupancy ratio of 0.579 (4):0.421 (4). The mol-ecular structure of (I) is stabilized by an intra-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bond, which generates an S(7) ring motif. In the crystal, the mol-ecules are linked via weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which generate R (2) 2(16) ring motifs in (I) and C(8) chains in (II). In both structures, the crystal packing also features C-H⋯π inter-actions. The crystal studied of compound (I) was twinned by non-merohedry. The twin component is related by the twin law [-1 0 0 -0.101 1 -0.484 0 0 -1] operated by a twofold rotation axis parallel to the b axis. The structure of (I) was refined with a twin scale factor of 0.275 (2).

  2. Postglacial vegetation history of Mitkof Island, Alexander Archipelago, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ager, T.A.; Carrara, P.E.; Smith, Jody L.; Anne, V.; Johnson, J.

    2010-01-01

    An AMS radiocarbon-dated pollen record from a peat deposit on Mitkof Island, southeastern Alaska provides a vegetation history spanning ???12,900??cal yr BP to the present. Late Wisconsin glaciers covered the entire island; deglaciation occurred > 15,400??cal yr BP. The earliest known vegetation to develop on the island (???12,900??cal yr BP) was pine woodland (Pinus contorta) with alder (Alnus), sedges (Cyperaceae) and ferns (Polypodiaceae type). By ???12,240??cal yr BP, Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) began to colonize the island while pine woodland declined. By ???11,200??cal yr BP, mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) began to spread across the island. Sitka spruce-mountain hemlock forests dominated the lowland landscapes of the island until ???10,180??cal yr BP, when western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) began to colonize, and soon became the dominant tree species. Rising percentages of pine, sedge, and sphagnum after ???7100??cal yr BP may reflect an expansion of peat bog habitats as regional climate began to shift to cooler, wetter conditions. A decline in alders at that time suggests that coastal forests had spread into the island's uplands, replacing large areas of alder thickets. Cedars (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, Thuja plicata) appeared on Mitkof Island during the late Holocene.

  3. Postglacial vegetation history of Mitkof Island, Alexander Archipelago, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, Thomas A.; Carrara, Paul E.; Smith, Jane L.; Anne, Victoria; Johnson, Joni

    2010-03-01

    An AMS radiocarbon-dated pollen record from a peat deposit on Mitkof Island, southeastern Alaska provides a vegetation history spanning ˜12,900 cal yr BP to the present. Late Wisconsin glaciers covered the entire island; deglaciation occurred > 15,400 cal yr BP. The earliest known vegetation to develop on the island (˜12,900 cal yr BP) was pine woodland ( Pinus contorta) with alder ( Alnus), sedges (Cyperaceae) and ferns (Polypodiaceae type). By ˜12,240 cal yr BP, Sitka spruce ( Picea sitchensis) began to colonize the island while pine woodland declined. By ˜11,200 cal yr BP, mountain hemlock ( Tsuga mertensiana) began to spread across the island. Sitka spruce-mountain hemlock forests dominated the lowland landscapes of the island until ˜10,180 cal yr BP, when western hemlock ( Tsuga heterophylla) began to colonize, and soon became the dominant tree species. Rising percentages of pine, sedge, and sphagnum after ˜7100 cal yr BP may reflect an expansion of peat bog habitats as regional climate began to shift to cooler, wetter conditions. A decline in alders at that time suggests that coastal forests had spread into the island's uplands, replacing large areas of alder thickets. Cedars ( Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, Thuja plicata) appeared on Mitkof Island during the late Holocene.

  4. Movements and wetland selection by brood-rearing black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringelman, J.K.; Longcore, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Movements and wetland selection by brood-rearing black ducks (Anas rubripes) were studied in Maine during 1977-80. Eight radio-marked hens moved their broods an average of 1.2 km from the nest to rearing pond, but only 1 hen initiated secondary brood movements. Half of the 85 broods reared in the study area used only 3 wetlands, and most rearing ponds contained active beaver (Castor canadensis) colonies. Brood-rearing hens preferred Emergent ponds over lakes and Evergreen Scrub-Shrub wetlands, and did not occupy Dead Scrub-Shrub, Unconsolidated Bottom, or Aquatic Bed wetlands. Rearing ponds were large and possessed extensive areas of flooded mountain alder (Alnus incana), willow (Salix spp.), and herbaceous vegetation. Wetlands avoided by brood-rearing hens were those with large areas of open water, submergent aquatics, or ericaceous shrub vegetation.

  5. Initial and continued effects of a release spray in a coastal Oregon douglas-fir plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.E.; Obermeyer, E.L.

    1996-03-01

    Portions of a 4-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantation were sprayed with herbicide. Five years after spraying the authors established 18 plots and used several means to determine retrospectively that six plots probably received full spray treatment and six others received no spray. Various portions of the remaining six plots were sprayed. Herbicide reduced number and size of red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.), increased number and size of planted Douglas-fir, damaged terminal shoots of Douglas-fir resulting in more abnormal boles and branching, and increased number of volunteer conifers. Fifteen of the eighteen plots were thinned, in the subsequent 6 years, thinned plots that had received full release at age 4 averaged 9 percent more volume growth (all species) than plots not released.

  6. A 20th century calendar of snow avalanche activity within the Bødalen valley, inner Nordfjord, western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaulne, A.; Eggertsson, O.; Laute, K.; Beylich, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    The forest-covered valley floor of the Bødalen valley located in the inner Nordfjord, western Norway offers the great opportunity for snow-avalanche reconstruction using tree rings. By sampling at different points within the forest stand, both on birch (Betula pubescens) and alder (Alnus), we are able to extract the magnitude and return period of major snow-avalanche events in the valley. The years of 1967, 1974, 1985, 1994 and 2001 appear like very avalanche-rich, and the years of 1992 and 2007 appear as extreme, with snow-avalanche signals being recorded at the majority of the trees. Although the investigated valley is quite remote during the winter time, the gained knowledge of the recent snow-avalanche history provides a picture of the potential activity that can be expected also elsewhere in the Nordfjord region, and escpecially in the inhabited areas as well as along important transportation corridors that do not have such records available.

  7. Comparison of planted soil infiltration systems for treatment of log yard runoff.

    PubMed

    Hedmark, Asa; Scholz, Miklas; Aronsson, Par; Elowson, Torbjorn

    2010-07-01

    Treatment of log yard runoff is required to avoid contamination of receiving watercourses. The research aim was to assess if infiltration of log yard runoff through planted soil systems is successful and if different plant species affect the treatment performance at a field-scale experimental site in Sweden (2005 to 2007). Contaminated runoff from the log yard of a sawmill was infiltrated through soil planted with Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gärtner (common alder), Salix schwerinii X viminalis (willow variety "Gudrun"), Lolium perenne (L.) (rye grass), and Phalaris arundinacea (L.) (reed canary grass). The study concluded that there were no treatment differences when comparing the four different plants with each other, and there also were no differences between the tree and the grass species. Furthermore, the infiltration treatment was effective in reducing total organic carbon (55%) and total phosphorus (45%) concentrations in the runoff, even when the loads on the infiltration system increased from year to year.

  8. Late Stage 5 Glacio-isostatic Sea in the St. Lawrence Valley, Canada and United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Occhietti, S.; Balescu, S.; Lamothe, M.; Clet, M.; Cronin, T.; Ferland, P.; Pichet, P.

    1996-01-01

    Although post-glacial marine sediments of late Wisconsinan and early Holocene age are common in eastern Canada and the northeastern United States, remnants of older Pleistocene marine sediments are scarce. A fossiliferous marine clay that predates the classical Wisconsinan was recently discovered in the St. Lawrence Valley. A dominantly estuarine environment is inferred from the geochemistry of the shells (??18O = -7.1) and from benthic foraminifer and ostracode assemblages. The clay indicates a marine invasion (Cartier Sea) shallower and probably shorter than that during the upper late Wisconsinan Champlain Sea episode (12,000-9,500 yr B.P.). The pollen content shows that regional vegetation during the marine episode began as open tundra, then became a Betula and Alnus crispa forest, reached a climatic optimum with Quercus, Corylus, and Abies, and concluded as a Pinus/Picea boreal forest. A corrected infrared stimulated luminescence age of 98,000 ?? 9000 yr is compatible with the epimerization ratio of shells. The Cartier Sea resulted from a post-glacial glacio-isostatic marine invasion in the St. Lawrence lowlands. It probably occurred during late stage 5 and is tentatively assigned to the transition of oxygen isotope substages 5b/5a. This marine episode dates to stage 5 of the preceding continental glacier which extended to middle latitudes in NE America. ?? 1996 University of Washington.

  9. A 12,000-year history of vegetation and climate for Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Marjorie Green

    1985-05-01

    Pollen and charcoal analysis of radiocarbon-dated sediment cores from Duck Pond in the Cape Cod National Seashore provide a continuous 12,000-yr vegetation and climate history of outer Cape Cod. A Picea-Hudsonia parkland and then a Picea-Pinus banksiana-Alnus crispa boreal forest association grew near the site between 12,000 and 10,000 yr B.P. This vegetation was replaced by a northern conifer forest of Pinus strobus-P. banksiana, and, subsequently, by a more mesophytic forest ( Pinus strobus, Tsuga, Quercus, Fagus, Acer, Ulmus, Fraxinus, Ostrya) as the climate became warmer and wetter by 9500 yr B.P. By 9000 yr B.P. a Pinus rigida-Quercus association dominated the landscape. High charcoal frequencies from this and subsequent levels suggest that the pine barrens association developed during a warmer and drier climate that lasted from 9000 to about 5000 yr B.P. Increased percentages of Pinus strobus pollen indicate a return to moister and cooler conditions by about 3500 yr B.P. A doubled sedimentation rate, increased charcoal, and increased herb pollen suggest land disturbance near the pond before European settlement. These results suggest a rapid warming in the northeast in the early Holocene and support a hypothesis of a rapid sea level rise at that time. Comparison of the pollen results from Duck Pond with those from Rogers Lake, Connecticut, illustrates the importance of edaphic factors in determining the disturbance frequency and vegetation history of an area.

  10. A molecular identification protocol for roots of boreal forest tree species1

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Morgan J.; Karst, Justine; Pec, Gregory J.; Davis, Corey S.; Hall, Jocelyn C.; Cahill, James F.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Roots play a key role in many ecological processes, yet our ability to identify species from bulk root samples is limited. Molecular tools may be used to identify species from root samples, but they have not yet been developed for most systems. Here we present a PCR-based method previously used to identify roots of grassland species, modified for use in boreal forests. • Methods: We used repeatable interspecific size differences in fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphisms of three noncoding chloroplast DNA regions to identify seven woody species common to boreal forests in Alberta, Canada. • Results: Abies balsamea, Alnus crispa, Betula papyrifera, Pinus contorta, and Populus tremuloides were identifiable to species, while Picea glauca and Picea mariana were identifiable to genus. In mixtures of known composition of foliar DNA, species were identified with 98% accuracy using one region. Mixed root samples of unknown composition were identified with 100% accuracy; four species were identified using one region, while three species were identified using two regions. • Discussion: This methodology is accurate, efficient, and inexpensive, and thus a valuable approach for ecological studies of roots. Furthermore, this method has now been validated for both grassland and boreal forest systems, and thus may also have applications in any plant community. PMID:25383267

  11. Tree-mediated methane emissions from tropical and temperate peatlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangala, S. R.; Gauci, V.; Hornibrook, E. R. C.; Gowing, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    Methane production and transport processes in peatlands are fairly well understood, but growing evidence for emission of methane through trees has highlighted the need to revisit methane transport processes. In wetland trees, morphological adaptations such as development of hypertrophied lenticels, aerenchyma and adventitious roots in response to soil anoxia mediates gas transport, transporting both oxygen from the atmosphere to oxygen-deprived roots and soil-produced methane from the root-zone to the atmosphere. Although, tree-mediated methane emissions from temperate tree species have been confirmed, methane emissions from tropical tree species and processes that control tree-mediated methane emissions remain unclear. This study explains the role of trees in transporting soil-produced methane to the atmosphere and uncovers the principal mechanisms of tree-mediated methane emissions. Methane emissions from eight tropical tree species and two temperate tree species were studied in situ. The mechanisms and controls on tree-mediated methane emissions were investigated using three year old common alder (Alnus glutinosa; 50 trees) grown under two artificially controlled water-table positions. Methane fluxes from whole mesocosms, the soil surface and tree stems were measured using static closed chambers. Both temperate and tropical tree species released significant quantities of methane, with tropical trees dominating ecosystem level methane fluxes. In temperate peatlands, both the methane gas transport mechanism and quantity of methane emitted from stems is tree-species dependent. In Alnus glutinosa, no correlations were observed between stomatal behaviour and tree-mediated methane emissions, however, stem methane emissions were positively correlated with both stem lenticel density and dissolved soil methane concentration. In Alnus glutinosa, no emissions were observed from leaf surfaces. The results demonstrate that exclusion of tree-mediated methane emissions from

  12. ADVANCED INTRAMOLECULAR DIELS-ALDER STUDY TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF (-)-MORPHINE: STRUCTURE CORRECTION OF A PREVIOUSLY REPORTED DIELS-ALDER PRODUCT. (R826113)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. Grazing preference and utilization of soil fungi by Folsomia candida (Collembola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedenec, Petr; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Soil fungi are important food resources for soil fauna. Here we ask whether the collembolan Folsomia candida shows selectivity in grazing between four saprophytic fungi (Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Absidia glauca, and Cladosporium herbarum), whether grazing preference corresponds to effects on collembolan reproduction, and whether the effects of fungi on grazing and reproduction depends on the fungal substrate, which included three kinds of litter (Alnus glutinosa, Salix caprea, and Quercus robur) and one kind of agar (yeast extract). On agar, Cladosporium herbarum and Absidia glauca were the most preferred fungi and supported the highest collembolan reproduction. On fungal-colonized litter, grazing preference was more affected by litter type than by fungal species whereas collembolan reproduction was affected by both litter type and fungal species. On fungal-colonized litter, the litter type that was most preferred for grazing did not support the highest reproduction, i.e., there was an inconsistency between food preference and suitability. Alder and willow were preferred over oak for grazing, but alder supported the least reproduction.

  14. Ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret fertilizers increase volume growth of 57-year-old douglas-fir trees within a gradient of nitrogen deficiency. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.E.; Reukema, D.L.; Hazard, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    In a nitrogen-deficient plantation in southwest Washington, the authors (1) compared effects of 224 kg N/ha as ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret on volume growth of dominant and codominant Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco); (2) determined how 8-year response of these trees to fertilization was related to their distance from a strip of the plantation interplanted with nitrogen-fixing red alder (alnus rubra Bong.); and (3) observed effects of biuret on understory vegetation. On both sides of the strip centerline, the authors grouped subject trees into 30 plots of 4 trees each, based on slope position and distance from alder. The authors randomly assigned three fertilizers and a control within each plot. They analyzed separately data from east and west of the mixed stand certerline. Initial volume differed greatly among the 120 trees on each side, so they used covariance analysis to adjust observed treatment means. Adjusted mean volume growth was increased (p equal to or less than 0.10) by 22 to 28 percent on the east side and by 11 to 14 percent on the west side, with no significant difference in response to the three fertilizers.

  15. Experimental woodcock management at the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepik, G.F.; Owen, R.B.; Coulter, M.W.; Keppie, Daniel M.; Owen, Ray B.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop woodcock(Philohela minor) management techniques that can be easily used by the small landowner or incorporated with other land management operations such as commercial timber harvesting. The Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge contains areas which are characteristic of the abandoned farms now being purchased for recreation or retirement as well as areas suitable for commercial forest management. Woodcock management, beginning in 1973, has centered on rejuvenation of diurnal habitat and creation of summer fields and singing grounds. Strips (10 mwide, 25 to 125 mlong and separated by 40 m) were clear~cut in two alder (Alnus sp.) stands resulting in increased diurnal use in at least one cover, increased singing male use and good alder regeneration. Small clear-cuts (30 X30 m) in a large contiguous woodland (1200 ha) with a history of few singing males resulted in an increased number of singing males despite an overall decrease in the number of singing males throughout the refuge. Management strategies and recommendations also are given.

  16. Biotic and abiotic variables influencing plant litter breakdown in streams: a global study.

    PubMed

    Boyero, Luz; Pearson, Richard G; Hui, Cang; Gessner, Mark O; Pérez, Javier; Alexandrou, Markos A; Graça, Manuel A S; Cardinale, Bradley J; Albariño, Ricardo J; Arunachalam, Muthukumarasamy; Barmuta, Leon A; Boulton, Andrew J; Bruder, Andreas; Callisto, Marcos; Chauvet, Eric; Death, Russell G; Dudgeon, David; Encalada, Andrea C; Ferreira, Verónica; Figueroa, Ricardo; Flecker, Alexander S; Gonçalves, José F; Helson, Julie; Iwata, Tomoya; Jinggut, Tajang; Mathooko, Jude; Mathuriau, Catherine; M'Erimba, Charles; Moretti, Marcelo S; Pringle, Catherine M; Ramírez, Alonso; Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Rincon, José; Yule, Catherine M

    2016-04-27

    Plant litter breakdown is a key ecological process in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Streams and rivers, in particular, contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes. However, there is little information available on the relative roles of different drivers of plant litter breakdown in fresh waters, particularly at large scales. We present a global-scale study of litter breakdown in streams to compare the roles of biotic, climatic and other environmental factors on breakdown rates. We conducted an experiment in 24 streams encompassing latitudes from 47.8° N to 42.8° S, using litter mixtures of local species differing in quality and phylogenetic diversity (PD), and alder (Alnus glutinosa) to control for variation in litter traits. Our models revealed that breakdown of alder was driven by climate, with some influence of pH, whereas variation in breakdown of litter mixtures was explained mainly by litter quality and PD. Effects of litter quality and PD and stream pH were more positive at higher temperatures, indicating that different mechanisms may operate at different latitudes. These results reflect global variability caused by multiple factors, but unexplained variance points to the need for expanded global-scale comparisons.

  17. Monitoring vegetation water uptake in a semiarid riparian corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Ochoa, C. G.; Leonard, J.

