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Sample records for alder flycatcher empidonax

  1. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  2. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  3. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, and the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males.

  4. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru?? during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, nd the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males. ?? The Neotropical Ornithological Society.

  5. Habitat and sex differences in physiological condition of breeding Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, J.C.; Sogge, M.K.; Kern, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter "flycatcher") is a federally listed endangered species that breeds in densely vegetated riparian habitats dominated by native and exotic plants, including introduced monotypic saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima). Some workers have theorized that saltcedar is unsuitable habitat for the flycatcher, primarily because it generally supports a smaller and less diverse invertebrate community (the flycatcher's food base) than native habitats (e.g. Salix spp.). However, differences in insect communities between native and saltcedar habitats are not proof that saltcedar habitats are inferior. The only way to evaluate whether the habitats differ in dietary or energetic quality is to document actual food limitation or its manifestations. Measurements of an individual's body condition and metabolic state can serve as indicators of environmental stressors, such as food limitation and environmental extremes. We captured 130 flycatchers breeding in native and saltcedar habitats in Arizona and New Mexico and measured 12 variables of physiological condition. These variables included body mass, fat level, body condition index, hematocrit, plasma triglycerides, plasma free fatty acids and glycerol, plasma glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate, plasma uric acid, total leukocyte count, and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. We found substantial sex-based differences in the condition of male and female flycatchers. Ten of the 12 measures of physiological condition differed significantly between the sexes. In all cases where male and female condition differed (except mass), the differences suggest that males were in poorer condition than females. We found few habitat-based differences in flycatcher condition. Only 3 of the 12 physiological condition indices differed significantly between habitats. Our data show that, at least in some parts of the flycatcher's range, there is no evidence that flycatchers breeding in saltcedar

  6. Geographic variation in the plumage coloration of willow flycatchers Empidonax traillii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Koronkiewicz, Thomas J.; McLeod, Mary Anne; Theimer, Tad C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to identify distinct taxonomic groups of birds (species, subspecies, geographic races) can advance ecological research efforts by determining connectivity between the non-breeding and breeding grounds for migrant species, identifying the origin of migrants, and helping to refine boundaries between subspecies or geographic races. Multiple methods are available to identify taxonomic groups (e.g., morphology, genetics), and one that has played an important role for avian taxonomists over the years is plumage coloration. With the advent of electronic devices that can quickly and accurately quantify plumage coloration, the potential of using coloration as an identifier for distinct taxonomic groups, even when differences are subtle, becomes possible. In this study, we evaluated the degree to which plumage coloration differs among the four subspecies of the willow flycatcher Empidonax traillii, evaluated sources of variation, and considered the utility of plumage coloration to assign subspecies membership for individuals of unknown origin. We used a colorimeter to measure plumage coloration of 374 adult willow flycatchers from 29 locations across their breeding range in 2004 and 2005. We found strong statistical differences among the mean plumage coloration values of the four subspecies; however, while individuals tended to group around their respective subspecies' mean color value, the dispersion of individuals around such means overlapped. Mean color values for each breeding site of the three western subspecies clustered together, but the eastern subspecies' color values were dispersed among the other subspecies, rather than distinctly clustered. Additionally, sites along boundaries showed evidence of intergradation and intermediate coloration patterns. We evaluated the predictive power of colorimeter measurements on flycatchers by constructing a canonical discriminant model to predict subspecies origin of migrants passing through the southwestern U

  7. Pathways and consequences of contaminant flux to Acadian flycatchers (Empidonax virescens) in urbanizing landscapes of Ohio, USA.

    PubMed

    Rowse, Linnea M; Rodewald, Amanda D; Sullivan, S Mažeika P

    2014-07-01

    A prevalent environmental contaminant, mercury (Hg) is mobile and persistent in aquatic systems, where it often occurs in its bioavailable form methylmercury. Because methylmercury can bioaccumulate in aquatic insects and then transfer to terrestrial food webs, riparian consumers reliant upon aquatic emergent insects, should be disproportionately affected. Using the aerial insectivore Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) as a focal species, we examined (1) the extent to which total Hg loads in breeding flycatchers affected body condition and reproductive output and (2) potential pathways of contaminant flux in 19 riparian forest fragments distributed across an urban-to-rural landscape gradient in Ohio, USA. From April-August 2011-2012, we collected blood samples from adult (n=76) and nestling (n=17 from 7 nests) flycatchers, monitored their annual reproductive success (i.e., total number of fledglings), and sampled water, sediment, and aquatic emergent insects at each site. Hg concentrations in adult flycatcher blood (47 to 584 μg/kg, x¯=211.8, SD=95.5) were low relative to published advisory levels and not related to body condition. However, even at low concentrations, blood Hg was negatively related to reproductive success, with a 0.83 decline in the number of fledglings per μg/kg (loge) increase of blood Hg. Adult flycatchers had 11× greater concentrations of blood Hg than their offspring. Hg levels in flycatcher blood were not predicted by Hg concentrations in sediment, water, or aquatic emergent insects, with the exception of rural landscapes alone, in which flycatcher Hg was negatively related to sediment Hg. In addition to illustrating the difficulty of predicting exposure pathways that may vary among landscape contexts, our study provides evidence that even trace levels of contaminants may impair reproductive success of free-living songbirds. PMID:24742556

  8. Preliminary Risk Assessment of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.

    1998-10-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is the fourth threatened or endangered species to undergo a preliminary assessment for estimating potential risk from environmental contaminants at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The assessments are being conducted as part of a three-year project to develop a habitat management plan for threatened and endangered species and species of concern at the Laboratory. For the preliminary assessment, estimated doses were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (HIs). This assessment included a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic chemicals) to 100 simulated nest sites located within flycatcher potential habitat. Sources of contaminant values were 10,000-ft{sup 2} grid cells within an Ecological Exposure Unit (EEU). This EEU was estimated around the potential habitat and was based on the maximum home range for the fly catcher identified in the scientific literature. The tools used included a custom FORTRAN program, ECORSK5, and a geographic information system. Food consumption and soil ingestion contaminant pathways were addressed in the assessment. Using a four-category risk evaluation, HI results indicate no appreciable impact is expected to the southwestern willow flycatcher. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, flycatcher habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain low levels of risk from contaminants.

  9. Winter distribution of willow flycatcher subspecies (Distribución Invernal de las Subespecies de Empidonax traillii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Unitt, Philip; Sogge, Mark K.; Whitfield, Mary; Keim, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Documenting how different regions across a species' breeding and nonbreeding range are linked via migratory movements is the first step in understanding how events in one region can influence events in others and is critical to identifying conservation threats throughout a migratory animal's annual cycle. We combined two studies that evaluated migratory connectivity in the Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), one using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 172 flycatchers sampled throughout their winter range, and another which examined morphological characteristics of 68 museum specimens collected in the winter range. Our results indicate that the four subspecies occupy distinct but overlapping regions of the winter range. Connectivity between specific breeding and winter grounds appears to be moderate to strong, with distributions that suggest migration patterns of both the chain and leap-frog types connecting the breeding and nonbreeding grounds. The Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica appear to be a key winter location for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), although other countries in Central America may also be important for the subspecies.

  10. A satellite model of Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) breeding habitat and a simulation of potential effects of tamarisk leaf beetles (Diorhabda spp.), southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, James R.

    2016-08-08

    The study described in this report represents the first time that a satellite model has been used to identify potential Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) (hereinafter referred to as “flycatcher”) breeding habitat rangewide for 2013–15. Fifty-seven Landsat scenes were required to map the entire range of the flycatcher, encompassing parts of six States and more than 1 billion 30-meter pixels. Predicted flycatcher habitat was summarized in a hierarchical fashion from largest to smallest: regionwide, State, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) management unit, 7.5-minute quadrangle, and critical-habitat reach. The term “predicted habitat” is used throughout this report to distinguish areas the satellite model predicts as suitable flycatcher habitat from what may actually exist on the ground. A rangewide accuracy assessment was done with 758 territories collected in 2014, and change detection was done with yearly habitat maps to identify how and where habitat changed over time. Additionally, effects of tamarisk leaf beetles (Diorhabda spp.) on flycatcher habitat were summarized for the lower Virgin River from 2010 to 2015, and simulations of how tamarisk leaf beetles may affect flycatcher habitat in the lower Colorado and upper Gila Rivers were done for 2015. Model results indicated that the largest areas of predicted flycatcher habitat at elevations below 1,524 meters were in New Mexico and Arizona, areas followed in descending order by California, Texas, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado. By FWS management unit, the largest area of flycatcher habitat during all 3 years were the Middle Rio Grande (New Mexico), followed by the Upper Gila (Arizona and New Mexico) and Middle Gila/San Pedro (Arizona) management units. The area of predicted flycatcher habitat varied considerably in 7.5-minute quadrangles, ranging from 0 to1,398 hectares (ha). Averaged across 3 years, the top three producing quadrangles were Paraje Well (New Mexico), San Marcial

  11. A satellite model of Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) breeding habitat and a simulation of potential effects of tamarisk leaf beetles (Diorhabda spp.), southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this report represents the first time that a satellite model has been used to identify potential Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) (hereinafter referred to as “flycatcher”) breeding habitat rangewide for 2013–15. Fifty-seven Landsat scenes were required to map the entire range of the flycatcher, encompassing parts of six States and more than 1 billion 30-meter pixels. Predicted flycatcher habitat was summarized in a hierarchical fashion from largest to smallest: regionwide, State, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) management unit, 7.5-minute quadrangle, and critical-habitat reach. The term “predicted habitat” is used throughout this report to distinguish areas the satellite model predicts as suitable flycatcher habitat from what may actually exist on the ground. A rangewide accuracy assessment was done with 758 territories collected in 2014, and change detection was done with yearly habitat maps to identify how and where habitat changed over time. Additionally, effects of tamarisk leaf beetles (Diorhabda spp.) on flycatcher habitat were summarized for the lower Virgin River from 2010 to 2015, and simulations of how tamarisk leaf beetles may affect flycatcher habitat in the lower Colorado and upper Gila Rivers were done for 2015. Model results indicated that the largest areas of predicted flycatcher habitat at elevations below 1,524 meters were in New Mexico and Arizona, areas followed in descending order by California, Texas, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado. By FWS management unit, the largest area of flycatcher habitat during all 3 years were the Middle Rio Grande (New Mexico), followed by the Upper Gila (Arizona and New Mexico) and Middle Gila/San Pedro (Arizona) management units. The area of predicted flycatcher habitat varied considerably in 7.5-minute quadrangles, ranging from 0 to1,398 hectares (ha). Averaged across 3 years, the top three producing quadrangles were Paraje Well (New Mexico), San Marcial

  12. Parasitism, productivity, and population growth: response of Least Bell's Vireos (Vireo bellii pusillus) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus) to cowbird (Molothrus spp.) control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kus, Barbara E.; Whitfield, Mary J.

    2005-01-01

    Cowbird (Molothrus spp.) control is a major focus of recovery-oriented management of two endangered riparian bird species,the Least Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). During the past 20 years, annual trapping of cowbirds at Least Bell's Vireo and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher breeding sites has eliminated or reduced parasitism in comparison with pretrapping rates and, thereby, significantly increased seasonal productivity of nesting pairs. Enhanced productivity, in turn, has resulted in an 8-fold increase in numbers of Least Bell's Vireos; Southwestern Willow Flycatcher abundance, however, has changed little, and at some sites has declined despite cowbird control. Although generally successful by these short-term measures of host population response, cowbird control poses potential negative consequences for long-term recovery of endangered species. As currently employed, cowbird control lacks predetermined biological criteria to trigger an end to the control, making these species' dependence on human intervention open-ended. Prolonged reliance on cowbird control to manage endangered species can shift attention from identifying and managing other factors that limit populations--in particular, habitat availability. On the basis of our analysis of these long-term programs, we suggest that cowbird control be reserved for short-term crisis management and be replaced, when appropriate, by practices emphasizing restoration and maintenance of natural processes on which species depend. /// El manejo orientado hacia la recuperación de dos especies de aves ribereñas Vireo belli pusillus y Empidonax trailli extimus se ha focalizado principalmente en el control de los Molothrus spp parásitos. Durante los pasados 20 años, la captura anual de los Molothrus en las áreas de nidificación de Vireo belli pusillus y Empidonax trailli extimus ha eliminado o reducido el parasitismo en comparación con las tasas

  13. A high incidence of brown-headed cowbird parasitism of willow flycatchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1988-01-01

    Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) parasitize both Willow (Empidonax traillii) and Alder (E. alnorum) flycatchers (Friedmann et al. 1977, Friedmann and Kiff 1985). These two flycatchers were considered a single species until 1973 (AOU 1973), which has masked information about the frequency with which each is parasitized. Whereas several studies of the superspecies (Traill's Flycatcher) have focused on or included details of cowbird parasitism, most were of eastern populations, and most reported frequencies of parasitism ≤21% (Hicks 1934, Berger 1951, Berger and Parmalee 1952, Walkinshaw 1966, Holcomb 1972). Friedmann et al. (1977:13) suggested that western populations (Willow Flycatchers) are parasitized only about half as much (ca. 10%) as eastern populations (Traill's Flycatcher superspecies). This note described a high rate of cowbird parasitism within a population of Willow Flycatchers in northcentral Colorado. We include details of responses to parasitism and host vs. cowbird fledgling success.

  14. Primary song by a juvenile willow flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    The timing of song development in suboscines, in which song appears not to be learned from other adults is poorly known. The Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) is a suboscine with a primary song typically referred to as fitz-bew. I report here an instance of very early singing by a 6-8-wk-old Willow Flycatcher, which sang in an aggressive context in response to a recording of adult flycatcher song. This is exceptionally early development of primary song, even among suboscines. Early song development may assist in the defense of winter territories.

  15. Winter distribution of willow flycatcher subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Unitt, P.; Sogge, M.K.; Whitfield, M.; Keim, P.

    2011-01-01

    Documenting how different regions across a species' breeding and nonbreeding range are linked via migratory movements is the first step in understanding how events in one region can influence events in others and is critical to identifying conservation threats throughout a migratory animal's annual cycle. We combined two studies that evaluated migratory connectivity in the Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), one using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 172 flycatchers sampled throughout their winter range, and another which examined morphological characteristics of 68 museum specimens collected in the winter range. Our results indicate that the four subspecies occupy distinct but overlapping regions of the winter range. Connectivity between specific breeding and winter grounds appears to be moderate to strong, with distributions that suggest migration patterns of both the chain and leap-frog types connecting the breeding and nonbreeding grounds. The Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica appear to be a key winter location for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), although other countries in Central America may also be important for the subspecies. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  16. Willow Flycatcher nonbreeding territory defense behavior in Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, M.K.; Koronkiewicz, T.J.; van Riper, Charles; Durst, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the intraspecific territorial defense behavior of wintering Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) in Costa Rica using a randomized playback experiment that exposed male and female birds to recordings of Willow Flycatcher songs and calls, Lesser Ground Cuckoo (Morococcyx erythropygius) vocalizations, and random noise. Flycatchers of both sexes responded most strongly to simulated conspecific territory intrusion, and the agonistic behaviors that we observed were similar to those seen during natural intraspecific encounters in winter. Both males and females engaged in song and aggressive behaviors in defense of territories, and there was no significant difference between the sexes in scored agonistic responses. The similarity between the sexes in intraspecific territorial defense behaviors and aggressiveness may account for both sexes of flycatchers using the same habitats at our study sites in Costa Rica, and wintering females defending territories against males. The Willow Flycatcher, a sexually monomorphic species, differs in this way from a number of sexually dimorphic passerines, in which behaviorally dominant males occur in more optimal winter habitats. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2007.

  17. Nestling sex ratios in the southwestern willow flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.; McCarthey, Tracy; Keim, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular-genetic techniques, we determined the gender of 202 Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nestlings from 95 nests sampled over a five-year period. Overall nestling sex ratio did not vary significantly from 50:50 among years, by clutch order, or by mating strategy (monogamous vs. polygamous pairings). However, we did observe significant differences among the four sites sampled, with sex ratios biased either toward males or females at the different sites. Given the small population sizes and geographic isolation of many of the endangered subspecies' breeding populations, sex-ratio differences may have localized negative impacts.

  18. Nestling sex ratio in the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.; McCarthey, T.D.; Keim, P.

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular-genetic techniques, we determined the gender of 202 Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nestlings from 95 nests sampled over a five-year period. Overall nestling sex ratio did not vary significantly from 50:50 among years, by clutch order, or by mating strategy (monogamous vs. polygamous pairings). However, we did observe significant differences among the four sites sampled, with sex ratios biased either toward males or females at the different sites. Given the small population sizes and geographic isolation of many of the endangered subspecies' breeding populations, sex-ratio differences may have localized negative impacts. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2002.

  19. Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Site and Territory Summary - 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durst, Scott L.; Sogge, Mark K.; Stump, Shay D.; Walker, Hira A.; Kus, Barbara E.; Sferra, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter references to willow flycatcher and flycatcher refer to E.t. extimus, except where specifically noted) is an endangered bird that breeds only in dense riparian habitats in parts of six Southwestern states (Arizona, New Mexico, southern California, extreme southern Nevada, southern Utah, and southwestern Colorado). Since 1993, hundreds of Southwestern willow flycatcher surveys have been conducted each year, and many new flycatcher breeding sites located. This document synthesizes the most current information available on all known Southwestern willow flycatcher breeding sites. This rangewide data synthesis was designed to meet two objectives: (1) identify all known Southwestern willow flycatcher breeding sites and (2) assemble data to estimate population size, location, habitat, and other information for all breeding sites, for as many years as possible, from 1993 through 2007. This report provides data summaries in terms of the number of flycatcher sites and the number of territories. When interpreting and using this information, it must be kept in mind that a 'site' is a geographic location where one or more willow flycatchers establishes a territory. Sites with unpaired territorial males are considered breeding sites, even if no nesting attempts were documented. A site is often a discrete patch of riparian habitat but may also be a cluster of riparian patches; there is no standardized definition for site, and its use varies within and among states. For example, five occupied habitat patches along a 10-km stretch of river might be considered five different sites in one state but only a single site in another state. This lack of standardization makes comparisons based on site numbers problematic. Researchers for this report generally deferred to statewide summary documents or to local managers and researchers when delineating a site for inclusion in the database. However, to avoid inflating

  20. Available data support protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theimer, Tad C.; Smith, Aaron D.; Mahoney, Sean M.; Ironside, Kirsten E.

    2016-01-01

    Zink (2015) argued there was no evidence for genetic, morphological, or ecological differentiation between the federally endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and other Willow Flycatcher subspecies. Using the same data, we show there is a step-cline in both the frequency of a mtDNA haplotype and in plumage variation roughly concordant with the currently recognized boundary between E. t. extimus and E. t adastus, the subspecies with which it shares the longest common boundary. The geographical pattern of plumage variation is also concordant with previous song analyses differentiating those 2 subspecies and identified birds in one low-latitude, high-elevation site in Arizona as the northern subspecies. We also demonstrate that the ecological niche modeling approach used by Zink yields the same result whether applied to the 2 flycatcher subspecies or to 2 unrelated species, E. t. extimus and Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia). As a result, any interpretation of those results as evidence for lack of ecological niche differentiation among Willow Flycatcher subspecies would also indicate no differentiation among recognized species and would therefore be an inappropriate standard for delineating subspecies. We agree that many analytical techniques now available to examine genetic, morphological, and ecological differentiation would improve our understanding of the distinctness (or lack thereof) of Willow Flycatcher subspecies, but we argue that currently available evidence supports protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act.

  1. Reproductive ecology of Dusky Flycatchers in western Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Breeding ecology of Dusky Flycatchers (Empidonax oberholseri) was studied in western Montana from May-August 1974. Dusky Flycatchers were monogamous and single-brooded although some pairs made renesting attempts after first nests failed. Length of the reproductive cycle for first nesting attempts, from arrival on the breeding grounds to fledging, was about 70 days. All nests were placed in shrubs, primarily ninebark (Physocarpus malvaceus) and Rocky Mountain maple (Acer glabrum), and were an average of 150 cm above the ground. Females incubated a clutch with an average of 4.0 eggs for 15-16 days, and the average nestling period was 17.5 days. Both sexes fed nestlings and fledglings, but only females brooded nestlings. Egg survival was 63.8%, hatching success was 95.4%, and nestling survival was 61.9% for an overall probability of 0.376 percent that an egg produced a fledgling. Predation was the major cause of nest failure. Dusky Flycatchers reared an average of 1.9 fledglings/pair.

  2. The Ecology of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher inCentral Arizona - A 10-Year Synthesis Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Durst, Scott L.; Theimer, Tad C.; Hatten, James R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND From 1996 to 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a demographic study of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) in Arizona in collaboration with the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD). The study was begun the year following the listing of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher as an endangered species. At the time of the listing, very little was known about the biology and threats to the flycatcher, and one of the main objectives of the study was to gather detailed long-term information on the biology of the flycatcher. This report is organized into eight chapters. Following the introductory chapter, we deal with specific aspects of flycatcher ecology and habitat use in each of six separate chapters. We end with a concluding chapter that synthesizes information into broad topical themes that address key management issues. Each of the core chapters (chapters 2 through 7) conclude with a list of management considerations derived from the findings of the respective chapter.

  3. Elucidating spatially explicit behavioral landscapes in the Willow Flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Sullivan, Kimberly A.; Paxton, Eben H.

    2012-01-01

    Animal resource selection is a complex, hierarchical decision-making process, yet resource selection studies often focus on the presence and absence of an animal rather than the animal's behavior at resource use locations. In this study, we investigate foraging and vocalization resource selection in a population of Willow Flycatchers, Empidonax traillii adastus, using Bayesian spatial generalized linear models. These models produce “behavioral landscapes” in which space use and resource selection is linked through behavior. Radio telemetry locations were collected from 35 adult Willow Flycatchers (n = 14 males, n = 13 females, and n = 8 unknown sex) over the 2003 and 2004 breeding seasons at Fish Creek, Utah. Results from the 2-stage modeling approach showed that habitat type, perch position, and distance from the arithmetic mean of the home range (in males) or nest site (in females) were important factors influencing foraging and vocalization resource selection. Parameter estimates from the individual-level models indicated high intraspecific variation in the use of the various habitat types and perch heights for foraging and vocalization. On the population level, Willow Flycatchers selected riparian habitat over other habitat types for vocalizing but used multiple habitat types for foraging including mountain shrub, young riparian, and upland forest. Mapping of observed and predicted foraging and vocalization resource selection indicated that the behavior often occurred in disparate areas of the home range. This suggests that multiple core areas may exist in the home ranges of individual flycatchers, and demonstrates that the behavioral landscape modeling approach can be applied to identify spatially and behaviorally distinct core areas. The behavioral landscape approach is applicable to a wide range of animal taxa and can be used to improve our understanding of the spatial context of behavior and resource selection.

  4. Describing Willow Flycatcher habitats: scale perspectives and gender differences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    We compared habitat characteristics of nest sites (female-selected sites) and song perch sites (male-selected sites) with those of sites unused by Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) at three different scales of vegetation measurement: (1) microplot (central willow [Salix spp.] bush and four adjacent bushes); (2) mesoplot (0.07 ha); and, (3) macroplot (flycatcher territory size). Willow Flycatchers exhibited vegetation preferences at all three scales. Nest sites were distinguished by high willow density and low variability in willow patch size and bush height. Song perch sites were characterized by large central shrubs, low central shrub vigor, and high variability in shrub size. Unused sites were characterized by greater distances between willows and willow patches, less willow coverage, and a smaller riparian zone width than either nest or song perch sites. At all scales, nest sites were situated farther from unused sites in multivariate habitat space than were song perch sites, suggesting (1) a correspondence among scales in their ability to describe Willow Flycatcher habitat, and (2) females are more discriminating in habitat selection than males. Microhabitat differences between male-selected (song perch) and female-selected (nest) sites were evident at the two smaller scales; at the finest scale, the segregation in habitat space between male-selected and female-selected sites was greater than that between male-selected and unused sites. Differences between song perch and nest sites were not apparent at the scale of flycatcher territory size, possibly due to inclusion of (1) both nest and song perch sites, (2) defended, but unused habitat, and/or (3) habitat outside of the territory, in larger scale analyses. The differences between nest and song perch sites at the finer scales reflect their different functions (e.g., nest concealment and microclimatic requirements vs. advertising and territorial defense, respectively), and suggest that the exclusive use

  5. Vocal frequency change reflects different responses to anthropogenic noise in two suboscine tyrant flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Clinton D.; Ortega, Catherine P.; Cruz, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise is prevalent across the globe and can exclude birds from otherwise suitable habitat and negatively influence fitness; however, the mechanisms responsible for species' responses to noise are not always clear. One effect of noise is a reduction in effective acoustic communication through acoustic masking, yet some urban songbirds may compensate for masking by noise through altering their songs. Whether this vocal flexibility accounts for species persistence in noisy areas is unknown. Here, we investigated the influence of noise on habitat use and vocal frequency in two suboscine flycatchers using a natural experiment that isolated effects of noise from confounding stimuli common to urban habitats. With increased noise exposure, grey flycatcher (Empidonax wrightii) occupancy declined, but vocal frequency did not change. By contrast, ash-throated flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens) occupancy was uninfluenced by noise, but individuals in areas with greater noise amplitudes vocalized at a higher frequency, although the increase (≈200 kHz) may only marginally improve communication and may represent a secondary effect from increased vocal amplitude. Even so, the different flycatcher behavioural responses suggest that signal change may help some species persist in noisy areas and prompt important questions regarding which species will cope with an increasingly noisy world. PMID:21123268

  6. Genetic variation in the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busch, Joseph; Miller, Mark P.; Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.; Keim, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher(Empidonax trailii extimus) is an endangered Neotropical migrant that breeds in isolated remnants of dense riparian habitat in the southwestern United States. We estimated genetic variation at 20 breedings sites of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher(290 individuals) using 38 amplified fragment length polymorphisms(AFLPs). Our results suggest that considerable genetic diversity exists within the subspecies and within local breeding sites. Statistical analyses of genetic variation revealed only slight, although significant, differentiation among breeding sites( Mantel's r = 0.0705, P < 0.0005; 0 = 0.0816, 95% CI = 0.0608 to 0.1034; a??sr = 0.0458, P < 0.001). UPGMA cluster analysis of the AFLP markers indicates that extensive gene flow has occurred among breeding sites. No one site stood out as being genetically unique or isolated. Therefore the small level of genetic structure that we detected may not be biologically significant. Ongoing field studies are consistent with this conclusion. Of the banded birds that were resighted or recaptured in Arizona during the 1996 to 1998 breeding seasons, one-third moved between breeding sites and two-thirds were philopatric. Low differentiation maybe the result of historically high rangewide diversity followed by recent geographic isolation of breeding sites, although observational data indicate that gene flow is a current phenomenon. Our data suggest that breeding groups of E. t. extimus act as a metapopulation.

  7. Acadian flycatcher nest placement: Does placement influence reproductive success?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, R.R.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We located 511 Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests in bottomland hardwood forest of eastern Arkansas. Microhabitat characteristics were measured and their relationship with nest success evaluated. Fifty-two percent of all nesting attempts resulted in predation. Attributes of nest placement were similar between successful and unsuccessful nests, although successful nests were placed higher. Similarly, nonparasitized nests were typically higher than parasitized nests. Nests initiated late in the breeding season were placed in larger trees with higher canopy bases resulting in increased vegetation around the nest. Fifteen different tree species were used for nesting. Acadian Flycatchers chose nest trees in a nonrandom fashion, selecting Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii) and possumhaw (Ilex decidua) in greater proportions than their availability. However, there was no relationship between tree species used for nesting and nest success. Nest height was positively correlated with concealment at the nest site, supporting the predator-avoidance theory. No other attribute of nest placement differentiated successful nest sites, suggesting that nest predation is likely a function of random events in space and time.

  8. Injury due to leg bands in willow flycatchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, J.A.; Klus, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We report an apparently unusually high incidence of leg injury in Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) as a result of banding and color banding. Color bands and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) bands applied to Willow Flycatchers from 1988-1995 resulted in an overall leg injury rate of 9.6% to birds returning to our study areas in subsequent years. Most injuries occurred on legs with only color band(s) (58.3%) or on legs with both a USFWS band and a color band (35%); only 6.7% of injuries (4/60) were due to USFWS bands alone, yielding an overall USFWS band injury rate of only 0.6%. Injuries ranged from severe (swollen, bleeding legs; a missing foot) to relatively minor (irritations on the tarsus). Amputation of the foot occurred in 33.9% of the cases. Return rates of adult injured birds in the year(s) following injury were significantly lower than for the population at large.

  9. A habitat overlap analysis derived from maxent for tamarisk and the south-western willow flycatcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Patricia; Evangelista, Paul; Kumar, Sunil; Graham, James; Flather, Curtis; Stohlgren, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Biologic control of the introduced and invasive, woody plant tamarisk ( Tamarix spp, saltcedar) in south-western states is controversial because it affects habitat of the federally endangered South-western Willow Flycatcher ( Empidonax traillii extimus). These songbirds sometimes nest in tamarisk where floodplain-level invasion replaces native habitats. Biologic control, with the saltcedar leaf beetle ( Diorhabda elongate), began along the Virgin River, Utah, in 2006, enhancing the need for comprehensive understanding of the tamarisk-flycatcher relationship. We used maximum entropy (Maxent) modeling to separately quantify the current extent of dense tamarisk habitat (>50% cover) and the potential extent of habitat available for E. traillii extimus within the studied watersheds. We used transformations of 2008 Landsat Thematic Mapper images and a digital elevation model as environmental input variables. Maxent models performed well for the flycatcher and tamarisk with Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) values of 0.960 and 0.982, respectively. Classification of thresholds and comparison of the two Maxent outputs indicated moderate spatial overlap between predicted suitable habitat for E. traillii extimus and predicted locations with dense tamarisk stands, where flycatcher habitat will potentially change flycatcher habitats. Dense tamarisk habitat comprised 500 km2 within the study area, of which 11.4% was also modeled as potential habitat for E. traillii extimus. Potential habitat modeled for the flycatcher constituted 190 km2, of which 30.7% also contained dense tamarisk habitat. Results showed that both native vegetation and dense tamarisk habitats exist in the study area and that most tamarisk infestations do not contain characteristics that satisfy the habitat requirements of E. traillii extimus. Based on this study, effective biologic control of Tamarix spp. may, in the short term, reduce suitable habitat available to E. traillii extimus, but also has the potential

  10. A Natural History Summary and Survey Protocol for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, Mark K.; ,; Ahlers, Darrell; ,; Sferra, Susan J.; ,

    2010-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) has been the subject of substantial research, monitoring, and management activity since it was listed as an endangered species in 1995. When proposed for listing in 1993, relatively little was known about the flycatcher's natural history, and there were only 30 known breeding sites supporting an estimated 111 territories rangewide (Sogge and others, 2003a). Since that time, thousands of presence/absences surveys have been conducted throughout the historical range of the flycatcher, and many studies of its natural history and ecology have been completed. As a result, the ecology of the flycatcher is much better understood than it was just over a decade ago. In addition, we have learned that the current status of the flycatcher is better than originally thought: as of 2007, the population was estimated at approximately 1,300 territories distributed among approximately 280 breeding sites (Durst and others, 2008a). Concern about the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher on a rangewide scale was brought to focus by Unitt (1987), who described declines in flycatcher abundance and distribution throughout the Southwest. E. t. extimus populations declined during the 20th century, primarily because of habitat loss and modification from activities, such as dam construction and operation, groundwater pumping, water diversions, and flood control. In 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) designated the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher as a candidate category 1 species (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1991). In July 1993, the USFWS proposed to list E. t. extimus as an endangered species and to designate critical habitat under the Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1993). A final rule listing E. t. extimus as endangered was published in February 1995 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1995); critical habitat was designated in 1997 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1997). The USFWS Service released a Recovery Plan for

  11. Risky business: Site selection by Acadian Flycatchers under threat of nest predation and brood parasitism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    HazIer, K.R.; Cooper, R.J.; Twedt, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Habitat quality is determined not only by habitat structure and the availability of resources, but also by competitors, cooperators, predators, and parasites. We hypothesized that, for passerines, minimizing risk from avian nest predators and brood parasites is an important factor in selecting a breeding site. Through the early part of two breeding seasons, we spot-mapped locations of Acadian Flycatchers (Empidonax virescens, territory selectors), Red-bellied Woodpeckers (Melanerpes carolinus, nest predators) and Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater, brood parasites) in a 56-ha study area within an extensive bottomland hardwood forest. We were thereby able to determine the order of flycatcher territory settlement and nest initiation in relation to risk of predation and parasitism, while accounting for habitat structure. Male settlement was influenced by both habitat structure and risk avoidance. However, risk trom woodpeckers was relatively more important in the first season and risk from cowbirds in the second, evidently due to differences in the relative abundance of predator and brood-parasite in each year. For male flycatchers, settlement choices appear to be flexible in the face of changing 'risk landscapes.' For females, habitat structure was the most important predictor of nest site selection. Even so, there was evidence that females avoided cowbirds. Surprisingly, nest site selection was positively associated with woodpecker abundance in the first season when woodpeckers were present in greater numbers. Possible explanations for this contradictory result are discussed.

  12. Territoriality, site fidelity, and survivorship of willow flycatchers wintering in Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koronkiewicz, T.J.; Sogge, M.K.; van Riper, Charles; Paxton, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    We studied wintering Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) in two seasonal freshwater wetland habitats in northwestern Costa Rica during five boreal winters, to determine habitat occupancy, overwinter and between-year site and territory fidelity, and the degree to which the sexes maintain and defend winter territories. Both males and females used agonistic displays, song, and other vocalizations to maintain and defend mutually exclusive winter territories. Males were generally more abundant than females, but this varied by site and year. There was no significant difference in male and female territory size, nor any indication of sexual habitat segregation. Similarity in morphology and aggressiveness between the sexes may account for the lack of habitat segregation and the ability of females to maintain territories at wintering sites. Each year, 80%-92% of banded flycatchers that were present in midwinter remained at the site until late winter; of these, 86%-100% of individuals maintained the same territories throughout the entire period. We also observed nonterritorial floaters that subsequently established and held winter territories. Between-year site fidelity averaged 68%, and almost all returning birds established territories with boundaries similar to the previous year. Between-year apparent survivorship estimates ranged annually from 54%-72%, with no difference between sites but weak support for higher survivorship of males compared to females. Values for winter site and territory fidelity were generally higher than those reported for other species and for Willow Flycatchers on the breeding grounds; between-year survivorship estimates were similar to those reported for breeding flycatchers. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  13. Rivers, dams, and willow flycatchers: a summary of their science and policy connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, William L.; Stromberg, Julie; Valentine, Brad

    2002-10-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher ( Empidonax traillii extimus) is a riparian bird that spends winter months in Central and South America and summer breeding months in riparian zones of the American Southwest. Decline of the willow flycatcher population to less than 1000 breeding pairs prompted the Federal government to declare the species endangered, triggering a major recovery effort. The most important aspect of recovery is management and improvement of the riparian habitat of the bird population. Although the direct management of the species is primarily a biological issue, fluvial hydrology and geomorphology play an important role in understanding the dynamics of the present bird population and in designing a recovery plan because these physical systems are the substrates for the living communities which include the birds. Contributions of geomorphology and hydrology to the recovery plan include the use of watersheds and river basins as planning and evaluation units; understanding the connections between fluvial forms and riparian vegetation; implications for the bird population of the magnitude, frequency, duration, timing, and rate of change for various river discharges. The installation and operation of dams are the most important causes of hydro-geomorphic and ecological change in the region, so that management of these structures offers primary opportunities to improve the physical and biological conditions for the endangered species.

  14. A multiscaled model of southwestern willow flycatcher breeding habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, J.R.; Paradzick, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (SWFL; Empidonax traillii extimus) is an endangered songbird whose habitat has declined dramatically over the last century. Understanding habitat selection patterns and the ability to identify potential breeding areas for the SWFL is crucial to the management and conservation of this species. We developed a multiscaled model of SWTL breeding habitat with a Geographic Information System (GIS), survey data, GIS variables, and multiple logistic regressions. We obtained presence and absence survey data from a riverine ecosystem and a reservoir delta in south-central Arizona, USA, in 1999. We extracted the GIS variables from satellite imagery and digital elevation models to characterize vegetation and floodplain within the project area. We used multiple logistic regressions within a cell-based (30 X 30 m) modeling environment to (1) determine associations between GIS variables and breeding-site occurrence at different spatial scales (0.09-72 ha), and (2) construct a predictive model. Our best model explained 54% of the variability in breeding-site occurrence with the following variables: vegetation density at the site (0.09 ha), proportion of dense vegetation and variability in vegetation density within a 4.5-ha neighborhood, and amount of floodplain or flat terrain within a 41-ha neighborhood. The density of breeding sites was highest in areas that the model predicted to be most suitable within the project area and at an external test site 200 km away. Conservation efforts must focus on protecting not only occupied patches, but also surrounding riparian forests and floodplain to ensure long-term viability of SWTL. We will use the multiscaled model to map SWTL breeding habitat in Arizona, prioritize future survey effort, and examine changes in habitat abundance and quality over time.

  15. Using a Remote Sensing/GIS Model to Predict Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Habitat along the Rio Grande, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, James R.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter SWFL) is a federally endangered bird (USFWS 1995) that breeds in riparian areas in portions of New Mexico, Arizona, southwestern Colorado, extreme southern Utah and Nevada, and southern California (USFWS 2002). Across this range, it uses a variety of plant species as nesting/breeding habitat, but in all cases prefers sites with dense vegetation, high canopy, and proximity to surface water or saturated soils (Sogge and Marshall 2000). As of 2005, the known rangewide breeding population of SWFLs was roughly 1,214 territories, with approximately 393 territories distributed among 36 sites in New Mexico (Durst et al. 2006), primarily along the Rio Grande. One of the key challenges facing the management and conservation of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher is that riparian areas are dynamic, with individual habitat patches subject to cycles of creation, growth, and loss due to drought, flooding, fire, and other disturbances. Former breeding patches can lose suitability, and new habitat can develop within a matter of only a few years, especially in reservoir drawdown zones. Therefore, measuring and predicting flycatcher habitat - either to discover areas that might support SWFLs, or to identify areas that may develop into appropriate habitat - requires knowledge of recent/current habitat conditions and an understanding of the factors that determine flycatcher use of riparian breeding sites. In the past, much of the determination of whether a riparian site is likely to support breeding flycatchers has been based on qualitative criteria (for example, 'dense vegetation' or 'large patches'). These determinations often require on-the-ground field evaluations by local or regional SWFL experts. While this has proven valuable in locating many of the currently known breeding sites, it is difficult or impossible to apply this approach effectively over large geographic areas (for example, the

  16. Song discrimination by nestling collared flycatchers during early development.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Söderberg, Axel; Wheatcroft, David; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Pre-zygotic isolation is often maintained by species-specific signals and preferences. However, in species where signals are learnt, as in songbirds, learning errors can lead to costly hybridization. Song discrimination expressed during early developmental stages may ensure selective learning later in life but can be difficult to demonstrate before behavioural responses are obvious. Here, we use a novel method, measuring changes in metabolic rate, to detect song perception and discrimination in collared flycatcher embryos and nestlings. We found that nestlings as early as 7 days old respond to song with increased metabolic rate, and, by 9 days old, have increased metabolic rate when listening to conspecific when compared with heterospecific song. This early discrimination between songs probably leads to fewer heterospecific matings, and thus higher fitness of collared flycatchers living in sympatry with closely related species. PMID:27405379

  17. Song discrimination by nestling collared flycatchers during early development

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Axel; Wheatcroft, David; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Pre-zygotic isolation is often maintained by species-specific signals and preferences. However, in species where signals are learnt, as in songbirds, learning errors can lead to costly hybridization. Song discrimination expressed during early developmental stages may ensure selective learning later in life but can be difficult to demonstrate before behavioural responses are obvious. Here, we use a novel method, measuring changes in metabolic rate, to detect song perception and discrimination in collared flycatcher embryos and nestlings. We found that nestlings as early as 7 days old respond to song with increased metabolic rate, and, by 9 days old, have increased metabolic rate when listening to conspecific when compared with heterospecific song. This early discrimination between songs probably leads to fewer heterospecific matings, and thus higher fitness of collared flycatchers living in sympatry with closely related species. PMID:27405379

  18. The genomic landscape of species divergence in Ficedula flycatchers.

    PubMed

    Ellegren, Hans; Smeds, Linnéa; Burri, Reto; Olason, Pall I; Backström, Niclas; Kawakami, Takeshi; Künstner, Axel; Mäkinen, Hannu; Nadachowska-Brzyska, Krystyna; Qvarnström, Anna; Uebbing, Severin; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2012-11-29

    Unravelling the genomic landscape of divergence between lineages is key to understanding speciation. The naturally hybridizing collared flycatcher and pied flycatcher are important avian speciation models that show pre- as well as postzygotic isolation. We sequenced and assembled the 1.1-Gb flycatcher genome, physically mapped the assembly to chromosomes using a low-density linkage map and re-sequenced population samples of each species. Here we show that the genomic landscape of species differentiation is highly heterogeneous with approximately 50 'divergence islands' showing up to 50-fold higher sequence divergence than the genomic background. These non-randomly distributed islands, with between one and three regions of elevated divergence per chromosome irrespective of chromosome size, are characterized by reduced levels of nucleotide diversity, skewed allele-frequency spectra, elevated levels of linkage disequilibrium and reduced proportions of shared polymorphisms in both species, indicative of parallel episodes of selection. Proximity of divergence peaks to genomic regions resistant to sequence assembly, potentially including centromeres and telomeres, indicate that complex repeat structures may drive species divergence. A much higher background level of species divergence of the Z chromosome, and a lower proportion of shared polymorphisms, indicate that sex chromosomes and autosomes are at different stages of speciation. This study provides a roadmap to the emerging field of speciation genomics. PMID:23103876

  19. Flycatcher song in allopatry and sympatry--convergence, divergence and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Haavie, J; Borge, T; Bures, S; Garamszegi, L Z; Lampe, H M; Moreno, J; Qvarnström, A; Török, J; Saetre, G-P

    2004-03-01

    The theory of reinforcement predicts that natural selection against the production of unfit hybrids favours traits that increase assortative mating. Whether culturally inherited traits, such as bird song, can increase assortative mating by reinforcement is largely unknown. We compared songs of pied (Ficedula hypoleuca) and collared flycatchers (F. albicollis) from two hybrid zones of different ages with songs from allopatric populations. Previously, a character divergence in male plumage traits has been shown to reinforce premating isolation in sympatric flycatchers. In contrast, we find that the song of the pied flycatcher has converged towards that of the collared flycatcher (mixed singing). However, a corresponding divergence in the collared flycatcher shows that the species differences in song characters are maintained in sympatry. Genetic analyses suggest that mixed song is not caused by introgression from the collared flycatcher, but rather due to heterospecific copying. Circumstantial evidence suggests that mixed song may increase the rate of maladaptive hybridization. In the oldest hybrid zone where reinforcement on plumage traits is most pronounced, the frequency of mixed singing and hybridization is also lowest. Thus, we suggest that reinforcement has reduced the frequency of mixed singing in the pied flycatcher and caused a divergence in the song of the collared flycatcher. Whether a culturally inherited trait promotes or opposes speciation in sympatry may depend on its plasticity. The degree of plasticity may be genetically determined and accordingly under selection by reinforcement.

