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Sample records for alder creek sanidine

  1. Ultra-high precision 40Ar/39Ar ages for Fish Canyon Tuff and Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine: New dating standards required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D.; Matchan, E. L.

    2013-11-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique is a high precision (<0.1%) method with wide application to geological samples. However, the method is predicated on the availability of natural mineral standards of known age. Widely used 40Ar/39Ar standards include sanidine from the (ca. 28 Ma) Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) and the (ca. 1.2 Ma) Alder Creek Rhyolite (ACR). Despite common usage, the ages of FCT and ACR sanidine have proven contentious, with reported values varying by >2%; well outside the ±0.1% aspiration of EARTHTIME (http://www.earth-time.org).

  2. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: Age of the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, Brent D.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Carter Hearn, B., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ±0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The new age is statistically older (α = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ±0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, we propose that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  4. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  5. Seepage study for unnamed tributary to Alder Creek, Stevens County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, P.J.; Drost, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of seepage measurements in the Alder Creek basin, Stevens County, Wash., shows that approximately 50% of 0.2 cubic foot per second taken from an unnamed tributary and used for the 1978 irrigation season would have reached Alder Creek as surface flow. Differences in discharge and specific conductance are explained by the basin geology, physical characteristics, climate, and water use. Only general conclusions could be made from data collected for five seepage measurements because irrigation activities could not be scheduled to allow the hydrologic system to reach equilibrium. (USGS)

  6. Age of the Lava Creek supereruption and magma chamber assembly at Yellowstone based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating of sanidine and zircon crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matthews, Naomi E.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    The last supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff. Tephra from the Lava Creek eruption is a key Quaternary chronostratigraphic marker, in particular for dating the deposition of mid Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits in western North America. To resolve the timing of eruption and crystallization history for the Lava Creek magma, we performed (1) 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidine crystals to delimit eruption age and (2) ion microprobe U-Pb and trace-element analyses of the crystal faces and interiors of single zircons to date the interval of zircon crystallization and characterize magmatic evolution. Sanidines from the two informal members composing Lava Creek Tuff yield a preferred 40Ar/39Ar isochron date of 631.3 ± 4.3 ka. Crystal faces on zircons from both members yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 626.5 ± 5.8 ka, and have trace element concentrations that vary with the eruptive stratigraphy. Zircon interiors yield a mean 206Pb/238U date of 659.8 ± 5.5 ka, and reveal reverse and/or oscillatory zoning of trace element concentrations, with many crystals containing high U concentration cores that likely grew from highly evolved melt. The occurrence of distal Lava Creek tephra in stratigraphic sequences marking the Marine Isotope Stage 16–15 transition supports the apparent eruption age of ∼631 ka. The combined results reveal that Lava Creek zircons record episodic heating, renewed crystallization, and an overall up-temperature evolution for Yellowstone's subvolcanic reservoir in the 103−104 year interval before eruption.

  7. Age of the Lava Creek supereruption and magma chamber assembly at Yellowstone based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating of sanidine and zircon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Matthews, N. E.; Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The last supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT). Tephra from the eruption blanketed much of the western United States, and is a key Quaternary chronostratigraphic marker, in particular for dating deposition of mid-Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits in western North America. We performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidines to delimit eruption age, and ion microprobe U-Pb and trace-element analyses of crystal faces on single zircons to characterize magmatic evolution and date near-eruption crystallization, as well as analyses of crystal interiors to date the interval of zircon crystallization. Sanidines from the two LCT members A and B yield an 40Ar/39Ar isochron date of 631 ± 4 ka (2σ). Crystal faces on zircons from both members yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 627 ± 6 ka (2σ) and have trace element concentrations that vary with eruptive stratigraphy. Zircon interiors yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 660 ± 6 ka, and reveal reverse and/or oscillatory zoning of trace element concentrations, with many crystals containing high-U concentrations and dark cathodoluminescence (CL) cores. These crystals with high-U cores are possibly sourced from 'defrosting' of melt-impregnated margins of the growing subvolcanic reservoir. LCT sanidines mirror the variation of zircon composition within the eruptive stratigraphy, with crystals from upper LCT-A and basal LCT-B having bright-CL rims with high Ba concentrations, suggesting late crystallization after addition of less evolved silicic magma. The occurrence of distal LCT in stratigraphic sequences marking the Marine Isotope Stage 16-15 transition supports the apparent eruption age of ca. 631 ka. These results reveal that Lava Creek zircons record episodic heating, renewed crystallization, and an overall up-temperature evolution for Yellowstone's subvolcanic reservoir in the 103-104 year interval

  8. Frictional Properties of Sand Collected from the 1906 Rupture Zone of the San Andreas Fault at Alder Creek, CA}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. D.; Cashman, S.; Marone, C.; Carpenter, B.; Baldwin, J.

    2006-12-01

    For the purpose of determining fault frictional properties of unconsolidated late Holocene fluvial sediments, samples were collected from trenches excavated across the 1906 rupture trace of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Alder Creek, CA. Two fault perpendicular ~2.5m deep trenches cut into late Holocene fluvial sand and gravel exposed a narrow (<1m) steeply dipping, branching, and anastomosing fault zone. Fault strands are defined by abrupt contacts and 0.5-2.0cm wide deformation bands. Samples of sand were collected several meters from the fault zone and enclosed in airtight bags to retain their original moisture content. We sheared layers of the sand in a servocontrolled, double direct shear testing machine at room temperature. A leveling jig prepared 5 mm thick layers of sand that were sheared between rough forcing blocks (5cm x 5cm nominal contact). Normal stress was constant during shear and varied over the suite of experiments from 75KPa to 900KPa, to a corresponding burial of ~3-40 meters. Shear loading was accomplished via a displacement rate boundary condition, which was set initially at 20μm/s and then subject to step changes to 200 and 2000μm/s for a cumulative total shear displacement of 25mm. Velocity stepping procedures are used to measure the velocity dependence of friction where the friction rate parameter, a-b, is the change in steady state sliding friction normalized by the log of velocity. In fault gouge it has been demonstrated that stable frictional behavior (a-b>0) is associated with pervasive shearing and velocity strengthening, while unstable velocity weakening frictional behavior (a-b<0) has been correlated with localized shear. The a-b values for the Alder Creek sands decrease steadily from 0.11 at 75KPa normal stress to less than 0.005 at 900KPa normal stress. If this rate can be extrapolated, it would imply a transition to velocity weakening at ~1Mpa normal stress or a burial of ~45m. The average measured and calculated steady

  9. Origin of a sanidine-coesite grospydite

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.; Smyth, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    A grospydite xenolith from the Roberts Victor kimberlite pipe in South Africa presents an unusual phase assemblage of clinopyroxene, garnet, kyanite, coesite, and sanidine. The rock as previously described (Smyth and Hatton, 1977) consists of 50% omphocitic clinopyroxene, 28% garnet (Gr/sub 50/Py/sub 28/Alm/sub 22/), 9% kyanite, 65 coesite, and 1% sanidine (Or/sub 99/). Assuming the addition of three additional compatible phases (phlogopite, enstatite, and H/sub 2/O vapor) and a simplified chemistry of the phases present, a Schreinemakers thermodynamic analysis was attempted in order to estimate the pressure and temperature of equilibrium of the rock. Four reactions involving six components are likely to have determined an invariant point for the assemblage: (1) Kyn + 2 Cpx reversible Cos + Gt + En; (2) 3 Cos + Phl reversible San + 3 En + H/sub 2/O; (3) 3 Kyn + 6 Cpx + Phl reversible San + 3 Gt + 6 En + H/sub 2/O; and (4) 6 Cos + 3 gt + Phl reversible San + 3 Kyn + 6 Cpx + H/sub 2/O. Using tabulated as well as estimated thermodynamic data for the phases, the calculated values for equilibrium temperatures and pressures for the reactions yield an invariant point for the assemblage at a depth of about 160 km (40 kbars) and a temperature of about 1060/sup 0/C. This point likely represents a subsolidus recrystallization stage of origin.

  10. Distribution of rubidium between sodic sanidine and natural silicic liquid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; Hedge, C.E.

    1970-01-01

    Phenocrysts of sodic sanidine from twelve upper Cenozoic units of silicic ash-flow tuff and lava from the Western United States contain from 0.25 to 0.45 the Rb present in the associated groundmass materials. The ratios of potassium to rubidium in the sanidines are, on the average, about four times greater than those of the groundmass. Separation of phenocrystic sanidine from salic melts provides an efficient method for raising the Rb content and lowering the K/Rb ratio of the melts, although the amount of differentiation probably is limited by continuous reequilibration of the alkalis between crystal and liquid phases through ion exchange. Syenites of cumulate origin will have appreciably lower Rb contents and higher K/Rb ratios than the melts from which they precipitated. Available data on the distribution of Rb between synthetic biotite and K-sanidine demonstrate that the separation of biotite probably will not deplete salic melts in Rb relative to K. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  11. The Dynamics of the Post-Caldera Magmatic System at Yellowstone: Insights from Age, Trace Element, and Isotopic Data of Zircon and Sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, M. E.; Cooper, K. M.; Vazquez, J. A.; Calvert, A. T.; Glessner, J. J.; Wimpenny, J.; Yin, Q. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Yellowstone hosts a voluminous magmatic system that produced three silicic caldera-forming eruptions over the past 2.1 My. Following the most recent of these (the Lava Creek Tuff at 639 ka), the magma system at Yellowstone underwent two episodes of intracaldera eruptions, the latest of which produced the Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites. The CPM rhyolites erupted intermittently from ca. 170 ka to ca. 70 ka and can be viewed as snapshots of the magma system through time, which provides a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of an evolving caldera system. To constrain the nature and timescales of magmatic processes at Yellowstone we examine four CPM rhyolites that erupted from ca. 116 ka to ca. 74 ka and present a comprehensive data set that integrates (1) 238U-230Th ages, trace-elements, and Hf isotope compositions of the surfaces and interiors of single zircons, (2) bulk 238U-230Th ages and in situ Ba and Pb isotope compositions of sanidines, (3) sanidine 40Ar-39Ar ages, and (4) trace-element and isotopic compositions of the CPM glasses. Zircon 238U-230Th ages and Hf isotope data demonstrate that isotopically juvenile magmas, derived from Yellowstone basalts, were added to the Yellowstone magma reservoir over time and were fundamental to its post-caldera isotopic evolution. We use zircon Hf isotope data along with new Hf isotope data (and existing O isotope data) for the Yellowstone basalts (whole-rocks), older Yellowstone rhyolites (glasses), and local crustal sources to quantify the role of isotopically juvenile magma in the evolution of the magmatic system. Additionally, linking age, trace-element, and isotopic data from zircon and sanidine demonstrates that eruptible CPM rhyolites were generated by extracting melt and antecrystic zircon from a long-lived (>200 ky) crystal mush, while sanidine remained trapped in the crystal network. The extracted melts amalgamated and then crystallized new sanidines and rims on the antecrystic zircons that were in

  12. Volcanic processes recorded by inclusions in sanidine megacrystals ejected from Quaternary Rockeskyll volcano, Eifel, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilhard, Nicole; Schreuer, Jürgen; Stöckhert, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Sanidine megacrystals were ejected by a late stage explosive eruption at the Quaternary Rockeskyll volcanic complex, Eifel volcanic field, Germany. The homogeneous distribution of barium (about 1 % wt BaO equivalent to about 2 mole % celsian component) indicates that the nearly perfect single crystals must have crystallized in the Ostwald-Miers range from a huge reservoir, probably in the roof of a magma chamber. Irregularities during crystal growth caused trapping of hydrous melt inclusions, which are the objective of the present study. The inclusions show a characteristic concentric microstructure, in the following described from the sanidine host towards the inclusion center: (1) Ba is enriched by a factor of 2 to 3 in a ca. 0.01 mm wide rim, compared to the otherwise homogeneous sanidine host; (2) inwards, the continuous rim is overgrown by a thin crust of Ba enriched sanidine with irregular surface; (3) a layer of glass with a composition similar to sanidine; (4) a second, thinner layer of glass slightly reduced in Na2O and K2O, separated from the first glass layer by a sharp interface with approximately spherical shape; (5) a bubble containing a fluid phase, composed of H2O and minor CO2. This record is interpreted as follows: After crystallization of the sanidine megacrystals, a rise in temperature within the magmatic system caused some re-melting of the Ba-rich sanidine around the inclusions. Partitioning of Ba between the small included melt reservoir and the host caused formation of the Ba-rich rim (layer 1) by diffusive exchange. The onset of cooling lead to crystallization of the thin sanidine crust (layer 2). Finally, very rapid decompression and cooling during the subsequent explosive eruption caused sequential phase separation (two stages) in the remaining melt, the denser melt phase (layers 3 and 4) quenched to glass, the complementary low-density volatile-rich phase forming the central bubble. In summary, the microstructure and phase composition of

  13. New Polybenzimidazole Architectures by Diels Alder Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-14

    REPORT New Polybenzimidazole Architectures By Diels Alder Polymerization. Final Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Due to their high...substituents to improve processability, are desirable. This project was a proof of principle study to determine if Diels - Alder polymerization of monomers...AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Polybenzimidazole, Diels Alder

  14. Ba-rich sanidine megacrysts in trachytic rocks of Eslamy volcano, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Asadpour, Manijeh; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The Eslamy volcano is located on a peninsula at the eastern coast of Urumieh lake, NW Iran. The complex stratovolcano with gentle slope flanks exposes a collapsed caldera in the central part. Specific features are different sanidine rich rocks that occur in form of ejecta and flows. According to the field observations they are products of one volcanic event. XRF measurements show they all have trachytic compositions. Typical for this locality are the large sanidine phenocrysts. In the trachytic flow the sanidine crystals reach average size of ~4 cm embedded in a greenish-blue matrix consisting mainly of crystallized feldspar and subordinate pyroxen. Occasionally feldspar megacrysts of approx. 10 cm were observed. Na content of the sanidine megacrysts varies between 0.05 - 0.5 pfu with higher concentrations in the cores. Furthermore they show oscillatory zoning patterns caused by variations of Ba content (0-0.04 pfu). The matrix of the trachytic flow consist mainly of interlocking sanidine crystals (0.05-0.45 pfu Na) partly with Ba-rich cores containing up to 0.06 pfu Ba. In contrast to the megacrysts they show slightly higher Fe contents (0.025-0.035 pfu). The volcanic ejecta with bombs of approx. 50 cm in size were found in one distinct layer within a pyroclastic horizon. The average diameter of the feldspar phenocrysts is much smaller (0.5-2 cm). Sanidine is the main phase of these rocks (up to 80 %). As mafic phase up to 30 % pyroxen (mainly diospide) ± biotite can be observed. Accessories are magnetite ± apatite ± titanite ± zircon. In contrast to the flow rocks the main phase of the matrix of the ejecta is always glass with higher Fe2O3 (total) contents (up to 6 wt.-%) indicating a fast cooling of the sample due to ejection. They are completely depleted in Ba. In two samples zoned feldspar relicts enclosed in glass show remolten rims. Similar to flow rocks the feldspar phenocrysts of all ejecta show a complex zoning pattern, e.g. three samples expose high

  15. The role of superheating in the formation of Glass Mountain obsidians (Long Valley, CA) inferred through crystallization of sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Laura E.; Andrews, Benjamin J.

    2016-10-01

    The Glass Mountain obsidians (Long Valley, CA) are crystal poor (<8 vol%) and highly evolved (high SiO2, low Sr), and therefore, their formation required extremely efficient separation of melts from a crystal-rich source. A petrologic and experimental investigation of the mineral phases in Glass Mountain lavas identifies conditions under which phenocrysts grew and the driving mechanism for crystallization, which places constraints on the possible processes that generated the obsidians. The obsidian in this study (GM-11) is saturated in nine phases (sanidine + quartz + plagioclase + titanomagnetite + ilmenite + zircon + apatite + allanite + biotite), and results of high-resolution SEM compositional mapping and electron microprobe analysis reveal that individual sanidine crystals are normally zoned and span a range of compositions (Or40-78). Sanidines have a "granophyric" texture, characterized by intergrowths of quartz and sanidine. Mineral phases in the natural sample are compared to H2O-saturated phase equilibrium experiments conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, over a range of conditions (700-850 °C; 75-225 MPa), and all are found to be plausible phenocrysts. Comparison of sanidine compositions from the natural sample with those grown in phase equilibrium experiments demonstrates that sanidine in the natural sample occurs in a reduced abundance. Further comparison with phase equilibrium experiments suggests that sanidine compositions track progressive loss of dissolved melt water (±cooling), suggesting that crystallization in the natural obsidian was driven predominantly by degassing resulting from decompression. It is paradoxical that an effusively (slowly) erupted lava should contain multiple phenocryst phases, including sanidine crystals that span a range of compositions with granophyric textures, and yet remain so crystal poor. To resolve this paradox, it is necessary that the solidification mechanism (degassing or cooling) that produced the sanidine

  16. Temperature, size, and depth of the magma reservoir for the Taylor Creek Rhyolite, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; du Bray, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 55 km3 mid-Tertiary Taylor Creek Rhyolite in southwestern New Mexico consists of 20 lava domes and flows. This rhyolite is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous. Compositional zonation in feldspar phenocrysts is very minor and nonsystematic. The compositions of each feldspar species vary little throughout the suite of analyzed samples. This chemical homogeneity of phenocrysts reflects similar whole-rock homogeneity and suggests that the lavas were tapped from a single large reservoir of magma. Ages of sanidine phenocrysts determined using 40Ar/39Ar indicate that the Taylor Creek Rhyolite lavas were emplaced during a period of less than 0.42 my. and possibly less than 0.13 m.y., which is consistent with the single-reservoir scenario. Two-feldspar geothermometry suggests that Taylor Creek Rhyolite phenocrysts crystallized at about 775??C, at an assumed pressure of 2 kbar. Fe-Ti-oxide geothermometry suggests phenocryst growth at about 800??C. Experimental studies suggest that quartz and potassium-feldspar crystals that grow from H2O-undersaturated granitic magmas should exhibit resorption texture, a texture ubiquitous to Taylor Creek Rhyolite quartz and sanidine phenocrysts. We tentatively conclude that the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma was H2O undersaturated and subliquidus at an unspecified pressure greater than 0.5 kbar during phenocryst growth and that Taylor Creek Rhyolite pyroclastic deposits formed because volatile saturation developed during the ascent of magma to sites of eruption. -from Authors

  17. Mechanisms and timescales of generating eruptible rhyolitic magmas at Yellowstone caldera from zircon and sanidine geochronology and geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelten, Mark; Cooper, Kari M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Glessner, Justin G

    2015-01-01

    We constrain the physical nature of the magma reservoir and the mechanisms of rhyolite generation at Yellowstone caldera via detailed characterization of zircon and sanidine crystals hosted in three rhyolites erupted during the (ca. 170 – 70 ka) Central Plateau Member eruptive episode – the most recent post-caldera magmatism at Yellowstone. We present 238U-230Th crystallization ages and trace-element compositions of the interiors and surfaces (i.e., unpolished rims) of individual zircon crystals from each rhyolite. We compare these zircon data to 238U- 230Th crystallization ages of bulk sanidine separates coupled with chemical and isotopic data from single sanidine crystals. Zircon age and trace-element data demonstrate that the magma reservoir that sourced the Central Plateau Member rhyolites was long-lived (150 – 250 kyr) and genetically related to the preceding episode of magmatism, which occurred ca. 256 ka. The interiors of most zircons in each rhyolite were inherited from unerupted material related to older stages of Central Plateau Member magmatism or the preceding late Upper Basin Member magmatism (i.e., are antecrysts). Conversely, most zircon surfaces crystallized near the time of eruption from their host liquids (i.e., are autocrystic). The repeated recycling of zircon interiors from older stages of magmatism demonstrates that sequentially erupted Central Plateau Member rhyolites are genetically related. Sanidine separates from each rhyolite yield 238U-230Th crystallization ages at or near the eruption age of their host magmas, coeval with the coexisting zircon surfaces, but are younger than the coexisting zircon interiors. Chemical and isotopic data from single sanidine crystals demonstrate that the sanidines in each rhyolite are in equilibrium with their host melts, which considered along with their near-eruption crystallization ages suggests that nearly all CPM sanidines are autocrystic. The paucity of antecrystic sanidine crystals relative to

  18. Synthesis of Antitumor Lycorines by Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Dolores; Burés, Gema; Guitián, Enrique; Castedo, Luis

    1996-03-08

    Pharmacologically interesting lycorines were obtained by a short, efficient method based on an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction between an alpha-pyrone and an alkyne, followed by loss of CO(2) in a retro Diels-Alder reaction. The cyclization precursors (pyrones 9) were obtained in good yields in two or three steps from the corresponding homophthalic acid or anhydride.

  19. Reinvestigation of the annite = sanidine + magnetite + H2 reaction using the fH2-sensor technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cygan, G.L.; Chou, I.-Ming; Sherman, David M.

    1996-01-01

    The decomposition of the iron mica, annite, to sanidine plus magnetite and vapor, KFe3AlSi3O10(OH)2 = KAlSi3O8 + Fe3O4 + H2, has been reexamined experimentally with the use of a variety of buffers coupled with fH2 sensors at 2 kbar and between 400 and 840 ??C. Various capsule configurations were used in this study to delineate the equilibrium constant for this reaction in conjunction with 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy measurements to monitor the oxy-annite component in mica in selected experiments. Results at the most reducing and highest temperature conditions of this study extend the annite stability field to higher temperature and fo2 values than those defined in previous work. Lower temperature results indicate that the annite-sanidine-magnetite stability boundary does not intersect the hematite + magnetite + H2O buffer at 400??C as previously reported but rather is subparallel to the buffer curve at lower fo2 values. The equilibrium fH2 (in bars) for the assemblage annite + sanidine + magnetite + vapor at 2 kbar and between 400 and 840 ??C can be described by the relation log fH2 (??0.08) = 13.644 - (17368/T) + (5.168 ?? 106)/T2, where T is temperature in kelvins.

  20. Variations in trace element partition coefficients in sanidine in the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico: Effects of composition, temperature, and volatiles

    SciTech Connect

    Stix, J. ); Gorton, M.P. )

    1990-10-01

    Trace element partition coefficients have been measured for one plagioclase and five sanidine mineral separates from the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite, New Mexico. Sanidine partition coefficients vary substantially and systematically within the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite. Partition coefficients for Ca, Sr, Zn, La, and Eu are lowest in the most evolved rhyolites, whereas Sm and HREE partition coefficients are highest. Rubidium partition coefficients remain constant, while those for Ba, Ce, and Th are variable. Variations of the Sr, Zn, La, and Eu partition coefficients are correlated with the Ca contents and partition coefficients of the sanidines. Calcium may have controlled the distribution of these elements in the sanidine by modifying the feldspar structure. The low Ca partition coefficients in sanidines for the most evolved rhyolites may be the consequence of modification of the melt structure, possibly due to increased volatile contents at the top of the magma chamber(s) during evolution of the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite. The Zn and La partition coefficients between sanidine and melt also may have been controlled by this change in melt structure. Modelling using major elements and the constant Rb partition coefficient for sanidine indicates 70% crystallization of magma during Cerro Toledo Rhyolite time by removal of 68% sanidine and 32% quartz. Estimates of the volume (1) of initial parental magma and (2) of the magma that crystallized during this period are 11,670 km{sup 3} and 8,170 km{sup 3}, respectively. The average intrusion rate of silicic magma during Cerro Toledo Rhyolite activity was 35 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} km{sup 3}/a.

  1. Single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating reveals bimodal sanidine ages in the Bishop Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    The 650 km3 Bishop Tuff (BT) is among the most studied volcanic deposits because it is an extensive marker bed deposited just after the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary. Reconstructions of the vast BT magma reservoir from which high-silica rhyolite erupted have long influenced thinking about how large silicic magma systems are assembled, crystallized, and mixed. Yet, the longevity of the high silica rhyolitic melt and exact timing of the eruption remain controversial due to recent conflicting 40Ar/39Ar sanidine vs. SIMS and ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon dates. We have undertaken 21 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating ages on 2 mm BT sanidine crystals from pumice in 3 widely separated outcrops of early-erupted fall and flow units. Plateau ages yield a bimodal distribution: a younger group has a mean of 766 ka and an older group gives a range between 772 and 782 ka. The younger population is concordant with the youngest ID-TIMS and SIMS U-Pb zircon ages recently published, as well as the astronomical age of BT in marine sediment. Of 21 crystals, 17 yield older, non-plateau, steps likely affected by excess Ar that would bias traditional 40Ar/39Ar total crystal fusion ages. The small spread in older sanidine ages, together with 25+ kyr of pre-eruptive zircon growth, suggest that the older sanidines are not partially outgassed xenocrysts. A bimodal 40Ar/39Ar age distribution implies that some fraction of rhyolitic melt cooled below the Ar closure temperature at least 10 ky prior to eruption. We propose that rapid "thawing" of a crystalline mush layer released older crystals into rhyolitic melt from which sanidine also nucleated and grew immediately prior to the eruption. High precision 40Ar/39Ar dating can thus provide essential information on thermo-physical processes at the millenial time scale that are critical to interpreting U-Pb zircon age distributions that are complicated by large uncertainties associated with zircon-melt U-Th systematics.

  2. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Christopher; Adzima, Brian J.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  3. Tracking the Evolution of Young Mush at Long Valley through High Spatial Resolution U-Th Zircon Dating and Sanidine Geospeedometry of Inyo Domes Rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, N. E.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Inyo Domes rhyolitic chain, which erupted at ca. 1350 CE from a fissure near the northern boundary of Long Valley caldera, California, provides an example of rhyolitic mush that has been episodically tapped over an interval of hundreds of thousands of years1. Our new data reveal that the mixed magmas each have unique crystallization histories with varying residence times but also exhibit evidence for final mixing within a hundred years of final eruption. In order to evaluate the timing of crystallization and history of rejuvenation, we present ion microprobe 238U-230Th zircon geochronology coupled with geospeedometry from trace-element zoning data for crystals extracted from the Inyo Domes and older related rhyolite. The South Deadman and Glass Creek domes display complex magma mixing features, involving a coarsely-porphyritic (CP) and finely-porphyritic (FP) rhyolite which are distinct in their mineralogy, chemistry and textures. The CP lava is similar in texture and mineralogy to the ~100 ka Deer Mountain rhyolite, situated to the south of the Inyo chain. In contrast, the FP lava may relate to magma sourced in the Mono chain to the north of the caldera2. Mafic enclaves are commonly found within CP lava, suggesting late stage mixing and heating episodes in the crystal mush. High-resolution records of zircon crystallization were obtained using SHRIMP-RG analyses of unpolished rims for crystals embedded in indium, along with sectioned crystals exposing interiors. Deer Mountain zircons have rims that grew immediately prior to eruption (~100 ka) and cores that are significantly older (~250 ka), providing evidence for zircon growth during protracted evolution of the mush body. South Deadman Dome CP rhyolite contains three populations of zircon, with apparent populations of ~30 ka, ~100 ka, and >200 ka, the latter two correlating to populations sampled by the earlier Deer Mountain eruption. Zircons extracted from FP rhyolite return near-eruption ages (~1 ka) and do

  4. The pentadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Teng; Naredla, Rajasekhar Reddy; Thompson, Severin K.; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    In the classic Diels–Alder (DA) [4+2] cycloaddition reaction1, the overall degree of unsaturation of the 4π (diene) and 2π (dienophile) pairs of reactants dictates the oxidation state of the newly formed six-membered carbocycle. For example, in the classic DA reaction, butadiene and ethylene combine to produce cyclohexene. More recent developments include variants in which the hydrogen atom count in the reactant pair and in the resulting product is reduced by2, for example, four in the tetradehydro-DA (TDDA) and by six in the hexadehydro-DA (HDDA3,4,5,6,7) reactions. Any oxidation state higher than tetradehydro leads to the production of a reactive intermediate that is more highly oxidized than benzene. This significantly increases the power of the overall process because trapping of the benzyne intermediate8,9 can be used to increase the structural complexity of the final product in a controllable and versatile manner. In this manuscript, we report an unprecedented net 4π+2π cycloaddition reaction that generates a different, highly reactive intermediate known as an α,3-dehydrotoluene. This species is at the same oxidation state as a benzyne. Like benzynes, α,3-dehydrotoluenes can be captured by various trapping agents to produce structurally diverse products that are complementary to those arising from the HDDA process. We call this new cycloisomerization reaction a pentadehydro-Diels–Alder (PDDA) reaction—a nomenclature chosen for chemical taxonomic rather than mechanistic reasons. In addition to alkynes, nitriles (RC≡N), although non-participants in aza-HDDA reactions, readily function as the 2π-component in PDDA cyclizations to produce, via trapping of the α,3-(5-aza)dehydrotoluene intermediates, pyridine-containing products. PMID:27088605

  5. A Diels-Alder Route to Angularly Functionalized Bicyclic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Han; Lee, Jun Hee; Aussedat, Baptiste; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    A Diels-Alder based route to trans-fused angularly functionalized bicyclic structures has been developed. This transformation features the use of a tetrasubstituted dienophile in the cycloaddition step. PMID:20717474

  6. The hetero-Diels-Alder approach to spiroketals.

    PubMed

    Rizzacasa, Mark A; Pollex, Annett

    2009-03-21

    The hetero-Diels-Alder reaction can provide spiroketal systems with excellent stereoselectivity. This perspective article will briefly outline the scope and limitations of this approach for the production of naturally occurring spiroketals and derivatives.

  7. 1. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF EAGLE CREEK TRAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF EAGLE CREEK TRAIL REGISTRY BOOTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  8. The hexadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hoye, Thomas R.; Baire, Beeraiah; Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H.; Woods, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary o-Benzynes (arynes) are among the most versatile of all reactive (short-lived) intermediates in organic chemistry. These species can be trapped to give products that are valuable from the perspective of both fine (pharmaceuticals) and commodity (agrochemicals, dyes, polymers, etc.) chemicals. Here we show a fundamentally new strategy that unites a de novo generation of benzynes, through the title hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) reaction, with their in situ elaboration into structurally complex benzenoid products. In the HDDA reaction a 1,3-diyne is engaged in a [4+2] cycloisomerization with a third (pendant) alkyne–the diynophile–to produce the highly reactive benzyne intermediate. The metal- and reagent-free reaction conditions for this simple, thermal transformation are notable. The subsequent and highly efficient trapping reactions increase the power of the overall process. Finally, we provide examples of how this de novo benzyne generation approach allows new modes of intrinsic reactivity to be revealed. PMID:23060191

  9. Isotopic dating of Lava Creek B tephra in terrace deposits along the Wind River, Wyoming--Implications for post 0. 6 Ma uplift of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect

    Izett, G.A.; Pierce, K.L.; Naeser, N.D. ); Jaworowski, C. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Along the Wind River near Kinnear (Pavillon quadrangle), a meter-thick tephra layer occurs near the middle of a main-stem gravel deposit about 100 m above the river. On Muddy Ridge 25 km east of Kinnear, a Lava Creek B tephra layer occurs at the base of a terrace deposit about 100 m above Muddy Creek. Another Lava Creek B tephra site 67 km northwest and upstream from Kinnear occurs within main-stem gravels of a terrace deposit 145 m above the river. This upstream increase of 45 m of the tephra horizon raises the concern that the two tephra layers might not be of the same age. All three tephras contain the same assemblage of phenocrysts as that in the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and the Lava Creek B volcanic ash bed of the Western U.S., and therefore they are arguably correlatives. The authors confirmed this petrographic correlation by isotopic dating of sanidine crystals recovered from cm-size pumice lapilli in the Kinnear tephra and from coarse-grained tephra at the Muddy Creek site. Laser total-fusion Ar-40-Ar-39 ages of sanidine from the two sites are coeval, 0.66[plus minus]0.01 Ma and 0.67[plus minus]0.01 Ma at Muddy Creek. Conventional K-Ar dating of sanidine from the tephra at the Cl453 site resulted in an age of 0.60[plus minus]0.02 Ma. Glass-mantled zircon crystals from the Cl453 site yielded a fission-track age of 0.67[plus minus]0.16 Ma. These isotopic ages are compatible with conventional K-Ar, Ar-40-Ar-39, and fission-track ages of the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and other occurrences of Lava Creek B ash beds. The authors suggest that the terrace deposit that contains the Lava Creek B tephra rises from the Kinnear site northwest up the Wind River as a result of Quaternary uplift in the area of the Yellowstone hotspot.

  10. New nomenclature combinations in the green alder species complex (Betulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The name Alnus viridis (Chaix) DC., based on Betula viridis Chaix (1785), has traditionally been attributed to green alders although it is based on a later basionym. Alnus alnobetula (Ehrh.) K. Koch based on Betula alnobetula Ehrh. (1783) is the correct name for green alders. In light of the increasing use and recognition of the name Alnus alnobetula (Ehrh.) K. Koch in the literature. I herein propose new nomenclatural combinations to account for the Japanese and Chinese subspecies respectively: Alnus alnobetula subsp. maximowiczii (Callier ex C.K. Schneid.) J. Chery and Alnus alnobetula subsp. mandschurica (Callier ex C.K. Schneid.) J. Chery. Recent phylogenetic analyses place these two taxa in the green alder species complex, suggesting that they should be treated as infraspecific taxa under the polymorphic Alnus alnobetula. PMID:26491381

  11. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  12. Permuting Diels-Alder and Robinson Annulation Stereopatterns.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Dai, Mingji; Angeles, Angie R; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2012-01-01

    Controlled isomerization of the double bond of certain Diels-Alder reactions provides substrates that, upon oxidation, give rise to products whose gross structure corresponds to that of a Robinson annulation. In these cases, the stereochemistry of the Robinson annulation product reflects the fact that the initial combination occurred in a Diels-Alder mode. Using these principles, we have synthesized carissone and cosmosoic acid. In the latter case, our total synthesis raised serious questions as to the accuracy of the assigned structure of the natural product.

  13. High stereoselectivity on low temperature Diels-Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Filho, Luiz Carlos; Lacerda Júnior, Valdemar; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; da Silva, Gil Valdo José; Invernize, Paulo Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We have found that some of the usually poor dienophiles (2-cycloenones) can undergo Diels-Alder reaction at -78°C with unusually high stereoselectivity in the presence of niobium pentachloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. A remarkable difference in reaction rates for unsubstituted and α- or β-methyl substituted 2-cycloenones was also observed. PMID:16542029

  14. 61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The Niagara Shipbuilding Corp. Engineering Department, Buffalo, New York. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-1604-10, dated February 1943; revised January 1963. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  15. N2-fixing red alder indirectly accelerates ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic N2-fixing tree species can accelerate ecosystem N dynamics through decomposition via direct pathways by producing readily decomposed leaf litter and increasing N supply to decomposers, as well as via indirect pathways by increasing tissue and detrital N in non-fixing vegetation. To evaluate the relative importance of these pathways, we compared three-year decomposition and N dynamics of N2-fixing red alder leaf litter (2.34 %N) to both low-N (0.68 %N) and high-N (1.21 %N) litter of non-fixing Douglas-fir, and decomposed each litter source in four forests dominated by either red alder or Douglas-fir. We also used experimental N fertilization of decomposition plots to assess elevated N availability as a potential mechanism of N2-fixer effects on litter mass loss and N dynamics. Direct effects of N2-fixing red alder on decomposition occurred primarily as faster N release from red alder than Douglas-fir litter, but direct increases in N supply to decomposers via fertilization did not stimulate decomposition of any litter. Fixed N indirectly influenced detrital dynamics by increasing Douglas-fir tissue and litter N concentrations, which accelerated litter N release without accelerating mass loss. By increasing soil N, tissue N, and the rate of N release from litter of non-fixers, we conclude that N2-fixing vegetation can indirectly foster plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to the persistence of elevated N availability in terrestrial ecosystems.