    2015-12-01

    With a changing global climate and growing demand for water throughout the world, responsible and sustainable land and water resource management practices are becoming increasingly important. Accounting for the amount of water used by riparian vegetation is a critical element for better managing water resources in arid and semiarid environments. The objective of this study was to determine water uptake by selected riparian vegetative species in a semiarid riparian corridor in North-Central Oregon. Exo-skin sap flow sensors (Dynamax, Houston, TX, U.S.A.) were used to measure sap flux in red alder (Alnus rubra) trees, the dominant overstory vegetation at the field site. Xylem sap flow data was collected from selected trees at the field site and in a greenhouse setting. Transpiration rates were determined based on an energy balance method, which makes it possible to estimate the mass flow of sap by measuring the velocity of electrical heat pulses through the plant stem. Preliminary field results indicate that red alder tree branches of about 1 inch diameter transpire between 2 and 6 kg of water/day. Higher transpiration rates of up to 7.3 kg of water/day were observed under greenhouse conditions. Streamflow and stream water temperature, vegetation characteristics, and meteorological data were analyzed in conjunction with transpiration data. Results of this study provide insight on riparian vegetation water consumption in water scarce ecosystems. This study is part of an overarching project focused on climate-vegetation interactions and ecohydrologic processes in arid and semiarid landscapes.

  18. Methane Emission through Trees in Temperate and Tropical Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangala, S. R.; Gauci, V.; Hornibrook, E. R.; Gowing, D.

    2012-12-01

    Methane produced in wetland soil generally is thought to be emitted by a combination of three key processes: 1) diffusion through water-filled pores, 2) abrupt release of bubbles (ebullition), and 3) via internal spaces within the stems of herbaceous plants adapted to live in waterlogged soils. The capacity for trees to mediate methane emissions has received limited attention despite mesocosm studies of seedlings and saplings demonstrating that wetland trees have a significant capacity to transport soil-produced methane to the atmosphere. Notably ~60% of global wetlands are forested. We present in situ measurements of methane flux from a temperate carr (swamp) composed of alder (Alnus glutinosa) and birch (Betula pubescens) situated in the United Kingdom and a tropical forested peat swamp located in Borneo. The in situ data are complemented by a mesocosm experiment in which methane emissions were measured from alder saplings subjected to two water-regime treatments. In both the in situ and mesocosm studies, emissions from trees are compared to methane flux from the ground surface, the latter occurring via pore water diffusion, ebullition or via the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. We show that tree stem emissions are controlled by a number of factors including tree species, soil pore-water concentration and stem lenticel density. Our results demonstrate that the omission of tree-mediated methane fluxes from measurement campaigns conducted in forested wetland can significantly underestimate the total ecosystem flux of methane.

  19. Trees are important conduits for emission of methane from temperate and tropical wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Pangala, Sunitha; Gowing, David; Hornibrook, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Methane produced in wetland soil generally is thought to be emitted to the atmosphere primarily via diffusion through pore water, release of gas bubbles (i.e., ebullition), and gas phase diffusion through the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. The role of trees as a conduit for methane export from soil to the atmosphere has received limited attention despite evidence from mesocosm experiments showing that seedlings and saplings of wetland trees have a significant capacity to transport soil-produced gases. Notably ~60% of global wetlands are forested. We present in situ measurements of methane flux from a temperate carr (swamp) composed of alder (Alnus glutinosa) and birch (Betula pubescens) situated in the United Kingdom and a tropical forested peat swamp located in Borneo. The in situ data are complemented by a mesocosm experiment in which methane emissions were measured from alder saplings subjected to two water-regime treatments. In both the in situ and mesocosm studies, emissions from trees are compared to methane flux from the ground surface, the latter occurring via pore water diffusion, ebullition or the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. We show that tree stem emissions are controlled by a number of factors including tree species, soil pore-water concentration and stem lenticel density. Our results demonstrate that the omission of tree-mediated methane fluxes from measurement campaigns conducted in forested wetland can significantly underestimate total ecosystem flux of methane.

  20. Distinct temperature sensitivity among taiga and tundra shrubs in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreu-Hayles, L.; Anchukaitis, K. J.; D'Arrigo, R.

    2014-12-01

    Shrub expansion into Arctic and alpine tundra ecosystems is well documented, mostly over the last 50 years, based on remote sensing data, aerial photography, and in-situ observations. Warming temperatures are considered the main driver of the observed change in shrub vegetation patterns. Here, we assess the relationship between temperatures and shrub growth from five populations of Salix spp. (willow) and Alnus spp. (alder) in Alaska growing within the tundra and the boreal forest (~taiga) using dendrochronological techniques. The three tundra shrub sites are located on the Dalton Highway north from Toolik Lake (~69ºN 148ºW), whereas the two taiga shrub sites are located closer to Fairbanks at the Twelve Mile Summit site (~65ºN 146ºW). Because shrub ages vary among the studied populations lead to different time spans for the ring-width chronologies generated, a common period with available satellite data spanning from 1982 to 2010 was selected for this study. All tundra shrub chronologies shared a strong positive response to summer temperatures despite growing in heterogeneous site conditions and belonging to different species. In contrast, in the taiga, summer temperatures enhance willow growth, whereas alder growth appears almost insensitive to temperature over the interval studied. Extending the analyses back in time, a very strong positive relationship was found between alder ring-width and June temperatures prior to 1970. This phenomenon, a weakening of the previously existing relationship between growth and temperatures, was also detected in white spruce (Picea glauca) growing at the same site, and it is known in the literature as the 'divergence problem'. Thus, at this taiga location, alder shrubs and trees seem to have similar growth patterns. Summer temperatures no longer seem to enhance taiga alder growth. Shrubs of different species exposed to the same climatic conditions can exhibit varied growth responses. The distinct temperature sensitivities

  1. Effects of low-dosed imidacloprid pulses on the functional role of the caged amphipod Gammarus roeseli in stream mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Böttger, R; Feibicke, M; Schaller, J; Dudel, G

    2013-07-01

    Effects of two series of imidacloprid pulses on caged amphipods (Gammarus roeseli) and their shredder efficiency for litter decomposition were studied for 70 days as part of a comprehensive stream mesocosm experiment. The duration of each imidacloprid pulse of 12µgL(-1) was 12h. About 250mL cages with an initial stock of 10 adult gammarids together with different conditioned litter substrates were used. Beside alder leaves (Alnus glutinosa), straw (× Triticosecale) was also used in different trials and tested for its suitability to serve as litter substrate. Results from tracer and microprobe measurements approved the suitability of the test system under low-flow condition of 10cms(-1) in the surrounding stream water. Population development followed a logistic growth function with a carrying capacity of 200 Ind cage(-1) for alder and 161 for straw. In the course of the study, the F1 generation reached sexual maturity and F2 offspring appeared. Increased nitrogen contents of gammarid-free trials compared to stocked ones after 70 days indicated that biofilm on both substrates was an important food source for G. roeseli. However, increased shredding activity by gammarids was only detected for alder during the second pulse series. During the remaining time and also for straw, losses of coarse particular organic matter were quite constant and slow indicating the dominance of transport limited decomposition processes on the litter surfaces. No effect of imidacloprid pulses on population levels and litter decomposition could be detected. However, the number of brood carrying females was reduced in the treatments compared to the control groups in the last 3 weeks of the study. In conclusion, repeated low-level and short-term exposition may have adverse long-term effects on G. roeseli in the field with regard to both the population size and the functional role as key shredder.

  2. The effect of saprophagous macrofauna on litter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Previous experiments show that feeding of the larvae of Bibionidae on lef litter cause short term increase of respiration but in long term the decomposition of bibio feces is slower than decomposition of litter from which feces were produced. To understand why excrements of decompose more slowly than leaf litter, we fed Bibio marci larvae the litter of tree species differing in litter quality (Alnus glutinosa, Salix caprea, and Quercus robur) and then measured respiration induced by litter and excrements. We also measured respiration induced by the same litter artificially modified to mimic faunal effects; the litter was modified by grinding, grinding with alkalinization to pH 11, grinding with coating by kaolinite, and grinding with both alkalinization and coating. Decomposition of excrements tended to be slower for willow and was significantly slower for oak and alder than for the corresponding litter. With oak, decomposition was slower for all artificially modified litter than for non-modified litter. The reduction in the decomposition was similar for excrements and for alder and willow litter that was ground, coated, and alkalinized. In alder, a similar reduction was found in ground and alkalinized litter. 13C NMR indicated that gut passage increases aliphatic components and decreases polysaccharides. Pyrolysis indicated that gut passage increases the ratio of guaiacyl to hydroxymethyl derivatives in lignin. Our findings indicate that the decreased decomposition rate of excrements might result from the removal of easily available polysaccharides, the increase in aliphatic components, an increase in the resistant components of lignin, the accumulation of microbial cell walls, and the binding of nitrogen into complexes with aromatic components. Several of these mechanisms are supported or determined by litter alkalinization during gut passage.

  3. Effects of Elevated CO2 on Litter Chemistry and Subsequent Invertebrate Detritivore Feeding Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dray, Matthew W.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Thomas, Stephen M.; A’Bear, A. Donald; Godbold, Douglas L.; Ormerod, Steve J.; Hartley, Susan E.; Jones, T. Hefin

    2014-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 can change foliar tissue chemistry. This alters leaf litter palatability to macroinvertebrate detritivores with consequences for decomposition, nutrient turnover, and food-web structure. Currently there is no consensus on the link between CO2 enrichment, litter chemistry, and macroinvertebrate-mediated leaf decomposition. To identify any unifying mechanisms, we presented eight invertebrate species from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with litter from Alnus glutinosa (common alder) or Betula pendula (silver birch) trees propagated under ambient (380 ppm) or elevated (ambient +200 ppm) CO2 concentrations. Alder litter was largely unaffected by CO2 enrichment, but birch litter from leaves grown under elevated CO2 had reduced nitrogen concentrations and greater C/N ratios. Invertebrates were provided individually with either (i) two litter discs, one of each CO2 treatment (‘choice’), or (ii) one litter disc of each CO2 treatment alone (‘no-choice’). Consumption was recorded. Only Odontocerum albicorne showed a feeding preference in the choice test, consuming more ambient- than elevated-CO2 birch litter. Species’ responses to alder were highly idiosyncratic in the no-choice test: Gammarus pulex and O. albicorne consumed more elevated-CO2 than ambient-CO2 litter, indicating compensatory feeding, while Oniscus asellus consumed more of the ambient-CO2 litter. No species responded to CO2 treatment when fed birch litter. Overall, these results show how elevated atmospheric CO2 can alter litter chemistry, affecting invertebrate feeding behaviour in species-specific ways. The data highlight the need for greater species-level information when predicting changes to detrital processing–a key ecosystem function–under atmospheric change. PMID:24465985

  4. Diversity of Riparian Plants among and within Species Shapes River Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jackrel, Sara L.; Wootton, J. Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Organismal diversity among and within species may affect ecosystem function with effects transmitting across ecosystem boundaries. Whether recipient communities adjust their composition, in turn, to maximize their function in response to changes in donor composition at these two scales of diversity is unknown. We use small stream communities that rely on riparian subsidies as a model system. We used leaf pack experiments to ask how variation in plants growing beside streams in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State, USA affects stream communities via leaf subsidies. Leaves from red alder (Alnus rubra), vine maple (Acer cinereus), bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) were assembled in leaf packs to contrast low versus high diversity, and deployed in streams to compare local versus non-local leaf sources at the among and within species scales. Leaves from individuals within species decomposed at varying rates; most notably thin leaves decomposed rapidly. Among deciduous species, vine maple decomposed most rapidly, harbored the least algal abundance, and supported the greatest diversity of aquatic invertebrates, while bigleaf maple was at the opposite extreme for these three metrics. Recipient communities decomposed leaves from local species rapidly: leaves from early successional plants decomposed rapidly in stream reaches surrounded by early successional forest and leaves from later successional plants decomposed rapidly adjacent to later successional forest. The species diversity of leaves inconsistently affected decomposition, algal abundance and invertebrate metrics. Intraspecific diversity of leaf packs also did not affect decomposition or invertebrate diversity. However, locally sourced alder leaves decomposed more rapidly and harbored greater levels of algae than leaves sourced from conspecifics growing in other areas on the Olympic Peninsula, but did not harbor greater aquatic invertebrate diversity. In contrast to

  5. Diversity of Riparian Plants among and within Species Shapes River Communities.

    PubMed

    Jackrel, Sara L; Wootton, J Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Organismal diversity among and within species may affect ecosystem function with effects transmitting across ecosystem boundaries. Whether recipient communities adjust their composition, in turn, to maximize their function in response to changes in donor composition at these two scales of diversity is unknown. We use small stream communities that rely on riparian subsidies as a model system. We used leaf pack experiments to ask how variation in plants growing beside streams in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State, USA affects stream communities via leaf subsidies. Leaves from red alder (Alnus rubra), vine maple (Acer cinereus), bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) were assembled in leaf packs to contrast low versus high diversity, and deployed in streams to compare local versus non-local leaf sources at the among and within species scales. Leaves from individuals within species decomposed at varying rates; most notably thin leaves decomposed rapidly. Among deciduous species, vine maple decomposed most rapidly, harbored the least algal abundance, and supported the greatest diversity of aquatic invertebrates, while bigleaf maple was at the opposite extreme for these three metrics. Recipient communities decomposed leaves from local species rapidly: leaves from early successional plants decomposed rapidly in stream reaches surrounded by early successional forest and leaves from later successional plants decomposed rapidly adjacent to later successional forest. The species diversity of leaves inconsistently affected decomposition, algal abundance and invertebrate metrics. Intraspecific diversity of leaf packs also did not affect decomposition or invertebrate diversity. However, locally sourced alder leaves decomposed more rapidly and harbored greater levels of algae than leaves sourced from conspecifics growing in other areas on the Olympic Peninsula, but did not harbor greater aquatic invertebrate diversity. In contrast to

  6. FATE AND EFFECTS OF PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS IN SOILS UNDER N2-FIXING RED ALDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil phosphorus (P) dynamics are controlled by the interaction of geochemical, biochemical and biological processes, and changing species composition or management may alter the relative importance of these processes. We examined the role of these processes in two plantations of...

  7. Evidence contrary to the accepted Diels-Alder mechanism in the thermal modification of vegetable oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A transesterified oleochemical product has been made using two routes. Soybean oil was thermally polymerized anaerobically at 330 deg C. and the material was then transesterified using base catalyst and methanol. Alternatively, a similar product can be obtained by heating methyl linoleate to the sam...

  8. Rate Acceleration of the Retro Diels-Alder Reaction of Anthracene Cycloadducts by Polysiloxy Substituents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Lindsey 13 yielded 9, 1O-dimethyl-2,3,6,7-tetramethoxyanthracene (13) by condensing veratrole (12) and acetaldehyde in the presence of sulfuric acid...combination of those cited by Boldt12 and Lindsey.13 To an ice cooled solution of veratrole (32 mL, 250 mmol) in acetic acid (125 mL) was slowly added...solution of veratrole (32 mL, 250 mmol) in acetic acid (125 mL) was slowly added an ice cooled solution of benzaldehyde ( 25 mL, 246 mmol) in methanol

  9. Synthesis of readily recyclable biobased plastics by Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuki; Yoshie, Naoko

    2008-10-08

    Readily recyclable biobased plastics were designed and synthesized utilizing the thermally reversible DA reaction. Furyl-telechelic poly(butylene succinate) prepolymers (PBSF(2)) were extended with bis- and tris-maleimide linkers (M(2) and M(3)) by the DA reaction in the bulk state to produce linear and network polymers, respectively. The DA reaction was able to proceed at 25-80 degrees C, at which crystalline domains of PBSF(2) were present. In the linear polymer system, the molecular weight in the reaction equilibrium was dependent on the chain length of the prepolymer, but almost independent of the reaction temperature. The cycle of DA and retro-DA reactions was repeatable with no prepolymer deterioration.

  10. Synthesis of novel plant oil derivatives: Furan and Diels-Alder reaction products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant oils are useful sustainable raw materials for the development of new chemical products. In this work epoxidized soybean oil was treated with different acids, and variable amounts of furan structures were produced from the epoxidized linoleate moiety. From process studies, the highest yields of...

  11. Multistep Synthesis of a Terphenyl Derivative Showcasing the Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Elizabeth A. Colby

    2015-01-01

    An adaptable multistep synthesis project designed for the culmination of a second-year organic chemistry laboratory course is described. The target compound is a terphenyl derivative that is an intermediate in the synthesis of compounds used in organic light-emitting devices. Students react a conjugated diene with dimethylacetylene dicarboxylate…

  12. An intramolecular inverse electron demand Diels–Alder approach to annulated α-carbolines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Ni, Feng; Woo, Grace H C; Lo, Sie-Mun; Roveto, Philip M; Schaus, Scott E

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intramolecular inverse electron demand cycloadditions of isatin-derived 1,2,4-triazines with acetylenic dienophiles tethered by amidations or transesterifications proceed in excellent yields to produce lactam- or lactone-fused α-carbolines. Beginning with various isatins and alkynyl dienophiles, a pilot-scale library of eighty-eight α-carbolines was prepared by using this robust methodology for biological evaluation. PMID:23015831

  13. ISOPRENE/METHYL ACRYLATE DIELS-ALDER REACTION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE. (R822721C640)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. AQUEOUS AZA-DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS CATALYZED BY LANTHANIDE(III) TRIFLUOROMETHANESULFONATES. (R826123)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Quality of Life and Physical Capacity of Alder Ambulatory Adults with Rate-Controlled Atrial Fibrillation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    history of angina pectoris . Only 29.8% of the AF patients have a history of either electrical or chemical cardioversion. 14.9% of the AF patients and...Mean heart rate (rate ±1.0 SD) 73 ±11 72 ±11 Maximum heart rate (rate ±1.0 SD) 130+25 112 ±16 ft Angina 12 (25.5) 14 (29.8) Arrhythmia...PCS MCS n A A Allergy 842 -0.82* 0.04 Angina 112 -3.67 0.18 Chronic lung disease 194 -3.12 -3.03" Congestive heart failure 93 -6.72 -1.36

  16. Intramolecular Diels–Alder/1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Cascade of 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Gregory I.; Fuchs, James R.; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Ishikawa, Hayato; Tao, Houchao; Yuan, Z.-Q.; Boger, Dale L.