  20. The pentadehydro-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Teng; Naredla, Rajasekhar Reddy; Thompson, Severin K; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-04-28

    In the classic Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction, the overall degree of unsaturation (or oxidation state) of the 4π (diene) and 2π (dienophile) pairs of reactants dictates the oxidation state of the newly formed six-membered carbocycle. For example, in the classic Diels-Alder reaction, butadiene and ethylene combine to produce cyclohexene. More recent developments include variants in which the number of hydrogen atoms in the reactant pair and in the resulting product is reduced by, for example, four in the tetradehydro-Diels-Alder (TDDA) and by six in the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reactions. Any oxidation state higher than tetradehydro (that is, lacking more than four hydrogens) leads to the production of a reactive intermediate that is more highly oxidized than benzene. This increases the power of the overall process substantially, because trapping of the reactive intermediate can be used to increase the structural complexity of the final product in a controllable and versatile manner. Here we report an unprecedented overall 4π + 2π cycloaddition reaction that generates a different, highly reactive intermediate known as an α,3-dehydrotoluene. This species is in the same oxidation state as a benzyne. Like benzynes, α,3-dehydrotoluenes can be captured by various trapping agents to produce structurally diverse products that are complementary to those arising from the HDDA process. We call this new cycloisomerization process a pentadehydro-Diels-Alder (PDDA) reaction-a nomenclature chosen for chemical taxonomic reasons rather than mechanistic ones. In addition to alkynes, nitriles (RC≡N), although non-participants in aza-HDDA reactions, readily function as the 2π component in PDDA cyclizations to produce, via trapping of the α,3-(5-aza)dehydrotoluene intermediates, pyridine-containing products.

  1. The pentadehydro-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Teng; Naredla, Rajasekhar Reddy; Thompson, Severin K; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-04-28

    In the classic Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction, the overall degree of unsaturation (or oxidation state) of the 4π (diene) and 2π (dienophile) pairs of reactants dictates the oxidation state of the newly formed six-membered carbocycle. For example, in the classic Diels-Alder reaction, butadiene and ethylene combine to produce cyclohexene. More recent developments include variants in which the number of hydrogen atoms in the reactant pair and in the resulting product is reduced by, for example, four in the tetradehydro-Diels-Alder (TDDA) and by six in the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reactions. Any oxidation state higher than tetradehydro (that is, lacking more than four hydrogens) leads to the production of a reactive intermediate that is more highly oxidized than benzene. This increases the power of the overall process substantially, because trapping of the reactive intermediate can be used to increase the structural complexity of the final product in a controllable and versatile manner. Here we report an unprecedented overall 4π + 2π cycloaddition reaction that generates a different, highly reactive intermediate known as an α,3-dehydrotoluene. This species is in the same oxidation state as a benzyne. Like benzynes, α,3-dehydrotoluenes can be captured by various trapping agents to produce structurally diverse products that are complementary to those arising from the HDDA process. We call this new cycloisomerization process a pentadehydro-Diels-Alder (PDDA) reaction-a nomenclature chosen for chemical taxonomic reasons rather than mechanistic ones. In addition to alkynes, nitriles (RC≡N), although non-participants in aza-HDDA reactions, readily function as the 2π component in PDDA cyclizations to produce, via trapping of the α,3-(5-aza)dehydrotoluene intermediates, pyridine-containing products. PMID:27088605

  2. A New Species of Muscicapa Flycatcher from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ding Li; Prawiradilaga, Dewi M.; Putra, Dadang Dwi; Round, Philip D.; Rheindt, Frank E.

    2014-01-01

    The Indonesian island of Sulawesi, a globally important hotspot of avian endemism, has been relatively poorly studied ornithologically, to the extent that several new bird species from the region have been described to science only recently, and others have been observed and photographed, but never before collected or named to science. One of these is a new species of Muscicapa flycatcher that has been observed on several occasions since 1997. We collected two specimens in Central Sulawesi in 2012, and based on a combination of morphological, vocal and genetic characters, we describe the new species herein, more than 15 years after the first observations. The new species is superficially similar to the highly migratory, boreal-breeding Gray-streaked Flycatcher Muscicapa griseisticta, which winters in Sulawesi; however, the new species differs strongly from M. griseisticta in several morphological characters, song, and mtDNA. Based on mtDNA, the new species is only distantly related to M. griseisticta, instead being a member of the M. dauurica clade. The new species is evidently widely distributed in lowland and submontane forest throughout Sulawesi. This wide distribution coupled with the species' apparent tolerance of disturbed habitats suggests it is not currently threatened with extinction. PMID:25419968

  3. A new species of Muscicapa flycatcher from Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Berton C; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Yong, Ding Li; Prawiradilaga, Dewi M; Putra, Dadang Dwi; Round, Philip D; Rheindt, Frank E

    2014-01-01

    The Indonesian island of Sulawesi, a globally important hotspot of avian endemism, has been relatively poorly studied ornithologically, to the extent that several new bird species from the region have been described to science only recently, and others have been observed and photographed, but never before collected or named to science. One of these is a new species of Muscicapa flycatcher that has been observed on several occasions since 1997. We collected two specimens in Central Sulawesi in 2012, and based on a combination of morphological, vocal and genetic characters, we describe the new species herein, more than 15 years after the first observations. The new species is superficially similar to the highly migratory, boreal-breeding Gray-streaked Flycatcher Muscicapa griseisticta, which winters in Sulawesi; however, the new species differs strongly from M. griseisticta in several morphological characters, song, and mtDNA. Based on mtDNA, the new species is only distantly related to M. griseisticta, instead being a member of the M. dauurica clade. The new species is evidently widely distributed in lowland and submontane forest throughout Sulawesi. This wide distribution coupled with the species' apparent tolerance of disturbed habitats suggests it is not currently threatened with extinction.

  4. Female ornamentation and territorial conflicts in collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis).

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Gergely; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Eens, Marcel; Török, János

    2008-10-01

    Female ornaments in species with conventional sex roles often indicate individual quality, but the evolutionary forces maintaining them are less clear. Sexual competition for breeding opportunities may represent an important role for female signals, especially in polygynous species, but there is little experimental evidence for this. The wing patch size (WPS) of female collared flycatchers indicates age and body condition and predicts social mating patterns. We challenged nest-building females with decoy females of varying WPS and found that the aggressive response of residents increased with decoy WPS, suggesting a role for this female ornament in territorial competition. Our results explain why female WPS predicts territorial distances when mated to a polygynous male and indicate that the role of WPS in female competitive interactions is similar to that in males of the same population.

  5. Using Molecular Genetic Markers to Resolve a Subspecies Boundary: The Northern Boundary of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher in the Four-Corner States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Theimer, Tad C.; Girard, Jessica; Keim, Paul

    2008-01-01

    *Executive Summary* The northern boundary of the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is currently approximated as running through southern Colorado and Utah, but the exact placement is uncertain because this subspecies shares a border with the more northern and non-endangered E. t. adastus. To help resolve this issue, we evaluated the geographic distribution of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by sampling breeding sites across the four-corner states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). We found that breeding sites clustered into two major groups generally consistent with the currently designated boundary, with the exception of three sites situated along the current boundary. However, delineating a precise boundary that would separate the two subspecies is made difficult because (1) we found evidence for a region of intergradation along the boundary area, suggesting the boundary is not discreet, and (2) the boundary region is sparsely populated, with too few extant breeding populations to precisely locate a boundary. The boundary region encompasses an area where elevation changes markedly over relatively short distances, with low elevation deserts to the south and more mesic, higher elevation habitats to the north. We hypothesized that latitudinal and elevational differences and their concomitant ecological effects could form an ecological barrier that inhibited gene flow between the subspecies, forming the basis for the subspecies boundary. We modeled changes in geographic patterns of genetic markers as a function of latitude and elevation finding significant support for this relationship. The model was brought into a GIS environment to create multiple subspecies boundaries, with the strength of each predicted boundary evaluated on the basis of how much genetic variation it explained. The candidate boundary that accounted for the most genetic variation was situated generally near the currently recognized subspecies boundary

  6. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Christopher; Adzima, Brian J.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  7. Molecular phylogeny of the Indian Ocean Terpsiphone paradise flycatchers: undetected evolutionary diversity revealed amongst island populations.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Rachel M; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Irestedt, Martin; Jønsson, Knud A; Shah, Nirmal J; Tatayah, Vikash; Warren, Ben H; Groombridge, Jim J

    2013-05-01

    We construct a molecular phylogeny of Terpsiphone flycatchers of the Indian Ocean and use this to investigate their evolutionary relationships. A total of 4.4 kb of mitochondrial (cyt-b, ND3, ND2, control region) and nuclear (G3PDH, MC1R) sequence data were obtained from all species, sub-species and island populations of the region. Colonisation of the western Indian Ocean has been within the last two million years and greatly postdates the formation of the older islands of the region. A minimum of two independent continent-island colonisation events must have taken place in order to explain the current distribution and phylogenetic placement of Terpsiphone in this region. While five well-diverged Indian Ocean clades are detected, the relationship between them is unclear. Short intermodal branches are indicative of rapid range expansion across the region, masking exact routes and chronology of colonisation. The Indian Ocean Terpsiphone taxa fall into five well supported clades, two of which (the Seychelles paradise flycatcher and the Mascarene paradise flycatcher) correspond with currently recognised species, whilst a further three (within the Madagascar paradise flycatcher) are not entirely predicted by taxonomy, and are neither consistent with distance-based nor island age-based models of colonisation. We identify the four non-Mascarene clades as Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESUs), while the Mascarene paradise flycatcher contains two ESUs corresponding to the Mauritius and Réunion subspecies. All six ESUs are sufficiently diverged to be worthy of management as if they were separate species. This phylogenetic reconstruction highlights the importance of sub-specific molecular phylogenetic reconstructions in complex island archipelago settings in clarifying phylogenetic history and ESUs that may otherwise be overlooked and inadvertently lost. Our phylogenetic reconstruction has identified hidden pockets of evolutionary distinctiveness, which provide a valuable

  8. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  9. The pentadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Teng; Naredla, Rajasekhar Reddy; Thompson, Severin K.; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    In the classic Diels–Alder (DA) [4+2] cycloaddition reaction1, the overall degree of unsaturation of the 4π (diene) and 2π (dienophile) pairs of reactants dictates the oxidation state of the newly formed six-membered carbocycle. For example, in the classic DA reaction, butadiene and ethylene combine to produce cyclohexene. More recent developments include variants in which the hydrogen atom count in the reactant pair and in the resulting product is reduced by2, for example, four in the tetradehydro-DA (TDDA) and by six in the hexadehydro-DA (HDDA3,4,5,6,7) reactions. Any oxidation state higher than tetradehydro leads to the production of a reactive intermediate that is more highly oxidized than benzene. This significantly increases the power of the overall process because trapping of the benzyne intermediate8,9 can be used to increase the structural complexity of the final product in a controllable and versatile manner. In this manuscript, we report an unprecedented net 4π+2π cycloaddition reaction that generates a different, highly reactive intermediate known as an α,3-dehydrotoluene. This species is at the same oxidation state as a benzyne. Like benzynes, α,3-dehydrotoluenes can be captured by various trapping agents to produce structurally diverse products that are complementary to those arising from the HDDA process. We call this new cycloisomerization reaction a pentadehydro-Diels–Alder (PDDA) reaction—a nomenclature chosen for chemical taxonomic rather than mechanistic reasons. In addition to alkynes, nitriles (RC≡N), although non-participants in aza-HDDA reactions, readily function as the 2π-component in PDDA cyclizations to produce, via trapping of the α,3-(5-aza)dehydrotoluene intermediates, pyridine-containing products. PMID:27088605

  10. Oxidative stress in pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings from metal contaminated environments in northern Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, A.M.M. Sturve, J.; Foerlin, L.; Nyholm, N.E.I.

    2007-11-15

    Metals have been shown to induce oxidative stress in animals. One of the most metal polluted terrestrial environments in Sweden is the surroundings of a sulfide ore smelter plant located in the northern part of the country. Pied flycatcher nestlings (Ficedula hypoleuca) that grew up close to the industry had accumulated amounts of arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, iron and zinc in their liver tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate if pied flycatcher nestlings in the pollution gradient of the industry were affected by oxidative stress using antioxidant molecules and enzyme activities. The antioxidant assays were also evaluated in search for useful biomarkers in pied flycatchers. This study indicated that nestlings in metal contaminated areas showed signs of oxidative stress evidenced by up regulated hepatic antioxidant defense given as increased glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) activities and slightly but not significantly elevated lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities. Stepwise linear regression indicated that lipid peroxidation and CAT activities were influenced mostly by iron, but iron and lead influenced the CAT activity to a higher degree. Positive relationships were found between GST and lead as well as GR activities and cadmium. We conclude that GR, CAT, GST activities and lipid peroxidation levels may function as useful biomarkers for oxidative stress in free-living pied flycatcher nestlings exposed to metal contaminated environments.

  11. The hexadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hoye, Thomas R.; Baire, Beeraiah; Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H.; Woods, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary o-Benzynes (arynes) are among the most versatile of all reactive (short-lived) intermediates in organic chemistry. These species can be trapped to give products that are valuable from the perspective of both fine (pharmaceuticals) and commodity (agrochemicals, dyes, polymers, etc.) chemicals. Here we show a fundamentally new strategy that unites a de novo generation of benzynes, through the title hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) reaction, with their in situ elaboration into structurally complex benzenoid products. In the HDDA reaction a 1,3-diyne is engaged in a [4+2] cycloisomerization with a third (pendant) alkyne–the diynophile–to produce the highly reactive benzyne intermediate. The metal- and reagent-free reaction conditions for this simple, thermal transformation are notable. The subsequent and highly efficient trapping reactions increase the power of the overall process. Finally, we provide examples of how this de novo benzyne generation approach allows new modes of intrinsic reactivity to be revealed. PMID:23060191

  12. Understanding the mechanism of polar Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Sáez, José A

    2009-09-01

    A good correlation between the activation energy and the polar character of Diels-Alder reactions measured as the charge transfer at the transition state structure has been found. This electronic parameter controls the reaction rate to an even greater extent than other recognized structural features. The proposed polar mechanism, which is characterized by the electrophilic/nucleophilic interactions at the transition state structure, can be easily predicted by analyzing the electrophilicity/nucleophilicity indices defined within the conceptual density functional theory. Due to the significance of the polarity of the reaction, Diels-Alder reactions should be classified as non-polar (N), polar (P), and ionic (I).

  13. Myiarchus flycatchers are the primary seed dispersers of Bursera longipes in a Mexican dry forest.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Núñez, R Carlos; Eguiarte, Luis E; Arizmendi, María Del Coro; Corcuera, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the seed dispersal of Bursera longipes by birds along a successional gradient of tropical dry forest (TDF) in southwestern Mexico. B. longipes is an endemic tree to the TDF in the Balsas basin. The relative abundance of frugivorous birds, their frequency of visits to B. longipes and the number of removed fruits were recorded at three study sites with different stages of forest succession (early, intermediate and mature) characterized by distinct floristic and structural elements. Flycatchers of the Myiarchus and Tyrannus genera removed the majority of fruits at each site. Overall, visits to B. longipes were less frequent at the early successional site. Birds that function as legitimate dispersers by consuming whole seeds and regurgitating or defecating intact seeds in the process also remove the pseudoaril from seeds, thereby facilitating the germination process. The highest germination percentages were recorded for seeds that passed through the digestive system of two migratory flycatchers: M. cinerascens and M. nutingii. Perch plants, mainly composed of legumes (e.g., Eysenhardtia polystachya, Acacia cochliacantha, Calliandra eryophylla, Mimosa polyantha), serve also as nurse plants since the number of young individuals recruited from B. longipes was higher under these than expected by chance. This study shows that Myiarchus flycatchers are the most efficient seed dispersers of B. longipes across all successional stages. This suggests a close mutualistic relationship derived from adaptive processes and local specializations throughout the distribution of both taxa, as supported by the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution.

  14. Myiarchus flycatchers are the primary seed dispersers of Bursera longipes in a Mexican dry forest

    PubMed Central

    Almazán-Núñez, R. Carlos; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Arizmendi, María del Coro

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the seed dispersal of Bursera longipes by birds along a successional gradient of tropical dry forest (TDF) in southwestern Mexico. B. longipes is an endemic tree to the TDF in the Balsas basin. The relative abundance of frugivorous birds, their frequency of visits to B. longipes and the number of removed fruits were recorded at three study sites with different stages of forest succession (early, intermediate and mature) characterized by distinct floristic and structural elements. Flycatchers of the Myiarchus and Tyrannus genera removed the majority of fruits at each site. Overall, visits to B. longipes were less frequent at the early successional site. Birds that function as legitimate dispersers by consuming whole seeds and regurgitating or defecating intact seeds in the process also remove the pseudoaril from seeds, thereby facilitating the germination process. The highest germination percentages were recorded for seeds that passed through the digestive system of two migratory flycatchers: M. cinerascens and M. nutingii. Perch plants, mainly composed of legumes (e.g., Eysenhardtia polystachya, Acacia cochliacantha, Calliandra eryophylla, Mimosa polyantha), serve also as nurse plants since the number of young individuals recruited from B. longipes was higher under these than expected by chance. This study shows that Myiarchus flycatchers are the most efficient seed dispersers of B. longipes across all successional stages. This suggests a close mutualistic relationship derived from adaptive processes and local specializations throughout the distribution of both taxa, as supported by the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution. PMID:27326382

  15. The Rusty-tailed Flycatcher (Muscicapa ruficauda; Aves: Muscicapidae) is a member of the genus Ficedula.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Daniel M; Olsson, Urban; Alström, Per

    2016-09-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the avian family Muscicapidae (Old World chats and flycatchers) have historically been enigmatic and remain an active area of study. Widespread instances of non-monophyly resulting from misleading morphological and behavioral similarities have merited numerous taxonomic revisions to the group. Here we report one such instance with regard to the Rusty-tailed Flycatcher Muscicapa ruficauda, which has recently been placed in the newly proposed monotypic genus Ripleyia, due to inferred sister relationship to the genus Muscicapa and related genera (Voelker et al., 2016a). This name was later replaced by Ripleyornis, as it was realized that Ripleyia is a junior homonym of a genus of Mollusca (Voelker et al., 2016b). Using a Bayesian phylogenetic assessment of the Muscicapidae with near-complete taxon sampling of the genus Ficedula for five loci, along with an acoustic comparison of M. ruficauda to a subset of other flycatcher species, we show that this species should be reassigned to the genus Ficedula and accordingly that the names Ripleyia and Ripleyornis are both junior synonyms of Ficedula. PMID:27246102

  16. Myiarchus flycatchers are the primary seed dispersers of Bursera longipes in a Mexican dry forest.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Núñez, R Carlos; Eguiarte, Luis E; Arizmendi, María Del Coro; Corcuera, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the seed dispersal of Bursera longipes by birds along a successional gradient of tropical dry forest (TDF) in southwestern Mexico. B. longipes is an endemic tree to the TDF in the Balsas basin. The relative abundance of frugivorous birds, their frequency of visits to B. longipes and the number of removed fruits were recorded at three study sites with different stages of forest succession (early, intermediate and mature) characterized by distinct floristic and structural elements. Flycatchers of the Myiarchus and Tyrannus genera removed the majority of fruits at each site. Overall, visits to B. longipes were less frequent at the early successional site. Birds that function as legitimate dispersers by consuming whole seeds and regurgitating or defecating intact seeds in the process also remove the pseudoaril from seeds, thereby facilitating the germination process. The highest germination percentages were recorded for seeds that passed through the digestive system of two migratory flycatchers: M. cinerascens and M. nutingii. Perch plants, mainly composed of legumes (e.g., Eysenhardtia polystachya, Acacia cochliacantha, Calliandra eryophylla, Mimosa polyantha), serve also as nurse plants since the number of young individuals recruited from B. longipes was higher under these than expected by chance. This study shows that Myiarchus flycatchers are the most efficient seed dispersers of B. longipes across all successional stages. This suggests a close mutualistic relationship derived from adaptive processes and local specializations throughout the distribution of both taxa, as supported by the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution. PMID:27326382

  17. N2-fixing red alder indirectly accelerates ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic N2-fixing tree species can accelerate ecosystem N dynamics through decomposition via direct pathways by producing readily decomposed leaf litter and increasing N supply to decomposers, as well as via indirect pathways by increasing tissue and detrital N in non-fixing vegetation. To evaluate the relative importance of these pathways, we compared three-year decomposition and N dynamics of N2-fixing red alder leaf litter (2.34 %N) to both low-N (0.68 %N) and high-N (1.21 %N) litter of non-fixing Douglas-fir, and decomposed each litter source in four forests dominated by either red alder or Douglas-fir. We also used experimental N fertilization of decomposition plots to assess elevated N availability as a potential mechanism of N2-fixer effects on litter mass loss and N dynamics. Direct effects of N2-fixing red alder on decomposition occurred primarily as faster N release from red alder than Douglas-fir litter, but direct increases in N supply to decomposers via fertilization did not stimulate decomposition of any litter. Fixed N indirectly influenced detrital dynamics by increasing Douglas-fir tissue and litter N concentrations, which accelerated litter N release without accelerating mass loss. By increasing soil N, tissue N, and the rate of N release from litter of non-fixers, we conclude that N2-fixing vegetation can indirectly foster plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to the persistence of elevated N availability in terrestrial ecosystems.

  18. 61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The Niagara Shipbuilding Corp. Engineering Department, Buffalo, New York. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-1604-10, dated February 1943; revised January 1963. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  19. High stereoselectivity on low temperature Diels-Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Filho, Luiz Carlos; Lacerda Júnior, Valdemar; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; da Silva, Gil Valdo José; Invernize, Paulo Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We have found that some of the usually poor dienophiles (2-cycloenones) can undergo Diels-Alder reaction at -78°C with unusually high stereoselectivity in the presence of niobium pentachloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. A remarkable difference in reaction rates for unsubstituted and α- or β-methyl substituted 2-cycloenones was also observed. PMID:16542029

  20. High stereoselectivity on low temperature Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    da Silva Filho, Luiz Carlos; Lacerda Júnior, Valdemar; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; da Silva, Gil Valdo José; Invernize, Paulo Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We have found that some of the usually poor dienophiles (2-cycloenones) can undergo Diels-Alder reaction at -78 degrees C with unusually high stereoselectivity in the presence of niobium pentachloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. A remarkable difference in reaction rates for unsubstituted and alpha- or beta-methyl substituted 2-cycloenones was also observed. PMID:16542029

  1. Norbornenes in inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Vrabel, Milan; Kölle, Patrick; Brunner, Korbinian M; Gattner, Michael J; López-Carrillo, Verónica; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Carell, Thomas

    2013-09-27

    Significant differences in the reactivity of norbornene derivatives in the inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction with tetrazines were revealed by kinetic studies. Substantial rate enhancement for the exo norbornene isomers was observed. Quantum-chemical calculations were used to rationalize and support the observed experimental data.

  2. Catalytic enantioselective intramolecular aza-diels-alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang; Lin, Chih-Tsung; Seidel, Daniel

    2015-05-26

    A readily available chiral Brønsted acid was identified as an efficient catalyst for intramolecular Povarov reactions. Polycyclic amines containing three contiguous stereogenic centers were obtained with excellent stereocontrol in a single step from secondary anilines and aldehydes possessing a pendent dienophile. These transformations constitute the first examples of catalytic enantioselective intramolecular aza-Diels-Alder reactions.

  3. Zero prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in 300 breeding Collared Flycatchers in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Järhult, Josef D; Stedt, Johan; Gustafsson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Wild birds are important indicators and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. The order Passerines is scarcely studied apart from Corvus sp. but extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) has been found in Blackbirds. We tested 300 fecal samples from a well-studied population of Collared Flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) at the Island of Gotland in Sweden and found no ESBL-producing bacteria. These results support the idea of 'ecological guild' as Blackbirds are ground-foraging invertebrate feeders, whereas Collared Flycatchers are aerial insectivores not regularly coming into contact with fecal contaminations and therefore less prone to acquire pathogens spread by the fecal-oral route. PMID:23898397

  4. Recent Progress in Dehydro(genative) Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbo; Zhou, Liejin; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-01-26

    In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in dehydro or dehydrogenative Diels-Alder (D-A) reactions. This Minireview gives an overview of the major two strategies for dehydro(genative) Diels-Alder reactions, which differ in dehydrogenation and D-A cyclization sequence. Reactions in which D-A cycloaddition is followed by dehydrogenation are useful methods for the synthesis of various aromatic compounds, whereas advancements in dehydro genative procedures with oxidants or catalysts prior to D-A cycloaddition offer yet further new routes to functionalized cycloadducts. Recent leading findings are highlighted and the current state of the art, scope, and limitations of these processes are discussed in this Minireview. PMID:26786814

  5. Cobalt(III) porphyrin catalyzed aza-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ryota; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2012-09-21

    An efficient protocol for the aza-Diels-Alder reaction of electron-deficient 1,3-dienes with unactivated imines in the presence of a cationic cobalt(III) porphyrin complex was developed. The transformation proceeded smoothly to afford the desired piperidine scaffold within 2 h at ambient temperature. Highly chemoselective cycloaddition of imines with dienes in the presence of a variety of carbonyl compounds was also demonstrated.

  6. The role of red alder in riparian forest structure along headwater streams in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlikowska, E.H.; Deal, R.L.; Hennon, P.E.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the influence of red alder on tree species composition, stand density, tree size distribution, tree mortality, and potential for producing large conifers, in 38-42 yr old riparian forests along 13 headwater streams in the Maybeso and Harris watersheds on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Red alder ranged from 0 to 53% of the total live basal area of the stands. Tree density, basal area of live and dead trees, and mean diameter of live conifers were not significantly related to the percent of alder as a proportion of total stand live basal area within these riparian forests. The mean diameter of the 100 largest conifers per hectare (the largest trees) was similar among different sites and appeared unrelated to the amount of alder in the stands. The mean diameter of dead conifers increased slightly with increasing proportion of red alder. Most dead trees were small and died standing. Red alder was much more concentrated immediately along stream margins (within 0-1 m distance from the stream bank vs. > 1 m). The presence of red alder did not inhibit the production of large-diameter conifers, and both alder and conifers provided small woody debris for fishless headwater streams in southeastern Alaska. Red alder is an important structural component of young-growth riparian stands.

  7. Climate adaptation and speciation: particular focus on reproductive barriers in Ficedula flycatchers.

    PubMed

    Qvarnström, Anna; Ålund, Murielle; McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M

    2016-01-01

    Climate adaptation is surprisingly rarely reported as a cause for the build-up of reproductive isolation between diverging populations. In this review, we summarize evidence for effects of climate adaptation on pre- and postzygotic isolation between emerging species with a particular focus on pied (Ficedula hypoleuca) and collared (Ficedula albicollis) flycatchers as a model for research on speciation. Effects of climate adaptation on prezygotic isolation or extrinsic selection against hybrids have been documented in several taxa, but the combined action of climate adaptation and sexual selection is particularly well explored in Ficedula flycatchers. There is a general lack of evidence for divergent climate adaptation causing intrinsic postzygotic isolation. However, we argue that the profound effects of divergence in climate adaptation on the whole biochemical machinery of organisms and hence many underlying genes should increase the likelihood of genetic incompatibilities arising as side effects. Fast temperature-dependent co-evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may be particularly likely to lead to hybrid sterility. Thus, how climate adaptation relates to reproductive isolation is best explored in relation to fast-evolving barriers to gene flow, while more research on later stages of divergence is needed to achieve a complete understanding of climate-driven speciation. PMID:27087843

  8. Experimental manipulation shows that the white wing patch in collared flycatchers is a male sexual ornament

    PubMed Central

    de Heij, Maaike E; Gustafsson, Lars; Brommer, Jon E

    2011-01-01

    Descriptive analysis suggests that a conspicuous white wing patch in dichromatic (black and white) pied and collared flycatchers is under sexual selection. Here, we use an experimental approach to test whether this trait is indeed the target of selection. We caught 100 collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis males soon after their arrival on the breeding site. We reduced (blackened) part of the white wing patch in half of these males and recorded their mating success and within and extra-pair offspring production. Reduction of the size of the white wing patch lowered a male's probability to attract a secondary social female, but not a primary female. However, primary females paired to males with a reduced wing patch were smaller (in tarsus), suggesting that male choice of partner or female–female competition over mates occurs in this species. The probability of pairing with a primary female (but not other components of male reproductive success) declined with arrival time (proxied by the date of capture). Males with a reduced wing patch size tended to sire less extra-pair offspring, although this relationship was reversed in one of the three study plots, suggesting that mating dynamics are context dependent. While our findings show that wing patch size is the target of sexual selection, the pathways and the strength of selection on this ornament differed markedly from a previous descriptive study. Nonexperimental studies of sexual selection in the wild may overestimate its importance because male fitness and ornamentation both depend positively on environmental conditions. PMID:22393521

  9. Alder (alnus crispa) effects on soils in ecosystems of the agashashok river valley, northwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhoades, C.; Oskarsson, H.; Binkley, D.; Stottlemyer, B.

    2001-01-01

    At the northern limit of the boreal forest biome, alder (Alnus crispa [Ait.] Pursh) shrubs occur in a variety of ecosystems. We assessed the effects of individual alder shrubs on soil properties and understory plant tissue nitrogen in floodplain terraces, valley slopes and tussock tundra ridges. The three ecosystems differed with respect to soil properties and abiotic conditions and supported distinct plant communities. Alder increased resin-exchangeable soil N and NO3 production significantly in each ecosystem. The greatest difference between alder canopy and surrounding soil NO3 measured both under field and laboratory conditions occured in floodplain sites. The shrub effect on soil pH and soil organic matter was greatest on tundra ridges. Alder shrubs also influenced the nitrogen nutrition of plants growing beneath their canopies. Plants growing below alder canopies had higher foliar nitrogen concentration and natural abundance 15N composition and lower carbon to nitrogen ratio than open-grown plants. Similar to soil N availability, understory plant leaf chemistry responded more to alder on floodplains than on slope or tundra ecosystems. This pattern suggests that understory plants rely more heavily on alder-fixed-N in this resource-poor ecosystem.

  10. Is it true that polymerization of vegetable oil occurs through Diels-Alder reaction?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is known to be one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. However, our NMR study showed no evidence for Diels-Alder products. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ...

  11. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions. PMID:27583553

  12. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions.

  13. Alternate non-stop migration strategies of pied flycatchers to cross the Sahara desert.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Janne; Both, Christiaan

    2016-04-01

    Each year more than two billion songbirds cross the Sahara, but how they perform this formidable task is largely unknown. Using geolocation tracks from 27 pied flycatchers, a nocturnally migrating passerine, we show that most birds made diurnal flights in both autumn and spring. These diurnal flights were estimated to be part of non-stop flights of mostly 40-60 h. In spring, birds flew across the Sahara, while autumn migration probably circumpassed part of the desert, through a long oversea flight. Our data contradict claims that passerines cross the Sahara by intermittent flight and daytime resting. The frequent occurrence of long non-stop flights to cross the desert shows migrants' physiological abilities and poses the question why this would not be the general migration strategy to cross the Sahara.

  14. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S. Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M.; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions. PMID:27583553

  15. Mitochondrial genome organization of the Ochre-bellied Flycatcher, Mionectes oleagineus.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Jose R; Aguilar, Celestino; De León, Luis Fernando; McMillan, W Owen; Miller, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    We sequenced and compared the mitogenome organization of two specimens of suboscine tyrant flycatcher Mionectes oleagineus from western and eastern Panama, representing distinct mtDNA clades. These samples show identical gene arrangement and vary in size by less than 5 base pairs. Both depict a non-standard avian gene order with an extra non-coding region (e.g. the remnant CR2), which differs in one base pair between them. Small size differences are also found on the control region and the 16S rRNA. Average uncorrected pairwise divergence among protein-coding genes (PCGs) was 2.8, ranging from 1.9% for COXIII and ND6 to 3.2% for ND2 and ATP6, respectively. These mitogenomes may be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of gene order in bird mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24857375

  16. Breeding Experience and the Heritability of Female Mate Choice in Collared Flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Gergely; Herényi, Márton; Wilson, Alastair J.; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Rosivall, Balázs; Eens, Marcel; Török, János

    2010-01-01

    Background Heritability in mate preferences is assumed by models of sexual selection, and preference evolution may contribute to adaptation to changing environments. However, mate preference is difficult to measure in natural populations as detailed data on mate availability and mate sampling are usually missing. Often the only available information is the ornamentation of the actual mate. The single long-term quantitative genetic study of a wild population found low heritability in female mate ornamentation in Swedish collared flycatchers. One potentially important cause of low heritability in mate ornamentation at the population level is reduced mate preference expression among inexperienced individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying animal model analyses to 21 years of data from a Hungarian collared flycatcher population, we found that additive genetic variance was 50 percent and significant for ornament expression in males, but less than 5 percent and non-significant for mate ornamentation treated as a female trait. Female breeding experience predicted breeding date and clutch size, but mate ornamentation and its variance components were unrelated to experience. Although we detected significant area and year effects on mate ornamentation, more than 85 percent of variance in this trait remained unexplained. Moreover, the effects of area and year on mate ornamentation were also highly positively correlated between inexperienced and experienced females, thereby acting to remove difference between the two groups. Conclusions/Significance The low heritability of mate ornamentation was apparently not explained by the presence of inexperienced individuals. Our results further indicate that the expression of mate ornamentation is dominated by temporal and spatial constraints and unmeasured background factors. Future studies should reduce unexplained variance or use alternative measures of mate preference. The heritability of mate preference in the wild

  17. Snail consumption and breeding performance of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) along a pollution gradient in the Middle Urals, Russia.

    PubMed

    Belskii, Eugen; Grebennikov, Maxim

    2014-08-15

    During the years 1989-91, 1997-2003, and 2005-07, we studied how emissions from the Middle Urals copper smelter affect snail availability and reproduction of free-living pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). We counted snail shells dropped in nests and analysed food samples of nestlings. Pied flycatchers brought to nestlings fewer shells in heavily polluted sites compared to background sites, resulting in reduced Ca intake. Species diversity of snails collected by birds decreased with decreasing distance from the pollution source. The pattern was the same both in deciduous and coniferous forests. In sites closest to the smelter, 20-50% of breeding females suffered from Ca deficiency, which resulted in an increased proportion of deserted clutches and clutches with defective eggshells. Number of fledglings per nest decreased in heavily polluted sites, especially in broods with decreased snail supply. This study demonstrated that pollution can cause both direct effect of toxicants to birds and indirect effects via reduced Ca availability.

  18. Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Roy, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Alders have already demonstrated their potential for the revegetation of both mining and industrial sites. These actinorhizal trees and shrubs and the actinobacteria Frankia associate in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis which could however be negatively affected by the presence of heavy metals, and accumulate them. In our hydroponic assay with black alders, quantification of the roots and shoots metal concentrations showed that, in the absence of stress, symbiosis increases Mo and Ni root content and simultaneously decreases Mo shoot content. Interestingly, the Mo shoot content also decreases in the presence of Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd for symbiotic alders. In symbiotic alders, Pb shoot translocation was promoted in presence of Pb. On the other hand, Cd exclusion in symbiotic root tissues was observed with Pb and Cd. In the presence of symbiosis, only Cd and Pb showed translocation into aerial tissues when present in the nutrient solution. Moreover, the translocation of Ni to shoot was prevented by symbiosis in the presence of Cd, Ni and Pb. The hydroponic experiment demonstrated that alders benefit from the symbiosis, producing more biomass (total, root and shoot) than non nodulated alders in control condition, and in the presence of metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd). Heavy metals did not reduce the nodule numbers (SNN), but the presence of Zn or Cd did reduce nodule allocation. Our study suggests that the Frankia-alder symbiosis is a promising (and a compatible) plant-microorganism association for the revegetation of contaminated sites, with minimal risk of metal dispersion.

  19. Estimation of linkage disequilibrium and interspecific gene flow in Ficedula flycatchers by a newly developed 50k single-nucleotide polymorphism array.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Backström, Niclas; Burri, Reto; Husby, Arild; Olason, Pall; Rice, Amber M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-11-01

    With the access to draft genome sequence assemblies and whole-genome resequencing data from population samples, molecular ecology studies will be able to take truly genome-wide approaches. This now applies to an avian model system in ecological and evolutionary research: Old World flycatchers of the genus Ficedula, for which we recently obtained a 1.1 Gb collared flycatcher genome assembly and identified 13 million single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s in population resequencing of this species and its sister species, pied flycatcher. Here, we developed a custom 50K Illumina iSelect flycatcher SNP array with markers covering 30 autosomes and the Z chromosome. Using a number of selection criteria for inclusion in the array, both genotyping success rate and polymorphism information content (mean marker heterozygosity = 0.41) were high. We used the array to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and hybridization in flycatchers. Linkage disequilibrium declined quickly to the background level at an average distance of 17 kb, but the extent of LD varied markedly within the genome and was more than 10-fold higher in 'genomic islands' of differentiation than in the rest of the genome. Genetic ancestry analysis identified 33 F1 hybrids but no later-generation hybrids from sympatric populations of collared flycatchers and pied flycatchers, contradicting earlier reports of backcrosses identified from much fewer number of markers. With an estimated divergence time as recently as <1 Ma, this suggests strong selection against F1 hybrids and unusually rapid evolution of reproductive incompatibility in an avian system.

  20. Slow improvements of metal exposure, health- and breeding conditions of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) after decreased industrial heavy metal emissions.