  16. Generation of Magmas Within the Southwest Nevada Volcanic Field: Constraints Based on Trace Element Concentrations in Melt Inclusions and Sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefend, K. S.; Vogel, T. A.; Patino, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    The southwest Nevada volcanic field contains four large compositionally zoned ash-flow tuffs, which are among the best studied in the world. This study presents trace element data from melt inclusions and sanidines in order to evaluate interpretations that the compositional zoning is due to the emplacement of discrete magma batches. The earlier ash-flows are the Topopah Spring (13.4 Ma, 1200 km3) and the Tiva Canyon (12.9 Ma, ~900 km3) tuffs. The later ash-flow tuffs are the Rainier Mesa (11.6 Ma, 1200 km3) and the Ammonia Tanks tuff (11.4 Ma, 900 km3), which erupted following a period of major extension that occurred within this region of the southern Great Basin. Each unit consists of a lower portion, dominated by rhyolitic pumice fragments and an upper portion dominated by more mafic pumice fragments - each of these contain distinct Sr, Nd and δ 18O isotopic compositions. These data are inconsistent with fractional crystallization relating the rhyolitic and mafic portions within each ash-flow tuff. In addition, the compositional variation among ash-flow units cannot be related by fractional crystallization. All melt inclusions within phenocrysts from the more mafic pumice fragments of each tuff have identical trace element concentrations. Furthermore, melt inclusions within the high-silica pumice fragments of each tuff also have identical trace element concentrations, except for a group of high-Rb, high-Nb inclusions from Rainier Mesa. Magma mixing occurred during evolution of each tuff, and is recorded in both the melt inclusions and in the host sanidines. These mixing events are subtle in the Topopah Spring tuff, but extensive mixing produced magmas of intermediate composition within the Tiva Canyon, Rainier Mesa, and Ammonia Tanks tuffs. The chemical analyses of pumice fragments from the Topopah Spring, Tiva Canyon, and Ammonia Tanks tuffs are consistent with their generation from a common source. However, Rainier Mesa magmas are different, having been

  17. First-principles calibration of 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and complete extraction of 40Ar* from sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D.; Postma, O.; Villa, I. M.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology relies on comparing argon isotopic data for unknowns to those for knowns. Mineral standards used as neutron fluence monitors must be dated by the K-Ar method (or at least referenced to a mineral of known K-Ar age). The commonly used age of 28.02 ± 0.28 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) (Renne et al., 1998) is based upon measurements of radiogenic 40Ar in GA1550 biotite (McDougall and Roksandic, 1974), but underlying full data were not published (these measurements were never intended for use as an international standard), so uncertainties are difficult to assess. Recent developments by Kuiper et al. (2008) and Renne et al. (2010) are limited by their reliance on the accuracy of other systems. Modern technology should allow for more precise and accurate calibration of primary K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar standards. From the ideal gas law, the number of moles of 40Ar in a system can be calculated from measurements of pressure, volume, and temperature. Thus we have designed and are proceeding to build a pipette system to introduce well-determined amounts of 40Ar into noble gas extraction lines and mass spectrometers. This system relies on components with calibrations traceable to SI unit prototypes, including a diaphragm pressure gauge (MKS Instruments), thermocouples, and a “slug” of an accurately determined volume to be inserted into the reservoir for volume determinations of the reservoir and pipette. The system will be renewable, with a lifetime of ca. 1 month for gas in the reservoir, and portable, to permit interlaboratory calibrations. The quantitative extraction of 40Ar* from the mineral standard is of highest importance; for sanidine standards this is complicated by high melt viscosity during heating. Experiments adding basaltic “zero age glass” (ZAG) to decrease melt viscosity are underway. This has previously been explored by McDowell (1983) with a resistance furnace, but has not been quantitatively addressed with laser heating

  18. Application of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction in the synthesis of natural products.

    PubMed

    Cao, Min-Hui; Green, Nicholas J; Xu, Sheng-Zhen

    2017-03-22

    The Diels-Alder reaction that involves a nitrogen atom in the diene or dienophile is termed the aza-Diels-Alder reaction. As well as the powerful all-carbon Diels-Alder reaction, the aza-Diels-Alder reaction has also played an important role in the total synthesis of natural products. Herein, we review various natural products using an aza-Diels-Alder reaction as a key step to their total synthesis, and divide the syntheses into inter- and intra-molecular aza-Diels-Alder reactions and a retro-aza-Diels-Alder reaction. Inter- and intra-molecular aza-Diels-Alder reactions involve an imine as an electron deficient dienophile and an imine as an electron deficient azadiene. The significance of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction for the construction of a six-membered ring containing nitrogen is tremendous, but the development of asymmetric, in particular catalytic enantioselective intramolecular aza-Diels-Alder reaction in the total synthesis of natural products remains highly challenging, and will no doubt see enormous advances in the future.

  19. Shell Creek Summers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Mark; Goedeken, Suzy

    2005-01-01

    In 2002 Shell Creek Watershed Improvement Group turned to the Newman Grove Public Schools' science department to help educate the public on water quality in the watershed and to establish a monitoring system that would be used to improve surface and groundwater quality in the creek's watershed. Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality provided…

  20. 40Ar/39Ar age of the Manson impact structure, Iowa, and correlative impact ejecta in the Crow Creek member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous), South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Obradovich, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A set of 34 laser total-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses of sanidine from a melt layer in crater-fill deposits of the Manson impact structure in Iowa has a weighted-mean age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma. This age is about 9.0 m.y. older than 40Ar/39Ar ages of shocked microcline from the Manson impact structure reported previously by others. The 74.1 Ma age of the sanidine, which is a melt product of Precambrian microcline clasts, indicates that the Manson impact structure played no part in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) mass extinction at 64.5 Ma. Moreover, incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages of the sanidine show that it is essentially free of excess 40Ar and has not been influenced by postcrystallization heating or alteration. An age spectrum of the matrix of the melt layer shows effects of 39Ar recoil, including older ages in the low-temperature increments and younger ages in the high-temperature increments. At 17 places in eastern South Dakota and Nebraska, shocked quartz and feldspar grains are concentrated in the lower part of the Crow Creek Member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The grains are largest (3.2 mm) in southeastern South Dakota and decrease in size (0.45 mm) to the northwest, consistent with the idea that the Manson impact structure was their source. The ubiquitous presence of shocked grains concentrated in a thin calcarenite at the base of the Crow Creek Member suggests it is an event bed recording an instant of geologic time. Ammonites below and above the Crow Creek Member limit its age to the zone of Didymoceras nebrascense of earliest late Campanian age. Plagioclase from a bentonite bed in this zone in Colorado has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma commensurate with our sanidine age of 74.1 Ma for the Manson impact structure. 40Ar/39Ar ages of bentonite beds below and above the Crow Creek are consistent with our 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma age for the Manson impact structure and limit its age to the interval ?? 74.5 0.1 to 73.8 ?? 0.1 Ma. Recently, two origins for the

  1. Compositional gradients in large reservoirs of silicic magma as evidenced by ignimbrites versus Taylor Creek Rhyolite lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Ruiz, Joaquin

    1992-04-01

    The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwest New Mexico consists of 20 lava domes and flows that were emplaced during a period of a few thousand years or less in late Oligocene time. Including genetically associated pyroclastic deposits, which are about as voluminous as the lava domes and flows, the Taylor Creek Rhyolite represents roughly 100 km3 of magma erupted from vents distributed throughout an area of several hundred square kilometers. Major-element composition is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous high-silica rhyolite and is nearly constant throughout the lava field. The magma reservoir for the Taylor Creek Rhyolite was vertically zoned in trace elements, 87Sr/86Sr, and phenocryst abundance and size. Mean trace-element concentrations, ranges in concentrations, and element-pair correlations are similar to many subalkaline silicic ignimbrites. However, the polarity of the zonation was opposite that in reservoirs for ignimbrites, for most constituents. For example, compared to the Bishop Tuff, only 87Sr/86Sr and Sc increased upward in both reservoirs. Quite likely, a dominant but nonerupted volume of the magma reservoir for the Taylor Creek Rhyolite was zoned like that for the Bishop Tuff, whereas an erupted, few-hundred-meter-thick cap on the magma body was variably contaminated by roof rocks whose contribution to this part of the magma system moderated relatively extreme trace-element concentrations of uncontaminated Taylor Creek Rhyolite but did not change the sense of correlation for most element pairs. The contaminant probably was a Precambrian rock of broadly granitic composition and with very high 87Sr/86Sr. Although examples apparently are not yet reported in the literature, evidence for a similar thin contaminated cap on reservoirs for large-volume silicic ignimbrites may exist in the bottom few meters of ignimbrites or perhaps only in the pumice fallout that normally immediately precedes ignimbrite emplacement. 87Sr/86Sr in sanidine phenocrysts of the

  2. Compositional gradients in large reservoirs of silicic magma as evidenced by ignimbrites versus Taylor Creek Rhyolite lava domes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Ruiz, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwest New Mexico consists of 20 lava domes and flows that were emplaced during a period of a few thousand years or less in late Oligocene time. Including genetically associated pyroclastic deposits, which are about as voluminous as the lava domes and flows, the Taylor Creek Rhyolite represents roughly 100 km3 of magma erupted from vents distributed throughout an area of several hundred square kilometers. Major-element composition is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous high-silica rhyolite and is nearly constant throughout the lava field. The magma reservoir for the Taylor Creek Rhyolite was vertically zoned in trace elements, 87Sr/86Sr, and phenocryst abundance and size. Mean trace-element concentrations, ranges in concentrations, and element-pair correlations are similar to many subalkaline silicic ignimbrites. However, the polarity of the zonation was opposite that in reservoirs for ignimbrites, for most constituents. For example, compared to the Bishop Tuff, only 87Sr/86Sr and Sc increased upward in both reservoirs. Quite likely, a dominant but nonerupted volume of the magma reservoir for the Taylor Creek Rhyolite was zoned like that for the Bishop Tuff, whereas an erupted, few-hundred-meter-thick cap on the magma body was variably contaminated by roof rocks whose contribution to this part of the magma system moderated relatively extreme trace-element concentrations of uncontaminated Taylor Creek Rhyolite but did not change the sense of correlation for most element pairs. The contaminant probably was a Precambrian rock of broadly granitic composition and with very high 87Sr/86Sr. Although examples apparently are not yet reported in the literature, evidence for a similar thin contaminated cap on reservoirs for large-volume silicic ignimbrites may exist in the bottom few meters of ignimbrites or perhaps only in the pumice fallout that normally immediately precedes ignimbrite emplacement. 87Sr/86Sr in sanidine phenocrysts of the

  3. San Mateo Creek Basin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The San Mateo Creek Basin comprises approximately 321 square miles within the Rio San Jose drainage basin in McKinley and Cibola counties, New Mexico. This basin is located within the Grants Mining District (GMD).

  4. Partridge Creek Diversion Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Goal: prevent mercury contamination by keeping the creek from flowing through a mine pit. The project improved brook trout habitat, green infrastructure, the local economy, and decreased human health risks. Includes before-and-after photos.

  5. Is it true that polymerization of vegetable oil occurs through Diels-Alder reaction?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is known to be one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. However, our NMR study showed no evidence for Diels-Alder products. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ...

  6. Why a Proximity-Induced Diels–Alder Reaction is So Fast

    PubMed Central

    Krenske, Elizabeth H.; Perry, Emma W.; Jerome, Steven V.; Maimone, Thomas J.; Baran, Phil S.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike normal Diels–Alder reactions of acyclic alkadienes with alkenes, the vinylbicyclo[2.2.2]octene employed in the Baran total synthesis of vinigrol undergoes quantitative Diels–Alder reaction with a tethered alkene at room temperature. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this unprecedented reactivity originates from a combination of preorganization, diene strain, and tether stabilization. PMID:22630569

  7. Alder (alnus crispa) effects on soils in ecosystems of the Agashashok river valley, northwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhoades, C.; Oskarsson, H.; Binkley, D.; Stottlemyer, B.

    2001-01-01

    At the northern limit of the boreal forest biome, alder (Alnus crispa [Ait.] Pursh) shrubs occur in a variety of ecosystems. We assessed the effects of individual alder shrubs on soil properties and understory plant tissue nitrogen in floodplain terraces, valley slopes and tussock tundra ridges. The three ecosystems differed with respect to soil properties and abiotic conditions and supported distinct plant communities. Alder increased resin-exchangeable soil N and NO3 production significantly in each ecosystem. The greatest difference between alder canopy and surrounding soil NO3 measured both under field and laboratory conditions occured in floodplain sites. The shrub effect on soil pH and soil organic matter was greatest on tundra ridges. Alder shrubs also influenced the nitrogen nutrition of plants growing beneath their canopies. Plants growing below alder canopies had higher foliar nitrogen concentration and natural abundance 15N composition and lower carbon to nitrogen ratio than open-grown plants. Similar to soil N availability, understory plant leaf chemistry responded more to alder on floodplains than on slope or tundra ecosystems. This pattern suggests that understory plants rely more heavily on alder-fixed-N in this resource-poor ecosystem.

  8. A facile avenue to conductive polymer brushes via cyclopentadiene-maleimide Diels-Alder ligation.

    PubMed

    Yameen, Basit; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Preuss, Corinna M; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Trouillet, Vanessa; Rezek, Bohuslav; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2013-10-07

    Cyclopentadienyl end-capped poly(3-hexylthiophene) was employed to fabricate conductive surface tethered polymer brushes via a facile route based on cyclopentadiene-maleimide Diels-Alder ligation. The efficient nature of the Diels-Alder ligation was further combined with a biomimetic polydopamine-assisted functionalization of surfaces, making it an access route of choice for P3HT surface immobilization.

  9. The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of New Mexico: a rapidly emplaced field of lava domes and flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Tertiary Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwest New Mexico comprises at least 20 lava domes and flows. Each of the lavas was erupted from its own vent, and the vents are distributed throughout a 20 km by 50 km area. The volume of the rhyolite and genetically associated pyroclastic deposits is at least 100 km3 (denserock equivalent). The rhyolite contains 15%-35% quartz, sanidine, plagioclase, ??biotite, ??hornblende phenocrysts. Quartz and sanidine account for about 98% of the phenocrysts and are present in roughly equal amounts. With rare exceptions, the groundmass consists of intergrowths of fine-grained silica and alkali feldspar. Whole-rock major-element composition varies little, and the rhyolite is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous; mean SiO2 content is about 77.5??0.3%. Similarly, major-element compositions of the two feldsparphenocryst species also are nearly constant. However, whole-rock concentrations of some trace-elements vary as much as several hundred percent. Initial radiometric age determinations, all K-Ar and fission track, suggest that the rhyolite lava field grew during a period of at least 2 m.y. Subsequent 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate that the period of growth was no more than 100 000 years. The time-space-composition relations thus suggest that the Taylor Creek Rhyolite was erupted from a single magma reservoir whose average width was at least 30 km, comparable in size to several penecontemporaneous nearby calderas. However, this rhyolite apparently is not related to a caldera structure. Possibly, the Taylor Creek Phyolite magma body never became sufficiently volatile rich to produce a large-volume pyroclastic eruption and associated caldera collapse, but instead leaked repeatedly to feed many relatively small domes and flows. The new 40Ar/39Ar ages do not resolve preexisting unknown relative-age relations among the domes and flows of the lava field. Nonetheless, the indicated geologically brief period during which Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma was

  10. Soap Creek Associates NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit number MT-0023183, Soap Creek Associates, Inc. is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in West, Bighorn County, Montana, to Soap Creek.

  11. Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Roy, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Alders have already demonstrated their potential for the revegetation of both mining and industrial sites. These actinorhizal trees and shrubs and the actinobacteria Frankia associate in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis which could however be negatively affected by the presence of heavy metals, and accumulate them. In our hydroponic assay with black alders, quantification of the roots and shoots metal concentrations showed that, in the absence of stress, symbiosis increases Mo and Ni root content and simultaneously decreases Mo shoot content. Interestingly, the Mo shoot content also decreases in the presence of Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd for symbiotic alders. In symbiotic alders, Pb shoot translocation was promoted in presence of Pb. On the other hand, Cd exclusion in symbiotic root tissues was observed with Pb and Cd. In the presence of symbiosis, only Cd and Pb showed translocation into aerial tissues when present in the nutrient solution. Moreover, the translocation of Ni to shoot was prevented by symbiosis in the presence of Cd, Ni and Pb. The hydroponic experiment demonstrated that alders benefit from the symbiosis, producing more biomass (total, root and shoot) than non nodulated alders in control condition, and in the presence of metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd). Heavy metals did not reduce the nodule numbers (SNN), but the presence of Zn or Cd did reduce nodule allocation. Our study suggests that the Frankia-alder symbiosis is a promising (and a compatible) plant-microorganism association for the revegetation of contaminated sites, with minimal risk of metal dispersion.

  12. Boulder Creek Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingaman, Deirdre; Eitel, Karla Bradley

    2010-01-01

    Boulder Creek runs literally in the backyard of Donnelly Elementary School and happens to be on the EPA list of impaired water bodies. Therefore, a unique opportunity for problem solving opened the door to an exciting chance for students to become scientists, while also becoming active in their community. With the help of the Idaho Department of…

  13. [Alder forests of Numidia (N.E. Algeria): floristic biodiversity, vulnerability and conservation].

    PubMed

    Belouahem-Abed, Djamila; Belouahem, Foudil; Benslama, Mohamed; de Bélair, Gérard; Muller, Serge D

    2011-01-01

    The phytoecological study of the alder forests of north-east Algeria shows that these habitats with boreal affinities harbour very high species richness (> 400 species) and complex structures, which suggest their ancient origin. They correspond phytosociologically to two syntaxa, the Campanulo alatae-Alnenion glutinosae (riparian alder forests) and the Rusco hypophylli-Alnetum glutinosae (peat-forming alder carrs), respectively. Their degraded state and their regressive dynamics, observed during the 14 years of the study, reveal their precarious situation and their rapid ongoing decline under the influence of human-induced uncontroled disturbances (cutting, burning, draining, dumping…). With regard to their ecological, historical and patrimonial importance, the alder forests of Algerian Numidia should be urgently protected, with the aim of assuring the perennity of their exceptional floristic corteges.

  14. Envisioning an enzymatic Diels-Alder reaction by in situ acid-base catalyzed diene generation.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Manta, Bianca; Olsson, Philip; Brinck, Tore

    2012-06-07

    We present and evaluate a new and potentially efficient route for enzyme-mediated Diels-Alder reactions, utilizing general acid-base catalysis. The viability of employing the active site of ketosteroid isomerase is demonstrated.

  15. Rheological and chemical analysis of reverse gelation in a covalently crosslinked Diels-Alder polymer network

    PubMed Central

    Adzima, Brian J.; Aguirre, H. Alan; Kloxin, Christopher J.; Scott, Timothy F.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    A network polymer, incorporating dynamic and reversible crosslinks, was synthesized using the Diels-Alder reaction. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the reaction rate and thermodynamic equilibrium over a broad temperature range. Equilibrium conversion of the furan and maleimide varied from 74% at 85°C to 24% at 155°C, demonstrating significant depolymerization via the retro-Diels-Alder reaction. The gel point temperature, as determined by rheometry using the Winter-Chambon criterion, was 92°C, corresponding to a gel-point conversion of 71%, consistent with the Flory-Stockmayer equation. The scaling exponents for the complex moduli, viscosity, and plateau modulus, in the vicinity of the gel-point, were determined and compared with experimental and theoretical literature values. Further, the material exhibited a low frequency relaxation owing to dynamic rearrangement of crosslinks by the Diels-Alder and retro-Diels-Alder reactions. PMID:20711364

  16. Mannich-Michael versus formal aza-Diels-Alder approaches to piperidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Girling, P Ricardo; Kiyoi, Takao; Whiting, Andrew

    2011-05-07

    A review into the aza-Diels-Alder reaction, mainly concentrating on literature examples that form piperidin-4-ones from the reaction of imines and electron rich dienes or enones, either through a Lewis acidic/Brønsted acid approach or through the use of an organocatalyst. This review questions whether the mechanism of the aza-Diels-Alder reaction is step wise as opposed to concerted when using oxygenated dienes.

  17. Looking beyond the endo Rule in a Diels-Alder Discovery Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarret, Ronald M.; New, Jamie; Hurley, Rebecca; Gillooly, Laura

    2001-09-01

    The commonly described reaction of maleic anhydride and cyclopentadiene generates a Diels-Alder product in accord with the endo rule. Replacing the dienophile with maleic acid or fumaric acid (with modified reaction conditions) allows students to discover or verify that the Diels-Alder reaction is stereospecific with respect to the stereochemistry of the alkene. The recording of NMR spectra is a particularly useful means of establishing cis-trans stereochemistry (symmetry) of the products.

  18. Diels–Alder reactions in confined spaces: the influence of catalyst structure and the nature of active sites for the retro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cantín, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diels–Alder cycloaddition between cyclopentadiene and p-benzoquinone has been studied in the confined space of a pure silica zeolite Beta and the impact on reaction rate due to the concentration effect within the pore and diffusion limitations are discussed. Introduction of Lewis or Brønsted acid sites on the walls of the zeolite strongly increases the reaction rate. However, contrary to what occurs with mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41), Beta zeolite does not catalyse the retro-Diels–Alder reaction, resulting in a highly selective catalyst for the cycloaddition reaction. PMID:27829925

  19. WELCOME CREEK WILDERNESS, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidke, D.J.; Close, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource surveys indicate probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential for small amounts of gold and other metals. Areas of alluvium in Welcome Creek and in part of Rock Creek are classed as having probable and substantiated mineral-resource potential for small quantities of gold in small and scattered placers and in placer tailings. A small area which contains the Cleveland mine, on Cleveland Mountain, near the west border of the wilderness was classed as having probable mineral-resource potential for silver and gold in veins. Although green mudstone strata that often are favorable hosts for stratabound copper occurrences were found in the northeast part of the wilderness, no copper deposits were found and these studies indicate little likelihood for the occurrence of copper resources. The nature of the geologic terrain indicates that there is little likelihood of the occurrence of energy resources.

  20. Absence of net long-term successional facilitation by alder in a boreal Alaska floodplain.

    PubMed

    Stuart Chapin, F; Conway, Alexandra J; Johnstone, Jill F; Hollingsworth, Teresa N; Hollingsworth, Jamie

    2016-11-01

    Long-term experiments provide a way to test presumed causes of successional or environmentally driven vegetation changes. Early-successional nitrogen (N)-fixing plants are widely thought to facilitate productivity and vegetation development on N-poor sites, thus accounting for observed vegetation patterns later in succession. We tested this facilitative impact on vegetation development in a 23-yr field experiment on an Interior Alaska (USA) floodplain. On three replicate early-successional silt bars, we planted late-successional white spruce (Picea glauca) seedlings in the presence and absence of planted seedlings of an early-successional N-fixing shrub, thinleaf alder (Alnus incana). Alder initially facilitated survivorship and growth of white spruce. Within six years, however, after canopy closure, alder negatively affected spruce survivorship and growth. Our three replicate sites followed different successional trajectories. One site was eliminated by erosion and supported no vegetation development during our study. The other two sites, which differed in site moisture, diverged in vegetation composition. Structural equation modeling (SEM) suggested that, in the drier of these two sites, alder inhibited spruce growth directly (presumably by competition) and indirectly through effects mediated by competition with other woody species. However, at the wetter site, alder had both positive and negative effects on spruce growth, with negative effects predominating. Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) in alder thickets further reduced height growth of spruce in the wetter site. We conclude that net effects of alder on white spruce, the late-successional dominant, were primarily inhibitory and indirect, with the mechanisms depending on initial site moisture. Our results highlight the importance of long-term research showing that small differences among initial replicate sites can cause divergence in successional trajectories, consistent with individualistic distributions

  1. Water-Quality Characteristics of Cottonwood Creek, Taggart Creek, Lake Creek, and Granite Creek, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; O'Ney, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    To address water-resource management objectives of the National Park Service in Grand Teton National Park, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Park Service has conducted water-quality sampling on streams in the Snake River headwaters area. A synoptic study of streams in the western part of the headwaters area was conducted during 2006. Sampling sites were located on Cottonwood Creek, Taggart Creek, Lake Creek, and Granite Creek. Sampling events in June, July, August, and October were selected to characterize different hydrologic conditions and different recreational-use periods. Stream samples were collected and analyzed for field measurements, major-ion chemistry, nutrients, selected trace elements, pesticides, and suspended sediment. Water types of Cottonwood Creek, Taggart Creek, Lake Creek, and Granite Creek were calcium bicarbonate. Dissolved-solids concentrations were dilute in Cottonwood Creek and Taggart Creek, which drain Precambrian-era rocks and materials derived from these rocks. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 11 to 31 milligrams per liter for samples collected from Cottonwood Creek and Taggart Creek. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 55 to 130 milligrams per liter for samples collected from Lake Creek and Granite Creek, which drain Precambrian-era rocks and Paleozoic-era rocks and materials derived from these rocks. Nutrient concentrations generally were small in samples collected from Cottonwood Creek, Taggart Creek, Lake Creek, and Granite Creek. Dissolved-nitrate concentrations were the largest in Taggart Creek. The Taggart Creek drainage basin has the largest percentage of barren land cover of the basins, and subsurface waters of talus slopes may contribute to dissolved-nitrate concentrations in Taggart Creek. Pesticide concentrations, trace-element concentrations, and suspended-sediment concentrations generally were less than laboratory reporting levels or were small for all samples. Water

  2. The Beaver Creek story

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, W.H.; Whitworth, B.G.; Smith, G.F.; Byl, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Beaver Creek watershed in West Tennessee includes about 95,000 acres of the Nation's most productive farmland and most highly erodible soils. In 1989 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, began a study to evaluate the effect of agricultural activities on water quality in the watershed and for best management practices designed to reduce agricultural nonpoint-source pollution. Agrichemical monitoring included testing the soils, ground water, and streams at four farm sites ranging from 27 to 420 acres. Monitoring stations were operated downstream to gain a better understanding of the water chemistry as runoff moved from small ditches into larger streams to the outlet of the Beaver Creek watershed. Prior to the implementation of best management practices at one of the farm study sites, some storms produced an average suspended-sediment concentration of 70,000 milligrams per liter. After the implementation of BMP's, however, the average value never exceeded 7,000 milligrams per liter. No-till crop production was the most effective best management practice for conserving soil on the farm fields tested. A natural bottomland hardwood wetland and a constructed wetland were evaluated as instream resource-management systems. The wetlands improved water quality downstream by acting as a filter and removing a significant amount of nonpoint-source pollution from the agricultural runoff. The constructed wetland reduced the sediment, pesticide, and nutrient load by approximately 50 percent over a 4-month period. The results of the Beaver Creek watershed study have increased the understanding of the effects of agriculture on water resources. Study results also demonstrated that BMP's do protect and improve water quality.

  3. 75 FR 27332 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC; Eagle Creek Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources... Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC.... For the transferee: Mr. Paul Ho, Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC,...

  4. Line Creek improves efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, P.

    1988-04-01

    Boosting coal recovery rate by 8% and reducing fuel expense $18,000 annually by replacing two tractors, are two tangible benefits that Crows Nest Resources of British Columbia has achieved since overseas coal markets weakened in 1985. Though coal production at the 4-million tpy Line Creek open pit mine has been cut 25% from its 1984 level, morale among the pit crew remains high. More efficient pit equipment, innovative use of existing equipment, and encouragement of multiple skill development among workers - so people can be assigned to different jobs in the operation as situations demand - contribute to a successful operation.

  5. Kiowa Creek Switching Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Ship Creek bioassessment investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

  7. Linking Landscape Characteristics and High Stream Nitrogen in the Oregon Coast Range: Red Alder Complicates Use of Nutrient Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Red alder (a nitrogen-fixing tree) and sea salt inputs can strongly influence stream nitrogen concentrations in western Oregon and Washington. We compiled a database of stream nitrogen and landscape characteristics in the Oregon Coast Range. Basal area of alder, expressed as a ...

  8. Diels-Alder reactions: The effects of catalyst on the addition reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Özgür; Kus, Nermin Simsek; Tunç, Tuncay; Sahin, Ertan

    2015-10-01

    The reaction between 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene and dimethyl 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene-2,3-dicarboxylate is efficiently achieved with small amounts of catalyst, i.e. phenol, AcOH, nafion, and β-cyclodextrin. Exo-diastereoselective cycloaddition reactions were observed both without catalyst and different catalysts for 48 days. As a result, different products (tricyclicmolecule 5, retro-Diels-Alder product 6, and oxidation product 7) were obtained with different catalysts. In addition, we synthesized Diels-Alders product 8 and tricyclocyclitol 10 via Diels-Alder reaction. The structures of these products were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and IR spectroscopy.

  9. Electrostatic catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Haworth, Naomi L; Darwish, Nadim; Ciampi, Simone; Bloomfield, Nathaniel J; Wallace, Gordon G; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-03-03

    It is often thought that the ability to control reaction rates with an applied electrical potential gradient is unique to redox systems. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that oriented electric fields could affect the outcomes of a range of chemical reactions, regardless of whether a redox system is involved. This possibility arises because many formally covalent species can be stabilized via minor charge-separated resonance contributors. When an applied electric field is aligned in such a way as to electrostatically stabilize one of these minor forms, the degree of resonance increases, resulting in the overall stabilization of the molecule or transition state. This means that it should be possible to manipulate the kinetics and thermodynamics of non-redox processes using an external electric field, as long as the orientation of the approaching reactants with respect to the field stimulus can be controlled. Here, we provide experimental evidence that the formation of carbon-carbon bonds is accelerated by an electric field. We have designed a surface model system to probe the Diels-Alder reaction, and coupled it with a scanning tunnelling microscopy break-junction approach. This technique, performed at the single-molecule level, is perfectly suited to deliver an electric-field stimulus across approaching reactants. We find a fivefold increase in the frequency of formation of single-molecule junctions, resulting from the reaction that occurs when the electric field is present and aligned so as to favour electron flow from the dienophile to the diene. Our results are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by quantum-chemical calculations in a theoretical model of this system, and herald a new approach to chemical catalysis.

  10. Validation of the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, B; Lancaster, G; Lawson, J; Williams, K; Daly, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To describe the validation and reliability of a new pain tool (the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score, AHTPS) for children at triage in the accident and emergency (A&E) setting. Methods: A new behavioural observational pain tool was developed because of dissatisfaction with available tools and a lack of confidence in self-assessment scores at triage. The study was conducted in a large paediatric A&E department; 575 children (aged 0–16 years) were included. Inter-rater reliability and various aspects of validity were assessed. In addition this tool was compared to the Wong-Baker self-assessment tool.1 The children were concurrently scored by a research nurse and triage nurses to assess inter-rater reliability. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's triage score with the research nurse reassessment score after intervention and/or analgesia. Known group construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's score at triage with the level of pain of the condition as judged by the discharge diagnosis. Predictive validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's AHTPS with the level of analgesia needed by each patient. The AHTPS was also compared to a self-assessment score. Results: A high level of inter-rater reliability, kappa statistic 0.84 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.88), was shown. Construct validity was well demonstrated; known group construct validity and predictive validity were also demonstrated to a varying degree. Conclusions: Results support the use of this observational pain scoring tool in the triage of children in A&E. PMID:15210492

  11. Symmetry-enthalpy correlations in Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Tuvi-Arad, Inbal; Avnir, David

    2012-08-06

    Woodward-Hoffmann (WH) rules provide strict symmetry selection rules: when they are obeyed, a reaction proceeds; when they are not obeyed, there is no reaction. However, the voluminous experimental literature provides ample evidence that strict compliance to symmetry requirements is not an obstacle for a concerted reaction to proceed, and therefore the idea has developed that it is enough to have a certain degree of the required symmetry to have reactivity. Here we provide quantitative evidence of that link, and show that as one deviates from the desired symmetry, the enthalpy of activation increases, that is, we show that concerted reactions slow down the further they are from the ideal symmetry. Specifically, we study the deviation from mirror symmetry (evaluated with the continuous symmetry measure (CSM)) of the [4+2] carbon skeleton of the transition state of a series of twelve Diels-Alder reactions in seven different solvents (and in the gas phase), in which the dienes are butadiene, cyclopentadiene, cyclohexadiene, and cycloheptadiene; the dienophiles are the 1-, 1,1-, and 1,1,2-cyanoethylene derivatives; the solvents were chosen to sample a range of dielectric constants from heptane to ethanol. These components provide twenty-four symmetry-enthalpy DFT-calculated correlation lines (out of which only one case is a relatively mild exception) that show the general trend of increase in enthalpy as symmetry decreases. The various combinations between the dienophiles, cyanoethylenes, and solvents provide all kinds of sources for symmetry deviations; it is therefore remarkable that although the enthalpy of activation is dictated by various parameters, symmetry emerges as a primary parameter. In our analysis we also bisected this overall picture into solvent effects and geometry variation effects to evaluate under which conditions the electronic effects are more dominant than symmetry effects.

  12. Paleomagnetism and Lithostratigraphy of the Miocene Tuff of Huntoon Creek Type Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S.; Pluhar, C. J.; Lindeman, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Here we define the Tuff of Huntoon Creek (THC), previously identified and mapped in Mono Basin, CA by Gilbert et al. (1968) as "latite ignimbrite" (K-Ar date of 11.1-11.9 Ma). Formally defining this formation and its paleomagnetic characteristics, can help reveal the spatial and temporal relationships of the Walker Lane and Mina Deflection structural features, including distribution of vertical axis rotation. THC is composed of four tuffs with an intercalated volcaniclastic sandstone giving a total stratigraphic thickness of ~300 m. We define THC in a gorge of Huntoon Creek, where the stratigraphic section is capped by Pliocene basalt. The lowest and most extensive stratigraphic unit, the Huntoon Valley member of THC, is ~243 m thick and can be distinguished from other units by the presence of sanidine and biotite phenocrysts and normal polarity. A 7-meter-thick volcaniclastic sandstone overlies the Huntoon Valley member, straddling a magnetic polarity reversal within the section. The 3 overlying members of THC are reversed-polarity, biotite-bearing, sanidine-free tuffs of variable degrees of welding. Their paleomagnetic directions are each statistically distinguishable from the others, indicating that the deposition of each tuff is separated by a significant amount of time and can be used as a geologically instantaneous measure of Earth's magnetic field for purposes of averaging out secular variation. The capping Pliocene olivine basalt was emplaced over an erosional unconformity of significant relief, as evidenced by the complete absence at some locations of the uppermost biotite-bearing THC member. The tilt corrected mean paleomagnetic direction for the 4 members of THC indicate a clockwise rotation magnitude of 77.5°±40.3°. The absolute rotation results of this locality are statistically indistinguishable from the relative rotation results of this locality compared to Cowtrack Mountain (Lindeman et al. 2013). The corroboration of these data suggests that

  13. [Effects of the decomposition of poplar and alder mixed leaf litters on soil microbial biomass].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Fang, Sheng-Zuo; Tian, Ye

    2012-08-01

    An incubation test was conducted to study the effects of the decomposition of poplar and trabeculate alder leaf litters with different mixed ratios and under different application ways on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN). The mixed ratio of the litters had significant effects on soil MBC and MBN. On the 30th day of incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significantly higher in the treatments with > or = 50% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. On the 75th day of incubation, the soil MBC in the treatments with > or = 40% of alder litter and the soil MBN in the treatments with > or = 30% of alder litter were significantly greater than those in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. After 135 days incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significant higher in the treatments with > or = 20% and > or = 40% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control, respectively. There was no significant difference in the soil MBC/MBN between the treatments with different mixed ratios of poplar and alder leaf litters and the control. Overall, soil MBC/MBN increased during the early period of incubation and decreased in the later period, suggesting that soil microflora changed during the decomposition of the litters. In the whole incubation period, the application ways of the litters had lesser effects on the soil MBC, MBN, and MBC/MBN, indicating that the addition ways of the litters did not affect soil microflora.

  14. 75 FR 40034 - Northeastern Tributary Reservoirs Land Management Plan, Beaver Creek, Clear Creek, Boone, Fort...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... Northeastern Tributary Reservoirs Land Management Plan, Beaver Creek, Clear Creek, Boone, Fort Patrick Henry... Land Management Plan (NTRLMP) for the 4,933 acres of TVA-managed public land on Beaver Creek, Clear... the Watauga River. Beaver Creek and Clear Creek reservoirs are on tributaries within the South...