    2008-01-01

    Full details of a systematic exploration of the intramolecular [4+2]/[3+2] cycloaddition cascade of 1,3,4-oxadiazoles are disclosed in which the scope and utility of the reaction are defined. PMID:16895427

  17. Chiral holmium complex-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of silyloxyvinylindoles: stereoselective synthesis of hydrocarbazoles.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinji; Morikawa, Takahiro; Nishida, Atsushi

    2013-10-18

    The catalytic and asymmetric cycloaddition between 3-[1-(silyloxy)vinyl]indoles and electron-deficient olefins gave substituted hydrocarbazoles in up to 99% yield and 94% ee. This reaction was catalyzed by a novel chiral holmium(III) complex. Alkylation of the cycloadduct gave a tricyclic compound with four continuous chiral centers, one of which was a quaternary carbon.

  18. ISOPRENE/METHYL ACRYLATE DIELS-ALDER REACTION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE. (R826694C640)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Leaf litter decomposition of four different deciduous tree species - resource stoichiometry, nutrient release and microbial community composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, S.; Keiblinger, K. M.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the role of microbial communities for ecosystem processes like litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. For example, fungi are thought to be key players during litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems because they are able to degrade recalcitrant compounds like lignin and also dominate the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose, whereas bacteria seem to play an important role for lignin decomposition especially under anaerobic conditions. However, our knowledge about the contribution of bacteria and fungi to decomposition is still scarce. The aim of the present study was to elucidate how the microbial decomposer community is affected by resource stoichiometry and how changes in community composition affect litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. To this end, we collected leaf litter of four deciduous tree species (beech (Fagus), oak (Quercus), alder (Alnus) and ash tree (Fraxinus)) at four different seasons (winter, spring, summer and autumn) in an Austrian forest (Schottenwald, 48°14'N16°15'E; MAT=9°C; soil type: dystric cambiosol; soil C:N=16) in 2010. We determined litter nutrient content (micro- and macronutrients) and extractable nutrients and assessed the microbial community by PFLA analysis to test the following hypotheses: (i) tree species affects microbial community composition, (ii) microbial community composition changes over the course of the year, and (iii) narrow litter C:nutrient ratios favour nutrient release. Our data show that litter of different tree species varied in their stoichiometry, with C:N ratios between 16 (alder) and 46 (beech) and C:P ratios between 309 (ash) and 1234 (alder). Tree species had a significant impact on microbial community composition: highest amounts of actinomycetes and protozoa were observed for alder, while arbuscular mycorrhizae were lowest for oak. Bacteria were favoured by litter with narrow C:N shortly after litterfall. During litter decomposition

  20. Soil aggregation and slope stability related to soil density, root length, and mycorrhiza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Frank; Frei, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Eco-engineering measures combine the use of living plants and inert mechanical constructions to protect slopes against erosion and shallow mass movement. Whereas in geotechnical engineering several performance standards and guidelines for structural safety and serviceability of construction exist, there is a lack of comparable tools in the field of ecological restoration. Various indicators have been proposed, including the fractal dimension of soil particle size distribution, microbiological parameters, and soil aggregate stability. We present results of an soil aggregate stability investigation and compare them with literature data of the angle of internal friction ?' which is conventionally used in slope stability analysis and soil failure calculation. Aggregate stability tests were performed with samples of differently treated moraine, including soil at low (~15.5 kN/m³) and high (~19.0 kN/m³) dry unit weight, soil planted with Alnus incana (White Alder) as well as the combination of soil planted with alder and inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Melanogaster variegatus s.l. After a 20 weeks growth period in a greenhouse, a total of 100 samples was tested and evaluated. Positive correlations were found between the soil aggregate stability and the three variables dry unit weight, root length per soil volume, and degree of mycorrhization. Based on robust statistics it turned out that dry unit weight and mycorrhization degree were strongest correlated with soil aggregate stability. Compared to the non-inoculated control plants, mycorrhized White Alder produced significantly more roots and higher soil aggregate stability. Furthermore, the combined biological effect of plant roots and mycorrhizal mycelia on aggregate stability on soil with low density (~15.5 kN/m³) was comparable to the compaction effect of the pure soil from 15.5 to ~19.0 kN/m³. Literature data on the effect of vegetation on the angle of internal friction ?' of the same moraine showed

  1. Defining an adequate sample of earlywood vessels for retrospective injury detection in diffuse-porous species.

    PubMed

    Arbellay, Estelle; Corona, Christophe; Stoffel, Markus; Fonti, Patrick; Decaulne, Armelle

    2012-01-01

    Vessels of broad-leaved trees have been analyzed to study how trees deal with various environmental factors. Cambial injury, in particular, has been reported to induce the formation of narrower conduits. Yet, little or no effort has been devoted to the elaboration of vessel sampling strategies for retrospective injury detection based on vessel lumen size reduction. To fill this methodological gap, four wounded individuals each of grey alder (Alnus incana (L.) Moench) and downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were harvested in an avalanche path. Earlywood vessel lumina were measured and compared for each tree between the injury ring built during the growing season following wounding and the control ring laid down the previous year. Measurements were performed along a 10 mm wide radial strip, located directly next to the injury. Specifically, this study aimed at (i) investigating the intra-annual duration and local extension of vessel narrowing close to the wound margin and (ii) identifying an adequate sample of earlywood vessels (number and intra-ring location of cells) attesting to cambial injury. Based on the results of this study, we recommend analyzing at least 30 vessels in each ring. Within the 10 mm wide segment of the injury ring, wound-induced reduction in vessel lumen size did not fade with increasing radial and tangential distances, but we nevertheless advise favoring early earlywood vessels located closest to the injury. These findings, derived from two species widespread across subarctic, mountainous, and temperate regions, will assist retrospective injury detection in Alnus, Betula, and other diffuse-porous species as well as future related research on hydraulic implications after wounding.

  2. Defining an Adequate Sample of Earlywood Vessels for Retrospective Injury Detection in Diffuse-Porous Species

    PubMed Central

    Arbellay, Estelle; Corona, Christophe; Stoffel, Markus; Fonti, Patrick; Decaulne, Armelle

    2012-01-01

    Vessels of broad-leaved trees have been analyzed to study how trees deal with various environmental factors. Cambial injury, in particular, has been reported to induce the formation of narrower conduits. Yet, little or no effort has been devoted to the elaboration of vessel sampling strategies for retrospective injury detection based on vessel lumen size reduction. To fill this methodological gap, four wounded individuals each of grey alder (Alnus incana (L.) Moench) and downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were harvested in an avalanche path. Earlywood vessel lumina were measured and compared for each tree between the injury ring built during the growing season following wounding and the control ring laid down the previous year. Measurements were performed along a 10 mm wide radial strip, located directly next to the injury. Specifically, this study aimed at (i) investigating the intra-annual duration and local extension of vessel narrowing close to the wound margin and (ii) identifying an adequate sample of earlywood vessels (number and intra-ring location of cells) attesting to cambial injury. Based on the results of this study, we recommend analyzing at least 30 vessels in each ring. Within the 10 mm wide segment of the injury ring, wound-induced reduction in vessel lumen size did not fade with increasing radial and tangential distances, but we nevertheless advise favoring early earlywood vessels located closest to the injury. These findings, derived from two species widespread across subarctic, mountainous, and temperate regions, will assist retrospective injury detection in Alnus, Betula, and other diffuse-porous species as well as future related research on hydraulic implications after wounding. PMID:22761707

  3. Holocene environmental changes in southern Kamchatka, Far Eastern Russia, inferred from a pollen and testate amoebae peat succession record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimaschewski, A.; Barnekow, L.; Bennett, K. D.; Andreev, A. A.; Andrén, E.; Bobrov, A. A.; Hammarlund, D.

    2015-11-01

    High resolution palaeoenvironmental records in Far-Eastern Russia are rare, and the Kamchatka Peninsula is among the least studied areas of the region. This paper describes a record spanning the last ca. 11,000 yr, obtained from a bog in the southern part of Kamchatka. The radiocarbon dated core was analysed for pollen, testate amoebae, charcoal and loss-on-ignition (LOI). The vegetation during the early Holocene was dominated by grasses (Poaceae), birch (Betula) and heath (Ericaceae p. p.). Around 10,300 cal yr BP there was a substantial change in the vegetation cover to shrub alder (Alnus viridis s.l.) stands with sedges and ferns (Polypodiophyta) as well as herbs such as meadow rue (Thalictrum) in the understory. In the surroundings of Utka peatlands started to form. The variations in the vegetation cover were most probably caused by climatic changes. At the beginning of sediment accumulation, before 10,300 cal yr BP, the composition of the vegetation points to cooler summers and/or decreased annual precipitation. Around 10,300 cal yr BP, changes in vegetation occurred due to rising temperatures and/or changed water regimes. Increased abundancies of dry indicating testate amoebae after 9100 cal yr BP point to intermediate to dry soil conditions. Between 8600 and 7700 cal yr BP tree alder (Alnus incana) was widely spread at the site which probably indicates optimal environmental conditions. The tephra layer at 381-384.5 cm (ca. 8500 cal yr BP) produces a strong impact on the testate amoebae assemblages. At 7700 cal yr BP there was a sudden drop of A. incana in the local vegetation. From this time on, A. incana and also A. viridis decrease continuously whereas Betula gradually increases. The upper part of the sequence (after 6300 cal yr BP) shows higher abundancies of meadowsweet (Filipendula) and sweet gale (Myrica) pollen. After 6300 cal yr BP, changes in testate amoebae demonstrate variable soil moisture conditions at the site. Between 3700 and 1800 cal yr BP

  4. Paleoecological studies at Lake Patzcuaro on the west-central Mexican Plateau and at Chalco in the basin of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, W.A.; Bradbury, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    A 1520-cm sediment core from Lake Patzcuaro, Michoacan, Mexico, is 44,000 yr old at the base. All parts of the core have abundant pollen of Pinus (pine), Alnus (alder), and Quercus (oak) with frequent Abies (fir). The interval dated from 44,000 to 11,000 yr ago has a homogeneous flora characterized by abundant Juniperus (juniper) pollen and frequent Artemisia (sagebrush). It is believed to represent an appreciably drier and colder climate than at present. The Holocene at Lake Patzcuaro is characterized by a moderate increase in Pinus pollen and the loss of Juniperus pollen, as the modern type of climate succeeded. Alnus was abundant until about 5000 yr ago; its abrupt decrease with the first appearance of herbaceous weed pollen may reflect the cutting of lake-shore and stream-course alder communities for agricultural purposes, or it may simply reflect a drying tendency in the climate. Pollen of Zea (corn) appears at Lake Patzcuaro along with low peaks of chenopod and grass pollen at 3500 yr B.P. apparently recording a human population large enough to modify the natural environment, as well as the beginning of agriculture. A rich aquatic flora in this phase suggests eutrophication of the lake by slope erosion. In the most recent period corn is absent from the sediments, perhaps reflecting a change in agricultural practices. The environment changes at Lake Patzcuaro are similar to and correlate with those in the Cuenca de Mexico, where diatom stratigraphy from the Chalco basin indicates fluctuations in lake levels and lake chemistry in response to variations in available moisture. Before 10,000 yr ago climates there were cool and dry, and the Chalco basin was occupied by a shallow freshwater marsh that drained north to Lake Texcoco, where saline water accumulated by evaporation. Increases in effective moisture and possible melting of glaciers during the Holocene caused lake levels to rise throughout the Cuenca de Mexico, and Lake Texcoco flooded the Chalco basin with

  5. Riparian seed dispersal: transport and depositional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnings, A.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2012-04-01

    Riparian tree population dynamics are linked to the physical processes controlled by the hydrogeomorphic setting. In particular, fluvial seed dispersal is influenced by a combination of factors including the hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, and seed dispersal traits. This study examines the influence of stream flow patterns on the transportation and deposition of buoyant seeds by applying a one dimensional transport model. Conceptually, the model separates the stream into two components: the main channel and transient storage /deposition zones. The hydrologic processes are governed by an advection-dispersion equation and numerically solved using the Crank-Nicolson method. Additional terms in the equation allow for model variation in the flow regime (lateral inflow and outflow) and the incorporation of a transient storage/deposition component where seeds may be detained. The model parameters are based on a bedrock-gravel bed river with pool-riffle morphology where we conducted field experimentation in Coastal Northern California. The riparian zone of the study reach is inhabited by White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia) which disperses buoyant seeds in late winter/early spring coinciding with the latter part of the wet, Mediterranean climate. Artificial seeds with similar characteristic traits of buoyancy, density and Bond Number to White Alder seeds were used to quantify transport times and identify storage areas. The model output captures a greater number of seeds during a receding hydrograph due to the increase in transient storage. Typically, this is found in shallow stream margins where the flow is divergent such as areas with back-eddies. In the field, this is associated with the ends of gravel bars or riffles where flow expansion causes secondary flows. The results demonstrate the importance of transient storage for seed transport and depositional processes and emphasize the need for improved measurement techniques, in lieu of empirical coefficients, to advance the

  6. Effects of a natural dam-break flood on geomorphology and vegetation on the Elwha River, Washington, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Acker, S.A.; Beechie, T.J.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    Ephemeral dams caused by landslides have been observed around the world, yet little is known about the effects of their failure on landforms and vegetation. In 1967, a landslide-dam-break flood in a pristine reach of the Elwha River valley filled the former channel and diverted the river. The reach is a reference site for restoration following the planned removal of dams on the river. We identified five surfaces on the 25 ha debris fan deposited by the flood. Based on tree ages and historic air photos, three of the surfaces formed in 1967, while two formed later. The surfaces varied in substrate (silt and sand, to boulders), and height above the river channel. Tree mortality resulted from tree removal and burial by sediment, the latter leaving snags and some surviving trees. Tree species composition was generally consistent within each surface. Dominant species included red alder (Alnus rubra) and Sitka willow (Salix sitchensis), alone or in combination, a combination of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and black cottonwood (Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa), or a combination of alder and Cottonwood. There were significant differences between surfaces in stem density, basal area, and rate of basal area growth. The large degree of heterogeneity in forest structure, composition, and productivity within a relatively small floodplain feature is in part due to spatial variability in the intensity of a single disturbance event, and in part due to the occurrence of subsequent, smaller events. To recreate natural diversity of riparian forests may require mimicking the variety of physical and biotic habitats that a single, complex disturbance event may create.

  7. Tall shrub and tree expansion in Siberian tundra ecotones since the 1960s.

    PubMed

    Frost, Gerald V; Epstein, Howard E

    2014-04-01

    Circumpolar expansion of tall shrubs and trees into Arctic tundra is widely thought to be occurring as a result of recent climate warming, but little quantitative evidence exists for northern Siberia, which encompasses the world's largest forest-tundra ecotonal belt. We quantified changes in tall shrub and tree canopy cover in 11, widely distributed Siberian ecotonal landscapes by comparing very high-resolution photography from the Cold War-era 'Gambit' and 'Corona' satellite surveillance systems (1965-1969) with modern imagery. We also analyzed within-landscape patterns of vegetation change to evaluate the susceptibility of different landscape components to tall shrub and tree increase. The total cover of tall shrubs and trees increased in nine of 11 ecotones. In northwest Siberia, alder (Alnus) shrubland cover increased 5.3-25.9% in five ecotones. In Taymyr and Yakutia, larch (Larix) cover increased 3.0-6.7% within three ecotones, but declined 16.8% at a fourth ecotone due to thaw of ice-rich permafrost. In Chukotka, the total cover of alder and dwarf pine (Pinus) increased 6.1% within one ecotone and was little changed at a second ecotone. Within most landscapes, shrub and tree increase was linked to specific geomorphic settings, especially those with active disturbance regimes such as permafrost patterned-ground, floodplains, and colluvial hillslopes. Mean summer temperatures increased at most ecotones since the mid-1960s, but rates of shrub and tree canopy cover expansion were not strongly correlated with temperature trends and were better correlated with mean annual precipitation. We conclude that shrub and tree cover is increasing in tundra ecotones across most of northern Siberia, but rates of increase vary widely regionally and at the landscape scale. Our results indicate that extensive changes can occur within decades in moist, shrub-dominated ecotones, as in northwest Siberia, while changes are likely to occur much more slowly in the highly continental

  8. The effects of experimental warming on the timing of a plant-insect herbivore interaction.

    PubMed

    Kharouba, Heather M; Vellend, Mark; Sarfraz, Rana M; Myers, Judith H

    2015-05-01

    The phenology of many species is shifting in response to climatic changes, and these shifts are occurring at varying rates across species. This can potentially affect species' interactions and individual fitness. However, few studies have experimentally tested the influence of warming on the timing of species interactions. This is an important gap in the literature given the potential for different direct and indirect effects of temperature via phenological change. Our aim was to test the effects of warming on the western tent caterpillar (Malacosoma californicum pluviale). In addition to the direct effects of warming, we considered the two primary indirect effects mediated by warming-driven changes in its host plant, red alder (Alnus rubra): changes in resource availability due to phenological mismatch (i.e. changes in the relative timing of the interaction), and changes in resource quality associated with leaf maturation. We experimentally warmed egg masses and larvae of the western tent caterpillar placed on branches of red alder in the field. Warming advanced the timing of larval but not leaf emergence. This led to varying degrees of phenological mismatch, with larvae emerging as much as 25 days before to 10 days after the emergence of leaves. Even the earliest-emerging larvae, however, had high survival in the absence of leaves for up to 3 weeks, and they were surprisingly resistant to starvation. In addition, although warming created phenological mismatch that initially slowed the development of larvae that emerged before leaf emergence, it accelerated larval development once leaves were available. Therefore, warming had no net effect on our measures of insect performance. Our results demonstrate that the indirect effects of warming, in creating phenological mismatch, are as important to consider as the direct effects on insect performance. Although future climatic warming might influence plants and insects in different ways, some insects may be well adapted