    PubMed

    Berglund, A M M; Nyholm, N E I

    2011-09-15

    The environment around metal industries, such as smelters, is often highly contaminated due to continuous deposition of metals. We studied nest box breeding populations of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) in a well-studied pollution gradient from a sulfide ore smelter in Northern Sweden, after reduced aerial metal emissions (by 93-99%) from the smelter. The deposition of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc (based on moss samples) reflected the reduced emissions fairly well. However, nestling pied flycatchers had similar concentrations of these elements and mercury in tissues (bone, liver and blood) and feces in the 2000s, as in the 1980s, when the emissions were substantially higher. The exposure to high metal concentrations in the close vicinity of the smelter resulted in inhibited ALAD activities, depressed hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and increased mortality of nestlings. Our results indicate that in the highly contaminated environment around the smelter, nestlings reflected the slowly cycling soil pool, rather than the atmospheric deposition, and the concentration in soils plays an important role for the response of pied flycatchers to reduced atmospheric deposition. PMID:21788063

  1. Slow improvements of metal exposure, health- and breeding conditions of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) after decreased industrial heavy metal emissions.

    PubMed

    Berglund, A M M; Nyholm, N E I

    2011-09-15

    The environment around metal industries, such as smelters, is often highly contaminated due to continuous deposition of metals. We studied nest box breeding populations of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) in a well-studied pollution gradient from a sulfide ore smelter in Northern Sweden, after reduced aerial metal emissions (by 93-99%) from the smelter. The deposition of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc (based on moss samples) reflected the reduced emissions fairly well. However, nestling pied flycatchers had similar concentrations of these elements and mercury in tissues (bone, liver and blood) and feces in the 2000s, as in the 1980s, when the emissions were substantially higher. The exposure to high metal concentrations in the close vicinity of the smelter resulted in inhibited ALAD activities, depressed hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and increased mortality of nestlings. Our results indicate that in the highly contaminated environment around the smelter, nestlings reflected the slowly cycling soil pool, rather than the atmospheric deposition, and the concentration in soils plays an important role for the response of pied flycatchers to reduced atmospheric deposition.

  2. The effect of pressure on microwave-enhanced Diels-Alder reactions. A case study.

    PubMed

    Kaval, Nadya; Dehaen, Wim; Kappe, C Oliver; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2004-01-21

    It is demonstrated that microwave-assisted Diels-Alder reactions of substituted 2(1H)-pyrazinones with ethylene are significantly more effective utilizing pre-pressurized (up to 10 bar) reaction vessels.

  3. Envisioning an enzymatic Diels-Alder reaction by in situ acid-base catalyzed diene generation.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Manta, Bianca; Olsson, Philip; Brinck, Tore

    2012-06-01

    We present and evaluate a new and potentially efficient route for enzyme-mediated Diels-Alder reactions, utilizing general acid-base catalysis. The viability of employing the active site of ketosteroid isomerase is demonstrated.

  4. Electron transfer-initiated Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones.

    PubMed

    Cong, Huan; Ledbetter, Dustin; Rowe, Gerard T; Caradonna, John P; Porco, John A

    2008-07-23

    An efficient approach to cyclohexenyl chalcones employing highly electron rich 2'-hydroxychalcone dienophiles via electron transfer-initiated Diels-Alder cycloaddition is described. Using the methodology, the total synthesis of nicolaiodesin C has been accomplished. PMID:18576647

  5. Polluted environment and cold weather induce laying gaps in great tit and pied flycatcher.

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Lehikoinen, Esa

    2010-02-01

    We studied the occurrence of laying gaps in free-living populations of the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca, and the great tit, Parus major, in a pollution gradient of a copper smelter in south-west Finland. Laying gaps were 2.8 times more common in F. hypoleuca than in P. major. The probability of laying gaps was highest in the heavily polluted zone and lowest in the unpolluted zone for both bird species. Cold weather at the time of laying increased the number of laying gaps in both species, but in P. major this effect was most pronounced in the heavily polluted environment. In the most heavily polluted environment the laying gaps were more likely to occur near the beginning of the laying sequence in both species. The laying gap probability increased with increasing laying date in P. major but not in F. hypoleuca. We suggest that the increased number of laying gaps in the polluted environment results from limited Ca availability and the interference of heavy metals with Ca metabolism in laying females. PMID:19784674

  6. Trade-offs between sexual advertisement and immune function in the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca).

    PubMed Central

    Kilpimaa, Janne; Alatalo, Rauno V.; Siitari, Heli

    2004-01-01

    Good genes models of sexual selection assume that sexual advertisement is costly and thus the level of advertisement honestly reveals heritable viability. Recently it has been suggested that an important cost of sexual advertisement might be impairment of the functioning of the immune system. In this field experiment we investigated the possible trade-offs between immune function and sexual advertisement by manipulating both mating effort and activity of immune defence in male pied flycatchers. Mating effort was increased in a non-arbitrary manner by removing females from mated males during nest building. Widowed males sustained higher haematocrit levels than control males and showed higher expression of forehead patch height, suggesting that manipulation succeeded in increasing mating effort. Males that were experimentally forced to increase mating effort had reduced humoral immune responsiveness compared with control males. In addition, experimental activation of immune defence by vaccination with novel antigens reduced the expression of male ornament dimensions. To conclude, our results indicate that causality behind the trade-off between immune function and sexual advertisement may work in both directions: sexual activity suppresses immune function but immune challenge also reduces sexual advertisement. PMID:15058434

  7. Unexpected divergence and lack of divergence revealed in continental Asian Cyornis flycatchers (Aves: Muscicapidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yuan; Olsson, Urban; Martinez, Jonathan; Alström, Per; Lei, Fumin

    2016-01-01

    The flycatcher genus Cyornis (Aves: Muscicapidae) comprises 25 species with Oriental distributions. Their relationships are poorly known. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of 70 individuals from 12 species and several subspecies of Cyornis based on three mitochondrial genes and five nuclear introns, with special focus on Chinese and Vietnamese populations of the monotypic C. hainanus and polytypic C. rubeculoides. We found no support for inclusion of C. concretus in Cyornis. Deep divergences were observed among different subspecies of C. banyumas and C. rubeculoides. C. rubeculoides glaucicomans was also shown to have a highly distinctive song, and we propose that it is treated as a distinctive Chinese endemic species, C. glaucicomans. In contrast, the south Vietnamese C. rubeculoides klossi, which has a disjunct distribution from the other subspecies of C. rubeculoides, along with a recently discovered population in Guangdong Province (China) with several plumage features reminiscent of C. r. klossi, were indistinguishable in all loci analyzed from the phenotypically markedly different C. hainanus. More research is needed to elucidate the reasons for this unexpected pattern.

  8. Nestling testosterone is associated with begging behaviour and fledging success in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca

    PubMed Central

    Goodship, Nicola M; Buchanan, Katherine L

    2005-01-01

    Animal signals are hypothesized to be costly in order to honestly reflect individual quality. Offspring solicitation signals given by nestling birds are thought to have evolved to advertise either need or individual quality. We tested the potential role of testosterone (T) in controlling the intensity of these signals by measuring begging behaviour as: (i) duration of the begging display and (ii) maximum height of the begging stretch, and by sampling endogenous T levels in nestling blood. We tested nestling pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) using well-established experimental paradigm involving transient food deprivation to encourage begging behaviour and then blood-sampled nestlings at the end of these tests for T levels. Our results show that individual nestlings with the most intense begging displays had the highest circulating levels of T immediately after testing. In addition, we found substantial differences between broods in terms of circulating T. Finally, we found evidence that broods with higher levels of T showed increased fledging success, indicating a benefit for increased T production in nestlings. The potential trade-offs involved in T-mediated begging behaviour are discussed. PMID:16519237

  9. Nutritional correlates and mate acquisition role of multiple sexual traits in male collared flycatchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyi, Gergely; Szöllősi, Eszter; Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Török, János; Eens, Marcel; Garamszegi, László Zsolt

    2010-06-01

    The information content of a sexual signal may predict its importance in a multiple signal system. Many studies have correlated sexual signal expression with the absolute levels of nutrient reserves. In contrast, the changes of nutrient reserves associated with signal expression are largely unknown in the wild due to technical limitations although they are important determinants of signal information content. We compared two visual and eight acoustic sexual traits in male collared flycatchers to see whether the nutritional correlates of expression predict the role of the signal in sexual selection. We used single point assays of plasma lipid metabolites to estimate short-term changes in nutritional state in relation to sexual trait expression during courtship. As a measure of sexual selection, we estimated the relationship with pairing latency after arrival in a 4-year dataset. Males which found a mate rapidly were characterized by large wing and forehead patches, but small song strophe complexity and small figure repertoire size. Traits more strongly related to pairing latency were also more closely related to changes in nutrient reserves. This indicates a link between signal role and information content. Small wing patches and, surprisingly, complex songs seemed to indicate poor phenotypic quality and were apparently disfavoured at mate acquisition in our population. Future studies of the information content of sexual traits, especially dynamic traits such as song, may benefit from the use of plasma metabolite profiles as non-invasive indicators of short-term changes in body condition.

  10. Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Roy, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Alders have already demonstrated their potential for the revegetation of both mining and industrial sites. These actinorhizal trees and shrubs and the actinobacteria Frankia associate in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis which could however be negatively affected by the presence of heavy metals, and accumulate them. In our hydroponic assay with black alders, quantification of the roots and shoots metal concentrations showed that, in the absence of stress, symbiosis increases Mo and Ni root content and simultaneously decreases Mo shoot content. Interestingly, the Mo shoot content also decreases in the presence of Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd for symbiotic alders. In symbiotic alders, Pb shoot translocation was promoted in presence of Pb. On the other hand, Cd exclusion in symbiotic root tissues was observed with Pb and Cd. In the presence of symbiosis, only Cd and Pb showed translocation into aerial tissues when present in the nutrient solution. Moreover, the translocation of Ni to shoot was prevented by symbiosis in the presence of Cd, Ni and Pb. The hydroponic experiment demonstrated that alders benefit from the symbiosis, producing more biomass (total, root and shoot) than non nodulated alders in control condition, and in the presence of metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd). Heavy metals did not reduce the nodule numbers (SNN), but the presence of Zn or Cd did reduce nodule allocation. Our study suggests that the Frankia-alder symbiosis is a promising (and a compatible) plant-microorganism association for the revegetation of contaminated sites, with minimal risk of metal dispersion. PMID:26091871

  11. Modeling climate impact on an emerging disease, the Phytophthora alni-induced alder decline.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Jaime; Elegbede, Fabrice; Husson, Claude; Saintonge, François-Xavier; Marçais, Benoît

    2014-10-01

    Alder decline caused by Phytophthora alni is one of the most important emerging diseases in natural ecosystems in Europe, where it has threatened riparian ecosystems for the past 20 years. Environmental factors, such as mean site temperature and soil characteristics, play an important role in the occurrence of the disease. The objective of the present work was to model and forecast the effect of environment on the severity of alder Phytophthora outbreaks, and to determine whether recent climate change might explain the disease emergence. Two alder sites networks in NE and SW France were surveyed to assess the crown health of trees; the oomycete soil inoculum was also monitored in the NE network. The main factors explaining the temporal annual variation in alder crown decline or crown recovery were the mean previous winter and previous summer temperatures. Both low winter temperatures and high summer temperatures were unfavorable to the disease. Cold winters promoted tree recovery because of poor survival of the pathogen, while hot summer temperature limited the incidence of tree decline. An SIS model explaining the dynamics of the P. alni-induced alder decline was developed using the data of the NE site network and validated using the SW site network. This model was then used to simulate the frequency of declining alder over time with historical climate data. The last 40 years' weather conditions have been generally favorable to the establishment of the disease, indicating that others factors may be implicated in its emergence. The model, however, showed that the climate of SW France was much more favorable for the disease than that of the Northeast, because it seldom limited the overwintering of the pathogen. Depending on the European area, climate change could either enhance or decrease the severity of the alder decline.

  12. PSMC analysis of effective population sizes in molecular ecology and its application to black-and-white Ficedula flycatchers.

    PubMed

    Nadachowska-Brzyska, Krystyna; Burri, Reto; Smeds, Linnéa; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Climatic fluctuations during the Quaternary period governed the demography of species and contributed to population differentiation and ultimately speciation. Studies of these past processes have previously been hindered by a lack of means and genetic data to model changes in effective population size (Ne ) through time. However, based on diploid genome sequences of high quality, the recently developed pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent (PSMC) can estimate trajectories of changes in Ne over considerable time periods. We applied this approach to resequencing data from nearly 200 genomes of four species and several populations of the Ficedula species complex of black-and-white flycatchers. Ne curves of Atlas, collared, pied and semicollared flycatcher converged 1-2 million years ago (Ma) at an Ne of ≈ 200 000, likely reflecting the time when all four species last shared a common ancestor. Subsequent separate Ne trajectories are consistent with lineage splitting and speciation. All species showed evidence of population growth up until 100-200 thousand years ago (kya), followed by decline and then start of a new phase of population expansion. However, timing and amplitude of changes in Ne differed among species, and for pied flycatcher, the temporal dynamics of Ne differed between Spanish birds and central/northern European populations. This cautions against extrapolation of demographic inference between lineages and calls for adequate sampling to provide representative pictures of the coalescence process in different species or populations. We also empirically evaluate criteria for proper inference of demographic histories using PSMC and arrive at recommendations of using sequencing data with a mean genome coverage of ≥18X, a per-site filter of ≥10 reads and no more than 25% of missing data. PMID:26797914

  13. New quill mites (Cheyletoidea: Syringophilidae) parasitizing the black-headed paradise-flycatcher Terpsiphone rufiventer (Passeriformes: Monarchidae) in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Glowska, Eliza; Schmidt, Brian K

    2014-04-08

    A new genus of quill mites (Cheyletoidea: Syringophilidae) and two new species Pipicobia terpsiphoni gen. nov. and sp. nov. and Syringophiloidus furthi sp. nov. parasitizing the black-headed paradise-flycatcher Terpsiphone rufiventer (Swainson) (Passeriformes: Monarchidae) in Gabon are described. Three species of the Neopicobia Skoracki, 2011 are moved to the newly established genus: Pipicobia locustella (Skoracki, Bochkov and Wauthy, 2004) comb. nov., Pipicobia pyrrholaemus (Skoracki and Glowska, 2008) comb.nov., and Pipicobia glossopsitta (Skoracki, Glowska and Sikora, 2008) comb.nov. Syringophilids are recorded on hosts of the family Monarchidae and in Gabon for the first time. A key to the genera of the subfamily Picobiinae is proposed.

  14. Facile Diels-Alder reactions with pyridines promoted by tungsten.

    PubMed

    Graham, Peter M; Delafuente, David A; Liu, Weijun; Myers, William H; Sabat, Michal; Harman, W D

    2005-08-01

    The isoquinuclidine (2-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) core is found in numerous molecules of biological and medicinal importance, including the widely investigated Iboga alkaloids and their related bisindole Cantharanthus alkaloids (Sundberg, R. J.; Smith, S. Q. Alkaloids (San Diego, CA, United States) 2002, 59, 281-386). A diverse range of synthetic methods for the stereoselective construction of this architecture is required for the efficient development of related pharmaceuticals. Here, we report a fundamentally new methodology that constructs the isoquinuclidine core directly from pyridines, using a pi-basic tungsten complex to disrupt the aromatic stabilization of these otherwise inert heterocycles. By this approach, common pyridines are found to undergo stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions with electron-deficient alkenes under mild reaction conditions, thus providing access to a broad range of functionalized isoquinuclidines. Further, by using the common terpene alpha-pinene, a single enantiomer of the tungsten fragment can be isolated and used to provide access to enantio-enriched isoquinuclidines from pyridines.

  15. The Influence of Speckled Alder on Nitrogen Accumulation in Adirondack Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiernan, B. D.; Hurd, T. M.; Raynal, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    Shrub-dominated wetlands of the Adirondacks typically support vigorous populations of nitrogen-fixing speckled alder Alnus incana (L.) Moench var. americana Regel), and are the second most abundant wetland type in the Adirondack region. In symbiotic association with an actinomycete of the genus Frankia, this shrub fixes 37-43 kg N/ha/yr in monotypic stands. This study was undertaken to quantify the abundance of alder in wetlands typed as "Scrub-shrub 1" (SS1; known as alder/willow wetlands) in the National Wetlands Inventory, and to determine the accumulation of nitrate and ammonium in alder wetland substrates. Twenty wetlands from the Oswegatchie-Black (OB) and Upper Hudson (UH) watersheds were randomly selected using the Adirondack Park Agency's GIS data base which includes wetland cover types assigned using remotely sensed data. Wetlands designated as "SS1" (scrub-shrub vegetation) and "SS1/EM1" (scrub-shrub with emergent herbaceous vegetation) were included in the sample. Six wetlands varying in alder abundance were chosen to estimate N accumulation in the substrate, with measurement of dissolved inorganic N in groundwater and ion exchange resin extracts. In the OB watershed, A. incana averaged 30 % of total shrub density in SS1 wetlands and 36 % in SS1/EM1 wetlands. Alder accounted for 49 % of all stems in UH SS1 wetlands, 28 % in the SS1/EM1 wetlands and in total accounted for 35 % of all stems in this study. Nitrate in IER extracts and groundwater was significantly higher in high-density alder wetlands (p < 0.05). Eight of the 20 wetlands included in this study were estimated to have less than 3,000 alder stems/ha, and five were estimated to have greater than 10,000 stems/ha. The other seven wetlands averaged 6,000 stems/ha. At nine sites, foliar N equaled or exceeded estimated atmospheric deposition (~10 kg/ha/yr), and was likely derived from N fixation. We conclude that 50 % of the SS1/EM1 wetlands and at least 75 % of the SS1 wetlands in these watersheds

  16. The relationship between DRD4 polymorphisms and phenotypic correlations of behaviors in the collared flycatcher.

    PubMed

    Garamszegi, László Z; Mueller, Jakob C; Markó, Gábor; Szász, Eszter; Zsebők, Sándor; Herczeg, Gábor; Eens, Marcel; Török, János

    2014-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that the genetic architecture of exploration behavior includes the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4). Such a link implies that the within-individual consistency in the same behavior has a genetic basis. Behavioral consistency is also prevalent in the form of between-individual correlation of functionally different behaviors; thus, the relationship between DRD4 polymorphism and exploration may also be manifested for other behaviors. Here, in a Hungarian population of the collared flycatcher, Ficedula albicollis, we investigate how males with distinct DRD4 genotypes differ in the consistent elements of their behavioral displays during the courtship period. In completely natural conditions, we assayed novelty avoidance, aggression and risk-taking, traits that were previously shown repeatable over time and correlate with each other, suggesting that they could have a common mechanistic basis. We identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP554 and SNP764) in the exon 3 of the DRD4 gene by sequencing a subsample, then we screened 202 individuals of both sexes for these SNPs. Focusing on the genotypic variation in courting males, we found that "AC" heterozygote individuals at the SNP764 take lower risk than the most common "AA" homozygotes (the "CC" homozygotes were not represented in our subsample of males). We also found a considerable effect size for the relationship between SNP554 polymorphism and novelty avoidance. Therefore, in addition to exploration, DRD4 polymorphisms may also be associated with the regulation of behaviors that may incur fear or stress. Moreover, polymorphisms at the two SNPs were not independent indicating a potential role for genetic constraints or another functional link, which may partially explain behavioral correlations.

  17. The relationship between DRD4 polymorphisms and phenotypic correlations of behaviors in the collared flycatcher

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, László Z; Mueller, Jakob C; Markó, Gábor; Szász, Eszter; Zsebők, Sándor; Herczeg, Gábor; Eens, Marcel; Török, János

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the genetic architecture of exploration behavior includes the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4). Such a link implies that the within-individual consistency in the same behavior has a genetic basis. Behavioral consistency is also prevalent in the form of between-individual correlation of functionally different behaviors; thus, the relationship between DRD4 polymorphism and exploration may also be manifested for other behaviors. Here, in a Hungarian population of the collared flycatcher, Ficedula albicollis, we investigate how males with distinct DRD4 genotypes differ in the consistent elements of their behavioral displays during the courtship period. In completely natural conditions, we assayed novelty avoidance, aggression and risk-taking, traits that were previously shown repeatable over time and correlate with each other, suggesting that they could have a common mechanistic basis. We identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP554 and SNP764) in the exon 3 of the DRD4 gene by sequencing a subsample, then we screened 202 individuals of both sexes for these SNPs. Focusing on the genotypic variation in courting males, we found that “AC” heterozygote individuals at the SNP764 take lower risk than the most common “AA” homozygotes (the “CC” homozygotes were not represented in our subsample of males). We also found a considerable effect size for the relationship between SNP554 polymorphism and novelty avoidance. Therefore, in addition to exploration, DRD4 polymorphisms may also be associated with the regulation of behaviors that may incur fear or stress. Moreover, polymorphisms at the two SNPs were not independent indicating a potential role for genetic constraints or another functional link, which may partially explain behavioral correlations. PMID:24834341

  18. Territorial behaviour and hormones of pied flycatchers in optimal and suboptimal habitats.

    PubMed

    Silverin

    1998-10-01

    Since pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca, breed at higher densities in deciduous forests than in coniferous forests, competition for territories is likely to be greater in the former, optimal habitat. I tested the hypotheses that males in a deciduous forest defend their newly established territories more intensely and have higher plasma levels of testosterone than males in a suboptimal coniferous forest. In the deciduous forest, breeding density was higher, egg laying started earlier and more fledglings were produced. Morphological characters such as wing length, plumage colour and the size of the white forehead patch did not differ consistently between males establishing territories in deciduous and coniferous forests. Before the nest-building period, males in the deciduous forest were heavier, and had significantly larger furcula fat depots. I tested territorial aggressiveness by exposing unmated territorial males to simulated territorial intrusions. A significantly higher proportion of territorial males in the deciduous forest physically attacked the intruder; those that did attack also attacked more frequently than did males in the coniferous forest. Furthermore, males in the deciduous forest stayed closer to the decoy, and were more restless during the simulated territorial intrusion. Males in the deciduous forest had higher plasma levels of testosterone and corticosterone than did males in the coniferous forest, but there was no difference in dihydrotestosterone levels. These hormonal differences are most likely to be the result of a higher intrusion rate and a higher population density in the deciduous forest. I conclude that prior ownership is a crucial factor in maintaining a territory, and that differences in aggressive motivation between unmated males in the deciduous and coniferous forests reflect the value of the nestboxes defended. The high testosterone levels observed in males from the deciduous forest are likely to be the physiological factor

  19. Geographical trends in the yolk carotenoid composition of the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca).

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Ruuskanen, Suvi; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Belskii, Eugen; Järvinen, Antero; Kerimov, Anvar; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Moreno, Juan; Morosinotto, Chiara; Mänd, Raivo; Orell, Markku; Qvarnström, Anna; Siitari, Heli; Slater, Fred M; Tilgar, Vallo; Visser, Marcel E; Winkel, Wolfgang; Zang, Herwig; Laaksonen, Toni

    2011-02-01

    Carotenoids in the egg yolks of birds are considered to be important antioxidants and immune stimulants during the rapid growth of embryos. Yolk carotenoid composition is strongly affected by the carotenoid composition of the female's diet at the time of egg formation. Spatial and temporal differences in carotenoid availability may thus be reflected in yolk concentrations. To assess whether yolk carotenoid concentrations or carotenoid profiles show any large-scale geographical trends or differences among habitats, we collected yolk samples from 16 European populations of the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca. We found that the concentrations and proportions of lutein and some other xanthophylls in the egg yolks decreased from Central Europe northwards. The most southern population (which is also the one found at the highest altitude) also showed relatively low carotenoid levels. Concentrations of β-carotene and zeaxanthin did not show any obvious geographical gradients. Egg yolks also contained proportionally more lutein and other xanthophylls in deciduous than in mixed or coniferous habitats. We suggest that latitudinal gradients in lutein and xanthophylls reflect the lower availability of lutein-rich food items in the northern F. hypoleuca populations and in montane southern populations, which start egg-laying earlier relative to tree phenology than the Central European populations. Similarly, among-habitat variation is likely to reflect the better availability of lutein-rich food in deciduous forests. Our study is the first to indicate that the concentration and profile of yolk carotenoids may show large-scale spatial variation among populations in different parts of the species' geographical range. Further studies are needed to test the fitness effects of this geographical variation.

  20. Habitat shifts in the evolutionary history of a Neotropical flycatcher lineage from forest and open landscapes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Little is known about the role ecological shifts play in the evolution of Neotropical radiations that have colonized a variety of environments. We here examine habitat shifts in the evolutionary history of Elaenia flycatchers, a Neotropical bird lineage that lives in a range of forest and open habitats. We evaluate phylogenetic relationships within the genus based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, and then employ parsimony-based and Bayesian methods to reconstruct preferences for a number of habitat types and migratory behaviour throughout the evolutionary history of the genus. Using a molecular clock approach, we date the most important habitat shifts. Results Our analyses resolve phylogenetic relationships among Elaenia species and confirm several species associations predicted by morphology while furnishing support for other taxon placements that are in conflict with traditional classification, such as the elevation of various Elaenia taxa to species level. While savannah specialism is restricted to one basal clade within the genus, montane forest was invaded from open habitat only on a limited number of occasions. Riparian growth may have been favoured early on in the evolution of the main Elaenia clade and subsequently been deserted on several occasions. Austral long-distance migratory behaviour evolved on several occasions. Conclusion Ancestral reconstructions of habitat preferences reveal pronounced differences not only in the timing of the emergence of certain habitat preferences, but also in the frequency of habitat shifts. The early origin of savannah specialism in Elaenia highlights the importance of this habitat in Neotropical Pliocene and late Miocene biogeography. While forest in old mountain ranges such as the Tepuis and the Brazilian Shield was colonized early on, the most important colonization event of montane forest was in conjunction with Pliocene Andean uplift. Riparian habitats may have played an important role in

  1. Linking Landscape Characteristics and High Stream Nitrogen in the Oregon Coast Range: Red Alder Complicates Use of Nutrient Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Red alder (a nitrogen-fixing tree) and sea salt inputs can strongly influence stream nitrogen concentrations in western Oregon and Washington. We compiled a database of stream nitrogen and landscape characteristics in the Oregon Coast Range. Basal area of alder, expressed as a ...

  2. Snail consumption and breeding performance of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) along a pollution gradient in the Middle Urals, Russia.

    PubMed

    Belskii, Eugen; Grebennikov, Maxim

    2014-08-15

    During the years 1989-91, 1997-2003, and 2005-07, we studied how emissions from the Middle Urals copper smelter affect snail availability and reproduction of free-living pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). We counted snail shells dropped in nests and analysed food samples of nestlings. Pied flycatchers brought to nestlings fewer shells in heavily polluted sites compared to background sites, resulting in reduced Ca intake. Species diversity of snails collected by birds decreased with decreasing distance from the pollution source. The pattern was the same both in deciduous and coniferous forests. In sites closest to the smelter, 20-50% of breeding females suffered from Ca deficiency, which resulted in an increased proportion of deserted clutches and clutches with defective eggshells. Number of fledglings per nest decreased in heavily polluted sites, especially in broods with decreased snail supply. This study demonstrated that pollution can cause both direct effect of toxicants to birds and indirect effects via reduced Ca availability. PMID:24846405

  3. Changing climate and the phenological response of great tit and collared flycatcher populations in floodplain forest ecosystems in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Zdeněk; Trnka, Miroslav; Bauerová, Jana; Možný, Martin; Štěpánek, Petr; Bartošová, Lenka; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    This study is based on 47 years of observations (1961-2007) on two common bird species, the Great Tit ( Parus major) and the Collared Flycatcher ( Ficedula albicollis), and a dominant tree species in their habitat, the English Oak ( Quercus robur). The study took place at four research sites in the Czech Republic located in full-grown, multi-aged floodplain forests with no forestry management. An increase in air temperature over the evaluated period clearly influenced the length of phenological phases. The full foliage date of English Oak has advanced by 8.7 days during the past 47 years. Great Tit and Collared Flycatcher populations have reacted to the changing climate in the same way, with first laying date and mean laying date advancing by between 6.0 and 9.0 days. In all cases, the trends are highly significant and consistent over all sites. Despite the ongoing shift in phenological stages toward the beginning of the year, the change does not appear to have led to mistiming in the trophic food chain. Overall, this study shows almost identical rates of change in egg laying dates for both bird species in all the floodplain forests studied, and these trends are coherent with those of English Oak and peak herbivorous caterpillar activity.

  4. Candidate genes for colour and vision exhibit signals of selection across the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) breeding range.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, P K; Laaksonen, T; Artemyev, A V; Belskii, E; Berg, P R; Both, C; Buggiotti, L; Bureš, S; Burgess, M D; Bushuev, A V; Krams, I; Moreno, J; Mägi, M; Nord, A; Potti, J; Ravussin, P-A; Sirkiä, P M; Sætre, G-P; Winkel, W; Primmer, C R

    2012-04-01

    The role of natural selection in shaping adaptive trait differentiation in natural populations has long been recognized. Determining its molecular basis, however, remains a challenge. Here, we search for signals of selection in candidate genes for colour and its perception in a passerine bird. Pied flycatcher plumage varies geographically in both its structural and pigment-based properties. Both characteristics appear to be shaped by selection. A single-locus outlier test revealed 2 of 14 loci to show significantly elevated signals of divergence. The first of these, the follistatin gene, is expressed in the developing feather bud and is found in pathways with genes that determine the structure of feathers and may thus be important in generating variation in structural colouration. The second is a gene potentially underlying the ability to detect this variation: SWS1 opsin. These two loci were most differentiated in two Spanish pied flycatcher populations, which are also among the populations that have the highest UV reflectance. The follistatin and SWS1 opsin genes thus provide strong candidates for future investigations on the molecular basis of adaptively significant traits and their co-evolution.

  5. Candidate genes for colour and vision exhibit signals of selection across the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) breeding range

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, P K; Laaksonen, T; Artemyev, A V; Belskii, E; Berg, P R; Both, C; Buggiotti, L; Bureš, S; Burgess, M D; Bushuev, A V; Krams, I; Moreno, J; Mägi, M; Nord, A; Potti, J; Ravussin, P-A; Sirkiä, P M; Sætre, G-P; Winkel, W; Primmer, C R

    2012-01-01

    The role of natural selection in shaping adaptive trait differentiation in natural populations has long been recognized. Determining its molecular basis, however, remains a challenge. Here, we search for signals of selection in candidate genes for colour and its perception in a passerine bird. Pied flycatcher plumage varies geographically in both its structural and pigment-based properties. Both characteristics appear to be shaped by selection. A single-locus outlier test revealed 2 of 14 loci to show significantly elevated signals of divergence. The first of these, the follistatin gene, is expressed in the developing feather bud and is found in pathways with genes that determine the structure of feathers and may thus be important in generating variation in structural colouration. The second is a gene potentially underlying the ability to detect this variation: SWS1 opsin. These two loci were most differentiated in two Spanish pied flycatcher populations, which are also among the populations that have the highest UV reflectance. The follistatin and SWS1 opsin genes thus provide strong candidates for future investigations on the molecular basis of adaptively significant traits and their co-evolution. PMID:22027894

  6. Differentiation in neutral genes and a candidate gene in the pied flycatcher: using biological archives to track global climate change

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Kerstin; Schwenk, Klaus; Both, Christiaan; Canal, David; Johansson, Ulf S; van der Mije, Steven; Töpfer, Till; Päckert, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is one of the major driving forces for adaptive shifts in migration and breeding phenology and possibly impacts demographic changes if a species fails to adapt sufficiently. In Western Europe, pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) have insufficiently adapted their breeding phenology to the ongoing advance of food peaks within their breeding area and consequently suffered local population declines. We address the question whether this population decline led to a loss of genetic variation, using two neutral marker sets (mitochondrial control region and microsatellites), and one potentially selectively non-neutral marker (avian Clock gene). We report temporal changes in genetic diversity in extant populations and biological archives over more than a century, using samples from sites differing in the extent of climate change. Comparing genetic differentiation over this period revealed that only the recent Dutch population, which underwent population declines, showed slightly lower genetic variation than the historic Dutch population. As that loss of variation was only moderate and not observed in all markers, current gene flow across Western and Central European populations might have compensated local loss of variation over the last decades. A comparison of genetic differentiation in neutral loci versus the Clock gene locus provided evidence for stabilizing selection. Furthermore, in all genetic markers, we found a greater genetic differentiation in space than in time. This pattern suggests that local adaptation or historic processes might have a stronger effect on the population structure and genetic variation in the pied flycatcher than recent global climate changes. PMID:24363905

  7. Diels-Alder reactions: The effects of catalyst on the addition reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Özgür; Kus, Nermin Simsek; Tunç, Tuncay; Sahin, Ertan

    2015-10-01

    The reaction between 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene and dimethyl 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene-2,3-dicarboxylate is efficiently achieved with small amounts of catalyst, i.e. phenol, AcOH, nafion, and β-cyclodextrin. Exo-diastereoselective cycloaddition reactions were observed both without catalyst and different catalysts for 48 days. As a result, different products (tricyclicmolecule 5, retro-Diels-Alder product 6, and oxidation product 7) were obtained with different catalysts. In addition, we synthesized Diels-Alders product 8 and tricyclocyclitol 10 via Diels-Alder reaction. The structures of these products were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and IR spectroscopy.

  8. Electrostatic catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Haworth, Naomi L; Darwish, Nadim; Ciampi, Simone; Bloomfield, Nathaniel J; Wallace, Gordon G; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-03-01

    It is often thought that the ability to control reaction rates with an applied electrical potential gradient is unique to redox systems. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that oriented electric fields could affect the outcomes of a range of chemical reactions, regardless of whether a redox system is involved. This possibility arises because many formally covalent species can be stabilized via minor charge-separated resonance contributors. When an applied electric field is aligned in such a way as to electrostatically stabilize one of these minor forms, the degree of resonance increases, resulting in the overall stabilization of the molecule or transition state. This means that it should be possible to manipulate the kinetics and thermodynamics of non-redox processes using an external electric field, as long as the orientation of the approaching reactants with respect to the field stimulus can be controlled. Here, we provide experimental evidence that the formation of carbon-carbon bonds is accelerated by an electric field. We have designed a surface model system to probe the Diels-Alder reaction, and coupled it with a scanning tunnelling microscopy break-junction approach. This technique, performed at the single-molecule level, is perfectly suited to deliver an electric-field stimulus across approaching reactants. We find a fivefold increase in the frequency of formation of single-molecule junctions, resulting from the reaction that occurs when the electric field is present and aligned so as to favour electron flow from the dienophile to the diene. Our results are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by quantum-chemical calculations in a theoretical model of this system, and herald a new approach to chemical catalysis.

  9. Symmetry-enthalpy correlations in Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Tuvi-Arad, Inbal; Avnir, David

    2012-08-01

    Woodward-Hoffmann (WH) rules provide strict symmetry selection rules: when they are obeyed, a reaction proceeds; when they are not obeyed, there is no reaction. However, the voluminous experimental literature provides ample evidence that strict compliance to symmetry requirements is not an obstacle for a concerted reaction to proceed, and therefore the idea has developed that it is enough to have a certain degree of the required symmetry to have reactivity. Here we provide quantitative evidence of that link, and show that as one deviates from the desired symmetry, the enthalpy of activation increases, that is, we show that concerted reactions slow down the further they are from the ideal symmetry. Specifically, we study the deviation from mirror symmetry (evaluated with the continuous symmetry measure (CSM)) of the [4+2] carbon skeleton of the transition state of a series of twelve Diels-Alder reactions in seven different solvents (and in the gas phase), in which the dienes are butadiene, cyclopentadiene, cyclohexadiene, and cycloheptadiene; the dienophiles are the 1-, 1,1-, and 1,1,2-cyanoethylene derivatives; the solvents were chosen to sample a range of dielectric constants from heptane to ethanol. These components provide twenty-four symmetry-enthalpy DFT-calculated correlation lines (out of which only one case is a relatively mild exception) that show the general trend of increase in enthalpy as symmetry decreases. The various combinations between the dienophiles, cyanoethylenes, and solvents provide all kinds of sources for symmetry deviations; it is therefore remarkable that although the enthalpy of activation is dictated by various parameters, symmetry emerges as a primary parameter. In our analysis we also bisected this overall picture into solvent effects and geometry variation effects to evaluate under which conditions the electronic effects are more dominant than symmetry effects.

  10. Validation of the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, B; Lancaster, G; Lawson, J; Williams, K; Daly, J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To describe the validation and reliability of a new pain tool (the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score, AHTPS) for children at triage in the accident and emergency (A&E) setting. Methods: A new behavioural observational pain tool was developed because of dissatisfaction with available tools and a lack of confidence in self-assessment scores at triage. The study was conducted in a large paediatric A&E department; 575 children (aged 0–16 years) were included. Inter-rater reliability and various aspects of validity were assessed. In addition this tool was compared to the Wong-Baker self-assessment tool.1 The children were concurrently scored by a research nurse and triage nurses to assess inter-rater reliability. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's triage score with the research nurse reassessment score after intervention and/or analgesia. Known group construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's score at triage with the level of pain of the condition as judged by the discharge diagnosis. Predictive validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse's AHTPS with the level of analgesia needed by each patient. The AHTPS was also compared to a self-assessment score. Results: A high level of inter-rater reliability, kappa statistic 0.84 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.88), was shown. Construct validity was well demonstrated; known group construct validity and predictive validity were also demonstrated to a varying degree. Conclusions: Results support the use of this observational pain scoring tool in the triage of children in A&E. PMID:15210492

  11. Competition between classical and hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) reactions of HDDA triynes with furan

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang Luu; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    We report here thermal reactions between furan and one of three related triyne substrates. Each triyne is capable of reacting initially in two modes: (i) unimolecular hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction or (ii) bimolecular Diels-Alder reaction between one of its alkynes with furan. The relative rates of these initial events are such that two of the substrates react essentially in only one of modes (i) or (ii). The third is intermediate in behavior; its bifurcation is dependent on the concentration of the furan reactant. These results teach, more generally, principles relevant to the design of efficient HDDA-based reaction cascades. PMID:26028780

  12. Enantioselective Organocatalytic Diels–Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Hydroxy‐o‐Quinodimethanes

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Amico, Luca; Vega‐Peñaloza, Alberto; Cuadros, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The photoenolization/Diels–Alder strategy offers straightforward access to synthetically valuable benzannulated carbocyclic products. This historical light‐triggered process has never before succumbed to efforts to develop an enantioselective catalytic approach. Herein, we demonstrate how asymmetric organocatalysis provides simple yet effective catalytic tools to intercept photochemically generated hydroxy‐o‐quinodimethanes with high stereoselectivity. We used a chiral organic catalyst, derived from natural cinchona alkaloids, to activate maleimides toward highly stereoselective Diels–Alder reactions. An unconventional mechanism of stereocontrol is operative, wherein the organocatalyst is actively involved in both the photochemical pathway, by leveraging the formation of the reactive photoenol, and the stereoselectivity‐defining event. PMID:26797768

  13. Tandem enyne metathesis-Diels-Alder reaction for construction of natural product frameworks.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, Marta; Domínguez, Gema; Casarrubios, Luis; Amador, Ulises; Pérez-Castells, Javier

    2004-03-19

    Enynes connected through aromatic rings are used as substrates for metathesis reactions. The reactivity of three ruthenium carbene complexes is compared. The resulting 1,3-dienes are suitable precursors of polycyclic structures via a Diels-Alder process. Some domino RCM-Diels-Alder reactions are performed, suggesting a possible beneficial effect of the ruthenium catalyst in the cycloaddition process. Other examples require Lewis acid cocatalyst. When applied to aromatic ynamines or enamines, a new synthesis of vinylindoles is achieved. Monitorization of several metathesis reactions with NMR shows the different behavior for ruthenium catalysts. New carbenic species are detected in some reactions with an important dependence on the solvent used.

  14. Assembly of the Isoindolinone Core of Muironolide A by Asymmetric Intramolecular Diels-Alder Cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Beatris; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2011-01-01

    The hexahydro-1H-isoindolin-1-one core of muironolide A was prepared by asymmetric intramolecular Diels Alder cycloaddition using a variant of the MacMillan organocatalyst which sets the C4,C5 and C11 stereocenters. PMID:21751773

  15. WATERSHED BIOGEOCHEMISTRY IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF RED ALDER AND SALMON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  16. The Phytophthora species assemblage and diversity in riparian alder ecosystems of western Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Sims, Laura Lee; Sutton, Wendy; Reeser, Paul; Hansen, Everett M

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora species were systematically sampled, isolated, identified and compared for presence in streams, soil and roots of alder (Alnus species) dominated riparian ecosystems in western Oregon. We describe the species assemblage and evaluate Phytophthora diversity associated with alder. We recovered 1250 isolates of 20 Phytophthora species. Only three species were recovered from all substrates (streams, soil, alder roots): P. gonapodyides, the informally described "P. taxon Pgchlamydo", and P. siskiyouensis. P. alni ssp. uniformis along with five other species not previously recovered in Oregon forests are included in the assemblage: P.citricola s.l., P. gregata, P. gallica, P. nicotianae and P. parsiana. Phytophthora species diversity was greatest in downstream riparian locations. There was no significant difference in species diversity comparing soil and unwashed roots (the rhizosphere) to stream water. There was a difference between the predominating species from the rhizosphere compared to stream water. The most numerous species was the informally described "P. taxon Oaksoil", which was mainly recovered from, and most predominant in, stream water. The most common species from riparian forest soils and alder root systems was P. gonapodyides.