  15. Enantioselective Organocatalytic Diels–Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Hydroxy‐o‐Quinodimethanes

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Amico, Luca; Vega‐Peñaloza, Alberto; Cuadros, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The photoenolization/Diels–Alder strategy offers straightforward access to synthetically valuable benzannulated carbocyclic products. This historical light‐triggered process has never before succumbed to efforts to develop an enantioselective catalytic approach. Herein, we demonstrate how asymmetric organocatalysis provides simple yet effective catalytic tools to intercept photochemically generated hydroxy‐o‐quinodimethanes with high stereoselectivity. We used a chiral organic catalyst, derived from natural cinchona alkaloids, to activate maleimides toward highly stereoselective Diels–Alder reactions. An unconventional mechanism of stereocontrol is operative, wherein the organocatalyst is actively involved in both the photochemical pathway, by leveraging the formation of the reactive photoenol, and the stereoselectivity‐defining event. PMID:26797768

  16. Diels–Alder reactions of myrcene using intensified continuous-flow reactors

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Diéguez, Miguel Á; Kohl, Thomas M; Tsanaktsidis, John

    2017-01-01

    This work describes the Diels–Alder reaction of the naturally occurring substituted butadiene, myrcene, with a range of different naturally occurring and synthetic dienophiles. The synthesis of the Diels–Alder adduct from myrcene and acrylic acid, containing surfactant properties, was scaled-up in a plate-type continuous-flow reactor with a volume of 105 mL to a throughput of 2.79 kg of the final product per day. This continuous-flow approach provides a facile alternative scale-up route to conventional batch processing, and it helps to intensify the synthesis protocol by applying higher reaction temperatures and shorter reaction times. PMID:28228853

  17. Tandem enyne metathesis-Diels-Alder reaction for construction of natural product frameworks.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, Marta; Domínguez, Gema; Casarrubios, Luis; Amador, Ulises; Pérez-Castells, Javier

    2004-03-19

    Enynes connected through aromatic rings are used as substrates for metathesis reactions. The reactivity of three ruthenium carbene complexes is compared. The resulting 1,3-dienes are suitable precursors of polycyclic structures via a Diels-Alder process. Some domino RCM-Diels-Alder reactions are performed, suggesting a possible beneficial effect of the ruthenium catalyst in the cycloaddition process. Other examples require Lewis acid cocatalyst. When applied to aromatic ynamines or enamines, a new synthesis of vinylindoles is achieved. Monitorization of several metathesis reactions with NMR shows the different behavior for ruthenium catalysts. New carbenic species are detected in some reactions with an important dependence on the solvent used.

  18. Stereoselection in Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of 2-Cyano-1-azadienes: Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tay, Gidget C; Sizemore, Nicholas; Rychnovsky, Scott D

    2016-07-01

    Progress toward understanding the scope and diastereoselectivity of intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions using 2-cyano-1-azadienes is described herein. The resulting cyanoenamine products are underutilized intermediates in organic synthesis. Assembly of the Diels-Alder precursors was achieved using an improved imine condensation/oxidative cyanation protocol. By this method, several highly substituted indolizidine and quinolizidine architectures were constructed. Quantum mechanical DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory were performed for these cyclizations and provide insights into the origins of the observed diastereoselectivities.

  19. GEE CREEK WILDERNESS, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Epstein, Jack B.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mine and prospect surveys, it was determined that the Gee Creek Wilderness, Tennessee has little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. Iron ore was formerly mined, but the deposits are small, have a high phosphorous content, and are inaccessible. Shale, suitable for brick or lightweight aggregate, and sandstone, which could be utilized for crushed stone or sand, are found in the area, but are also found in areas closer to potential markets. The geologic setting precludes the presence of oil and gas resources in the surface rocks, but the possibility of finding natural gas at depth below the rocks exposed in the area cannot be discounted. Geophysical exploration would be necessary to define the local structure in rocks at depth to properly evaluate the potential of the area for gas.

  20. PINEY CREEK WILDERNESS, MISSOURI.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.; Ellis, Clarence

    1984-01-01

    The Piney Creek Wilderness in southwest Missouri was investigated by geologic, geochemical, and mineral-occurrence surveys. These is no evidence of metallic mineral deposits in the rock units exposed at the surface in the wilderness, but the entire area has a probable potential for significant zinc-lead deposits at depths of several hundred feet. A probable potential also exists for a small to moderate-sized iron ore deposit at a depth of at least 2100 ft along the northwest side of the wilderness. Evaluation of these potentials would require deep drilling, and in the case of the possible iron ore deposit, a detailed magnetic survey. No energy resource potential was identified within this area.

  1. Coyote Creek Trash Reduction Project: Clean Creeks, Healthy Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Coyote Creek Trash Reduction Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  2. 1. DEADWOOD CREEK BRIDGE FACING SOUTHWEST. MOUNT RAINIER AND EMMONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DEADWOOD CREEK BRIDGE FACING SOUTHWEST. MOUNT RAINIER AND EMMONS GLACIER VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Deadwood Creek Bridge, Spanning Deadwood Creek on Mather Memorial Parkway, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  3. Alameda Creeks Healthy Watersheds Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Alameda Creeks Healthy Watersheds Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resour

  4. 77 FR 13592 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources... Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC (transferees) filed an...) 805-1469. Transferees: Mr. Bernard H. Cherry, Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek...

  5. The mechanisms and timescales of rhyolite generation at Yellowstone caldera: New insights from 238U-230Th crystallization ages, trace-elements, and isotope compositions of zircon and sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, M. E.; Cooper, K. M.; Vazquez, J. A.; Calvert, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau hosts one of the largest Quaternary magmatic systems on Earth, with caldera forming eruptions at ~2.1 Ma, ~1.3 Ma, and ~0.64 Ma, as well as numerous intracaldera rhyolitic eruptions between caldera-forming events. The most recent post-caldera eruptive episode at Yellowstone produced the Central Plateau Member (CPM) of the Plateau Rhyolite, which erupted intermittently between ca. 170-70 ka with a cumulative volume ≥600 km3. Thus, the CPM rhyolites provide snapshots of a large silicic magmatic system though time. We examine five CPM rhyolites that erupted from ~125 ka to ~70 ka, and constrain the mechanisms and timescales of generating eruptible rhyolites at Yellowstone caldera by comparing (1) 238U-230Th crystallization ages and trace-element compositions of the interiors and surfaces (i.e., unpolished rims) of individual zircons with (2) bulk 238U-230Th crystallization ages and in situ major-element, Ba, and Pb isotope data for sanidines hosted in each rhyolite. The zircon age and trace-element data show that zircons in CPM rhyolites record crystallization from their respective eruption age to >150 ka before eruption, with most zircon surfaces crystallizing close to eruption and many interiors crystallizing 10 kyr to 150 kyr before eruption. At any given age, zircon surfaces have homogeneous trace-element compositions relative to zircon interiors for most elements and element ratios. For example, when considering data from all five CPM rhyolites, the zircon surfaces and interiors show similar broad trends in Eu/Eu* and U/Th over time, but the surfaces display less scatter. These observations suggest that the zircon surfaces grew from a more homogeneous region of the magma reservoir relative to where the zircon interiors grew. Although the zircon surfaces and interiors are similar in some elements and element ratios (e.g., Eu/Eu*, U/Th) at a given age, zircon surfaces and interiors display distinct (Y, MREE, HREE)/(P, U) ratios at a given

  6. Total synthesis of (±)-epithuriferic acid methyl ester via Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Marek; Bałczewski, Piotr; Owsianik, Krzysztof; Różycka-Sokołowska, Ewa; Marciniak, Bernard

    2016-02-07

    In this paper, we have described the first total synthesis of (±)-epithuriferic acid methyl ester from non-natural sources, in four steps (20% overall yield). The key step involves the Diels-Alder reaction of isobenzofuran with methyl 3-(dimethoxyphosphoryl)acrylate which is controlled by "ortho" regio- and endo stereoselectivities due to the COOMe group.

  7. Synthesis and Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction of norbornadiene and benzonorbornadiene dimers.

    PubMed

    Nişanci, Bilal; Dalkiliç, Erdin; Güney, Murat; Daştan, Arif

    2009-08-11

    Dimeric forms of norbornadiene and benzonorbornadiene were synthesized starting with known monobromide derivatives. The Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction of dimers with TCNE and PTAD was investigated and new norbornenoid polycyclics were obtained. All compounds were characterized properly using NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Concerning the reactivity of PTAD with isomeric dienes: the mechanism of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Mariza N; Orfanopoulos, Michael

    2009-04-02

    Cyclopropyl substituted dienes are employed as mechanistic probes in the triazolinedione Diels-Alder (DA) reaction. In aprotic and protic solvents, apart from the DA adducts that bear an intact cyclopropyl group, complicated and rearranged products are also obtained. These results provide solid evidence for the involvement of an open intermediate with a lifetime greater than 2 x 10(-12) s.

  9. WATERSHED BIOGEOCHEMISTRY IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF RED ALDER AND SALMON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  10. Arthropod fauna of rolled alder leaves in Washington State, United States of America (Insecta: Arachnida)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alders, Alnus spp., growing on the eastern slopes and foothills of the Cascade Range in Washington State, are often infested with shelter-making (primarily leafrolling) Lepidoptera in the families Tortricidae, Gracillariidae, and Choreutidae. Over a 5 year survey period, 5,172 rolled leaves were ex...

  11. Oxazole as an electron-deficient diene in the Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Moreno, Galdina Vanessa; González-Zamora, Eduardo; Méndez, Francisco

    2011-12-16

    The Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction of oxazole with ethylene is facilitated by addition of an alkyl group or Brønsted or Lewis acids to the oxazole nitrogen atom. The efficacy consists of stabilizing the transition state, lowering the activation barrier and the HOMO(dienophile)-LUMO(diene) gap, and increasing the reaction exothermicity.

  12. Biotransformation of a cage-like diels-alder adduct and derivatives by Mucor ramosissimus samutsevitsch

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Felicia Megumi; Mena, Ana Elisa Maciel; Marques, Maria Rita; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Beatriz, Adilson

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the ability for biotransformation of the Diels-Alder adduct tricyclo[6.2.1.02,7]undeca-4,9-dien-3,6-dione (1) and two synthetic derivatives by the saprobe fungus Mucor ramosissimus Samutsevitsch. Products from oxidation, isomerization and, regioselective and enantioselective reduction were achieved. PMID:24031400

  13. Enantioselective Synthesis of (+)-Estrone Exploiting a Hydrogen Bond-Promoted Diels−Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Starting from Dane’s diene and methylcyclopentenedione, (+)-estrone is synthesized along the Quinkert−Dane route in 24% total yield. The key step is an enantioselective Diels−Alder reaction promoted by an amidinium catalyst as efficiently as by a traditional Ti-TADDOLate Lewis acid. PMID:20302330

  14. Scope of the Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder Reactions of 1,2,3-Triazine

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Erin D.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    An examination of the scope of the inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions of the parent unsubstituted 1,2,3-triazine is described including the first report of its unique capabilities for participating in previously unexplored [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with heterodienophiles. PMID:21488676

  15. High-pressure Diels-Alder approach to natural kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sushil K; Orellana, Arturo; Greene, Andrew E; Poisson, Jean-François

    2006-11-23

    The first Diels-Alder based synthesis of (-)-kainic acid is described. Danishefsky's diene and a vinylogous malonate derived from 4-hydroxyproline combine under high pressure to afford a key bicyclic intermediate with virtually no loss of enantiopurity. This adduct can be converted into the natural product with complete stereocontrol. [reaction: see text].

  16. A Computational Experiment of the Endo versus Exo Preference in a Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Christopher N.; Woo, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and tested a computational laboratory that investigates an endo versus exo Diels-Alder cycloaddition. This laboratory employed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the cycloaddition of N-phenylmaleimide to furan. The endo and exo stereoisomers of the product were distinguished by building the two isomers in a…

  17. Synthesis of isoquinuclidines from highly substituted dihydropyridines via the Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rhia M; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2013-02-01

    A stereo- and regioselective Diels-Alder reaction for the synthesis of highly substituted isoquinuclidines from dihydropyridines and electron-deficient alkenes has been developed. While reactions with activated dienophiles proceed readily under thermal conditions, the use of Lewis acid additives is necessary to facilitate cycloadditions for less reactive alkenes. This procedure affords the target compounds in high yields and diastereoselectivities.

  18. Stable Isotope Variability of Altered Sanidine Feldspars within the Bear Lodge Alkaline Intrusive Complex, Wyoming: Implications for Mineral Exploration Near a Late-Stage Carbonatite Ore Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvaney-Norris, J. L.; Larson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    In a brecciated intrusive complex, mineral assemblages from non-ore-stage hydrothermal alteration may be mistakenly associated with ore body emplacement during exploration. The ability to differentiate mineralizing from non-mineralizing alteration by stable isotope analysis, and to map the fluid pathways, is a useful tool for future exploration. The Bull Hill diatreme, central Bear Lodge Mountains, contains porphyritic alkaline clasts and cross-cutting megacrystic sanidine trachyte dikes. The K feldspar (Kfs) phenocrysts reacted with and recorded the passage of hydrothermal fluids, likely derived from post-diatreme carbonatite intrusions. A study of the δ18O values of Kfs in the complex can assist mineralization mapping by revealing the late hydrothermal fluid pathways and provenance. Dike and breccia samples were split from three drill holes at regular distances, moving away from carbonatite dikes and large veins. Eighteen samples were prepared for oxygen isotope analysis by physical separation of megacrysts, or by crushing and hand-picking Kfs fragments from the breccia. A carbonatite Kfs sample was prepared by partial HCl digestion. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured at the Washington State University GeoAnalytical Laboratory using a Finnegan Delta S Mass Spectrometer. Kfs δ18O values range between 7.69‰ and 9.09‰ in the diatreme breccia xenocrysts, 5.28‰ to 8.12‰ in the megacrystic dike phenocrysts, and 7.15‰ in the carbonatite phenocrysts. Results suggest no clear relationship between the δ18O values in Kfs and the different phases of intrusion. This may be due to δ18O variability introduced by zoned and multi-crystal samples, limited variations of δ18O values among intrusion fluids, or that the final carbonatite intrusion pervasively altered all samples within the study area. Therefore, this method may not be particularly useful for identifying potential ore-bearing units in the Bear Lodge Intrusive Complex.

  19. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar sanidine geochronology of ignimbrites in the Mogollon-Datil volcanic field, southwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntosh, W.C.; Sutter, J.F.; Chapin, C.E.; Kedzie, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra have been obtained from 85 sanidine separates from 36 ignimbrites and one rhyolitic lava in the latest Eocene-Oligocene Mogollon-Datil volcanic field of southwestern New Mexico. Of the 97 measured age spectra, 94 yield weighted-mean plateau ages each giving single-spectrum 1?? precision of??0.25%-0.4% (??0.07-0.14 Ma). Replicate plateau age determinations for eight different samples show within-sample 1?? precisions averaging ??0.25%. Plateau ages from multiple (n=3-8) samples of individual ignimbrites show 1?? within-unit precision of ??0.1%-0.4% (??0.04-0.13 Ma). This within-unit precision represents a several-fold improvement over published K-Ar data for the same ignimbrites, and is similar to the range of precisions reported from single-crystal laser fusion studies. A further indication of the high precision of unit-mean 40Ar/30Ar ages is their close agreement with independently established stratigraphic order. Two samples failed to meet plateau criteria, apparently due to geologic contamination by older feldspars. Effects of minor contamination are shown by six other samples, which yielded slightly anomalous plateau ages. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages permit resolution of units differing in age by 0.5% (0.15 Ma) or less. This high resolution, combined with paleomagnetic studies, has helped to correlate ignimbrites among isolated ranges and has allowed development of an integrated timestratigraphic framework for the volcanic field. Mogollon-Datil ignimbrites range in age from 36.2 to 24.3 Ma. Ignimbrite activity was strongly episodic, being confined to four brief (<2.6 m.y.) eruptive episodes separated by 1-3 m.y. gaps. Ignimbrite activity generally tended to migrate from the southeast toward the north and west. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Changes in sediment volume in Alder Lake, Nisqually River Basin, Washington, 1945-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Gish, Casey C.

    2012-01-01

    The Nisqually River drains the southwest slopes of Mount Rainier, a glaciated stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of western Washington. The Nisqually River was impounded behind Alder Dam when the dam was completed in 1945 and formed Alder Lake. This report quantifies the volume of sediment deposited by the Nisqually and Little Nisqually Rivers in their respective deltas in Alder Lake since 1945. Four digital elevation surfaces were generated from historical contour maps from 1945, 1956, and 1985, and a bathymetric survey from 2011. These surfaces were used to compute changes in sediment volume since 1945. Estimates of the volume of sediment deposited in Alder Lake between 1945 and 2011 were focused in three areas: (1) the Nisqually River delta, (2) the main body of Alder Lake, along a 40-meter wide corridor of the pre-dam Nisqually River, and (3) the Little Nisqually River delta. In each of these areas the net deposition over the 66-year period was 42,000,000 ± 4,000,000 cubic meters (m3), 2,000,000 ± 600,000 m3, and 310,000 ± 110,000 m3, respectively. These volumes correspond to annual rates of accumulation of 630,000 ± 60,000 m3/yr, 33,000 ± 9,000 m3/yr, and 4,700 ± 1,600 m3/yr, respectively. The annual sediment yield of the Nisqually (1,100 ± 100 cubic meters per year per square kilometer [(m3/yr)/km2]) and Little Nisqually River basins [70 ± 24 (m3/yr)/km2] provides insight into the yield of two basins with different land cover and geomorphic processes. These estimates suggest that a basin draining a glaciated stratovolcano yields approximately 15 times more sediment than a basin draining forested uplands in the Cascade Range. Given the cumulative net change in sediment volume in the Nisqually River delta in Alder Lake, the total capacity of Alder Lake since 1945 decreased about 3 percent by 1956, 8 percent by 1985, and 15 percent by 2011.

  1. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  2. Recrystallization and anatexis along the plutonic-volcanic contact of the Turkey Creek caldera, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.; Pallister, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual geologic and geochemical relations are preserved along the contact between intracaldera tuff and a resurgent intrusion within the 26.9 Ma Turkey Creek caldera of southeast Arizona. Thick intracaldera tuff is weakly argillically altered throughout, except in zones within several hundred meters of its contact with the resurgent intrusion, where the groundmass of the tuff has been variably converted to granophyre and unaltered sanidine phenocrysts are present. Dikes of similarly granophyric material originate at the tuff-resurgent intrusion contact and intrude overlying intracaldera megabreccia and tuff. Field relations indicate that the resurgent intrusion is a laccolith and that it caused local partial melting of adjacent intracaldera tuff. Geochemical and petrographic relations indicate that small volumes of partially melted intracaldera tuff assimilated and mixed with dacite of the resurgent intrusion along their contact, resulting in rocks that have petrographic and compositional characteristics transitional between those of tuff and dacite. Some of this variably contaminated, second-generation magma coalesced, was mobilized, and was intruded into overlying intracaldera rocks. Interpretation of the resurgent intrusion in the Turkey Creek and other calderas as intracaldera laccoliths suggests that intrusions of this type may be a common, but often unrecognized, feature of calderas. Development of granophyric and anatectic features such as those described here may be equally common in other calderas. The observations and previously undocumented processes described here can be applied to identification and interpretation of similarly enigmatic relations and rocks in other caldera systems. Integration of large-scale field mapping with detailed petrographic and chemical data has resulted in an understanding of otherwise intractable but petrologically important caldera-related features.

  3. Multiple Magmatic Events Over 40 Ma in the Fish Creek Mountains, North-central Great Basin, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, B.; Henry, C. D.; Stevens, C.; Varve, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Fish Creek Mountains, located in north-central Nevada south of Battle Mountain, is a site of multiple igneous events ranging from ca. 35 Ma to 1 Ma, covering most of the igneous history of the Great Basin of the western United States. Such extended volcanic activity allows for documentation of mantle sources and petrogenetic processes over time. Beginning approximately 50 Ma, the Great Basin experienced a magmatic front that began migrating southwestward across southern Idaho, central Oregon and into northern Nevada and Utah. Intermediate, "arc-like" andesite and dacite dominated volcanic activity in northeastern Nevada between about 45 and 36 Ma. By 34 Ma, a northwest-trending belt of rhyolitic ash-flow calderas began to develop through central Nevada, the "ignimbrite flare-up". Volcanism then migrated westwards towards the Sierra Nevada. In north-central Nevada, the oldest lavas are ca. 35 Ma basaltic andesites through rhyolites that are exposed in the western Shoshone Range, the eastern Tobin Range, and the northern and eastern Fish Creek Mountains. Plagioclase-rich andesites, dacite intrusions, and volcanic breccias occur in a belt along the western side of the Fish Creek Mountains. The bulk of the Fish Creek Mountains is composed of the 24.7 Ma Fish Creek Mountains rhyolitic tuff that is largely confined to an undeformed caldera structure. The caldera and tuff are anomalously young compared to nearby felsic centers such as the Caetano caldera (33.8Ma) and Shoshone Range (39-35 Ma) and relative to the southwest to west magmatic migration. The basal tuff is unwelded, with abundant pumice and lithic (primarily volcanic) fragments but only rare crystals. Sanidine and smoky quartz phenocrysts become more abundant upsection and glassy fiamme (hydrated to devitrified) are common, but the abundance of lithic fragments diminishes. 16-15 Ma volcanic rocks of the Northern Nevada Rift are exposed in the Battle Mountain area, ranging in composition from subalkaine

  4. Effect of Counterion Structure on Rates and Diastereoselectivities in α,β-Unsaturated Iminium-Ion Diels-Alder Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Marcoux, David; Bindschädler, Pascal; Speed, Alexander W. H.; Chiu, Anna; Pero, Joseph E.; Borg, George A.; Evans, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of cyclic α,β-unsaturated iminium-ion dienophiles is documented in two highly diastereoselective Diels-Alder (DA) reactions. The dienophilic counterion was found to have a significant effect on reactivity. PMID:21678927

  5. New domino transposition/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction in monocyclic allenols: a general strategy for tricyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Aragoncillo, Cristina; Redondo, María C

    2002-07-21

    A novel and direct synthetic strategy to prepare fused tricycles has been developed from monocyclic allenols, masked functionalized dienes, which underwent a domino allenol transposition/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  6. Water quality study at the Congaree Swamp National monument of Myers Creek, Reeves Creek and Toms Creek. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rikard, M.

    1991-11-01

    The Congaree Swamp National Monument is one of the last significant near virgin tracts of bottom land hardwood forests in the Southeast United States. The study documents a water quality monitoring program on Myers Creek, Reeves Creek and Toms Creek. Basic water quality parameters were analyzed. High levels of aluminum and iron were found, and recommendations were made for further monitoring.

  7. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

    1995-04-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

  8. Growth of fullerene fragments using the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction: first step towards a C60 synthesis by dimerization.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Martha; Méndez, Francisco; Alonso, Julio A

    2013-02-13

    Density Functional Theory has been used to model the Diels-Alder reactions of the fullerene fragments triindenetriphenilene and pentacyclopentacorannulene with ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. The purpose is to prove the feasibility of using Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions to grow fullerene fragments step by step, and to dimerize fullerene fragments, as a way to obtain C₆₀. The dienophile character of the fullerene fragments is dominant, and the reaction of butadiene with pentacyclopentacorannulene is favored.

  9. Magma mixing and the generation of isotopically juvenile silicic magma at Yellowstone caldera inferred from coupling 238U–230Th ages with trace elements and Hf and O isotopes in zircon and Pb isotopes in sanidine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelten, Mark E.; Cooper, Kari M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Reid, Mary R.; Barfod, Gry H.; Wimpenny, Josh; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The nature of compositional heterogeneity within large silicic magma bodies has important implications for how silicic reservoirs are assembled and evolve through time. We examine compositional heterogeneity in the youngest (~170 to 70 ka) post-caldera volcanism at Yellowstone caldera, the Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites, as a case study. We compare 238U–230Th age, trace-element, and Hf isotopic data from zircons, and major-element, Ba, and Pb isotopic data from sanidines hosted in two CPM rhyolites (Hayden Valley and Solfatara Plateau flows) and one extracaldera rhyolite (Gibbon River flow), all of which erupted near the caldera margin ca. 100 ka. The Hayden Valley flow hosts two zircon populations and one sanidine population that are consistent with residence in the CPM reservoir. The Gibbon River flow hosts one zircon population that is compositionally distinct from Hayden Valley flow zircons. The Solfatara Plateau flow contains multiple sanidine populations and all three zircon populations found in the Hayden Valley and Gibbon River flows, demonstrating that the Solfatara Plateau flow formed by mixing extracaldera magma with the margin of the CPM reservoir. This process highlights the dynamic nature of magmatic interactions at the margins of large silicic reservoirs. More generally, Hf isotopic data from the CPM zircons provide the first direct evidence for isotopically juvenile magmas contributing mass to the youngest post-caldera magmatic system and demonstrate that the sources contributing magma to the CPM reservoir were heterogeneous in 176Hf/177Hf at ca. 100 ka. Thus, the limited compositional variability of CPM glasses reflects homogenization occurring within the CPM reservoir, not a homogeneous source.

  10. Magma mixing and the generation of isotopically juvenile silicic magma at Yellowstone caldera inferred from coupling 238U-230Th ages with trace elements and Hf and O isotopes in zircon and Pb isotopes in sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, Mark E.; Cooper, Kari M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Reid, Mary R.; Barfod, Gry H.; Wimpenny, Josh; Yin, Qing-zhu

    2013-08-01

    The nature of compositional heterogeneity within large silicic magma bodies has important implications for how silicic reservoirs are assembled and evolve through time. We examine compositional heterogeneity in the youngest (~170 to 70 ka) post-caldera volcanism at Yellowstone caldera, the Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites, as a case study. We compare 238U-230Th age, trace-element, and Hf isotopic data from zircons, and major-element, Ba, and Pb isotopic data from sanidines hosted in two CPM rhyolites (Hayden Valley and Solfatara Plateau flows) and one extracaldera rhyolite (Gibbon River flow), all of which erupted near the caldera margin ca. 100 ka. The Hayden Valley flow hosts two zircon populations and one sanidine population that are consistent with residence in the CPM reservoir. The Gibbon River flow hosts one zircon population that is compositionally distinct from Hayden Valley flow zircons. The Solfatara Plateau flow contains multiple sanidine populations and all three zircon populations found in the Hayden Valley and Gibbon River flows, demonstrating that the Solfatara Plateau flow formed by mixing extracaldera magma with the margin of the CPM reservoir. This process highlights the dynamic nature of magmatic interactions at the margins of large silicic reservoirs. More generally, Hf isotopic data from the CPM zircons provide the first direct evidence for isotopically juvenile magmas contributing mass to the youngest post-caldera magmatic system and demonstrate that the sources contributing magma to the CPM reservoir were heterogeneous in 176Hf/177Hf at ca. 100 ka. Thus, the limited compositional variability of CPM glasses reflects homogenization occurring within the CPM reservoir, not a homogeneous source.

  11. 76 FR 35379 - Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek, and Broad River; U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, SC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek, and Broad River; U.S... fishing shops. The public will continue to be able to use these portions of Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek.... 3). 2. Revise Sec. 334.480 to read as follows: Sec. 334.480 Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek, and...

  12. Hulburt Creek Hydrology, Southwestern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gebert, Warren A.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hydrologic characteristics of Hulburt Creek, Sauk County, Wis., in order to evaluate a proposed reservoir. The streamflow characteristics estimated are the low flow, monthly flow, and inflow flood. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. The following estimates are for the point on Hulburt Creek at the proposed Dell Lake damsite near Wisconsin Dells. The drainage area is 11.2 square miles.

  13. Headwater riparian invertebrate communities associated with red alder and conifer wood and leaf litter in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeSage, C.M.; Merritt, R.W.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    We examined how management of young upland forests in southeastern Alaska affect riparian invertebrate taxa richness, density, and biomass, in turn, potentially influencing food abundance for fish and wildlife. Southeastern Alaska forests are dominated by coniferous trees including Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), with mixed stands of red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn.). Red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) is hypothesized to influence the productivity of young-growth conifer forests and through forest management may provide increased riparian invertebrate abundance. To compare and contrast invertebrate densities between coniferous and alder riparian habitats, leaf litter and wood debris (early and late decay classes) samples were collected along eleven headwater streams on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, during the summers of 2000 and 2001. Members of Acarina and Collembola were the most abundant taxa collected in leaf litter with alder litter having significantly higher mean taxa richness than conifer litter. Members of Acarina were the most abundant group collected on wood debris and alder wood had significantly higher mean taxa richness and biomass than conifer wood. Alder wood debris in more advanced decay stages had the highest mean taxa richness and biomass, compared to other wood types, while conifer late decay wood debris had the highest densities of invertebrates. The inclusion of alder in young-growth conifer forests can benefit forest ecosystems by enhancing taxa richness and biomass of riparian forest invertebrates. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  14. 27 CFR 9.85 - Willow Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Willow Creek. 9.85 Section... THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.85 Willow Creek. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Willow Creek.”...

  15. 27 CFR 9.85 - Willow Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Willow Creek. 9.85 Section... THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.85 Willow Creek. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Willow Creek.”...

  16. 27 CFR 9.85 - Willow Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Willow Creek. 9.85 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.85 Willow Creek. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Willow Creek.”...

  17. 27 CFR 9.85 - Willow Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Willow Creek. 9.85 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.85 Willow Creek. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Willow Creek.”...

  18. 27 CFR 9.85 - Willow Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Willow Creek. 9.85 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.85 Willow Creek. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Willow Creek.”...

  19. 33 CFR 117.331 - Snake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake Creek. 117.331 Section 117.331 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.331 Snake Creek. The draw of the Snake Creek bridge, at Islamorada, Florida, shall open...

  20. Polar Diels-Alder reactions using electrophilic nitrobenzothiophenes. A combined experimental and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Rosa, Claudia D.; Mancini, Pedro M. E.; Kneeteman, Maria N.; Lopez Baena, Anna F.; Suligoy, Melisa A.; Domingo, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    The reactions between 2- and 3-nitrobenzothiophenes with three dienes of different nucleophilicity, 1-methoxy-3-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene, 1-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene and isoprene developed in anhydrous benzene and alternative under microwave irradiation with molecular solvents or in free solvent conditions, respectively, for produce dibenzothiophenes permit to conclude that both nitroheterocycles act as electrophile with the cited dienes. In the cases of the dienes 1-methoxy-3-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene and 1-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene which posses major nucleophilicity the observed product is the normal cycloaddition one. However when the diene is isoprene the product with both electrophiles follow the hetero Diels-Alder way. These reactions are considered polar cycloaddition reactions and the yields are reasonables. Moreover the polar Diels-Alder reactions of nitrobenzothiophenes with electron rich dienes 1-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3-butadiene have been theoretically studied using DFT methods.

  1. Use of wetlands for production of woody plants for fuels and petrochemical substitutes. [Alders, willows, poplars

    SciTech Connect

    Farnham, R.S.; Read, P.

    1981-03-01

    Work performed on this project in the past year has included the evaluations of natural stands productivity for wetland biomass species; propagation studies with alder, willow and poplar species; nursery establishment for production of cultivars and evaluation of wetland soils suitable for production of woody biomass species. Also a biomass research facility has been established in N. Minnesota suitable for long-term research and demonstration. Propagation research has included both micro and macro propagation techniques with native willows, selected willow clones from Sweden, alder seed selection from Finland and hybrid poplar clones from US Forest Service, Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Approximately 100,000 rooted plants will be available for field research by June 1, 1981.

  2. Origins of Stereoselectivity in Diels-Alder Cycloadditions Catalyzed by Chiral Imidazolidinones

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Ruth; Houk, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory has been used to study Diels-Alder reactions of cyclopentadiene with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones organocatalyzed by MacMillan’s chiral imidazolidinones. Preferred conformations of transition structures and reaction intermediates have been located. The dramatically different reactivities and enantioselectivities exhibited by two similar chiral imidazolidinones are rationalized. PMID:16536527

  3. The unexpected product of Diels-Alder reaction between "indanocyclon" and maleimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, Michał A.; Roszkowski, Piotr; Struga, Marta; Szulczyk, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    A heterocyclic compound commonly known as "indanocyclon" undergoes an unexpected Diels-Alder addition with maleimide. The resulting product has been isolated and characterized in order to get an information about its structure and possible mechanism of the reaction. Extensive comparison of single crystal properties of 3-(2,8-dioxo-1,3-diphenyl-2,8-dihydrocyclopenta[a]inden-8a(1H)-yl)pyrrolidine-2,5-dione and favorable product of the reaction has been also performed.

  4. Control of femtosecond laser driven retro-Diels-Alder-like reaction of dicyclopentadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dipak Kumar; Goswami, Tapas; Goswami, Debabrata

    2010-12-01

    Using femtosecond time resolved degenerate pump-probe mass spectrometry coupled with simple linearly chirped frequency modulated pulse, we elucidate that the dynamics of retro-Diels-Alder reaction of diclopentadiene (DCPD) to cyclopentadiene (CPD) in supersonic molecular beam occurs in ultrafast time scale. Negatively chirped pulse enhances the ion yield of CPD, as compared to positively chirped pulse. This indicates that by changing the frequency (chirp) of the laser pulse we can control the ion yield of a chemical reaction.

  5. Intramolecular Diels–Alder Reactions of Cycloalkenones: Stereoselectivity, Lewis Acid Acceleration, and Halogen Substituent Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The intramolecular Diels–Alder reactions of cycloalkenones and terminal dienes occur with high endo stereoselectivity, both thermally and under Lewis-acidic conditions. Through computations, we show that steric repulsion and tether conformation govern the selectivity of the reaction, and incorporation of either BF3 or α-halogenation increases the rate of cycloaddition. With a longer tether, isomerization from a terminal diene to the more stable internal diene results in a more facile cycloaddition. PMID:24410341

  6. Diels-Alder reactions as an efficient route to high purity cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Glassner, Mathias; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2011-05-18

    A simple and efficient route for the synthesis of cyclic polymer systems is presented. Linear furan protected α-maleimide-ω-cyclopentadienyl functionalized precursors (poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(tert-butyl acrylate)) were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and subsequent substitution of the bromine end-group with cyclopentadiene. Upon heating at high dilution, deprotection of the dieneophile occurs followed by an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction yielding a high purity cyclic product.

  7. Acid-free aza Diels-Alder reaction of Danishefsky's diene with imines.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Li, Xin; Ding, Kuiling

    2002-09-19

    [reaction: see text] A highly efficient aza Diels-Alder reaction of Danishefsky's diene with imines was found to occur in methanol in the absence of any acids at room temperature to give corresponding 2-substituted dihydro-4-pyridone derivatives in high yields. This reaction can be also carried out in a three-component one-pot reaction manner. The reaction was found to proceed through a Mannich-type condensation mechanism.

  8. Biomass of Speckled Alder on an Air-Polluted Mountain Site and its Response to Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneš, Ivan; Baláš, Martin; Koňasová, Tereza; Špulák, Ondřej; Balcar, Vratislav; Millerová, Kateřina Bednářová; Kacálek, Dušan; Jakl, Michal; Zahradník, Daniel; Vítámvás, Jan; Š´astná, Jaroslava; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana

    2014-12-01

    The article summarizes outcomes of a biomass study conducted in a young speckled alder plantation on a cold mountain site. At this location, the previously existing old forest was clear felled because of damage from air pollution, and present-day surface humus is in need of restoration. The intention of this study was to quantify the biomass and nutrients accumulated by alders and their components and assess whether the initial fertilization resulted in increased biomass production and nutrient accumulation in the biomass. Besides the control, two fertilized treatments were installed. In the surface treatment (SUT), the amendment was applied as a base dressing in small circles around trees. In the planting-hole treatment (PHT), the amendment was incorporated into soil inside the planting holes. Five growth seasons after planting and fertilization, six alders from each treatment were harvested including roots. Their biomass was quantified and analyzed for macroelements. The greatest pool of dry mass (DM) was branches in the control and stem wood in the fertilized treatments. The greatest pools of macroelements were leaves and branches. The most pronounced effects of fertilization were recorded in the DM and consequently in the absolute quantities of nutrients. The DM of an average tree in the control, SUT, and PHT was 85, 226, and 231 g, respectively. The absolute contents of nutrients per tree in the fertilized treatments showed the following increases, as compared with the control: (N) 2.5-2.6 times; (P) 1.6-2.4 times; (K) 1.8-2.1 times; and (Mg) 1.8-2.0 times, respectively. Speckled alder responded positively to fertilization.