  9. Leaf morphology and photosynthetic adjustments among deciduous broad-leaved trees within the vertical canopy profile.

    PubMed

    Koike, T; Kitao, M; Maruyama, Y; Mori, S; Lei, T T

    2001-08-01

    Photosynthetic acclimation of deciduous broad-leaved tree species was studied along a vertical gradient within the canopy of a multi-species deciduous forest in northern Japan. We investigated variations in (1) local light regime and CO2 concentration ([CO2]), and (2) morphological (area, thickness and area per mass), biochemical (nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations) and physiological (light-saturated photosynthetic rate) attributes of leaves of seven major species on three occasions (June, August and October). We studied early successional species, alder (Alnus hirsuta (Spach) Rupr.) and birch (Betula platyphylla var. japonica (Miq.) Hara); gap phase species, walnut (Juglans ailanthifolia Carrière) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica var. japonica Rupr.); mid-successional species, basswood (Tilia japonica (Miq.) Simonk.) and elm (Ulmus davidiana var. japonica (Rehd.) Nakai); and the late-successional species, maple (Acer mono Bunge). All but maple initiated leaf unfolding from the lower part of the crown. The [CO2] within the vertical profile ranged from 320-350 ppm in the upper canopy to 405-560 ppm near the ground. The lowest and highest ambient [CO2] occurred during the day and during the night, respectively. This trend was observed consistently during the summer, but not when trees were leafless. Chlorophyll concentration was positively related to maximum photosynthetic rate within, but not among, species. Leaf senescence started from the inner part of the crown in alder and birch, but started either in the outer or top portion of the canopy of ash, basswood and maple. Chlorophyll (Chl) to nitrogen ratio in leaves increased with decreasing photon flux density. However, Chl b concentration in all species remained stable until the beginning of leaf senescence. Maximum photosynthetic rates observed in sun leaves of early successional species, gap phase or mid-successional species, and late successional species were 12.5-14.8 micromol m(-2) s(-1), 4.1-7.8 micromol

  10. Host-associated allozyme variation in tree cambium miners, Phytobia spp. (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Nyman, T; Ylioja, T; Roininen, H

    2002-11-01

    The larvae of the agromyzid flies that belong to the genus Phytobia Lioy feed by mining in the differentiating xylem just below the cambium of growing forest trees. The genus, which is apparently one of the most primitive groups in the Agromyzidae, comprises over 50 currently recognized species. Most of the species are mono- or oligophagous, and the host plants belong to numerous genera in about 60 families. Thus, Phytobia is an attractive candidate for studies on the evolution of insect-plant relationships. In spite of this, the taxonomy of Phytobia is currently poorly understood, mainly because the morphological differences between species are small. We used allozyme electrophoresis to investigate whether molecular markers could be used to separate and identify species in Phytobia, and to study the patterns of host use in the group. For this, we collected Phytobia larvae from eight host tree species occurring in southern Finland. An analysis of 10 variable allozyme loci showed that there are probably five species of Phytobia that feed on the hosts included in our study: one occurs on birches (Betula pubescens Ehrh. and B. pendula Roth) and alders (Alnus incana (L.) Moench and A. glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.), one on rowan (Sorbus aucuparia L.), and three species with overlapping feeding ranges on aspen (Populus tremula L.) and two willow species (Salix phylicifolia L. and S. caprea L.). Because birches and alders belong to the plant family Betulaceae, rowan to Rosaceae, and aspen and willows to Salicaceae, the host associations of the individual fly species can be explained by the taxonomic affinities of the hosts. However, our results also show that on a larger scale the evolution of host-plant associations in Phytobia cannot be explained by strict parallel cladogenesis (cospeciation) between the flies and their hosts.

  11. Thermal generation of pentacenes from soluble 6,13-dihydro-6,13-ethenopentacene precursors by a Diels-Alder-retro-Diels-Alder sequence with 3,6-disubstituted tetrazines.

    PubMed

    Bula, Rafael P; Oppel, Iris M; Bettinger, Holger F

    2012-04-06

    3,6-Substituted tetrazines 2 (a: R(2) = 2-pyridyl or b: CO(2)Me) react with 2,3,9,10-(R(1))(4)-dihydro-6,13-ethenopentacene 3 in solution at elevated temperature to the corresponding pentacene 1 (a: R(1) = H, b: OBn, c: F).

  12. Design and preparation of novel polyarylene ether materials based on Diels-Alder reaction as the crosslinker for electrooptical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wu; Hou, Wenjun; Zhen, Zhen; Liu, Xinhou; Liu, Jialei; Fedorchuk, A. A.; Czaja, P.

    2016-07-01

    Novel crosslinkable organic linear electro-optical (EO) material based on polyarylene ether as the main chain host polymer was designed and prepared. The host polymer with rigid aromatic has demonstrated a good compatibility with the guest chromophore. Long side chain with anthracene ensured the crosslinkable reaction and appropriate glass transition temperature of the host polymer (55 °C). The EO r33 tensor coefficient for this novel EO material has been magnitude of 66 pm/V at 1310 nm and the excellent long term stability at 85 °C. These parameters permit to consider their application in fabrication of organic electro optical devices. The semi-empirical and DFT quantum chemical simulations were performed for 4 principal chromophores to clarify a role of cross-linker in the enhancement of the ground state dipole moments and effective hyperpolarizabilities.

  13. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated o-Xylenols: Application in the Synthesis of Novel Organic Molecules and Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Bis(o-xylenol) equivalents are useful synthetic intermediates in the construction of polymers and hydroxyl substituted organic molecules which can organize by hydrogen bonded self-assembly into unique supramolecular structures. These polymers and supramolecular materials have potential use as coatings and thin films in aerospace, electronic and biomedical applications.

  14. SYNTHESIS OF AZASUGARS VIA LANTHANIDE-PROMOTED AZA DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION. (R826123)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. LANDSCAPE CHARACTERISTICS AND HIGH STREAM NITROGEN IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: RED ALDER COMPLICATES USE OF NUTRIENT CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream nitrogen concentrations are variable and often high in the Oregon Coast Range, uncharacteristic for a predominantly forested region. We compiled stream nitrogen data and GIS-derived landscape characteristics in order to examine variation in nitrogen across the region. In s...

  16. YTTERBIUM(III) TRIFLUOROMETHANESULFONATE CATALYZED SOLID PHASE AZA DIELS-ALDER REACTION AND SUBSEQUENT FACILE ADDUCT RELEASE. (R826123)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  17. The relationship between productivities of salmonids and forest stands in northern California watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frazey, S.L.; Wilzbach, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Productivities of resident salmonids and upland and riporian forests in 22 small watersheds of coastal northern California were estimated and compared to determine whether: 1) upland site productivity predicted riparian site productivity; 2) either upland or riparian site productivity predicted salmonid productivity; and 3) other parameters explained more of the variance in salmonid productivity. Upland and riparian site productivities were estimated using Site Index values for redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and red alder (Alnus rubra), respectively. Salmonid productivity was indexed by back-calculated length at age 1 of the largest individuals sampled and by total biomass. Upland and riparian site indices were correlated, but neither factor contributed to the best approximating models of salmonid productivity. Total salmonid biomass was best described by a positive relationship with drainage area. Length of dominant fish was best described by a positive relationship with percentage of hardwoods within riparian areas, which may result from nutrient and/or litter subsidies provided by red older. The inability of forest productivity to predict salmon productivity may reflect insufficient variation in independent variables, limitations of the indices, and the operation of other factors affecting salmonid production. The lack of an apparent relationship between upland conifer and salmonid productivity suggests that management of land for timber productivity and component streams for salmonid production in these sites will require separate, albeit integrated, management strategies.

  18. Marine-derived nitrogen and carbon in freshwater-riparian food webs of the Copper River Delta, southcentral Alaska.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Brendan J; Wipfli, Mark S; Lang, Dirk W; Lang, Maria E

    2005-08-01

    After rearing to adulthood at sea, coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) return to freshwater to spawn once and then die on or near their spawning grounds. We tested the hypothesis that spawning coho salmon return marine N and C to beaver (Castor canadensis) ponds of the Copper River Delta (CRD), Cordova, southcentral Alaska, thereby enhancing productivity of the aquatic food webs that support juvenile coho salmon. We sampled three types of pond treatment: (1) natural enrichment by spawning salmon, (2) artificial enrichment via addition of salmon carcasses and eggs, and (3) ponds with no salmon enrichment. All ponds supported juvenile coho salmon. Seasonal samples of stable isotopes revealed that juvenile coho salmon, threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), caddisfly larvae, leeches, and chironomid midge larvae were enriched with marine N and C. The aquatic vascular plants bur reed (Sparganium hyperboreum), pondweed (Potamogeton gramineus), and mare's tail (Hippuris vulgaris) were enriched with marine N only. Riparian vegetation (Sitka alder Alnus viridis ssp. sinuata and willow Salix spp.) did not show enrichment. Artificial additions of adult carcasses and eggs of coho salmon increased the delta15N and delta13C values of juvenile coho salmon. In this dynamic and hydrologically complex coastal environment, spawning coho salmon contributed marine N and C comprising 10-50% of the dietary needs of juvenile coho salmon through direct consumption of eggs and carcass material. Invertebrates that have assimilated marine N and C yield a further indirect contribution. This perennial subsidy maintains the productivity of the ecosystem of the coho salmon on the CRD.

  19. Pollen, vegetation, and climate relationships along the Dalton Highway, Alaska, USA: a basis for holocene paleoecological and paleoclimatic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Short, S.K.; Andrews, J.T.; Webber, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Dalton Highway extends from Fairbanks, in the interior of Alaska, to Prudhoe Bay on the Arctic Coastal Plain. Over this 600-km transect, July temperatures vary from 17 to 5/sup 0/C. Studies of vegetation along the Dalton Highway identified nine major zones. During the vegetation survey moss polsters were collected within the survey quadrats. Two hundred and nineteen individual moss polsters document regional variations in the modern pollen spectra along this vegetation/climate transect. Treeline is distinguished by a change from dominance by spruce and shrub (especially alder) pollen to the south to herb and shrub (especially willow) pollen dominance to the north; a shift from high modern pollen concentration values to very low values is also noted. Discriminant analysis indicated that the vegetation zones are also defined by different pollen assemblages, suggesting that former changes in vegetation during the Holocene, as recorded in peat deposits, could be interpreted from pollen diagrams. Transfer functions were developed to examine the statistical association between the modern pollen rain and several climatic parameters. The correlation between pollen taxa and mean July temperature was r = 0.84. The most important taxa in the equation are Picea, Alnus, Pinus, Sphagnum, and Betula. 59 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Nesting biology of Lesser Canada Geese, Branta canadensis parvipes, along the Tanana River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, C.R.; Pearce, J.M.; Ruess, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Lesser Canada Geese (Branta canadensis parvipes) are widespread throughout interior regions of Alaska and Canada, yet there have been no published studies documenting basic aspects of their nesting biology. We conducted a study to determine reproductive parameters of Lesser Canada Geese nesting along the Tanana River near the city of Fairbanks, in interior Alaska. Fieldwork was conducted in May of 2003, and consisted of locating nests along the riparian corridor between Fairbanks and Northpole, Alaska. Nests were found on gravel islands and shore habitats along the Tanana River, and were most commonly observed among driftwood logs associated with patches of alder (Alnus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.). Peak of nest initiation was 3-8 May, with a range from 27 April to 20 May; renesting was likely. Clutches ranged in size from 2 to 7 eggs and averaged 4.6 eggs. There was a negative correlation between clutch size and date of nest initiation. Egg size (mean mass = 128 g) was similar to other medium-sized Canada Geese. A positive correlation between egg size and clutch size was likely related to female age. Nineteen of 28 nests (68%) were active when visited; nests located on islands with nesting Mew Gulls (Larus canus) were more likely to be active than nests located elsewhere. Evidence at nest sites implicated Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as nest predators.

  1. Avoidance of nonhost plants by a bark beetle, Pityogenes bidentatus, in a forest of odors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, John A.; Zhang, Qing-He; Birgersson, Göran

    The bark beetle, Pityogenes bidentatus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), searches in mixed conifer and deciduous forests of northern Europe for suitable branches of its host, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). We tested whether odors from several diverse nonhost trees and plants common in the habitat (e.g., mountain ash, Sorbus aucuparia; oak, Quercus robur; alder buckthorn, Frangula alnus; blueberry, Vaccinium myrtillus; raspberry, Rubus idaeus; and grass, Deschampsia flexuosa) would reduce the attraction of the bark beetle to traps releasing its aggregation pheromone components in the field. Volatiles from the leaves or bark of each of these plants significantly reduced the attraction of the beetles to their pheromone. Odors collected from these nonhosts and analyzed by GC/MS contained monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and ``green-leaf'' alcohols, several of which (e.g., 1-octene-3-ol and β-caryophyllene) reduced the attraction to pheromone in the field and elicited electroantennographic responses. In the laboratory, reproduction by the beetle was marginal in nonhost Norway spruce, Picea abies, and was absent in the other nonhost trees. Olfactory avoidance of unsuitable nonhosts may have evolved due to advantages in avoiding mistakes during host selection.

  2. Cascading effects of induced terrestrial plant defences on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    Jackrel, Sara L; Wootton, J Timothy

    2015-04-22

    Herbivores induce plants to undergo diverse processes that minimize costs to the plant, such as producing defences to deter herbivory or reallocating limited resources to inaccessible portions of the plant. Yet most plant tissue is consumed by decomposers, not herbivores, and these defensive processes aimed to deter herbivores may alter plant tissue even after detachment from the plant. All consumers value nutrients, but plants also require these nutrients for primary functions and defensive processes. We experimentally simulated herbivory with and without nutrient additions on red alder (Alnus rubra), which supplies the majority of leaf litter for many rivers in western North America. Simulated herbivory induced a defence response with cascading effects: terrestrial herbivores and aquatic decomposers fed less on leaves from stressed trees. This effect was context dependent: leaves from fertilized-only trees decomposed most rapidly while leaves from fertilized trees receiving the herbivory treatment decomposed least, suggesting plants funnelled a nutritionally valuable resource into enhanced defence. One component of the defence response was a decrease in leaf nitrogen leading to elevated carbon : nitrogen. Aquatic decomposers prefer leaves naturally low in C : N and this altered nutrient profile largely explains the lower rate of aquatic decomposition. Furthermore, terrestrial soil decomposers were unaffected by either treatment but did show a preference for local and nitrogen-rich leaves. Our study illustrates the ecological implications of terrestrial herbivory and these findings demonstrate that the effects of selection caused by terrestrial herbivory in one ecosystem can indirectly shape the structure of other ecosystems through ecological fluxes across boundaries.

  3. Response of Aquatic Hyphomycete Communities to Changes in Heavy Metal Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Bärlocher, Felix; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Krauss, Gudrun

    2005-02-01

    Decomposition of Alnus glutinosa (alder) leaves was studied in a severely (site H4) and a moderately (site H8) heavy metal polluted stream in the former copper shale mining district of Mansfeld, Central Germany. Leaves at H8 had reduced fungal diversity and spore production but a high exponential decay rate (k = 0.065). No further mass loss of leaves occurred at H4 after 4-6 weeks, and fungal diversity and spore production were lower than in H8. Decay and sporulation rates gradually increased to values of H8 control leaves in leaves preincubated in H4 and then transferred to H8. These increases correlated with the invasion of transplanted leaves by Tetracladium marchalianum and Tricladium angulatum. In the reverse transplant experiment (H8 to H4), mass loss appeared to stop immediately. Sporulation rates also declined, but remained consistently above levels in H4 control leaves. Leaves precolonized in the laboratory by one of three aquatic hyphomycete species exhibited increased decay rates in both streams. Sporulation rates on these leaves were greater than those of control leaves in H4, but smaller than those of control leaves in H8.

  4. Headwater streams and forest management: does ecoregional context influence logging effects on benthic communities?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medhurst, R. Bruce; Wipfli, Mark S.; Binckley, Chris; Polivka, Karl; Hessburg, Paul F.; Salter, R. Brion

    2010-01-01

    Effects of forest management on stream communities have been widely documented, but the role that climate plays in the disturbance outcomes is not understood. In order to determine whether the effect of disturbance from forest management on headwater stream communities varies by climate, we evaluated benthic macroinvertebrate communities in 24 headwater streams that differed in forest management (logged-roaded vs. unlogged-unroaded, hereafter logged and unlogged) within two ecological sub-regions (wet versus dry) within the eastern Cascade Range, Washington, USA. In both ecoregions, total macroinvertebrate density was highest at logged sites (P = 0.001) with gathering-collectors and shredders dominating. Total taxonomic richness and diversity did not differ between ecoregions or forest management types. Shredder densities were positively correlated with total deciduous and Sitka alder (Alnus sinuata) riparian cover. Further, differences in shredder density between logged and unlogged sites were greater in the wet ecoregion (logging × ecoregion interaction; P = 0.006) suggesting that differences in post-logging forest succession between ecoregions were responsible for differences in shredder abundance. Headwater stream benthic community structure was influenced by logging and regional differences in climate. Future development of ecoregional classification models at the subbasin scale, and use of functional metrics in addition to structural metrics, may allow for more accurate assessments of anthropogenic disturbances in mountainous regions where mosaics of localized differences in climate are common.

  5. Bioaccumulation of hexachlorobenzene in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Kampe, Sebastian; Schlechtriem, Christian

    2016-11-01

    A test system to investigate the biomagnification of organic chemicals in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber was developed and validated. Adult isopods were fed on alder leaf powder (Alnus glutinosa) spiked with [(14) C]hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Test animals, sampled regularly during the uptake (16 d) and depuration phases (16 d), were analyzed, and the kinetics of tissue concentrations were determined. Uptake (k1 ) and depuration rates (k2 ) were calculated to estimate kinetic biomagnification factors (BMFs). In addition, the effect of coprophagy on the uptake and accumulation of HCB as well as the tissue distribution of HCB in P. scaber was investigated. The test system was shown to be suitable for investigations into the terrestrial bioaccumulation of chemicals. Coprophagy had no effect on the bioaccumulation of HCB in P. scaber. The hepatopancreas was identified as the main target tissue for HCB accumulation. The low BMF of 0.057 resulted from an assimilation efficiency (α) of 31.42%, a low uptake rate k1 (0.009 d(-1) ), and a high depuration rate k2 (0.164 d(-1) ). The results indicate that the terrestrial bioaccumulation of organic chemicals in P. scaber might not represent a worst-case scenario for biomagnification, limiting the value of the test system for the regulatory assessment of organic chemicals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2867-2873. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  6. Fluorescence responses and photosynthetic rates of sunlit and shaded leaves of Italian alpine forest species: Summer 1997 ATOM-LIFT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Bazzani, Marco; McMurtrey, James E., III; Corp, Lawrence A.; Sandu, R.; Tirelli, Daniele

    1998-07-01

    Terrestrial vegetation studies were carried out in the Italian Northeastern Alps in Val Visdende. The measurement site was 15 Kilometers Northeast of the town of St. Stefano di Calore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were acquired on a wooded site at the Italian Department of Forestry Station on species native to the Italian Alps. The species included spruce (Picea abies) and alder (Alnus incana) trees. Characterization was also made of the fluorescence responses of several under-story species such as Dactylorhiza fuchsii of the Orchidaceae family, Caltha palustris and Ranunculus ficaria of the Ranuncolcee family, and Trifolium pratense and Trifolium repens of the Leguminosae family. Terrestrial vegetation monitoring was conducted with the Italian FLIDAR remote sensing instrument mounted in a mobile van, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), and the Spectron SE-590 for optical properties. Photosynthetic CO2 gas exchange rates we made with LI-COR 6400 infrared gas analyzer. Pigments from the samples were extracted and analyzed with a Perkin Elmer Lamda 7 Spectrometer to determine pigment concentrations. Fluorescence responses were collected from vegetation samples grown under different ambient light regimes of sun-lit versus shaded. The vegetation showed different fluorescence characteristics. A fluorescence algorithm, (F740/F680)/F550, and rate of photosynthesis showed a strong linear relationship.