  17. A Computational Experiment of the Endo versus Exo Preference in a Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Christopher N.; Woo, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and tested a computational laboratory that investigates an endo versus exo Diels-Alder cycloaddition. This laboratory employed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the cycloaddition of N-phenylmaleimide to furan. The endo and exo stereoisomers of the product were distinguished by building the two isomers in a…

  18. Concise total synthesis of (-)-auxofuran by a click Diels-Alder strategy.

    PubMed

    Boukouvalas, John; Loach, Richard P

    2013-09-20

    The first synthesis of auxofuran, a newly discovered auxin-like signaling molecule of streptomycetes, has been achieved in seven steps and 59% overall yield from commercial starting materials. Central to the synthetic route is a click-unclick Diels-Alder cycloaddition/cycloreversion regimen enabling rapid access to an advanced intermediate from an unactivated alkyne.

  19. Regioselectivity of Diels-Alder Reactions Between 6,7-Dehydrobenzofuran and 2-Substituted Furans

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Neil; Buszek, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first report of the generation of 6,7-dehydrobenzofuran (6,7-benzofuranyne) from 6,7-dihalobenzofurans via metal-halogen exchange and elimination, in a manner similar to our previous work with 6,7-indole arynes. This benzofuranyne undergoes highly regioselective Diels-Alder cycloadditions with 2-substituted furans. PMID:25278635

  20. Mixed, short rotation culture of red alder and black cottonwood: growth, coppicing, nitrogen fixation, and allelopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Heilman, P.; Stettler, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Alnus rubra seedlings were grown in a 1:1 mixture at a spacing of 1.2 x 1.2 m with 28 Populus clones (25 clones pf P. trichocarpa, 2 of P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa, and one P. deltoides x P. nigra) in a study established in W. Washington in March 1979. Trees were harvested at 4 yr old. At harvest, average heights were: pure Populus, 10.2 m; Populus in the mixed stand 11.0 m; and alder 8.4 m. Most Populus sprouted satisfactorily after harvest (6.6 shoots/plant when pure, 7.6 shoots/plant in the mixture), but alder sprouted poorly (3.6 shoots/plant). Above-ground biomass at harvest was 15.9 t/ha p.a. for the mixture and 16.7 t/ha p.a. for pure Populus, although the mixture had been more productive at 2 yr. Nitrogenase activity (nitrogen fixation as measured by acetylene reduction) of alder declines in the 4th season; competition was the most important factor influencing this decline. Soil N content had no effect on fixation. A pot study showed that ground Populus leaf and litter material inhibited the growth of red alder seedlings, although soil collected from Populus plots had no effect. Results indicated that allelopathy is probably a minor factor under field conditions, at most, and that growing mixed stands may, on balance, be beneficial. 20 references.

  1. Sulfinyl-mediated stereoselective Overman rearrangements and Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Fernández de la Pradilla, Roberto; Colomer, Ignacio; Viso, Alma

    2012-06-15

    The Overman rearrangement of allylic sulfinyl trichloroacetimidates affords sulfinyl trichloroacetamides with high stereoselectivity and excellent yields. Bis-allylic substrates lead to amido 2-sulfinyl butadiene derivatives in excellent yields, with total chemo- and diastereoselectivity. The Diels-Alder cycloaddition of related dienes is controlled by the sulfoxide moiety.

  2. Ugi/Himbert Arene/Allene Diels-Alder Cycloaddition to Synthesize Strained Polycyclic Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guangsheng; He, Xiang; Tian, Lumin; Chen, Jiawen; Li, Chunju; Jia, Xueshun; Li, Jian

    2015-11-01

    The present work disclosed an efficient multicomponent reaction of isocyanide, allenic acid, aldehyde (ketone), and aniline. This protocol undergoes Ugi reaction followed by an intramolecular arene/allene Diels-Alder sequence, thus providing a rapid access to synthesize strained polycyclic skeletons.

  3. Arthropod fauna of rolled alder leaves in Washington State, United States of America (Insecta: Arachnida)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alders, Alnus spp., growing on the eastern slopes and foothills of the Cascade Range in Washington State, are often infested with shelter-making (primarily leafrolling) Lepidoptera in the families Tortricidae, Gracillariidae, and Choreutidae. Over a 5 year survey period, 5,172 rolled leaves were ex...

  4. Functionalization of organic semiconductor crystals via the Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Qualizza, Brittni A; Prasad, Srividya; Chiarelli, M Paul; Ciszek, Jacob W

    2013-05-18

    A surface adlayer is generated on organic single crystals (tetracene and rubrene) using the site specific Diels-Alder reaction and a series of vapor phase dienophiles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms adsorption on the surfaces of tetracene and rubrene and mass spectrometry demonstrates the reaction's applicability to a range of dienophiles. PMID:23571721

  5. Changes in sediment volume in Alder Lake, Nisqually River Basin, Washington, 1945-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Gish, Casey C.

    2012-01-01

    The Nisqually River drains the southwest slopes of Mount Rainier, a glaciated stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of western Washington. The Nisqually River was impounded behind Alder Dam when the dam was completed in 1945 and formed Alder Lake. This report quantifies the volume of sediment deposited by the Nisqually and Little Nisqually Rivers in their respective deltas in Alder Lake since 1945. Four digital elevation surfaces were generated from historical contour maps from 1945, 1956, and 1985, and a bathymetric survey from 2011. These surfaces were used to compute changes in sediment volume since 1945. Estimates of the volume of sediment deposited in Alder Lake between 1945 and 2011 were focused in three areas: (1) the Nisqually River delta, (2) the main body of Alder Lake, along a 40-meter wide corridor of the pre-dam Nisqually River, and (3) the Little Nisqually River delta. In each of these areas the net deposition over the 66-year period was 42,000,000 ± 4,000,000 cubic meters (m3), 2,000,000 ± 600,000 m3, and 310,000 ± 110,000 m3, respectively. These volumes correspond to annual rates of accumulation of 630,000 ± 60,000 m3/yr, 33,000 ± 9,000 m3/yr, and 4,700 ± 1,600 m3/yr, respectively. The annual sediment yield of the Nisqually (1,100 ± 100 cubic meters per year per square kilometer [(m3/yr)/km2]) and Little Nisqually River basins [70 ± 24 (m3/yr)/km2] provides insight into the yield of two basins with different land cover and geomorphic processes. These estimates suggest that a basin draining a glaciated stratovolcano yields approximately 15 times more sediment than a basin draining forested uplands in the Cascade Range. Given the cumulative net change in sediment volume in the Nisqually River delta in Alder Lake, the total capacity of Alder Lake since 1945 decreased about 3 percent by 1956, 8 percent by 1985, and 15 percent by 2011.

  6. A test of the "sexy son" hypothesis: sons of polygynous collared flycatchers do not inherit their fathers' mating status.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna

    2006-02-01

    According to the original "sexy son" hypothesis, a female may benefit from pairing with an already-mated male despite a reduction in fecundity because her sons inherit their father's attractiveness. We used data from a long-term study of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) collected during 24 years to test this prediction. Our results show that the sons of polygynously mated females fledged in poor condition and therefore did not inherit their father's large forehead patch (a condition-dependent display trait) or mating status. From the female's perspective, polygynous pairing resulted in fewer recruited grandchildren than did a monogamous pairing. The reproductive value of sons did not outweigh the fecundity costs of polygyny because the low paternal care reduced the attractiveness of sons. When there are long-lasting parental effects on offspring attractiveness, costs of polygyny may include the production of nonsexy sons.

  7. Interactions between the Avian Parasite, Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) and the Galapagos Flycatcher, Myiarchus magnirostris Gould (Passeriformes: Tyrannidae).

    PubMed

    Lincango, Piedad; Causton, Charlotte; Cedeño, Daniel; Castañeda, Johanna; Hillstrom, Alexandra; Freund, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    An incidental observation of the fly Philornis downsi parasitizing a Galapagos Flycatcher (Myiarchus magnirostris) nest has revealed new insights into the searching behavior and biology of this invasive fly parasite and its interactions with endemic landbirds in the Galapagos Islands. Observations suggest that P. downsi relies on olfactory cues, or olfactory cues combined with the activity of adult birds, to locate nests and that flies continue to visit nests when chicks are >3 d old. At least 200 eggs were laid by P. downsi in different parts of the nest and >40 early-instar larvae were found inside the head of one chick, with additional larvae found in the base of the nest. Parasitism was the likely cause of mortality of both chicks found in or near the nest. This description of P. downsi parasitizing chicks of M. magnirostris highlights the vulnerability of this endemic bird species to this invasive fly.

  8. New domino transposition/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction in monocyclic allenols: a general strategy for tricyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Aragoncillo, Cristina; Redondo, María C

    2002-07-21

    A novel and direct synthetic strategy to prepare fused tricycles has been developed from monocyclic allenols, masked functionalized dienes, which underwent a domino allenol transposition/intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  9. A high-density linkage map enables a second-generation collared flycatcher genome assembly and reveals the patterns of avian recombination rate variation and chromosomal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Smeds, Linnéa; Backström, Niclas; Husby, Arild; Qvarnström, Anna; Mugal, Carina F; Olason, Pall; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Detailed linkage and recombination rate maps are necessary to use the full potential of genome sequencing and population genomic analyses. We used a custom collared flycatcher 50 K SNP array to develop a high-density linkage map with 37 262 markers assigned to 34 linkage groups in 33 autosomes and the Z chromosome. The best-order map contained 4215 markers, with a total distance of 3132 cm and a mean genetic distance between markers of 0.12 cm. Facilitated by the array being designed to include markers from most scaffolds, we obtained a second-generation assembly of the flycatcher genome that approaches full chromosome sequences (N50 super-scaffold size 20.2 Mb and with 1.042 Gb (of 1.116 Gb) anchored to and mostly ordered and oriented along chromosomes). We found that flycatcher and zebra finch chromosomes are entirely syntenic but that inversions at mean rates of 1.5–2.0 event (6.6–7.5 Mb) per My have changed the organization within chromosomes, rates high enough for inversions to potentially have been involved with many speciation events during avian evolution. The mean recombination rate was 3.1 cm/Mb and correlated closely with chromosome size, from 2 cm/Mb for chromosomes >100 Mb to >10 cm/Mb for chromosomes <10 Mb. This size dependence seemed entirely due to an obligate recombination event per chromosome; if 50 cm was subtracted from the genetic lengths of chromosomes, the rate per physical unit DNA was constant across chromosomes. Flycatcher recombination rate showed similar variation along chromosomes as chicken but lacked the large interior recombination deserts characteristic of zebra finch chromosomes. PMID:24863701

  10. Dendrochronology and lakes: using tree-rings of alder to reconstruct lake levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Maaten, Ernst; Buras, Allan; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Kaiser, Knut; Lorenz, Sebastian; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Wilmking, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is considered a major threat for ecosystems around the world. Assessing its effects is challenging, amongst others, as we are unsure how ecosystems may respond to climate conditions they were not exposed to before. However, increased insight may be obtained by analyzing responses of ecosystems to past climate variability. In this respect, lake ecosystems appear as valuable sentinels, because they provide direct and indirect indicators of change through effects of climate. Lake-level fluctuations of closed catchments, for example, reflect a dynamic water balance, provide detailed insight in past moisture variations, and thereby allow for assessments of effects of anticipated climate change. Up to now, lake-level data are mostly obtained from gauging records and reconstructions from sediments and landforms. However, these records are in many cases only available over relatively short time periods, and, since geoscientific work is highly demanding, lake-level reconstructions are lacking for many regions. Here, we present and discuss an alternative method to reconstruct lake levels, which is based on tree-ring data of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.). This tree species tolerates permanently waterlogged and temporally flooded conditions (i.e. riparian vegetation), and is often found along lakeshores. As the yearly growth of trees varies depending upon the experienced environmental conditions, annual rings of black alder from lakeshore vegetation likely capture information on variations in water table, and may therefore be used to reconstruct lake levels. Although alder is a relatively short-lived tree species, the frequent use of its' decay-resistant wood in foundations of historical buildings offers the possibility of extending living tree-chronologies back in time for several centuries. In this study, the potential to reconstruct lake-level fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder is explored for three lake ecosystems in the Mecklenburg

  11. Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi–Isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Assignment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Hobson, Keith A.; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher. PMID:24847717

  12. Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi-isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach.

    PubMed

    Veen, Thor; Hjernquist, Mårten B; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L; Hobson, Keith A; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher.

  13. Genetic Mapping in a Natural Population of Collared Flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis): Conserved Synteny but Gene Order Rearrangements on the Avian Z Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Niclas; Brandström, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna; Cheng, Hans; Ellegren, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Data from completely sequenced genomes are likely to open the way for novel studies of the genetics of nonmodel organisms, in particular when it comes to the identification and analysis of genes responsible for traits that are under selection in natural populations. Here we use the draft sequence of the chicken genome as a starting point for linkage mapping in a wild bird species, the collared flycatcher—one of the most well-studied avian species in ecological and evolutionary research. A pedigree of 365 flycatchers was established and genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23 genes selected from (and spread over most of) the chicken Z chromosome. All genes were also found to be located on the Z chromosome in the collared flycatcher, confirming conserved synteny at the level of gene content across distantly related avian lineages. This high degree of conservation mimics the situation seen for the mammalian X chromosome and may thus be a general feature in sex chromosome evolution, irrespective of whether there is male or female heterogamety. Alternatively, such unprecedented chromosomal conservation may be characteristic of most chromosomes in avian genome evolution. However, several internal rearrangements were observed, meaning that the transfer of map information from chicken to nonmodel bird species cannot always assume conserved gene orders. Interestingly, the rate of recombination on the Z chromosome of collared flycatchers was only ∼50% that of chicken, challenging the widely held view that birds generally have high recombination rates. PMID:16783008

  14. δ15N patterns of Douglas-fir and red alder riparian forests in the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, E.E.; Perakis, S.S.; Hibbs, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    We used naturally occurring stable isotopes of N to compare N dynamics in near-stream and upslope environments along riparian catenas in N-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the Coast Range of western Oregon. Based on the existing literature, we expected soil δ15N to be enriched closer to streams owing to inputs of isotopically heavy, marine-derived N by spawning salmon, higher rates of denitrification near the stream, or both. However, it has been unclear what effect red alder might have on soil δ15N patterns near streams. We found a consistent −1‰ δ15N signature in red alder foliage, and δ15N of total N in soils under red alder averaged 2.2‰ along sampling transects extending 20 m upslope from the stream. Surprisingly, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir was progressively depleted nearer to streams, opposite from the pattern expected from N losses by denitrification or N inputs from anadromous salmon. Instead, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir converged toward soil δ15N values typical of red alder sites. We consider that the historic presence of red alder may have contributed a legacy of lower soil δ15N nearer to streams on sites that are currently dominated by young Douglas-fir forest.

  15. Headwater riparian invertebrate communities associated with red alder and conifer wood and leaf litter in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeSage, C.M.; Merritt, R.W.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    We examined how management of young upland forests in southeastern Alaska affect riparian invertebrate taxa richness, density, and biomass, in turn, potentially influencing food abundance for fish and wildlife. Southeastern Alaska forests are dominated by coniferous trees including Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), with mixed stands of red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn.). Red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) is hypothesized to influence the productivity of young-growth conifer forests and through forest management may provide increased riparian invertebrate abundance. To compare and contrast invertebrate densities between coniferous and alder riparian habitats, leaf litter and wood debris (early and late decay classes) samples were collected along eleven headwater streams on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, during the summers of 2000 and 2001. Members of Acarina and Collembola were the most abundant taxa collected in leaf litter with alder litter having significantly higher mean taxa richness than conifer litter. Members of Acarina were the most abundant group collected on wood debris and alder wood had significantly higher mean taxa richness and biomass than conifer wood. Alder wood debris in more advanced decay stages had the highest mean taxa richness and biomass, compared to other wood types, while conifer late decay wood debris had the highest densities of invertebrates. The inclusion of alder in young-growth conifer forests can benefit forest ecosystems by enhancing taxa richness and biomass of riparian forest invertebrates. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of ectomycorrhizae on containerized sweet birch and European alder seedlings for planting on low quality sites

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.F.; West, D.C.; McLaughlin, S.B.

    1982-01-01

    A study was initiated to assess the potential of Pisolithus tinctorius as an ectomycorrhizal associate of containerized sweet birch (Betula lenta) and European alder (Alnus glutinosa) seedlings and to determine the effect of this fungal symbiont on seedling growth. In a test of sweet birch and European alder grown in Leach tubes, P. tinctorius formed abundant ectomycorrhizae on sweet birch when introduced via a vegetative mycelial inoculum. Cenococcum geophilum, originating from sclerotia present in the potting medium, and Thelephora terrestris, introduced via wind-borne propagules, formed ectomycorrhizae on the sweet birch seedlings inoculated with P. tinctorius and on the sweet birch control seedlings. C. geophilum also formed ectomycorrhizae on the inoculated and control European alder seedlings, but an inoculation with P. tinctorius did not result in the formation of P. tinctorius ectomycorrhizae on this host. Sweet birch seedlings infected with P. tinctorius had a greater dry weight, height, root collar diameter, and volume and a lower shoot/root ratio than the sweet birch control seedlings, and European alder seedlings with abundant C. geophilum ectomycorrhizae exhibited a similar improvement in growth in comparison with European alder with lesser C. geophilum infections. The inoculation of containerized sweet birch and European alder seedlings in the nursery with the appropriate ectomycorrhizal symbiont may facilitate the establishment of these species on harsh sites such as surface mine spoils. 57 references, 3 tables.

  17. Problems in separating species with similar habits and vocalizations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.; Stallcup, R.W.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    The possibilities for species misidentification based on vocalization or habitat association are high. However, the magnitude of the errors actually perpetrated is generally within an acceptable range in most types of bird survey work. Examples of problems discussed are: congeners that are similar in appearance or in song (such as Chimney and Vaux's Swifts, Chaetura pelagica, C. vauxi; Hammond's, Dusky and Gray Flycatchers, Empidonax hammondii, E. oberholseri, E. wrightii; Willow and Alder Flycatchers, E. traillii, E. alnorum; Common and Fish Crows, Corvus brachyrhynchos, C. ossifragus); birds that are misidentified because they are not expected by the observer (House Finches, Carpodacus mexicanus, invading new areas of eastern U.S.); birds that imitate other species (especially Starling, Sturnus vulgaris, and Mockingbird, Mimus polyglottos); birds in mixed flocks; birds with geographic differences in vocalizations (Solitary Vireo, Vireo solitarius); woodpeckers that are only heard drumming; and nests or eggs that are misidentified. Equally serious problems are the errors resulting from undetected species and from careless recording or failure to check manuscripts against original data. The quality of published count work can be improved considerably by (1) recognizing the problems that exist, (2) standardizing techniques for dealing with situations where not all birds can be identified, and (3) routinely applying all appropriate safeguards such as verification by mist netting and measuring, photography, tape recording or playback, additional observations, and careful verification of all entries in the final manuscript.

  18. Total Synthesis of (+)-Cytosporolide A via a Biomimetic Hetero-Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Takao, Ken-Ichi; Noguchi, Shuji; Sakamoto, Shu; Kimura, Mizuki; Yoshida, Keisuke; Tadano, Kin-Ichi

    2015-12-23

    The first total synthesis of (+)-cytosporolide A was achieved by a biomimetic hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of (-)-fuscoatrol A with o-quinone methide generated from (+)-CJ-12,373. The dienophile, highly oxygenated caryophyllene sesquiterpenoid (-)-fuscoatrol A, was synthesized from the synthetic intermediate in our previous total synthesis of (+)-pestalotiopsin A. The o-quinone methide precursor, isochroman carboxylic acid (+)-CJ-12,373, was synthesized through a Kolbe-Schmitt reaction and an oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction. The hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of these two compounds proceeded with complete chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity to produce the complicated pentacyclic ring system of the cytosporolide skeleton. This total synthesis unambiguously demonstrates that natural cytosporolide A has the structure previously suggested. PMID:26633257

  19. Molecular Complexity via C–H Activation: A Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Erik M.; White, M. Christina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, C–H oxidation reactions install oxidized functionality onto a preformed molecular skeleton, resulting in a local molecular change. The use of C–H activation chemistry to construct complex molecular scaffolds is a new area with tremendous potential in synthesis. We report a Pd(II)/bis-sulfoxide catalyzed dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction that converts simple terminal olefins into complex cycloadducts in a single operation. PMID:21842902

  20. TEMPO-Mediated Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Synthesis of Tetrahydropyridazines Using Ketohydrazones and Olefins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Long; Peng, Xie-Xue; Chen, Fei; Han, Bing

    2016-05-01

    A novel, facile, and efficient method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyridazines by a one-pot tandem reaction of easily accessible ketohydrazones and olefins in the presence of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) has been successfully developed. The reaction involves the initial generation of azoalkenes from direct oxidative dehydrogenation of ketohydrazones using TEMPO as the commercially available oxidant, followed by a subsequent aza-Diels-Alder reaction with olefins.

  1. Molecular complexity via C-H activation: a dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Stang, Erik M; White, M Christina

    2011-09-28

    Traditionally, C-H oxidation reactions install oxidized functionality onto a preformed molecular skeleton, resulting in a local molecular change. The use of C-H activation chemistry to construct complex molecular scaffolds is a new area with tremendous potential in synthesis. We report a Pd(II)/bis-sulfoxide-catalyzed dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction that converts simple terminal olefins into complex cycloadducts in a single operation.

  2. Synthesis and Diels-Alder reactions of a benzo[5]radialene derivative.

    PubMed

    von Richthofen, Andreas A; Marzorati, Liliana; Ducati, Lucas C; Di Vitta, Claudio

    2014-08-01

    Apart from their exotic structure, radialenes have been employed as precursors of more complex polycyclic molecules. In this work we report the synthesis of the first compound having the benzo[5]radialene substructure, starting from simple materials. Such a compound proved to be a convenient diene in Diels-Alder reactions, for the preparation of highly functionalized fluorenes and benzo[b]fluorenes in a quimio- and stereocontrolled fashion.

  3. Intramolecular [4 + 2] trapping of a hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) benzyne by tethered arenes.

    PubMed

    Pogula, Vedamayee D; Wang, Tao; Hoye, Thomas R

    2015-02-20

    We report here the efficient, intramolecular trapping in a Diels-Alder (DA) sense of thermally generated benzynes by one of two pendant arene rings. A more electron-rich ring (p-methoxyphenyl) reacted substantially faster than a simple phenyl ring, which was, in turn, slightly more reactive vs a 4-carbomethoxyphenyl ring. Photoinduced di-π-methane rearrangement of the initial DA adducts gave rise to unusual isomeric polycyclic adducts.

  4. A Thermal Dehydrogenative Diels–Alder Reaction of Styrenes for the Concise Synthesis of Functionalized Naphthalenes

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Laura S.; Benedetti, Erica

    2012-01-01

    Functionalized naphthalenes are valuable building blocks in many important areas. A microwave-assisted, intramolecular dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction of styrenyl derivatives to provide cyclopenta[b]naphthalene substructures not previously accessible using existing synthetic methods is described. The synthetic utility of these uniquely functionalized naphthalenes was demonstrated by a single-step conversion of one of these cycloadducts to a fluorophore bearing a structural resemblance to Prodan. PMID:22913473

  5. New L-Serine Derivative Ligands as Cocatalysts for Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Carlos A. D.; Rodríguez-Borges, José E.; Freire, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    New L-serine derivative ligands were prepared and tested as cocatalyst in the Diels-Alder reactions between cyclopentadiene (CPD) and methyl acrylate, in the presence of several Lewis acids. The catalytic potential of the in situ formed complexes was evaluated based on the reaction yield. Bidentate serine ligands showed good ability to coordinate medium strength Lewis acids, thus boosting their catalytic activity. The synthesis of the L-serine ligands proved to be highly efficient and straightforward. PMID:24383009

  6. The effects of sex, age and breeding success on breeding dispersal of pied flycatchers along a pollution gradient.

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Ahola, Markus; Laaksonen, Toni; Lehikoinen, Esa

    2008-08-01

    We modelled breeding dispersal of an insectivorous bird, the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) around a point source of heavy metals (a copper smelter). We tested for the effects of sex, age, breeding success and environmental pollution on breeding dispersal distances of F. hypoleuca females and males. Unlike many earlier studies on breeding dispersal, we took into account distance-dependent sampling bias by including in our model the recapture probabilities at different distances from the site of origin. Our results show that F. hypoleuca females disperse much farther (on average 7.9 km) from their breeding sites than what was previously thought. In contrast, males only disperse short distances (on average 190 m). Breeding success affected female breeding dispersal distances depending on female age: young females moved on average 8 km from their previous breeding place irrespective of their breeding success, while old females only seemed to move this far when their fledgling production was good. Females successful in their breeding dispersed as far as less successful females, or, among old birds, even farther. Females which dispersed long distances produced more fledglings after the movement than those staying near their previous breeding site. Degree of environmental pollution had no effect on female or male breeding dispersal distances. A polluted and unproductive environment does not seem to stimulate F. hypoleuca parents to move to more profitable territories. PMID:18543001

  7. Effects of reduced lead deposition on pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings: tracing exposure routes using stable lead isotopes.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Asa M M; Klaminder, Jonatan; Nyholm, N Erik I

    2009-01-01

    To what extent the lead burden of birds living in strongly contaminated ecosystems is responding to decreased atmospheric lead deposition is not well known. In this study, we measured lead concentrations and stable lead isotope ratios (206pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb) in liver and feces from pied flycatcher nestlings (Ficedula hypoleuca) along a 90 km pollution gradient from the Rönnskär smelter in northern Sweden. Changes in lead concentration in the birds from 1984 to 2006 were used for assessing the recovery of the environment following reduced lead emissions at the smelter. The 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb ratios were used to identify lead sources to the birds. Lead concentrations in liver and feces have decreased since the 1980s, typically by 9-15% (liver) and 18-40% (feces) as a result of a 98% emission reduction. This relatively weak recovery is explained by a transfer of old lead contaminants accumulated in soil to the birds via their prey, which was evident by a 206Pb/207Pb ratio in liver tissue (1.15 +/- 0.01) that overlapped with the ratio in ants (1.16 +/- 0.01) and organic soil horizon (1.17 +/- 0.01) rather than the current atmospheric lead pollution (1.11 +/- 0.01). Our findings suggest that insectivorous birds living around smelters may remain contaminated decades after ceased emissions.

  8. Integrated plumage colour variation in relation to body condition, reproductive investment and laying date in the collared flycatcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laczi, Miklós; Hegyi, Gergely; Herényi, Márton; Kiss, Dorottya; Markó, Gábor; Nagy, Gergely; Rosivall, Balázs; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, János

    2013-10-01

    The possible integration of different sexual ornaments into a composite system, and especially the information content of such ornament complexes, is poorly investigated. Many bird species display complex plumage coloration, but whether this represents one integrated or several independent sexual traits can be unclear. Collared flycatchers ( Ficedula albicollis) display melanised and depigmented plumage areas, and the spectral features (brightness and UV chroma) of these are correlated with each other across the plumage. In a 5-year dataset of male and female plumage reflectance, we examined some of the potential information content of integrated, plumage-level colour attributes by estimating their relationships to previous and current year body condition, laying date and clutch size. Females were in better condition the year before they became darker pigmented, and males in better current year condition were also darker pigmented. Female pigment-based brightness was positively, while male structurally based brightness was negatively related to current laying date. Finally, the overall UV chroma of white plumage areas in males was positively associated with current clutch size. Our results show that higher degree of pigmentation is related to better condition, while the structural colour component is associated with some aspects of reproductive investment. These results highlight the possibility that correlated aspects of a multiple plumage ornamentation system may reflect together some aspects of individual quality, thereby functioning as a composite signal.

  9. Isospora hypoleucae sp. n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), a new coccidian parasite found in the Pied Flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca).

    PubMed

    Dolnik, O V; von Rönn, J A C; Bensch, S

    2009-07-01

    A new Coccidia species is reported from the natural population of Pied Flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) in northern Germany. Sporulated oocysts were found in faeces from 6 of 8 sampled adults. The spherical oocysts of the new Isospora species have a brownish, smooth, bi-layered wall. Average size of sporulated oocysts was 19.4 x 19.3 microm (17.5-22.8 microm x 17.5-22.8 microm ) with a shape index (length/width) of 1.0. The sporulated oocysts have no micropyle or residuum, but enclose several small polar granules that often cluster into 2-3 dumbbell-shaped formations. Sporocysts are slightly elongated, rounded at the end opposite the Stieda body, 15.3 microm x 9.2 microm in size (13.8-16.1 microm x 8.5-10.3 microm ), and have a shape index of 1.7 (1.6-1.8). The Stieda body has a prominent knob-like cap, whereas the substieda body is absent. Sporocysts contain a small compact sporocyst residuum and 4 sporozoites. COI haplotypes identical to those isolated from faecal oocysts were PCR amplified from the blood of 13-day-old nestlings, suggesting that the newly described species has extra-intestinal stages in blood. This represents the first description of a new avian Isospora species supported by molecular sequence data from the same oocysts that are described morphologically. PMID:19450377

  10. Integrated plumage colour variation in relation to body condition, reproductive investment and laying date in the collared flycatcher.

    PubMed

    Laczi, Miklós; Hegyi, Gergely; Herényi, Márton; Kiss, Dorottya; Markó, Gábor; Nagy, Gergely; Rosivall, Balázs; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, János

    2013-10-01

    The possible integration of different sexual ornaments into a composite system, and especially the information content of such ornament complexes, is poorly investigated. Many bird species display complex plumage coloration, but whether this represents one integrated or several independent sexual traits can be unclear. Collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) display melanised and depigmented plumage areas, and the spectral features (brightness and UV chroma) of these are correlated with each other across the plumage. In a 5-year dataset of male and female plumage reflectance, we examined some of the potential information content of integrated, plumage-level colour attributes by estimating their relationships to previous and current year body condition, laying date and clutch size. Females were in better condition the year before they became darker pigmented, and males in better current year condition were also darker pigmented. Female pigment-based brightness was positively, while male structurally based brightness was negatively related to current laying date. Finally, the overall UV chroma of white plumage areas in males was positively associated with current clutch size. Our results show that higher degree of pigmentation is related to better condition, while the structural colour component is associated with some aspects of reproductive investment. These results highlight the possibility that correlated aspects of a multiple plumage ornamentation system may reflect together some aspects of individual quality, thereby functioning as a composite signal.

  11. Disparity in population structuring of Southwestern Willow Flycatchers based on geographic distance, movement patterns, and genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Katie J; Theimer, Tad C; McLeod, Mary Anne; Koronkiewicz, Thomas J

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of population connectivity often are based on demographic analysis of movements among subpopulations, but this approach may fail to detect rare migrants or overestimate the contribution of movements into populations when migrants fail to successfully reproduce. We compared movement data of endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatchers among isolated populations in Nevada and Arizona from 1997 to 2008 to genetic analyses of samples collected between 2004 and 2008 to determine the degree to which these two methods were concordant in their estimates of population structuring. Given that documented movements of 13 color-banded adults and 23 juveniles over 10 years indicated low rates of long-distance movements, we predicted that genetic analyses would show significant population structuring between a northern (Nevada) deme and a southern (Arizona) deme. We genotyped 93 adult individuals at seven microsatellite loci and used two Bayesian clustering programs, STRUCTURE and GENELAND, to predict population structure. Both clustering algorithms produced the same structuring pattern; a cluster containing birds breeding in Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, the northern-most Nevada site, and a cluster comprised of all other populations. These results highlight that estimates of subpopulation connectivity based on demographic analyses may differ from those based on genetics, suggesting either temporal changes in the pattern of movements, the importance of undetected movements, or differential contribution of migrants to the subpopulations they enter.

  12. Dimerization of quercetin, Diels-Alder vs. radical-coupling approach: a joint thermodynamics, kinetics, and topological study.

    PubMed

    Fourré, Isabelle; Di Meo, Florent; Podloucká, Pavlína; Otyepka, Michal; Trouillas, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Quercetin is a prototypical antioxidant and prominent member of flavonoids, a large group of natural polyphenols. The oxidation of quercetin may lead to its dimerization, which is a paradigm of the more general polyphenol oligomerization. There exist two opposing mechanisms to describe the dimerization process, namely radical-coupling or Diels-Alder reactions. This work presents a comprehensive rationalization of this dimerization process, acquired from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is found that the two-step radical-coupling pathway is thermodynamically and kinetically preferred over the Diels-Alder reaction. This is in agreement with the experimental results showing the formation of only one isomer, whereas the Diels-Alder mechanism would yield two isomers. The evolution in bonding, occurring during these two processes, is investigated using the atoms in molecules (AIM) and electron localization function (ELF) topological approaches. It is shown that some electron density is accumulated between the fragments in the transition state of the radical-coupling reaction, but not in the transition state of the Diels-Alder process. Graphical Abstract Quantum chemistry calculations of the dimerization process of quercetin show that a radical coupling approach is preferred to a Diels-Alder type reaction, in agreement with experimental results. Analysis of the bonding evolution highlights the reaction mechanism. PMID:27449669

  13. Total Synthesis of the Galbulimima Alkaloids Himandravine and GB17 Using Biomimetic Diels–Alder Reactions of Double Diene Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Reed T.; Pemberton, Ryan P.; Franke, Jenna M.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Thomson, Regan J.

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective total syntheses of himandravine and GB17 were completed through a common biomimetic strategy involving Diels–Alder reactions of unusual double diene containing linear precursors. The double diene precursors, containing or lacking a C12 substituent as required to produce GB17 or himandravine, respectively, were found to undergo Diels–Alder reactions to afford mixtures of regioisomeric cycloadducts that map onto the alternative carbocyclic frameworks of both himandravine and GB17. Computational investigations revealed that these Diels–Alder reactions proceed via transition state structures of similar energy that have a high degree of bispericyclic character and that the low levels of regioselectivity observed in the reactions are a consequence of competing orbital interaction and distortion energies. The combined experimental and computational results provide valuable insights into the biosynthesis of the Galbulimima alkaloids. PMID:26305231

  14. A Diels–Alder super diene breaking benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic polyene with six carbon atoms (benzene) is very stable, whereas cyclic polyene with four carbon atoms (cyclobutadiene) is extremely unstable. The electron-withdrawing pentafluorophenyl group of a substituted cyclobutadiene lowers the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, greatly increasing its reactivity as a diene in Diels–Alder reactions with acetylene, ethylene and even benzene. Here we show that the reaction with benzene occurs cleanly at the relatively low temperature of 120 °C and results in the formal fragmentation of benzene into C2H2 and C4H4 units, via a unique Diels–Alder/retro-Diels–Alder reaction. This is a new example of the rare case where breaking the C–C bond of benzene is possible with no activation by a transition metal. PMID:24398593

  15. Recent Advances in Inverse-Electron-Demand Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of 1-Oxa-1,3-Butadienes.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    This review is an endeavor to highlight the progress in the inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes in recent years. The huge number of examples of 1-oxadienes cycloadditions found in the literature clearly demonstrates the incessant importance of this transformation in pyran ring synthesis. This type of reaction is today one of the most important methods for the synthesis of dihydropyrans which are the key building blocks in structuring of carbohydrate and other natural products. Two different modes, inter- and intramolecular, of inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxadienes are discussed. The domino Knoevenagel hetero-Diels-Alder reactions are also described. In recent years the use of chiral Lewis acids, chiral organocatalysts, new optically active heterodienes or dienophiles have provided enormous progress in asymmetric synthesis. Solvent-free and aqueous hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxabutadienes were also investigated. The reactivity of reactants, selectivity of cycloadditions, and chemical stability in aqueous solutions and under physiological conditions were taken into account to show the potential application of the described reactions in bioorthogonal chemistry. New bioorthogonal ligation by click inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition of in situ-generated 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes and vinyl ethers was developed. It seems that some of the hetero-Diels-Alder reactions described in this review can be applied in bioorthogonal chemistry because they are selective, non-toxic, and can function in biological conditions taking into account pH, an aqueous environment, and temperature. PMID:27573264

  16. Recent Advances in Inverse-Electron-Demand Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of 1-Oxa-1,3-Butadienes.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    This review is an endeavor to highlight the progress in the inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes in recent years. The huge number of examples of 1-oxadienes cycloadditions found in the literature clearly demonstrates the incessant importance of this transformation in pyran ring synthesis. This type of reaction is today one of the most important methods for the synthesis of dihydropyrans which are the key building blocks in structuring of carbohydrate and other natural products. Two different modes, inter- and intramolecular, of inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxadienes are discussed. The domino Knoevenagel hetero-Diels-Alder reactions are also described. In recent years the use of chiral Lewis acids, chiral organocatalysts, new optically active heterodienes or dienophiles have provided enormous progress in asymmetric synthesis. Solvent-free and aqueous hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxabutadienes were also investigated. The reactivity of reactants, selectivity of cycloadditions, and chemical stability in aqueous solutions and under physiological conditions were taken into account to show the potential application of the described reactions in bioorthogonal chemistry. New bioorthogonal ligation by click inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition of in situ-generated 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes and vinyl ethers was developed. It seems that some of the hetero-Diels-Alder reactions described in this review can be applied in bioorthogonal chemistry because they are selective, non-toxic, and can function in biological conditions taking into account pH, an aqueous environment, and temperature.

  17. Scandium(III)-zeolites as new heterogeneous catalysts for imino-Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Andrea; Louis, Benoit; Pale, Patrick

    2012-04-16

    This study demonstrates the first zeolite-catalyzed synthesis of piperidine derivatives, including peptidomimetics and indoloquinolizidine alkaloids. The approach developed utilizes a highly effective one-pot reaction cascade, through imine formation and imino-Diels-Alder reactions, promoted by scandium-loaded zeolites as a heterogeneous catalyst. The methodology described benefits from very low catalyst loadings (≤5 mol % of Sc(III) ), commercially and readily available starting materials, and mild reaction conditions. Furthermore, the Sc(III) -zeolite catalyst can be readily reused more than 10 times without any loss in efficiency.

  18. A practical new chiral controller for asymmetric Diels-Alder and alkylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Sarakinos, G; Corey, E J

    1999-12-01

    [formula: see text] The enantiomerically pure hydroxy sulfones (+)- and (-)-2 have been prepared from 1,2-epoxycyclohexane by a simple and practical procedure. The acrylate esters of these alcohols undergo BCl3-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions with a variety of dienes at -78 to -55 degrees C in CH2Cl2 or C7H8 with high dienophile face selectivity (Table 1). The chiral esters so formed are readily cleaved with recovery of the controllers (+)- or (-)-2. Esters of (+)- and (-)-2 can be converted to Z-potassium enolates and alkylated with high face selectivity. PMID:10836034

  19. The Nitrosocarbonyl Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction as a Useful Tool for Organic Syntheses

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Brian S.

    2014-01-01

    Organic transformations that result in the formation of multiple covalent bonds within the same reaction are some of the most powerful tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Nitrosocarbonyl hetero-Diels–Alder (HDA) reactions allow for the simultaneous stereospecific introduction of carbon–nitrogen and carbon–oxygen bonds in one synthetic step, and provide direct access to 3,6-dihydro-1,2-oxazines. This Review describes the development of the nitrosocarbonyl HDA reaction and the utility of the resulting oxazine ring in the synthesis of a variety of important, biologically active molecules. PMID:21520360

  20. Rates of Hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) Cyclizations: Impact of the Linker Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rates of the hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) reaction of substrates containing, minimally, a 1,3,8-triyne subunit are reported. Several series of related substrates, differing in the nature of the three-atom tether that links the 1,3-diyne and diynophile, were examined. Seemingly small changes in substrate structure result in large differences in cyclization rate, spanning more than 8 orders of magnitude. The reactivity trends revealed by these studies should prove useful in guiding substrate design and choice of reaction conditions in future applications. PMID:25153729

  1. Intramolecular Dehydro-Diels–Alder Reaction Affords Selective Entry to Arylnaphthalene or Aryldihydronaphthalene Lignans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intramolecular dehydro-Diels–Alder (DDA) reactions are performed affording arylnaphthalene or aryldihydronaphthalene lactones selectively as determined by choice of reaction solvent. This constitutes the first report of an entirely selective formation of arylnaphthalene lactones utilizing DDA reactions of styrene-ynes. The synthetic utility of the DDA reaction is demonstrated by the synthesis of taiwanin C, retrohelioxanthin, justicidin B, isojusticidin B, and their dihydronaphthalene derivatives. Computational methods for chemical shift assignment are presented that allow for regioisomeric lignans to be distinguished. PMID:25061845

  2. Hetero-Diels–Alder reactions of hetaryl and aryl thioketones with acetylenic dienophiles

    PubMed Central

    Grzelak, Paulina; Mikina, Maciej; Linden, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Summary Selected hetaryl and aryl thioketones react with acetylenecarboxylates under thermal conditions in the presence of LiClO4 or, alternatively, under high-pressure conditions (5 kbar) at room temperature yielding thiopyran derivatives. The hetero-Diels–Alder reaction occurs in a chemo- and regioselective manner. The initially formed [4 + 2] cycloadducts rearrange via a 1,3-hydrogen shift sequence to give the final products. The latter were smoothly oxidized by treatment with mCPBA to the corresponding sulfones. PMID:26124858

  3. Insight on mendable resin made by combining Diels-Alder epoxy adducts with DGEBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Iacono, S.; Martone, A.; Filippone, G.; Acierno, D.; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.; Amendola, E.