  9. Light-induced hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition: a facile and selective photoclick reaction.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2011-04-13

    2-Napthoquinone-3-methides (oNQMs) generated by efficient photodehydration (Φ=0.2) of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol undergo facile hetero-Diels-Alder addition (k(D-A)∼ 4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to electron-rich polarized olefins in an aqueous solution. The resulting photostable benzo[g]chromans are produced in high to quantitative yield. The unreacted oNQM is rapidly hydrated (k(H2O) ∼145 s(-1)) to regenerate the starting diol. This competition between hydration and cycloaddition makes oNQMs highly selective, since only vinyl ethers and enamines are reactive enough to form the Diels-Alder adduct in an aqueous solution; no cycloaddition was observed with other types of alkenes. To achieve photolabeling or photoligation of two substrates, one is derivatized with a vinyl ether moiety, while 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol is attached to the other via an appropriate linker. The light-induced Diels-Alder "click" strategy permits the formation of either a permanent or hydrolytically labile linkage. Rapid kinetics of this photoclick reaction (k=4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) is useful for time-resolved applications. The short lifetime (τ ∼7 ms in H(2)O) of the active form of the photoclick reagent prevents its migration from the site of irradiation, thus, allowing for spatial control of the ligation or labeling.

  10. Factors for converting hazelnut (Corylus avellana L) into black alder (Alnus glutinosa Yalt.) plantations.

    PubMed

    Durkaya, Ali; Durkaya, Birsen

    2009-07-01

    Hazelnut plantations, which are a major source of income for the villagers in the eastern Black sea region are notable to provide sufficient income to the villagers due to price fluctuations and sudden falls witnessed in recent years. Alternative investments in place of hazelnut cultivation are being investigated in order to prevent migration to urban areas and to increase the welfare of the rural population in the region. Black alder plantation investments have been assessed as one of the most essential alternative investment tools within the framework of the study Assessment was carried out by comparing expected possible net present values (NPV). Although value increase occurs 12-18 years later more income can be obtained through black alder than hazelnut plantation. In hazelnut plantations, the best NPV emerged in the lower zone. NPV was positive in the moderate zone but values were close to zero. In upper zone, positive NPV couldn't emerge. As a result, it was understood that black alder plantation investment is an effective alternative for hazelnut plantations.

  11. Timescales of magmatic processes prior to the ˜4.7 ka Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (Campi Flegrei caldera, Southern Italy) based on diffusion chronometry from sanidine phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, Raffaella Silvia; Fedele, Lorenzo; Mazzeo, Fabio Carmine; Arienzo, Ilenia; Cavallo, Andrea; Wörner, Gerhard; Orsi, Giovanni; Civetta, Lucia; D'Antonio, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    Barium diffusion chronometry applied to sanidine phenocrysts from the trachytic Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (˜4.7 ka) constrains the time between reactivation and eruption of magma batches in the Campi Flegrei caldera. Backscattered electron imaging and quantitative electron microprobe measurements on 50 sanidine phenocrysts from representative pumice samples document core-to-rim compositional zoning. We focus on compositional breaks near the crystal rims that record magma mixing processes just prior to eruption. Diffusion times were modeled at a magmatic temperature of 930 °C using profiles based on quantitative BaO point analyses, X-ray scans, and grayscale swath profiles, yielding times ≤60 years between mixing and eruption. Such short timescales are consistent with volcanological and geochronological data that indicate that at least six eruptions occurred in the Agnano-San Vito area during few centuries before the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption. Thus, the short diffusion timescales are similar to time intervals between eruptions. Therefore, the rejuvenation time of magma residing in a shallow reservoir after influx of a new magma batch that triggered the eruption, and thus pre-eruption warning times, may be as short as years to a few decades at Campi Flegrei caldera.

  12. Can an Alder Disease Influence the Controls of Ecosystem Water Flux?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrs-Richey, J. K.; Mulder, C. P.; Ruess, R. W.; Winton, L. M.; Stanosz, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    In Alaska, nitrogen-fixing shrubs (Alnus spp.) comprise a large component of the vegetation and are important for water and energy flux in the Alaskan tundra, the Interior boreal forest, and south-central Alaska. Recently there has been high incidence and severity of a canker disease on Alnus which alters small scale controls (e.g., leaves, branches) of water and carbon flux and may have ecosystem scale effects in severely diseased areas. The fungal pathogen, Valsa melanodiscus (anamorph =Cytospora umbrina), kills active xylem and phloem, causes long, girdling cankers on stems, and is frequently associated with stem mortality in the thin leaf alder (Alnus tenuifolia) and green alder (Alnus crispa). We are just beginning to understand how this canker disease affects the physiology of its host and the implications for water loss and carbon fixation. An inoculation experiment at the University of Alaska is currently being conducted on well-watered and water-limited green alders to: 1) monitor the response of the water transport system to infection and canker development; 2) assess the ability of colonized alders to adjust water use efficiency; and 3) measure the effect of canker development on photosynthesis. Only 4 weeks after inoculation, stems (3-5 mm diam.) with incipient cankers had an overall reduction in total daily water loss and up to 50 percent decrease in daily peak water loss. Stems with incipient cankers were also unable to attain the maximum photosynthetic rate of healthy stems, and had lower light saturation points and quantum efficiencies. Further quantification of these relationships is underway. This study, in combination with recent field measurements of sapflow, will allow us to estimate the impact of varying degrees of disease severity on stand-level water flux. Alders are a keystone species and are currently responding to climate change by expanding into the Alaska tundra, increasing abundance in northern Alaska, and migrating into river

  13. RICHLAND CREEK ROADLESS AREA, ARKANSAS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mary H.; Wood, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic and mineral surveys, Richland Creek Roadless Area, Arkanses, has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources, gas and oil, or oil shale. The Boone Formation of Mississippian age and the Everton Formation of Ordovician age, both known to contain zinc and lead deposits in northern Arkansas, underlie the roadless area. The presence or absence of zinc and lead deposits in these formations in the subsurface can be neither confirmed nor ruled out without exploratory drilling. Most of the Richland Creek Roadless Area is under lease for oil and gas; however two wells drilled near the eastern boundary of the area did not show contained gas or oil.

  14. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar isotopic dates from the Cripple Creek gold-Telluride district, Colorado: Constraints on the timing of magmatism and mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K.D.; Snee, L.W. ); Thompson, T.B. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-04-01

    The Cripple Creek district is within a Tertiary diatreme-intrusive complex, a steep-walled basin in Proterozoic pelitic and igneous rocks that is filled with terrigenous sedimentary rocks, volcanic and hydrothermal breccias, and tuffs. The orebodies occur as veins in Proterozoic and Tertiary rocks or as deposits localized within hydrothermal breccia bodies or disseminated in diatreme breccias. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dates from igneous rocks demonstrate the approximately contemporaneous emplacement of the most differentiated phonolitic rocks. Three sanidine samples from phonolite yield apparent ages ranging from 30.9 [+-] 0.1 to 31.8 [+-] 0.1 Ma (1 sigma). Biotite and sanidine age spectra from relatively less differentiated tephriphonolite are discordant; the emplacement age is estimated to be between 31.4 [+-] 0.1 and 32.5 [+-] 0.1 Ma. A maximum age of 31.5 [+-] 0.1 Ma was obtained on a whole-rock sample of trachyandesite. The mafic phonolitic rocks are relatively younger. A sample of the Isabella dike, a phonotephrite dike cutting phonolite, yields a whole-rock age of 28.7 [+-] 0.04 Ma. The data suggest that mineralization both predates and postdates emplacement of the mafic phonolitic rocks. Hydrothermal biotite in a vein cutting phonolite yields an age of 29.9 [+-] 0.1 Ma. The age spectrum of adularia from a vein cutting volcaniclastic rocks is difficult to interpret due to the presence of excess argon, but an age is estimated to be between 29.5 and 30.4 Ma. In the vicinity of the phonotephrite dike, field evidence suggests that vein mineralization postdates emplacement of the dike; potassium feldspar from potassium altered phonolite in the vicinity of mineralized rock yields ages of 28.2 [+-] 0.1 and 28.8 [+-] 0.1 Ma.

  15. Otter Creek Wilderness, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Warlow, R.C.; Behum, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Otter Creek Wilderness conducted in 1978 resulted in the determination of demonstrated coal resources estimated to total about 24 million short tons in beds more than 28 in. thick and an additional 62 million short tons of coal in beds between 14 and 28 in. thick. There is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or other energy resources in the area.

  16. LUSK CREEK ROADLESS AREA, ILLINOIS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klasner, John S.; Thompson, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic mapping and geochemical sampling show that the eastern third of the Lusk Creek Roadless Area in Illinois has a substantiated resource potential for fluorspar, lead, zinc, and barite, and other parts of the area have a probable resource potential for fluorspar. Fluorspar, which occurs along fault zones in the eastern part of the area, has been produced in the adjacent Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district. There is little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources.

  17. 76 FR 62631 - Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek, and Broad River; U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, SC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek, and Broad River; U.S... Depot Parris Island. The public will continue to be able to use these portions of Archers Creek, Ribbon... Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek, and Broad River; U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island,...

  18. Traveltime characteristics of Gore Creek and Black Gore Creek, upper Colorado River basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurdak, Jason J.; Spahr, Norman E.; Szmajter, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, major highways are often constructed in stream valleys. In the event of a vehicular accident involving hazardous materials, the close proximity of highways to the streams increases the risk of contamination entering the streams. Recent population growth has contributed to increased traffic volume along Colorado highways and has resulted in increased movement of hazardous materials, particularly along Interstate 70. Gore Creek and its major tributary, Black Gore Creek, are vulnerable to such contamination from vehicular accidents along Interstate 70. Gore Creek, major tributary of the Eagle River, drains approximately 102 square miles, some of which has recently undergone significant urban development. The headwaters of Gore Creek originate in the Gore Range in the eastern part of the Gore Creek watershed. Gore Creek flows west to the Eagle River. Beginning at the watershed boundary on Vail Pass, southeast of Vail Ski Resort, Interstate 70 parallels Black Gore Creek and then closely follows Gore Creek the entire length of the watershed. Interstate 70 crosses Gore Creek and tributaries 20 times in the watershed. In the event of a vehicular accident involving a contaminant spill into Gore Creek or Black Gore Creek, a stepwise procedure has been developed for water-resource managers to estimate traveltimes of the leading edge and peak concentration of a conservative contaminant. An example calculating estimated traveltimes for a hypothetical contaminant release in Black Gore Creek is provided. Traveltime measurements were made during May and September along Black Gore Creek and Gore Creek from just downstream from the Black Lakes to the confluence with the Eagle River to account for seasonal variability in stream discharge. Fluorometric dye injection of rhodamine WT and downstream dye detection by fluorometry were used to measure traveltime characteristics of Gore Creek and Black Gore Creek. During the May traveltime measurements

  19. 78 FR 62616 - Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, LLC; Notice of Transfer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Project, FERC No. 3730, originally issued August 10, 1981.\\1\\ The project is... Hydroelectric Project of 5 Megawatts or Less and Dismissing Application for Preliminary Permit. 2. Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, LLC is now the exemptee of the Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Project, FERC No. 3730....

  20. A Diels-Alder super diene breaking benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic polyene with six carbon atoms (benzene) is very stable, whereas cyclic polyene with four carbon atoms (cyclobutadiene) is extremely unstable. The electron-withdrawing pentafluorophenyl group of a substituted cyclobutadiene lowers the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, greatly increasing its reactivity as a diene in Diels-Alder reactions with acetylene, ethylene and even benzene. Here we show that the reaction with benzene occurs cleanly at the relatively low temperature of 120 °C and results in the formal fragmentation of benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units, via a unique Diels-Alder/retro-Diels-Alder reaction. This is a new example of the rare case where breaking the C-C bond of benzene is possible with no activation by a transition metal.

  1. A Diels–Alder super diene breaking benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic polyene with six carbon atoms (benzene) is very stable, whereas cyclic polyene with four carbon atoms (cyclobutadiene) is extremely unstable. The electron-withdrawing pentafluorophenyl group of a substituted cyclobutadiene lowers the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, greatly increasing its reactivity as a diene in Diels–Alder reactions with acetylene, ethylene and even benzene. Here we show that the reaction with benzene occurs cleanly at the relatively low temperature of 120 °C and results in the formal fragmentation of benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units, via a unique Diels–Alder/retro-Diels–Alder reaction. This is a new example of the rare case where breaking the C–C bond of benzene is possible with no activation by a transition metal. PMID:24398593

  2. Total Synthesis of the Galbulimima Alkaloids Himandravine and GB17 Using Biomimetic Diels–Alder Reactions of Double Diene Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Reed T.; Pemberton, Ryan P.; Franke, Jenna M.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Thomson, Regan J.

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective total syntheses of himandravine and GB17 were completed through a common biomimetic strategy involving Diels–Alder reactions of unusual double diene containing linear precursors. The double diene precursors, containing or lacking a C12 substituent as required to produce GB17 or himandravine, respectively, were found to undergo Diels–Alder reactions to afford mixtures of regioisomeric cycloadducts that map onto the alternative carbocyclic frameworks of both himandravine and GB17. Computational investigations revealed that these Diels–Alder reactions proceed via transition state structures of similar energy that have a high degree of bispericyclic character and that the low levels of regioselectivity observed in the reactions are a consequence of competing orbital interaction and distortion energies. The combined experimental and computational results provide valuable insights into the biosynthesis of the Galbulimima alkaloids. PMID:26305231

  3. Regiocontrol by remote substituents. An enantioselective total synthesis of frenolicin B via a highly regioselective Diels-Alder reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, G.A.; Li, J. ); Gordon, M.S.; Jensen, J.H. )

    1993-06-30

    The quinone subunit is contained in a broad range of biologically important natural products such as frenolicin B, which is a member of the pyranonaphthoquinone family. The diverse biological activity of quinones has led to the development of several new synthetic methods for quinones. Among the pathways featuring a cycloaddition reaction, one of the most general methods for the regiospecific synthesis of substituted quinones was pioneered by H.J. Rapoport and others. This method involves the Diels-Alder reaction of a substituted quinone. As part of a program to evaluate the directing effects of functional groups not directly attached to the atoms undergoing Diels-Alder cycloaddition, we now report that remote substituents on a dienophile can confer excellent regioselectivity in Diels-Alder reactions. This work has led to an extremely direct synthesis of the pyranonaphthoquinone framework and to the first synthesis of frenolicin B (1). 19 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Coop Creek Bridge with Checkerboard Mesa in background, historic photograph, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Co-op Creek Bridge with Checkerboard Mesa in background, historic photograph, no date, Zion National Park collection - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Co-op Creek Bridge, Spanning Co-op Creek, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  5. 2. Big Creek Road, worm fence and road at trailhead. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Big Creek Road, worm fence and road at trailhead. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Big Creek Road, Between State Route 284 & Big Creek Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  6. 8. DETAIL VIEW OF DATEPLATE WHICH READS 'HARP CREEK, LUTEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL VIEW OF DATEPLATE WHICH READS 'HARP CREEK, LUTEN BRIDGE CO., CONTRACTOR, ARKANSAS STATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, 1928' - Harp Creek Bridge, Spans Harp Creek at State Highway 7, Harrison, Boone County, AR

  7. 59. Credit FM. Flood waters on South Battle Creek next ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Credit FM. Flood waters on South Battle Creek next to powerhouse. Note height of water in relation to tailraces. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  8. 2. Deep Creek Road, old bridge at campground entrance. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Deep Creek Road, old bridge at campground entrance. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Deep Creek Road, Between Park Boundary near Bryson City & Deep Creek Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  9. 5. Big Creek Road, old bridge on Walnut Bottom Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Big Creek Road, old bridge on Walnut Bottom Road, deck view. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Big Creek Road, Between State Route 284 & Big Creek Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  10. 4. Big Creek Road, old bridge on Walnut Bottom Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Big Creek Road, old bridge on Walnut Bottom Road, elevation view. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Big Creek Road, Between State Route 284 & Big Creek Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  11. 1. Deep Creek Road, picnic pavilion Great Smoky Mountains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Deep Creek Road, picnic pavilion - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Deep Creek Road, Between Park Boundary near Bryson City & Deep Creek Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  12. 2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, headworks overflow weir to center left, view to east - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  13. 1. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, weir (to left), sand and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, weir (to left), sand and silt sluice gate (center), main canal headworks (to right), view to northwest - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  14. General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking northwest. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  15. Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking south. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking south. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  16. Topographic view of the Spring Creek Bridge and Collier State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topographic view of the Spring Creek Bridge and Collier State Park, view looking east. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  17. Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking north. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking north. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  18. General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking southeast. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  19. Elevation view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking east. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  20. General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking east. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  1. 2. View of Clear Creek Bridge railing and understructure, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Clear Creek Bridge railing and under-structure, looking northwest. - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, 62-foot Concrete Arch Pine Creek Bridge, Spanning Clear Creek, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  2. 7. Cable Creek Bridge after completion. Zion National Park negative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Cable Creek Bridge after completion. Zion National Park negative number 1485, classification series 002, 12. - Floor of the Valley Road, Cable Creek Bridge, Spanning Cable Creek on Floor of Valley, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  3. 121. Credit JE. Galpin Creek ditch, a feeder leading water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. Credit JE. Galpin Creek ditch, a feeder leading water to the Keswick ditch, supplying Volta powerhouse. (JE, v. 12 1902 p. 235). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  4. 3. Threequarter view of Oak Creek Bridge behind visitor center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Three-quarter view of Oak Creek Bridge behind visitor center facing southwest - Oak Creek Administrative Center, One half mile east of Zion-Mount Carmel Highway at Oak Creek, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  5. Detail view of 850 plate girder span directly over creek, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of 85-0 plate girder span directly over creek, looking west. - New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, Elk Creek Trestle, Spanning Elk Creek, south of Elk Park Road, Lake City, Erie County, PA

  6. Perspective view showing 850 plate girder span directly over creek, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view showing 85-0 plate girder span directly over creek, looking west. - New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, Elk Creek Trestle, Spanning Elk Creek, south of Elk Park Road, Lake City, Erie County, PA

  7. Aqueous catalysis: Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as a homogeneous catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Espenson, J.H.

    1997-04-16

    The title compound proves to be an effective and efficient catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction when the dienophile is an {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone or aldehyde. It is especially effective in water. Equal amounts of any such dienophile and any of six representative dienes (isoprene, 2-methyl-1,3-pentadiene, 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene, cyclopentadiene, 1,2,3,4,5,-pentamethylcyclopentadiene, and 1,3-cyclohexadiene) were used, along with 1% MTO. The reactions gave usually > 90% isolated yield of the cycloaddition product except for the larger dienophiles. Nearly exclusively, there was formed one product isomer, the same one that usually predominates. The reactions were often run in chloroform (mostly) and in other organic solvents. A select number were carried out in water, where the reactions gave a greater product yield in a considerably shorter time. Water, itself, is known to enhance the rates of Diels-Alder reactions, but MTO exerts an additional accelerating effect. Kinetics studies were carried out to show that the rate is proportional to the catalyst concentration. The products do not inhibit the reaction. The desirability of MTO as a Diels-Alder catalyst stems from a combination of favorable properties: the inertness to air/oxygen, the tolerance for many substrates, the use of an aqueous medium, and the absence of product inhibition. The initial step appears to be the (weak) coordination of the carbonyl oxygen to the electropositive rhenium center. Steric crowding around rhenium inhibits reactions of the larger dienophiles. 26 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Insight on mendable resin made by combining Diels-Alder epoxy adducts with DGEBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Iacono, S.; Martone, A.; Filippone, G.; Acierno, D.; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.; Amendola, E.

    2016-05-01

    Formation of micro-cracks is a critical problem in polymers and polymer composites during their service in structural applications. In this context, materials endowed with self-healing features would lead to the next polymers generation. In the present paper, an epoxy system integrating Diels-Alder epoxy adducts is investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis. The direct and retro D-A reaction have been studied by FTIR and specific absorption bands have been identified. Finally, mechanical tests have been performed on the system. The polymer is able to heal fracture and micro-cracks recovering its stiffness after a thermal treatment.

  9. Asymmetric Syntheses of the Flavonoid Diels–Alder Natural Products Sanggenons C and O

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chao; Xiong, Yuan; Eschenbrenner-Lux, Vincent; Cong, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed, double Claisen rearrangement of a bis-allyloxyflavone has been utilized to enable a concise synthesis of the hydrobenzofuro[3,2-b]chromenone core structure of the natural products sanggenon A and sanggenol F. In addition, catalytic, enantioselective [4+2] cycloadditions of 2′-hydroxychalcones have been accomplished using B(OPh)3/BINOL complexes. Asymmetric syntheses of the flavonoid Diels–Alder natural products sanggenons C and O have been achieved employing a stereodivergent reaction of a racemic mixture (stereodivergent RRM) involving [4+2] cycloaddition. PMID:26735066

  10. Mechanistic insights into the stepwise Diels-Alder reaction of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore

    2012-01-06

    The stepwise Diels-Alder reaction between 1-trimethylsiloxy-1,3-butadiene and 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan is explored using state-of-the-art computational methods. The results support a stepwise mechanism via a persistent intermediate, however, not the one previously reported (Lakhdar et al., Chem. Eur. J.2007, 16, 5681) but a heterocyclic adduct. The novel DFT functional M062X and the SCS-MP2 method were essential to reproduce a reasonable potential energy surface for this challenging system.

  11. 1-Azadienes as regio- and chemoselective dienophiles in aminocatalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Gu, Jing; Teng, Bin; Zhou, Qing-Qing; Li, Rui; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2013-12-20

    Electron-deficient 1-aza-1,3-butadienes containing a 1,2-benzoisothiazole-1,1-dioxide or 1,2,3-benzoxathiazine-2,2-dioxide motif act as regio- and chemoselective dienophiles in normal-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions with HOMO-raised trienamines, rather than typical 4π-participation in inverse-electron-demand versions. The enantioenriched cycloadducts could be efficiently converted to spiro or fused frameworks with high structural and stereogenic complexity by a sequential aza-benzoin reaction or other transformations.

  12. Structural Modification of Sol-Gel Materials through Retro Diels-Alder Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    SHALTOUT,RAAFAT M.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCCLAIN,MARK D.; PRABAKAR,SHESHASAYANA; GREAVES,JOHN; SHEA,KENNETH J.

    1999-12-08

    Hydrolysis and condensation of organically bridged bis-triethoxysilanes, (EtO){sub 3}Si-R-Si(OEt){sub 3}, results in the formation of three dimensional organic/inorganic hybrid networks (Equation 1). Properties of these materials, including porosity, are dependent on the nature of the bridging group, R. Flexible groups (akylene-spacers longer than five carbons in length) polymerize under acidic conditions to give non-porous materials. Rigid groups (such as arylene-, alkynylene-, or alkenylene) form non-porous, microporous, and macroporous gels. In many cases the pore size distributions are quite narrow. One of the motivations for preparing hybrid organic-inorganic materials is to extend the range of properties available with sol-gel systems by incorporating organic groups into the inorganic network. For example, organically modified silica gels arc either prepared by co-polymerizing an organoalkoxysilane with a silica precursor or surface silylating the inorganic gel. This can serve to increase hydrophobicity or to introduce some reactive organic functionality. However, the type and orientation of these organic functionalities is difficult to control. Furthermore, many organoalkoxysilanes can act to inhibitor even prevent gelation, limiting the final density of organic functionalities. We have devised a new route for preparing highly functionalized pores in hybrid materials using bridging groups that are thermally converted into the desired functionalities after the gel has been obtained. In this paper, we present the preparation and characterization of bridged polysilsesquioxanes with Diels-Alder adducts as the bridging groups from the sol-gel polymerization of monomers 2 and 4. The bridging groups are constructed such that the retro Diela-Alder reaction releases the dienes and leaves the dienophiles as integral parts of the network polymers. In the rigid architecture of a xerogel, this loss of organic functionality should liberate sufficient space to modify the

  13. Diels-Alder cycloadditions in water for the straightforward preparation of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Marchán, Vicente; Ortega, Samuel; Pulido, Daniel; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between diene-modified oligonucleotides and maleimide-derivatized peptides afforded peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates with high purity and yield. Synthesis of the reagents was easily accomplished by on-column derivatization of the corresponding peptides and oligonucleotides. The cycloaddition reaction was carried out in mild conditions, in aqueous solution at 37°C. The speed of the reaction was found to vary depending on the size of the reagents, but it can be completed in 8–10 h by reacting the diene-oligonucleotide with a small excess of maleimide-peptide. PMID:16478710

  14. Diels-Alder reactions of five-membered heterocycles containing one heteroatom.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyuan; Nguyen, Son T; Williams, John D; Peet, Norton P

    2014-12-17

    Diels-Alder reactions of five-membered heterocycles containing one heteroatom with an N-arylmaleimide were studied. Cycloaddition of 2,5-dimethylfuran (4) with 2-(4-methylphenyl)maleimide (3) in toluene at 60 °C gave bicyclic adduct 5. Cycloadditions of 3 with 2,5-dimethylthiophene (11) and 1,2,5-trimethylpyrrole (14) were also studied. Interestingly, the bicyclic compound 5 cleanly rearranged, with loss of water, when treated with p-toluenesulfonic acid in toluene at 80 °C to give 4,7-dimethyl-2-p-tolylisoindoline-1,3-dione (6).

  15. Stereo- and regioselectivity of the hetero-Diels–Alder reaction of nitroso derivatives with conjugated dienes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marvin J

    2016-01-01

    Summary The hetero-Diels–Alder reaction between a nitroso dienophile and a conjugated diene to give the 3,6-dihydro-2H-1,2-oxazine scaffold is useful for the synthesis of many biologically interesting molecules due to the diverse opportunities created by subsequent transformations of the resulting 1,2-oxazine ring. This review discusses the rationale for the observed regio- and stereoselectivity and the methods developed in recent years used to control and improve the stereo- and regioselectivity for the synthesis of 1,2-oxazine scaffolds. PMID:27829901

  16. Highly enantioselective access to cannabinoid-type tricyles by organocatalytic Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Nicole; Gläser, Franziska; Nieger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Summary After prosperous domino reactions towards benzopyrans, the products were used as the starting material in Lewis acid catalyzed and organocatalytic Diels–Alder reactions to build up a tricyclic system. Herein, an asymmetric induction up to 96% enantiomeric excess was obtained by the use of imidazolidinone catalysts. This approach can be utilized to construct the tricyclic system in numerous natural products, in particular the scaffold of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being the most representative one. Compared with other published methods, condensation with a preexisting cyclohexane moiety in the precursor is needed to gain the heterogenic tricycle systems, whereas we present a novel strategy towards cannabinoid derivatives based on a flexible modular synthesis. PMID:23019475

  17. Highly enantioselective access to cannabinoid-type tricyles by organocatalytic Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Bräse, Stefan; Volz, Nicole; Gläser, Franziska; Nieger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    After prosperous domino reactions towards benzopyrans, the products were used as the starting material in Lewis acid catalyzed and organocatalytic Diels-Alder reactions to build up a tricyclic system. Herein, an asymmetric induction up to 96% enantiomeric excess was obtained by the use of imidazolidinone catalysts. This approach can be utilized to construct the tricyclic system in numerous natural products, in particular the scaffold of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being the most representative one. Compared with other published methods, condensation with a preexisting cyclohexane moiety in the precursor is needed to gain the heterogenic tricycle systems, whereas we present a novel strategy towards cannabinoid derivatives based on a flexible modular synthesis.

  18. Thiourea-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of a naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Carsten S; Bräse, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A variety of organocatalysts were screened for the catalysis of the naphthoquinone monoketal Diels-Alder reaction. In this study we found that Schreiner's thiourea catalyst 10 and Jacobson's thiourea catalyst 12 facilitate the cycloaddition of the sterically hindered naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile 3 with diene 4. The use of thiourea catalysis allowed for the first time the highly selective synthesis of the exo-product 2a in up to 63% yield. In this reaction a new quaternary center was built. The so formed cycloaddition product 2a represents the ABC tricycle of beticolin 0 (1) and is also a valuable model substrate for the total synthesis of related natural products.

  19. KANAB CREEK ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, the Kanab Creek Roadless Area in north-central Arizona has a probable mineral-resource potential for uranium and copper in four small areas around five collapse structures. Gypsum is abundant in layers along the canyon rim of Snake Gulch, but it is a fairly common mineral in the region outside the roadless area. There is little promise for the occurence of fossil fuels in the area. Studies of collapse structures in surrounding adjacent areas might reveal significant mineralization at depth, such as the recent discovery of the uranium ore body at depth in the Pigeon Pipe.

  20. SANDY CREEK ROADLESS AREA, MISSISSIPPI.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Bitar, Richard F.

    1984-01-01

    The Sandy Creek Roadless Area includes about 3. 7 sq mi in the southeastern part of Adams County, Mississippi. On the basis of a mineral survey, the area offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources but has a probable resource potential for oil and natural gas. It is possible that wells drilled deep enough to penetrate the older reservoirs will encounter significant quantities of oil and natural gas in the roadless area. The deposits of gravel, sand, and clay present in the area could be utilized in the construction industry, but similar deposits elsewhere are much closer to available markets.

  1. 33 CFR 117.725 - Manantico Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manantico Creek. 117.725 Section 117.725 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.725 Manantico Creek. The draw of...

  2. 33 CFR 117.745 - Rancocas Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rancocas Creek. 117.745 Section 117.745 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.745 Rancocas Creek. (a) The...

  3. 33 CFR 117.732 - Nacote Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nacote Creek. 117.732 Section 117.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.732 Nacote Creek. (a) The Route 9 bridge,...

  4. 33 CFR 117.750 - Schellenger Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Schellenger Creek. 117.750 Section 117.750 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.750 Schellenger Creek. The draw...

  5. 33 CFR 117.732 - Nacote Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nacote Creek. 117.732 Section 117.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.732 Nacote Creek. (a) The Route 9 bridge,...

  6. 33 CFR 117.737 - Oldmans Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oldmans Creek. 117.737 Section 117.737 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.737 Oldmans Creek. The draws of...

  7. 33 CFR 117.745 - Rancocas Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rancocas Creek. 117.745 Section 117.745 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.745 Rancocas Creek. (a) The...

  8. 33 CFR 117.725 - Manantico Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manantico Creek. 117.725 Section 117.725 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.725 Manantico Creek. The draw of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.732 - Nacote Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nacote Creek. 117.732 Section 117.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.732 Nacote Creek. (a) The Route 9 bridge,...

  10. 33 CFR 117.737 - Oldmans Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oldmans Creek. 117.737 Section 117.737 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.737 Oldmans Creek. The draws of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.725 - Manantico Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manantico Creek. 117.725 Section 117.725 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.725 Manantico Creek. The draw of...

  12. 33 CFR 117.715 - Debbies Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Debbies Creek. 117.715 Section 117.715 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.715 Debbies Creek. (a) The draw...

  13. 33 CFR 117.750 - Schellenger Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Schellenger Creek. 117.750 Section 117.750 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.750 Schellenger Creek. The draw...

  14. 33 CFR 117.750 - Schellenger Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Schellenger Creek. 117.750 Section 117.750 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.750 Schellenger Creek. The draw...

  15. 33 CFR 117.725 - Manantico Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manantico Creek. 117.725 Section 117.725 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.725 Manantico Creek. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.750 - Schellenger Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Schellenger Creek. 117.750 Section 117.750 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.750 Schellenger Creek. The draw...

  17. 33 CFR 117.732 - Nacote Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nacote Creek. 117.732 Section 117.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.732 Nacote Creek. (a) The Route 9 bridge,...

  18. 33 CFR 117.737 - Oldmans Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oldmans Creek. 117.737 Section 117.737 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.737 Oldmans Creek. The draws of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.737 - Oldmans Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oldmans Creek. 117.737 Section 117.737 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.737 Oldmans Creek. The draws of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.737 - Oldmans Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oldmans Creek. 117.737 Section 117.737 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.737 Oldmans Creek. The draws of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.750 - Schellenger Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Schellenger Creek. 117.750 Section 117.750 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.750 Schellenger Creek. The draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.745 - Rancocas Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rancocas Creek. 117.745 Section 117.745 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.745 Rancocas Creek. (a) The...

  3. 33 CFR 117.725 - Manantico Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manantico Creek. 117.725 Section 117.725 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.725 Manantico Creek. The draw of...

  4. 33 CFR 117.732 - Nacote Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nacote Creek. 117.732 Section 117.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.732 Nacote Creek. (a) The Route 9 bridge,...

  5. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  6. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  7. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  8. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  9. 33 CFR 117.324 - Rice Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rice Creek. 117.324 Section 117.324 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.324 Rice Creek. The CSX Railroad Swingbridge,...

  10. 33 CFR 117.841 - Smith Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smith Creek. 117.841 Section 117.841 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements North Carolina § 117.841 Smith Creek. The draw of the...

  11. 33 CFR 117.185 - Pacheco Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacheco Creek. 117.185 Section 117.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.185 Pacheco Creek. The draw of the Contra Costa County highway bridge, mile 1.0,...

  12. 33 CFR 117.543 - Bear Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bear Creek. 117.543 Section 117.543 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.543 Bear Creek. (a) The draw of the...

  13. 33 CFR 117.543 - Bear Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bear Creek. 117.543 Section 117.543 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.543 Bear Creek. (a) The draws of the...

  14. 33 CFR 117.543 - Bear Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bear Creek. 117.543 Section 117.543 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.543 Bear Creek. (a) The draw of the...

  15. 33 CFR 117.543 - Bear Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bear Creek. 117.543 Section 117.543 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.543 Bear Creek. (a) The draw of the...

  16. 33 CFR 117.543 - Bear Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bear Creek. 117.543 Section 117.543 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.543 Bear Creek. (a) The draws of the...

  17. Pine Creek Ranch; Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Mark E.

    2003-02-01

    This report gives information about the following four objectives: OBJECTIVE 1--Gather scientific baseline information for monitoring purposes and to assist in the development of management plans for Pine Creek Ranch; OBJECTIVE 2--Complete and implement management plans; OBJECTIVE 3--Protect, manage and enhance the assets and resources of Pine Creek Ranch; and OBJECTIVE 4--Deliverables.

  18. 33 CFR 117.917 - Battery Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Battery Creek. 117.917 Section 117.917 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.917 Battery Creek. The draw...

  19. 33 CFR 117.917 - Battery Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Battery Creek. 117.917 Section 117.917 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.917 Battery Creek. The draw...

  20. 33 CFR 117.917 - Battery Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Battery Creek. 117.917 Section 117.917 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.917 Battery Creek. The draw...

  1. 33 CFR 117.917 - Battery Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Battery Creek. 117.917 Section 117.917 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.917 Battery Creek. The draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.917 - Battery Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Battery Creek. 117.917 Section 117.917 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.917 Battery Creek. The draw...

  3. 33 CFR 117.557 - Curtis Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Curtis Creek. 117.557 Section 117.557 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.557 Curtis Creek. The draw of the I695...

  4. 33 CFR 117.331 - Snake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Snake Creek. 117.331 Section 117.331 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.331 Snake Creek. The draw of the Snake...

  5. 33 CFR 117.331 - Snake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Snake Creek. 117.331 Section 117.331 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.331 Snake Creek. The draw of the Snake...

  6. 33 CFR 117.331 - Snake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Snake Creek. 117.331 Section 117.331 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.331 Snake Creek. The draw of the Snake...

  7. 33 CFR 117.331 - Snake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Snake Creek. 117.331 Section 117.331 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.331 Snake Creek. The draw of the Snake...

  8. 33 CFR 117.335 - Taylor Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylor Creek. 117.335 Section 117.335 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.335 Taylor Creek. The draw of US441 bridge, mile...

  9. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  10. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  11. New Insights into the Diels-Alder Reaction of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Patrick P; Kuss, Christian; Schougaard, Steen B; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Siaj, Mohamed

    2016-04-18

    Graphene oxide is regarded as a major precursor for graphene-based materials. The development of graphene oxide based derivatives with new functionalities requires a thorough understanding of its chemical reactivity, especially for canonical synthetic methods such as the Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Diels-Alder reaction has been successfully extended with graphene oxide as a source of diene by using maleic anhydride as a dienophile, thereby outlining the presence of the cis diene present in the graphene oxide framework. This reaction provides fundamental information for understanding the exact structure and chemical nature of graphene oxide. On the basis of high-resolution (13) C-SS NMR spectra, we show evidence for the formation of new sp(3) carbon centers covalently bonded to graphene oxide following hydrolysis of the reaction product. DFT calculations are also used to show that the presence of a cis dihydroxyl and C vacancy on the surface of graphene oxide are promoting the reaction with significant negative reaction enthalpies.