  7. Earthworms drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities in post-mining sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Obdřej; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Previous field observations indicated that earthworms promote late-successional plant species and reduce collembolan numbers at post-mining sites in the Sokolov coal mining district (Czech Republic). Here, we established a laboratory pot experiment to test the effect of earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffm.) and litter of low, medium, and high quality (the grass Calamagrostis epigejos, the willow Salix caprea, and the alder Alnus glutinosa, respectively) on late successional plants (grasses Arrhenatherum elatius and Agrostis capillaris, legumes Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium medium, and non-leguminous dicots Centaurea jacea and Plantago lanceolata) in spoil substrate originating from Sokolov post-mining sites and naturally inhabited by abundant numbers of Collembola. The earthworms increased plant biomass, especially that of the large-seeded A. elatius, but reduced the number of plant individuals, mainly that of the small-seeded A. capillaris and both legumes. Litter quality affected plant biomass, which was highest with S. caprea litter, but did not change the number of plant individuals. Litter quality did not modify the effect of earthworms on plants; the effect of litter quality and earthworms was only additive. Species composition of Collembola community was altered by litter quality, but earthworms reduced the number of individuals, increased the number of species, and increased species evenness consistently across the litter qualities. Because the results of this experiment were consistent with the field observations, we conclude that earthworms help drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities on post-mining sites.

  8. Earthworms drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities in post-mining sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Uteseny, Karoline; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Previous field observations indicated that earthworms promote late-successional plant species and reduce collembolan numbers at post-mining sites in the Sokolov coal mining district (Czech Republic). Here, we established a laboratory pot experiment to test the effect of earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffm.) and litter of low, medium, and high quality (the grass Calamagrostis epigejos, the willow Salix caprea, and the alder Alnus glutinosa, respectively) on late successional plants (grasses Arrhenatherum elatius and Agrostis capillaris, legumes Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium medium, and non-leguminous dicots Centaurea jacea and Plantago lanceolata) in spoil substrate originating from Sokolov post-mining sites and naturally inhabited by abundant numbers of Collembola. The earthworms increased plant biomass, especially that of the large-seeded A. elatius, but reduced the number of plant individuals, mainly that of the small-seeded A. capillaris and both legumes. Litter quality affected plant biomass, which was highest with S. caprea litter, but did not change the number of plant individuals. Litter quality did not modify the effect of earthworms on plants; the effect of litter quality and earthworms was only additive. Species composition of Collembola community was altered by litter quality, but earthworms reduced the number of individuals, increased the number of species, and increased species evenness consistently across the litter qualities. Because the results of this experiment were consistent with the field observations, we conclude that earthworms help drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities on post-mining sites.

  9. Densities of breeding birds and changes in vegetation in an alaskan boreal forest following a massive disturbance by spruce beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuoka, S.M.; Handel, C.M.; Ruthrauff, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    We examined bird and plant communities among forest stands with different levels of spruce mortality following a large outbreak of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Spruce beetles avoided stands with black spruce (Picea mariana) and selectively killed larger diameter white spruce (Picea glauca), thereby altering forest structure and increasing the dominance of black spruce in the region. Alders (Alnus sp.) and crowberry (Empetrum nigrum) were more abundant in areas with heavy spruce mortality, possibly a response to the death of overstory spruce. Grasses and herbaceous plants did not proliferate as has been recorded following outbreaks in more coastal Alaskan forests. Two species closely tied to coniferous habitats, the tree-nesting Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) and the red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), a major nest predator, were less abundant in forest stands with high spruce mortality than in low-mortality stands. Understory-nesting birds as a group were more abundant in forest stands with high levels of spruce mortality, although the response of individual bird species to tree mortality was variable. Birds breeding in stands with high spruce mortality likely benefited reproductively from lower squirrel densities and a greater abundance of shrubs to conceal nests from predators.

  10. The skin prick test - European standards.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, Lucie; Mari, Adriano; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bresciani, Megon; Burbach, Guido; Darsow, Ulf; Durham, Stephen; Fokkens, Wytske; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Haahtela, Tari; Bom, Ana Todo; Wöhrl, Stefan; Maibach, Howard; Lockey, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Skin prick testing is an essential test procedure to confirm sensitization in IgE-mediated allergic disease in subjects with rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, urticaria, anapylaxis, atopic eczema and food and drug allergy. This manuscript reviews the available evidence including Medline and Embase searches, abstracts of international allergy meetings and position papers from the world allergy literature. The recommended method of prick testing includes the appropriate use of specific allergen extracts, positive and negative controls, interpretation of the tests after 15 - 20 minutes of application, with a positive result defined as a wheal ≥3 mm diameter. A standard prick test panel for Europe for inhalants is proposed and includes hazel (Corylus avellana), alder (Alnus incana), birch (Betula alba), plane (Platanus vulgaris), cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), grass mix (Poa pratensis, Dactilis glomerata, Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense, Festuca pratensis, Helictotrichon pretense), Olive (Olea europaea), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), Alternaria alternata (tenuis), Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Parietaria, cat, dog, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and cockroach (Blatella germanica). Standardization of the skin test procedures and standard panels for different geographic locations are encouraged worldwide to permit better comparisons for diagnostic, clinical and research purposes.

  11. Tent caterpillars are robust to variation in leaf phenology and quality in two thermal environments.

    PubMed

    Sarfraz, Rana M; Kharouba, Heather M; Myers, Judith H

    2013-10-01

    The synchrony between emergence of spring-active, insect herbivores and the budburst of their host plants could be affected by warming temperatures with influences on the availability and quality of foliage as it undergoes physical and chemical changes. This can affect the growth and survival of insects. Here, we used sun-exposed and shaded trees to determine whether the synchrony between egg hatch of western tent caterpillar, Malacosoma californicum pluviale Dyar (Lepidoptera:Lasiocampidae) and budburst of its host red alder, Alnus rubra Bongard (Betulaceae)changes with different thermal environments (temperature and light together). To explore the potential outcome of a shift in phenological synchrony, we used laboratory assays of larval growth and survival to determine the effect of variation in young, youthful and mature leaves from sun-exposed and shaded trees. While the average higher temperature of sun-exposed trees advanced the timing of budburst and egg hatch, synchrony was not disrupted. Leaf quality had no significant influence on growth or survival in the laboratory for early instars reared as family groups. Later instar larvae, however, performed best on mature leaves from sun-exposed trees. The robust relationship between leaf and larval development of western tent caterpillars suggests that warming climates may not have a strong negative impact on their success through shifts in phenological synchrony, but might influence other aspects of leaf quality and larval condition.

  12. Dynamics of carbon fluxes above a hemiboreal mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnova, Alisa; Noe, Steffen M.; Niinemets, Ülo; Krasnov, Dmitrii

    2015-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are a major part of the biosphere and control land surface-atmosphere interactions. They influence atmospheric composition and climate significantly being sources and sinks of trace gases and energy. Mixed stands of both coniferous and deciduous tree species are characterized by greater seasonal variability of forest microclimate, canopy shape and density, length of growing season and plant activity and higher biota diversity and compared to pure boreal forests. These factors coupled with physical environment (atmospheric and meteorological conditions, soil properties) influence CO2 exchange between forest and the atmosphere. To explore complex interactions within ecosystem-atmosphere continuum of hemiboreal forest SMEAR Estonia station was established in Järvselja, Estonia. A 24 m height scaffolding tower located in a forest stand dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) with co-domination of Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.) was used to study eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2. We present the results from the first continuous EC measurements over a hemiboreal mixed forest performed in 2011-2012. The focus of the study is on diurnal and annual dynamics of carbon fluxes and the influence of main environmental drivers.

  13. Quantifying the effects of root reinforcing on slope stability: results of the first tests with an new shearing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickli, Christian; Graf, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The role of vegetation in preventing shallow soil mass movements such as shallow landslides and soil erosion is generally well recognized and, correspondingly, soil bioengineering on steep slopes has been widely used in practice. However, the precise effectiveness of vegetation regarding slope stabilityis still difficult to determine. A recently designed inclinable shearing device for large scale vegetated soil samples allows quantitative evaluation of the additional shear strength provided by roots of specific plant species. In the following we describe the results of a first series of shear strength experiments with this apparatus focusing on root reinforcement of White Alder (Alnus incana) and Silver Birch (Betula pendula) in large soil block samples (500 x 500 x 400 mm). The specimen with partly saturated soil of a maximum grain size of 10 mm were slowly sheared at an inclination of 35° with low normal stresses of 3.2 kPa accounting for natural conditions on a typical slope prone to mass movements. Measurements during the experiments involved shear stress, shear displacement and normal displacement, all recorded with high accuracy. In addition, dry weights of sprout and roots were measured to quantify plant growth of the planted specimen. The results with the new apparatus indicate a considerable reinforcement of the soil due to plant roots, i.e. maximum shear stress of the vegetated specimen were substantially higher compared to non-vegetated soil and the additional strength was a function of species and growth. Soil samples with seedlings planted five months prior to the test yielded an important increase in maximum shear stress of 250% for White Alder and 240% for Silver Birch compared to non-vegetated soil. The results of a second test series with 12 month old plants showed even clearer enhancements in maximum shear stress (390% for Alder and 230% for Birch). Overall the results of this first series of shear strength experiments with the new apparatus

  14. Postglacial vegetation history of the Kachemak Bay area, Cook Inlet, south-central Alaska: A section in Geologic studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ager, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Pollen records from two sites on the north shore of Kachemak Bay, south-central Alaska, provide the first radiocarbon-dated histories of postglacial vegetation development for southern Cook Inlet. During the late Wisconsin glacial interval, glaciers covered most of Cook Inlet. Deglaciation of Kachemak Bay began prior to 13,000 yr B.P. Pollen evidence indicates that a pioneering herbaceous tundra began to develop by 12,800 yr B.P., but was soon replaced by a shrub tundra of dwarf birch (Betula), Ericales (Ericaceae and Empetrum) and willows (Salix).By 9,500 yr B.P., a shrub-dominated vegetation of alders (Alnus) and willows, with some deciduous trees (Populus spp.) quickly developed and persisted until late Holocene time. By about 4,000–3,800 yr B.P., spruce trees (Picea glauca and (or) P. mariana) from the interior boreal forests reached the northern Kachemak Bay area from upper Cook Inlet and began to displace the alder-dominated vegetation. A coastal forest of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) began to colonize Kachemak Bay more recently, about 1,650 yr B.P. (minimum age), apparently from sources in Prince William Sound to the east. Where Sitka spruce came into proximity with boreal white spruce (Picea glauca), hybridization occurred, ultimately influencing the spruce forests over a large area of the Kenai Lowland. Some key findings of this study are: (1) the Kachemak Bay-area pollen records do not display persuasive evidence for a “Younger Dryas” cold, dry interval ca. 11,000–10,000 yr B.P. that has been reported from pollen records on Kodiak Island (Gulf of Alaska) and Pleasant Island (southeastern Alaska); (2) at least one species of alder may have survived in refugia in south-central Alaska during the last glacial interval; (3) coastal forests appear to be still migrating west along the coast of south-central Alaska, but their spread northward is being limited by drier, colder winter climates; (4) the mountainous topography of south-central Alaska

  15. Stable-Isotope Perspectives on Holocene Environmental Change at Archaeological Sites in the Middle Tanana Valley, Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. C.; Gaines, E. P.

    2010-12-01

    Summer of 2009, Colorado State University Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands conducted test excavations of 29 prehistoric archaeological sites situated on a loess-mantled morainal ridge complex within the Jarvis Creek valley of the Tanana River system at Fort Wainwright in Interior Alaska. Initial loess deposition on the moraines began about 13,000 cal yr BP, with subsequent long-term, nomadic occupation of the area occurring from 9,500 to 1,060 cal yr BP. An array of data were extracted from bulk-sediment samples and used to assess past environmental conditions. Parameters and approaches used to generate these data included stable carbon isotope ratios, magnetic susceptibility, biogenic opal analysis, detrital charcoal content, quantitative color (L*a*b), and particle-size distribution. Stable carbon isotope trends, in combination with the other environmental proxy data, document major environmental changes. Data from the glacial till-loess transition and lower silt mantle indicate that the area was cold and slightly mesic, and dominated by treeless C3-dominated grassland immediately after the terminal Pleistocene glacial retreat (~12,700 cal yr BP). A dearth of particulate charcoal and charred phytoliths from sediments of this period suggests a minor role for fire, e.g., only localized, small fires. Cold, treeless environmental conditions continued throughout the Early Holocene (~12,000-7,000 cal yr BP), though it was more mesic than earlier. Middle Holocene (~7000-5000 cal yr BP) data display a shift in C3 grass species (increased δ13C values), the appearance of a shrub component to the plant community, significant surface stability, and more widespread fire occurrence. Picea glauca (white spruce) and Alnus sp. (alder) appear in the later parts of the Middle Holocene, and charcoal concentration increases. The Late Holocene (since ~5,000 cal yr BP) witnessed a decline in P. glauca by about 50%, a tenfold increase in Alnus, and the appearance

  16. Effects of Debris Flows on Stream Ecosystems of the Klamath Mountains, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, M. R.; Delafuente, J. A.; Resh, V. H.

    2006-12-01

    We examined the long-term effects of debris flows on channel characteristics and aquatic food webs in steep (0.04-0.06 slope), small (4-6 m wide) streams. A large rain-on-snow storm event in January 1997 resulted in numerous landslides and debris flows throughout many basins in the Klamath Mountains of northern California. Debris floods resulted in extensive impacts throughout entire drainage networks, including mobilization of valley floor deposits and removal of vegetation. Comparing 5 streams scoured by debris flows in 1997 and 5 streams that had not been scoured as recently, we determined that debris-flows decreased channel complexity by reducing alluvial step frequency and large woody debris volumes. Unscoured streams had more diverse riparian vegetation, whereas scoured streams were dominated by dense, even-aged stands of white alder (Alnus rhombiflia). Benthic invertebrate shredders, especially nemourid and peltoperlid stoneflies, were more abundant and diverse in unscoured streams, reflecting the more diverse allochthonous resources. Debris flows resulted in increased variability in canopy cover, depending on degree of alder recolonization. Periphyton biomass was higher in unscoured streams, but primary production was greater in the recently scoured streams, suggesting that invertebrate grazers kept algal assemblages in an early successional state. Glossosomatid caddisflies were predominant scrapers in scoured streams; heptageniid mayflies were abundant in unscoured streams. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were of similar abundance in scoured and unscoured streams, but scoured streams were dominated by young-of-the-year fish while older juveniles were more abundant in unscoured streams. Differences in the presence of cold-water (Doroneuria) versus warm-water (Calineuria) perlid stoneflies suggest that debris flows have altered stream temperatures. Debris flows have long-lasting impacts on stream communities, primarily through the cascading effects of

  17. A 26,600 yr record of climate and vegetation from Rice Lake in the Eel River drainage of the northern California Coast Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusser, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rice Lake, (40'41" N; 123'30" W, 1109 m elev.) lies in the transition zone of the precipitation dipole in the western United States, which is reflected by the present vegetation - a mosaic of mesic northern mixed hardwood-evergreen forests (Quercus spp., Pinus spp., Calocedrus/Juniperus) and more arid southern oak foothill woodlands (Quercus spp.) that borders the westernmost edge of coastal redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) forest. The site, which lies on the active Lake Mountain fault zone, is now a large (~15 ha) sagpond that dries in summer. Between ~26,600 yr - ~15,000 yr, a permanent lake with aquatic vegetation (Isoetes) occupied the core site. Montane conifer forests, with pine (Pinus, spp.), mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana), spruce (Picea spp), and western hemlock (T. heterophylla) covered the region. Climatic parameters of modern montane coniferous forest and the continued presence of aquatic vegetation (Isoetes) suggest higher precipitation and lower temperatures during the last glacial. Charcoal (fire event frequency) was minimal. Rapid oscillations of oak, the riparian alder (Alnus), pine, Cupressaceae (Juniperus, Calocedrus), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menzeii), and fir (Abies) characterize the deglacial, and reflect rapid changes in precipitation and temperatures, e.g, Bølling-Allerød warming and Younger Dryas cooling. Between ~15,000 yr and ~13,000 yr, aquatic vegetation of the lake abruptly decreased. Expansion of oak, tanoak (Lithocarpus), shrubs (cf. Ceanothus) and decline of pine and montane conifers, along with the development of marshes with Typha and Cyperaceae on the former lakebed, imply early Holocene warming and decreasing precipitation. This is supported by an increase in charcoal, which is attributed to forest fires. Between ~5,000 yr - ~6,000 yr, a short interval of increased precipitation (inferred from a peak in alder and decrease in Cupressaceae) initiates the development of modern mixed hardwood-evergreen forest. Correlative data

  18. Effects of tree species richness and composition on moose winter browsing damage and foraging selectivity: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Harriet T; Koricheva, Julia

    2013-07-01

    The optimal foraging theory, the nutrient balance hypothesis, and the plant association theories predict that foraging decisions and resulting tree damage by large mammalian browsers may be influenced by the species richness and species composition of forest stands. This may lead to either associational susceptibility (increased damage on a focal plant in a mixed stand) or associational resistance (reduced damage in a mixed stand). Better understanding of the mechanisms and the relative importance of tree species richness and composition effects on foraging by mammalian browsers is needed to support sustainable management of forests and mammal populations. However, existing knowledge of forest diversity effects on foraging by large mammalian browsers comes largely from observational studies while experimental evidence is limited. We analysed winter browsing by moose (Alces alces L.) in a long-term, large-scale experiment in Finland, which represents a tree species richness gradient from monocultures to 2-, 3- and 5-species mixtures composed of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.), Siberian larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb.), silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.). The intensity of browsing per plot increased with tree species richness while browsing selectivity decreased with tree species being targeted more equally in species-rich mixtures. Tree species composition of a plot was also an important determinant of intensity of browsing. The greatest browsing occurred in plots containing preferred species (pine and birch) while intermediate preference species (larch and alder) experienced associational susceptibility when growing with pine and birch compared with their monocultures or mixtures without pine and birch. In contrast, we found no evidence of associational resistance; the presence of a least preferred species (spruce) in a mixture had no significant effect on moose browsing on other tree species. We

  19. Effects of invasive plant species on pollinator service and reproduction in native plants at Acadia National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stubbs, C.J.; Drummond, F.; Ginsberg, H.