    2016-05-01

    Formation of micro-cracks is a critical problem in polymers and polymer composites during their service in structural applications. In this context, materials endowed with self-healing features would lead to the next polymers generation. In the present paper, an epoxy system integrating Diels-Alder epoxy adducts is investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis. The direct and retro D-A reaction have been studied by FTIR and specific absorption bands have been identified. Finally, mechanical tests have been performed on the system. The polymer is able to heal fracture and micro-cracks recovering its stiffness after a thermal treatment.

  4. Syntheses of arabinose-derived pyrrolidine catalysts and their applications in intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Shing, Tony K M; Wu, Kwun W; Wu, Ho T; Xiao, Qicai

    2015-02-14

    Six chiral hydroxylated pyrrolidine catalysts were synthesized from commercially available D-arabinose in seven steps. Various aromatic substituents α to the amine can be introduced readily by a Grignard reaction, which enables facile optimization of the catalyst performance. The stereoselectivities of these catalysts have been assessed by comparing with those of MacMillan's imidazolidinone in a known intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reaction of a triene. Two additional IMDA reactions of symmetrical dienals with concomitant desymmetrisation further established the potential use of these novel amine catalysts. These pyrrolidines are valuable catalysts for other synthetic transformations. PMID:25503272

  5. Silver Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Diels-Alder Cycloadditions of 2′-Hydroxychalcones

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Huan; Becker, Clinton F.; Elliott, Sean J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Porco, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles are currently being employed as catalysts for a number of classical chemical transformations. In contrast, identification of novel reactions of nanoparticles, especially towards the synthesis of complex natural products and derivatives, is highly underdeveloped and represents a bourgeoning area in chemical synthesis. Herein, we report silica-supported silver nanoparticles as solid, recyclable catalysts for Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2′-hydroxychalcones and dienes in high yield and turnover number. The use of silver nanoparticle catalysts is further demonstrated by the total synthesis of the cytotoxic natural product panduratin A employing a highly electron-rich dienophile and Lewis acid-sensitive diene. PMID:20443601

  6. Diels–Alder Reactions of Allene with Benzene and Butadiene: Concerted, Stepwise, and Ambimodal Transition States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiconfigurational complete active space methods (CASSCF and CASPT2) have been used to investigate the (4 + 2) cycloadditions of allene with butadiene and with benzene. Both concerted and stepwise radical pathways were examined to determine the mechanism of the Diels–Alder reactions with an allene dienophile. Reaction with butadiene occurs via a single ambimodal transition state that can lead to either the concerted or stepwise trajectories along the potential energy surface, while reaction with benzene involves two separate transition states and favors the concerted mechanism relative to the stepwise mechanism via a diradical intermediate. PMID:25216056

  7. Diels-Alder reactions of allene with benzene and butadiene: concerted, stepwise, and ambimodal transition states.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung V; Houk, K N

    2014-10-01

    Multiconfigurational complete active space methods (CASSCF and CASPT2) have been used to investigate the (4 + 2) cycloadditions of allene with butadiene and with benzene. Both concerted and stepwise radical pathways were examined to determine the mechanism of the Diels-Alder reactions with an allene dienophile. Reaction with butadiene occurs via a single ambimodal transition state that can lead to either the concerted or stepwise trajectories along the potential energy surface, while reaction with benzene involves two separate transition states and favors the concerted mechanism relative to the stepwise mechanism via a diradical intermediate.

  8. Preparation of 2-BF3-substituted 1,3-dienes and their Diels-Alder/cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    De, Subhasis; Welker, Mark E

    2005-06-01

    [reaction: see text] 2-BF3-substituted 1,3-butadienes with potassium and tetrabutylammonium counterions have been prepared in gram quantities from chloroprene via a simple synthetic procedure. The potassium salt of this new main group element substituted diene has been characterized by 1H, 13C, 11B, and 19F NMR. Diels-Alder reactions of these dienes with ethyl acrylate and methyl vinyl ketone are reported, as well as subsequent Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of those Diels-Alder adducts. PMID:15932228

  9. Oxidative Stress in Early Life: Associations with Sex, Rearing Conditions, and Parental Physiological Traits in Nestling Pied Flycatchers.

    PubMed

    López-Arrabé, Jimena; Cantarero, Alejandro; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Palma, Antonio; Moreno, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Conditions experienced during juvenile development can affect the fitness of an organism. During early life, oxidative stress levels can be particularly high as a result of the increased metabolism and the relatively immature antioxidant system of the individual, and this may have medium- and long-term fitness consequences. Here we explore variation in levels of oxidative stress measured during early life in relation to sex, rearing conditions (hatching date and brood size), and parental condition and levels of oxidative markers in a wild population of the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) followed for 2 yr. A marker of total antioxidant status (TAS) in plasma and total levels of glutathione (GSH) in red blood cells, as well as a marker of oxidative damage in plasma lipids (malondialdehyde [MDA]), were assessed simultaneously. Our results show that nestling total GSH levels were associated with parental oxidative status, correlating negatively with maternal MDA and positively with total GSH levels of both parents, with a high estimated heritability. This suggests that parental physiology and genes could be determinants for endogenous components of the antioxidant system of the offspring. Moreover, we found that total GSH levels were higher in female than in male nestlings and that hatching date was positively associated with antioxidant defenses (higher TAS and total GSH levels). These results suggest that different components of oxidative balance are related to a variety of environmental and intrinsic--including parental--influencing factors. Future experimental studies must disentangle the relative contribution of each of these on nestling oxidative status and how the resulting oxidative stress at early phases shape adult phenotype and fitness.

  10. Male-male competition and parental care in collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis): an experiment controlling for differences in territory quality.

    PubMed

    Qvarnström, A; Grifffith, S C; Gustafsson, L

    2000-12-22

    Females are known to benefit from mate choice in several different ways but the relationship between these benefits has received little attention. The quality of resources provided by males, such as nest sites, and paternal care are often assumed to covary positively However, because the location of the nest affects the cost of parental care, these two benefits from mate choice can easily be confounded. To investigate the provisioning ability of successful competitors while controlling for differences in territory quality we removed early-settled pairs of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) and allowed replacement by later-arriving males or floaters (i.e.'poor competitors'). A control group of early-settled males (i.e. 'good competitors') had their females removed. Females paired to good competitors enjoyed a significantly higher reproductive success and tended to receive more parental assistance from their mates compared with females mated to poor competitors. Thus, some males seem able not only to compete successfully over resources but also to feed their offspring at a relatively higher rate. An alternative explanation, that poor competitors invested less in offspring quality in response to a lower share of paternity, could be rejected. The rate of extra-pair paternity did not differ between the two treatment groups. Our results suggest that male- male competition can sometimes facilitate female choice of superior care-givers. Thus, a female's benefit from choosing a competitive male may not be restricted to the quality of the resource he defends but can also include superior paternal care. PMID:11197133

  11. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction.

  12. Unconventional exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Guo-Ming; Huang, Ci-Jhang; Li, Elise Yu-Tzu; Hsu, Sheng-Kai; Wu, Ti; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Wu, Kevin Binchia; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The Diels–Alder reaction is a useful tool for generating functionalized chiral molecules through the concerted cycloaddition of dienes and dienophiles leading to six-membered rings. Traditionally, the selective predictions of the products rely heavily on consideration of the secondary orbital interactions that stabilize the endo pathway. However, there remain some basic examples defying this notion and produce the exo-isomer as major product. Here we systematically evaluated of the structural features driving exo selectivity in thermal normal-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions. Substitution at the Cβ position and the size and electronegativity of the electron-withdrawing group of the dienophile are contributing factors. Experimental and computational studies both point toward the steric and electrostatic forces between the substituents in both the diene and the dienophile that increase the likelihood of the exo pathway. For these substrates, the dominance of the endo pathway is reduced by transition state distortions and poor structural alignments of the reacting partners. We also noted the tilt of the dienophile with respect to the diene causing steric strain on the functionalities at the more advanced bond forming carbon-carbon position of the endo transition state. Insights into such factors may benefit synthetic planning and asserting control over this important named reaction. PMID:27731360

  13. Reconfigurable biodegradable shape-memory elastomers via Diels-Alder coupling.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Chi; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic biodegradable elastomers are a class of polymers that have demonstrated far-reaching utility as biomaterials for use in many medical applications. Biodegradable elastomers can be broadly classified into networks prepared by either step-growth or chain-growth polymerization. Each processing strategy affords distinct advantages in terms of capabilities and resulting properties of the network. This work describes the synthesis, processing, and characterization of cross-linked polyester networks based on Diels-Alder coupling reactions. Hyperbranched furan-modified polyester precursors based on poly(glycerol-co-sebacate) are coupled with bifunctional maleimide cross-linking agents. The chemical and thermomechanical properties of the elastomers are characterized at various stages of network formation. Experimental observations of gel formation are compared to theoretical predictions derived from Flory-Stockmayer relationships. This cross-linking strategy confers unique advantages in processing and properties including the ability to fabricate biodegradable reconfigurable covalent networks without additional catalysts or reaction byproducts. Reconfigurable biodegradable networks using Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions permit the fabrication of shape-memory polymers with complex permanent geometries. Biodegradable elastomers based on polyester networks with molecular reconfigurability achieve vastly expanded properties and processing capabilities for potential applications in medicine and beyond.

  14. The Mouse-colored Tyrannulet (Phaeomyias murina) is a species complex that includes the Cocos Flycatcher (Nesotriccus ridgwayi), an island form that underwent a population bottleneck.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Marc R; Harvey, Michael G; Oswald, Jessica A; Cuervo, Andrés; Derryberry, Elizabeth; Brumfield, Robb T

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous examination of evolutionary history in island forms and closely related mainland relatives can provide reciprocal insight into the evolution of island and mainland faunas. The Cocos Flycatcher (Nesotriccus ridgwayi) is a small tyrant flycatcher (Tyrannidae) endemic to Cocos Island, an oceanic island in the eastern Pacific Ocean. We first established its close relationship to the mainland species Mouse-colored Tyrannulet (Phaeomyias murina) using a phylogeny from genome-wide ultraconserved elements and exons. We then used mitochondrial DNA to explore the relationships between Nesotriccus and Phaeomyias populations from across its distribution in Central and South America. We found that Nesotriccus is nested within the Phaeomyias evolutionary tree, and that Phaeomyias represents a complex of at least four evolutionarily distinct species that differ in plumage, voice, and habitat association. Nesotriccus underwent a population bottleneck subsequent to its divergence from Central American and northern South American Phaeomyias populations in the middle Pleistocene. The 46 UCE loci containing alleles that are fixed between the two species are widely distributed across the genome, which suggests that selective or neutral processes responsible for divergence have occurred genome-wide. Overall, our simultaneous examination of Phaeomyias and Nesotriccus revealed divergent levels of genetic diversity and evolutionary histories between island and mainland forms. PMID:27126184

  15. Linked selection and recombination rate variation drive the evolution of the genomic landscape of differentiation across the speciation continuum of Ficedula flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Reto; Nater, Alexander; Kawakami, Takeshi; Mugal, Carina F.; Olason, Pall I.; Smeds, Linnea; Suh, Alexander; Dutoit, Ludovic; Bureš, Stanislav; Garamszegi, Laszlo Z.; Hogner, Silje; Moreno, Juan; Qvarnström, Anna; Ružić, Milan; Sæther, Stein-Are; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Török, Janos; Ellegren, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Speciation is a continuous process during which genetic changes gradually accumulate in the genomes of diverging species. Recent studies have documented highly heterogeneous differentiation landscapes, with distinct regions of elevated differentiation (“differentiation islands”) widespread across genomes. However, it remains unclear which processes drive the evolution of differentiation islands; how the differentiation landscape evolves as speciation advances; and ultimately, how differentiation islands are related to speciation. Here, we addressed these questions based on population genetic analyses of 200 resequenced genomes from 10 populations of four Ficedula flycatcher sister species. We show that a heterogeneous differentiation landscape starts emerging among populations within species, and differentiation islands evolve recurrently in the very same genomic regions among independent lineages. Contrary to expectations from models that interpret differentiation islands as genomic regions involved in reproductive isolation that are shielded from gene flow, patterns of sequence divergence (dxy and relative node depth) do not support a major role of gene flow in the evolution of the differentiation landscape in these species. Instead, as predicted by models of linked selection, genome-wide variation in diversity and differentiation can be explained by variation in recombination rate and the density of targets for selection. We thus conclude that the heterogeneous landscape of differentiation in Ficedula flycatchers evolves mainly as the result of background selection and selective sweeps in genomic regions of low recombination. Our results emphasize the necessity of incorporating linked selection as a null model to identify genome regions involved in adaptation and speciation. PMID:26355005

  16. Sorocenols G and H, Anti-MRSA Oxygen Heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type Adducts from Sorocea muriculata Roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a root extract of Sorocea muriculata led to the isolation and identification of two new oxygen heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type adducts, sorocenols G (1) and H (2), along with lupeol-3-(3'R-hydroxytetradecanoate) and oxyresveratrol. The structures of 1 and 2 were eluci...

  17. Asymmetric synthesis of bicyclic dihydropyrans via organocatalytic inverse-electron-demand oxo-Diels-Alder reactions of enolizable aliphatic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Long; Yang, Kai-Chuan; Li, Yi; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Hong-Ping; Han, Bo; Peng, Cheng; Zhi, Yong-Gang; Gou, Xiao-Jun

    2016-08-23

    A highly enantioselective organocatalytic inverse-electron-demand oxo-Diels-Alder reaction involving aqueous acetaldehyde has been discovered. The reaction, in which cyclic enones serve as dienes in the presence of readily available secondary amine catalysts, allows facile construction of optically active bicyclic dihydropyrans. Other typical enolizable aliphatic aldehydes can also serve as competent dienophiles in the reaction. PMID:27436351

  18. No evidence found for Diels-Alder reaction products in soybean oil oxidized at the frying temperature by NMR study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been generally accepted that the Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ratio showed 36.1% polymer peak area in g...

  19. The Preparation and Properties of Thermo-reversibly Cross-linked Rubber Via Diels-Alder Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Polgar, Lorenzo Massimo; van Duin, Martin; Picchioni, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    A method for using Diels Alder thermo-reversible chemistry as cross-linking tool for rubber products is demonstrated. In this work, a commercial ethylene-propylene rubber, grafted with maleic anhydride, is thermo-reversibly cross-linked in two steps. The pending anhydride moieties are first modified with furfurylamine to graft furan groups to the rubber backbone. These pendant furan groups are then cross-linked with a bis-maleimide via a Diels-Alder coupling reaction. Both reactions can be performed under a broad range of experimental conditions and can easily be applied on a large scale. The material properties of the resulting Diels-Alder cross-linked rubbers are similar to a peroxide-cured ethylene/propylene/diene rubber (EPDM) reference. The cross-links break at elevated temperatures (> 150 °C) via the retro-Diels-Alder reaction and can be reformed by thermal annealing at lower temperatures (50-70 °C). Reversibility of the system was proven with infrared spectroscopy, solubility tests and mechanical properties. Recyclability of the material was also shown in a practical way, i.e., by cutting a cross-linked sample into small parts and compression molding them into new samples displaying comparable mechanical properties, which is not possible for conventionally cross-linked rubbers.

  20. CYCLOADDITION REACTIONS OF AZIDE, FURAN, AND PYRROLE UNITS WITH BENZYNES GENERATED BY THE HEXADEHYDRO-DIELS–ALDER (HDDA) REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhua; Baire, Beeraiah

    2014-01-01

    Benzynes can be generated by the intramolecular thermal cycloisomerization of triynes–the title HDDA reaction. We report here that these can be trapped by cycloaddition reaction with trimethylsilyl azide (1,3-dipolar) or a furan or pyrrole (4+2 Diels–Alder). PMID:24910496

  1. The Preparation and Properties of Thermo-reversibly Cross-linked Rubber Via Diels-Alder Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Polgar, Lorenzo Massimo; van Duin, Martin; Picchioni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A method for using Diels Alder thermo-reversible chemistry as cross-linking tool for rubber products is demonstrated. In this work, a commercial ethylene-propylene rubber, grafted with maleic anhydride, is thermo-reversibly cross-linked in two steps. The pending anhydride moieties are first modified with furfurylamine to graft furan groups to the rubber backbone. These pendant furan groups are then cross-linked with a bis-maleimide via a Diels-Alder coupling reaction. Both reactions can be performed under a broad range of experimental conditions and can easily be applied on a large scale. The material properties of the resulting Diels-Alder cross-linked rubbers are similar to a peroxide-cured ethylene/propylene/diene rubber (EPDM) reference. The cross-links break at elevated temperatures (> 150 °C) via the retro-Diels-Alder reaction and can be reformed by thermal annealing at lower temperatures (50-70 °C). Reversibility of the system was proven with infrared spectroscopy, solubility tests and mechanical properties. Recyclability of the material was also shown in a practical way, i.e., by cutting a cross-linked sample into small parts and compression molding them into new samples displaying comparable mechanical properties, which is not possible for conventionally cross-linked rubbers. PMID:27583665

  2. Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

  3. NITROGEN EXPORT FROM FORESTED WATERSHEDS IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF N2-FIXING RED ALDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  4. Investigation of the possibility of functionalization of C20 fullerene by benzene via Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadati, Seyyed Amir; Nami, Navabeh

    2016-10-01

    C20 fullerene, this novel species with all its pentagonal faces has displayed some unique operations in making fast pericyclic reactions. As an example, the high dienophile character of the C20 fullerene and the ability of this species in making an ultra-fast Diels-Alder reaction with 1,3-butadiene, has been recently reported. Moreover, new experimental reports claim that the C60 fullerene, one of the fullerene family, could make a Diels-Alder reaction with the central ring of anthracene and make the ring non-aromatic. These reports may encourage researchers to do more studies on the properties of this small carbon cage. To address this question, the present research has discussed all the reaction channels of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition of benzene molecule as a 1,3-diene with the C20 fullerene in order to answer this question: "Is C20fullerene able to make a Diels-Alder reaction with this molecule?".

  5. Diversity-Oriented Approaches to Polycyclics and Bioinspired Molecules via the Diels-Alder Strategy: Green Chemistry, Synthetic Economy, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Chavan, Arjun S; Goyal, Deepti

    2015-05-11

    We describe diverse approaches to various dienes and their utilization in the Diels-Alder reaction to produce a variety of polycycles. The dienes covered here are prepared by simple alkylation reaction or via the Claisen rearrangement or by enyne metathesis of alkyne or enyne building blocks. Here, we have also included the Diels-Alder chemistry of dendralenes, a higher analog of cross-conjugated dienes. The present article is inclusive of o-xylylene derivatives that are generated in situ starting with benzosultine or benzosulfone derivatives. The Diels-Alder reaction of these dienes with various dienophiles gave diverse polycyclic systems and biologically important targets. PMID:25875156

  6. 1,4-Difluoro-2,5-dimethoxybenzene as a precursor for iterative double benzyne-furan Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Morton, Gillian E; Barrett, Anthony G M

    2005-04-29

    [reaction: see text] The use of 1,4-difluoro-2,5-dimethoxybenzene as a novel precursor for iterative two-directional benzyne-furan Diels-Alder reactions, using a range of 2- and 3-substituted furans, is reported. Substituted oxabenzonorbornadienes were synthesized following the initial Diels-Alder reaction, which upon ring opening under acidic conditions gave substituted naphthol derivatives. Highly substituted anthracenols were generated in the second benzyne-furan Diels-Alder reaction following acid-catalyzed isomerization of the cycloadducts.

  7. Diversity-Oriented Approaches to Polycyclics and Bioinspired Molecules via the Diels-Alder Strategy: Green Chemistry, Synthetic Economy, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Chavan, Arjun S; Goyal, Deepti

    2015-05-11

    We describe diverse approaches to various dienes and their utilization in the Diels-Alder reaction to produce a variety of polycycles. The dienes covered here are prepared by simple alkylation reaction or via the Claisen rearrangement or by enyne metathesis of alkyne or enyne building blocks. Here, we have also included the Diels-Alder chemistry of dendralenes, a higher analog of cross-conjugated dienes. The present article is inclusive of o-xylylene derivatives that are generated in situ starting with benzosultine or benzosulfone derivatives. The Diels-Alder reaction of these dienes with various dienophiles gave diverse polycyclic systems and biologically important targets.

  8. Landscape heterogeneity controls growth variability of alder, willow, and birch shrubs in response to observed increases in temperature and snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, K. D.; Hallinger, M.; Buras, A.; Wilmking, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged for a circumarctic trend of increasing shrub cover in tundra regions. On the Alaskan tundra, repeat photography has shown spatial differences in shrub patch dynamics: since 1950, most patches expanded while some remained stable. In this study we explore the underpinnings of this landscape heterogeneity by sampling the three dominant shrubs of the Alaskan tundra--alder, willow and birch--and creating shrub ring width chronologies to determine the influence of climate variability on shrub growth. Shrubs of expanding patches of all three species grew at higher rates than shrubs of stable patches. Alder and willow shrubs in expanding patches exhibited mainly positive growth trends, while their counterparts in stable patches exhibited mainly negative growth trends. Birch shrub growth declined in expanding and stable patches. Alder and willow shrub growth rates and responses to climate were controlled more by soil characteristics than by their genus; expanding alder and willow shrubs showed significant positive correlations with spring and summer temperatures, whereas alder and willow shrubs of stable patches were negatively influenced by winter precipitation. The widely-scattered stable shrub patches sampled here are considered ';moist tussock tundra,' which covers 13.4% of the low arctic landscape. In moist tussock tundra, and presumably also wet tussock tundra, the negative influence of deeper snow on shrubs outweighed the positive influence of deeper snow on ground temperature and nutrient stocks articulated by the snow-shrub-microbe hypothesis. Thus, while shrubs of expanding patches have generally profited from warmer summers, shrubs of stable patches have suffered from increased soil moisture resulting from increased snowmelt water. These results underscore the spatial and temporal complexity in shrub-climate dynamics, which will require considerable finesse to appropriately integrate into modeling efforts.

  9. The impact of a pulsing groundwater table on greenhouse gas emissions in riparian grey alder stands.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ülo; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Teemusk, Alar; Kanal, Arno; Uri, Veiko; Truu, Jaak

    2015-02-01

    Floods control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in floodplains; however, there is a lack of data on the impact of short-term events on emissions. We studied the short-term effect of changing groundwater (GW) depth on the emission of (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in two riparian grey alder (Alnus incana) stands of different age in Kambja, southern Estonia, using the opaque static chamber (five replicates in each site) and gas chromatography methods. The average carbon and total nitrogen content in the soil of the old alder (OA) stand was significantly higher than in the young alder (YA) stand. In both stands, one part was chosen for water table manipulation (Manip) and another remained unchanged with a stable and deeper GW table. Groundwater table manipulation (flooding) significantly increases CH4 emission (average: YA-Dry 468, YA-Manip 8,374, OA-Dry 468, OA-Manip 4,187 μg C m(-2) h(-1)) and decreases both CO2 (average: OA-Dry 138, OA-Manip 80 mg C m(-2) h(-1)) and N2O emissions (average: OA-Dry 23.1, OA-Manip 11.8 μg N m(-2) h(-1)) in OA sites. There was no significant difference in CO2 and CH4 emissions between the OA and YA sites, whereas in OA sites with higher N concentration in the soil, the N2O emission was significantly higher than at the YA sites. The relative CO2 and CH4 emissions (the soil C stock-related share of gaseous losses) were higher in manipulated plots showing the highest values in the YA-Manip plot (0.03 and 0.0030 % C day(-1), respectively). The soil N stock-related N2O emission was very low achieving 0.000019 % N day(-1) in the OA-Dry plot. Methane emission shows a negative correlation with GW, whereas the 20 cm depth is a significant limit below which most of the produced CH4 is oxidized. In terms of CO2 and N2O, the deeper GW table significantly increases emission. In riparian zones of headwater streams, the short-term floods (e.g. those driven by extreme climate events) may significantly enhance

  10. The impact of a pulsing groundwater table on greenhouse gas emissions in riparian grey alder stands.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ülo; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Teemusk, Alar; Kanal, Arno; Uri, Veiko; Truu, Jaak

    2015-02-01

    Floods control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in floodplains; however, there is a lack of data on the impact of short-term events on emissions. We studied the short-term effect of changing groundwater (GW) depth on the emission of (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in two riparian grey alder (Alnus incana) stands of different age in Kambja, southern Estonia, using the opaque static chamber (five replicates in each site) and gas chromatography methods. The average carbon and total nitrogen content in the soil of the old alder (OA) stand was significantly higher than in the young alder (YA) stand. In both stands, one part was chosen for water table manipulation (Manip) and another remained unchanged with a stable and deeper GW table. Groundwater table manipulation (flooding) significantly increases CH4 emission (average: YA-Dry 468, YA-Manip 8,374, OA-Dry 468, OA-Manip 4,187 μg C m(-2) h(-1)) and decreases both CO2 (average: OA-Dry 138, OA-Manip 80 mg C m(-2) h(-1)) and N2O emissions (average: OA-Dry 23.1, OA-Manip 11.8 μg N m(-2) h(-1)) in OA sites. There was no significant difference in CO2 and CH4 emissions between the OA and YA sites, whereas in OA sites with higher N concentration in the soil, the N2O emission was significantly higher than at the YA sites. The relative CO2 and CH4 emissions (the soil C stock-related share of gaseous losses) were higher in manipulated plots showing the highest values in the YA-Manip plot (0.03 and 0.0030 % C day(-1), respectively). The soil N stock-related N2O emission was very low achieving 0.000019 % N day(-1) in the OA-Dry plot. Methane emission shows a negative correlation with GW, whereas the 20 cm depth is a significant limit below which most of the produced CH4 is oxidized. In terms of CO2 and N2O, the deeper GW table significantly increases emission. In riparian zones of headwater streams, the short-term floods (e.g. those driven by extreme climate events) may significantly enhance

  11. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  12. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that the diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.

  13. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that themore » diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.« less

  14. A mechanochemical study of the effects of compression on a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjiv K; Brown, Katie; Todde, Guido; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2016-08-21

    We examine the effects of compressive external forces on the mechanisms of the parent Diels-Alder (DA) reaction between butadiene and ethylene. Reaction pathways and transition states were calculated using the nudged elastic band method within a mechanochemical framework at the CASSCF(6,6)/6-31G**, as well as the B3LYP/6-311++G** levels of theory. Our results suggest that compressive hydrostatic pressure lowers the energy barrier for the parent DA reaction while suppressing the undesirable side reaction, thereby leading to a direct increase in the yield of cyclohexene. Compressive pressure also increases the exothermicity of the parent DA reaction, which would lead to increased temperatures in a reaction vessel and thereby indirectly increase the yield of cyclohexene. Our estimates indicate that the compression used in our study corresponds to a range of 68 MPa-1410 MPa.

  15. A mechanochemical study of the effects of compression on a Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjiv K.; Brown, Katie; Todde, Guido; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2016-08-01

    We examine the effects of compressive external forces on the mechanisms of the parent Diels-Alder (DA) reaction between butadiene and ethylene. Reaction pathways and transition states were calculated using the nudged elastic band method within a mechanochemical framework at the CASSCF(6,6)/6-31G**, as well as the B3LYP/6-311++G** levels of theory. Our results suggest that compressive hydrostatic pressure lowers the energy barrier for the parent DA reaction while suppressing the undesirable side reaction, thereby leading to a direct increase in the yield of cyclohexene. Compressive pressure also increases the exothermicity of the parent DA reaction, which would lead to increased temperatures in a reaction vessel and thereby indirectly increase the yield of cyclohexene. Our estimates indicate that the compression used in our study corresponds to a range of 68 MPa-1410 MPa.

  16. Economic considerations in establishing European alder in herbaceous cover on surface-mined land

    SciTech Connect

    Ringe, J.M.; Graves, D.H.

    1985-12-09

    Herbicides are a practical tool for selectively controlling vegetative competition during tree seedling establishment. A study to investigate the effects of eight herbicide treatments on the survival and height growth of European alder (Alnus glutinosa) seedlings established in herbaceous cover indicated a positive treatment effect, but very little difference between the herbicide treatments themselves. Since the costs of the herbicides varied considerably, similar results could be obtained using the different herbicides, but at substantially different costs. Biological data were combined with the economic data to derive a modified benefit/cost ratio. This ratio facilitates herbicide treatment choice by comparing the amount of added survival or growth obtained per dollar spent on herbicides. 5 references, 6 tables.

  17. Carbocations as Lewis acid catalysts in Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Bah, Juho; Franzén, Johan

    2014-01-20

    In general, Lewis acid catalysts are metal-based compounds that owe their reactivity to a low-lying empty orbital. However, one potential Lewis acid that has received negligible attention as a catalyst is the carbocation. We have demonstrated the potential of the carbocation as a highly powerful Lewis acid catalyst for organic reactions. The stable and easily available triphenylmethyl (trityl) cation was found to be a highly efficient catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction for a range of substrates. Catalyst loadings as low as 500 ppm, excellent yields, and good endo/exo selectivities were achieved. Furthermore, by changing the electronic properties of the substituents on the tritylium ion, the Lewis acidity of the catalyst could be tuned to control the outcome of the reaction. The ability of this carbocation as a Lewis acid catalyst was also further extended to the Michael reaction.

  18. Thiourea-catalyzed Diels–Alder reaction of a naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Carsten S

    2013-01-01

    Summary A variety of organocatalysts were screened for the catalysis of the naphthoquinone monoketal Diels–Alder reaction. In this study we found that Schreiner's thiourea catalyst 10 and Jacobson's thiourea catalyst 12 facilitate the cycloaddition of the sterically hindered naphthoquinone monoketal dienophile 3 with diene 4. The use of thiourea catalysis allowed for the first time the highly selective synthesis of the exo-product 2a in up to 63% yield. In this reaction a new quaternary center was built. The so formed cycloaddition product 2a represents the ABC tricycle of beticolin 0 (1) and is also a valuable model substrate for the total synthesis of related natural products. PMID:23946836

  19. A Diels-Alder reaction triggered by a [4 + 3] metallacycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, Ángela; Vattier, Florencia; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Paneque, Margarita; Poveda, Manuel L; Álvarez, Eleuterio

    2015-04-01

    The Tp(Me2)Ir(III) complex 1-OH2 (Tp(Me2) = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate), which contains a labile molecule of water and an iridium-bonded alkenyl moiety (-C(R)═C(R)-(R=CO2Me)) as part of a benzo-annulated five-membered iridacycle, reacts readily with the conjugated dienes butadiene and 2,3-dimethylbutadiene to afford the corresponding Diels-Alder products. Experimental and DFT studies are in accordance with an initial [4 + 3] cyclometalation reaction between the diene and the five-coordinated 16-electron organometallic fragment 1 (generated from 1-OH2 by facile water dissociation). The reaction can be extended to a related TpIr(III) complex (Tp = hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate) that also features a labile ligand (i.e., 2-THF).

  20. Synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes and chemistry beyond Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xijian; Peng, Siyu; Li, Li; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Electron-rich dienes have revolutionized the synthesis of complex compounds since the discovery of the legendary Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. This highly efficient bond-forming process has served as a fundamental strategy to assemble many structurally formidable molecules. Amino silyloxy butadienes are arguably the most reactive diene species that are isolable and bottleable. Since the pioneering discovery by Rawal, 1-amino-3-silyloxybutadienes have been found to undergo cycloaddition reactions with unparalleled mildness, leading to significant advances in both asymmetric catalysis and total synthesis of biologically active natural products. In sharp contrast, this class of highly electron-rich conjugated olefins has not been studied in non-cycloaddition reactions. Here we report a simple synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes, a complementarily substituted Rawal's diene. This family of molecules is found to undergo a series of intriguing chemical transformations orthogonal to cycloaddition reactions. Structurally diverse polysubstituted ring architectures are established in one step from these dienes. PMID:25898310

  1. A mechanochemical study of the effects of compression on a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjiv K; Brown, Katie; Todde, Guido; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2016-08-21

    We examine the effects of compressive external forces on the mechanisms of the parent Diels-Alder (DA) reaction between butadiene and ethylene. Reaction pathways and transition states were calculated using the nudged elastic band method within a mechanochemical framework at the CASSCF(6,6)/6-31G**, as well as the B3LYP/6-311++G** levels of theory. Our results suggest that compressive hydrostatic pressure lowers the energy barrier for the parent DA reaction while suppressing the undesirable side reaction, thereby leading to a direct increase in the yield of cyclohexene. Compressive pressure also increases the exothermicity of the parent DA reaction, which would lead to increased temperatures in a reaction vessel and thereby indirectly increase the yield of cyclohexene. Our estimates indicate that the compression used in our study corresponds to a range of 68 MPa-1410 MPa. PMID:27544105

  2. 18F-Based Pretargeted PET Imaging Based on Bioorthogonal Diels–Alder Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind 18F pretargeted PET imaging approach based on the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels–Alder (IEDDA) reaction between tetrazine (Tz) and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) is presented. As proof-of-principle, a TCO-bearing immunoconjugate of the anti-CA19.9 antibody 5B1 and an Al[18F]NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand were harnessed for the visualization of CA19.9-expressing BxPC3 pancreatic cancer xenografts. Biodistribution and 18F-PET imaging data clearly demonstrate that this methodology effectively delineates tumor mass with activity concentrations up to 6.4 %ID/g at 4 h after injection of the radioligand. PMID:26479967

  3. Long-term recovery of clutch size and egg shell quality of the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) in a metal polluted area.

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Lehikoinen, Esa

    2015-06-01

    We explored if breeding parameters and egg shell quality of an insectivorous passerine, pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca, have fully recovered after c.a. 99% decrease in dust emissions from a non-ferrous smelter in the course of the 23 year study period. Some potentially important population characteristics (density, phenology, age) and environmental variables (habitat, inter-specific competition) were taken into account in the analysis. We found marked increase in reproductive parameters (egg shell quality, clutch size, hatchability, and fledgling number) in the metal polluted area especially in 1990's when metal-rich dust emissions from the smelter were markedly reduced. Still clutch sizes and fledgling numbers remain below the levels of the reference area. There is currently very little evidence of direct toxic effects of metals in our study population but full recovery of breeding parameters may not be reached until the full recovery of food chains, which is likely to be a slow process.

  4. Optimizing the trade-off between offspring number and quality in unpredictable environments: testing the role of differential androgen transfer to collared flycatcher eggs.

    PubMed

    Rice, Amber M; Vallin, Niclas; Kulma, Katarzyna; Arntsen, Hanna; Husby, Arild; Tobler, Michael; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-05-01

    According to the brood reduction hypothesis, parents adjust their brood size in response to current environmental conditions. When resources are abundant, parents can successfully raise all hatched offspring, but when resources are scarce, brood reduction, i.e., the sacrifice of some siblings to secure the quality of a subset of offspring, may maximize fitness. Differential transfer of maternal androgens is one potential proximate mechanism through which female birds may facilitate brood reduction because it may alter the relative competitive ability of sibling nestlings. We tested the hypothesis that female collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) manipulate sibling competition by transferring less androgens to eggs late in the laying sequence. We experimentally elevated androgen levels in i) whole clutches and ii) only the two last laid eggs, and compared growth and begging behavior of offspring from these treatments with a control treatment. By using three treatments and video assessment of begging, we examined the effects of within-clutch patterns of yolk androgen transfer on levels of sibling competition in situ. When androgens were elevated in only the two last laid eggs, begging was more even among siblings compared to control nests. We also found that female nestlings receiving additional yolk androgens showed higher mass gain later in the breeding season, while their male counterparts did not. Our results suggest that females may improve reproductive success in unpredictable environments by altering within-clutch patterns of yolk androgen transfer. We discuss the possibility that life-history divergence between the co-occurring collared and pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) is amplified by patterns of yolk androgen transfer.

  5. Climate change, breeding date and nestling diet: how temperature differentially affects seasonal changes in pied flycatcher diet depending on habitat variation.

    PubMed

    Burger, Claudia; Belskii, Eugen; Eeva, Tapio; Laaksonen, Toni; Mägi, Marko; Mänd, Raivo; Qvarnström, Anna; Slagsvold, Tore; Veen, Thor; Visser, Marcel E; Wiebe, Karen L; Wiley, Chris; Wright, Jonathan; Both, Christiaan

    2012-07-01

    1. Climate warming has led to shifts in the seasonal timing of species. These shifts can differ across trophic levels, and as a result, predator phenology can get out of synchrony with prey phenology. This can have major consequences for predators such as population declines owing to low reproductive success. However, such trophic interactions are likely to differ between habitats, resulting in differential susceptibility of populations to increases in spring temperatures. A mismatch between breeding phenology and food abundance might be mitigated by dietary changes, but few studies have investigated this phenomenon. Here, we present data on nestling diets of nine different populations of pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca, across their breeding range. This species has been shown to adjust its breeding phenology to local climate change, but sometimes insufficiently relative to the phenology of their presumed major prey: Lepidoptera larvae. In spring, such larvae have a pronounced peak in oak habitats, but to a much lesser extent in coniferous and other deciduous habitats. 2. We found strong seasonal declines in the proportions of caterpillars in the diet only for oak habitats, and not for the other forest types. The seasonal decline in oak habitats was most strongly observed in warmer years, indicating that potential mismatches were stronger in warmer years. However, in coniferous and other habitats, no such effect of spring temperature was found. 3. Chicks reached somewhat higher weights in broods provided with higher proportions of caterpillars, supporting the notion that caterpillars are an important food source and that the temporal match with the caterpillar peak may represent an important component of reproductive success. 4. We suggest that pied flycatchers breeding in oak habitats have greater need to adjust timing of breeding to rising spring temperatures, because of the strong seasonality in their food. Such between-habitat differences can have

  6. Exploring Reaction Mechanism on Generalized Force Modified Potential Energy Surfaces (G-FMPES) for Diels-Alder Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjiv; Brown, Katie; Subramanian, Gopinath

    We apply a recent formulation for searching minimum energy reaction path (MERP) and saddle point to atomic systems subjected to an external force. We demonstrate the effect of a loading modality resembling hydrostatic pressure on the trans to cis conformational change of 1,3-butadiene, and the simplest Diels-Alder reaction between ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. The calculated MERP and saddle points on the generalized force modified potential energy surface (G-FMPES) are compared with the corresponding quantities on an unmodified potential energy surface. Our study is performed using electronic structure calculations at the HF/6-31G** level as implemented in the AIMS-MOLPRO code. Our calculations suggest that the added compressive pressure lowers the energy of cis butadiene. The activation energy barrier for the concerted Diels-Alder reaction is found to decrease progressively with increasing compressive pressure.