  12. Diels-Alder reactions of 4-halo masked o-benzoquinones. Experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Surasani, Seshi Reddy; Parumala, Santosh Kumar Reddy; Peddinti, Rama Krishna

    2014-08-14

    The studies on [4 + 2] cycloaddition of 4-halo derivatives of 6,6-dimethoxycyclohexa-2,4-dienones known as orthoquinone monoketals/masked o-benzoquinones are described. The 4-fluoro, 4-chloro- and 4-iodo-masked o-benzoquinones were stable enough for their isolation and characterization. These conjugated dienones cycloadded with several electron-deficient and electron-rich dienophiles in a highly regio- and stereo-selective manner to afford the corresponding halo bicyclo[2.2.2]octenone derivatives in high to excellent chemical yields. The halo masked o-benzoquinones did not undergo dimerization under the reaction conditions. To evaluate the observed selectivities of these Diels-Alder reactions, we have performed quantum mechanical calculations for the reactions between halo masked o-benzoquinones and methyl vinyl ketone and ethyl vinyl ether at the B3LYP/6-31G** theory level. The differences in HOMO and LUMO energy gaps suggest that these reactions can be classified as inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions. The calculated transition state energies and global electronic indexes supported the experimentally observed selectivities of the reaction in many cases.

  13. Alternative statistical methods for interpreting airborne Alder ( Alnus glutimosa (L.) Gaertner) pollen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Parrado, Zulima; Valencia Barrera, Rosa M.; Fuertes Rodríguez, Carmen R.; Vega Maray, Ana M.; Pérez Romero, Rafael; Fraile, Roberto; Fernández González, Delia

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the behaviour of Alnus glutinosa (alder) pollen grains in the atmosphere of Ponferrada (León, NW Spain) from 1995 to 2006. The study, which sought to determine the effects of various weather-related parameters on Alnus pollen counts, was performed using a volumetric method. The main pollination period for this taxon is January-February. Alder pollen is one of the eight major airborne pollen allergens found in the study area. An analysis was made of the correlation between pollen counts and major weather-related parameters over each period. In general, the strongest positive correlation was with temperature, particularly maximum temperature. During each period, peak pollen counts occurred when the maximum temperature fell within the range 9°C-14°C. Finally, multivariate analysis showed that the parameter exerting the greatest influence was temperature, a finding confirmed by Spearman correlation tests. Principal components analysis suggested that periods with high pollen counts were characterised by high maximum temperature, low rainfall and an absolute humidity of around 6 g m-3. Use of this type of analysis in conjunction with other methods is essential for obtaining an accurate record of pollen-count variations over a given period.

  14. Liquid phase thermochemical energy conversion systems - An application of Diels-Alder chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, T. G.; Hegedus, L. S.; Vaughan, J. D.

    1982-12-01

    A method of thermochemical energy conversion, transport, and storage research involving moderate and low temperature liquid phase systems employing Diels-Alder cycloaddition chemistry is described. Proposed as a heat storage system for solar and industrial waste heat, the system involves the meeting, in a reactor, of energy-depleted and energy-rich fluids. The poor fluid gains energy and goes through a chemical, endothermic dissociative change. The use of Diels-Alder reactions provides completely reversible chemical reactions for this application. The heated fluid can be retransported for storage or implementation as a heat source. The return reaction, releasing the stored heat, can be done spontaneously or in the presence of a catalyst such as Lewis acids. Attention is recommended for the Wentworth-Chen temperature of 250-300 C to minimize the system thermal degradation. Research in the synthesis of diene and dienophile candidate chemicals, into sealed tube and reaction kinetic techniques, and into NMR techniques for identifying further reaction candidates are discussed.

  15. Stepwise Diels-Alder: more than just an oddity? A computational mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2012-08-03

    We have employed hybrid DFT and SCS-MP2 calculations at the SMD-PCM-6-311++G(2d,2p)//6-31+G(d) level to investigate the relationship between three possible channels for forming a Diels-Alder adduct from a highly nucleophilic diene and moderately to highly electrophilic dienophiles. We discuss geometries optimized using the B3LYP and M06-2X functionals with the 6-31+(d) basis set. The transition states and intermediates are characterized on the basis of geometric and electronic properties, and we also address the possibility of predicting detectability of a zwitterionic intermediate based on its relative stability. Our results show that a conventional Diels-Alder transition state conformation yields intermediates in all four investigated cases, but that these are too short-lived to be detected experimentally for the less activated reactants. The stepwise trans pathway, beginning with a conjugate addition-like transition state, becomes increasingly competitive with more activated reactants and is indeed favored for the most electrophilic dienophiles. Addition of a trans diene leads to a dead-end as the trans intermediates have insurmountable rotation barriers that prohibit formation of the second bond, unless another, heterocyclic intermediate is formed. We also show that introduction of a hydrogen bond donating catalyst favors a stepwise pathway even for less activated dienophiles.

  16. Reconfigurable biodegradable shape-memory elastomers via Diels-Alder coupling.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Chi; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2013-07-08

    Synthetic biodegradable elastomers are a class of polymers that have demonstrated far-reaching utility as biomaterials for use in many medical applications. Biodegradable elastomers can be broadly classified into networks prepared by either step-growth or chain-growth polymerization. Each processing strategy affords distinct advantages in terms of capabilities and resulting properties of the network. This work describes the synthesis, processing, and characterization of cross-linked polyester networks based on Diels-Alder coupling reactions. Hyperbranched furan-modified polyester precursors based on poly(glycerol-co-sebacate) are coupled with bifunctional maleimide cross-linking agents. The chemical and thermomechanical properties of the elastomers are characterized at various stages of network formation. Experimental observations of gel formation are compared to theoretical predictions derived from Flory-Stockmayer relationships. This cross-linking strategy confers unique advantages in processing and properties including the ability to fabricate biodegradable reconfigurable covalent networks without additional catalysts or reaction byproducts. Reconfigurable biodegradable networks using Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions permit the fabrication of shape-memory polymers with complex permanent geometries. Biodegradable elastomers based on polyester networks with molecular reconfigurability achieve vastly expanded properties and processing capabilities for potential applications in medicine and beyond.

  17. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction. PMID:27731360

  18. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction.

  19. Hydrology of the Johnson Creek Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Karl K.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Creek basin is an important resource in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Johnson Creek forms a wildlife and recreational corridor through densely populated areas of the cities of Milwaukie, Portland, and Gresham, and rural and agricultural areas of Multnomah and Clackamas Counties. The basin has changed as a result of agricultural and urban development, stream channelization, and construction of roads, drains, and other features characteristic of human occupation. Flooding of Johnson Creek is a concern for the public and for water management officials. The interaction of the groundwater and surface-water systems in the Johnson Creek basin also is important. The occurrence of flooding from high groundwater discharge and from a rising water table prompted this study. As the Portland metropolitan area continues to grow, human-induced effects on streams in the Johnson Creek basin will continue. This report provides information on the groundwater and surface-water systems over a range of hydrologic conditions, as well as the interaction these of systems, and will aid in management of water resources in the area. High and low flows of Crystal Springs Creek, a tributary to Johnson Creek, were explained by streamflow and groundwater levels collected for this study, and results from previous studies. High flows of Crystal Springs Creek began in summer 1996, and did not diminish until 2000. Low streamflow of Crystal Springs Creek occurred in 2005. Flow of Crystal Springs Creek related to water-level fluctuations in a nearby well, enabling prediction of streamflow based on groundwater level. Holgate Lake is an ephemeral lake in Southeast Portland that has inundated residential areas several times since the 1940s. The water-surface elevation of the lake closely tracked the elevation of the water table in a nearby well, indicating that the occurrence of the lake is an expression of the water table. Antecedent conditions of the groundwater level and autumn

  20. Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

  1. Investigation of the possibility of functionalization of C20 fullerene by benzene via Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadati, Seyyed Amir; Nami, Navabeh

    2016-10-01

    C20 fullerene, this novel species with all its pentagonal faces has displayed some unique operations in making fast pericyclic reactions. As an example, the high dienophile character of the C20 fullerene and the ability of this species in making an ultra-fast Diels-Alder reaction with 1,3-butadiene, has been recently reported. Moreover, new experimental reports claim that the C60 fullerene, one of the fullerene family, could make a Diels-Alder reaction with the central ring of anthracene and make the ring non-aromatic. These reports may encourage researchers to do more studies on the properties of this small carbon cage. To address this question, the present research has discussed all the reaction channels of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition of benzene molecule as a 1,3-diene with the C20 fullerene in order to answer this question: "Is C20fullerene able to make a Diels-Alder reaction with this molecule?".

  2. Sorocenols G and H, Anti-MRSA Oxygen Heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type Adducts from Sorocea muriculata Roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a root extract of Sorocea muriculata led to the isolation and identification of two new oxygen heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type adducts, sorocenols G (1) and H (2), along with lupeol-3-(3'R-hydroxytetradecanoate) and oxyresveratrol. The structures of 1 and 2 were eluci...

  3. NITROGEN EXPORT FROM FORESTED WATERSHEDS IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF N2-FIXING RED ALDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  4. Organocatalytic sequential hetero-Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reaction: constructions of fused heterocycles with scaffold diversity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Si-Li; Li, Jun-Long; Dong, Lin; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2011-11-04

    A highly enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reaction sequence of N-sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes and aliphatic aldehydes tethered to an arene motif has been developed, affording the fused chiral piperidine frameworks with a versatile scaffold diversity. A similar strategy has been applied for the construction of complex chiral tetrahydroquinoxaline structures.

  5. A Counterion‐Directed Approach to the Diels–Alder Paradigm: Cascade Synthesis of Tricyclic Fused Cyclopropanes

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Emily; Campbell, Craig D.; Driver, Russell W.; Jolliffe, John D.; Lang, Rosemary; Sergeieva, Tetiana; Okovytyy, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An approach to the intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction has led to a cascade synthesis of complex carbocycles composed of three fused rings and up to five stereocenters with complete stereocontrol. Computational analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds by a Michael/Michael/cyclopropanation/epimerization cascade in which size and coordination of the counterion is key. PMID:27714921

  6. A 11-Steps Total Synthesis of Magellanine through a Gold(I)-Catalyzed Dehydro Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    McGee, Philippe; Bétournay, Geneviève; Barabé, Francis; Barriault, Louis

    2017-01-12

    We have developed an innovative strategy for the formation of angular carbocycles via a gold(I)-catalyzed dehydro Diels-Alder reaction. This transformation provides rapid access to a variety of complex angular cores in excellent diastereoselectivities and high yields. The usefulness of this Au(I) -catalyzed cycloaddition was further demonstrated by accomplishing a 11-steps total synthesis of (±)-magellanine.

  7. Biosynthesis inspired Diels-Alder route to pyridines: synthesis of the 2,3-dithiazolylpyridine core of the thiopeptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moody, Christopher J; Hughes, Rachael A; Thompson, Stewart P; Alcaraz, Lilian

    2002-08-21

    Reaction of serine derived 1-alkoxy-2-azadienes with dehydroalanine derived dienophiles results in Diels-Alder reaction and aromatisation to give 2,3,6-trisubstituted pyridines, thereby establishing the viability of the proposed biosynthetic route to the pyridine ring of the thiopeptide antibiotics originally proposed by Bycroft and Gowland.

  8. Silver-Catalyzed Formal Inverse Electron-Demand Diels-Alder Reaction of 1,2-Diazines and Siloxy Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Türkmen, Yunus E.; Montavon, Timothy J.; Kozmin, Sergey A.; Rawal, Viresh H.

    2012-01-01

    A highly effective silver-catalyzed formal inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-diazines and siloxy alkynes has been developed. The reactions provide ready access to a wide range of siloxy naphthalenes and anthracenes, which are formed in good to high yields, under mild reaction conditions, using low catalyst loadings. PMID:22607029

  9. Highly enantioselective aza-Diels-Alder reaction of 1-azadienes with enecarbamates catalyzed by chiral phosphoric acids.

    PubMed

    He, Long; Laurent, Gregory; Retailleau, Pascal; Folléas, Benoît; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Masson, Géraldine

    2013-10-11

    On demand: A highly enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of 6-amino- trisubstituted tetrahydropyridine compounds has been developed through the inverse-electron-demand aza-Diels-Alder reaction of N-aryl α,β-unsaturated ketimines with enecarbamates (E)-1. Chiral phosphoric acid catalysts achieve simultaneous activation of both the 1-azadiene and dienophile partners.

  10. Strong counteranion effects on the catalytic activity of cationic silicon Lewis acids in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenji; Akiyama, Ryuto; Sawamura, Masaya

    2005-12-08

    [chemical reaction: see text]. A toluene-coordinated silyl borate, [Et3Si(toluene)]B(C6F5)4, demonstrated catalytic activities significantly higher than those of Me3SiOTf and Me3SiNTf2 in Mukaiyama aldol and Diels-Alder reactions.

  11. 81. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING NEW CREEK CHANNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING NEW CREEK CHANNEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION AT P STREET BEND, FROM 1940 REPORT ON PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT OF ROCK CREEK AND POTOMAC PARKWAY, SECTION II (ROCK CREEK AND POTOMAC PARKWAY FILE, HISTORY DEPARTMENT ARCHIVES, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, WASHINGTON, DC). - Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF SOUTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF SOUTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX SHOWING THE RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE AT PHOTO RIGHT (TAILRACE IN FOREGROUND), BUILDING 106 NEXT TO THE POWERHOUSE AT PHOTO LEFT CENTER, AND BUILDING 103 AT UPPER PHOTO LEFT ABOVE AND BEHIND BUILDING 106. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  13. 1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF NORTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF NORTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX SHOWING BUILDING 108 AT PHOTO RIGHT AND BUILDING 105 AT PHOTO CENTER BEHIND TREE. RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE IS PARTIALLY VISIBLE AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Clubhouse Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  14. Diversity-Oriented Approaches to Polycyclics and Bioinspired Molecules via the Diels-Alder Strategy: Green Chemistry, Synthetic Economy, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Chavan, Arjun S; Goyal, Deepti

    2015-05-11

    We describe diverse approaches to various dienes and their utilization in the Diels-Alder reaction to produce a variety of polycycles. The dienes covered here are prepared by simple alkylation reaction or via the Claisen rearrangement or by enyne metathesis of alkyne or enyne building blocks. Here, we have also included the Diels-Alder chemistry of dendralenes, a higher analog of cross-conjugated dienes. The present article is inclusive of o-xylylene derivatives that are generated in situ starting with benzosultine or benzosulfone derivatives. The Diels-Alder reaction of these dienes with various dienophiles gave diverse polycyclic systems and biologically important targets.

  15. Flood discharges and hydraulics near the mouths of Wolf Creek, Craig Branch, Manns Creek, Dunloup Creek, and Mill Creek in the New River Gorge National River, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, studied the frequency and magnitude of flooding near the mouths of five tributaries to the New River in the New River Gorge National River. The 100-year peak discharge at each tributary was determined from regional frequency equations. The 100-year discharge at Wolf Creek, Craig Branch, Manns Creek, Dunloup Creek, and Mill Creek was 3,400 cubic feet per second, 640 cubic feet per second, 8,200 cubic feet per second, 7,100 cubic feet per second, and 9,400 cubic feet per second, respectively. Flood elevations for each tributary were determined by application of a steady-state, one-dimensional flow model. Manning's roughness coefficients for the stream channels ranged from 0.040 to 0.100. Bridges that would be unable to contain the 100-year flood within the bridge opening included: the State Highway 82 bridge on Wolf Creek, the second Fayette County Highway 25 bridge upstream from the confluence with New River on Dunloup Creek, and an abandoned log bridge on Mill Creek.

  16. The impact of a pulsing groundwater table on greenhouse gas emissions in riparian grey alder stands.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ülo; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Teemusk, Alar; Kanal, Arno; Uri, Veiko; Truu, Jaak

    2015-02-01

    Floods control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in floodplains; however, there is a lack of data on the impact of short-term events on emissions. We studied the short-term effect of changing groundwater (GW) depth on the emission of (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in two riparian grey alder (Alnus incana) stands of different age in Kambja, southern Estonia, using the opaque static chamber (five replicates in each site) and gas chromatography methods. The average carbon and total nitrogen content in the soil of the old alder (OA) stand was significantly higher than in the young alder (YA) stand. In both stands, one part was chosen for water table manipulation (Manip) and another remained unchanged with a stable and deeper GW table. Groundwater table manipulation (flooding) significantly increases CH4 emission (average: YA-Dry 468, YA-Manip 8,374, OA-Dry 468, OA-Manip 4,187 μg C m(-2) h(-1)) and decreases both CO2 (average: OA-Dry 138, OA-Manip 80 mg C m(-2) h(-1)) and N2O emissions (average: OA-Dry 23.1, OA-Manip 11.8 μg N m(-2) h(-1)) in OA sites. There was no significant difference in CO2 and CH4 emissions between the OA and YA sites, whereas in OA sites with higher N concentration in the soil, the N2O emission was significantly higher than at the YA sites. The relative CO2 and CH4 emissions (the soil C stock-related share of gaseous losses) were higher in manipulated plots showing the highest values in the YA-Manip plot (0.03 and 0.0030 % C day(-1), respectively). The soil N stock-related N2O emission was very low achieving 0.000019 % N day(-1) in the OA-Dry plot. Methane emission shows a negative correlation with GW, whereas the 20 cm depth is a significant limit below which most of the produced CH4 is oxidized. In terms of CO2 and N2O, the deeper GW table significantly increases emission. In riparian zones of headwater streams, the short-term floods (e.g. those driven by extreme climate events) may significantly enhance

  17. Steel Creek wildlife: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, M.A.; Patterson, K.K.

    1988-03-01

    Reptile and amphibian populations in Steel Creek below L-Lake were assessed in monthly or quarterly sampling programs. Thirty-eight species of reptiles or amphibians were collected during 1987 in the Steel Creek corridor below the L-Lake impoundment, and in the delta and channel. Juvenile turtles and alligators, and larval amphibians were observed or collected during the study, indicating continued reproduction in Steel Creek. The reptile and amphibian populations in Steel Creek show no indication of any effect due to the impoundment of the lake or the operation of L-Reactor. Waterfowl and associated birds in Steel Creek below L-Lake were observed, in conjunction with other sampling programs, during winter--spring and fall--winter migrations. Nine species of waterfowl and five species of associated birds were observed in 1987 in the Steel Creek corridor below the L-Lake impoundment and in the delta and channel.

  18. Flood of August 27-28, 1977, West Cache Creek and Blue Beaver Creek, southwestern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corley, Robert K.; Huntzinger, Thomas L.

    1979-01-01

    This report documents a major storm which occurred August 27-28, 1977, in southwest Oklahoma near the communities of Cache and Faxon, OK. Blue Beaver Creek and West Cache Creek and their tributaries experienced extensive flooding that caused an estimated $1 million in damages. Reported rainfall amounts of 8 to 12 inches in 6 hours indicate the storm had a frequency in excess of the 100-year rainfall. Peak discharges on Blue Beaver Creek near Cache and West Cache Creek near Faxon were 13,500 cubic feet per second and 45,700 cubic feet per second respectively. The estimated flood frequency was in excess of 100 years on Blue Beaver Creek and in excess of 50 years on West Cache Creek. Unit runoff on small basins were in excess of 2000 cubic feet per second per square mile. Surveyed highwater marks were used to map the flooded area. (USGS)

  19. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  20. LOST CREEK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and mineral-resource investigations identified no mineral-resource potential in the Lost Creek Roadless Area, California. Sand and gravel have been mined from alluvial flood-plain deposits less than 1 mi outside the roadless area; these deposits are likely to extend into the roadless area beneath a Holocene basalt flow that may be as much as 40 ft thick. An oil and gas lease application which includes the eastern portion of the roadless area is pending. Abundant basalt in the area can be crushed and used as aggregate, but similar deposits of volcanic cinders or sand and gravel in more favorable locations are available outside the roadless area closer to major markets. No indication of coal or geothermal energy resources was identified.

  1. 78 FR 5798 - Grouse Creek Wind Park, LLC, Grouse Creek Wind Park II, LLC; Notice of Petition for Enforcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grouse Creek Wind Park, LLC, Grouse Creek Wind Park II, LLC; Notice of... Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), Grouse Creek Wind Park, LLC and Grouse Creek Wind Park...

  2. Synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes and chemistry beyond Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xijian; Peng, Siyu; Li, Li; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Electron-rich dienes have revolutionized the synthesis of complex compounds since the discovery of the legendary Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. This highly efficient bond-forming process has served as a fundamental strategy to assemble many structurally formidable molecules. Amino silyloxy butadienes are arguably the most reactive diene species that are isolable and bottleable. Since the pioneering discovery by Rawal, 1-amino-3-silyloxybutadienes have been found to undergo cycloaddition reactions with unparalleled mildness, leading to significant advances in both asymmetric catalysis and total synthesis of biologically active natural products. In sharp contrast, this class of highly electron-rich conjugated olefins has not been studied in non-cycloaddition reactions. Here we report a simple synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes, a complementarily substituted Rawal's diene. This family of molecules is found to undergo a series of intriguing chemical transformations orthogonal to cycloaddition reactions. Structurally diverse polysubstituted ring architectures are established in one step from these dienes. PMID:25898310

  3. Click and Patterned Functionalization of Graphene by Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Meng; Zhou, Li-Li; Lang, Shuang-Yan; Lu, Hai-Yan; Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-06-22

    Chemical functionalization is a promising approach to controllably manipulate the characteristics of graphene. Here, we designed cis-dienes, featuring two dihydronaphthalene backbones, to decorate a graphene surface via Diels-Alder (DA) click reaction. The installation of a diene moiety into a nonplanar molecular structure to form cis-conformation enables a rapid (∼5 min) DA reaction between graphene and diene groups. Patterned graphene of sub-micrometer resolution can be obtained by easily soaking poly(methyl methacrylate)-masked graphene in solution of hydroxyl-substituted cis-diene at room temperature. The functionalization degree can be further controlled by carrying out the reaction at higher temperature. The present result gives important insight into the effect of molecular conformation on the graphene functionalization process, and provides an effective and facile method for graphene functionalization.

  4. (18)F-Based Pretargeted PET Imaging Based on Bioorthogonal Diels-Alder Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jan-Philip; Houghton, Jacob L; Kozlowski, Paul; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Reiner, Thomas; Pillarsetty, Naga Vara Kishore; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Zeglis, Brian M; Lewis, Jason S

    2016-02-17

    A first-of-its-kind (18)F pretargeted PET imaging approach based on the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction between tetrazine (Tz) and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) is presented. As proof-of-principle, a TCO-bearing immunoconjugate of the anti-CA19.9 antibody 5B1 and an Al[(18)F]NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand were harnessed for the visualization of CA19.9-expressing BxPC3 pancreatic cancer xenografts. Biodistribution and (18)F-PET imaging data clearly demonstrate that this methodology effectively delineates tumor mass with activity concentrations up to 6.4 %ID/g at 4 h after injection of the radioligand.

  5. Impact of Lewis acids on Diels-Alder reaction reactivity: a conceptual density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yue; Yin, Dulin; Rong, Chunying; Xu, Qiong; Yin, Donghong; Liu, Shubin

    2008-10-09

    Density functional theory (DFT) and conceptual/chemical DFT studies are carried out in this work for the normal electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between isoprene and acrolein to compare chemical reactivity and regioselectivity of the reactants in the absence and presence of Lewis acid (LA) catalysts. A cyclic coplanar structure of acrolein-LA complex has been observed and the natural bond orbital analysis has been employed to interpret the interaction between acrolein and LAs. Reactivity indices from frontier molecular orbital energies are proved to be adequate and efficient to evaluate the catalytic property of LAs. Linear relationships have been discovered among the bond order, bond length, catalytic activation, and chemical reactivity for the systems concerned. The validity and applicability of maximum hardness principle, minimum polarizability principle, and minimum electrophilicity principle are examined and discussed in the prediction of the major regioselective isomer and the preferred reaction pathway for the reactions in the present study.

  6. Bio‐orthogonal Fluorescent Labelling of Biopolymers through Inverse‐Electron‐Demand Diels–Alder Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Demeter, Orsolya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bio‐orthogonal labelling schemes based on inverse‐electron‐demand Diels–Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition have attracted much attention in chemical biology recently. The appealing features of this reaction, such as the fast reaction kinetics, fully bio‐orthogonal nature and high selectivity, have helped chemical biologists gain deeper understanding of biochemical processes at the molecular level. Listing the components and discussing the possibilities and limitations of these reagents, we provide a recent snapshot of the field of IEDDA‐based biomolecular manipulation with special focus on fluorescent modulation approaches through the use of bio‐orthogonalized building blocks. At the end, we discuss challenges that need to be addressed for further developments in order to overcome recent limitations and to enable researchers to answer biomolecular questions in more detail. PMID:28070925

  7. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; ...

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that themore » diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.« less

  8. Carbocations as Lewis acid catalysts in Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Bah, Juho; Franzén, Johan

    2014-01-20

    In general, Lewis acid catalysts are metal-based compounds that owe their reactivity to a low-lying empty orbital. However, one potential Lewis acid that has received negligible attention as a catalyst is the carbocation. We have demonstrated the potential of the carbocation as a highly powerful Lewis acid catalyst for organic reactions. The stable and easily available triphenylmethyl (trityl) cation was found to be a highly efficient catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction for a range of substrates. Catalyst loadings as low as 500 ppm, excellent yields, and good endo/exo selectivities were achieved. Furthermore, by changing the electronic properties of the substituents on the tritylium ion, the Lewis acidity of the catalyst could be tuned to control the outcome of the reaction. The ability of this carbocation as a Lewis acid catalyst was also further extended to the Michael reaction.

  9. Economic considerations in establishing European alder in herbaceous cover on surface-mined land

    SciTech Connect

    Ringe, J.M.; Graves, D.H.

    1985-12-09

    Herbicides are a practical tool for selectively controlling vegetative competition during tree seedling establishment. A study to investigate the effects of eight herbicide treatments on the survival and height growth of European alder (Alnus glutinosa) seedlings established in herbaceous cover indicated a positive treatment effect, but very little difference between the herbicide treatments themselves. Since the costs of the herbicides varied considerably, similar results could be obtained using the different herbicides, but at substantially different costs. Biological data were combined with the economic data to derive a modified benefit/cost ratio. This ratio facilitates herbicide treatment choice by comparing the amount of added survival or growth obtained per dollar spent on herbicides. 5 references, 6 tables.

  10. Effect of Diels-Alder Reaction in C60-Tetracene Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Proudian, Andrew P; Jaskot, Matthew B; Lyiza, Christelle; Diercks, David R; Gorman, Brian P; Zimmerman, Jeramy D

    2016-10-12

    Developing organic photovoltaic materials systems requires a detailed understanding of the heterojunction interface, as it is the foundation for photovoltaic device performance. The bilayer fullerene/acene system is one of the most studied models for testing our understanding of this interface. We demonstrate that the fullerene and acene molecules chemically react at the heterojunction interface, creating a partial monolayer of a Diels-Alder cycloadduct species. Furthermore, we show that the reaction occurs during standard deposition conditions and that thermal annealing increases the concentration of the cycloadduct. The cycloaddition reaction reduces the number of sites available at the interface for charge transfer exciton recombination and decreases the charge transfer state reorganization energy, increasing the open circuit voltage. The submonolayer quantity of the cycloadduct renders it difficult to identify with conventional characterization techniques; we use atom probe tomography to overcome this limitation while also measuring the spatial distribution of each chemical species.

  11. Poly /Diels-Alder/ matrix resins. [high temperature resistant graphite reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A poly (Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high-temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication conditions. The results of the study were highly promising and program objectives were achieved. Low-void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepreg prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 400 F and 100 psi for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 600 F, the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 550 F. The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term (over 1000 hours) use at 500 F and shorter-term use at 550 F.

  12. Total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine via an organocatalytic Diels–Alder approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoming; Duan, Shengguo; Tao, Cheng; Zhai, Hongbin; Qiu, Fayang G.

    2015-01-01

    The structurally complex alkaloid gelsemine was previously thought to have no significant biological activities, but a recent study has shown that it has potent and specific antinociception in chronic pain. While this molecule has attracted significant interests from the synthetic community, an efficient synthetic strategy is still the goal of many synthetic chemists. Here we report the asymmetric total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine, including a highly diastereoselective and enantioselective organocatalytic Diels–Alder reaction, an efficient intramolecular trans-annular aldol condensation furnishing the prolidine ring and establishing the configuration of the C20 quaternary carbon stereochemical centre. The entire gelsemine skeleton was constructed through a late-stage intramolecular SN2 substitution. The enantiomeric excess of this total synthesis is over 99%, and the overall yield is around 5%. PMID:25995149

  13. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  14. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that the diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.

  15. Thiourea-catalyzed Diels–Alder reaction of a naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Carsten S

    2013-01-01

    Summary A variety of organocatalysts were screened for the catalysis of the naphthoquinone monoketal Diels–Alder reaction. In this study we found that Schreiner's thiourea catalyst 10 and Jacobson's thiourea catalyst 12 facilitate the cycloaddition of the sterically hindered naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile 3 with diene 4. The use of thiourea catalysis allowed for the first time the highly selective synthesis of the exo-product 2a in up to 63% yield. In this reaction a new quaternary center was built. The so formed cycloaddition product 2a represents the ABC tricycle of beticolin 0 (1) and is also a valuable model substrate for the total synthesis of related natural products. PMID:23946836

  16. Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III

    1992-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  17. The inverse electron demand Diels-Alder click reaction in radiochemistry.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Zeglis, Brian M

    2014-04-01

    The inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition between 1,2,4,5-tetrazines and strained alkene dienophiles is an emergent variety of catalyst-free 'click' chemistry that has the potential to have a transformational impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. The ligation is selective, rapid, high-yielding, clean, and bioorthogonal and, since its advent in 2008, has been employed in a wide variety of chemical settings. In radiochemistry, the reaction has proven particularly useful with (18)  F and has already been utilized to create a number of (18)  F-labeled agents, including the PARP1-targeting small molecule (18)  F-AZD2281, the αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide (18)  F-RGD, and the GLP-1-targeting peptide (18)  F-exendin. The inherent flexibility of the ligation has also been applied to the construction of radiometal-based probes, specifically the development of a modular strategy for the synthesis of radioimmunoconjugates that effectively eliminates variability in the construction of these agents. Further, the exceptional speed and biorthogonality of the reaction have made it especially promising in the realm of in vivo pretargeted imaging and therapy, and pretargeted imaging strategies based on the isotopes (111) In, (18)  F, and (64) Cu have already proven capable of producing images with high tumor contrast and low levels of uptake in background, nontarget organs. Ultimately, the characteristics of inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder click chemistry make it almost uniquely well-suited for radiochemistry, and although the field is young, this ligation has the potential to make a tremendous impact on the synthesis, development, and study of novel radiopharmaceuticals.

  18. Development and applications of Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Huan

    Single electron transfer (SET)-initiated formal [4+2] cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones have been achieved employing a combination of Lewis acid and electron donor as catalyst. Mechanistic studies using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and deuterium labeling experiments suggested a radical anion-mediated stepwise mechanism. The utility of this methodology was established in the first total synthesis of natural product nicolaioidesin C. A novel silica-supported silver nanoparticle (AgNP) catalyst has been developed as a highly active, reusable, and user-friendly catalyst for Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones, as showcased by the first total synthesis of natural product panduratin A. Our work demonstrates results from an interdisciplinary research project involving synthetic methodology development, nanometric material preparation, heterogeneous catalysis, natural product synthesis, and mechanistic studies using various instrumental techniques. Biomimetic, dehydrogenative cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones have been achieved using a mixture of platinum on activated carbon (Pt/C) and silica-supported silver nanoparticles (AgNP's) catalysts. This heterogeneous multicatalytic protocol converts a prenyl subunit in situ to diene which subsequently reacts with a 2'-hyroxychalcone dienophile to provide Diels-Alder cycloadducts in a single step. Using this methodology, a concise synthesis of the core structure of the natural product brosimone B has been accomplished. Enantioselective cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones have been established with excellent yields and enantioselectivity. Two optimized catalytic conditions have been developed: the first method utilizes a catalyst system comprised of chiral rare earth metal complex and electron donor; the second approach involves a chiral borate catalyst. The asymmetric total synthesis of natural product (+)-sorocenol B has been pursued.

  19. Tyrosine-lipid peroxide adducts from radical termination: para coupling and intramolecular Diels-Alder cyclization.

    PubMed

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N; Kim, Hye-young H; Hatch, Duane M; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael; Porter, Ned A

    2010-12-15

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogues of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry (MS). The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic (13)C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl (13)C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All of the NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignments of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision-induced dissociation data. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined, and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion to give a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found in either the primary or cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts, which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein cross-links via interprotein Michael adducts.

  20. 33 CFR 117.738 - Overpeck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.738 Overpeck Creek. (a) The draws of the Conrail and the New York, Susquehanna and Western railroad bridges, mile 0.0 both at...

  1. 33 CFR 117.701 - Alloway Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.701 Alloway Creek. (a) The draws of the Salem County bridges, miles 5.1 at Hancocks Bridge, and 6.5 at New Bridge, shall open on signal...

  2. 33 CFR 117.701 - Alloway Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.701 Alloway Creek. (a) The draws of the Salem County bridges, miles 5.1 at Hancocks Bridge, and 6.5 at New Bridge, shall open on signal...

  3. 33 CFR 117.738 - Overpeck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.738 Overpeck Creek. (a) The draws of the Conrail and the New York, Susquehanna and Western railroad bridges, mile 0.0 both at...

  4. 33 CFR 117.738 - Overpeck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.738 Overpeck Creek. (a) The draws of the Conrail and the New York, Susquehanna and Western railroad bridges, mile 0.0 both at...

  5. 33 CFR 117.701 - Alloway Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.701 Alloway Creek. (a) The draws of the Salem County bridges, miles 5.1 at Hancocks Bridge, and 6.5 at New Bridge, shall open on signal...

  6. 33 CFR 117.701 - Alloway Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.701 Alloway Creek. (a) The draws of the Salem County bridges, miles 5.1 at Hancocks Bridge, and 6.5 at New Bridge, shall open on signal...

  7. 33 CFR 117.701 - Alloway Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.701 Alloway Creek. (a) The draws of the Salem County bridges, miles 5.1 at Hancocks Bridge, and 6.5 at New Bridge, shall open on signal...

  8. 33 CFR 117.738 - Overpeck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.738 Overpeck Creek. (a) The draws of the Conrail and the New York, Susquehanna and Western railroad bridges, mile 0.0 both at...

  9. 33 CFR 117.736 - Oceanport Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.736 Oceanport Creek. The drawspan for the New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Drawbridge, mile 8.4 near Oceanport, must open on signal...

  10. 33 CFR 117.736 - Oceanport Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.736 Oceanport Creek. The drawspan for the New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Drawbridge, mile 8.4 near Oceanport, must open on signal...

  11. 33 CFR 117.929 - Durham Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.929 Durham Creek. The removable span of the... Charleston of an emergency in the Bushy Park Reservoir, the span shall be removed as soon as possible...

  12. 33 CFR 117.929 - Durham Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.929 Durham Creek. The removable span of the... Charleston of an emergency in the Bushy Park Reservoir, the span shall be removed as soon as possible...

  13. 33 CFR 117.929 - Durham Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.929 Durham Creek. The removable span of the... Charleston of an emergency in the Bushy Park Reservoir, the span shall be removed as soon as possible...

  14. 33 CFR 117.929 - Durham Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.929 Durham Creek. The removable span of the... Charleston of an emergency in the Bushy Park Reservoir, the span shall be removed as soon as possible...

  15. Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Proctor Creek Watershed/Atlanta (Georgia) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  16. Featured Partner: Saddle Creek Logistics Services

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA fact sheet spotlights Saddle Creek Logistics as a SmartWay partner committed to sustainability in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by freight transportation, partly by growing its compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles for

  17. News and Updates from Proctor Creek

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains news and updates from the Proctor Creek Urban Waters Partnership location. They span ongoing projects, programs, and initiatives that this Atlanta-based partnership is taking on in its work plan.

  18. Proctor Creek Boone Boulevard Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Proctor Creek watershed and community, green infrastructure, the Boone Boulevard Green Street Project Conceptual Design, and the added value and application of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to the project.