    2007-01-01

    Invasive plant species can have profound negative effects on natural communities by competively excluding native species. Berberis thunbergii (Japanese barberry), Frangula alnus (glossy or alder buckthorn) and Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) are invasive species known to reduce native plant diversity and are thus of great concern to Acadia National Park. Pollinators visit them for nectar and pollen. The effects of invasive plant species on pollinator behavior were investigated by comparing pollinator visitation to co-flowering native and invasive species with visitation to native species growing alone. The effect of invasives on pollination of native plants was studied by comparing fruit set in patches of the native species growing near invasives with patches far from invasive species in Acadia National Park. The coflowering pairs were as follows: in the spring native Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry) was paired with B. thunbergii; in early summer native Viburnum nudum (wild raisin) was paired with F. alnus ; in late summer native Spiraea alba (meadowsweet) was paired with L. salicaria. We investigated whether these invasives competed with native plants for pollinators in Acadia and thus negatively affected native plant reproduction. Our objectives were to determine: 1) the influence, if any, of each invasive on pollinator visitation to a co-flowering native species, 2) factors that might affect visitation, 3) invasive pollen transfer to native plants, and 4) whether invasives influence native plant reproduction (fruit set). Our findings indicate that at times the number of flower visitors to natives was lower or the species composition of visitors different when invasives were present, that invasives sometimes attracted more pollinators, that generally the invasives were more rewarding as far as nectar and pollen availability for pollinators, and that generally native plant fruit set and seed set was not significantly lowered in the presence of

  20. Environmental drivers of spatial variation in whole-tree transpiration in an aspen-dominated upland-to-wetland forest gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranty, Michael M.; Mackay, D. Scott; Ewers, Brent E.; Adelman, Jonathan D.; Kruger, Eric L.

    2008-02-01

    Assumed representative center-of-stand measurements are typical inputs to models that scale forest transpiration to stand and regional extents. These inputs do not consider gradients in transpiration at stand boundaries or along moisture gradients and therefore potentially bias the large-scale estimates. We measured half-hourly sap flux (JS) for 173 trees in a spatially explicit cyclic sampling design across a topographically controlled gradient between a forested wetland and upland forest in northern Wisconsin. Our analyses focused on three dominant species in the site: quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx), speckled alder (Alnus incana (DuRoi) Spreng), and white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.). Sapwood area (AS) was used to scale JS to whole tree transpiration (EC). Because spatial patterns imply underlying processes, geostatistical analyses were employed to quantify patterns of spatial autocorrelation across the site. A simple Jarvis type model parameterized using a Monte Carlo sampling approach was used to simulate EC (EC-SIM). EC-SIM was compared with observed EC(EC-OBS) and found to reproduce both the temporal trends and spatial variance of canopy transpiration. EC-SIM was then used to examine spatial autocorrelation as a function of environmental drivers. We found no spatial autocorrelation in JS across the gradient from forested wetland to forested upland. EC was spatially autocorrelated and this was attributed to spatial variation in AS which suggests species spatial patterns are important for understanding spatial estimates of transpiration. However, the range of autocorrelation in EC-SIM decreased linearly with increasing vapor pressure deficit, implying that consideration of spatial variation in the sensitivity of canopy stomatal conductance to D is also key to accurately scaling up transpiration in space.

  1. Effects of multiple but low pesticide loads on aquatic fungal communities colonizing leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Talk, Anne; Kublik, Susanne; Uksa, Marie; Engel, Marion; Berghahn, Rüdiger; Welzl, Gerhard; Schloter, Michael; Mohr, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In the first tier risk assessment (RA) of pesticides, risk for aquatic communities is estimated by using results from standard laboratory tests with algae, daphnids and fish for single pesticides such as herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides. However, fungi as key organisms for nutrient cycling in ecosystems as well as multiple pesticide applications are not considered in the RA. In this study, the effects of multiple low pesticide pulses using regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) on the dynamics of non-target aquatic fungi were investigated in a study using pond mesocosm. For that, fungi colonizing black alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaves were exposed to multiple, low pulses of 11 different pesticides over a period of 60days using a real farmer's pesticide application protocol for apple cropping. Four pond mesocosms served as treatments and 4 as controls. The composition of fungal communities colonizing the litter material was analyzed using a molecular fingerprinting approach based on the terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (t-RFLP) of the fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) gene(s). Our data indicated a clear fluctuation of fungal communities based on the degree of leaf litter degradation. However significant effects of the applied spraying sequence were not observed. Consequently also degradation rates of the litter material were not affected by the treatments. Our results indicate that the nutrient rich environment of the leaf litter material gave fungal communities the possibility to express genes that induce tolerance against the applied pesticides. Thus our data may not be transferred to other fresh water habitats with lower nutrient availability.

  2. Monitoring plant tissue nitrogen isotopes to assess nearshore inputs of nitrogen to Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Stephen E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Fradkin, Steven C.

    2016-05-31

    Mats of filamentous-periphytic algae present in some nearshore areas of Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, may indicate early stages of eutrophication from nutrient enrichment of an otherwise highly oligotrophic lake. Natural abundance ratios of stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) measured in plant tissue growing in nearshore areas of the lake indicate that the major source of nitrogen used by these primary producing plants is derived mainly from atmospherically fixed nitrogen in an undeveloped forested ecosystem. Exceptions to this pattern occurred in the Barnes Point area where elevated δ15N ratios indicate that effluent from septic systems also contribute nitrogen to filamentous-periphytic algae growing in the littoral zone of that area. Near the Lyre River outlet of Lake Crescent, the δ15N of filamentous-periphytic algae growing in close proximity to the spawning areas of a unique species of trout show little evidence of elevated δ15N indicating that nitrogen from on-site septic systems is not a substantial source of nitrogen for these plants. The δ15N data corroborate estimates that nitrogen input to Lake Crescent from septic sources is comparatively small relative to input from motor vehicle exhaust and vegetative sources in undeveloped forests, including litterfall, pollen, and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. The seasonal timing of blooms of filamentous-periphytic algal near the lake shoreline is also consistent with nitrogen exported from stands of red alder trees (Alnus rubra). Isotope biomonitoring of filamentous-periphytic algae may be an effective approach to monitoring the littoral zone for nutrient input to Lake Crescent from septic sources.

  3. Impacts of a recent storm surge on an Arctic delta ecosystem examined in the context of the last millennium.

    PubMed

    Pisaric, Michael F J; Thienpont, Joshua R; Kokelj, Steven V; Nesbitt, Holly; Lantz, Trevor C; Solomon, Steven; Smol, John P

    2011-05-31

    One of the most ominous predictions related to recent climatic warming is that low-lying coastal environments will be inundated by higher sea levels. The threat is especially acute in polar regions because reductions in extent and duration of sea ice cover increase the risk of storm surge occurrence. The Mackenzie Delta of northwest Canada is an ecologically significant ecosystem adapted to freshwater flooding during spring breakup. Marine storm surges during the open-water season, which move saltwater into the delta, can have major impacts on terrestrial and aquatic systems. We examined growth rings of alder shrubs (Alnus viridis subsp. fruticosa) and diatoms preserved in dated lake sediment cores to show that a recent marine storm surge in 1999 caused widespread ecological changes across a broad extent of the outer Mackenzie Delta. For example, diatom assemblages record a striking shift from freshwater to brackish species following the inundation event. What is of particular significance is that the magnitude of this recent ecological impact is unmatched over the > 1,000-year history of this lake ecosystem. We infer that no biological recovery has occurred in this lake, while large areas of terrestrial vegetation remain dramatically altered over a decade later, suggesting that these systems may be on a new ecological trajectory. As climate continues to warm and sea ice declines, similar changes will likely be repeated in other coastal areas of the circumpolar Arctic. Given the magnitude of ecological changes recorded in this study, such impacts may prove to be long lasting or possibly irreversible.

  4. Cascading effects of induced terrestrial plant defences on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem function

    PubMed Central

    Jackrel, Sara L.; Wootton, J. Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Herbivores induce plants to undergo diverse processes that minimize costs to the plant, such as producing defences to deter herbivory or reallocating limited resources to inaccessible portions of the plant. Yet most plant tissue is consumed by decomposers, not herbivores, and these defensive processes aimed to deter herbivores may alter plant tissue even after detachment from the plant. All consumers value nutrients, but plants also require these nutrients for primary functions and defensive processes. We experimentally simulated herbivory with and without nutrient additions on red alder (Alnus rubra), which supplies the majority of leaf litter for many rivers in western North America. Simulated herbivory induced a defence response with cascading effects: terrestrial herbivores and aquatic decomposers fed less on leaves from stressed trees. This effect was context dependent: leaves from fertilized-only trees decomposed most rapidly while leaves from fertilized trees receiving the herbivory treatment decomposed least, suggesting plants funnelled a nutritionally valuable resource into enhanced defence. One component of the defence response was a decrease in leaf nitrogen leading to elevated carbon : nitrogen. Aquatic decomposers prefer leaves naturally low in C : N and this altered nutrient profile largely explains the lower rate of aquatic decomposition. Furthermore, terrestrial soil decomposers were unaffected by either treatment but did show a preference for local and nitrogen-rich leaves. Our study illustrates the ecological implications of terrestrial herbivory and these findings demonstrate that the effects of selection caused by terrestrial herbivory in one ecosystem can indirectly shape the structure of other ecosystems through ecological fluxes across boundaries. PMID:25788602

  5. Plant Responses to Climate Change: The Case Study of Betulaceae and Poaceae Pollen Seasons (Northern Italy, Vignola, Emilia-Romagna).

    PubMed

    Mercuri, Anna Maria; Torri, Paola; Fornaciari, Rita; Florenzano, Assunta

    2016-12-06

    Aerobiological data have especially demonstrated that there is correlation between climate warming and the pollination season of plants. This paper focuses on airborne pollen monitoring of Betulaceae and Poaceae, two of the main plant groups with anemophilous pollen and allergenic proprieties in Northern Italy. The aim is to investigate plant responses to temperature variations by considering long-term pollen series. The 15-year aerobiological analysis is reported from the monitoring station of Vignola (located near Modena, in the Emilia-Romagna region) that had operated in the years 1990-2004 with a Hirst spore trap. The Yearly Pollen Index calculated for these two botanical families has shown contrasting trends in pollen production and release. These trends were well identifiable but fairly variable, depending on both meteorological variables and anthropogenic causes. Based on recent reference literature, we considered that some oscillations in pollen concentration could have been a main effect of temperature variability reflecting global warming. The duration of pollen seasons of Betulaceae and Poaceae, depending on the different species included in each family, has not unequivocally been determined. Phenological responses were particularly evident in Alnus and especially in Corylus as a general moving up of the end of pollination. The study shows that these trees can be affected by global warming more than other, more tolerant, plants. The research can be a contribution to the understanding of phenological plant responses to climate change and suggests that alder and hazelnut trees have to be taken into high consideration as sensible markers of plant responses to climate change.

  6. Paleofloristic and paleofaunistic analysis of Dudváh River oxbow and implication for Late Holocene paleoenvironmental development of the Žitný ostrov Island (SW Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pišút, Peter; Břízová, Eva; Čejka, Tomáš; Pipík, Radovan

    2010-12-01

    Žitný ostrov, the largest island of the Danube River (SW Slovakia) gained its present shape in the Neoholocene period. As a result of increased flood and geomorphological Danube river activity dated to 1378-1528 AD, the Lower Dudváh River was abandoned and its alluvium became a part of the Žitný ostrov. Study of a Dudváh terrestrialized paleomeander by means of pollen and macrofossil analysis provides new information about the paleoenvironments of the Danubian Plain. The meander under study was cut-off during the Sub-Boreal period when the land was mostly covered by oak-dominated mixed forest with a notable high frequency of Fagus and Abies. In low-lying depressions, Alnus glutinosa formed typical alder carrs. The largest decline of the mixed forest occurred during the Sub-Atlantic period. Until the mid-19th century the region was strongly influenced by shallow groundwater and periodical floods, as reflected by pollen of aquatics and marsh species. Amongst non-arboreal taxa, pollen of Cyperaceae, Brassicaceae/Cuscuta, Poaceae and Apiaceae prevailed. Local successional changes started with i) stage of abandoned oxbow still with influx of moving water, poor in both macrophytes and molluscs, ii) shallow eutrophic oxbow lake with slowly flowing or stagnant water overgrown with aquatics (Ranunculus subgen. Batrachium, Potamogeton sp., Ceratophyllum demersum etc.) and abundant molluscs, iii) an open marsh dominated by Cyperaceae (mainly Carex riparia) with Atriplex prostrata, supporting diverse molluscan and Ostracod fauna. Present-day habitat is a result of landscape changes, which have been associated with draining, intensified agriculture, ruderalisation and spread of invasive species.

  7. Plant Responses to Climate Change: The Case Study of Betulaceae and Poaceae Pollen Seasons (Northern Italy, Vignola, Emilia-Romagna)

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, Anna Maria; Torri, Paola; Fornaciari, Rita; Florenzano, Assunta

    2016-01-01

    Aerobiological data have especially demonstrated that there is correlation between climate warming and the pollination season of plants. This paper focuses on airborne pollen monitoring of Betulaceae and Poaceae, two of the main plant groups with anemophilous pollen and allergenic proprieties in Northern Italy. The aim is to investigate plant responses to temperature variations by considering long-term pollen series. The 15-year aerobiological analysis is reported from the monitoring station of Vignola (located near Modena, in the Emilia-Romagna region) that had operated in the years 1990–2004 with a Hirst spore trap. The Yearly Pollen Index calculated for these two botanical families has shown contrasting trends in pollen production and release. These trends were well identifiable but fairly variable, depending on both meteorological variables and anthropogenic causes. Based on recent reference literature, we considered that some oscillations in pollen concentration could have been a main effect of temperature variability reflecting global warming. The duration of pollen seasons of Betulaceae and Poaceae, depending on the different species included in each family, has not unequivocally been determined. Phenological responses were particularly evident in Alnus and especially in Corylus as a general moving up of the end of pollination. The study shows that these trees can be affected by global warming more than other, more tolerant, plants. The research can be a contribution to the understanding of phenological plant responses to climate change and suggests that alder and hazelnut trees have to be taken into high consideration as sensible markers of plant responses to climate change. PMID:27929423

  8. Proximate weather patterns and spring green-up phenology effect Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) body mass and reproductive success: the implications of climate change and topography.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ruairidh D; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W; Rosell, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Low spring temperatures have been found to benefit mobile herbivores by reducing the rate of spring-flush, whereas high rainfall increases forage availability. Cold winters prove detrimental, by increasing herbivore thermoregulatory burdens. Here we examine the effects of temperature and rainfall variability on a temperate sedentary herbivore, the Eurasian beaver, Castor fiber, in terms of inter-annual variation in mean body weight and per territory offspring production. Data pertain to 198 individuals, over 11 years, using capture-mark-recapture. We use plant growth (tree cores) and fAPAR (a satellite-derived plant productivity index) to examine potential mechanisms through which weather conditions affect the availability and the seasonal phenology of beaver forage. Juvenile body weights were lighter after colder winters, whereas warmer spring temperatures were associated with lighter adult body weights, mediated by enhanced green-up phenology rates. Counter-intuitively, we observed a negative association between rainfall and body weight in juveniles and adults, and also with reproductive success. Alder, Alnus incana, (n = 68) growth rings (principal beaver food in the study area) exhibited a positive relationship with rainfall for trees growing at elevations >2 m above water level, but a negative relationship for trees growing <0.5 m. We deduce that temperature influences beavers at the landscape scale via effects on spring green-up phenology and winter thermoregulation. Rainfall influences beavers at finer spatial scales through topographical interactions with plant growth, where trees near water level, prone to water logging, producing poorer forage in wetter years. Unlike most other herbivores, beavers are an obligate aquatic species that utilize a restricted 'central-place' foraging range, limiting their ability to take advantage of better forage growth further from water during wetter years. With respect to anthropogenic climate change, interactions between

  9. Effects of Recent Debris Flows on Stream Ecosystems and Food Webs in Small Watersheds in the Central Klamath Mountains, NW California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, M. R.; de La Fuente, J.

    2008-12-01

    Debris flows are common erosional processes in steep mountain areas throughout the world, but little is known about the long-term ecological effects of debris flows on stream ecosystems. Based on debris flow histories that were developed for each of ten tributary basins, we classified channels as having experienced recent (1997) or older (pre-1997) debris flows. Of the streams classified as older debris flow streams, three streams experienced debris flows during floods in 1964 or 1974, while two streams showed little or no evidence of debris flow activity in the 20th century. White alder (Alnus rhombifolia) was the dominant pioneer tree species in recent debris flow streams, forming localized dense patches of canopy cover. Maximum temperatures and daily temperature ranges were significantly higher in recent debris flow streams than in older debris flow streams. Debris flows resulted in a shift in food webs from allochthonous to autochthonous energy sources. Primary productivity, as measured by oxygen change during the day, was greater in recent debris flow streams, resulting in increased abundances of grazers such as the armored caddisfly Glossosoma spp. Detritivorous stoneflies were virtually absent in recent debris flow streams because of the lack of year-round, diverse sources of leaf litter. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were abundant in four of the recent debris flow streams. Poor recolonizers, such as the Pacific giant salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus), coastal tailed frog (Ascaphus truei), and signal crayfish (Pacifistacus leniusculus), were virtually absent in recent debris flow streams. Forest and watershed managers should consider the role of forest disturbances, such as road networks, on debris flow frequency and intensity, and the resulting ecological effects on stream ecosystems.