  7. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Dienes with Acrylic Esters: A Novel Approach to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilhan, Faysal; Tyson, Daniel S.; Smith, Deedee; Meador, Mary Ann; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloadditions have often been utilized in polymer synthesis as an alternative to condensation reactions. In our earlier efforts, we developed a new method for the preparation of linear aromatic polyimides, which employs o-quionodimethanes (o-QDMs), generated by a well-known photochemical reaction: the photoenolization of o-methylphenyl ketones. Photolysis of o-methylbenzophenone 1 produces hydroxy-o-quino- diemthane 2, which can be trapped with dienophiles, such as dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate, to efficiently yield the corresponding cycloadduct (Scheme 1). Here we extend this approach to a novel photocuring process for development of polymer films. We synthesized a series of molecules with multi o-mehtylphenyl ketone functionalities. We further investigated these molecules as photoreactive monomers to obtain polyester films through Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

  8. Quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship modeling for Diels-Alder ligations utilizing quantum chemical structural descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show the correlation of quantum chemical structural descriptors with the activation barriers of the Diels-Alder ligations. A set of 72 non-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions were subjected to quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) under the framework of theoretical quantum chemical descriptors calculated solely from the structures of diene and dienophile reactants. Experimental activation barrier data were obtained from literature. Descriptors were computed using Hartree-Fock theory using 6-31G(d) basis set as implemented in Gaussian 09 software. Results Variable selection and model development were carried out by stepwise multiple linear regression methodology. Predictive performance of the quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) model was assessed by training and test set concept and by calculating leave-one-out cross-validated Q2 and predictive R2 values. The QSABR model can explain and predict 86.5% and 80% of the variances, respectively, in the activation energy barrier training data. Alternatively, a neural network model based on back propagation of errors was developed to assess the nonlinearity of the sought correlations between theoretical descriptors and experimental reaction barriers. Conclusions A reasonable predictability for the activation barrier of the test set reactions was obtained, which enabled an exploration and interpretation of the significant variables responsible for Diels-Alder interaction between dienes and dienophiles. Thus, studies in the direction of QSABR modelling that provide efficient and fast prediction of activation barriers of the Diels-Alder reactions turn out to be a meaningful alternative to transition state theory based computation. PMID:24171724

  9. Visible-light induced isoindoles formation to trigger intermolecular Diels-Alder reactions in the presence of air.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Zhen, Le; Cheng, Yong; Du, Hong-Jin; Zhao, Hui; Wen, Xiaoan; Kong, Ling-Yi; Xu, Qing-Long; Sun, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Visible-light induced isoindole formation triggered an intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles such as acetylenedicarboxylate and maleimides in the presence of air. The reaction resulted in excellent diastereoselctivity and high yields under mild reaction conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical, transition-metal-free (TM-free) and straightforward approach to structurally diverse bridged-ring heterocycles from easily accessible molecules.

  10. Spectacular Rate Enhancement of the Diels-Alder Reaction at the Ionic Liquid/n-Hexane Interface.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Vijay; Manna, Arpan; Kumar, Anil

    2016-07-01

    The use of the ionic liquid/n-hexane interface as a new class of reaction medium for the Diels-Alder reaction gives large rate enhancements of the order of 10(6) to 10(8) times and high stereoselectivity, as compared to homogeneous media. The rate enhancement is attributed to the H-bonding abilities and polarities of the ionic liquids, whereas the hydrophobicity of ionic liquids was considered to be the factor in controlling stereoselectivity.

  11. Design and synthesis of fused polycycles via Diels–Alder reaction and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Ongolu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Atom efficient processes such as the Diels–Alder reaction (DA) and the ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM) have been used to design new polycycles. In this regard, ruthenium alkylidene catalysts are effective in realizing the RRM of bis-norbornene derivatives prepared by DA reaction and Grignard addition. Here, fused polycycles are assembled which are difficult to produce by conventional synthetic routes. PMID:26425184

  12. Short-term influence of nitrate on acetylene reduction, photosynthesis and nodule respiration of black alder seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cazell, B.H.; Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaernt.) has shown significant benefits in several silvicultural applications such as nurse-trees. However, little is known concerning the nitrate/N-fixing interactions. Our objections were to examine the effects of three nitrate levels on acetylene reduction (AR), net photosynthesis (Ps) and nodule respiration (NR). Fifteen month-old black alder rooted cuttings were inoculated with one strain of Frankia inoculum (ARgN22D) at six months, maintained under 16h photoperiod at ambient greenhouse conditions, and fertilized for two months prior to study with a modified Crone's N-free solution. At study initiation seedlings were fertilized for six days with 0, 7.5 or 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Measurements of AR, Ps and NR were collected on the second, fourth and sixth day of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} application. By day four AR was significantly lowered by 75% for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatment when compared with the controls. On day six, Ps and NR were lowered significantly by 29% and 59%, respectively, for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatments when compared to control values. Results suggest any benefit from black alder N-fixation might be negated by nitrate fertilization.

  13. Design Paradigm Utilizing Reversible Diels-Alder Reactions to Enhance the Mechanical Properties of 3D Printed Materials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joshua R; Appuhamillage, Gayan A; Thompson, Christina M; Voit, Walter; Smaldone, Ronald A

    2016-07-01

    A design paradigm is demonstrated that enables new functional 3D printed materials made by fused filament fabrication (FFF) utilizing a thermally reversible dynamic covalent Diels-Alder reaction to dramatically improve both strength and toughness via self-healing mechanisms. To achieve this, we used as a mending agent a partially cross-linked terpolymer consisting of furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) adducts that exhibit reversibility at temperatures typically used for FFF printing. When this mending agent is blended with commercially available polylactic acid (PLA) and printed, the resulting materials demonstrate an increase in the interfilament adhesion strength along the z-axis of up to 130%, with ultimate tensile strength increasing from 10 MPa in neat PLA to 24 MPa in fmDA-enhanced PLA. Toughness in the z-axis aligned prints increases by up to 460% from 0.05 MJ/m(3) for unmodified PLA to 0.28 MJ/m(3) for the remendable PLA. Importantly, it is demonstrated that a thermally reversible cross-linking paradigm based on the furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) reaction can be more broadly applied to engineer property enhancements and remending abilities to a host of other 3D printable materials with superior mechanical properties.

  14. Performance of ectomycorrhizal alders exposed to specific Canadian oil sands tailing stressors under in vivo bipartite symbiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Nadeau, Martin; Gagné, André; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Fortin, J André; Roy, Sébastien; Greer, Charles W; Khasa, Damase P

    2016-07-01

    Canadian oil sands tailings are predominately sodic residues contaminated by hydrocarbons such as naphthenic acids. These conditions are harsh for plant development. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inoculating roots of Alnus viridis ssp. crispa and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa with ectomycorrhizal fungi in the presence of tailings compounds. Seedlings were inoculated with 7 different strains of Paxillus involutus and Alpova diplophloeus and were grown under different treatments of NaCl, Na2SO4, and naphthenic acids in a growth chamber. Afterwards, seedling survival, height, dry biomass, leaf necrosis, and root mycorrhization rate were measured. Paxillus involutus Mai was the most successful strain in enhancing alder survival, health, and growth. Seedlings inoculated with this strain displayed a 25% increase in survival rate, 2-fold greater biomass, and 2-fold less leaf necrosis compared with controls. Contrary to our expectations, A. diplophloeus was not as effective as P. involutus in improving seedling fitness, likely because it did not form ectomycorrhizae on roots of either alder species. High intraspecific variation characterized strains of P. involutus in their ability to stimulate alder height and growth and to minimize leaf necrosis. We conclude that in vivo selection under bipartite symbiotic conditions is essential to select effective strains that will be of use for the revegetation and reclamation of derelict lands. PMID:27170470

  15. Design Paradigm Utilizing Reversible Diels-Alder Reactions to Enhance the Mechanical Properties of 3D Printed Materials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joshua R; Appuhamillage, Gayan A; Thompson, Christina M; Voit, Walter; Smaldone, Ronald A

    2016-07-01

    A design paradigm is demonstrated that enables new functional 3D printed materials made by fused filament fabrication (FFF) utilizing a thermally reversible dynamic covalent Diels-Alder reaction to dramatically improve both strength and toughness via self-healing mechanisms. To achieve this, we used as a mending agent a partially cross-linked terpolymer consisting of furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) adducts that exhibit reversibility at temperatures typically used for FFF printing. When this mending agent is blended with commercially available polylactic acid (PLA) and printed, the resulting materials demonstrate an increase in the interfilament adhesion strength along the z-axis of up to 130%, with ultimate tensile strength increasing from 10 MPa in neat PLA to 24 MPa in fmDA-enhanced PLA. Toughness in the z-axis aligned prints increases by up to 460% from 0.05 MJ/m(3) for unmodified PLA to 0.28 MJ/m(3) for the remendable PLA. Importantly, it is demonstrated that a thermally reversible cross-linking paradigm based on the furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) reaction can be more broadly applied to engineer property enhancements and remending abilities to a host of other 3D printable materials with superior mechanical properties. PMID:27299858

  16. A new approach to the synthesis of monomers and polymers incorporating furan/maleimide Diels-Alder adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banella, Maria Barbara; Gioia, Claudio; Vannini, Micaela; Colonna, Martino; Celli, Annamaria; Gandini, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between furan and maleimide moieties is a well-known and widely used strategy to build bio-based macromolecular structures with peculiar properties. The furan-maleimide adducts are thermally reversible because they can be broken above about 120°C and recombined at lower temperatures. At the moment only the monomers exhibiting the furan or the maleimide moieties on their extremity are used in order to get linear or cross-linked polymeric structures. The innovative idea described here consists in using a monomer bearing two carboxylic acidic groups on its extremities and a furan-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct within its structure. This monomer can give rise to classical polycondensation reactions leading to polymers. These polymers (which are polyesters in the present case) can be broken at high temperatures in correspondence of the furane-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct leading to segments exhibiting furan or maleimide moieties at their extremities, which at lower temperature recombine leading to random or block copolymers.

  17. Effects of fungal inocula and habitat conditions on alder and eucalyptus leaf litter decomposition in streams of northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Javier; Galán, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how fungal decomposer (aquatic hyphomycetes) communities colonizing alder and eucalyptus leaf litter respond to changes in habitat characteristics (transplantation experiment). We examined the breakdown of leaf materials and the associated fungal communities at two contrasting sites, a headwater stream (H) and a midreach (M). Agroforestry increased from headwater to midreach. One month after the start of experiments at both sites, some leaf samples from the midreach site were transplanted to the headwater site (M-H treatment). Although both sites showed similar dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, eucalyptus leaves initially incubated at the midreach site (M, M-H) increased their breakdown rate compared to those incubated along the experiment at the headwater site (H). Alder breakdown rate was not enhanced, suggesting that their consumption was not limited by nutrient availability. Sporulation rates clearly differed between leaf types (alder > eucalyptus) and streams (H > M), but no transplantation effect was detected. When comparing conidial assemblages after transplantation, an inoculum effect (persistence of early colonizing species) was clear in both leaf species. Substrate preference and shifts in the relative importance of some fungal species along the process were also observed. Overall, our results support the determining role of the initial conditioning phase on the whole litter breakdown process, highlighting the importance of intrinsic leaf characteristics and those of the incubation habitat.

  18. A Soil Moisture-Heat Based Early Establishment Model of Riparian White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablkowski, P.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2013-12-01

    Establishment of fluvially dispersed seeds on accreted gravel-sand bars is limited by water availability in streams. Past establishment models have used the stream/water table recession rate, and maximum root growth rate to determine the elevation limit of seedling establishment. This approach neglects the role of the saturated-unsaturated vadose zone in providing water to recently germinated seedlings, the physical processes that determine the soil moisture content, and the effect moisture deficit has on seedling root growth. This study combines a soil moisture-heat budget and a seedling root growth model that responds to soil moisture availability to find the elevation limit of establishment of white alder (Alnus rhombifolia) on vertically accreted bars along the south fork Eel River in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, California. To establish successfully, seedling roots must maintain a connection with sufficient moisture to avoid water stress. This will depend on the elevation of the bar, the stream recession rate, the root growth rate, and the diurnal cycle of soil moisture. A one-dimensional moisture-heat budget of the top 15 centimeters of sediment was validated at two locations characterized by sand and clay-gravel textures respectively, using soil moisture and temperature measurements at 5, 10 and 15 cm, net radiation, air temperature, humidity, wind velocity and precipitation measured during spring-summer stream recession. Two patterns in soil water content were apparent: an average daily moisture decrease at each depth driven by stream/water table recession, and a diurnal pattern of isothermal liquid and vapour flux increasing soil water content in the upper 15 cm between 12:00 pm and 5:00 pm PDT. To determine seedling root growth rates, white alder seedlings were grown in growth chambers under a range of reduced matric potentials using polyethylene glycol. Root length measurements were made at 4 hour intervals and a quadratic equation was fit to the root

  19. Trans-cyclooctene tag with improved properties for tumor pretargeting with the diels-alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Rossin, Raffaella; van Duijnhoven, Sander M J; Läppchen, Tilman; van den Bosch, Sandra M; Robillard, Marc S

    2014-09-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of solid tumors is hampered by low tumor-to-nontumor (T/NT) ratios of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies resulting in low tumor doses in patients. Pretargeting technologies can improve the effectiveness of RIT in cancer therapy by increasing this ratio. We showed that a pretargeting strategy employing in vivo chemistry in combination with clearing agents, proceeds efficiently in tumor-bearing mice resulting in high T/NT ratios. A dosimetry study indicated that the chemical pretargeting technology, which centered on the bioorthogonal Diels-Alder click reaction between a radiolabeled tetrazine probe and a trans-cyclooctene-oxymethylbenzamide-tagged CC49 antibody (CC49-TCO(1)), can match the performance of clinically validated high-affinity biological pretargeting approaches in mice ( Rossin J Nucl Med. 2013 , 54 , 1989 - 1995 ). Nevertheless, the increased protein surface hydrophobicity of CC49-TCO(1) led to a relatively rapid blood clearance and concomitant reduced tumor uptake compared to native CC49 antibody. Here, we present the in vivo evaluation of a TCO-oxymethylacetamide-tagged CC49 antibody (CC49-TCO(2)), which is highly reactive toward tetrazines and less hydrophobic than CC49-TCO(1). CC49-TCO(2) was administered to healthy mice to determine its blood clearance and the in vivo stability of the TCO. Next, pretargeting biodistribution and SPECT studies with CC49-TCO(2), tetrazine-functionalized clearing agent, and radiolabeled tetrazine were carried out in nude mice bearing colon carcinoma xenografts (LS174T). CC49-TCO(2) had an increased circulation half-life, a 1.5-fold higher tumor uptake, and a 2.6-fold improved in vivo TCO stability compared to the more hydrophobic TCO-benzamide-CC49. As a consequence, and despite the 2-fold lower reactivity of CC49-TCO(2) toward tetrazines compared with CC49-TCO(1), administration of radiolabeled tetrazine afforded a significantly increased tumor accumulation and improved T/NT ratios in mice

  20. 76 FR 20004 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... (September 1, 2010, 75 FR 53708) to take (harass by survey) the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax.... The applicant requests an amendment to an existing permit (February 3, 1997, 62 FR 5030) to take..., California. The applicant requests an amendment to an existing permit (March 20, 2007, 72 FR 13121) to...

  1. 75 FR 33633 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ..., 2002, 67 FR 15222) to take (harass by survey) the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii... applicant requests an amendment to an existing permit (April 19, 2006, 71 FR 20121) to take (capture and... (August 9, 2005, 70 FR 46185) to take (survey, capture, handle, and release) the salt marsh harvest...

  2. A Single Molecular Diels-Alder Crosslinker for Achieving Recyclable Cross-Linked Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Wang, Fenfen; Peng, Yongjin; Chen, Tiehong; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Pingchuan

    2015-09-01

    A triol-functional crosslinker combining the thermoreversible properties of Diels-Alder (DA) adducts in one molecule is designed, synthesized, and used as an ideal substitute of a traditional crosslinker to prepare thermal recyclable cross-linked polyurethanes with excellent mechanical properties and recyclability in a very simple and efficient way. The recycle property of these materials achieved by the DA/retro-DA reaction at a suitable temperature is verified by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ variable temperature solid-state NMR experiments during the cyclic heating and cooling processes. The thermal recyclability and remending ability of the bulk polyurethanes is demonstrated by three polymer processing methods, including hot-press molding, injection molding, and solution casting. It is notable that all the recycled cross-linked polymers display nearly invariable elongation/stress at break compared to the as-synthesized samples. Further end-group functionalization of this single molecular DA crosslinker provides the potential in preparing a wide range of recyclable cross-linked polymers.

  3. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediatemore » ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.« less

  4. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediate ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

  5. A Single Molecular Diels-Alder Crosslinker for Achieving Recyclable Cross-Linked Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Wang, Fenfen; Peng, Yongjin; Chen, Tiehong; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Pingchuan

    2015-09-01

    A triol-functional crosslinker combining the thermoreversible properties of Diels-Alder (DA) adducts in one molecule is designed, synthesized, and used as an ideal substitute of a traditional crosslinker to prepare thermal recyclable cross-linked polyurethanes with excellent mechanical properties and recyclability in a very simple and efficient way. The recycle property of these materials achieved by the DA/retro-DA reaction at a suitable temperature is verified by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ variable temperature solid-state NMR experiments during the cyclic heating and cooling processes. The thermal recyclability and remending ability of the bulk polyurethanes is demonstrated by three polymer processing methods, including hot-press molding, injection molding, and solution casting. It is notable that all the recycled cross-linked polymers display nearly invariable elongation/stress at break compared to the as-synthesized samples. Further end-group functionalization of this single molecular DA crosslinker provides the potential in preparing a wide range of recyclable cross-linked polymers. PMID:26248230

  6. Vanadium redox flow battery efficiency and durability studies of sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene)s

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Kim, Soowhan; Stains, Ronald; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    Sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP) was examined for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) use. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied from 1.4, 1.6 and 2.0 meq/g in order to tune the proton conductivity and vanadium permeability. Coulombic efficiencies between 92 to 99% were observed, depending on IEC (lower IEC, higher coulombic efficiencies). In all cases the SDAPP displayed comparable energy efficiencies (88 - 90%) to Nafion 117 (88%) at 50mA/cm2. Membrane durability also was dependent on IEC; SDAPP with the highest IEC lasted slightly over 50 cycles while SDAPP with the lowest IEC lasted over 400 cycles and testing was discontinued only due to time constraints. Accelerated vanadium lifetime studies were initialed with SDAPP, by soaking films in a 0.1 M V5+ and 5.0 M total SO4-2 solution. The rate of degradation was also proportional with IEC; the 2 meq/g sample dissolved within 376 hours, the 1.6 meq/g sample dissolved after 860 hours, while the 1.4 meq/g sample broke apart after 1527 hours.

  7. Phylogeography of the Vermilion Flycatcher species complex: Multiple speciation events, shifts in migratory behavior, and an apparent extinction of a Galápagos-endemic bird species.

    PubMed

    Carmi, Ore; Witt, Christopher C; Jaramillo, Alvaro; Dumbacher, John P

    2016-09-01

    The Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) is a widespread species found in North and South America and the Galápagos. Its 12 recognized subspecies vary in degree of geographic isolation, phenotypic distinctness, and migratory status. Some authors suggest that Galápagos subspecies nanus and dubius constitute one or more separate species. Observational reports of distinct differences in song also suggest separate species status for the austral migrant subspecies rubinus. To evaluate geographical patterns of diversification and taxonomic limits within this species complex, we carried out a molecular phylogenetic analysis encompassing 10 subspecies and three outgroup taxa using mitochondrial (ND2, Cyt b) and nuclear loci (ODC introns 6 through 7, FGB intron 5). We used samples of preserved tissues from museum collections as well as toe pad samples from museum skins. Galápagos and continental clades were recovered as sister groups, with initial divergence at ∼1mya. Within the continental clade, North and South American populations were sister groups. Three geographically distinct clades were recovered within South America. We detected no genetic differences between two broadly intergrading North American subspecies, mexicanus and flammeus, suggesting they should not be recognized as separate taxa. Four western South American subspecies were also indistinguishable on the basis of loci that we sampled, but occur in a region with patchy habitat, and may represent recently isolated populations. The austral migrant subspecies, rubinus, comprised a monophyletic mitochondrial clade and had many unique nuclear DNA alleles. In combination with its distinct song, exclusive song recognition behavior, different phenology, and an isolated breeding range, our data suggests that this taxon represents a separate species from other continental populations. Mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data, morphology, and behavior suggest that Galápagos forms should be elevated to two

  8. Phylogeography of the Vermilion Flycatcher species complex: Multiple speciation events, shifts in migratory behavior, and an apparent extinction of a Galápagos-endemic bird species.

    PubMed

    Carmi, Ore; Witt, Christopher C; Jaramillo, Alvaro; Dumbacher, John P

    2016-09-01

    The Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) is a widespread species found in North and South America and the Galápagos. Its 12 recognized subspecies vary in degree of geographic isolation, phenotypic distinctness, and migratory status. Some authors suggest that Galápagos subspecies nanus and dubius constitute one or more separate species. Observational reports of distinct differences in song also suggest separate species status for the austral migrant subspecies rubinus. To evaluate geographical patterns of diversification and taxonomic limits within this species complex, we carried out a molecular phylogenetic analysis encompassing 10 subspecies and three outgroup taxa using mitochondrial (ND2, Cyt b) and nuclear loci (ODC introns 6 through 7, FGB intron 5). We used samples of preserved tissues from museum collections as well as toe pad samples from museum skins. Galápagos and continental clades were recovered as sister groups, with initial divergence at ∼1mya. Within the continental clade, North and South American populations were sister groups. Three geographically distinct clades were recovered within South America. We detected no genetic differences between two broadly intergrading North American subspecies, mexicanus and flammeus, suggesting they should not be recognized as separate taxa. Four western South American subspecies were also indistinguishable on the basis of loci that we sampled, but occur in a region with patchy habitat, and may represent recently isolated populations. The austral migrant subspecies, rubinus, comprised a monophyletic mitochondrial clade and had many unique nuclear DNA alleles. In combination with its distinct song, exclusive song recognition behavior, different phenology, and an isolated breeding range, our data suggests that this taxon represents a separate species from other continental populations. Mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data, morphology, and behavior suggest that Galápagos forms should be elevated to two

  9. Factors affecting distribution of wood, detritus, and sediment in headwater streams draining managed young-growth red alder - Conifer forests in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomi, T.; Johnson, A.C.; Deal, R.L.; Hennon, P.E.; Orlikowska, E.H.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Factors (riparian stand condition, management regimes, and channel properties) affecting distributions of wood, detritus (leaves and branches), and sediment were examined in headwater streams draining young-growth red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) - conifer riparian forests (40 years old) remained in channels and provided sites for sediment and organic matter storage. Despite various alder-conifer mixtures and past harvesting effects, the abundance of large wood, fine wood, and detritus accumulations significantly decreased with increasing channel bank-full width (0.5-3.5 m) along relatively short channel distances (up to 700 m). Changes in wood, detritus, and sediment accumulations together with changes in riparian stand characteristics create spatial and temporal variability of in-channel conditions in headwater systems. A component of alder within young-growth riparian forests may benefit both wood production and biological recovery in disturbed headwater stream channels. ?? 2006 NRC.

  10. Modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by Diels-Alder and Sandmeyer reactions.

    PubMed

    Gergely, A; Telegdi, J; Mészáros, E; Pászti, Z; Tárkanyi, G; Kármán, F H; Kálmán, E

    2007-08-01

    Random (L) and aligned (A) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified by Diels-Alder (DA) [4+2] cycloaddition, Sandmeyer (SM) reaction and by catalytic oxidation (OX). The properties of modified carbon nanotubes were studied by dispersability tests, elemental analysis, thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy. The cycloaddition reaction could only be successfully performed with the L-MWNTs in molten and in solution state by using an aluminum chloride homogeneous catalyst. The efficiency and thermal stability of the solution phase cycloaddition were much higher than in the case of modification in the molten phase. The functionalization of both types of MWNTs by Sandmeyer reaction was carried out by copper(I) and iron(ll) ions that helped in the radical decomposition of diazonium salts. Successful functionalization of nanotubes is achieved by a long decomposition time of the thermally activated diazonium salts. To the contrary, in the case of radical decomposition of diazonium salts, the time is not a decisive parameter. The dispersability tests have proved the changes in the physical features of modified carbon nanotubes depending on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic character of the solvents. The presence of the modifying groups and their fragments from the functionalized MWNTs has been demonstrated by thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry (TG/MS). Relatively high concentration of sulfur atoms was detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in nanotubes modified by sulfur substituent groups. In the case of catalytic oxidation, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic signal of oxygen bound to nanotubes showed considerable change as compared to pristine nanotubes. Due to the high thermal stability of modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes, the functionalized derivatives are applicable in several industrial fields. PMID:17685300

  11. π-conjugated polymer-fullerene covalent hybrids via ambient conditions Diels-Alder ligation.

    PubMed

    Yameen, Basit; Puerckhauer, Tanja; Ludwig, Jens; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Altintas, Ozcan; Fruk, Ljiljana; Colsmann, Alexander; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-08-13

    The established ability of graphitic carbon-nanomaterials to undergo ambient condition Diels-Alder reactions with cyclopentadienyl (Cp) groups is herein employed to prepare fullerene-polythiophene covalent hybrids with improved electron transfer and film forming characteristics. A novel precisely designed polythiophene (M n 9.8 kD, Đ 1.4) with 17 mol% of Cp-groups bearing repeat unit is prepared via Grignard metathesis polymerization. The UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence (λex 450 nm) characteristics of polythiophene with pendant Cp-groups (λmax 447 nm, λe-max 576 nm) are comparable to the reference poly(3-hexylthiophene) (λmax 450 nm, λe-max 576 nm). The novel polythiophene with pendant Cp-groups is capable of producing solvent-stable free-standing polythiophene films, and non-solvent assisted self-assemblies resulting in solvent-stable nanoporous-microstructures. (1) H-NMR spectroscopy reveals an efficient reaction of the pendant Cp-groups with C60 . The UV/Vis spectroscopic analyses of solution and thin films of the covalent and physical hybrids disclose closer donor-acceptor packing in the case of covalent hybrids. AFM images evidence that the covalent hybrids form smooth films with finer lamellar-organization. The effect is particularly remarkable in the case of poorly soluble C60 . A significant enhancement in photo-voltage is observed for all devices constituted of covalent hybrids, highlighting novel avenues to developing efficient electron donor-acceptor combinations for light harvesting systems. PMID:24711288

  12. Harnessing the Bioorthogonal Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder Cycloaddition for Pretargeted PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their exquisite affinity and specificity, antibodies have become extremely promising vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes to cancer cells for PET imaging. However, the necessity of labeling antibodies with radionuclides with long physical half-lives often results in high background radiation dose rates to non-target tissues. In order to circumvent this issue, we have employed a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The methodology decouples the antibody from the radioactivity and thus exploits the positive characteristics of antibodies, while eschewing their pharmacokinetic drawbacks. The system is composed of four steps: (1) the injection of a mAb-trans-cyclooctene (TCO) conjugate; (2) a localization time period during which the antibody accumulates in the tumor and clears from the blood; (3) the injection of the radiolabeled tetrazine; and (4) the in vivo click ligation of the components followed by the clearance of excess radioligand. In the example presented in the work at hand, a 64Cu-NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand and a trans-cyclooctene-conjugated humanized antibody (huA33) were successfully used to delineate SW1222 colorectal cancer tumors with high tumor-to-background contrast. Further, the pretargeting methodology produces high quality images at only a fraction of the radiation dose to non-target tissue created by radioimmunoconjugates directly labeled with 64Cu or 89Zr. Ultimately, the modularity of this protocol is one of its greatest assets, as the trans-cyclooctene moiety can be appended to any non-internalizing antibody, and the tetrazine can be attached to a wide variety of radioisotopes. PMID:25742199

  13. Harnessing the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition for pretargeted PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2015-02-03

    Due to their exquisite affinity and specificity, antibodies have become extremely promising vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes to cancer cells for PET imaging. However, the necessity of labeling antibodies with radionuclides with long physical half-lives often results in high background radiation dose rates to non-target tissues. In order to circumvent this issue, we have employed a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The methodology decouples the antibody from the radioactivity and thus exploits the positive characteristics of antibodies, while eschewing their pharmacokinetic drawbacks. The system is composed of four steps: (1) the injection of a mAb-trans-cyclooctene (TCO) conjugate; (2) a localization time period during which the antibody accumulates in the tumor and clears from the blood; (3) the injection of the radiolabeled tetrazine; and (4) the in vivo click ligation of the components followed by the clearance of excess radioligand. In the example presented in the work at hand, a (64)Cu-NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand and a trans-cyclooctene-conjugated humanized antibody (huA33) were successfully used to delineate SW1222 colorectal cancer tumors with high tumor-to-background contrast. Further, the pretargeting methodology produces high quality images at only a fraction of the radiation dose to non-target tissue created by radioimmunoconjugates directly labeled with (64)Cu or (89)Zr. Ultimately, the modularity of this protocol is one of its greatest assets, as the trans-cyclooctene moiety can be appended to any non-internalizing antibody, and the tetrazine can be attached to a wide variety of radioisotopes.

  14. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  15. Origins of stereoselectivity in the Diels-Alder addition of chiral hydroxyalkyl vinyl ketones to cyclopentadiene: a quantitative computational study.

    PubMed

    Bakalova, Snezhana M; Kaneti, Jose

    2008-12-18

    Modest basis set level MP2/6-31G(d,p) calculations on the Diels-Alder addition of S-1-alkyl-1-hydroxy-but-3-en-2-ones (1-hydroxy-1-alkyl methyl vinyl ketones) to cyclopentadiene correctly reproduce the trends in known experimental endo/exo and diastereoface selectivity. B3LYP theoretical results at the same or significantly higher basis set level, on the other hand, do not satisfactorily model observed endo/exo selectivities and are thus unsuitable for quantitative studies. The same is valid also with regard to subtle effects originating from, for example, conformational distributions of reactants. The latter shortcomings are not alleviated by the fact that observed diastereoface selectivities are well-reproduced by DFT calculations. Quantitative computational studies of large cycloaddition systems would require higher basis sets and better account for electron correlation than MP2, such as, for example, CCSD. Presently, however, with 30 or more non-hydrogen atoms, these computations are hardly feasible. We present quantitatively correct stereochemical predictions using a hybrid layered ONIOM computational approach, including the chiral carbon atom and the intramolecular hydrogen bond into a higher level, MP2/6-311G(d,p) or CCSD/6-311G(d,p), layer. Significant computational economy is achieved by taking account of surrounding bulky (alkyl) residues at 6-31G(d) in a low HF theoretical level layer. We conclude that theoretical calculations based on explicit correlated MO treatment of the reaction site are sufficiently reliable for the prediction of both endo/exo and diastereoface selectivity of Diels-Alder addition reactions. This is in line with the understanding of endo/exo selectivity originating from dynamic electron correlation effects of interacting pi fragments and diastereofacial selectivity originating from steric interactions of fragments outside of the Diels-Alder reaction site. PMID:18637663

  16. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Joshua J.; Davis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  17. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Katrina L.; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  18. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  19. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    PubMed

    Callender, Katrina L; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  20. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    PubMed

    Callender, Katrina L; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  1. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed.

  2. Can We Use Tree Rings of Black Alder to Reconstruct Lake Levels? A Case Study for the Mecklenburg Lake District, Northeastern Germany

    PubMed Central

    van der Maaten, Ernst; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Buras, Allan; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Kaiser, Knut; Lorenz, Sebastian; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential to reconstruct lake-level (and groundwater) fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.) for three study lakes in the Mecklenburg Lake District, northeastern Germany. As gauging records for lakes in this region are generally short, long-term reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations could provide valuable information on past hydrological conditions, which, in turn, are useful to assess dynamics of climate and landscape evolution. We selected black alder as our study species as alder typically thrives as riparian vegetation along lakeshores. For the study lakes, we tested whether a regional signal in lake-level fluctuations and in the growth of alder exists that could be used for long-term regional hydrological reconstructions, but found that local (i.e. site-specific) signals in lake level and tree-ring chronologies prevailed. Hence, we built lake/groundwater-level reconstruction models for the three study lakes individually. Two sets of models were considered based on (1) local tree-ring series of black alder, and (2) site-specific Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Indices (SPEI). Although the SPEI-based models performed statistically well, we critically reflect on the reliability of these reconstructions, as SPEI cannot account for human influence. Tree-ring based reconstruction models, on the other hand, performed poor. Combined, our results suggest that, for our study area, long-term regional reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations that consider both recent and ancient (e.g., archaeological) wood of black alder seem extremely challenging, if not impossible. PMID:26317768

  3. Nitroso Diels-Alder (NDA) Reaction as an Efficient Tool for the Functionalization of Diene-Containing Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Carosso, Serena; Miller, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the use of nitroso Diels-Alder reactions for the functionalization of complex diene-containing natural products in order to generate libraries of compounds with potential biological activity. The application of this methodology to the structural modification of a series of natural products (thebaine, steroidal dienes, rapamycin, leucomycin, colchicine, isocolchicine and piperine) is discussed using relevant examples from the literature from 1973 onwards. The biological activity of the resulting compounds is also discussed. Additional comments are provided that evaluate the methodology as a useful tool in organic, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry. PMID:25119424

  4. Tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR). An easy entry to linear bicyclic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Javier; Sánchez-Roselló, María; Sanz, Álvaro; Rabasa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Summary A new tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR) has been carried out. It involves conjugated ketones, esters or amides bearing a remote olefin and aromatic alkynes as the starting materials. The overall process enables the preparation of a small family of linear bicyclic scaffolds in a very simple manner with moderate to good levels of diastereoselectivity. This methodology constitutes one of the few examples that employ olefins differently than ethylene in tandem CEYM–IMDAR protocols. PMID:26425205

  5. Tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)-intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction (IMDAR). An easy entry to linear bicyclic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Miró, Javier; Sánchez-Roselló, María; Sanz, Álvaro; Rabasa, Fernando; Del Pozo, Carlos; Fustero, Santos

    2015-01-01

    A new tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)-intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction (IMDAR) has been carried out. It involves conjugated ketones, esters or amides bearing a remote olefin and aromatic alkynes as the starting materials. The overall process enables the preparation of a small family of linear bicyclic scaffolds in a very simple manner with moderate to good levels of diastereoselectivity. This methodology constitutes one of the few examples that employ olefins differently than ethylene in tandem CEYM-IMDAR protocols. PMID:26425205

  6. Design and synthesis of polycyclic sulfones via Diels–Alder reaction and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps

    PubMed Central

    Gunta, Rama

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, we describe a new and simple synthetic strategy to various polycyclic sulfones via Diels–Alder reaction and ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM) as the key steps. This approach delivers tri- and tetracyclic sulfones with six (n = 1), seven (n = 2) or eight-membered (n = 3) fused-ring systems containing trans-ring junctions unlike the conventional all cis-ring junctions generally obtained during the RRM sequence. Interestingly the starting materials used are simple and commercially available. PMID:26425192

  7. Theoretical Study on Regioselectivity of the Diels-Alder Reaction between 1,8-Dichloroanthracene and Acrolein.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Mujeeb A; Karama, Usama; Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Soliman, Saied M

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical study of the regioselectivity of the Diels-Alder reaction between 1,8-dichloroanthracene and acrolein is performed using DFT at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The FMO analysis, global and local reactivity indices confirmed the reported experimental results. Potential energy surface analysis showed that the cycloadditions (CAs) favor the formation of the anti product. These results are in good agreement with the reported results obtained experimentally where the anti is the major product. PMID:27669204

  8. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Phuong T. M.; McAtee, Jesse R.; Watson, Donald A.; Lobo, Raul F.

    2012-12-12

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structures of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst have been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed, demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels–Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions.

  9. Laying date and polygyny as determinants of annual reproductive success in male collared flycatchers ( Ficedula albicollis): a long-term study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herényi, Márton; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Hargitai, Rita; Hegyi, Gergely; Rosivall, Balázs; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, János

    2014-04-01

    Annual reproductive success (ARS) is one of the main components of lifetime reproductive success, a reliable measure of individual fitness. Previous studies often dealt with ARS and variables potentially affecting it. Among them, long-term studies that consider multiple factors at the same time are particularly important in understanding the adaptive value of different phenotypes. Here, we used an 18-year dataset to quantify the ARS of male collared flycatchers ( Ficedula albicollis) on the basis of recruited offspring. We simultaneously assessed the effect of start of breeding, age, polygyny, body size and the expression of forehead patch (a sexually selected trait). The success of early breeding individuals was appreciably higher than late birds; however, breeding too early was also disadvantaged, and males that bred around the yearly median breeding date had the highest ARS. Polygynous males were more successful in years with good food supply, while in years with low food availability, they did not produce more recruits than monogamous males. The age of males, their forehead patch size and body size did not affect the number of recruits. Our findings support the importance of breeding date and suggest stabilizing selection on it in the long term. We also show that polygyny is not always advantageous for males, and its fitness pay-off may depend on environmental quality.

  10. Laying date and polygyny as determinants of annual reproductive success in male collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis): a long-term study.

    PubMed

    Herényi, Márton; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Hargitai, Rita; Hegyi, Gergely; Rosivall, Balázs; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, János

    2014-04-01

    Annual reproductive success (ARS) is one of the main components of lifetime reproductive success, a reliable measure of individual fitness. Previous studies often dealt with ARS and variables potentially affecting it. Among them, long-term studies that consider multiple factors at the same time are particularly important in understanding the adaptive value of different phenotypes. Here, we used an 18-year dataset to quantify the ARS of male collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) on the basis of recruited offspring. We simultaneously assessed the effect of start of breeding, age, polygyny, body size and the expression of forehead patch (a sexually selected trait). The success of early breeding individuals was appreciably higher than late birds; however, breeding too early was also disadvantaged, and males that bred around the yearly median breeding date had the highest ARS. Polygynous males were more successful in years with good food supply, while in years with low food availability, they did not produce more recruits than monogamous males. The age of males, their forehead patch size and body size did not affect the number of recruits. Our findings support the importance of breeding date and suggest stabilizing selection on it in the long term. We also show that polygyny is not always advantageous for males, and its fitness pay-off may depend on environmental quality.

  11. Dichlorination of (hexadehydro-Diels-Alder generated) benzynes and a protocol for interrogating the kinetic order of bimolecular aryne trapping reactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Wang, Tao; Woods, Brian P; Hoye, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    The efficient dichlorination of benzynes prepared by the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction is reported. Cycloisomerization of a triyne substrate in the presence of dilithium tetrachlorocuprate is shown to provide dichlorinated products A by capture of the benzyne intermediate. A general strategy for discerning the kinetic order of an external aryne trapping agent is presented. It merely requires measurement of the competition between bimolecular vs unimolecular trapping events (here, dichlorination vs intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reaction to give A vs B, respectively) as a function of the concentration of the trapping agent.

  12. Copper(II)-catalyzed room temperature aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides to acyl-nitroso and azo intermediates, and their Diels-Alder trapping.

    PubMed

    Chaiyaveij, Duangduan; Cleary, Leah; Batsanov, Andrei S; Marder, Todd B; Shea, Kenneth J; Whiting, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    CuCl(2), in the presence of a 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline ligand, is an effective catalyst for the room temperature, aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides, to acyl-nitroso and azo dienophiles respectively, which are efficiently trapped in situ via both inter- and intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reactions with dienes. Both inter- and intramolecular variants of the Diels-Alder reaction are suitable under the reaction conditions using a variety of solvents. Under the same conditions, an acyl hydrazide was also oxidized to give an acyl-azo dienophile which was trapped intramolecularly by a diene. PMID:21644530

  13. Synthesis of 3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones via microwave-activated inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Salah; Hajbi, Youssef; Khouili, Mostafa; Lazar, Said

    2014-01-01

    Summary Substituted 3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones have been synthesized with the inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction from 1,2,4-triazines bearing an acylamino group with a terminal alkyne side chain. Alkynes were first subjected to the Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction with aryl halides, the product of which then underwent an intramolecular inverse electron-demand Diels–Alder reaction to yield 5-aryl-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones by an efficient synthetic route. PMID:24605148

  14. Extraordinary Mechanism of the Diels-Alder Reaction: Investigation of Stereochemistry, Charge Transfer, Charge Polarization, and Biradicaloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Thomas; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2016-02-25

    The Diels-Alder reaction between 1,3-butadiene and ethene is investigated from far-out in the entrance channel to the very last step in the exit channel thus passing two bifurcation points and extending the range of the reaction valley studied with URVA (Unified Reaction Valley Approach) by 300% compared to previous studies. For the first time, the pre- and postchemical steps of the reaction are analyzed at the same level of theory as the actual chemical processes utilizing the path curvature and its decomposition into internal coordinate or curvilinear coordinate components. A first smaller charge transfer to the dienophile facilitates the rotation of gauche butadiene into its cis form. The actual chemical processes are initiated by a second larger charge transfer to the dienophile that facilitates pyramidalization of the reacting carbon centers, bond equalization, and biradicaloid formation of the reactants. The transition state is aromatically stabilized and moved by five path units into the entrance channel in line with the Hammond-Leffler postulate. The pseudorotation of the boat form into the halfchair of cyclohexene is analyzed. Predictions are made for the Diels-Alder reaction based on a 11-phase mechanism obtained by the URVA analysis. PMID:26785172

  15. Low dielectric, nanoporous fluorinated polyimide films prepared from PCL-PI-PCL triblock copolymer using retro-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Ju, Junping; Wang, Qihua; Wang, Tingmei; Wang, Chao

    2013-08-15

    The triblock copolymers with the majority phase comprising fluorinated polyimide and the minor phase consisting of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) were synthesized through Diels-Alder reaction between PI-Maleimide and PCL-Furfuryl Amine. The chemical composition and structure of the copolymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Films of the copolymers were spined and microphase-separation of the thin film was achieved by solvent annealing in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) vapor. The microphase-separation morphology was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Based on the microphase-separation structures, nanoporous fluorinated polyimide films were obtained after removal of the PCL block can removed via a retro-DA (Diels-Alder) reaction using a simple heating and immersing procedure. The nanoporous thin film was characterized by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dielectric property of the nanoporous fluorinated polyimide films was investigated. It was found that the nanopores introduction could effectively reduce the dielectric constant from 2.82 of PI dense films to 2.10 of nanoporous PI films.