  19. Morphological measurements and ITS sequences show that the new alder rust in Europe is conspecific with Melampsoridium hiratsukanum in eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Hantula, J; Kurkela, T; Hendry, S; Yamaguchi, T

    2009-01-01

    Three species of Melampsoridium have been reported to infect hosts in genus Alnus. An epidemic of foliar rust affecting A. glutinosa and A. incana began in Europe in the mid-1990s, and the associated pathogen was identified as Melampsoridium hiratsukanum based on morphology. In this investigation we analyzed the morphology and genetic variation of alder rusts from Europe and Japan and the host specificity of the European epidemic rust. Our results showed that two rusts occur on the leaves of alders native to northern Europe; in Scotland an endemic rust indistinguishable from M. betulinum occurs, whereas alders in areas of Europe affected by the current epidemic were infected by M. hiratsukanum. M. hiratsukanum from naturally infected alder in Finland produced aecia on all Larix species tested but did not infect Betula leaves.

  20. Final Environmental Assessment, Horse Creek Bridge Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    floodplain, deep swamp, meander scars, loops, and oxbow lakes . Sandy Run Creek, along the southern boundary of Robins AFB, has a floodplain up to 2,000...River floodplain (Figure 3). The erosion action of the Ocmulgee has created bluffs, high floodplain, deep swamp, meander scars, loops, and oxbow ... lakes . Robins Air Force Base Horse Creek Bridge Replacement J. Gross L. Neal 15268146 April 2010 CLIENT: TITLE: PROJECT: DATE: SCALE: FILE: DESIGNED

  1. Bisoxazoline-Lewis acid-catalyzed direct-electron demand oxo-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of N-oxy-pyridine aldehyde and ketone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Landa, Aitor; Richter, Bo; Johansen, Rasmus Lyng; Minkkilä, Anna; Jørgensen, Karl Anker

    2007-01-05

    A general catalytic oxo-hetero-Diels-Alder reaction for pro-chiral aldehyde and ketone N-oxy-pyridines is presented. The catalytic and asymmetric oxo-hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of electron-rich dienes with N-oxy-pyridine-2-carbaldehyde and ketone derivatives, catalyzed by chiral copper(II)-bisoxazoline complexes, gives optically active six-membered oxygen heterocycles in moderate to good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities.

  2. Synthesis of Isochromene-Type Scaffolds via Single-Flask Diels–Alder-[4 + 2]-Annulation Sequence of a Silyl-Substituted Diene with Menadione

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A sequential Diels–Alder reaction/silicon-directed [4 + 2]-annulation was developed to assemble hydroisochromene-type ring systems from menadione 2. In the first step, a Diels–Alder of the 1-silyl-substituted butadiene 1 with 2 furnished an intermediate cyclic allylsilane. Subsequently, TMSOTf promoted a [4 + 2]-annulation through trapping of an oxonium, generated by condensation between an aldehyde and the TBS protected alcohol resulted in the formation of a cis-fused hydroisochromene 13. PMID:24918110

  3. Synthesis of isochromene-type scaffolds via single-flask Diels-Alder-[4 + 2]-annulation sequence of a silyl-substituted diene with menadione.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihoon; Panek, James S

    2014-06-20

    A sequential Diels-Alder reaction/silicon-directed [4 + 2]-annulation was developed to assemble hydroisochromene-type ring systems from menadione 2. In the first step, a Diels-Alder of the 1-silyl-substituted butadiene 1 with 2 furnished an intermediate cyclic allylsilane. Subsequently, TMSOTf promoted a [4 + 2]-annulation through trapping of an oxonium, generated by condensation between an aldehyde and the TBS protected alcohol resulted in the formation of a cis-fused hydroisochromene 13.

  4. Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Nitroso-Diels-Alder Reaction of 1,3-Diene-1-carbamates Catalyzed by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Pous, Jonathan; Courant, Thibaut; Bernadat, Guillaume; Iorga, Bogdan I; Blanchard, Florent; Masson, Géraldine

    2015-09-23

    Chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction of nitrosoarenes with carbamate-dienes afforded cis-3,6-disubstituted dihydro-1,2-oxazines in high yields with excellent regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivities. Interestingly, we observed that the catalyst is able not only to control the enantioselectivity but also to reverse the regioselectivity of the noncatalyzed nitroso-Diels-Alder reaction. The regiochemistry reversal and asynchronous concerted mechanism were confirmed by DFT calculations.

  5. Radiometric ages of the Fire Clay tonstein [Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous), Westphalian, Duckmantian]: A comparison of U-Pb zircon single-crystal ages and 40Ar/39Ar sanidine single-crystal plateau ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.; Krogh, T.E.; Kwok, Y.Y.; Davis, D.W.; Outerbridge, W.F.; Evans, H.T.

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Clay tonstein [Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous), Westphalian Series, Duckmantian Stage]-a kaolinized, volcanic-ash deposit occurring in Kentucky, West Virginia, Tennessee, and Virginia-is the most widespread bed in the Middle Pennsylvanian of the central Appalachian basin, USA. A concordant single-crystal U-Pb zircon datum for this tonstein gives a 206Pb/238U age of 314.6 ?? 0.9 Ma (2??). This age is in approximate agreement with a mean sanidine plateau age of 311.5 ?? 1.3 Ma (1??, n = 11) for the Fire Clay tonstein. The difference between the two ages may be due to bias between the 40K and 238U decay constants and other factors. The age of the Fire Clay tonstein has important implications for Duckmantian Stage (Westphalian Series) sedimentation rates, correlations with the Westphalian Series of Europe, Middle Pennsylvanian volcanic events, and the late Paleozoic time scale. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 4. O'BRIAN CANAL/SECOND CREEK INTERSECTION Second Creek is in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. O'BRIAN CANAL/SECOND CREEK INTERSECTION Second Creek is in the foreground; the O'Brian Canal is in the background; vicinity of East 112th Avenue and Potomac Road in Adams County - O'Brian Canal, South Platte River Drainage Area Northest of Denver, Brighton, Adams County, CO

  7. Creek Women and the "Civilizing" of Creek Society, 1790-1820.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dysart, Jane E.

    Women in traditional Creek society, while making few decisions in the public domain, held almost absolute power in the domestic realm. When a Creek couple married, the husband moved into his wife's house and lived among her clan, her matrilineal kin. The house, household goods, fields, and children belonged to her. Boys were educated by their…

  8. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Dienes with Acrylic Esters: A Novel Approach to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilhan, Faysal; Tyson, Daniel S.; Smith, Deedee; Meador, Mary Ann; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloadditions have often been utilized in polymer synthesis as an alternative to condensation reactions. In our earlier efforts, we developed a new method for the preparation of linear aromatic polyimides, which employs o-quionodimethanes (o-QDMs), generated by a well-known photochemical reaction: the photoenolization of o-methylphenyl ketones. Photolysis of o-methylbenzophenone 1 produces hydroxy-o-quino- diemthane 2, which can be trapped with dienophiles, such as dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate, to efficiently yield the corresponding cycloadduct (Scheme 1). Here we extend this approach to a novel photocuring process for development of polymer films. We synthesized a series of molecules with multi o-mehtylphenyl ketone functionalities. We further investigated these molecules as photoreactive monomers to obtain polyester films through Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

  9. Expanding the scope of cyclopropene reporters for the detection of metabolically engineered glycoproteins by Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Späte, Anne-Katrin; Schart, Verena F; Häfner, Julia; Niederwieser, Andrea; Mayer, Thomas U

    2014-01-01

    Summary Monitoring glycoconjugates has been tremendously facilitated by the development of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. Recently, the inverse-electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction between methylcyclopropene tags and tetrazines has become a popular ligation reaction due to the small size and high reactivity of cyclopropene tags. Attaching the cyclopropene tag to mannosamine via a carbamate linkage has made the reaction even more efficient. Here, we expand the application of cyclopropene tags to N-acylgalactosamine and N-acylglucosamine derivatives enabling the visualization of mucin-type O-glycoproteins and O-GlcNAcylated proteins through Diels–Alder chemistry. Whereas the previously reported cyclopropene-labeled N-acylmannosamine derivative leads to significantly higher fluorescence staining of cell-surface glycoconjugates, the glucosamine derivative gave higher labeling efficiency with protein preparations containing also intracellular proteins. PMID:25298790

  10. Baseline Characteristics of Jordan Creek, Juneau, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Host, Randy H.; Neal, Edward G.

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous fish populations historically have found healthy habitat in Jordan Creek, Juneau, Alaska. Concern regarding potential degradation to the habitat by urban development within the Mendenhall Valley led to a cooperative study among the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, and the U.S. Geological Survey, that assessed current hydrologic, water-quality, and physical-habitat conditions of the stream corridor. Periods of no streamflow were not uncommon at the Jordan Creek below Egan Drive near Auke Bay stream gaging station. Additional flow measurements indicate that periods of no flow are more frequent downstream of the gaging station. Although periods of no flow typically were in March and April, streamflow measurements collected prior to 1999 indicate similar periods in January, suggesting that no flow conditions may occur at any time during the winter months. This dewatering in the lower reaches likely limits fish rearing and spawning habitat as well as limiting the migration of juvenile salmon out to the ocean during some years. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations may not be suitable for fish survival during some winter periods in the Jordan Creek watershed. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations were measured as low as 2.8 mg/L at the gaging station and were measured as low as 0.85 mg/L in a tributary to Jordan Creek. Intermittent measurements of pH and dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the mid-reaches of Jordan Creek were all within acceptable limits for fish survival, however, few measurements of these parameters were made during winter-low-flow conditions. One set of water quality samples was collected at six different sites in the Jordan Creek watershed and analyzed for major ions and dissolved nutrients. Major-ion chemistry showed Jordan Creek is calcium bicarbonate type water with little variation between sampling sites.

  11. Quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship modeling for Diels-Alder ligations utilizing quantum chemical structural descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show the correlation of quantum chemical structural descriptors with the activation barriers of the Diels-Alder ligations. A set of 72 non-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions were subjected to quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) under the framework of theoretical quantum chemical descriptors calculated solely from the structures of diene and dienophile reactants. Experimental activation barrier data were obtained from literature. Descriptors were computed using Hartree-Fock theory using 6-31G(d) basis set as implemented in Gaussian 09 software. Results Variable selection and model development were carried out by stepwise multiple linear regression methodology. Predictive performance of the quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) model was assessed by training and test set concept and by calculating leave-one-out cross-validated Q2 and predictive R2 values. The QSABR model can explain and predict 86.5% and 80% of the variances, respectively, in the activation energy barrier training data. Alternatively, a neural network model based on back propagation of errors was developed to assess the nonlinearity of the sought correlations between theoretical descriptors and experimental reaction barriers. Conclusions A reasonable predictability for the activation barrier of the test set reactions was obtained, which enabled an exploration and interpretation of the significant variables responsible for Diels-Alder interaction between dienes and dienophiles. Thus, studies in the direction of QSABR modelling that provide efficient and fast prediction of activation barriers of the Diels-Alder reactions turn out to be a meaningful alternative to transition state theory based computation. PMID:24171724

  12. Synthesis of polysubstituted 3-hydroxypyridines via the revisited hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of 5-alkoxyoxazoles with dienophiles.

    PubMed

    Sabot, Cyrille; Oueis, Emilia; Brune, Xavier; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-18

    A general and single-step access to polysubstituted 3-hydroxypyridine scaffolds via hetero-Diels-Alder (HDA) reactions between readily prepared 5-ethoxyoxazoles and dienophiles is reported. The HDA reaction, run in the presence of Nd(OTf)(3) at room temperature, was successfully applied to various 5-ethoxyoxazoles showing good functional group tolerance, and led to a straightforward process to obtain useful building-blocks.

  13. Controlled spacing of 60-carbon spheres with 1,4-cyclohexadienyl ladders by pairwise Diels-Alder cycloaddition to buckminsterfullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, L.A.; Graham, R.J.

    1995-05-19

    This article focuses on the synthesis of Buckminsterfullerenes using a pair of Diels-Alder reactions involving C{sub 60} and the multiply unsaturated bisdienes 1 - 3. The achievement of a dumbbell-like structure may not be desirable for solubility, but controlled spacing of the spheres using 1,4-cyclohexadienyl in this manner will lead to other structure-function insights. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Chiral GAP catalysts of phosphonylated imidazolidinones and their applications in asymmetric Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reactions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuo; Mo, Junming; Wilcox, Cody B; Jiang, Bo; Li, Guigen

    2017-02-21

    The design and synthesis of recyclable imidazolidinone catalysts using GAP chemistry/technique was described. Their applications in asymmetric Diels-Alder and Friedel-Crafts reactions with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes resulted in excellent yields and higher enantioselectivities than previous processes. As recyclable small molecular catalysts, phosphonylated imidazolidinones can be recovered and reused for up to three runs without costing significant decrease in catalytic activity.

  15. Enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-dihydropyridines with aldehydes using β-amino alcohol organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kohari, Yoshihito; Okuyama, Yuko; Kwon, Eunsang; Furuyama, Taniyuki; Kobayashi, Nagao; Otuki, Teppei; Kumagai, Jun; Seki, Chigusa; Uwai, Koji; Dai, Gang; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Nakano, Hiroto

    2014-10-17

    The enantioselective Diels-Alder reaction of 1,2-dihydropyridines with aldehydes using an easily prepared optically active β-amino alcohol catalyst was found to provide optically active isoquinuclidines, an efficient synthetic intermediate of pharmaceutically important compounds such as oseltamivir phosphate, with a satisfactory chemical yield and enantioselectivity (up to 96%, up to 98% ee). In addition, the obtained highly optically pure isoquinuclidine was easily converted to an optically active piperidine having four successive carbon centers.

  16. A new approach to the synthesis of monomers and polymers incorporating furan/maleimide Diels-Alder adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banella, Maria Barbara; Gioia, Claudio; Vannini, Micaela; Colonna, Martino; Celli, Annamaria; Gandini, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between furan and maleimide moieties is a well-known and widely used strategy to build bio-based macromolecular structures with peculiar properties. The furan-maleimide adducts are thermally reversible because they can be broken above about 120°C and recombined at lower temperatures. At the moment only the monomers exhibiting the furan or the maleimide moieties on their extremity are used in order to get linear or cross-linked polymeric structures. The innovative idea described here consists in using a monomer bearing two carboxylic acidic groups on its extremities and a furan-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct within its structure. This monomer can give rise to classical polycondensation reactions leading to polymers. These polymers (which are polyesters in the present case) can be broken at high temperatures in correspondence of the furane-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct leading to segments exhibiting furan or maleimide moieties at their extremities, which at lower temperature recombine leading to random or block copolymers.

  17. Design Paradigm Utilizing Reversible Diels-Alder Reactions to Enhance the Mechanical Properties of 3D Printed Materials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joshua R; Appuhamillage, Gayan A; Thompson, Christina M; Voit, Walter; Smaldone, Ronald A

    2016-07-06

    A design paradigm is demonstrated that enables new functional 3D printed materials made by fused filament fabrication (FFF) utilizing a thermally reversible dynamic covalent Diels-Alder reaction to dramatically improve both strength and toughness via self-healing mechanisms. To achieve this, we used as a mending agent a partially cross-linked terpolymer consisting of furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) adducts that exhibit reversibility at temperatures typically used for FFF printing. When this mending agent is blended with commercially available polylactic acid (PLA) and printed, the resulting materials demonstrate an increase in the interfilament adhesion strength along the z-axis of up to 130%, with ultimate tensile strength increasing from 10 MPa in neat PLA to 24 MPa in fmDA-enhanced PLA. Toughness in the z-axis aligned prints increases by up to 460% from 0.05 MJ/m(3) for unmodified PLA to 0.28 MJ/m(3) for the remendable PLA. Importantly, it is demonstrated that a thermally reversible cross-linking paradigm based on the furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) reaction can be more broadly applied to engineer property enhancements and remending abilities to a host of other 3D printable materials with superior mechanical properties.

  18. Short-term influence of nitrate on acetylene reduction, photosynthesis and nodule respiration of black alder seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cazell, B.H.; Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaernt.) has shown significant benefits in several silvicultural applications such as nurse-trees. However, little is known concerning the nitrate/N-fixing interactions. Our objections were to examine the effects of three nitrate levels on acetylene reduction (AR), net photosynthesis (Ps) and nodule respiration (NR). Fifteen month-old black alder rooted cuttings were inoculated with one strain of Frankia inoculum (ARgN22D) at six months, maintained under 16h photoperiod at ambient greenhouse conditions, and fertilized for two months prior to study with a modified Crone's N-free solution. At study initiation seedlings were fertilized for six days with 0, 7.5 or 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Measurements of AR, Ps and NR were collected on the second, fourth and sixth day of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} application. By day four AR was significantly lowered by 75% for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatment when compared with the controls. On day six, Ps and NR were lowered significantly by 29% and 59%, respectively, for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatments when compared to control values. Results suggest any benefit from black alder N-fixation might be negated by nitrate fertilization.

  19. Performance of ectomycorrhizal alders exposed to specific Canadian oil sands tailing stressors under in vivo bipartite symbiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Nadeau, Martin; Gagné, André; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Fortin, J André; Roy, Sébastien; Greer, Charles W; Khasa, Damase P

    2016-07-01

    Canadian oil sands tailings are predominately sodic residues contaminated by hydrocarbons such as naphthenic acids. These conditions are harsh for plant development. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inoculating roots of Alnus viridis ssp. crispa and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa with ectomycorrhizal fungi in the presence of tailings compounds. Seedlings were inoculated with 7 different strains of Paxillus involutus and Alpova diplophloeus and were grown under different treatments of NaCl, Na2SO4, and naphthenic acids in a growth chamber. Afterwards, seedling survival, height, dry biomass, leaf necrosis, and root mycorrhization rate were measured. Paxillus involutus Mai was the most successful strain in enhancing alder survival, health, and growth. Seedlings inoculated with this strain displayed a 25% increase in survival rate, 2-fold greater biomass, and 2-fold less leaf necrosis compared with controls. Contrary to our expectations, A. diplophloeus was not as effective as P. involutus in improving seedling fitness, likely because it did not form ectomycorrhizae on roots of either alder species. High intraspecific variation characterized strains of P. involutus in their ability to stimulate alder height and growth and to minimize leaf necrosis. We conclude that in vivo selection under bipartite symbiotic conditions is essential to select effective strains that will be of use for the revegetation and reclamation of derelict lands.

  20. A Soil Moisture-Heat Based Early Establishment Model of Riparian White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablkowski, P.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2013-12-01

    Establishment of fluvially dispersed seeds on accreted gravel-sand bars is limited by water availability in streams. Past establishment models have used the stream/water table recession rate, and maximum root growth rate to determine the elevation limit of seedling establishment. This approach neglects the role of the saturated-unsaturated vadose zone in providing water to recently germinated seedlings, the physical processes that determine the soil moisture content, and the effect moisture deficit has on seedling root growth. This study combines a soil moisture-heat budget and a seedling root growth model that responds to soil moisture availability to find the elevation limit of establishment of white alder (Alnus rhombifolia) on vertically accreted bars along the south fork Eel River in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, California. To establish successfully, seedling roots must maintain a connection with sufficient moisture to avoid water stress. This will depend on the elevation of the bar, the stream recession rate, the root growth rate, and the diurnal cycle of soil moisture. A one-dimensional moisture-heat budget of the top 15 centimeters of sediment was validated at two locations characterized by sand and clay-gravel textures respectively, using soil moisture and temperature measurements at 5, 10 and 15 cm, net radiation, air temperature, humidity, wind velocity and precipitation measured during spring-summer stream recession. Two patterns in soil water content were apparent: an average daily moisture decrease at each depth driven by stream/water table recession, and a diurnal pattern of isothermal liquid and vapour flux increasing soil water content in the upper 15 cm between 12:00 pm and 5:00 pm PDT. To determine seedling root growth rates, white alder seedlings were grown in growth chambers under a range of reduced matric potentials using polyethylene glycol. Root length measurements were made at 4 hour intervals and a quadratic equation was fit to the root

  1. Cache Creek ocean: Closure or enclosure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Joanne; Mihalynuk, Mitch

    1993-02-01

    Exotic Tethyan faunas within the Cache Creek terrane contrast markedly with faunas and lithologic associations in the adjacent Quesnel and Stikine terranes. In northern British Columbia and southeast Yukon, all three terranes are enveloped in the north by pericontinental rocks of the Yukon-Tanana terrane, a geometry that imposes severe constraints on terrane assembly models for the northern Canadian Cordillera. Our solution to the problem invokes a northern join between the Stikinia and Quesnellia arcs through the Yukon-Tanana terrane, forming an orocline that encloses the Cache Creek terrane. This model involves (1) collision of a linear oceanic plateau at the cusp between Quesnellia and Stikinia, (2) anticlockwise rotation of Stikinia about an axis in the Yukon-Tanana terrane, (3) simultaneous enclosure of the Cache Creek ocean, and (4) emplacement of Quesnellia onto the margin of ancestral North America and the Cache Creek terrane onto Stikinia during final closure of the orocline. Early Mesozoic Paleomagnetic declinations in Stikinia are permissive of the large anticlockwise rotations predicted by the model. Similar large-scale rotations and ocean-basin enclosure are common features in the southwest Pacific. This model accounts for Paleozoic and younger linkages between Yukon-Tanana and both northern Stikinia and Quesnellia, the striking similarity between Triassic-Jurassic arcs east and west of the Cache Creek terrane, and the profound early Mesozoic deformational event in the Yukon-Tanana terrane.

  2. Environmental setting of Maple Creek watershed, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredrick, Brian S.; Linard, Joshua I.; Carpenter, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    The Maple Creek watershed covers a 955-square-kilometer area in eastern Nebraska, which is a region dominated by agricultural land use. The Maple Creek watershed is one of seven areas currently included in a nationwide study of the sources, transport, and fate of water and chemicals in agricultural watersheds. This study, known as the topical study of 'Agricultural Chemicals: Sources, Transport, and Fate' is part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The Program is designed to describe water-quality conditions and trends based on representative surface- and ground-water resources across the Nation. The objective of the Agricultural Chemicals topical study is to investigate the sources, transport, and fate of selected agricultural chemicals in a variety of agriculturally diverse environmental settings. The Maple Creek watershed was selected for the Agricultural Chemicals topical study because its watershed represents the agricultural setting that characterizes eastern Nebraska. This report describes the environmental setting of the Maple Creek watershed in the context of how agricultural practices, including agricultural chemical applications and irrigation methods, interface with natural settings and hydrologic processes. A description of the environmental setting of a subwatershed within the drainage area of Maple Creek is included to improve the understanding of the variability of hydrologic and chemical cycles at two different scales.

  3. Estimating pothole wetland connectivity to Pipestem Creek ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Understanding hydrologic connectivity between wetlands and perennial streams is critical to understanding how reliant stream flow is on wetlands within their watershed. We used the isotopic evaporation signal in water to examine hydrologic connectivity within Pipestem Creek, North Dakota, with a watershed dominated by prairie potholes. During a decadal period of wet conditions, Pipestem Creek contained evaporated water that had approximately half the isotopic evaporative enrichment signal found in most evaporated permanent wetlands. If evaporation was mainly occurring within the stream, we expected the evaporation signal to increase from the headwaters with distance downstream. However, the signal either remained similar or decreased downstream over the two years of sampling. Groundwater measured at the water table adjacent to Pipestem Creek had isotopic values that indicated recharge from winter precipitation and had no significant evaporation. Using isotopic theory and discharge data, we estimated the surface area of open water necessary to generate the evaporation signal found within Pipestem Creek over time. The range of evaporating surface-area estimates was highly dynamic, spanning from 43 to 2653 ha and varying primarily with discharge. The average value (just over 600 ha) was well above the surface area of Pipestem Creek network (245 ha). This estimate of contributing area indicated that Prairie Pothole wetlands were important sources of stream fl

  4. 8. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF KILLBUCK CREEK TAKEN FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF KILLBUCK CREEK TAKEN FROM THE BRIDGE DECK SHOWING THE SECOND OR THIRD GROWTH SPROUT. - Madison County Bridge 90, Spanning Killbuck Creek on County Road No. 600, Moonville, Madison County, IN

  5. Detail view of Fanno Creek trestle, showing trestle substructure, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of Fanno Creek trestle, showing trestle substructure, view looking north - Oregon Electric Railroad, Fanno Creek Trestle, Garden Home to Wilsonville Segment, Milepost 34.7, Garden Home, Washington County, OR

  6. 1. WATER ENTERING CONFLUENCE POOL FROM BEAR CREEK AT LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WATER ENTERING CONFLUENCE POOL FROM BEAR CREEK AT LEFT, AND FROM SANTA ANA RIVER THROUGH TUNNEL #0 AT RIGHT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Bear Creek Diversion Dam & Confluence Pool, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway / Waterside Drive Sycamore and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway / Waterside Drive Sycamore and White Ash Trees, Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway, median between northbound and southbound lanes near the Waterside Drive exit and entrance ramps., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 17. View from Sterling Creek Marsh looking west, with berm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View from Sterling Creek Marsh looking west, with berm to the left and Henry Ford Mansion in the far background - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  9. 8. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking northeast across the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking northeast across the berm with the marsh to the left - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  10. 10. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking south with house ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking south with house in the background and marsh in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  11. 9. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southwest, with the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southwest, with the marsh in the background and the berm in the foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  12. 20. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southwest with oyster ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southwest with oyster house in the tree line - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  13. 14. View of Sterling Creek Marsh east across the marsh, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of Sterling Creek Marsh east across the marsh, with canal in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  14. 12. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southeast across marsh, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southeast across marsh, with canal in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  15. 3. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing rubble at the entrance of dam/bridge looking southwest - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  16. 4. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing rubble at the entrance of the dam/bridge looking east - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  17. Big Creek Hydroelectric System, East & West Transmission Line, 241mile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Big Creek Hydroelectric System, East & West Transmission Line, 241-mile transmission corridor extending between the Big Creek Hydroelectric System in the Sierra National Forest in Fresno County and the Eagle Rock Substation in Los Angeles, California, Visalia, Tulare County, CA

  18. 13. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southeast; looking at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of Sterling Creek Marsh looking southeast; looking at canal going to the tree line - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  19. 5. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking northwest showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking northwest showing office - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  20. 15. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second floor support beams. - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  1. 13. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second floor window sill - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  2. 1. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking south, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking south, with road in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  3. 12. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing floor joist and support beams - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  4. Water-quality appraisal, Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek, Mono County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Setmire, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    A late summer reconnaissance in 1981 and a spring high-flow sampling in 1982 of Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek, located in the Mammoth crest area of the Sierra Nevada, indicated that mineralization, eutrophication, sedimentation, and limited areas of fecal contamination were occurring. Mineralization, indicated by a downstream increase in dissolved-solids concentration, was due primarily to geothermal springs that gradually decreased in the percentage of calcium, increased in the percentage of magnesium and sodium, and caused fluctuating, but overall increasing percentage of fluoride, sulfate, and chloride. Resulting water quality in Mammoth Creek was similar to that of the springs forming Hot Creek. Eutrophication was observed in Twin Lakes and the reach of Hot Creek below the fish hatchery. Twin Lakes had floating mats of algae and a high dissolved-oxygen saturation of 147 percent at a pH of 9.2. Hot Creek had excessive aquatic vascular plant and algae growth, dissolved-oxygen saturations ranging from 65 to 200 percent, algal growth potential of 30 milligrams per liter, and nitrates and phosphates of 0.44 and 0.157 milligrams per liter. Sedimentation was noted in observations of bed-material composition showing the presence of fine material beginning at Sherwin Creek Road. Fecal contamination was indicated by fecal coliform counts of 250 colonies per 100 milliliters and fecal streptococcal counts greater than 1,000 colonies per 100 milliliters. (USGS)

  5. Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

    1988-03-01

    Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

  6. Steel Creek water quality: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, November 1985--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.; Kretchmer, D.W.; Chimney, M.J.

    1992-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet envirorunental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  7. Silylium ion-catalyzed challenging Diels-Alder reactions: the danger of hidden proton catalysis with strong Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Müther, Kristine; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Grimme, Stefan; Oestreich, Martin

    2012-03-07

    The pronounced Lewis acidity of tricoordinate silicon cations brings about unusual reactivity in Lewis acid catalysis. The downside of catalysis with strong Lewis acids is, though, that these do have the potential to mediate the formation of protons by various mechanisms, and the thus released Brønsted acid might even outcompete the Lewis acid as the true catalyst. That is an often ignored point. One way of eliminating a hidden proton-catalyzed pathway is to add a proton scavenger. The low-temperature Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by our ferrocene-stabilized silicon cation are such a case where the possibility of proton catalysis must be meticulously examined. Addition of the common hindered base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine resulted, however, in slow decomposition along with formation of the corresponding pyridinium ion. Quantitative deprotonation of the silicon cation was observed with more basic (Mes)(3)P to yield the phosphonium ion. A deuterium-labeling experiment verified that the proton is abstracted from the ferrocene backbone. A reasonable mechanism of the proton formation is proposed on the basis of quantum-chemical calculations. This is, admittedly, a particular case but suggests that the use of proton scavengers must be carefully scrutinized, as proton formation might be provoked rather than prevented. Proton-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions are not well-documented in the literature, and a representative survey employing TfOH is included here. The outcome of these catalyses is compared with our silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions, thereby clearly corroborating that hidden Brønsted acid catalysis is not operating with our Lewis acid. Several simple-looking but challenging Diels-Alder reactions with exceptionally rare dienophile/enophile combinations are reported. Another indication is obtained from the chemoselectivity of the catalyses. The silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction is general with regard to the oxidation level of the

  8. Meager Creek Geothermal Project: preliminary resource evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Stauder, J.J.; Menzies, A.J.; Harvey, C.C.; Leach, T.M.

    1983-09-01

    A 190-200/sup 0/C geothermal resource has been identified in the Meager Creek Geothermal Area (South Meager, previously called the South Reservoir), British Columbia, Canada, on the basis of surface and near surface exploration and the results of a three well deep drilling exploration program. The geothermal resource appears to be fracture dominated with limited flow capacity. It is associated with the Meager Creek Fault Zone which was encountered by the deep wells at a depth of 1200-1600 meters (400-800 meters below MSL). Temperatures of up to 270/sup 0/C were encountered below the Meager Creek Fault Zone but both petrologic and well testing data indicate that the rock is generally impermeable. The high temperatures at depth appear to be a manifestation of the abnormally high (approximately equal to 90/sup 0/C/km) regional geothermal gradient.

  9. The Boulder Creek Batholith, Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gable, Dolores J.

    1980-01-01

    The Boulder Creek batholith is the best known of several large Precambrian batholiths of similar rock composition that crop out across central Colorado. The rocks in the batholith belong to the calc-alkaline series and range in composition from granodiorite through quartz diorite (tonalite) to gneissic aplite. Two rock types dominate': the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, the major rock unit, and a more leucocratic and slightly younger unit herein named Twin Spruce Quartz Monzonite. Besides mafic inclusions, which occur mainly in hornblende-bearing phases of the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, there are cogenetic older and younger lenses, dikes, and small plutons of hornblende diorite, hornblendite, gabbro, and pyroxenite. Pyroxenite is not found in the batholith. The Boulder Creek Granodiorite in the batholith represents essentially two contemporaneous magmas, a northern body occurring in the Gold Hill and Boulder quadrangles and a larger southern body exposed in the Blackhawk and the greater parts of the Tungsten and Eldorado Springs quadrangles. The two bodies are chemically and mineralogically distinct. The northern body is richer in CaO and poorer in K2O, is more mafic, and has a larger percentage of plagioclase than the southern body. A crude sequence of rock types occurs from west to east in the batholith accompanied by a change in plagioclase composition from calcic plagioclase on the west to sodic on the east. Ore minerals tend to decrease, and the ratio potassium feldspar:plagioclase increases inward from the western contact of the batholith, indicating that the Boulder Creek batholith is similar to granodiorite batholiths the world over. Emplacement of the Boulder Creek batholith was contemporaneous with plastic deformation and high-grade regional metamorphism that folded the country rock and the batholith contact along west-northwest and north-northwest axes. Also, smaller satellitic granodiorite bodies tend to conform to the trends of foliation and fold axes in

  10. Water-quality appraisal. Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Setmire, J.G.

    1984-06-01

    A late summer reconnaissance in 1981 and a spring high-flow sampling in 1982 of Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek, located in the Mammoth crest area of the Sierra Nevada, indicated that three water-quality processes were occurring: (1) mineralization; (2) eutrophication; and (3) sedimentation. Limited areas of fecal contamination were also observed. Mineralization due primarily to geothermal springs increased dissolved-solids concentration downstream, which changed the chemical composition of the water. The percentage of calcium decreased gradually, the percentage of magnesium and sodium increased, and the percentage of fluoride, sulfate, and chloride fluctuated, but increased overall. These changes produced water quality in Mammoth Creek similar to that of the springs forming Hot Creek. Twin Lakes and the reach of Hot Creek below the fish hatchery showed evidence of eutrophication. Twin Lakes had floating mats of algae and a high dissolved-oxygen saturation of 147% at a pH of 9.2. Hot Creek had abundant growth of aquatic vascular plants and algae, dissolved-oxygen saturations ranging from 65% to 200%, algal growth potential of 30 milligrams per liter, nitrate concentration of 0.44 milligram per liter, and phosphate concentration of 0.157 milligram per liter. Sediment deposition was determined from detailed observations of bed-material composition, which showed that fine material was deposited at Sherwin Creek Road and downstream. Fecal contamination was indicated by fecal-coliform bacteria counts of 250 colonies per 100 milliliters and fecal-streptococcal bacteria counts greater than 1000 colonies per 100 milliliters. Although bacterial sampling was sporadic and incomplete, it did indicate adverse effects on water quality for the following beneficial uses that have been identified for Mammoth Creek and Hot Creek: (1) municipal supply; (2) cold-water habitat; and (3) contact and noncontact water recreation. 6 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Hydrology and Flood Profiles of Duck Creek and Jordan Creek Downstream from Egan Drive, Juneau, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic updates for Duck Creek and the lower part of Jordan Creek in Juneau, Alaska, included computation of new estimates of peak streamflow magnitudes and new water-surface profiles for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods. Computations for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence interval flood magnitudes for both streams used data from U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations weighted with regional regression equations for southeast Alaska. The study area for the hydraulic model consisted of three channels: Duck Creek from Taku Boulevard near the stream's headwaters to Radcliffe Road near the end of the Juneau International Airport runway, an unnamed tributary to Duck Creek from Valley Boulevard to its confluence with Duck Creek, and Jordan Creek from a pedestrian bridge upstream from Egan Drive to Crest Street at Juneau International Airport. Field surveys throughout the study area provided channel geometry for 206 cross sections, and geometric and hydraulic characteristics for 29 culverts and 15 roadway, driveway, or pedestrian bridges. Hydraulic modeling consisted of application of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) for steady-state flow at the selected recurrence intervals using an assumed high tide of 20 feet and roughness coefficients refined by calibration to measured water-surface elevations from a 2- to 5-year flood that occurred on November 21, 2005. Model simulation results identify inter-basin flow from Jordan Creek to the southeast at Egan Drive and from Duck Creek to Jordan Creek downstream from Egan Drive at selected recurrence intervals.

  12. 1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF SOUTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF SOUTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX SHOWING THE RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE AT PHOTO RIGHT, BUILDING 106 NEXT TO THE POWERHOUSE AT PHOTO CENTER, BUILDING 103 AT UPPER PHOTO LEFT, AND BUILDING 104 ABOVE BUILDING 106 PARTIALLY OBSCURED BEHIND TREE AT UPPER PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  13. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  14. Selected hydrologic data for Fountain Creek and Monument Creek basins, east-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuhn, Gerhard; Ortiz, Roderick F.

    1989-01-01

    Selected hydrologic data were collected during 1986, 1987, and 1988 by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Fountain Creek and Monument Creek basins, east-central Colorado. The data were obtained as part of a study to determine the present and projected effects of wastewater discharges on the two creeks. The data, which are available for 129 surface-water sites, include: (1) About 1,100 water quality analyses; (2) about 420 measurements of discharge, (3) characteristics of about 50 dye clouds associated with measurements of traveltime and reaeration , and (4) about 360 measurements of channel geometry. (USGS)

  15. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; ...