  10. National Dam Safety Program. Alder Pond Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 1489), Black River Basin, Oneida County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-17

    HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING DATA AND COMPUTATIONS ALDEA , POND4 MA CHECK LIST FOR DAMS ~1B HYDROLOGIC AND HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING DATA AREA-CAPACITY DATA...Releases (mechanisms): 90KI5- 93-15=a , 9/8o)? ALDEA Pom P VAtA - 1489 DRAINAGE AREA: 55(p ACE 5.18 ’SQ IbILEb5 DRAINAGE BASIN RUNOFF CHARACTERISTICS

  11. Development of a HPLC/tandem-MS method for the analysis of the larvicides methoprene, hydroprene, and kinoprene at trace levels using Diels-Alder derivatization.

    PubMed

    Aronov, Pavel A; Dettmer, Katja; Christiansen, Julie A; Cornel, Anthony J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2005-05-04

    The invasion and subsequent spread of the mosquito-borne West Nile virus in the United States has resulted in increased use of methoprene. With the increased need for sensitive detection and monitoring of methoprene in the environment, an analytical LC/ESI-MS/MS method has been developed for the analysis of methoprene and two analogues, kinoprene and hydroprene, in water. To improve the ionization efficiency of the nonpolar analytes, a derivatization step with the Cookson-type reagent 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was used. Derivatization improved the limit of detection 100-fold. For tandem MS analyses, limits of detection in environmental water samples (S/N = 3) are about 6 pg/mL for methoprene and 20 pg/mL for kinoprene and hydroprene, resulting in limits of quantification (S/N = 10) of 20 pg/mL for methoprene and 60 pg/mL for hydroprene and kinoprene extracted from 10 mL of water. This method was applied to measure methoprene concentrations in water samples from a treated site.

  12. Selective oxidation of the double bonds in the 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione diels-alder adduct of ergosterol acetate.

    PubMed

    Piatak, D M; Swenson, R P

    1984-01-01

    Methods for oxidations at the 6(7)- and 22(23)-double bonds in the phenyltriazoline adduct of ergosterol acetate (I) are described. KMnO4 and OsO4 were found to react with the 6(7)-double bond to yield the 6,7-glycol and osmate ester, respectively. Other reagents (I2/AgOAc, H2O2, m-chloroperbenzoic acid, HCO3H) formed either isomeric epoxides or glycols with the 22(23)-double bond, with the latter two reagents giving their products in quite high yields.

  13. Transannular Diels-Alder/1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Cascade of 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles: Total Synthesis of a Unique Set of Vinblastine Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Erica L.; Skepper, Colin K.; Sankar, Kuppusamy; Duncan, Katharine K.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    A powerful tandem [4+2]/[3+2] cycloaddition cascade of 1,3,4-oxadiazoles initiated by a transannular [4+2] cycloaddition is detailed. An impressive four rings, four carbon-carbon bonds, and six stereocenters are set on each site of the newly formed central six-membered ring in a cascade thermal reaction that proceeds at temperatures as low as 80 °C. The resulting cycloadducts provide the basis for the synthesis of unique analogues of vinblastine containing metabolically benign deep-seated cyclic modifications at the C3/C4 centers of the vindoline-derived subunit of the natural product. PMID:24087969

  14. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as a tool for probing the reactivity of polyynes relevant to hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) cascades.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brian P; Hoye, Thomas R

    2014-12-19

    The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) behavior of a number of alkyne-rich compounds is described. The DSC trace for each compound exhibits an exothermic event at a characteristic onset temperature. For the tri- and tetraynes whose [4 + 2] HDDA reactivity in solution has been determined, these onset temperatures show a strong correlation with the cyclization activation energy. The studies reported here exemplify how the data available through this operationally simple analytical technique can give valuable insights into the thermal behavior of small molecules.

  15. Stepwise acid-promoted double-Michael process: an alternative to Diels-Alder cycloadditions for hindered silyloxydiene-dienophile pairs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Michael E; Ho, David G

    2007-01-18

    The hindered diene 1 reacts with 3-methylcyclohexenone 6 catalyzed by triflimide to produce the Mukaiyama Michael product 7 (low-temperature quenching) or the [4+2] cycloadduct 8 (quenching at 0 degrees C). Reaction of the hindered diene 23 with 2-methylcyclohexenone 12 with 5:1 AlBr3:AlMe3 afforded a 71% yield of a 1.9:1 mixture of two cycloadducts. Hydrolysis of the major isomer gave the dione 27', a model for the BCD ring system of pentacyclic triterpenes. [reaction: see text].

  16. Modular strategy for the construction of radiometalated antibodies for positron emission tomography based on inverse electron demand Diels-Alder click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zeglis, Brian M; Mohindra, Priya; Weissmann, Gabriel I; Divilov, Vadim; Hilderbrand, Scott A; Weissleder, Ralph; Lewis, Jason S

    2011-10-19

    A modular system for the construction of radiometalated antibodies was developed based on the bioorthogonal cycloaddition reaction between 3-(4-benzylamino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine and the strained dienophile norbornene. The well-characterized, HER2-specific antibody trastuzumab and the positron emitting radioisotopes (64)Cu and (89)Zr were employed as a model system. The antibody was first covalently coupled to norbornene, and this stock of norbornene-modified antibody was then reacted with tetrazines bearing the chelators 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or desferrioxamine (DFO) and subsequently radiometalated with (64)Cu and (89)Zr, respectively. The modification strategy is simple and robust, and the resultant radiometalated constructs were obtained in high specific activity (2.7-5.3 mCi/mg). For a given initial stoichiometric ratio of norbornene to antibody, the (64)Cu-DOTA- and (89)Zr-DFO-based probes were shown to be nearly identical in terms of stability, the number of chelates per antibody, and immunoreactivity (>93% in all cases). In vivo PET imaging and acute biodistribution experiments revealed significant, specific uptake of the (64)Cu- and (89)Zr-trastuzumab bioconjugates in HER2-positive BT-474 xenografts, with little background uptake in HER2-negative MDA-MB-468 xenografts or other tissues. This modular system-one in which the divergent point is a single covalently modified antibody stock that can be reacted selectively with various chelators-will allow for both greater versatility and more facile cross-comparisons in the development of antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals.

  17. The Chemoselective Reduction of Isoxazoline γ-Lactams Through Iminium Aza-Diels-Alder Reactions: A Short-Cut Synthesis of Aminols as Valuable Intermediates towards Nucleoside Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Misal Giuseppe; Mella, Mariella; Quadrelli, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Isoxazoline γ-lactams are prepared starting from the regioisomeric cycloadducts of benzonitrile oxide to the N-alkyl 2-azanorbornenes taking advantage of the efficient catalytic oxidation by RuO4. The reduction of the amide groups is easily conducted in the presence of LiAlH4 under mild conditions, which allowed for the chemoselective reduction of the amide moiety followed by ring opening to afford the desired conformationally locked isoxazoline-carbocyclic aminols, as valuable intermediates for nucleoside synthesis. PMID:22629174

  18. Identifying important spatial and temporal scales and patterns of soil properties in a tidal saltmarsh situated in a mixed red alder and Douglas fir watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea level rise is expected to drive a loss in salt marsh area and a change in marsh habitat composition, potentially leading to changes in the nitrogen source/sink dynamics of these systems. Estuaries in the Pacific Northwest might be particularly vulnerable to the effect of sal...

  19. Development of a HPLC/Tandem-MS Method for the Analysis of the Larvicides Methoprene, Hydroprene, and Kinoprene at Trace Levels Using Diels–Alder Derivatization

    PubMed Central

    Aronov, Pavel A.; Dettmer, Katja; Hammock, Bruce D.; Christiansen, Julie A.; Cornel, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The invasion and subsequent spread of the mosquito-borne West Nile virus in the United States has resulted in increased use of methoprene. With the increased need for sensitive detection and monitoring of methoprene in the environment, an analytical LC/ESI–MS/MS method has been developed for the analysis of methoprene and two analogues, kinoprene and hydroprene, in water. To improve the ionization efficiency of the nonpolar analytes, a derivatization step with the Cookson-type reagent 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was used. Derivatization improved the limit of detection 100-fold. For tandem MS analyses, limits of detection in environmental water samples (S/N = 3) are about 6 pg/mL for methoprene and 20 pg/mL for kinoprene and hydroprene, resulting in limits of quantification (S/N = 10) of 20 pg/mL for methoprene and 60 pg/mL for hydroprene and kinoprene extracted from 10 mL of water. This method was applied to measure methoprene concentrations in water samples from a treated site. PMID:15853364

  20. [4 + 2] cycloadditions of N-alkenyl iminium ions: structurally complex heterocycles from a three-component Diels-Alder reaction sequence.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Nihar; Banerjee, Abhisek; Nelson, Scott G

    2008-07-23

    N-Alkenyl iminium ions serve as conduits to three-component [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions accessing structurally and stereochemically diverse piperidine derivatives. These cationic 2-azadienes participate in endo- or exo-selective [4 + 2] cycloadditions with electron-rich and neutral alkene dienophiles to generate a tetrahydropyridinium ion as the initial cycloadduct. In situ nucleophilic addition to the cycloaddition-derived iminium ion completes the three-component coupling sequence and affords a versatile synthesis of structurally complex piperidines.

  1. Effect of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and solvent on the rate of the Diels-Alder reaction between 9,10-anthracenedimethanol and maleic anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. D.; Kornilov, D. A.; Anikin, O. V.; Latypova, L. I.; Konovalov, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    The rate of the reaction between 9,10-anthracenedimethanol and maleic anhydride in 1,4-dioxane, acetonitrile, trichloromethane, and toluene is studied at 25, 35, 45°C in the pressure range of 1-1772 bar. The rate constants, enthalpies, entropies and activation volumes are determined. It is shown that the rate of reaction with 9,10-anthracenedimethanol is approximately one order of magnitude higher than with 9-anthracenemethanol.

  2. Synthesis of an Imidazolidinone Organocatalyst and Its Application in a Diels-Alder Cycloaddition: A Multistep Experiment for the Organic Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John J.; Driver, Ross B.; Walsh, Ria; Stephens, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel, high-yielding, and selective methodologies for the asymmetric synthesis of stereocenters is at the forefront of modern synthetic chemistry research. Organocatalysis can now be viewed as a viable alternative to the use of the sometimes toxic transition-metal catalysts. In this experiment, the simple synthesis of an achiral…

  3. Synthesis of protected (1-phenyl-1h-pyrrol-2-yl)-alkane-1-amines from phenylnitroso Diels-Alder adducts with 1,2-dihydropyridines.

    PubMed

    Berti, Francesco; Di Bussolo, Valeria; Pineschi, Mauro

    2013-07-19

    The reductive cleavage of nitrosobenzene-derived cycloadducts with appropriately protected 1,2-dihydropyridines allows a novel and simple obtainment of substituted N-[1-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)alkylamides. This synthesis can also be carried out in a very simple, mild, and practical one-pot procedure without isolation of the corresponding nitrosobenzene cycloadduct by means of catalytic amounts of CuCl.

  4. 78 FR 32443 - United States, et al. v. Cinemark Holdings, Inc., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ..., requires Cinemark Holdings, Inc. to divest certain theatre assets and requires Alder Wood Partners, L.P... Road, Suite 800, Dallas, TX 75201, and Alder Wood Partners, L.P., 12400 Coit Road, Suite 800, Dallas... by Cinemark's founder and Chairman of the Board and majority owned by Defendant Alder Wood...

  5. Palynostratigraphical correlation of the excavated Miocene lignite seams of the Yataǧan basin (Muǧla Province, south-western Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchal, Johannes Martin; Grímsson, Friðgeir; Denk, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The excavated main lignite seams and overlying lacustrine sediments of the opencast mines Eskihisar, Salihpaşalar, and Tı naz, Muǧla Province, south-western Turkey were investigated using a high taxonomic resolution palynological approach. The Eskihisar section comprises 47m and 56 samples of which 30 were usable for palynological analysis. The Tı naz section comprises 75 m and 29 samples of which 15 were usable for palynological analysis. Finally, the Salihpaşalar section comprises 25 m and 26 samples of which 16 were usable for palynological analysis. The age of the palynological sections is middle to late Miocene based on radiometric dating and vertebrate fossils. In order to investigate dispersed pollen and spores and their botanical affinities a combined light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach was used. The rich palynoflora comprises: seven types of algal cysts (Botryococcus, Zygnemataceae), seventeen spore types belonging to Lycopsida (club mosses), Marsileaceae (water-clover), Osmundaceae, Pteridaceae (brake), and Polypodiaceae; 14 types of gymnosperm pollen belonging to Ephedraceae (Mormon tea), Cupressaceae, Pinaceae (Cathaya, cedar, hemlock, pine, spruce); five types of monocotyledone pollen belonging to Poaceae (grasses, common reed), and Typhaceae (bulrush, bur-reed); ca 90 dicotyledone pollen types belonging to Altingiaceae (sweet gum), Amaranthaceae (goosefoot), Anacardiaceae (sumac family), Apiaceae (parsley family), Aquifoliaceae (holly), Asteraceae (sunflower family), Betulaceae (alder, birch, hazel, hophornbeam, hornbeam), Campanulaceae (bellflower family), Cannabaceae (hackberries), Caprifoliaceae (honeysuckle, teasel family), Caryophyllaceae (pink family), Ericaceae (heather family), Eucommiaceae, Euphorbiaceae (spurge family), Fabaceae (bean family), Fagaceae (beech, oak), Geraniaceae (storkbills), Juglandaceae (hickory, walnut, wingnut), Lamiaceae (bagflower), Linaceae (flax), Lythraceae (waterwillow), Malvaceae

  6. Noteworthy habitat and phylogeny updates for eastern US Ulota (Orthotrichaceae, Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Tessler, Michael; Cunningham, Seth W; Clark, Theresa A

    2016-04-06

    The moss Ulota crispa is ubiquitous as an obligate epiphyte in eastern North America. Yet several specimens preliminarily identified as U. crispa were collected from the upper portions of boulders in the Shawangunks, NY. Mitochondrial (nad5) and chloroplast (rps4 and trnL-trnF) sequence data were produced for these specimens, confirming their status as the first record of rock-dwelling U. crispa in North America. The reviewed loci were then used to assess phylogenetic relationships of Northeastern US Ulota species, incorporating a species not yet reviewed, U. coarctata. Conforming to peristome morphology, Ulota hutchinsiae appears to be more closely related to U. crispa than to U. coarctata. Monophyly was recovered for U. crispa and U. coarctata. Although monophyly was not found for U. hutchinsiae, it is diagnosably distinct based on the reviewed loci. While almost identical in number of nucleotides sequenced, mitochondrial DNA held substantially less phylogenetically informative nucleotides than the chloroplast loci, but did have important indel information segregating U. coarctata from other species reviewed.

  7. Linking Watershed Nitrogen Sources with Nitrogen Dynamics in Rivers of Western Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, D. J.; Compton, J.; Goodwin, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    We constructed contemporary nitrogen (N) budgets for 25 river basins in the Willamette River Basin (WRB) of western Oregon, USA, to improve the understanding of how recent trends in human-driven N loading have influenced riverine N dynamics in the region. Nearly 20% of WRB stream length is currently in fair or poor condition because of high N concentrations. Additionally, nitrate contamination of drinking water affects at least 8,000 people in the WRB. We hypothesized that 1) the majority of N inputs in the WRB would originate from agricultural activities in lowland portions of watersheds, 2) annual riverine N yield (kg/ha/yr) would correspond to annual per area watershed N inputs, and 3) riverine N yields would be seasonal and highest during winter due to the region's Mediterranean climate. We calculated average annual N inputs for each study basin by summing newly available datasets describing spatially explicit N inputs of synthetic fertilizer, atmospheric deposition, crop biological N2 fixation, biological N2 fixation by red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.), livestock manure, and point sources for the period 1996 - 2007. Annual and seasonal riverine N exports were estimated with the USGS model LOADEST calibrated to N concentration data collected during the study period. We estimated that two-thirds of total N input to the WRB study basins in the 2000s came from synthetic fertilizer application. Nearly all fertilizer application occurred on the lowlands near watershed mouths. We found a wide range of riverine N yields from the study basins, ranging from one to 70 kg N/ha/yr. Across the study basins, N export was more strongly correlated to fertilizer application rates than to percent of agricultural area in the watershed. Low watershed N yields reflected a high proportion of watershed area in the forested Cascade Mountain Range, which received low N inputs mainly from atmospheric deposition. N yields from study basins were strongly seasonal, with at least 50%, and

  8. Seasonal and vertical changes in leaf angle distribution for selected deciduous broadleaf tree species common to Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Kairi; Pisek, Jan; Sonnentag, Oliver; Annuk, Kalju

    2014-05-01

    Leaf inclination angle distribution is a key parameter in determining the transmission and reflection of radiation by vegetation canopies. It has been previously observed that leaf inclination angle might change gradually from more vertical in the upper canopy and in high light habitats to more horizontal in the lower canopy and in low light habitats [1]. Despite its importance, relatively few measurements on actual leaf angle distributions have been reported for different tree species. Even smaller number of studies have dealt with the possible seasonal changes in leaf angle distribution [2]. In this study the variation of leaf inclination angle distributions was examined both temporally throughout the growing season and vertically at different heights of trees. We report on leaf inclination angle distributions for five deciduous broadleaf species found commonly in several parts of Europe: grey alder (Alnus incana), Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth), chestnut (Castanea), Norway maple (Acer platanoides), and aspen (Populus tremula). The angles were measured using the leveled camera method [3], with the data collected at several separate heights and four times during the period of May-September 2013. The results generally indicate the greatest change in leaf inclination angles for spring, with the changes usually being the most pronounced at the top of the canopy. It should also be noted, however, that whereas the temporal variation proved to be rather consistent for different species, the vertical variation differed more between species. The leveled camera method was additionally tested in terms of sensitivity to different users. Ten people were asked to measure the leaf angles for four different species. The results indicate the method is quite robust in providing coinciding distributions irrespective of the user and level of previous experience with the method. However, certain caution must be exercised when measuring long narrow leaves. References [1] G.G. Mc

  9. Two are better than one: combining landscape genomics and common gardens for detecting local adaptation in forest trees.