  16. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Zhang, Ziwei; Mao, Jiahui; Tan, Huaping; Hu, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37°C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry.

  17. An interpenetrating HA/G/CS biomimic hydrogel via Diels-Alder click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Zeng, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2013-08-14

    In order to mimic the natural cartilage extracellular matrix, a novel biological degradable interpenetrating network hydrogel was synthesized from the gelatin (G), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) by Diels-Alder "click" chemistry. HA was modified with furylamine and G was modified with furancarboxylic acid respectively. (1)H NMR spectra and elemental analysis showed that the substitution degrees of HA-furan and G-furan were 71.5% and 44.5%. Then the hydrogels were finally synthesized by cross-linking furan-modified HA and G derivatives with dimaleimide poly(ethylene glycol) (MAL-PEG-MAL). The mechanical and degradation properties of the hydrogels could be tuned simply through varying the molar ratio between furan and maleimide. Rheological, mechanical and degradation studies demonstrated that the Diels-Alder "click" chemistry is an efficient method for preparing high performance biological interpenetrating hydrogels. This biomimic hydrogel with improved mechanical properties could have great potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:23769536

  18. Studies on the biosynthesis of paraherquamide A and VM99955. A theoretical study of intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Zaragozá, Ramón J; Williams, Robert M

    2003-04-01

    Intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions of 2-azadiene models have been studied quantum chemically at the B3LYP/6-31G level in order to elucidate the stereochemical features of the cyclization step involved in the biosynthesis of paraherquamide A and VM99955. These cycloadditions take place through concerted transition states associated with [4 + 2] processes. Analysis of the energies along the competitive paths reveals that while the cycloadditions of the oxindoles present a large anti selectivity, the indoles show a low syn selectivity for the formation of the C20 stereogenic center that is larger for the reduced tertiary amide form. The presence of the C14 methyl of the beta-methylproline ring produces a low hindrance along the reaction coordinate for the syn approach of the isoprene framework, in agreement with the low facial selectivity found experimentally. An analysis of the electrophilicity and activation parameters for experimental models of the inter- and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions reveals several significant factors controlling these biosynthetic cyclizations. The results are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  19. Employing Arynes in Diels-Alder Reactions and Transition-Metal-Free Multicomponent Coupling and Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhojgude, Sachin Suresh; Bhunia, Anup; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-09-20

    Arynes are highly reactive intermediates having several applications in organic synthesis for the construction of various ortho-disubstituted arenes. Traditionally, arynes are generated in solution from haloarenes under strongly basic conditions. However, the scopes of many of the aryne reactions are limited because of the harsh conditions used for their generation. The renaissance of interest in aryne chemistry is mainly due to the mild conditions for their generation by the fluoride-induced 1,2-elimination of 2-(trimethylsilyl)aryl triflates. This Account is focused on the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes and their transition-metal-free application in multicomponent couplings as well as arylation reactions. The Diels-Alder reaction of arynes is a powerful tool for constructing benzo-fused carbocycles and heterocycles. In 2012, we developed an efficient, broad-scope, and scalable Diels-Alder reaction of pentafulvenes with arynes affording benzonorbornadiene derivatives. Subsequently, we accomplished the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes with dienes such as 1,2-benzoquinones and tropones. Moreover, we uncovered a transition-metal-free protocol for the synthesis of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes by the reaction of arynes with styrenes that proceeds via a Diels-Alder/ene-reaction cascade. In addition, we demonstrated the reaction of arynes with indene/benzofurans, which proceeds via a tandem [4 + 2]/[2 + 2] sequence. Multicomponent coupling (MCC) involving arynes mainly comprises the initial addition of a nucleophile to the aryne followed by interception of the aryl anion intermediate with an electrophile (provided the nucleophilic and electrophilic moieties do not belong to the same molecule). We have disclosed aryne MCCs initiated by N-heterocycles such as (iso)quinoline, pyridine, and aziridines. When (iso)quinoline is used as the nucleophilic trigger and N-substituted isatin as the third component, the reaction affords spirooxazino(iso)quinolines via 1,4-dipolar

  20. Employing Arynes in Diels-Alder Reactions and Transition-Metal-Free Multicomponent Coupling and Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhojgude, Sachin Suresh; Bhunia, Anup; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-09-20

    Arynes are highly reactive intermediates having several applications in organic synthesis for the construction of various ortho-disubstituted arenes. Traditionally, arynes are generated in solution from haloarenes under strongly basic conditions. However, the scopes of many of the aryne reactions are limited because of the harsh conditions used for their generation. The renaissance of interest in aryne chemistry is mainly due to the mild conditions for their generation by the fluoride-induced 1,2-elimination of 2-(trimethylsilyl)aryl triflates. This Account is focused on the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes and their transition-metal-free application in multicomponent couplings as well as arylation reactions. The Diels-Alder reaction of arynes is a powerful tool for constructing benzo-fused carbocycles and heterocycles. In 2012, we developed an efficient, broad-scope, and scalable Diels-Alder reaction of pentafulvenes with arynes affording benzonorbornadiene derivatives. Subsequently, we accomplished the Diels-Alder reaction of arynes with dienes such as 1,2-benzoquinones and tropones. Moreover, we uncovered a transition-metal-free protocol for the synthesis of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes by the reaction of arynes with styrenes that proceeds via a Diels-Alder/ene-reaction cascade. In addition, we demonstrated the reaction of arynes with indene/benzofurans, which proceeds via a tandem [4 + 2]/[2 + 2] sequence. Multicomponent coupling (MCC) involving arynes mainly comprises the initial addition of a nucleophile to the aryne followed by interception of the aryl anion intermediate with an electrophile (provided the nucleophilic and electrophilic moieties do not belong to the same molecule). We have disclosed aryne MCCs initiated by N-heterocycles such as (iso)quinoline, pyridine, and aziridines. When (iso)quinoline is used as the nucleophilic trigger and N-substituted isatin as the third component, the reaction affords spirooxazino(iso)quinolines via 1,4-dipolar

  1. Accurate Diels-Alder reaction energies from efficient density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Pál D; Csonka, Gábor I; Kállay, Mihály

    2015-06-01

    We assess the performance of the semilocal PBE functional; its global hybrid variants; the highly parametrized empirical M06-2X and M08-SO; the range separated rCAM-B3LYP and MCY3; the atom-pairwise or nonlocal dispersion corrected semilocal PBE and TPSS; the dispersion corrected range-separated ωB97X-D; the dispersion corrected double hybrids such as PWPB95-D3; the direct random phase approximation, dRPA, with Hartree-Fock, Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof, and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof hybrid reference orbitals and the RPAX2 method based on a Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange reference orbitals for the Diels-Alder, DARC; and self-interaction error sensitive, SIE11, reaction energy test sets with large, augmented correlation consistent valence basis sets. The dRPA energies for the DARC test set are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. CCSD(T)/CBS energies were used as a reference. The standard global hybrid functionals show general improvements over the typical endothermic energy error of semilocal functionals, but despite the increased accuracy the precision of the methods increases only slightly, and thus all reaction energies are simply shifted into the exothermic direction. Dispersion corrections give mixed results for the DARC test set. Vydrov-Van Voorhis 10 correction to the reaction energies gives superior quality results compared to the too-small D3 correction. Functionals parametrized for energies of noncovalent interactions like M08-SO give reasonable results without any dispersion correction. The dRPA method that seamlessly and theoretically correctly includes noncovalent interaction energies gives excellent results with properly chosen reference orbitals. As the results for the SIE11 test set and H2(+) dissociation show that the dRPA methods suffer from delocalization error, good reaction energies for the DARC test set from a given method do not prove that the method is free from delocalization error. The RPAX2 method shows good performance for the DARC

  2. Diels-Alder hydrogels with enhanced stability: First step toward controlled release of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Susanne; Gregoritza, Manuel; Messmann, Viktoria; Hammer, Nadine; Goepferich, Achim M; Brandl, Ferdinand P

    2015-10-01

    Eight-armed PEG was functionalized with furyl and maleimide groups (8armPEG20k-Fur and 8armPEG20k-Mal); degradable hydrogels were obtained by cross-linking via Diels-Alder chemistry. To increase the stability to degradation, the macromonomers were modified by introducing a hydrophobic 6-aminohexanoic acid spacer between PEG and the reactive end-groups (8armPEG20k-Ahx-Fur and 8armPEG20k-Ahx-Mal). In an alternative approach, the number of reactive groups per macromonomer was increased by branching the terminal ends of eight-armed PEG with lysine (Lys) and Ahx residues (8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx-Fur2 and 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx-Mal2). The hydrolytic resistance of the synthesized macromonomers was determined by UV spectroscopy; the obtained hydrogels were characterized by rheology and degradation studies. The degradation time of 5% (w/v) 8armPEG20k-Ahx hydrogels (28days) was twice as long as the degradation time of 5% (w/v) 8armPEG20k hydrogels (14days); this is explained by increased hydrolytic resistance of the maleimide group. Using dendritic 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx macromonomers substantially increased the stability of the resulting hydrogels; degradation of 5% (w/v) 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx hydrogels occurred after 34 weeks. 8armPEG20k hydrogels had the largest mesh size of all tested hydrogels, while hydrogels made from dendritic 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx macromonomers showed the smallest value. To evaluate their potential for the controlled release of therapeutic antibodies, the hydrogels were loaded with bevacizumab. The incorporated bevacizumab was released over 10 days (8armPEG20k) and 42days (8armPEG20k-Ahx), respectively; release from 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx hydrogels was not completed after 105 days. In summary, we believe that 8armPEG20k-Ahx or 8armPEG20k-Lys-Ahx hydrogels could serve as controlled release system for therapeutic antibodies such as bevacizumab.

  3. Diels-Alder Synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Wustholz, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    A study investigated the Diels-Alder synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo [2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide. The amount of time taken by a reaction between the 1,3-cyclohexadiene and N-phenylmaleimide at room temperature and also whether the desired cycloadduct would precipitate directly from the reaction mixture was examined.

  4. Synthesis of the Reported Pyranonaphthoquinone Structure of the Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase Inhibitor Annulin B by Regioselective Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Inman, Martyn; Carvalho, Catarina; Lewis, William; Moody, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Annulin B, isolated from the marine hydroid isolated from Garveia annulata, is a potent inhibitor of the tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). A synthesis of the reported pyranonaphthoquinone structure is described, in which the key step is a regioselective Diels-Alder reaction between a pyranobenzoquinone dienophile and a silyl ketene acetal diene. PMID:27513176

  5. Kinetic study of the Diels-Alder reaction of Li⁺@C₆₀ with cyclohexadiene: greatly increased reaction rate by encapsulated Li⁺.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Koji; Okada, Hiroshi; Ikuma, Naohiko; Aoyagi, Shinobu; Kokubo, Ken; Matsuo, Yutaka; Oshima, Takumi

    2014-08-01

    We studied the kinetics of the Diels-Alder reaction of Li(+)-encapsulated [60]fullerene with 1,3-cyclohexadiene and characterized the obtained product, [Li(+)@C60(C6H8)](PF6(-)). Compared with empty C60, Li(+)@C60 reacted 2400-fold faster at 303 K, a rate enhancement that corresponds to lowering the activation energy by 24.2 kJ mol(-1). The enhanced Diels-Alder reaction rate was well explained by DFT calculation at the M06-2X/6-31G(d) level of theory considering the reactant complex with dispersion corrections. The calculated activation energies for empty C60 and Li(+)@C60 (65.2 and 43.6 kJ mol(-1), respectively) agreed fairly well with the experimentally obtained values (67.4 and 44.0 kJ mol(-1), respectively). According to the calculation, the lowering of the transition state energy by Li(+) encapsulation was associated with stabilization of the reactant complex (by 14.1 kJ mol(-1)) and the [4 + 2] product (by 5.9 kJ mol(-1)) through favorable frontier molecular orbital interactions. The encapsulated Li(+) ion catalyzed the Diels-Alder reaction by lowering the LUMO of Li(+)@C60. This is the first detailed report on the kinetics of a Diels-Alder reaction catalyzed by an encapsulated Lewis acid catalyst rather than one coordinated to a heteroatom in the dienophile.

  6. Synthesis of polysubstituted β-amino cyclohexane carboxylic acids via Diels-Alder reaction using Ni(II)-complex stabilized β-alanine derived dienes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Hengshuai; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Sinan; Lin, Daizong; Lv, Li; Zhou, Yu; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Aceña, José Luis; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design and synthesis of a new class of β-alanine derived dienes stabilized by Ni(II)-complex. Preliminary study of their Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions with several types of dienophiles demonstrates their significant synthetic potential for the preparation of various polyfunctional β-aminocyclohexane carboxylic acids.

  7. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  8. Fast Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions Using 4-Phenyl-1,2,4-Triazoline-3,5-Dione (PTAD) as the Dienophile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celius, Tevye C.

    2010-01-01

    A hetero-Diels-Alder reaction that proceeds rapidly and only requires a simple filtration to purify the product is presented. The dienophile, 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD), is prepared by the heterogeneous oxidation of 4-phenylurazole by the bromenium ion, Br[superscript +], generated in situ by the oxidation of potassium bromide by…

  9. Illustrating the Utility of X-Ray Crystallography for Structure Elucidation through a Tandem Aldol Condensation/Diels-Alder Reaction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang T.; Kubo, Tomohiro; Young, Victor G., Jr.; Kautzky, Jacob A.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Two introductory organic chemistry laboratory experiments are described based on the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenylcyclopentadienone, which is synthesized prior to or in a one-pot reaction, with styrene. Students are presented with three possible products, the "endo" and "exo" diastereomers and the decarbonylated…

  10. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  11. The Synthesis of "N"-Benzyl-2-Azanorbornene via Aqueous Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction: An Undergraduate Project in Organic Synthesis and Structural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvage, Xavier; Delaude, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of "N"-benzyl-2-azanorbornene via aqueous hetero Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and benzyliminium chloride formed in situ from benzylamine hydrochloride and formaldehyde is described. Characterization of the product was achieved by IR and NMR spectroscopies. The spectral data acquired are thoroughly discussed. Numerous…

  12. Diels-Alder Cycloadditions: A MORE Experiment in the Organic Laboratory Including a Diene Identification Exercise Involving NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Roosevelt; Severin, Ashika; Balfour, Miguel; Nettles, Columbus

    2005-01-01

    Two Diels-Alder reactions are described that are suitable for a MORE (microwave-induced organic reaction enhanced) experiment in the organic chemistry laboratory course. A second experiment in which the splitting patterns of the vinyl protons in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two MORE adducts are used in conjunction with molecular…

  13. Towards the simplification of MHC typing protocols: targeting classical MHC class II genes in a passerine, the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) has drawn the attention of evolutionary biologists due to its importance in crucial biological processes, such as sexual selection and immune response in jawed vertebrates. However, the characterization of classical MHC genes subjected to the effects of natural selection still remains elusive in many vertebrate groups. Here, we have tested the suitability of flanking intron sequences to guide the selective exploration of classical MHC genes driving the co-evolutionary dynamics between pathogens and their passerine (Aves, Order Passeriformes) hosts. Findings Intronic sequences flanking the usually polymorphic exon 2 were isolated from different species using primers sitting on conserved coding regions of MHC class II genes (β chain). Taking the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca as an example, we demonstrate that careful primer design can evade non-classical MHC gene and pseudogene amplification. At least four polymorphic and expressed loci were co-replicated using a single pair of primers in five non-related individuals (N = 28 alleles). The cross-amplification and preliminary inspection of similar MHC fragments in eight unrelated songbird taxa suggests that similar approaches can also be applied to other species. Conclusions Intron sequences flanking the usually polymorphic exon 2 may assist the specific investigation of classical MHC class II B genes in species characterized by extensive gene duplication and pseudogenization. Importantly, the evasion of non-classical MHC genes with a more specific function and non-functional pseudogenes may accelerate data collection and diminish lab costs. Comprehensive knowledge of gene structure, polymorphism and expression profiles may be useful not only for the selective examination of evolutionarily relevant genes but also to restrict chimera formation by minimizing the number of co-amplifying loci. PMID:20815923

  14. Retrospective multicenter evaluation of the "fly-catching syndrome" in 24 dogs: EEG, BAER, MRI, CSF findings and response to antiepileptic and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, Marcin; Płonek, Marta; Nicpoń, Józef; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Pakozdy, Akos

    2015-12-01

    The fly-catching syndrome (FCS) is a rare canine condition of sudden, occasional, or constant episodes of biting the air. It may be accompanied by jumping, licking, and swallowing. The etiology of FCS is unknown and controversial. Various explanations for its occurrence have included epileptoid disorders such as visual cortex epileptiform disturbances and simple and complex partial seizures as well as compulsive disorders, hallucinatory behavior, and stereotypy. A retrospective multicenter analysis of 24 dogs with clinical symptoms of FCS is presented. Clinical signs at the time of presentation, the mean age at onset of the disease, the response to treatment, and the clinical outcome were recorded and analyzed in all patients. All dogs underwent clinical, neurological, and otoscopic examinations. Complete blood cell counts (CBCs) and serum chemistry panels were obtained from each dog. Diagnostic testing included MRI and EEG examinations in 21 cases, BAER in 19 cases, and CSF analysis in 20 cases. The EEG revealed spike activity in 8 (38%) of the 21 cases, 7 of which had activity in the occipital lobes. The brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) revealed three cases of bilateral deafness. The MRI revealed six cases of Chiari malformation (CM), one case of syringohydromyelia (SM), and one case of a falx cerebri meningioma. The dogs were divided into groups according to their treatment protocol. Group A included dogs treated with phenobarbital (PB), and group B consisted of dogs treated with fluoxetine (FLX). Thirty-six percent of the dogs in group A responded to PB, while 100% of the dogs in group B responded to FLX. The results suggest that FCS is more responsive to FLX than PB. However, the etiology of this behavior remains unclear in most cases.

  15. Factors Controlling the Reactivity and Selectivity of the Diels-Alder Reactions Involving 1,2-Azaborines.

    PubMed

    García-Rodeja, Yago; Fernández, Israel

    2016-08-01

    The factors controlling the reactivity and endo/exo selectivity of the Diels-Alder reactions involving 1,2-azaborines have been computationally explored within the density functional theory framework. It is found that the AlCl3-catalyzed [4 + 2]-cycloaddition reaction between these dienes and N-methylmaleimide proceeds concertedly and leads almost exclusively to the corresponding endo cycloadduct, which is in good agreement with previous experimental observations. In addition, the effect of the substituent directly attached to the boron atom of the 1,2-azaborine on the process is also analyzed in detail. To this end, the combination of the activation strain model of reactivity and the energy decomposition analysis methods has been applied to gain a quantitative understanding into the origins of the endo selectivity of the process as well as the influence of the boron and nitrogen substituent on the barrier heights of the transformations. PMID:27383907

  16. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Amaral, M.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Colaço, B.; Gama, A.; Paiva, M. C.; Gomes, P. S.; Silva, R. F.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT

  17. Synthesis of complex benzenoids via the intermediate generation of o-benzynes through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Baire, Beeraiah; Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-03-01

    The hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) cascade enables the synthesis of complex benzenoid products with various substitution patterns through aryne intermediates. The first stage of this cascade involves the generation of a highly reactive ortho-benzyne intermediate by a net [4+2] cycloisomerization of a triyne substrate. The benzyne can be rapidly 'trapped' either intramolecularly or intermolecularly with myriad nucleophilic or π-bond-donating reactants. As a representative example of a general procedure for synthesizing highly substituted benzenoids, this protocol describes the synthesis of a typical triyne substrate and its use as the reactant in an HDDA cascade to form a phthalide. The synthetic procedure detailed herein (four chemical reactions) takes 16-20 h of active effort over a period of several days for the preparation of the triyne precursor and ∼2 h of active effort over a 3-d period for the generation and trapping of the benzyne and isolation of the phthalide product.

  18. Synthesis of complex benzenoids via the intermediate generation of o-benzynes through the hexadehydro-Diels–Alder reaction

    PubMed Central

    Baire, Beeraiah; Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H.; Woods, Brian P.; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) cascade enables the synthesis of complex benzenoid products with various substitution patterns via aryne intermediates. The first stage of this cascade involves generation of a highly reactive ortho-benzyne intermediate by a net [4+2] cycloisomerization of a triyne substrate. The benzyne can be rapidly ‘trapped’ either intra- or intermolecularly with a myriad of nucleophilic or π-bond-donating reactants. As a representative example of a general procedure to synthesize highly substituted benzenoids, this protocol describes the synthesis of a typical triyne substrate and its use as the reactant in an HDDA cascade to form a phthalide. The synthetic procedure detailed herein (four chemical reactions) takes 16–20 h of active effort over a several day period for preparation of the triyne precursor and ~2 h of active effort over a 3-day period for generation and trapping of the benzyne and isolation of the phthalide product. PMID:23411632

  19. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Do, Phuong T M; McAtee, Jesse R; Watson, Donald A; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structure of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst has been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels-Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions. PMID:23316419

  20. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Do, Phuong T.M.; McAtee, Jesse R.; Watson, Donald A.; Lobo, Raul F.

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structure of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst has been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels-Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions. PMID:23316419

  1. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not playmore » a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.« less

  2. Catalytic Effects of Oxide Surfaces on Diels-Alder Cycloaddition between Furan and Methyl Acrylate: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-Fard, Taha; Jenness, Glen; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas

    Using density functional theory with periodic boundary conditions, we study the catalytic effects of oxide surfaces such as ZrO_2 and HfO_2 on Diels-Alder reaction between furan and methyl acrylate. The cycloadduct can be dehydrated later to produce methyl benzoic which is an important step toward benzoic acid production. The gas-phase and on-surface reaction mechanisms are studied in detail. The surface hydration effects on the reaction mechanism and energy profile are studied as well. Our calculations show that the oxide surfaces catalyze the reaction significantly through the interaction of metal sites with methyl acrylate. The calculations are interpreted by making use of electronic density of states and band structure of the catalyst.

  3. Irreversible endo-selective diels-alder reactions of substituted alkoxyfurans: a general synthesis of endo-cantharimides.

    PubMed

    Foster, Robert W; Benhamou, Laure; Porter, Michael J; Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Hailes, Helen C; Tame, Christopher J; Sheppard, Tom D

    2015-04-13

    The [4+2] cycloaddition of 3-alkoxyfurans with N-substituted maleimides provides the first general route for preparing endo-cantharimides. Unlike the corresponding reaction with 3H furans, the reaction can tolerate a broad range of 2-substitued furans including alkyl, aromatic, and heteroaromatic groups. The cycloaddition products were converted into a range of cantharimide products with promising lead-like properties for medicinal chemistry programs. Furthermore, the electron-rich furans are shown to react with a variety of alternative dienophiles to generate 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane derivatives under mild conditions. DFT calculations have been performed to rationalize the activation effect of the 3-alkoxy group on a furan Diels-Alder reaction.

  4. Diels-Alder attachment of a planar organic molecule to a dangling bond dimer on a hydrogenated semiconductor surface.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Szymon; Kawai, Hiroyo; Engelund, Mads; Kolmer, Marek; Zuzak, Rafal; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Novell-Leruth, Gerard; Echavarren, Antonio M; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Joachim, Christian; Saeys, Mark

    2016-06-22

    Construction of single-molecule electronic devices requires the controlled manipulation of organic molecules and their properties. This could be achieved by tuning the interaction between the molecule and individual atoms by local "on-surface" chemistry, i.e., the controlled formation of chemical bonds between the species. We demonstrate here the reversible attachment of a planar conjugated polyaromatic molecule to a pair of unpassivated dangling bonds on a hydrogenated Ge(001):H surface via a Diels-Alder [4+2] addition using the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Due to the small stability difference between the covalently bonded and a nearly undistorted structure attached to the dangling bond dimer by long-range dispersive forces, we show that at cryogenic temperatures the molecule can be switched between both configurations. The reversibility of this covalent bond forming reaction may be applied in the construction of complex circuits containing organic molecules with tunable properties.

  5. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not play a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.

  6. Origin of the synchronicity on the transition structures of polar Diels-Alder reactions. Are these reactions [4 + 2] processes?

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; José Aurell, M; Pérez, Patricia; Contreras, Renato

    2003-05-16

    The transition structures (TSs) for a series of related Diels-Alder reactions between cyclopentadiene and mono-, di-, tri-, and tetracyanoethylene derivatives have been studied with use of DFT methods at the B3LYP/6-31G computational level. The increase of the electron-withdrawing substitution on ethylene increases the rate of these polar cycloadditions. However, the symmetric arrangement of cis and trans 1,2-di- and tetracyanoethylenes decreases the effectiveness of the substitution, which can be related to the symmetry found at the corresponding TSs. A DFT analysis of the global and local electrophilicity power of these series of cyano ethylenes provides a sound explanation about the nature of these synchronous processes. The present theoretical study is in agreement with the experimental outcomes.

  7. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated o-Quinodimethane Intermediates: An Alternative Route to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, Daniel S.; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Smith, Dee Dee; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Photolysis of o-methylphenyl ketones generates bis-o-quinodimethane intermediates that can be trapped in situ by dienophiles through Diels-Alder cycloadditions. This well-known photochemical process is applied to a series of six new photoreactive monomers containing bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone) functionalities combined with diacrylate and triacrylate ester monomers for the development of acrylic ester copolymer blends. Irradiation of cyclohexanone solutions of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s and acrylate esters produce thin polymer films. Solid state 13C NMR data indicated 47- 100% reaction of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s, depending on experimental conditions, to yield the desired products. DSC and TGA analyses were performed to determine the glass transition temperature, T,, and onset of decomposition, Td, of the resulting polymer films. A statistical Design of Experiments approach was used to obtain a systematic understanding of the effects of experimental variables on the extent of polymerization and the final polymer properties.

  8. Seasonal fluctuations in leaf phenolic composition under UV manipulations reflect contrasting strategies of alder and birch trees.

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, Titta; Tegelberg, Riitta; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Lindfors, Anders; O'Hara, Robert B; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2010-11-01

    Seasonal variation in leaf phenolic composition may be important for acclimation of plants to seasonal changes in their biotic and abiotic environment. For a realistic assessment of how plants respond to solar UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm) radiation, seasonal variation in both environment and plant responses needs to be taken into account. This also has implications for studies concerning stratospheric ozone depletion and resulting increased UV-B radiation, as other environmental variables and/or plant phenology could interact with UV radiation. To elucidate this, we established a field experiment using plastic films attenuating different parts of the solar UV spectrum. The concentration of individual phenolic compounds was measured during one growing season in leaves of grey alder (Alnus incana) and white birch (Betula pubescens) trees. Our results showed changes in concentration of, e.g. hydrolyzable tannins in birch that suggest an effect of UV-A alone and e.g. chlorogenic acids in alder indicate a quadratic effect of UV-B irradiance and both linear and quadratic effect for UV-A in second-degree polynomial fits. Further, there was interaction between treatment and sampling time for some individual metabolites; hence, the UV response varied during the season. In addition to the UV effects, three temporal patterns emerged in the concentrations of particular groups of phenolics. Possible implications for both sampling methods and timing are discussed. Moreover, our results highlight differences in responses of the two tree species, which are taken to indicate differences in their ecological niche differentiation.

  9. Effects of surface inactivation, high temperature drying and preservative treatment on surface roughness and colour of alder and beech wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ismail; Colakoglu, Gursel

    2005-10-01

    Although extensive research has been conducted in wood surface quality analysis, a unified approach to surface quality characterisation does not exist. Measurements of the variation in surface roughness and surface colour are used widely for the evaluation of wood surface quality. Colour is a basic visual feature for wood and wood-based products. Colour measurement is one of the quality control tests that should be carried out because the colour deviations are spotted easily by the consumers. On the other hand, a common problem faced by plywood manufacturers is panel delamination, for which a major cause is poor quality glue-bonds resulting from rough veneer. Rotary cut veneers with dimensions of 500 mm × 500 mm × 2 mm manufactured from alder ( Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata) and beech ( Fagus orientalis Lipsky) logs were used as materials in this study. Veneer sheets were oven-dried in a veneer dryer at 110 °C (normal drying temperature) and 180 °C (high drying temperature) after peeling process. The surfaces of some veneers were then exposed at indoor laboratory conditions to obtain inactive wood surfaces for glue bonds, and some veneers were treated with borax, boric acid and ammonium acetate solutions. After these treatments, surface roughness and colour measurements were made on veneer surfaces. High temperature drying process caused a darkening on the surfaces of alder and beech veneers. Total colour change value (Δ E*) increased linear with increasing exposure time. Among the treatment solutions, ammonium acetate caused the biggest colour change while treatment with borax caused the lowest changes in Δ E* values. Considerable changes in surface roughness after preservative treatment did not occur on veneer surfaces. Generally, no clear changes were obtained or the values mean roughness profile ( Ra) decreased slightly in Ra values after the natural inactivation process.

  10. On the Diels-Alder approach to solely biomass-derived polyethylene terephthalate (PET): conversion of 2,5-dimethylfuran and acrolein into p-xylene.

    PubMed

    Shiramizu, Mika; Toste, F Dean

    2011-10-24

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a polymeric material with high global demand. Conventionally, PET is produced from fossil-fuel-based materials. Herein, we explored the feasibility of a sustainable method for PET production by using solely bio-renewable resources. Specifically, 2,5-dimethylfuran (derived from lignocellulosic biomass through 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural) and acrolein (produced from glycerol, a side product of biodiesel production) were converted into the key intermediate p-xylene (a precursor of terephthalic acid). This synthesis consists of a sequential Diels-Alder reaction, oxidation, dehydration, and decarboxylation. In particular, the pivotal first step, the Diels-Alder reaction, was studied in detail to provide useful kinetic and thermodynamic data. Although it was found that this reaction requires low temperature to proceed efficiently, which presents a limitation on economic feasibility on an industrial scale, the concept was realized and bio-derived p-xylene was obtained in 34% overall yield over four steps. PMID:21922576

  11. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  12. Highly Regio- and Stereoselective Diels-Alder Cycloadditions via Two-Step and Multicomponent Reactions Promoted by Infrared Irradiation under Solvent-Free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Conde, Maria Ines; Reyes, Leonor; Herrera, Rafael; Rios, Hulme; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Miranda, Rene; Tamariz, Joaquin; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Infrared irradiation promoted the Diels-Alder cycloadditions of exo-2-oxazolidinone dienes 1–3 with the Knoevenagel adducts 4–6, as dienophiles, leading to the synthesis of new 3,5-diphenyltetrahydrobenzo[d]oxazol-2-one derivatives (7, 9, 11 and 13–17), under solvent-free conditions. These cycloadditions were performed with good regio- and stereoselectivity, favoring the para-endo cycloadducts. We also evaluated the one-pot three-component reaction of active methylene compounds 20, benzaldehydes 21 and exo-2-oxazolidinone diene 2 under the same reaction conditions. A cascade Knoevenagel condensation/Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction was observed, resulting in the final adducts 13–16 in similar yields. These procedures are environmentally benign, because no solvent and no catalyst were employed in these processes. The regioselectivity of these reactions was rationalized by Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) calculations. PMID:22489113

  13. Understanding the mechanism of non-polar Diels-Alder reactions. A comparative ELF analysis of concerted and stepwise diradical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Chamorro, Eduardo; Pérez, Patricia

    2010-12-21

    The electron-reorganization along the concerted and stepwise pathways associated with the non-polar Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene (Cp, 1) and ethylene (2) has been studied using the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. ELF results for the concerted mechanism stresses that the electron-reorganization demanded on the diene and ethylene reagents to reach two pseudo-diradical structures is responsible for the high activation energy. A comparative ELF analysis of some relevant points of the non-polar Diels-Alder reaction between Cp and styrene (10) suggests that these concerted mechanisms do not have a pericyclic electron-reorganization.

  14. Adaptation of a Small-Molecule Hydrogen-Bond Donor Catalyst to an Enantioselective Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction Hypothesized for Brevianamide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chiral diamine-derived hydrogen-bond donors were evaluated for their ability to effect stereocontrol in an intramolecular hetero-Diels–Alder (HDA) reaction hypothesized in the biosynthesis of brevianamides A and B. Collectively, these results provide proof of principle that small-molecule hydrogen-bond catalysis, if even based on a hypothetical biosynthesis construct, holds significant potential within enantioselective natural product synthesis. PMID:25697748

  15. New and Concise Syntheses of the Bicyclic Oxamazin Core Using an Intramolecular Nitroso Diels-Alder Reaction and Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Kyle D.; Carosso, Serena

    2013-01-01

    Herein two new and concise synthetic approaches for making an unsaturated bicyclic oxamazin core are reported. The first involves the use of an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction to form both of the fused rings in one step. The second approach incorporates ring-closing olefin metathesis in the final step to form the second fused ring of the core. The scope of the second approach was also expanded further to afford larger ringed bicyclic systems. PMID:23276301

  16. New and concise syntheses of the bicyclic oxamazin core using an intramolecular nitroso Diels-Alder reaction and ring-closing olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kyle D; Carosso, Serena; Miller, Marvin J

    2013-01-18

    Herein two new and concise synthetic approaches for making an unsaturated bicyclic oxamazin core are reported. The first involves the use of an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction to form both of the fused rings in one step. The second approach incorporates ring-closing olefin metathesis in the final step to form the second fused ring of the core. The scope of the second approach was also expanded further to afford larger ringed bicyclic systems.

  17. Synthesis of Complex Hexacyclic Compounds via a Tandem Rh(II)-Catalyzed Double-Cyclopropanation/Cope Rearrangement/Diels–Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of (E)-1-(methoxymethylene)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene with styryl diazoacetates in the presence of catalytic amounts of the dirhodium complex Rh2(S-DOSP)4 provides a highly enantioenriched hexacyclic product with 10 new stereogenic centers. The transformation proceeds by a cascade sequence starting with a double cyclopropanation of a benzene ring, followed by a Cope rearrangement of a divinylcyclopropane and then an intramolecular Diels–Alder cycloaddition. PMID:25208337

  18. Highly stereoselective generation of complex oxy-bicyclic scaffolds via an atom-economic Pd(II)-catalyzed hydroalkynylation, isomerization and Diels-Alder cycloaddition sequence.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruwei; Chen, Ke; Deng, Qiulin; Yang, Jianjun; Zhang, Lixiong

    2014-02-21

    An atom-economic tandem Pd(II)-catalyzed hydroalkynylation, alkyne-allene isomerization, and Diels-Alder cycloaddition is reported. The reaction employs readily available starting substrates, proceeds in a highly ordered fashion, features high regio- and stereoselectivity, and tolerates a wide range of functionality and structural motifs, thus offering an attractive strategy for producing new molecular complexity and diversity from easily available starting materials. A mechanistic study with density functional theoretical calculations was conducted to rationalize the observed stereoselectivity.

  19. Simultaneous analysis of 70 pesticides using HPlc/MS/MS: a comparison of the multiresidue method of Klein and Alder and the QuEChERS method.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Melanie; Speer, Karl; Stuke, Sven; Schmeer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, two new multipesticide residue methods for screening crops for a large number of pesticides, developed by Klein and Alder and Anastassiades et al. (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe; QuEChERS), have been published. Our intention was to compare these two important methods on the basis of their extraction efficiency, reproducibility, ruggedness, ease of use, and speed. In total, 70 pesticides belonging to numerous different substance classes were analyzed at two concentration levels by applying both methods, using five different representative matrixes. In the case of the QuEChERS method, the results of the three sample preparation steps (crude extract, extract after SPE, and extract after SPE and acidification) were compared with each other and with the results obtained with the Klein and Alder method. The extraction efficiencies of the QuEChERS method were far higher, and the sample preparation was much quicker when the last two steps were omitted. In most cases, the extraction efficiencies after the first step were approximately 100%. With extraction efficiencies of mostly less than 70%, the Klein and Alder method did not compare favorably. Some analytes caused problems during evaluation, mostly due to matrix influences.

  20. Simultaneous analysis of 70 pesticides using HPlc/MS/MS: a comparison of the multiresidue method of Klein and Alder and the QuEChERS method.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Melanie; Speer, Karl; Stuke, Sven; Schmeer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, two new multipesticide residue methods for screening crops for a large number of pesticides, developed by Klein and Alder and Anastassiades et al. (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe; QuEChERS), have been published. Our intention was to compare these two important methods on the basis of their extraction efficiency, reproducibility, ruggedness, ease of use, and speed. In total, 70 pesticides belonging to numerous different substance classes were analyzed at two concentration levels by applying both methods, using five different representative matrixes. In the case of the QuEChERS method, the results of the three sample preparation steps (crude extract, extract after SPE, and extract after SPE and acidification) were compared with each other and with the results obtained with the Klein and Alder method. The extraction efficiencies of the QuEChERS method were far higher, and the sample preparation was much quicker when the last two steps were omitted. In most cases, the extraction efficiencies after the first step were approximately 100%. With extraction efficiencies of mostly less than 70%, the Klein and Alder method did not compare favorably. Some analytes caused problems during evaluation, mostly due to matrix influences. PMID:21313828

  1. Stem Photosynthesis not Pressurized Ventilation is Responsible for Light-enhanced Oxygen Supply to Submerged Roots of Alder (Alnus glutinosa)

    PubMed Central

    ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM; ARMSTRONG, JEAN

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Claims that submerged roots of alder and other wetland trees are aerated by pressurized gas flow generated in the stem by a light-induced thermo-osmosis have seemed inconsistent with root anatomy. Our aim was to seek a verification using physical root–stem models, stem segments with or without artificial roots, and rooted saplings. • Methods Radial O2 loss (ROL) from roots was monitored polarographically as the gas space system of the models, and stems were pressurized artificially. ROL and internal pressurization were also measured when stems were irradiated and the xylem stream was either CO2 enriched or not. Stem photosynthesis and respiration were measured polarographically. Stem and root anatomy were examined by light and fluorescence microscopy. • Key Results Pressurizing the models and stems to ≤10 kPa, values much higher than those reportedly generated by thermo-osmosis, created only a negligible density-induced increase in ROL, but ROL increased rapidly when ambient O2 concentrations were raised. Internal pressures rose by several kPa when shoots were exposed to high light flux and ROL increased substantially, but both were due to O2 accumulation from stem photosynthesis using internally sourced CO2. Increased stem pressures had little effect on O2 transport, which remained largely diffusive. Oxygen flux from stems in high light periods indicated a net C gain by stem photosynthesis. Chloroplasts were abundant in the secondary cortex and secondary phloem, and occurred throughout the secondary xylem rays and medulla of 3-year-old stems. Diurnal patterns of ROL, most marked when light reached submerged portions of the stem, were modified by minor variations in light flux and water level. Low root temperatures also helped improve root aeration. • Conclusions Pressurized gas flow to submerged roots does not occur to any significant degree in alder, but stem photosynthesis, using internally sourced CO2 from respiration and the

  2. Gaseous nitrogen losses and mineral nitrogen transformation along a water table gradient in a black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) forest on organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, T.; Heinichen, J.; Augustin, J.; Freibauer, A.; Drösler, M.

    2013-12-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) forests on peat soils have been reported to be hotspots for high nitrous oxide (N2O) losses. High emissions may be attributed to alternating water tables of peatlands and to the incorporation of high amounts of easily decomposable nitrogen (N) into the ecosystem by symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixation of alder trees. Our study addressed the question to what extent drainage enhances the emissions of N2O from black alder forests and how N turnover processes and physical factors influence the production of N2O and total denitrification. The study was conducted in a drained black alder forest with variable groundwater tables at a southern German fen peatland. Fluxes of N2O were measured using the closed chamber method at two drained sites (D-1 and D-2) and one undrained site (U). Inorganic N contents and net N mineralization rates (NNM) were determined. Additionally a laboratory incubation experiment was carried out to investigate greenhouse gas and N2 fluxes at different temperature and soil moisture conditions. Significantly different inorganic N contents and NNM rates were observed which however did not result in significantly different N2O fluxes in the field, but in the laboratory experiment. Measured N2O fluxes were low for all sites, with total annual emissions of 0.51 ± 0.07 (U), 0.97 ± 0.13 (D-1) and 0.93 ± 0.08 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 (D-2). Only 37% of the spatio-temporal variation in field N2O fluxes could be explained by peat temperature and groundwater level, demonstrating the complex interlinking of the controlling factors for N2O emissions. However, temperature was one of the key variables of N2O fluxes in the conducted incubation experiment. Increasing soil moisture content was found to enhance total denitrification losses during the incubation experiment, whereas N2O fluxes remained constant. At the undrained site, permanently high ground water level was found to prevent net nitrification, resulting in a

  3. Nitrogen mineralization and gaseous nitrogen losses from waterlogged and drained organic soils in a black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, T.; Heinichen, J.; Augustin, J.; Freibauer, A.; Drösler, M.