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediatemore » ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.« less

  16. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediate ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

  17. On the method-dependence of transition state asynchronicity in Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2013-04-14

    This work discusses the dependence of transition state geometries on the choice of quantum chemical optimization method for the extensively studied Diels-Alder reaction. Rather significant differences are observed between post-Hartree-Fock methods and (hybrid) density functional theory, where the latter predicts larger asynchronicities. The results show that the low MP2 asynchronicity observed is likely artificial. Still, there are significant discrepancies between hybrid and pure density functionals. The role of the exchange functional seems to be most prominent in less activated reacting systems, while the importance of the correlation functional seems to increase as they become more activated by, e.g., an electron-donating group on the diene. To correct the dubious MP2 geometries, we employed the SCS-MP2 protocol for transition state optimization, which leads to significantly better results with respect to CCSD/6-31+G(d) level calculations. We conclude that in order for hybrid functionals to give descriptions consistent with the sample post-Hartree-Fock methods, a balanced combination of both Hartree-Fock exchange (with a couple of exceptions) and a well-behaved correlation functional is required. Given that the benchmark CCSD/6-31+G(d) geometries are sufficient representations, the best geometries were obtained using ωB97X(D), B2PLYP(D) and M06-2X.

  18. Vanadium redox flow battery efficiency and durability studies of sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene)s

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Kim, Soowhan; Stains, Ronald; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    Sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP) was examined for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) use. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied from 1.4, 1.6 and 2.0 meq/g in order to tune the proton conductivity and vanadium permeability. Coulombic efficiencies between 92 to 99% were observed, depending on IEC (lower IEC, higher coulombic efficiencies). In all cases the SDAPP displayed comparable energy efficiencies (88 - 90%) to Nafion 117 (88%) at 50mA/cm2. Membrane durability also was dependent on IEC; SDAPP with the highest IEC lasted slightly over 50 cycles while SDAPP with the lowest IEC lasted over 400 cycles and testing was discontinued only due to time constraints. Accelerated vanadium lifetime studies were initialed with SDAPP, by soaking films in a 0.1 M V5+ and 5.0 M total SO4-2 solution. The rate of degradation was also proportional with IEC; the 2 meq/g sample dissolved within 376 hours, the 1.6 meq/g sample dissolved after 860 hours, while the 1.4 meq/g sample broke apart after 1527 hours.

  19. A Single Molecular Diels-Alder Crosslinker for Achieving Recyclable Cross-Linked Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Wang, Fenfen; Peng, Yongjin; Chen, Tiehong; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Pingchuan

    2015-09-01

    A triol-functional crosslinker combining the thermoreversible properties of Diels-Alder (DA) adducts in one molecule is designed, synthesized, and used as an ideal substitute of a traditional crosslinker to prepare thermal recyclable cross-linked polyurethanes with excellent mechanical properties and recyclability in a very simple and efficient way. The recycle property of these materials achieved by the DA/retro-DA reaction at a suitable temperature is verified by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ variable temperature solid-state NMR experiments during the cyclic heating and cooling processes. The thermal recyclability and remending ability of the bulk polyurethanes is demonstrated by three polymer processing methods, including hot-press molding, injection molding, and solution casting. It is notable that all the recycled cross-linked polymers display nearly invariable elongation/stress at break compared to the as-synthesized samples. Further end-group functionalization of this single molecular DA crosslinker provides the potential in preparing a wide range of recyclable cross-linked polymers.

  20. Combinatorial Synthesis of Linearly Condensed Polycyclic Compounds, Including Anthracyclinones, Through Tandem Diels-Alder Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Pierre

    Double exocyclic 1,3-dienes such as 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane and its 1-substituted derivatives undergo two successive Diels-Alder additions with large reactivity difference between the addition of the first equivalent (k 1) and the second equivalent (k 2) of dienophile. This allows one to prepare, through parallel synthesis, a large number of linearly condensed polycyclic systems containing three annulated six-membered rings, including naphthacenyl systems and anthracyclinones. The large k 1/k 2 rate constant ratio is a consequence of the Dimroth principle, the first cycloaddition being significantly more exothermic then the second one. Control of regio- and stereoselectivity of the two successive cycloadditions is possible by 1-substitution of the 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane, for instance by a 1-(dimethoxymethyl) group, or by stereoselective disubstitution of the double diene by arenesulfenyl substituents. Enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones and analogues are obtained using enantiomerically pure dienophiles such as 3-oxo-but-2-en-2-yl esters. The chemistry so-developed has allowed the preparation of enantiomerically pure 6-((aminoalkoxy)oxy)methyl-6,7-dideoxyidarubicinones that are DNA intercalators and inhibitors of topoisomerase II-induced DNA strained religation.

  1. Liquid-Crystalline Ionic Liquids as Ordered Reaction Media for the Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Duncan W; Gao, Yanan; Canongia Lopes, José Nuno; Shimizu, Karina; Slattery, John M

    2016-11-02

    Liquid-crystalline ionic liquids (LCILs) are ordered materials that have untapped potential to be used as reaction media for synthetic chemistry. This paper investigates the potential for the ordered structures of LCILs to influence the stereochemical outcome of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and methyl acrylate. The ratio of endo- to exo-product from this reaction was monitored for a range of ionic liquids (ILs) and LCILs. Comparison of the endo:exo ratios in these reactions as a function of cation, anion and liquid crystallinity of the reaction media, allowed for the effects of liquid crystallinity to be distinguished from anion effects or cation alkyl chain length effects. These data strongly suggest that the proportion of exo-product increases as the reaction media is changed from an isotropic IL to a LCIL. A detailed molecular dynamics (MD) study suggests that this effect is related to different hydrogen bonding interactions between the reaction media and the exo- and endo-transition states in solvents with layered, smectic ordering compared to those that are isotropic.

  2. Returning to the Alder Hey report and its reporting: addressing confusions and improving inquiries.

    PubMed

    Dewar, S; Boddington, P

    2004-10-01

    The Royal Liverpool Children's Inquiry investigated the circumstances leading to the removal, retention, and disposal of human tissue, including children's organs, at the Royal Liverpool Children's NHS Trust (the Alder Hey Hospital). It recommended changes to procedures for obtaining consent for postmortems and retaining organs and tissues for research or education. However, the report contains five areas of confusion. Firstly, it allowed the cultural and historical traditions of horror over the use and misuse of body parts to suffuse the logical analysis of past wrongs and future rights. Secondly, it makes an inappropriate conflation between seeking redress for past wrongs and shaping future policy. Thirdly, the report takes a muddled stance over the value of bodily integrity at burial. Fourthly, the report is inconsistent over the justification for future organ and tissue collections. Fifthly, the notion of "respect" is used with troublesome looseness. The extent to which subsequent policy work has furthered the search for greater ethical clarity over these difficult issues is discussed, together with reflection on three particular improvements that could be made to the process of such an inquiry.

  3. Quantitative rate determination by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced NMR of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Lee, Youngbok; Hilty, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Emerging techniques for hyperpolarization of nuclear spins, foremost dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), lend unprecedented sensitivity to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sufficient signal can be obtained from a single scan, and reactions even far from equilibrium can be studied in real-time. When following the progress of a reaction by nuclear magnetic resonance, however, spin relaxation occurs concomitantly with the reaction to alter resonance line intensities. Here, we present a model for accounting for spin-relaxation in such reactions studied by hyperpolarized NMR. The model takes into account auto- and cross-relaxation in dipole-dipole coupled spin systems and is therefore applicable to NMR of hyperpolarized protons, the most abundant NMR-active nuclei. Applied to the Diels-Alder reaction of 1,4-dipheneylbutadiene (DPBD) with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione (PTD), reaction rates could be obtained accurately and reproducibly. Additional parameters available from the same experiment include relaxation rates of the reaction product, which may yield further information about the molecular properties of the product. The method presented is also compatible with an experiment where a single spin in the reactant is labeled in its spin-state by a selective radio frequency pulse for subsequent tracking through the reaction, allowing the unambiguous identification of its position in the product molecule. In this case, the chemical shift specificity of high-resolution NMR can allow for the simultaneous determination of reaction rates and mechanistic information in one experiment.

  4. 78 FR 28897 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project; Sweetwater County, Wyoming AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and finding of no...

  5. 20. DISTANT HELICOPTER VIEW TO SOUTHEAST UP LITTLE ROCK CREEK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DISTANT HELICOPTER VIEW TO SOUTHEAST UP LITTLE ROCK CREEK CANYON, WITH DAM AND RESERVOIR AT RIGHT CENTER. PALMDALE-LITTLEROCK DITCH, MARKED BY DENSE VEGETATION, CROSSES ROAD AT LOWER CENTER - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF NORTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW OF NORTH END OF RUSH CREEK POWERHOUSE RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX SHOWING BUILDING 108 AT PHOTO RIGHT AND BUILDING 105 AT PHOTO CENTER BEHIND SWITCHRACKS AND TREE. POWERHOUSE IS AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO WEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  7. 77 FR 5201 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The proposed change will alter the... Avenue across Bear Creek, mile 3.4 between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. This change would require...

  8. 77 FR 73967 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD... highway bridge at Wise Avenue across Bear Creek, mile 3.4, between Dundalk and Sparrows Point, MD. The... Regulation; Bear Creek, Dundalk, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 5201). The rulemaking concerned...

  9. 1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW SHOWING BISHOP CREEK PLANT 4 RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW SHOWING BISHOP CREEK PLANT 4 RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX. BUILDING 122 IS VISIBLE AT PHOTO CENTER. PLANT 5 INTAKE DAM AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO WEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  10. 1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW SHOWING BISHOP CREEK PLANT 4 RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW SHOWING BISHOP CREEK PLANT 4 RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX. BUILDING 113 IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT PHOTO CENTER. PLANT 5 INTAKE DAM AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO WEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  11. 1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW SHOWING BISHOP CREEK PLANT 4 RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW SHOWING BISHOP CREEK PLANT 4 RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX. ROOF OF BUILDING 105 IS VISIBLE IN UPPER PHOTO CENTER. PLANT 5 INTAKE DAM AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO WEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  12. 75 FR 8036 - Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Forest Service Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent... continued livestock grazing ] within the Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project area. The analysis will... conditions within the Monitor-Hot Creek Rangeland Project area towards desired conditions. The project...

  13. 76 FR 13524 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... FM Channel 258A at Willow Creek, California. Channel 258A can be allotted at Willow Creek, consistent... Congressional Review Act, see U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio...

  14. 75 FR 52463 - Safety Zone; Raccoon Creek, Bridgeport, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Raccoon Creek, Bridgeport, NJ AGENCY: Coast... specified waters of Raccoon Creek, Bridgeport, NJ. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of... intended to restrict vessel access in order to protect mariners in a portion of Raccoon Creek. DATES:...

  15. 75 FR 54069 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ...-2010-0265] RIN 1625--AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD AGENCY: Coast....9, across Curtis Creek at Baltimore, MD. The requested change would have allowed the bridge to... Regulation Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 30747-30750). The...

  16. 75 FR 1705 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Curtis Creek... operation of the I695 Bridge across Curtis Creek, mile 0.9, at Baltimore, MD. The deviation is necessary to... section of Curtis Creek and the bridge will not be able to open in the event of an emergency. Coast...

  17. 33 CFR 334.480 - Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek and Broad River, S.C.; U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot rifle and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek and... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.480 Archers Creek, Ribbon Creek and Broad River... navigation: (1) At the rifle range. Archers Creek between Broad River and Beaufort River and Ribbon...

  18. Origin, Age, and Geochemistry of the Tuff of Saguache Creek, Southwestern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, K. J.; Young, M. D.; Wendlandt, R. F.

    2003-12-01

    A crystal-poor, rhyolitic, ash-flow tuff in the Eastern San Juan Volcanic Field currently known as the tuff of Saguache Creek (TSC) was reinterpreted by Simon and Wendlandt (1999) as not being distal Sapinero Mesa Tuff. Currently there is no source caldera established for this tuff thereby leaving uncertainties in the volcanic history. Regional mapping of the TSC has subsequently been completed to constrain a possible source caldera. Petrographic studies, and EPMA and LA-ICPMS analyses of the mineral assemblage have been performed to characterize further the tuff, enable correlation of mapped TSC, and constrain petrogenetic models. Petrographic and chemical identification of the TSC builds on characteristics set forth by Simon (2000). These characteristics include abundant feldspar clusters, alkali feldspar mantled plagioclase, no modal quartz, Fe-Ti oxides (often with apatites and zircons), and sparse biotite and pyroxene. Pyroxenes show curiously high MnO (avg 2.70 wt%) and Mg# (avg 79.2) and might be xenocrystic. In comparison, biotites have much lower MnO (avg 0.82 wt%). Average sanidine (Or50) and plagioclase (Ab71) compositions fall within the documented range (Simon, 2000) and show little trace element substitution including Eu <3 ppm and Ba <1200 ppm. Titanites are enriched in Ce (17,000-20,000 ppm) and Pr (2,200-2700 ppm). Apatites show similar enrichment in Ce (2200-7600 ppm) and Pr (330-350 ppm). Confirmed outcrops of TSC are best preserved just north of Trickle Mtn where it is approximately 30 m thick and overlain by a welded airfall ash deposit preliminarily dated at 29-30 Ma. Outcrop localities south of Colorado Highway 114 show thinning and are interpreted as erosional remnants plastered on older Conejos age volcanic deposits. Similarly, an andesitic topographic high just west of Trickle Mtn has TSC vitrophyre on the east-facing slope suggesting strong north-south channeling of the flow unit by paleo-topographic lows. Outcrop elevations also decrease

  19. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334... and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md....

  20. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334... and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md....

  1. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334... and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md....

  2. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334... and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md....

  3. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334... and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md....

  4. Intensive survey of the bay creek watershed, July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Short, M.B.; Kelly, T.G.; Hefley, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    During July 1992, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency conducted an intensive survey of the Bay Creek basin, a fifth order tributary in the Mississippi River North Central Basin. Bay Creek drains approximately 176.4 square miles primarily in Pike and a small portion of Calhoun counties. Four stations were sampled on the Bay Creek main stem and one on Honey Creek. The survey focused on macroinvertebrate communities, fish populations, instream habitat, fish tissue, sediment and water chemistry, and land use as well as a review of ambient water quality data from IEPA station KCA-01 near Nebo, Illinois, as tools to document the biological and chemical status of Bay Creek.

  5. Drywell corrosion stopped at Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Lipford, B.L. ); Flynn, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    This article describes the detection of corrosion on the drywell containment vessel of Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant and the application of a protective coating to repair the drywell. The topics of the article include drywell design features, identification of the problem, initial action, drywell corrosion, failure of cathodic protection, long-term repair, and repair results.

  6. How Fern Creek Is Beating Goliath

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Margaret; Galatowitsch, Patrick; Hefferin, Keri; Highland, Shanita

    2013-01-01

    The "David" is Fern Creek Elementary, a small urban school in Orlando, Florida, that serves an overwhelmingly disadvantaged student population. The "Goliaths" are the mountains of problems that many inner-city students face--poverty, homelessness, mobility, instability, limited parent involvement, and violent neighborhood…

  7. Gold Creek: Preserving an Environmental Studies Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Suzanne

    In response to a Board of Trustees request for information and recommendations concerning the future use of the Gold Creek property owned by the Los Angeles Community College District, this report emphasizes that the use of this site for instructional field experiences enhances the quality of environmental education for the district's diverse…

  8. 33 CFR 117.709 - Cheesequake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.709 Cheesequake Creek. (a) The draw of the S35 Bridge, at mile 0.0, at Morgan, South Amboy, New Jersey, shall operate as follows: (1... calling the number posted at the bridge. (b) The draw of the New Jersey Transit Rail Operations...

  9. 33 CFR 117.709 - Cheesequake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.709 Cheesequake Creek. (a) The draw of the S35 Bridge, at mile 0.0, at Morgan, South Amboy, New Jersey, shall operate as follows: (1... calling the number posted at the bridge. (b) The draw of the New Jersey Transit Rail Operations...

  10. 27 CFR 9.211 - Swan Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-Salem, North Carolina, 1984, photoinspected 1982; (2) Boone, North Carolina-Tennessee, 1985; and (3... viticultural area is as described below: (1) The beginning point is on the Winston-Salem, North Carolina map at..., returning to the Winston-Salem map, to the intersection of Rocky Creek with State Highway 115 at New Hope...

  11. 27 CFR 9.211 - Swan Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-Salem, North Carolina, 1984, photoinspected 1982; (2) Boone, North Carolina-Tennessee, 1985; and (3... viticultural area is as described below: (1) The beginning point is on the Winston-Salem, North Carolina map at..., returning to the Winston-Salem map, to the intersection of Rocky Creek with State Highway 115 at New Hope...

  12. 27 CFR 9.211 - Swan Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-Salem, North Carolina, 1984, photoinspected 1982; (2) Boone, North Carolina-Tennessee, 1985; and (3... viticultural area is as described below: (1) The beginning point is on the Winston-Salem, North Carolina map at..., returning to the Winston-Salem map, to the intersection of Rocky Creek with State Highway 115 at New Hope...

  13. 27 CFR 9.211 - Swan Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-Salem, North Carolina, 1984, photoinspected 1982; (2) Boone, North Carolina-Tennessee, 1985; and (3... viticultural area is as described below: (1) The beginning point is on the Winston-Salem, North Carolina map at..., returning to the Winston-Salem map, to the intersection of Rocky Creek with State Highway 115 at New Hope...

  14. 27 CFR 9.211 - Swan Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-Salem, North Carolina, 1984, photoinspected 1982; (2) Boone, North Carolina-Tennessee, 1985; and (3... viticultural area is as described below: (1) The beginning point is on the Winston-Salem, North Carolina map at..., returning to the Winston-Salem map, to the intersection of Rocky Creek with State Highway 115 at New Hope...

  15. 27 CFR 9.62 - Loramie Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Loramie Creek. 9.62 Section 9.62 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  16. 27 CFR 9.62 - Loramie Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Loramie Creek. 9.62 Section 9.62 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  17. Species status of Mill Creek Elliptio

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.M.; Mulvey, M.

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses environmental effects of the Savannah River Plant on aqautic populations in Mill Creek and surrounding tributaries. Of particular concern was the status of Elliptio. Genetics and phenotypic characteristics have shown that the current classification system is not adequate for these populations. The appendices characterize genetic variability at different loci, electrophoretic data, allele frequencies, sympatric species, and anatomical characters.

  18. 33 CFR 117.738 - Overpeck Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 117.738 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.738 Overpeck Creek. (a) The draws of the Conrail and the New York, Susquehanna and Western railroad bridges, mile 0.0 both at...

  19. 33 CFR 117.709 - Cheesequake Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 117.709 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.709 Cheesequake Creek. (a) The draw of the S35 Bridge, at mile 0.0, at Morgan, South Amboy, New Jersey, shall operate as follows:...

  20. 33 CFR 117.715 - Debbies Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 117.715 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.715 Debbies Creek. (a) The draw of... to operators of vessels approaching the bridge either up or downstream....

  1. Bereavement Rituals in the Muscogee Creek Tribe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Andrea C.; Balk, David E.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative, collective case study explores bereavement rituals in the Muscogee Creek tribe. Data from interviews with 27 participants, all adult members of the tribe, revealed consensus on participation in certain bereavement rituals. Common rituals included (a) conducting a wake service the night before burial; (b) never leaving the body alone…

  2. Habitat suitability index models: Creek chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    The creek chub is a widely-distributed cyprinid ranging from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Coast and from the Gulf of Mexico to southern Manitoba and Quebec (Scott and Crossman 1973). Within its range, it is one of the most characteristic and common fishes of small, clear streams (Trautman 1957).

  3. Gold Creek: An Environmental Studies Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodley, Laurel

    A description is provided of the Gold Creek Ecological Reserve, 240 acres of undisturbed land in Northeast Los Angeles County, which serves the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) as an outdoor laboratory for students and faculty in numerous disciplines. Section I provides introductory information on the reserve and its features, which…

  4. Steel Creek zooplankton: L Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Starkel, W.M.; Chimney, M.J.

    1988-03-01

    The objectives of this portion of the Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program were to analyze data on macrozooplankton taxonomy and density in the Steel Creek corridor and swamp/delta, and compare the composition of the post-impoundment macrozooplankton community with pre-impoundment conditions and communities from other stream and swamp systems. The data presented in the report cover the period January 1986 through December 1987. Macrozooplankton samples were collected monthly using an 80 ..mu..m mesh net at Stations 275, 280, and 290 in the Steel Creek corridor and Stations 310, 330, 350, and 370 in the Steel Creek delta/swamp. Macrozooplankton taxa richness was highest at the two Steel Creek corridor stations nearest the L-Lake dam (Stations 275 and 280); mean values were 10.6 and 7.2 taxa collected/month in 1986 vs 12.1 and 12.3 taxa collected/month in 1987. The lowest taxa richness occurred at Steel Creek swamp/delta stations; means ranged from 1.9 to 4.2 taxa collected/month during both years.

  5. Diastereoselective Diels–Alder Reactions of N-Sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes With Optically Active Enol Ethers: An Asymmetric Variant of the 1-Azadiene Diels–Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ryan C.; Pfeiffer, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    The first detailed study of a room temperature asymmetric Diels–Alder reaction of N-sulfonyl-1-aza-1,3-butadienes enlisting a series of nineteen enol ethers bearing chiral auxilaries is reported with many providing highly diastereoselective (endo and facial diastereoselection) reactions largely the result of an exquisitely organized [4 + 2] cycloaddition transition state. Three new, readily accessible, and previously unexplored auxilaries (18a, 19a and 37a) rationally emerged from the studies and provide remarkable selectivities (for 19a and 37a: 49:1 endo:exo and 48:1 facial selectivity) that promise to be useful in systems beyond those detailed. PMID:16492042

  6. Pine Creek Ranch, FY 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Mark E.

    2001-11-01

    Pine Creek Ranch was purchased in 1999 by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs using Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation funds. The 25,000 acre property will be managed in perpetuity for the benefit of fish and wildlife habitat. Major issues include: (1) Restoring quality spawning and rearing habitat for stealhead. Streams are incised and fish passage barriers exist from culverts and possibly beaver dams. In addition to stealhead habitat, the Tribes are interested in overall riparian recovery in the John Day River system for wildlife habitat, watershed values and other values such as recreation. (2) Future grazing for specific management purposes. Past grazing practices undoubtedly contributed to current unacceptable conditions. The main stem of Pine Creek has already been enrolled in the CREP program administered by the USDA, Natural Resource Conservation Service in part because of the cost-share for vegetation restoration in a buffer portion of old fields and in part because of rental fees that will help the Tribes to pay the property taxes. Grazing is not allowed in the riparian buffer for the term of the contract. (3) Noxious weeds are a major concern. (4) Encroachment by western juniper throughout the watershed is a potential concern for the hydrology of the creek. Mark Berry, Habitat Manager, for the Pine Creek Ranch requested the Team to address the following objectives: (1) Introduce some of the field staff and others to Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessments and concepts. (2) Do a PFC assessment on approximately 10 miles of Pine Creek. (3) Offer management recommendations. (4) Provide guidelines for monitoring.

  7. Factors affecting distribution of wood, detritus, and sediment in headwater streams draining managed young-growth red alder - Conifer forests in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomi, T.; Johnson, A.C.; Deal, R.L.; Hennon, P.E.; Orlikowska, E.H.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Factors (riparian stand condition, management regimes, and channel properties) affecting distributions of wood, detritus (leaves and branches), and sediment were examined in headwater streams draining young-growth red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) - conifer riparian forests (40 years old) remained in channels and provided sites for sediment and organic matter storage. Despite various alder-conifer mixtures and past harvesting effects, the abundance of large wood, fine wood, and detritus accumulations significantly decreased with increasing channel bank-full width (0.5-3.5 m) along relatively short channel distances (up to 700 m). Changes in wood, detritus, and sediment accumulations together with changes in riparian stand characteristics create spatial and temporal variability of in-channel conditions in headwater systems. A component of alder within young-growth riparian forests may benefit both wood production and biological recovery in disturbed headwater stream channels. ?? 2006 NRC.

  8. Synthesis of novel dendritic 2,2'-bipyridine ligands and their application to Lewis acid-catalyzed diels-alder and three-component condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takahito; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kujime, Masato

    2007-10-12

    A series of dendritic ligands with a 2,2'-bipyridine core was synthesized through the coupling of 4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine with poly(aryl ether) dendrons. The corresponding dendritic Cu(OTf)2 catalysts were used for Diels-Alder and three-component condensation reactions. The dendritic Cu(OTf)2-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction proceeded smoothly, and these dendritic catalysts could be recycled without deactivation by reprecipitation. Three-component condensation reactions such as Mannich-type reactions also proceeded not only in dichloromethane but also in water. Furthermore, a positive dendritic effect on chemical yields was observed in both Diels-Alder reactions and aqueous-media three-component condensation reactions.

  9. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, and the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males.

  10. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru?? during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, nd the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males. ?? The Neotropical Ornithological Society.

  11. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  12. Computational design of a lipase for catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Hermansson, Anders; Liebeschuetz, John; Brinck, Tore

    2011-04-01

    Combined molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) studies have been employed to study catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction by a modified lipase. Six variants of the versatile enzyme Candida Antarctica lipase B (CALB) have been rationally engineered in silico based on the specific characteristics of the pericyclic addition. A kinetic analysis reveals that hydrogen bond stabilization of the transition state and substrate binding are key components of the catalytic process. In the case of substrate binding, which has the greater potential for optimization, both binding strength and positioning of the substrates are important for catalytic efficiency. The binding strength is determined by hydrophobic interactions and can be tuned by careful selection of solvent and substrates. The MD simulations show that substrate positioning is sensitive to cavity shape and size, and can be controlled by a few rational mutations. The well-documented S105A mutation is essential to enable sufficient space in the vicinity of the oxyanion hole. Moreover, bulky residues on the edge of the active site hinders the formation of a sandwich-like nearattack conformer (NAC), and the I189A mutation is needed to obtain enough space above the face of the α,β-double bond on the dienophile. The double mutant S105A/I189A performs quite well for two of three dienophiles. Based on binding constants and NAC energies obtained from MD simulations combined with activation energies from DFT computations, relative catalytic rates (v(cat)/v(uncat)) of up to 103 are predicted.

  13. Harnessing the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition for pretargeted PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2015-02-03

    Due to their exquisite affinity and specificity, antibodies have become extremely promising vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes to cancer cells for PET imaging. However, the necessity of labeling antibodies with radionuclides with long physical half-lives often results in high background radiation dose rates to non-target tissues. In order to circumvent this issue, we have employed a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The methodology decouples the antibody from the radioactivity and thus exploits the positive characteristics of antibodies, while eschewing their pharmacokinetic drawbacks. The system is composed of four steps: (1) the injection of a mAb-trans-cyclooctene (TCO) conjugate; (2) a localization time period during which the antibody accumulates in the tumor and clears from the blood; (3) the injection of the radiolabeled tetrazine; and (4) the in vivo click ligation of the components followed by the clearance of excess radioligand. In the example presented in the work at hand, a (64)Cu-NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand and a trans-cyclooctene-conjugated humanized antibody (huA33) were successfully used to delineate SW1222 colorectal cancer tumors with high tumor-to-background contrast. Further, the pretargeting methodology produces high quality images at only a fraction of the radiation dose to non-target tissue created by radioimmunoconjugates directly labeled with (64)Cu or (89)Zr. Ultimately, the modularity of this protocol is one of its greatest assets, as the trans-cyclooctene moiety can be appended to any non-internalizing antibody, and the tetrazine can be attached to a wide variety of radioisotopes.

  14. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Katrina L.; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  15. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed.

  16. Can We Use Tree Rings of Black Alder to Reconstruct Lake Levels? A Case Study for the Mecklenburg Lake District, Northeastern Germany

    PubMed Central

    van der Maaten, Ernst; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Buras, Allan; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Kaiser, Knut; Lorenz, Sebastian; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential to reconstruct lake-level (and groundwater) fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.) for three study lakes in the Mecklenburg Lake District, northeastern Germany. As gauging records for lakes in this region are generally short, long-term reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations could provide valuable information on past hydrological conditions, which, in turn, are useful to assess dynamics of climate and landscape evolution. We selected black alder as our study species as alder typically thrives as riparian vegetation along lakeshores. For the study lakes, we tested whether a regional signal in lake-level fluctuations and in the growth of alder exists that could be used for long-term regional hydrological reconstructions, but found that local (i.e. site-specific) signals in lake level and tree-ring chronologies prevailed. Hence, we built lake/groundwater-level reconstruction models for the three study lakes individually. Two sets of models were considered based on (1) local tree-ring series of black alder, and (2) site-specific Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Indices (SPEI). Although the SPEI-based models performed statistically well, we critically reflect on the reliability of these reconstructions, as SPEI cannot account for human influence. Tree-ring based reconstruction models, on the other hand, performed poor. Combined, our results suggest that, for our study area, long-term regional reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations that consider both recent and ancient (e.g., archaeological) wood of black alder seem extremely challenging, if not impossible. PMID:26317768

  17. Nitroso Diels-Alder (NDA) Reaction as an Efficient Tool for the Functionalization of Diene-Containing Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Carosso, Serena; Miller, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the use of nitroso Diels-Alder reactions for the functionalization of complex diene-containing natural products in order to generate libraries of compounds with potential biological activity. The application of this methodology to the structural modification of a series of natural products (thebaine, steroidal dienes, rapamycin, leucomycin, colchicine, isocolchicine and piperine) is discussed using relevant examples from the literature from 1973 onwards. The biological activity of the resulting compounds is also discussed. Additional comments are provided that evaluate the methodology as a useful tool in organic, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry. PMID:25119424

  18. A Minimal, Unstrained S‐Allyl Handle for Pre‐Targeting Diels–Alder Bioorthogonal Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Bruno L.; Guo, Zijian; Boutureira, Omar; Guerreiro, Ana; Jiménez‐Osés, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The unstrained S‐allyl cysteine amino acid was site‐specifically installed on apoptosis protein biomarkers and was further used as a chemical handle and ligation partner for 1,2,4,5‐tetrazines by means of an inverse‐electron‐demand Diels–Alder reaction. We demonstrate the utility of this minimal handle for the efficient labeling of apoptotic cells using a fluorogenic tetrazine dye in a pre‐targeting approach. The small size, easy chemical installation, and selective reactivity of the S‐allyl handle towards tetrazines should be readily extendable to other proteins and biomolecules, which could facilitate their labeling within live cells. PMID:27763724

  19. Diels-Alder Reactions of α-Amido Acrylates with N-Cbz-1,2-dihydropyridine and Cyclopentadiene.

    PubMed

    Abas, Hossay; Frampton, Christopher S; Spivey, Alan C

    2016-10-21

    Thermal Diels-Alder reactions of α-amido acrylates with N-Cbz-1,2-dihydropyridine and cyclopentadiene have been explored to investigate the factors influencing the endo/exo selectivity. For the dihydropyridine, steric factors allowed the diastereoselectivity to be modulated to favor either endo- or exo-ester adducts. For cyclopentadiene, the endo-ester adducts were favored regardless of steric perturbation, although catalysis by bulky Lewis acids increased the proportion of exo-ester adducts in some cases. These Lewis acids were incompatible with the dihydropyridine diene as they induced its decomposition.

  20. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Phuong T. M.; McAtee, Jesse R.; Watson, Donald A.; Lobo, Raul F.

    2012-12-12

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structures of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst have been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed, demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels–Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions.

  1. Bidentate Lewis Acid Catalyzed Domino Diels-Alder Reaction of Phthalazine for the Synthesis of Bridged Oligocyclic Tetrahydronaphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Schweighauser, Luca; Bodoky, Ina; Kessler, Simon N; Häussinger, Daniel; Donsbach, Carsten; Wegner, Hermann A

    2016-03-18

    A domino process consisting of an inverse and a normal electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction is presented for the formation of bridged tri- and tetracyclic 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalenes catalyzed by a bidentate Lewis acid. The products were synthesized in a one-pot reaction from commercially available starting materials and contain up to six stereogenic centers. The tetrahydronaphthalenes were isolated as single diastereomers and are derivatives of phenylethylamine, which is well-known as a scaffold of amphetamine or dopamine.

  2. Tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR). An easy entry to linear bicyclic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Javier; Sánchez-Roselló, María; Sanz, Álvaro; Rabasa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Summary A new tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR) has been carried out. It involves conjugated ketones, esters or amides bearing a remote olefin and aromatic alkynes as the starting materials. The overall process enables the preparation of a small family of linear bicyclic scaffolds in a very simple manner with moderate to good levels of diastereoselectivity. This methodology constitutes one of the few examples that employ olefins differently than ethylene in tandem CEYM–IMDAR protocols. PMID:26425205

  3. Hybrid metal/organo relay catalysis enables enynes to be latent dienes for asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Dian-Feng; Wang, Ya-Yi; Guo, Rui; Wang, Pu-Sheng; Wang, Chao; Gong, Liu-Zhu

    2012-04-18

    The hybrid Au(I)/Brønsted acid binary catalyst system enables enynes to serve as latent 1,3-silyloxydienes capable of participating in the first cascade hydrosiloxylation of an enynyl silanol/asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction. A variety of polycyclic compounds bearing multistereogenic centers were obtained in high yields and excellent enantioselectivities from the relay catalytic cascade reaction between (2-(but-3-en-1-ynyl)phenyl) silanols and quinones catalyzed by the combined achiral gold complex and chiral N-triflyl phosphoramide.

  4. One-pot cross-enyne metathesis (CEYM)-Diels-Alder reaction of gem-difluoropropargylic alkynes.

    PubMed

    Fustero, Santos; Bello, Paula; Miró, Javier; Sánchez-Roselló, María; Haufe, Günter; Del Pozo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Propargylic difluorides 1 were used as starting substrates in a combination of cross-enyne metathesis and Diels-Alder reactions. Thus, the reaction of 1 with ethylene in the presence of 2(nd) generation Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst generates a diene moiety which in situ reacts with a wide variety of dienophiles giving rise to a small family of new fluorinated carbo- and heterocyclic derivatives in moderate to good yields. This is a complementary protocol to the one previously described by our research group, which involved the use of 1,7-octadiene as an internal source of ethylene.

  5. Summer food habits and trophic overlap of roundtail chub and creek chub in Muddy Creek, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Bower, M.R.; Hubert, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Native fishes of the Upper Colorado River Basin have experienced substantial declines in abundance and distribution, and are extirpated from most of Wyoming. Muddy Creek, in south-central Wyoming (Little Snake River watershed), contains sympatric populations of native roundtail chub (Gila robusta), bluehead sucker, (Catostomus discobolus), and flannelmouth sucker (C. tatipinnis), and represents an area of high conservation concern because it is the only area known to have sympatric populations of all 3 species in Wyoming. However, introduced creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) are abundant and might have a negative influence on native fishes. We assessed summer food habits of roundtail chub and creek chub to provide information on the ecology of each species and obtain insight on potential trophic overlap. Roundtail chub and creek chub seemed to be opportunistic generalists that consumed a diverse array of food items. Stomach contents of both species were dominated by plant material, aquatic and terrestrial insects, and Fishes, but also included gastropods and mussels. Stomach contents were similar between species, indicating high trophic, overlap. No length-related patterns in diet were observed for either species. These results suggest that creek chubs have the potential to adversely influence the roundtail chub population through competition for food and the native fish assemblage through predation.

  6. PADDY CREEK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MISSOURI.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.; Ellis, Clarence

    1984-01-01

    The Paddy Creek Wilderness study area, Missouri was investigated by geologic and mineral surveys. There is no known record of mineral production, development, or prospecting in the area. Several rock units that underlie the study area are known to be the host rocks for important lead-zinc-silver-copper-nickel-cobalt deposits and magnetic iron-ore deposits of the Southeast Missouri district, about 52 mi east of the study area. Similar occurrences may exist in the Paddy Creek Wilderness study area, but the mineral-resource potential cannot be adequately evaluated without further study, specifically, deep drilling within or close to the area to test the potential for base-metal mineralization, and detailed magnetic surveys of the area to test for magnetic anomalies.

  7. DRY CREEK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, ARKANSAS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Stroud, Raymond B.

    1984-01-01

    The Dry Creek Wilderness Study Area covers an area of about 10 sq mi in parts of Logan, Scott, and Yell Counties, Arkansas. A mineral evaluation study of the area indicated that the area has a probable resource potential for natural gas and little promise for the occurrence of other mineral commodities. Less than 100,000 cu ft/day of natural gas is being produced from one well about 4 mi north of the area.