    PubMed

    Lepais, Olivier; Bacles, Cecile F

    2014-10-01

    Predicting likely species responses to an alteration of their local environment is key to decision-making in resource management, ecosystem restoration and biodiversity conservation practice in the face of global human-induced habitat disturbance. This is especially true for forest trees which are a dominant life form on Earth and play a central role in supporting diverse communities and structuring a wide range of ecosystems. In Europe, it is expected that most forest tree species will not be able to migrate North fast enough to follow the estimated temperature isocline shift given current predictions for rapid climate warming. In this context, a topical question for forest genetics research is to quantify the ability for tree species to adapt locally to strongly altered environmental conditions (Kremer et al. ). Identifying environmental factors driving local adaptation is, however, a major challenge for evolutionary biology and ecology in general but is particularly difficult in trees given their large individual and population size and long generation time. Empirical evaluation of local adaptation in trees has traditionally relied on fastidious long-term common garden experiments (provenance trials) now supplemented by reference genome sequence analysis for a handful of economically valuable species. However, such resources have been lacking for most tree species despite their ecological importance in supporting whole ecosystems. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, De Kort et al. () provide original and convincing empirical evidence of local adaptation to temperature in black alder, Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn, a surprisingly understudied keystone species supporting riparian ecosystems. Here, De Kort et al. () use an innovative empirical approach complementing state-of-the-art landscape genomics analysis of A. glutinosa populations sampled in natura across a regional climate gradient with phenotypic trait assessment in a common garden experiment (Fig. ). By

  10. Late Glacial-Holocene Pollen-Based Vegetation History from Pass Lake, Prince of Wales Island, Southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ager, Thomas A.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.

    2009-01-01

    A radiocarbon-dated history of vegetation development since late Wisconsin deglaciation has been reconstructed from pollen evidence preserved in a sediment core from Pass Lake on Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska. The shallow lake is in the south-central part of the island and occupies a low pass that was filled by glacial ice of local origin during the late Wisconsin glaciation. The oldest pollen assemblages indicate that pine woodland (Pinus contorta) had developed in the area by ~13,715 cal yr B.P. An abrupt decline in the pine population, coinciding with expansion of alder (Alnus) and ferns (mostly Polypodiaceae) began ~12,875 yr B.P., and may have been a response to colder, drier climates during the Younger Dryas climatic interval. Mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) began to colonize central Prince of Wales Island by ~11,920 yr B.P. and was soon followed by Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis). Pollen of western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) began to appear in Pass Lake sediments soon after 11,200 yr B.P. The abundance of western hemlock pollen in the Pass Lake core during most of the Holocene appears to be the result of wind transport from trees growing at lower altitudes on the island. The late Holocene pollen record from Pass Lake is incomplete because of one or more unconformities, but the available record suggests that a vegetation change occurred during the late Holocene. Increases in pollen percentages of pine, cedar (probably yellow cedar, Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), and heaths (Ericales) suggest an expansion of muskeg vegetation occurred in the area during the late Holocene. This vegetation change may be related to the onset of cooler, wetter climates that began as early as ~3,774 yr B.P. in the region. This vegetation history provides the first radiocarbon-dated Late Glacial-Holocene terrestrial paleoecological framework for Prince of Wales Island. An analysis of magnetic properties of core sediments from Pass Lake suggests that unconformities

  11. Interannual consistency in canopy stomatal conductance control of leaf water potential across seven tree species.

    PubMed

    Ewers, B E; Mackay, D S; Samanta, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigated interannual variability of canopy transpiration per unit ground area (E (C)) and per unit leaf area (E (L)) across seven tree species in northern Wisconsin over two years. These species have previously been shown to be sufficient to upscale stand-level transpiration to the landscape level during one growing season. Our objective was to test whether a simple plant hydraulic model could capture interannual variation in transpiration. Three species, wetland balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill), basswood (Tilia Americana L.) and speckled alder (Alnus rugosa (DuRoi) Spreng), had no change in E (C) or E (L) between 2000 and 2001. Red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait) had a 57 and 19% increase in E (C) and E (L), respectively, and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh) had an 83 and 41% increase in E (C) and E (L), respectively, from 2000 to 2001. Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx) had a 50 and 21% decrease in E (C) and E (L), respectively, from 2000 to 2001 in response to complete defoliation by forest tent caterpillar (Malascoma distria Hüber) and subsequent lower total leaf area index of the reflushed foliage. White cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.) had a 20% decrease in both E (C) and E (L) caused by lowered surface water in wetlands in 2001 because of lower precipitation and wetland flow management. Upland A. balsamea increased E (L) and E (C) by 55 and 53%, respectively, as a result of release from light competition of the defoliated, overstory P. tremuloides. We hypothesized that regardless of different drivers of interannual variability in E (C) and E (L), minimum leaf water potential would be regulated at the same value. Minimum midday water potentials were consistent over the two years within each of the seven species despite large changes in transpiration between years. This regulation was independently verified by the exponential saturation between daily E (C) and vapor pressure deficit (D) and the tradeoff between a reference canopy stomatal

  12. Record of Late Quaternary Glacial/Interglacial Variability in the Amerasian Basin (Arctic Ocean) with Improved Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenova, E.; Frederichs, T.; Wollenburg, J.; Stein, R. H.; Vogt, C. M.; Krylov, A.; Kostygov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Piston core TN062 0550, located 13 km offshore of Eureka, California (40.866 deg. N, 124.572 deg. W, 550 m water depth), contains a continuous high-resolution climate record of the past 7,300 yr. Deposition occurred at nearly constant sedimentation rates averaging 94 cm/kyr based on 14C AMS dating of planktonic foraminifers. Pollen and marine ecosystem proxies (diatoms, silicoflagellates, wt. percent biogenic silica) studied at 50-70 yr sample resolution show a stepwise development of the climate/ oceanographic system off northernmost California. The relative contributions of Sequoia sempervirens (coastal redwood) pollen, a proxy for coastal fog associated with offshore upwelling, and biogenic silica concentrations (a proxy for siliceous export productivity) increase (two fold and three fold, respectively) in successive steps at ~5,000 yr BP and from ~2,400 to 2,000 yr BP. These increases are interpreted to reflect a progressive intensification of spring upwelling based on modern observations of the California Current system. At 5,000 yr BP diatom assemblages change from an assorted mixture of warm, temperate, and cool-water taxa to a low diversity temperate-oceanic assemblage dominated by Thalassionema spp. At ~2,400 yr BP the diatom assemblage transitions to a mixture of nearshore upwelling taxa and taxa associated with the central North Pacific Gyre. Silicoflagellate assemblages undergo a similar increase in the representation of modern seasonal proxies at ~3,000 yr BP that may reflect intensified ENSO variability. A two-fold increase in the relative contributions of Quercus (oak) and riparian Alnus (alder) pollen between ~3,800 and 2,000 yr BP likely signals a period of enhanced fluvial runoff associated with increased winter precipitation. Given the present day association of the Eel River system with the northwestern half of the western US winter precipitation dipole, these pollen data suggest that the ~3,800 and 2,000 yr interval was dominated by protracted

  13. High-resolution paleoclimatology of the coastal margin of northernmost California during the past 7,300 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, J. A.; Heusser, L. E.; Addison, J. A.; Burky, D.; Kusler, J. E.; Finney, B.

    2013-12-01

    Piston core TN062 0550, located 13 km offshore of Eureka, California (40.866 deg. N, 124.572 deg. W, 550 m water depth), contains a continuous high-resolution climate record of the past 7,300 yr. Deposition occurred at nearly constant sedimentation rates averaging 94 cm/kyr based on 14C AMS dating of planktonic foraminifers. Pollen and marine ecosystem proxies (diatoms, silicoflagellates, wt. percent biogenic silica) studied at 50-70 yr sample resolution show a stepwise development of the climate/ oceanographic system off northernmost California. The relative contributions of Sequoia sempervirens (coastal redwood) pollen, a proxy for coastal fog associated with offshore upwelling, and biogenic silica concentrations (a proxy for siliceous export productivity) increase (two fold and three fold, respectively) in successive steps at ~5,000 yr BP and from ~2,400 to 2,000 yr BP. These increases are interpreted to reflect a progressive intensification of spring upwelling based on modern observations of the California Current system. At 5,000 yr BP diatom assemblages change from an assorted mixture of warm, temperate, and cool-water taxa to a low diversity temperate-oceanic assemblage dominated by Thalassionema spp. At ~2,400 yr BP the diatom assemblage transitions to a mixture of nearshore upwelling taxa and taxa associated with the central North Pacific Gyre. Silicoflagellate assemblages undergo a similar increase in the representation of modern seasonal proxies at ~3,000 yr BP that may reflect intensified ENSO variability. A two-fold increase in the relative contributions of Quercus (oak) and riparian Alnus (alder) pollen between ~3,800 and 2,000 yr BP likely signals a period of enhanced fluvial runoff associated with increased winter precipitation. Given the present day association of the Eel River system with the northwestern half of the western US winter precipitation dipole, these pollen data suggest that the ~3,800 and 2,000 yr interval was dominated by protracted

  14. Mid-Pliocene to Early Quaternary Evolution of the Beringian Arctic from Deep Drilling at Lake El'gygytgyn, Chukotka: initial results (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.; Minyuk, P.; Andreev, A.; Snyder, J.; Wennrich, V.; Lake El'Gygytgyn Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    One of the primary objectives for deep drilling at Lake El’gygytgyn (67°30' N, 172°05' E), formed 3.6 Ma ago by a meteorite impact event, was to recover lacustrine sediments that would provide the first high resolution Pliocene-Pleistocene paleoclimate record from the terrestrial Arctic. While discontinuous, spatially diverse Pliocene marine records are known from the arctic borderlands at the outcrop scale, the Lake El’gygytgyn record is critically important for balancing the inherent marine bias we currently have in understanding the climate variability of a world warmer than today. Moreover, this continuous land record contributes to our knowledge of the terminal Pliocene transition, be it steps, jolts or plunges, into the early Quaternary. The Pliocene portion of the lake record recovered extends from 130 m to 315 m depth below lake floor with nearly twice the sedimentation rate of Quaternary interval, presumably due to enhanced hydrologic systematics. The lower most, initial 15 m of the lake sequence directly after the meteorite impact appear to be sterile perhaps due to the intense heat generated by the impact that would have taken thousands of years to dissipate. The remaining portion of the Pliocene sequence is characterized by sequences of lacustrine mud overlain by coarser facies. Palynologically studied portions of the core are mostly dominated by tree pollen, providing us with a compositional idea of changes in Pliocene El’gygtgyn forests of pine (Pinus), larch (Larix) spruce (Picea), fir (Abies), alder (Alnus), and, hemlock (Tsuga), not just scrubs. However, sediments paleomagnetically dated between 3.11 and 3.04 Ma ago show dramatic decrease in tree pollen contents, while pollen of Artemisia and spores of Selaginella rupestris and coprophiluous fungi became common elements in the record. Such changes point to treeless environments that can be described as early tundra-steppe. We present here a very preliminary compilation of the collective

  15. Approximating Reflectance and Transmittance of Vegetation Using Multiple Spectral Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottus, M.

    2011-12-01

    irradiation levels on leaf surfaces for direct and diffuse incidence, thus (in theory) allowing more accurate calculation of potential photosynthesis rates. Similarly to the p-theory, the use of multiple spectral invariants facilitates easy parametrization of canopy structure and scaling between different structural levels (leaf-shoot-stand). Spectral invariant-based remote sensing approaches are well suited for relatively large pixels even when no detailed ground truth information is available. In a case study, the theory of multiple spectral invariants was applied to measured canopy scattering. Spectral reflectance and transmittance measurements were carried out in gray alder (Alnus incana) plantation at Tartu Observatory, Estonia, in August 2006. The equations produced by the theory of spectral invariants were fitted to measured radiation fluxes. Preliminary results indicate that quantities with invariant-like behavior may indeed be used to approximate canopy scattering directionality.

  16. Linking soil permeability and soil aggregate stability with root development: a pots experiment (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergani, Chiara; Graf, Frank; Gerber, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying and monitoring the contribution of vegetation to the stability of the slopes is a key issue for implementing effective soil bioengineering measures. This topic is being widely investigated both from the hydrological and mechanical point of view. Nevertheless, due to the high variability of the biological components, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of the role of plants in slope stabilization, especially if the different succession phases and the temporal development of vegetation is considered. Graf et al., 2014, found within the scope of aggregate stability investigations that the root length per soil volume of alder specimen grown for 20 weeks under laboratory conditions is comparable to the one of 20 years old vegetation in the field. This means that already relatively short time scales can provide meaningful information at least for the first stage of colonization of soil bioengineering measures, which is also the most critical. In the present study we analyzed the effect of root growth on two soil properties critical to evaluate the performance of vegetation in restoring and re-stabilizing slopes: permeability and soil aggregate stability. We set up a laboratory experiment in order to work under controlled conditions and limit as much as possible the natural variability. Alnus incana was selected as the study species as it is widely used in restoration projects in the Alps, also because of its capacity to fix nitrogen and its symbiosis with both ecto and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. After the first month of growth in germination pots, we planted one specimen each in big quasi cylindrical pots of 34 cm diameter and 35 cm height. The pots were filled with the soil fraction smaller than 10 mm coming from an oven dried moraine collected in a subalpine landslide area (Hexenrübi catchment, central Switzerland). The targeted dry unit weight was 16 kN/m3. The plants have been maintained at a daily temperature of 25°C and relative

  17. Pedagogical Comparison of Five Reactions Performed under Microwave Heating in Multi-Mode versus Mono-Mode Ovens: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Salt Formation, E2 Dehydrohalogenation to Form an Alkyne, Williamson Ether Synthesis, and Fischer Esterification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Gammerdinger, William; Leap, Jennifer; Morales, Erin; Shikora, Jonathan; Weber, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Five reactions were rate-accelerated relative to the standard reflux workup in both multi-mode and mono-mode microwave ovens, and the results were compared to determine whether the sequential processing of a mono-mode unit could provide for better lab logistics and pedagogy. Conditions were optimized so that yields matched in both types of…

  18. Iptycene synthesis: A new method for attaching a 2,3-anthracene moiety to the 9,10-positions of another anthracene moiety - Exceptional conditions for a Lewis acid catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yong-Shing; Hart, Harold

    1989-01-01

    An efficient three-step method for appending a 2,3-anthracene moiety to the 9,10-positions of an existing anthracene moiety is described. The first step uses excess 1,4-anthraquinone (3 equiv) and aluminum chloride (6 equiv) to obtain the anthracene-quinone cycloadduct (omission of the AlCl3 resulted in no adduct). The resulting diketone was reduced to the corresponding diol (excess LiAlH4), which was dehydrated to the arene with phosphorus oxychloride and pyridine. Specific examples include the preparation of heptipycene 8 from pentiptycene 6 (66 percent overall yield) and a similar conversion of 8 to the noniptycene 13 (75 percent overall yield). The methodology led to a markedly improved synthesis of tritriptycene 9 and the first synthesis of undecaiptycene 14.

  19. A rapid analytical method for cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) in fortified infant formula, milk and milk powder using Diels-Alder derivatisation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Grant A

    2012-05-01

    A method for analysing vitamin D(3) (VD3, cholecalciferol) has been established and validated. This method is rapid and cost effective and is intended for use in quality control in the manufacture of fortified infant formulae and milk powders. Milk or reconstituted milk powder was solubilised in methanol and extracted in one step into isooctane, which was separated by centrifugation. A portion of the isooctane layer was then transferred, and an aliquot of 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione was added to derivatise VD3. The analyte was then re-extracted into a small volume of acetonitrile and analysed by reverse-phase chromatography. Detection was by triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using a selective transition, m/z 560 → 298. An internal standard, deuterium-labelled VD3, was used to correct for losses in extraction and any variation in derivatisation and ionisation efficiencies. The method has been subjected to a single-laboratory validation and has been found to be linear, highly selective and accurate with respect to National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1849, analyte spiking experiments and comparison with an LC-UV-based method. The repeatability standard deviation was 4.23 %. Significantly for routine laboratories, the method returns results within 2 h, generates minimal waste and minimises health and safety concerns to the analyst.

  20. Preparation of dendritic and non-dendritic styryl-substituted Salens for cross-linking suspension copolymerization with styrene and multiple use of the corresponding Mn and Cr complexes in enantioselective epoxidations and hetero-Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Sellner, H; Karjalainen, J K; Seebach, D

    2001-07-02

    Following work with TADDOLs and BINOLs, we have now prepared Salen derivatives (2, 3, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21) carrying two to eight styryl groups for cross-linking copolymerization with styrene. The Salen cores are either derived from (R,R)-diphenyl ethylene diamine (3, 15, 19, 21) or from (R,R)-cyclohexane diamine (2, 14, 18, 20). The styryl groups are attached to the salicylic aldehyde moieties, using Suzuki (cf. 1) or Sonogashira cross-coupling (cf. 11), and/or phenolic etherification (cf. 5, 7) with dendritic styryl-substituted Fréchet-type benzylic branch bromides. Subsequent condensation with the diamines provides the chiral Salens. Corresponding Salens lacking the peripheral vinyl groups (cf. 12, 13, 16, 17) were also prepared for comparison of catalytic activities in homogeneous solution with those in polystyrene. Cross-linking radical suspension copolymerization of styrene and the styryl Salens, following a procedure by Itsuno and Fréchet, gave beads (ca. 400 microm diameter) which were loaded with Mn or Cr (ca. 0.2 mmol of complex per g of polymer), with more than 95% of the Salen incorporated being actually accessible for complexation (by elemental analysis). The polymer-bound Mn and Cr complexes were used as catalysts for epoxidations of six phenyl-substituted olefins (m-CPBA/NMO; products 22a-f), and for dihydropyranone formation from the Danishefsky diene and aldehydes (PhCHO, C5H11CHO, C6H11CHO, products 23a-c). There are several remarkable features of the novel immobilized Salens: i) The dendritic branches do not slow down the catalytic activity of the complexes in solution; ii) the reactions with Salen catalysts incorporated in polystyrene give products of essentially the same enantiopurity as those observed in homogeneous solution with the dendritically substituted or with the original Jacobsen - Katsuki complexes; iii) some Mn-loaded beads have been stored for a year, without loss of activity; iv) especially the biphenyl- and the acetylene-linked Salen polymers (p-2, -3, -20, -21, Figure 2, 3) give Mn complexes of excellent performance: after ten uses (without re-charging with Mn!) there is no loss of enantioselectivity or degree of conversion under the standard conditions.