  8. Channel stability of Turkey Creek, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rus, David L.; Soenksen, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    Channelization on Turkey Creek and its receiving stream, the South Fork Big Nemaha River, has disturbed the equilibrium of Turkey Creek and has led to channel-stability problems, such as degradation and channel widening, which pose a threat to bridges and land adjacent to the stream. As part of a multiagency study, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed channel stability at two bridge sites on upper and middle portions of Turkey Creek by analyzing streambed-elevation data for gradation changes, comparing recent cross-section surveys and historic accounts, identifying bank-failure blocks, and analyzing tree-ring samples. These results were compared to gradation data and trend results for a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station near the mouth of Turkey Creek from a previous study. Examination of data on streambed elevations reveals that degradation has occurred. The streambed elevation declined 0.5 m at the upper site from 1967-97. The streambed elevation declined by 3.2 m at the middle site from 1948-97 and exposed 2 m of the pilings of the Nebraska Highway 8 bridge. Channel widening could not be verified at the two sites from 1967-97, but a historic account indicates widening at the middle site to be two to three times that of the 1949 channel width. Small bank failures were evident at the upper site and a 4-m-wide bank failure occurred at the middle site in 1987 according to tree ring analyses. Examination of streambed-elevation data from a previous study at the lower site reveals a statistically significant aggrading trend from 1958-93. Further examination of these data suggests minor degradation occurred until 1975, followed by aggradation.

  9. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.; Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y.

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  10. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Analysis of Diels-Alder Reactions of Alkene Gases to Functional Ionic Liquids on Chips.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Hsuan; Chiang, Shu-Jen; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2016-11-15

    We demonstrated here a successful development of the use of functional ionic liquids FIL 1 and FIL 3 for chemoselective detection of alkene gases measured by quartz crystal microbalance. This detection of gaseous alkenes was achieved by the Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloadditions with FIL 1 and FIL 3 thin-coated on quartz chips. Our functional ionic liquids could be prepared by straightforward synthetic chemistry in short steps and are superior in alkene gas detection. The QCM platform developed in this work is chemoselective with fast gas diffusion into ionic liquids, readily applicable to low molecular weight alkene gases and insensitive to moisture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report based upon the Diels-Alder reactions demonstrating sensitive alkene gas detection in ionic liquids on a QCM. This work is a proof-of-concept inspection of the promising use of a QCM-based sensor method for reaction-directed detection of gas samples, which is part of an ongoing program aimed at studying diseases.

  11. Synergistic activation of the Diels-Alder reaction by an organic catalyst and substituents: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2009-04-07

    Density functional theory (DFT), using the hybrid functionals B3LYP and B2PLYP, has been employed to investigate the activation of the acrolein-butadiene Diels-Alder reaction, mediated by a thiourea catalyst. Effects due to electron-donating groups (EDGs) on the diene, as well as electron-withdrawing groups (EWGs) on the dienophile, have also been studied. Organic catalysts such as thioureas are known to lower the activation energy through hydrogen-bonding to the carbonyl oxygen, in a way that mimics the oxyanion holes of hydrolytic enzymes. EDGs and EWGs were found to further activate the reaction, and the catalyst showed a synergistic behavior towards the EDGs. Polar solvents were found to reduce the overall activation energy, but also the relative catalytic effect of the thiourea, in accordance with experimental studies. The substituent-mediated reactions displayed more asynchronous transition structures with lower activation energy, which led us to investigate the possibility of an alternative two-step, Michael-type route, similar to what has been found in macrophomate synthase. Although the concerted Diels-Alder route was found to be favored over the Michael route, the calculated activation energy difference is less than 1 kcal mol(-1), which suggests that the two mechanisms compete, and could be responsible for the particular stereochemical outcome of an experiment.

  12. Magnetic hyaluronic acid nanospheres via aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry to deliver dexamethasone for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yang; Fan, Ming; Chen, Huinan; Miao, Yuting; Xing, Lian; Jiang, Bohong; Cheng, Qifan; Liu, Dongwei; Bao, Weikang; Qian, Bin; Wang, Jionglu; Xing, Xiaodong; Tan, Huaping; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-11-15

    Biopolymer-based nanospheres have great potential in the field of drug delivery and tissue regenerative medicine. In this work, we present a flexible way to conjugate a magnetic hyaluronic acid (HA) nanosphere system that are capable of vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor, e.g. dexamethasone, for adipose tissue engineering. Conjugation of nanospheres was established by aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry between furan and maleimide of HA derivatives. Simultaneously, a furan functionalized dexamethasone peptide, GQPGK, was synthesized and covalently immobilized into the nanospheres. The magnetic HA nanospheres were fabricated by encapsulating super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which exhibited quick magnetic sensitivity. The aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry made nanospheres high binding efficiency of dexamethasone, and the vectoring delivery of dexamethasone could be easily controlled by a external magnetic field. The potential application of the magnetic HA nanospheres on vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor was confirmed by co-culture of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). In vitro cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that incorporation of dexamethasone into magnetic HA nanospheres showed high efficiency to promote ASCs viabilities, in particular under a magnetic field, which suggested a promising future for adipose regeneration applications.

  13. Humus bacteria of Norway spruce stands: plant growth promoting properties and birch, red fescue and alder colonizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Elo; Maunuksela; Salkinoja-Salonen; Smolander; Haahtela

    2000-02-01

    We studied the potential of the humus layer of the Norway spruce stands to supply beneficial rhizobacteria to birch (Betula pendula), alder (Alnus incana) and fescue grass (Festuca rubra), representatives of pioneer vegetation after clear-cutting of the coniferous forest. Axenically grown seedlings of these species were inoculated with the acid spruce humus, pH 3.7-5.3. Actinorhizal propagules, capable of nodulating alder, were present in high density (10(3) g(-1)) in humus of long-term limed plots, whereas plots with nitrogen fertilization contained almost none (

  14. Employing Arynes in Diels-Alder Reactions and Transition-Metal-Free Multicomponent Coupling and Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhojgude, Sachin Suresh; Bhunia, Anup; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-09-20

    Arynes are highly reactive intermediates having several applications in organic synthesis for the construction of various ortho-disubstituted arenes. Traditionally, arynes are generated in solution from haloarenes under strongly basic conditions. However, the scopes of many of the aryne reactions are limited because of the harsh conditions used for their generation. The renaissance of interest in aryne chemistry is mainly due to the mild conditions for their generation by the fluoride-induced 1,2-elimination of 2-(trimethylsilyl)aryl triflates. This Account is focused on the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes and their transition-metal-free application in multicomponent couplings as well as arylation reactions. The Diels-Alder reaction of arynes is a powerful tool for constructing benzo-fused carbocycles and heterocycles. In 2012, we developed an efficient, broad-scope, and scalable Diels-Alder reaction of pentafulvenes with arynes affording benzonorbornadiene derivatives. Subsequently, we accomplished the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes with dienes such as 1,2-benzoquinones and tropones. Moreover, we uncovered a transition-metal-free protocol for the synthesis of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes by the reaction of arynes with styrenes that proceeds via a Diels-Alder/ene-reaction cascade. In addition, we demonstrated the reaction of arynes with indene/benzofurans, which proceeds via a tandem [4 + 2]/[2 + 2] sequence. Multicomponent coupling (MCC) involving arynes mainly comprises the initial addition of a nucleophile to the aryne followed by interception of the aryl anion intermediate with an electrophile (provided the nucleophilic and electrophilic moieties do not belong to the same molecule). We have disclosed aryne MCCs initiated by N-heterocycles such as (iso)quinoline, pyridine, and aziridines. When (iso)quinoline is used as the nucleophilic trigger and N-substituted isatin as the third component, the reaction affords spirooxazino(iso)quinolines via 1,4-dipolar

  15. Floods in the Big Creek basin, Linn County, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinitz, Albert J.

    1977-01-01

    Flood information for the Big Creek basin in Linn County, Iowa, should be of use to those concerned with the design of bridges and other structures on the flood plains of the streams. Water-surface profiles for the flood of May 1974 are given for Big Creek and its major tributaries, East Big, Crabapple, Elbow, and Abbe Creeks. The May 1974 flood was at least a 50-year flood on East Big Creek and along certain reaches of Big and Abbe Creeks. Also included for Big Creek are a profile of the December 1971 medium-stage flow and a partial profile for the minor flood of July 1971. Profiles for the low-water condition of October 26, 1972, are shown for all reaches. Water-surface profiles for the 25- and 50-year floods are estimated in relation to the May 1974 flood.

  16. Cow Castle Creek, Orangeburg County, South Carolina. Environmental Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    woodlands, and drainage features. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS Cow Castle Creek Basin is located within the larger Edisto River Basin in Orangeburg...about 47 inches of precipitation per year. Water Quality. Cow Castle Creek lies within the Edisto River drainage basin . The Edisto Basin is located... Edisto River . Several small tributaries enter Cow Castle Creek, adding to its flow during storms and hurricanes. Siltation and extensive litter and log

  17. Bioassessment of Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Bogenrieder, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological components at five stations on Hollis Creek, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi were evaluated using Rapid Bioassessment Protocols (RBP) and the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) on August 24-26, 1999, in order to assess potential biological impacts from the Starkville Waste Water Treatment Facility (WWTF) on downstream resources. Two stations were selected above the WWTF and three below. The WWTF discharges treated effluent into Hollis Creek, but during storm events raw sewage may be released. Hollis Creek is a tributary of the Noxubee River that traverses the northern portion of Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, which is managed as bottomland hardwood forest land for the protection of fish and wildlife resources. Hollis Creek was channelized throughout most of its length, resulting in high, unstable banks, degraded stream channel and unstable substratum. The RBP scores for the habitat evaluations from each station indicated that Stations 1 and 2 had degraded habitat compared to the reference site, Station 5. Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish assemblages also indicated that the biological integrity at Stations 1 and 2 was less than that of the downstream stations. The SQT showed that Stations 1 and 2 were degraded and the most likely causes of the impairment were the elevated concentrations of polycylclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals in the sediments; Hyalella azteca survival in pore water and growth in solid-phase sediment exposures were reduced at these upstream sites. The source of contaminants to the upper reaches appears to be storm-water runoff. The close concordance between the RBP and SQT in identifying site degradation provided a preponderance of evidence indicating that the upper reaches (Stations 1 and 2) of Hollis Creek were impacted. Biological conditions improved downstream of the WWTF, even though physical degradation steinming from channelization activities were still evident. The increased discharge and stabilized base

  18. Geologic map of the Skull Creek Quadrangle, Moffat County Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Loenen, R. E.; Selner, Gary; Bryant, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Skull Creek quadrangle is in northwestern Colorado a few miles north of Rangely. The prominent structural feature of the Skull Creek quadrangle is the Skull Creek monocline. Pennsylvanian rocks are exposed along the axis of the monocline while hogbacks along its southern flank expose rocks that are from Permian to Upper Cretaceous in age. The Wolf Creek monocline and the Wolf Creek thrust fault, which dissects the monocline, are salient structural features in the northern part of the quadrangle. Little or no mineral potential exists within the quadrangle. A geologic map of the Lazy Y Point quadrangle, which is adjacent to the Skull Creek quadrangle on the west, is also available (Geologic Investigations Series I-2646). This companian map shows similar geologic features, including the western half of the Skull Creek monocline. The geology of this quadrangle was mapped because of its proximity to Dinosaur National Monument. It is adjacent to quadrangles previously mapped to display the geology of this very scenic and popular National Monument. The Skull Creek quadrangle includes parts of the Skull Creek Wilderness Study Area, which was assessed for its mineral resource potential.

  19. Northeast and northwest elevations. View to south Flint Creek ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northeast and northwest elevations. View to south - Flint Creek Hydroelectric Project, Powerhouse, Approximately 3 miles southeast of Porters Corner on Powerhouse Road, Philipsburg, Granite County, MT

  20. Characterization of Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2004-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 15 river miles long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson (fig. 1). Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, began studying Fish Creek in 2004 to describe the hydrology of the creek and later (2007?08) to characterize the water quality and the biological communities. The purpose of this fact sheet is to summarize the study results from 2004 to 2008.

  1. Diels-Alder Cycloadditions: A MORE Experiment in the Organic Laboratory Including a Diene Identification Exercise Involving NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Roosevelt; Severin, Ashika; Balfour, Miguel; Nettles, Columbus

    2005-01-01

    Two Diels-Alder reactions are described that are suitable for a MORE (microwave-induced organic reaction enhanced) experiment in the organic chemistry laboratory course. A second experiment in which the splitting patterns of the vinyl protons in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two MORE adducts are used in conjunction with molecular…

  2. Illustrating the Utility of X-Ray Crystallography for Structure Elucidation through a Tandem Aldol Condensation/Diels-Alder Reaction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang T.; Kubo, Tomohiro; Young, Victor G., Jr.; Kautzky, Jacob A.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Two introductory organic chemistry laboratory experiments are described based on the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenylcyclopentadienone, which is synthesized prior to or in a one-pot reaction, with styrene. Students are presented with three possible products, the "endo" and "exo" diastereomers and the decarbonylated…

  3. Fast Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions Using 4-Phenyl-1,2,4-Triazoline-3,5-Dione (PTAD) as the Dienophile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celius, Tevye C.

    2010-01-01

    A hetero-Diels-Alder reaction that proceeds rapidly and only requires a simple filtration to purify the product is presented. The dienophile, 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD), is prepared by the heterogeneous oxidation of 4-phenylurazole by the bromenium ion, Br[superscript +], generated in situ by the oxidation of potassium bromide by…

  4. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  5. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  6. The Synthesis of "N"-Benzyl-2-Azanorbornene via Aqueous Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction: An Undergraduate Project in Organic Synthesis and Structural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvage, Xavier; Delaude, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of "N"-benzyl-2-azanorbornene via aqueous hetero Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and benzyliminium chloride formed in situ from benzylamine hydrochloride and formaldehyde is described. Characterization of the product was achieved by IR and NMR spectroscopies. The spectral data acquired are thoroughly discussed. Numerous…

  7. Transformation of D-(-)-ribose into a natural product-like scaffold via a Lewis acid catalyzed intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Messer, Roland; Fuhrer, Cyril A; Häner, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Starting from D-(-)-ribose, a tricyclic natural product-like scaffold suitable for combinatorial derivatization was synthesized via an intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reaction. Lithium perchlorate was found to enhance the reaction rate and, at the same time, had a pronounced influence on the chemoselectivity of the reaction. The stereochemical course of the reaction, however, was not influenced by the Lewis acid.

  8. Diels-Alder Synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Wustholz, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    A study investigated the Diels-Alder synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo [2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide. The amount of time taken by a reaction between the 1,3-cyclohexadiene and N-phenylmaleimide at room temperature and also whether the desired cycloadduct would precipitate directly from the reaction mixture was examined.

  9. Combination of inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction with highly efficient oxime ligation expands the toolbox of site-selective peptide conjugations.

    PubMed

    Hörner, S; Uth, C; Avrutina, O; Frauendorf, H; Wiessler, M; Kolmar, H

    2015-07-14

    A modular approach combining inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder coupling (DARinv) and oxime ligation expands the toolbox of bioorthogonal peptide chemistry. Applicability of versatile site-specific bifunctional building blocks is demonstrated by generation of defined conjugates comprising linear, cystine-bridged and multi-disulfide functional peptides as well as their conjugation with hybrid silsesquioxane nanoparticles.

  10. First kinetic evidence for the CH/π and π/π solute-solvent interaction of C60 in the Diels-Alder reaction with cyclohexadiene.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takumi; Mikie, Tsubasa; Ikuma, Naohiko; Yakuma, Hajime

    2012-03-07

    The first CH/π solute-solvent interaction of C(60) was evidenced by the kinetic solvent effects in the Diels-Alder reaction with 1,3-cyclohexadiene based on the evaluation of linear free energy relationship of log k(2) with empirical solvent polarity and basicity parameters, E(T)(30) and D(π), respectively.

  11. A π-electronic covalent organic framework catalyst: π-walls as catalytic beds for Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-25

    We report a strategy for developing π-electronic covalent organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts that enable the use of columnar π-walls as catalytic beds to facilitate organic transformations in their one-dimensional open channels. The π-frameworks exhibit outstanding catalytic activity, promote Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions and are robust for cycle use.

  12. Formal Alder-ene reaction of a bicyclo[1.1.0]butane in the synthesis of the tricyclic quaternary ammonium core of daphniglaucins

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Masafumi; Walczak, Maciej A. A.; Wipf, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A tricyclic substructure of the tetracyclic nitrogen core of the daphniglaucins was formed by an oxidative activation of the allyl side chain of a bicyclo[1.1.0]butylmethylamine, a spontaneous intramolecular formal Alder-ene reaction, and a selective cyclization of a triol intermediate. PMID:19129907

  13. 75 FR 68780 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ...] Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing November 2, 2010. Take notice that on October 27, 2010, Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC (Cedar Creek) filed an appeal with the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  14. Hydrologic analysis of Steel Creek and L Lake and the effects of flow reduction on Steel Creek habitat

    SciTech Connect

    del Carmen, B.R.; Paller, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    This report was prepared to support a proposal to eliminate the EIS mandated spring flow requirements in Steel Creek below L Lake. The base flow in Steel Creek below L Lake was estimated using historical data. The water balance of L Lake was studied to evaluate the effects of flow reduction on the Steel Creek hydrologic system. The base flow in Steel Creek below L Lake is estimated as 0.28 cms (10 cfs). A reduction in L Lake discharge to 0.28 cms will result in a fish community similar to the one that existed before the impoundment of L Lake.

  15. Ecosystem engineers drive creek formation in salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huy D; Wie Ski, Kazimierz; Pennings, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    Ecosystem engineers affect different organisms and processes in multiple ways at different spatial scales. Moreover, similar species may differ in their engineering effects for reasons that are not always clear. We examined the role of four species of burrowing crabs (Sesarma reticulatum, Eurytium limosum, Panopeus herbstii, Uca pugnax) in engineering tidal creek networks in salt marshes experiencing sea level rise. In the field, crab burrows were associated with heads of eroding creeks and the loss of plant (Spartina alterniflora) stems. S. reticulatum was closely associated with creek heads, but densities of the other crab species did not vary across marsh zones. In mesocosm experiments, S. reticulatum excavated the most soil and strongly reduced S. alterniflora biomass. The other three species excavated less and did not affect S. alterniflora. Creek heads with vegetation removed to simulate crab herbivory grew significantly faster than controls. Percolation rates of water into marsh sediments were 10 times faster at creek heads than on the marsh platform. Biomass decomposed two times faster at creek heads than on the marsh platform. Our results indicate that S. reticulatum increases creek growth by excavating sediments and by consuming plants, thereby increasing water flow and erosion at creek heads. Moreover, it is possible that S. reticulatum burrows also increase creek growth by increasing surface and subsurface erosion, and by increasing decomposition of organic matter at creek heads. Our results show that the interaction between crab and plant ecosystem engineers can have both positive and negative effects. At a small scale, in contrast to other marsh crabs, S. reticulatum harms rather than benefits plants, and increases erosion rather than marsh growth. At a large scale, however, S. reticulatum facilitates the drainage efficiency of the marsh through the expansion of tidal creek networks, and promotes marsh health.

  16. A Creek to Bay Biological Assessment in Oakland, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, E.; Ramirez, N.; Lopez, A.; Avila, M.; Ramirez, J.; Arroyo, D.; Bracho, H.; Casanova, A.; Pierson, E.

    2011-12-01

    In 2007, the Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP) assessed the impact of trash on water quality in the Peralta Creek which is located in the Fruitvale district of Oakland, CA. This 2011 follow-up study will take further steps in evaluating the physical and biological impacts of pollution and human development on Peralta Creek and in the San Leandro Bay, where the Creek empties into the larger San Francisco Bay estuary. This study will utilize two forms of biological assessment in order to determine the level of water quality and ecosystem health of Peralta Creek and San Leandro Bay in Oakland, California. A Rapid Bioassesment Protocal (RBP) will be used as the method of biological assessment for Peralta Creek. RBP uses a biotic index of benthic macroinvertebrates to provide a measure of a water body's health. Larval trematodes found in two mud snails (Ilynassa obsoleta and Cerithidea californica) will be used to evaluate the health of the San Leandro Bay. Due to the complex life cycle of trematodes, the measure of trematode diversity and richness in host species serves as an indicator of estuarine health (Huspeni 2005). We have completed the assessment of one section of Peralta Creek, located at 2465 34th Avenue, Oakland, CA 94601. Abundance results indicate a moderately healthy creek because there were high levels of pollution tolerant benthic macroinvertebrates. The tolerant group of benthic macroinvertebrates includes such organisms as flatworms, leeches, and scuds. This is possibly due to this section of the creek being pumped up to the surface from culverts impacting the macroinvertebrate's life cycle. Another contributing factor to creek health is the amount of organic debris found in the creek, which inhibits the flow and oxygenation of the water, allowing for more pollution tolerant aquatic insects to persist. Further investigation is being conducted to fully assess the Peralta Creek watershed; from the preliminary results one can surmise that

  17. Reactivity of N-Phenyl-1-Aza-2-Cyano-1,3-Butadienes in the Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Nicholas J.; Motorina, Irina A.; Tran Huu Dau, Marie-Elise; Riche, Claude; Fowler, Frank W.; Grierson, David S.

    1996-05-31

    It is found that N-phenyl-2-cyano-1-azadiene 4, prepared via a two-step, one-pot, sequence from acrylanilide, undergoes efficient [4 + 2] cycloaddition with a complete range of electron rich, electron poor, and neutral dienophiles under remarkably mild thermal conditions (90-120 degrees C for 20-48 h). Regiospecific formation of the alpha-cycloadduct wherein the dienophile substituent is alpha to nitrogen is observed for vinyl ethers and styrene, whereas the Diels-Alder reactions with methyl acrylate and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) produce alpha/beta mixtures in which the alpha-cycloadduct is the major regioisomer (approximately 4-5:1). An essentially identical reaction pattern was observed in the Diels-Alder reaction of N-(p-methoxyphenyl)-2-cyano-1-azadiene 18 and the 4-methyl-substituted azadiene 27. For compound 19 derived from cycloaddition of 18 with ethyl vinyl ether, facile conversion to the dihydropyridine 21 through loss of EtOH on brief acid treatment was also noted. The 2,4-cis-disubstitution pattern confirmed by X-ray diffraction for the major cycloadduct 29 isolated from the reaction of 27 with styrene provides evidence for the endo mode of cycloaddition in the Diels-Alder reaction of N-phenyl(aryl)-2-cyano-1-azadienes. Calculation of the frontier orbital energies and coefficients, as well as the transition state geometries for the [4 + 2] cycloaddition of N-phenyl-2-cyano-1-azadiene 4 with methyl vinyl ether, styrene, and MVK were carried out at the RHF AM1 level (MOPAC, Version 5.0). The FMO treatment indicates that the reaction of 4 with methyl vinyl ether occurs under LUMO(diene) control, whereas in contrast, the corresponding cycloaddition with MVK occurs preferably under HOMO(diene) control. A high degree of asynchronicity is observed in the calculated transition states for reaction of 4 with the three representative dienophiles. In all cases the transition states leading to the alpha-cycloadducts are lower in energy than those giving the beta

  18. Surface waters of North Boggy Creek basin in the Muddy Boggy Creek basin in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laine, L.L.

    1958-01-01

    Analysis of short-term streamflow data in North Boggy Creek basin indicates that the average runoff in this region is substantial. The streamflow is highly variable from year to year and from month to month. The estimated total yield from the North Boggy Creek watershed of 231 square miles averages 155,000 acre-feet annually, equivalent to an average runoff depth of 12 1/2 inches. Almost a fourth of the annual volume is contributed by Chickasaw Creek basin, where about 35,000 acre-feet runs off from 46 square miles. Two years of records show a variation in runoff for the calendar year 1957 in comparison to 1956 in a ratio of 13 to 1 for the station on North Boggy Creek and a ratio of 18 to 1 for the station on Chickasaw Creek. In a longer-term record downstream on Muddy Boggy Creek near Farris, the corresponding range was 17 to 1, while the calendar years 1945 and 1956 show a 20-fold variation in runoff. Within a year the higher runoff tends to occur in the spring months, April to June, a 3-month period that, on the average, accounts for at least half of the annual flow. High runoff may occur during any month in the year, but in general, the streamflow is relatively small in the summer. Records for the gaging stations noted indicate that there is little or no base flow in the summer, and thus there will be periods of no flow at times in most years. The variation in runoff during a year is suggested by a frequency analysis of low flows at the reference station on Muddy Boggy Creek near Farris. Although the mean flow at that site is 955 cfs (cubic feet per second), the median daily flow is only 59 cfs and the lowest 30-day flow in a year will average less than 1 cfs in 4 out of 10 years on the average. The estimated mean flow on North Boggy Creek near Stringtown is 124 cfs, but the estimated median daily flow is only 3 1/2 cfs. Because of the high variability in streamflow, development of storage by impoundment will be necessary to attain maximum utilization of the

  19. RICHLAND CREEK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, ARKANSAS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Stroud, Raymond B.

    1984-01-01

    The Richland Creek Wilderness Study Area covers an area of about 5 sq mi in parts of Newton and Searcy Counties, Arkansas. Geochemical studies of the outcropping rocks and stream sediments in the study area indicate that these rocks have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. There is little promise for the occurrence of natural gas within the area because the Pennsylvanian age rocks have been breached by erosion and the other potential reservoir rocks were reported as dry. Some of the sandstone and limestone could be used for commercial purposes.

  20. Recovery of a PCB-Contaminated Creek Fish Community

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) from the Sangamo-Weston Superfund Site near Clemson, South Carolina, USA, were released into the Twelvemile Creek until the early 1990s. PCB concentrations in fish in this creek have remained elevated: levels in six target fish species are still a...

  1. 3. RUSTIC BENCH AT THE LADDER CREEK GARDENS NEAR GORGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. RUSTIC BENCH AT THE LADDER CREEK GARDENS NEAR GORGE POWERHOUSE AT NEWHALEM. J.D. ROSS HAD THE GROUNDS LANDSCAPED AND PLANTED WITH EXOTIC FLOWERS AND VEGETATION DURING THE 1930S AS AN ADDITIONAL TOURIST ATTRACTION, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Skagit River & Newhalem Creek Hydroelectric Project, On Skagit River, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  2. "Bridge #6 Rock Creek: Castiron 48" pipe lines to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "Bridge #6 - Rock Creek: Cast-iron 48" pipe lines to Gravity - 1859." Construction photo of Pennsylvania Avenue Bridge, 1859. Photograph courtesy Washington Aqueduct Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Pennsylvania Avenue Bridge, Spanning Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Bridge 223, view looking east up Rock Creek Canyon at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge 22-3, view looking east up Rock Creek Canyon at Milepost 22.82. The line passes through tunnel 4 onto Bridge 22-3 and heads eastward up Rock Creek Canyon out onto the Camas Prairie - Camas Prairie Railroad, Second Subdivision, From Spalding in Nez Perce County, through Lewis County, to Grangeville in Idaho County, Spalding, Nez Perce County, ID

  4. 33 CFR 117.745 - Rancocas River (Creek).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rancocas River (Creek). 117.745 Section 117.745 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.745 Rancocas River (Creek). (a)...

  5. 33 CFR 117.745 - Rancocas River (Creek).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rancocas River (Creek). 117.745 Section 117.745 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.745 Rancocas River (Creek). (a)...

  6. 33. Site Plan: Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Site Plan: Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, FD Radar Facilities-FPS-27, Electrical Plot Plan and Duet Details, USACOE, not date. - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  7. 78 FR 938 - Burton Creek Hydro Inc., Sollos Energy, LLC'

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Burton Creek Hydro Inc., Sollos Energy, LLC' Notice of Transfer of Exemption 1. By letter filed December 19, 2012, Burton Creek Hydro Inc. informed the Commission that...

  8. Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1998 Habitat Conservation Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, Duane G.

    1999-12-01

    The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. 1998 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek.

  9. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  10. 8. CLOSEUP OF THE GATES ON THE TOBY CREEK OUTLET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. CLOSEUP OF THE GATES ON THE TOBY CREEK OUTLET AND THE OUTLET OF THE PUMP DISCHARGE CHANNEL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  11. 78 FR 76750 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Chambers Creek, Steilacoom, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...The Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Chambers Creek Railway Bridge across Chambers Creek, mile 0.0, at Steilacoom, WA. The deviation is necessary to allow BNSF to perform maintenance and upgrade items to this vertical lift bridge in support of Positive Train Control requirements per the Rail Safety......

  12. 33 CFR 117.163 - Islais Creek (Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Islais Creek (Channel). 117.163 Section 117.163 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.163 Islais Creek (Channel). (a)...

  13. 33 CFR 117.115 - Three Mile Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Three Mile Creek. 117.115 Section 117.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.115 Three Mile Creek. (a) The draw...

  14. 33 CFR 117.153 - Corte Madera Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Corte Madera Creek. 117.153 Section 117.153 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.153 Corte Madera Creek. The draw...

  15. 5. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing the lining of the bottom of the marsh, with dam in background - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  16. 33 CFR 117.163 - Islais Creek (Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Islais Creek (Channel). 117.163 Section 117.163 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.163 Islais Creek (Channel). (a)...

  17. 33 CFR 117.163 - Islais Creek (Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Islais Creek (Channel). 117.163 Section 117.163 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.163 Islais Creek (Channel). (a)...

  18. 78 FR 37474 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dove Creek, Colorado AGENCY: Federal Communications..., allots FM Channel 229C3 as a first local transmission service at Dove Creek, Colorado. Channel 229C3 can... CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Chief,...

  19. 33 CFR 117.705 - Beaver Dam Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Beaver Dam Creek. 117.705 Section 117.705 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.705 Beaver Dam Creek. The draw of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.705 - Beaver Dam Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Beaver Dam Creek. 117.705 Section 117.705 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.705 Beaver Dam Creek. The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.705 - Beaver Dam Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beaver Dam Creek. 117.705 Section 117.705 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.705 Beaver Dam Creek. The draw of...

  2. 33 CFR 117.705 - Beaver Dam Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Beaver Dam Creek. 117.705 Section 117.705 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.705 Beaver Dam Creek. The draw of...

  3. 33 CFR 117.705 - Beaver Dam Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Beaver Dam Creek. 117.705 Section 117.705 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.705 Beaver Dam Creek. The draw of...

  4. 77 FR 6013 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Cheesequake Creek, Morgan, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Cheesequake Creek, Morgan, NJ AGENCY... Coast Guard District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the New Jersey Transit Rail Operation (NJTRO) Railroad Bridge across Cheesequake Creek, mile 0.2,...

  5. 2. Rear view of upper dam with Millstone Creek flowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Rear view of upper dam with Millstone Creek flowing over overspill. Photograph taken from west bank of Millstone Creek. VIEW SOUTHEAST - Loleta Recreation Area, Upper Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  6. Hydrologic data for Mountain Creek, Trinity River basin, Texas, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckner, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The total drainage area of Mountain Creek, Texas, is 304 sq mi. The stream-gaging stations on Mountain Creek near Cedar Hill and Walnut Creek near Mansfield provide hydrologic data to define runoff characteristics from small drainage basins. They also serve as index stations for inflow into the reservoir and provide operational data for the reservoir. In addition, the station Walnut Creek near Mansfield is equipped with a recording rain gage. The stage station near Duncanville provides data pertinent to operation of the gates in the Mountain Creek Lake Dam. The reservoir-content station at the dam provides records of reservoir state and contents. The stream-gaging station Mountain Creek at Grand Prairie provides records of outflow from Mountain Creek Lake and the basin. Basin outflow for the 1976 water year was 78,660 acre-feet which is only 1,140 acre-feet above the 16-year (1960-76) average of 77,520 acre-feet. Storage in Mountain Creek Lake showed a net gain of 760 acre-feet during the water year. Rainfall over the study area for the 1976 water year was about 32 inches, which is about 2 inches below the long-term mean rainfall (1960-75) for the area. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. 76 FR 9225 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore... changing the drawbridge operation regulations of the Pennington Avenue Bridge, across Curtis Creek, mile 0.... Regular users of the waterway consist of Coast Guard vessels bound for the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis...

  8. 75 FR 30747 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore... to change the regulations that govern the operation of the Pennington Avenue Bridge across Curtis... Curtis Creek in Baltimore, MD. DATES: Comments and related material must reach the Coast Guard on...

  9. 77 FR 12476 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore..., across Curtis Creek, mile 1.0, at Baltimore, MD. This deviation allows the bridge to operate on...

  10. 75 FR 50707 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Curtis Creek, Baltimore... operation of the Pennington Avenue Bridge, across Curtis Creek, mile 0.9, at Baltimore, MD. This deviation... vessels bound for the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, as well as a significant amount of commercial...

  11. 1. Threefourths view showing relation of span to creek with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Three-fourths view showing relation of span to creek with timber trestle approaches. North approach on timber piling, south approach on concrete bents. Note stone piers - Bridge No. 2.4, Spanning Boiling Fork Creek at Railroad Milepost JC-2.4, Decherd, Franklin County, TN

  12. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of...

  13. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.1001 - Cat Point Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cat Point Creek. 117.1001 Section 117.1001 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.1001 Cat Point Creek. The draw of...

  17. 78 FR 64186 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mantua Creek, Paulsboro, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Mantua Creek, mile marker 1.7, at Paulsboro, NJ. Bridge tender logs from 2007- 2013 indicates that the..., across Mantua Creek at Paulsboro. NJDOT provided the Coast Guard with the bridge tender logs dating back... provide 4 hours advanced notice. Based on the average logged openings between 2007-2013 during the...

  18. Asymmetric Lewis acid organocatalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction by a silylated C-H acid.

    PubMed

    Gatzenmeier, Tim; van Gemmeren, Manuel; Xie, Youwei; Höfler, Denis; Leutzsch, Markus; List, Benjamin

    2016-02-26

    Silylium ion equivalents have shown promise as Lewis acid catalysts for a range of important C-C bond-forming reactions. Here we describe chiral C-H acids that upon in situ silylation, generate silylium-carbanion pairs, which are extremely active Lewis acid catalysts for enantioselective Diels-Alder reactions of cinnamates with cyclopentadiene. Enantiomeric ratios of up to 97:3 and diastereomeric ratios of more than 20:1 are observed across a diverse set of substitution patterns with 1 mole percent (mol %) of C-H acid catalyst and 10 mol % of a silylating reagent. The results show promise for broad applications of such C-H acid-derived silylium ion equivalents in asymmetric Lewis acid catalysis.

  19. Three biscembranoids and their monomeric counterpart cembranoid, a biogenetic Diels-Alder precursor, from the soft coral Sarcophyton elegans.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Ashgan; Rudi, Amira; Benayahu, Yehuda; Kashman, Yoel

    2007-12-01

    Two new cembranoids, methyl tetrahydrosarcoate ( 1) and methyl tetrahydroisosarcoate ( 2), were isolated from the soft coral Sarcophyton elegans, collected at Kitangambwe Kenya, together with four biscembranoids, the known nyalolide ( 3) and the unprecedented desacetylnyalolide ( 4), diepoxynyalolide ( 5), and dioxanyalolide ( 6). The structures and relative stereochemistry of the compounds were elucidated by interpretation of MS, 1D NMR, COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY experiments. Compound 1 is most likely the dienophile affording, by a Diels-Alder reaction, the four biscembranoids. Dioxanyalolide ( 6) possesses antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli at a concentration of 1.25 microg/mL. Methyl tetrahydrosarcoate ( 1) and diepoxynyalolide ( 5) exhibited LC 50 values of 1.5 microM in a brine shrimp bioassay, while desacetylnyalolide ( 4) was only mildly active.

  20. The hetero-Diels-Alder addition of sulfur dioxide: the pseudo-chair conformation of a 4,5-dialkylsultine.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Dean; Roversi, Elena; Scoppelliti, Rosario; Vogel, Pierre; Meana, Rubén; Sordo, José A

    2003-10-17

    Even unsubstituted butadiene adds to sulfur dioxide in the hetero-Diels-Alder mode more rapidly than in the chelotropic mode. The sultine can be observed in equilibrium with the diene and the sulfur dioxide only at low temperature and in the presence of CF(3)COOH. Crystals of 4,5-dialkyl-sultine resulting from the SO(2) addition to 1,2-dimethylidenecyclohexane have been obtained at -100 degrees C and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Quantum chemical calculations have shown that hyperconjugative interactions within the sulfinyl moiety are responsible for the anomeric effects observed in sultines that prefer pseudo-chair conformations with pseudo-axial Sdbond;O bonds.