    2014-06-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) forests on peat soils have been reported to be hotspots for high nitrous oxide (N2O) losses. High emissions may be attributed to alternating water tables of peatlands and to the incorporation of high amounts of easily decomposable nitrogen (N) into the ecosystem by symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixation of alder trees. Our study addressed the question to what extent drainage enhances the emissions of N2O from black alder forests and how N turnover processes and physical factors influence the production of N2O and total denitrification. The study was conducted in a drained black alder forest with variable groundwater tables at a southern German fen peatland. Fluxes of N2O were measured using the closed chamber method at two drained sites (D-1 and D-2) and one undrained site (U). Inorganic N contents and net N mineralization rates (NNM) were determined. Additionally a laboratory incubation experiment was carried out to investigate greenhouse gas and N2 fluxes at different temperature and soil moisture conditions. Significantly different inorganic N contents and NNM rates were observed, which however did not result in significantly different N2O fluxes in the field but did in the laboratory experiment. N2O fluxes measured were low for all sites, with total annual emissions of 0.51 ± 0.07 (U), 0.97 ± 0.13 (D-1) and 0.93 ± 0.08 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 (D-2). Only 37% of the spatiotemporal variation in field N2O fluxes could be explained by peat temperature and groundwater level, demonstrating the complex interlinking of the controlling factors for N2O emissions. However, temperature was one of the key variables of N2O fluxes in the incubation experiment conducted. Increasing soil moisture content was found to enhance total denitrification losses during the incubation experiment, whereas N2O fluxes remained constant. At the undrained site, permanently high groundwater level was found to prevent net nitrification, resulting in a

  4. Face-selective Diels-Alder reactions between unsymmetrical cyclohexadienes and symmetric trans-dienophile: an experimental and computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Saswati; Yadav, Somnath; Banerjee, Srirupa; Patil, Mahendra P; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2008-01-18

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the Diels-Alder reactions between 2-trimethylsiloxy-1,3-cyclohexadienes (2-11) and (E)-1,4-diphenylbut-2-ene-1,4-dione (1) is reported. Two diastereomeric products, 5-endo-6-exo- (nx) and 5-exo-6-endo- (xn) dibenzoyl derivatives, are possible with symmetric trans-dienophile (1). While in many cases 5-endo-6-exo product is preferred over the corresponding 5-exo-6-endo product, the product ratio nx:xn is found to vary with the position of substituents on the diene. The density functional theory studies with the mPW1PW91/6-31G* as well as the B3LYP/6-31G* levels reveal that the electrostatic repulsion between the oxygen lone pairs on the diene and the dienophile is critical to the observed product selectivities. The optimized transition state geometries though appeared to involve secondary orbital interactions, careful examination of the frontier Kohn-Sham orbitals as well as calculations with the natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses confirm the absence of SOI in these transition states. In the case of methyl-substituted dienes, a cumulative effect of steric and electrostatic interactions between the diene and the dienophile is found to be the controlling element toward the observed selectivity. PMID:18088142

  5. On the importance of hydrogen bonding in the promotion of Diels-Alder reactions of unactivated aldehydes: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemouri, Hafida; Mekelleche, Sidi Mohamed

    2014-03-01

    The kinetic solvent effects on the Diels-Alder (DA) reaction of N,N-dimethylamino-3-trimethylsilyl butadiene with p-anisaldehyde are studied by density functional calculations at the B3LYP/6-31C(d) level of theory. Experimentally, it has been found that the acceleration of this reaction is not due to the increase of the polarity of the solvent but it is rather due to hydrogen bonding (HB). Intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations combined with electron localisation function analysis show that this reaction follows a one-step two-stage mechanism with a highly asynchronous sigma bond formation process. The calculations, performed using an explicit solvent model based on the coordination of the carbonyl group with one molecule of the solvent, show a considerable decrease of the activation energy when going from the gas phase (ɛ = 1) to solution phase and this diminution is found to be more important in isopropyl alcohol (ɛ = 18.3) in comparison with acetonitrile (ɛ = 37.5). Our calculations also show that the acceleration of this DA reaction is due to the increase of the electrophilicity power of the solvated carbonyl compound and consequently the increase of the polarity of the reaction in the presence of protic solvents. The obtained results put in evidence the relevance of HB in the promotion of DA reactions of unactivated ketones as experimentally expected.

  6. Nonstatistical dynamics in the thermal C2-C6/diels-alder cyclization of enyne-allenes: effect of topology.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Debabrata; Rana, Anup; Schmittel, Michael

    2015-02-20

    The thermal C(2)-C(6) (Schmittel) cyclization of an enyne-allene with two aryl rings at the allene terminus experimentally leads to three formal Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition products, two of which (involving the dimethylamino phenyl unit) are shown to form in a nonstatistical process. DFT computations on the reaction paths reveal that the two aryl rings (Ph vs PhNMe2) do not interact in a dynamic manner as their minimum energy pathways (MEPs) are separated by a large barrier. The preferential formation of the more-hindered DA product 8 (ortho to the dimethylamino group) over the less-hindered product 9 (para to the dimethylamino group), despite the higher energy TS for 8, suggests the occurrence of nonstatistical dynamics in the cyclization onto the dimethylamino phenyl unit, though. Potential energy surface (PES) computations indicate that the large amount of nonstatistical dynamics (97%) arises from facile IRC dynamics (left picture) that is compared with the non-IRC dynamics of a related system (∼76%, right picture, J. Org. Chem. 2014, 79, 2368). PMID:25647469

  7. N-(furfural) chitosan hydrogels based on Diels-Alder cycloadditions and application as microspheres for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Herrera, Marcelino; Gandini, Alessandro; Goycoolea, Francisco M; Jacobsen, Neil E; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Recillas-Mota, Maricarmen; Argüelles-Monal, Waldo M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, chitosan was chemically modified by reductive amination in a two-step process. The synthesis of N-(furfural) chitosan (FC) was confirmed by FT-IR and (1)H NMR analysis, and the degrees of substitution were estimated as 8.3 and 23.8%. The cross-linkable system of bismaleimide (BM) and FC shows that FC shared properties of furan-maleimide chemistry. This system produced non-reversible hydrogel networks by Diels-Alder cycloadditions at 85 °C. The system composed of BM and FC (23.8% substitution) generated stronger hydrogel networks than those of FC with an 8.3% degree of substitution. Moreover, the FC-BM system was able to produce hydrogel microspheres. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed the surface of the microspheres to be non-porous with small protuberances. In water, the microspheres swelled, increasing their volume by 30%. Finally, microspheres loaded with methylene blue were able to release the dye gradually, obeying second-order kinetics for times less than 600 min. This behavior suggests that diffusion is governed by the relaxation of polymer chains in the swelled state, thus facilitating drug release outside the microspheres.

  8. Highly reactive trans-cyclooctene tags with improved stability for Diels-Alder chemistry in living systems.

    PubMed

    Rossin, Raffaella; van den Bosch, Sandra M; Ten Hoeve, Wolter; Carvelli, Marco; Versteegen, Ron M; Lub, Johan; Robillard, Marc S

    2013-07-17

    One of the challenges of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy, which centers on the capture of a radiolabeled probe by a preinjected tumor-bound antibody, is the potential immunogenicity of biological capturing systems. A bioorthogonal chemical approach may circumvent this drawback, but effective in vivo chemistry in mice, larger animals, and eventually humans, requires very high reagent reactivity, sufficient stability, and retained selectivity. We report here that the reactivity of the fastest bioorthogonal reaction, the inverse-electron-demand-Diels-Alder cycloaddition between a tetrazine probe and a trans-cyclooctene-tagged antibody, can be increased 10-fold (k2 = 2.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) via the trans-cyclooctene, approaching the speed of biological interactions, while also increasing its stability. This was enabled by the finding that the trans-cyclooctene tag is probably deactivated through isomerization to the unreactive cis-cyclooctene isomer by interactions with copper-containing proteins, and that increasing the steric hindrance on the tag can impede this process. Next, we found that the higher reactivity of axial vs equatorial linked TCO can be augmented by the choice of linker. The new, stabilized, and more reactive tag allowed for improved tumor-to-nontumor ratios in pretargeted tumor-bearing mice.

  9. N-(furfural) chitosan hydrogels based on Diels-Alder cycloadditions and application as microspheres for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Herrera, Marcelino; Gandini, Alessandro; Goycoolea, Francisco M; Jacobsen, Neil E; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Recillas-Mota, Maricarmen; Argüelles-Monal, Waldo M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, chitosan was chemically modified by reductive amination in a two-step process. The synthesis of N-(furfural) chitosan (FC) was confirmed by FT-IR and (1)H NMR analysis, and the degrees of substitution were estimated as 8.3 and 23.8%. The cross-linkable system of bismaleimide (BM) and FC shows that FC shared properties of furan-maleimide chemistry. This system produced non-reversible hydrogel networks by Diels-Alder cycloadditions at 85 °C. The system composed of BM and FC (23.8% substitution) generated stronger hydrogel networks than those of FC with an 8.3% degree of substitution. Moreover, the FC-BM system was able to produce hydrogel microspheres. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed the surface of the microspheres to be non-porous with small protuberances. In water, the microspheres swelled, increasing their volume by 30%. Finally, microspheres loaded with methylene blue were able to release the dye gradually, obeying second-order kinetics for times less than 600 min. This behavior suggests that diffusion is governed by the relaxation of polymer chains in the swelled state, thus facilitating drug release outside the microspheres. PMID:26005158

  10. Aquatic hyphomycete communities associated with decomposing alder leaf litter in reference headwater streams of the Basque Country (northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2012-08-01

    The community of aquatic hyphomycetes associated with decomposing alder leaf litter was studied during autumn-winter in nine headwater reference streams of the Basque Country (northern Spain). In order to study the spatial variability in composition and community structure, three streams from each of three different river basins were compared. The colonization dynamics and community changes throughout the decomposition process were also followed in three of the rivers (one per basin). The taxonomic richness and community structure of these fungi varied among rivers, including similar streams of a given watershed. However, neither species diversity nor total abundance was statistically related to environmental variables. Only the conidial production of two of the species, Flagellospora curvula and Lunulospora curvula appeared to be enhanced by nitrate availability in the water. The taxonomic richness and the reproductive activity (sporulation rate) were positively related to the leaf litter decomposition rate. The changes in conidial production along the process were similar for all the streams and helped explain leaf litter quality dynamics.

  11. Short Rotation Woody Crops Program. Quarterly progress report, March 1-May 31, 1985. [Sycamore, alders, black locust, larch, poplars, saltbush

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Perlack, R.D.; Wenzel, C.R.; Trimble, J.L.; Ranney, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report covers the progress of the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP) during the third quarter of fiscal year 1985. This report summarizes ORNL management activities, technical activities at ORNL and subcontract institutions, and the technology transfer that is occurring as a result of subcontractor and ORNL activities. Third-year results of a nutrient utilization study confirmed that there were no benefits to quarterly fertilization with urea nitrogen. Testing of one prototype short-rotation intensive culture harvester was conducted on a sycamore plantation on Scott Paper Company land in southern Alabama. Coppice yields of European black alder reported by Iowa State University indicate potential productivity of about 7.2 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/ if the best trees are selected. Coppice yields were more than double first-rotation yields. About 31,000 black locust and larch trees were established in 12 genetic tests at 4 sites in Michigan. Seedling rotation productivity rates of 4-year-old hybrid poplar, based on harvest data, were reported by Pennsylvania State University. Rates varied from 4.8 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/ to 10.7 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/, depending on site, management strategy, and planting year. An efficient method for in vitro micropropagation of elite genotypes of fourwing saltbush was developed by Plant Resources Institute. A new study to evaluate yield/density relationships was established by the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. Dissertation research on the crown geometry of plantation-grown American sycamore was completed.

  12. Enantioselective synthesis of dihydrocoumarin derivatives by chiral scandium(III)-complex catalyzed inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haipeng; Liu, Yangbin; Guo, Jing; Lin, Lili; Xu, Yali; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    An asymmetric inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reaction between o-quinone methides and azlactones to generate potentially pharmacological active dihydrocoumarins has been achieved efficiently by using a chiral N,N'-dioxide-Sc(III) complex as the catalyst. The desired products were obtained in high yields with excellent enantioselectivities and diastereoselectivities (up to 94% yield, 96% ee and >19 : 1 dr) under mild reaction conditions. A concerted reaction pathway was confirmed by Operando IR and control experiments.

  13. From enantiopure hydroxyaldehydes to complex heterocyclic scaffolds: development of domino Petasis/Diels-Alder and cross-metathesis/Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Cannillo, Alexandre; Norsikian, Stéphanie; Tran Huu Dau, Marie-Elise; Retailleau, Pascal; Iorga, Bogdan I; Beau, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-15

    One-step assembly of hexahydroisoindole scaffolds by a sequence that combines the Petasis (borono-Mannich) and Diels-Alder reactions is described. The unique selectivity observed experimentally was confirmed by quantum calculations. The current method is applicable to a broad range of substrates, including free sugars, and holds significant potential to efficiently and stereoselectively build new heterocyclic structures. This easy and fast entry to functionalized polycyclic compounds can be pursued by further transformations, for example, additional ring closure by a cross-metathesis/Michael addition domino sequence.

  14. Multicomponent Double Diels-Alder/Nazarov Tandem Cyclization of Symmetric Cross-Conjugated Diynones to Generate [6-5-6] Tricyclic Products.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Rachael A; Chalifoux, Wesley A

    2016-06-20

    The construction of complex polycyclic terpenoid products in an efficient and step-economical manner using multicomponent and tandem processes is highly valuable. Herein, we report a tandem cyclization sequence that initiates with a multicomponent double Diels-Alder reaction of cross-conjugated diynones, followed by a Nazarov cyclization to efficiently produce [6-5-6] tricyclic products with excellent regio- and diastereoselectivity. This methodology generates five new carbon-carbon bonds, three rings, quaternary or vicinal quaternary carbons, and stereogenic centers in a one-pot reaction. PMID:27124516

  15. Ultra-high precision 40Ar/39Ar ages for Fish Canyon Tuff and Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine: New dating standards required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D.; Matchan, E. L.

    2013-11-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique is a high precision (<0.1%) method with wide application to geological samples. However, the method is predicated on the availability of natural mineral standards of known age. Widely used 40Ar/39Ar standards include sanidine from the (ca. 28 Ma) Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) and the (ca. 1.2 Ma) Alder Creek Rhyolite (ACR). Despite common usage, the ages of FCT and ACR sanidine have proven contentious, with reported values varying by >2%; well outside the ±0.1% aspiration of EARTHTIME (http://www.earth-time.org).

  16. 1,4-Cyclohexadienes--easy access to a versatile building block via transition-metal-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Gerhard

    2014-06-01

    1,4-Cyclohexadiene derivatives are easily accessed via transition-metal cycloadditions of 1,3-dienes with alkynes. The mild reaction conditions of several transition-metal-catalysed reactions allows the incorporation of various functional groups to access functionalised 1,4-cyclohexadienes. The control of the regiochemistry in the intermolecular cobalt-catalysed Diels-Alder reaction is realised utilising different ligand designs. The functionalised 1,4-cyclohexadiene derivatives are valuable building blocks in follow-up transformations. Finally, the oxidation of the 1,4-cyclohexadienes can be accomplished under mild conditions to generate the corresponding arene derivatives.

  17. Enantioselective synthesis of allenylenol silyl ethers via chiral lithium amide mediated reduction of ynenoyl silanes and their Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michiko; Kondo, Yasuhiro; Moto-ishi, Ta-ichi; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Takeda, Kei

    2015-03-01

    An enantioselective Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley-type reduction of ynenoylsilanes by a chiral lithium amide followed by a Brook rearrangement and anti-mode protonation across conjugated 1,3-enynes provides allene derivatives bearing a 2-siloxyvinyl moiety in high enantioselectivity. The E/Z geometry of enol silyl ethers is controlled by the geometry of the starting enyne moiety. Thus, (E)- and (Z)-enol silyl ethers are obtained from (Z)- and (E)-ynenoylsilans, respectively. The 2-siloxyvinylallene products can participate in Diels-Alder reactions with reactive dienophiles such as PTAD, which can be achieved in a one-pot operation from ynenoylsilanes.

  18. Toward an understanding of the acceleration of Diels-Alder reactions by a pseudo-intramolecular process achieved by molecular recognition. A DFT study.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Aurell, M José; Arnó, Manuel; Saez, José A

    2007-05-25

    The pseudo-intramolecular Diels-Alder (DA) reaction between a 2-substituted furan (1) and a N-maleimide derivative (2) has been analyzed using DFT methods. Formation of two hydrogen bonds between the appendages on furan and maleimide derivatives favors thermodynamically the formation of a molecular complex (MC1) through an efficient molecular recognition process. The large enthalpy stabilization associated with the molecular recognition overcomes the unfavorable activation entropy associated with the bimolecular process. As a consequence, the subsequent DA reaction is clearly accelerated through a pseudo-intramolecular process.

  19. Synthesis of Dihydrophenanthridines and Oxoimidazolidines from Anilines and Ethylglyoxylate via Aza Diels-Alder Reaction of Arynes and KF-Induced Annulation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R Santhosh; Lagishetti, Chandraiah; Chen, Shuo; Kiran, I N Chaithanya; He, Yun

    2016-09-16

    The transition-metal-free multicomponent coupling of arynes, anilines, and ethylglyoxylate, proceeding via an inverse electron-demand aza Diels-Alder cycloaddition and N-arylation, has been demonstrated. This protocol allows rapid access to N-aryl dihydrophenanthridine derivatives in moderate to high yields at room temperature from readily available starting materials. In addition, an unprecedented fluoride induced annulation of ethyl(arylimino)acetates led to the formation of highly functionalized oxoimidazolidine derivatives in good yields under mild conditions. PMID:27571345

  20. Avian use of forest habitats in the Pembina Hills of northeastern North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faanes, C.A.; Andrew, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    North Dakota has the least extensive total area of forested habitats of any of the 50 United States. Although occurring in limited area, forest communities add considerably to the total ecological diversity of the State. The forests of the Pembina Hills region in northeastern North Dakota are one of only three areas large enough to be considered of commercial value. During 1981 we studied the avifauna of the upper valley of the Pembina River in the Pembina Hills. Field work extended from 20 April to 23 July; breeding bird censuses were conducted 7 June to 2 July. Of the 120 bird species recorded during the study period, 79 species were recorded during the breeding season. The total breeding population was estimated at nearly 76,000 breeding pairs. The wood warblers (Parulidae) were the most numerous family, accounting for about 28,000 breeding pairs. The yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) was the most abundant breeding species, making up 19.4% of the population. American redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) was second in abundance, accounting for 10.5% of the breeding population. Largest breeding densities occurred in the willow (Salix sp.) shrub community. Although supporting the lowest mean breeding density, quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests supported the highest species diversity. First State breeding records were recorded for alder flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) and golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera). Records were obtained for 12 species considered rare or unusual in North Dakota during the breeding season. The status of all species known to have occurred in the study area is described in an annotated species list.

  1. Inverse Electron Demand Diels–Alder Reactions of 1,2,3-Triazines: Pronounced Substituent Effects on Reactivity and Cycloaddition Scope

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Erin D.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic study of the inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions of 1,2,3-triazines is disclosed, including an examination of the impact of a C5 substituent. Such substituents were found to exhibit a remarkable impact on the cycloaddition reactivity of the 1,2,3-triazine without altering, and perhaps even enhancing, the intrinsic cycloaddition regioselectivity. The study revealed that not only may the reactivity be predictably modulated by a C5 substituent (R = CO2Me > Ph > H), but that the impact is of a magnitude to convert 1,2,3-triazine (1) and its modest cycloaddition scope into a heterocyclic azadiene system with a reaction scope that portends extensive synthetic utility, expanding the range of participating dienophiles. Significantly, the studies define a now powerful additional heterocyclic azadiene, complementary to the isomeric 1,2,4-triazines and 1,3,5-triazines, capable of dependable participation in inverse electron demand Diels–Alder reactions, extending the number of complementary heterocyclic ring systems accessible with implementation of the methodology. PMID:21736324

  2. Isotopologue ratios of N2O and N2 measurements underpin the importance of denitrification in differently N-loaded riparian alder forests.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ulo; Well, Reinhard; Weymann, Daniel; Soosaar, Kaido; Maddison, Martin; Kanal, Arno; Lõhmus, Krista; Truu, Jaak; Augustin, Jürgen; Tournebize, Julien

    2014-10-21

    Known as biogeochemical hotspots in landscapes, riparian buffer zones exhibit considerable potential concerning mitigation of groundwater contaminants such as nitrate, but may in return enhance the risk for indirect N2O emission. Here we aim to assess and to compare two riparian gray alder forests in terms of gaseous N2O and N2 fluxes and dissolved N2O, N2, and NO3(-) in the near-surface groundwater. We further determine for the first time isotopologue ratios of N2O dissolved in the riparian groundwater in order to support our assumption that it mainly originated from denitrification. The study sites, both situated in Estonia, northeastern Europe, receive contrasting N loads from adjacent uphill arable land. Whereas N2O emissions were rather small at both sites, average gaseous N2-to-N2O ratios inferred from closed-chamber measurements and He-O laboratory incubations were almost four times smaller for the heavily loaded site. In contrast, groundwater parameters were less variable among sites and between landscape positions. Campaign-based average (15)N site preferences of N2O (SP) in riparian groundwater ranged between 11 and 44 ‰. Besides the strong prevalence of N2 emission over N2O fluxes and the correlation pattern between isotopologue and water quality data, this comparatively large range highlights the importance of denitrification and N2O reduction in both riparian gray alder stands. PMID:25264900

  3. Regioselectivity of Sc2C2@C3v(8)-C82: Role of the Sumanene-Type Hexagon in Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pei; Zhao, Xiang; Ehara, Masahiro

    2016-09-16

    Recently, several experiments have demonstrated high chemical reactivity of the sumanene-type hexagon in Sc2C2@C82. To further uncover its reactivity, the Diels-Alder reaction to all the nonequivalent C-C bonds of C82 and Sc2C2@C82 has been investigated by density functional theory calculations. For the free fullerene, the [5,6] bond 7 is the thermodynamically most favored, whereas the addition on the [6,6] bond 3 has the lowest activation energy. Diels-Alder reaction has no preference for addition sites in the sumanene-type hexagon. However, in the case of the endohedral fullerene, the [6,6] bond 19 in the special hexagon becomes the most reactive site according to both kinetic and thermodynamic considerations. Further analyses reveal that bond 19 in Sc2C2@C82 exhibits the shortest bond length and third largest π-orbital axis vector. In addition, the LUMOs of bond 19 are also symmetry-allowed to interact with butadiene. PMID:27538115

  4. Cross-Linked Hydrogels Formed through Diels-Alder Coupling of Furan- and Maleimide-Modified Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid).

    PubMed

    Stewart, S Alison; Backholm, Matilda; Burke, Nicholas A D; Stöver, Harald D H

    2016-02-23

    The Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition between furan- and maleimide-functional polyanions was used to form cross-linked synthetic polymer hydrogels. Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride) was reacted with furfurylamine or N-(2-aminoethyl)maleimide in acetonitrile to form pairs of furan- and maleimide-functionalized poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid)s. Mixtures of these mutually reactive polyanions in water gelled within 15 min to 18 h, depending on degree of functionalization and polymer concentrations. Solution and magic-angle spinning (1)H NMR were used to confirm the formation of the Diels-Alder adduct, to analyze competing hydrolytic side reactions, and demonstrate postgelation functionalization. The effect of the degree of furan and maleimide functionalization, polymer concentration, pH, and calcium ion concentration, on gelation time, gel mechanical properties, and equilibrium swelling, are described. Release of dextran as a model drug was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of gel composition and calcium treatment. PMID:26800849

  5. Toward an understanding of the unexpected regioselective hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of asymmetric tetrazines with electron-rich ethylenes: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Picher, M Teresa; Sáez, José A

    2009-04-01

    The regioselective hetero-Diels-Alder (HDA) reaction of asymmetric tetrazines (TTZs) with electron-rich (ER) ethylenes has been studied with use of DFT methods at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. The reaction is a domino process that comprises three consecutive reactions: (i) a HDA reaction between the TTZ and the ER ethylene; (ii) a retro-Diels-Alder reaction with loss of nitrogen; and (iii) a beta-hydrogen elimination with formation of the final pyridazines. The first polar HDA reaction, which is associated to the nucleophilic attack of the ER ethylene to the electrophilically activated TTZ, is the rate and regioselectivity determining step of the domino process. The unexpected regioselectivity of these HDA reactions is explained within the polar cycloaddition model by using the conceptual DFT. Although the nucleophilic attack of the ER ethylene over the para position relative to the methylsulfinyl substituent could favor the charge transfer, it is energetically more unfavorable because it diminishes the electron density at the electronegative TTZ core.

  6. Design of cross-linked semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone)-based networks with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties through Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Raquez, Jean-Marie; Vanderstappen, Sophie; Meyer, Franck; Verge, Pierre; Alexandre, Michael; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Jérôme, Christine; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-08-29

    Cross-linked poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based polyesterurethane (PUR) systems have been synthesized through Diels-Alder reactions by reactive extrusion. The Diels-Alder and retro-Diels-Alder reactions proved to be useful for enhancing the molecular motion of PCL-based systems, and therefore their crystallization ability, in the design of cross-linked semicrystalline polymers with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties. Successive reactions between α,ω-diol PCL (PCL(2) ), furfuryl alcohol, and methylene diphenyl 4,4'-diisocyanate straightforwardly afforded the α,ω-furfuryl PCL-based PUR systems, and subsequent Diels-Alder reactions with N,N-phenylenedimaleimide afforded the thermoreversible cycloadducts. The cross-linking density could be modulated by partially replacing PCL-diol with PCL-tetraol. Interestingly, the resulting PUR systems proved to be semicrystalline cross-linked polymers, the melting temperature of which (close to 45 °C) represented the switching temperature for their shape-memory properties. Qualitative and quantitative measurements demonstrated that these PUR systems exhibited one-way and two-way shape-memory properties depending on their cross-linking density.

  7. Design of cross-linked semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone)-based networks with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties through Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Raquez, Jean-Marie; Vanderstappen, Sophie; Meyer, Franck; Verge, Pierre; Alexandre, Michael; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Jérôme, Christine; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-08-29

    Cross-linked poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based polyesterurethane (PUR) systems have been synthesized through Diels-Alder reactions by reactive extrusion. The Diels-Alder and retro-Diels-Alder reactions proved to be useful for enhancing the molecular motion of PCL-based systems, and therefore their crystallization ability, in the design of cross-linked semicrystalline polymers with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties. Successive reactions between α,ω-diol PCL (PCL(2) ), furfuryl alcohol, and methylene diphenyl 4,4'-diisocyanate straightforwardly afforded the α,ω-furfuryl PCL-based PUR systems, and subsequent Diels-Alder reactions with N,N-phenylenedimaleimide afforded the thermoreversible cycloadducts. The cross-linking density could be modulated by partially replacing PCL-diol with PCL-tetraol. Interestingly, the resulting PUR systems proved to be semicrystalline cross-linked polymers, the melting temperature of which (close to 45 °C) represented the switching temperature for their shape-memory properties. Qualitative and quantitative measurements demonstrated that these PUR systems exhibited one-way and two-way shape-memory properties depending on their cross-linking density. PMID:21744399

  8. High π-Facial and exo-Selectivity for the Intramolecular Diels-Alder Cycloaddition of Dodeca-3,9,11-trien-5-one Precursors to 2-epi-Symbioimine and Related Compounds.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ming; Wu, Yiwei; Burke, Jason P; Chruma, Jason J

    2016-09-16

    An unconstrained exocyclic stereogenic center and a removable trimethylsilyl group are combined to induce high π-facial selectivity and near-exclusive exo-selectivity in the intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition of dodeca-3,9,11-trien-5-ones. This strategy provides direct access to polysubstituted trans-1-decalones related to the symbioimines in good yield and acceptable diastereoselectivity.

  9. High π-Facial and exo-Selectivity for the Intramolecular Diels-Alder Cycloaddition of Dodeca-3,9,11-trien-5-one Precursors to 2-epi-Symbioimine and Related Compounds.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ming; Wu, Yiwei; Burke, Jason P; Chruma, Jason J

    2016-09-16

    An unconstrained exocyclic stereogenic center and a removable trimethylsilyl group are combined to induce high π-facial selectivity and near-exclusive exo-selectivity in the intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition of dodeca-3,9,11-trien-5-ones. This strategy provides direct access to polysubstituted trans-1-decalones related to the symbioimines in good yield and acceptable diastereoselectivity. PMID:27563727

  10. Metalloporphyrin-Based Hypercrosslinked Polymers Catalyze Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Dienes: A Fascinating Strategy for the Construction of Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhiyu; Xu, Li; Zhi, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yuwei; Xia, Hong; Mu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-07-11

    We describe a novel and intriguing strategy for the construction of efficient heterogeneous catalysts by hypercrosslinking catalyst molecules in a one-pot Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. The new hypercrosslinked polymers (HCPs) as porous solid catalysts exhibit the combined advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, owing to their high surface area, good stability, and tailoring of catalytic centers on the frameworks. Indeed, a new class of metalloporphyrin-based HCPs were successfully synthesized using modified iron(III) porphyrin complexes as building blocks, and the resulting networks were found to be excellent recyclable heterogeneous catalysts for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of unactivated aldehydes with 1,3-dienes. Moreover, this new strategy showed wide adaptability, and many kinds of homogeneous-like solid-based catalysts with high catalytic performance and excellent recyclability were also constructed.

  11. Novel N-allyl/propargyl tetrahydroquinolines: Synthesis via Three-component Cationic Imino Diels-Alder Reaction, Binding Prediction, and Evaluation as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Yeray A; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Ramírez, David; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bernal, Cristian C; Güiza, Fausto M; Romero Bohórquez, Arnold R

    2016-10-01

    New N-allyl/propargyl 4-substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines derivatives were efficiently synthesized using acid-catalyzed three components cationic imino Diels-Alder reaction (70-95%). All compounds were tested in vitro as dual acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase inhibitors and their potential binding modes, and affinity, were predicted by molecular docking and binding free energy calculations (∆G) respectively. The compound 4af (IC50 = 72 μm) presented the most effective inhibition against acetylcholinesterase despite its poor selectivity (SI = 2), while the best inhibitory activity on butyryl-cholinesterase was exhibited by compound 4ae (IC50 = 25.58 μm) with considerable selectivity (SI = 0.15). Molecular docking studies indicated that the most active compounds fit in the reported acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase active sites. Moreover, our computational data indicated a high correlation between the calculated ∆G and the experimental activity values in both targets.

  12. Understanding reactivity and regioselectivity in Diels-Alder reactions of a sugar-derived dienophile bearing two competing EWGs. An experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Giri, Germán F; Sarotti, Ariel M; Spanevello, Rolando A

    2015-10-13

    The effect of an extra EWG in the reactivity and regioselectivity in Diels-Alder reactions of β-cyanolevoglucosenone and 4 different dienes was studied by a joint computational and experimental study. Conceptual DFT analysis successfully predicted an important enhancement in the reactivity, and correctly anticipated the regioselectivity in the reactions with isoprene. However, this static treatment failed when dealing the regiochemical preference of the reactions involving a substituted anthracene as diene. MPW1K/6-31G* calculations correctly reproduced the experimental observations. Based on the collected data, we found that when dealing with dienes and dienophiles with no clear electronically activated position, the ease of pyramidalization of the interacting atoms dictates the regioselectivity of the DA reaction. PMID:26318382

  13. Catalytic asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of enones with isatins to access functionalized spirooxindole tetrahydropyrans: scope, derivatization, and discovery of bioactives.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hai-Lei; Chouthaiwale, Pandurang V; Yin, Feng; Tanaka, Fujie

    2016-02-01

    The development of concise methods for the synthesis of functionalized small molecules is important in the search for new bioactive molecules. To contribute to this, we have developed oxa-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of enones with isatins catalyzed by amine-based catalyst systems. Various spirooxindole tetrahydropyranones were synthesized either in enantiomerically enriched forms or as racemic forms depending on the catalyst system. The reaction products were further transformed at the ketone carbonyl group and the indole nitrogen. Using these reactions, functionalized spirooxindole tetrahydropyran derivatives with functional groups in four directions in a three-dimensional space were concisely obtained. From these synthesized compounds, an inhibitor of human ion channel Nav1.7 with μM-level activity was identified, indicating that the developed reaction methods are useful for providing molecules for the discovery of new biofunctional molecules.

  14. ent-Kaurane-Based Regio- and Stereoselective Inverse Electron Demand Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions: Synthesis of Dihydropyran-Fused Diterpenoids†

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chunyong; Wang, Lili; Chen, Haijun; Wild, Christopher; Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wang, Tianzhi; White, Mark A.; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    A mild and concise approach for the construction of 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran ring integrated into the A-ring of the natural product oridonin using an optimized inverse electron demand hetero-Diels-Alder (IED HDA) reaction is reported herein. A self-dimerization of the exocyclic enone installed in the A-ring through a homo-HDA reaction was identified to exclusively give a dimeric ent-kaurane diterpenoid with the spirochroman core. Moreover, the efficient cross-HDA cycloadditions of this enone with various vinyl ethers or vinyl sulfides, instead of its own homo-HDA dimerization, were achieved in regio- and stereoselective manners, thus providing the access to novel dihydropyran-fused diterpenoids as potential anticancer agents to overcome chemoresistance. PMID:25225052

  15. Diels-Alder Reaction of Anthranilic Acids: A Versatile Route to Dense Monolayers on Flat Edge and Basal Plane Graphitic Carbon Substrates.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Anna K; Fitchett, Christopher M; Dykstra, Haidee M; Waterland, Mark R; Brooksby, Paula A; Downard, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Methods that reliably yield monolayers of covalently anchored modifiers on graphene and other planar graphitic materials are in demand. Covalently bonded groups can add functionality to graphitic carbon for applications ranging from sensing to supercapacitors and can tune the electronic and optical properties of graphene. Limiting modification to a monolayer gives a layer with well-defined concentration and thickness providing a minimum barrier to charge transfer. Here we investigate the use of anthranilic acid derivatives for grafting aryl groups to few layer graphene and pyrolyzed photoresist film (PPF). Under mild conditions, anthranilic acids generate arynes, which undergo Diels-Alder cycloadditions. Using spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and atomic force microscopy, we demonstrate that the reaction yields monolayers of aryl groups on graphene and PPF with maximum surface coverages consistent with densely packed layers. Our study confirms that anthranilic acids offer a convenient route to covalent modification of planar graphitic carbons (both basal and edge plane materials). PMID:27529723

  16. The Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction of Substituted Hemifullerenes with 1,3-Butadiene: Effect of Electron-Donating and Electron-Withdrawing Substituents.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Martha; Méndez, Francisco; Alonso, Julio A

    2016-02-12

    The Diels-Alder (DA) reaction provides an attractive route to increase the number of six member rings in substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). The density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method has been used in this work to inquire if the substitution of H over the edge of triindenetriphenylene (pristine hemifullerene 1) and pentacyclopentacorannulene (pristine hemifullerene 2), could improve the DA cycloaddition reaction with 1,3-butadiene. The substituents tested include electron-donating (NH₂, OMe, OH, Me, i-Pr) and electron-withdrawing groups (F, COOH, CF₃, CHO, CN, NO₂). The electronic, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the DA reactions of the substituted hemifullerenes with 1,3-butadiene have been analyzed. The most promising results were obtained for the NO₂ substituent; the activation energy barriers for reactions using this substituent were lower than the barriers for the pristine hemifullerenes. This leads us to expect that the cycloadditions to a starting fullerene fragment will be possible.

  17. Metalloporphyrin-Based Hypercrosslinked Polymers Catalyze Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Dienes: A Fascinating Strategy for the Construction of Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhiyu; Xu, Li; Zhi, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yuwei; Xia, Hong; Mu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-07-11

    We describe a novel and intriguing strategy for the construction of efficient heterogeneous catalysts by hypercrosslinking catalyst molecules in a one-pot Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. The new hypercrosslinked polymers (HCPs) as porous solid catalysts exhibit the combined advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, owing to their high surface area, good stability, and tailoring of catalytic centers on the frameworks. Indeed, a new class of metalloporphyrin-based HCPs were successfully synthesized using modified iron(III) porphyrin complexes as building blocks, and the resulting networks were found to be excellent recyclable heterogeneous catalysts for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of unactivated aldehydes with 1,3-dienes. Moreover, this new strategy showed wide adaptability, and many kinds of homogeneous-like solid-based catalysts with high catalytic performance and excellent recyclability were also constructed. PMID:27147500

  18. Catalytic effect of gallium chloride in the diels-alder reaction between maleic anhydride and its derivatives and unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.D.; Konovalov, A.I.; Shakirov, I.M.

    1985-11-10

    The stability of n, v complexes between gallium chloride and unsubstituted and substituted maleic anhydrides was determined in benzene by a thermochemical method; it was shown that the stability of the complexes decreases in the transition from maleic anhydrides with electron-donating substituents to maleic anhydrides with electron-withdrawing substituents. The reactivity of these dienophiles in the uncatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions with unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes in benzene and in the reactions catalyzed by gallium chloride was studied. The reactivity of the dienophiles varies similarly in the reactions with the investigated dienes, and this rules out treatment of steric hindrances as the reason for the reduced reactivity of the substituted dienophiles. A decrease in the catalytic effect was observed for the unreactive diene-dienophile pairs.

  19. Unique Steric Effect of Geminal Bis(silane) To Control the High Exo-selectivity in Intermolecular Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengjin; Lin, Xinglong; Yang, Na; Su, Zhishan; Hu, Changwei; Xiao, Peihong; He, Yanyang; Song, Zhenlei

    2016-02-17

    The unique steric effect of geminal bis(silane) [(R3Si)2CH] allows an exo-selective intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction of geminal bis(silyl) dienes with α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. The approach shows good generality to form ortho-trans cyclohexenes in good yields with high exo-selectivity and high enantioselectivity in some asymmetric cases. The excellent exo-stereocontrol aptitude of (R3Si)2CH group is highlighted by comparing with R3SiCH2 and R3Si groups, which leads to endo-selectivity predominantly. The conformational analysis of dienes suggests that (R3Si)2CH group effectively shields both sides of the diene moiety, ensuring the desired exo-selectivity. Moreover, the geminal bis(silane) can be further functionalized to transform the resulting ortho-trans cycloadducts into useful synthons, which makes the approach hold great potential for organic synthesis.

  20. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 105 Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Mark A.

    2002-08-22

    Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and 115kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 7/17. Corridor width varies. The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 30 miles of access roads will be cleared using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Tower sites will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposal.

  1. Effect on tumor necrosis factor-α production and antioxidant ability of black alder, as factors related to its anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores

    2012-06-01

    Alders exhibit several uses in different areas and also offer some nutritional and medicinal values. The bark and leaves from black alder [Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn] are used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory processes and other health disorders. This study assessed if an extract of A. glutinosa stem bark exhibits some biological properties linked to improving the inflammatory state, which could partly justify its ethnopharmacological use. Therefore, various aspects of antioxidant activity as well as the effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production were evaluated. The phytochemical study revealed the presence of terpenes, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, and anthraquinones (by high-performance thin-layer chromatography). The betulinic acid content in the extract, determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (validated method), was 0.72±0.027%. In addition, high amounts for total phenols as well as flavonoids were determined. The extract exhibited a 2,2'-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity similar to that of ascorbic acid and had a significant effect on superoxide anion scavenging, superior to that of ascorbic acid. It was also able to protect HeLa cells from induced oxidative stress. In the TNF-α assay, levels of this citokine were depressed by the extract in HL-60 cells. To test the effect of the extract on cell proliferation, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed. According to the results, the antioxidant properties displayed by the extract of A. glutinosa stem bark, together with the effect on TNF-α levels, suggest that these activities, linked to a successful reduction in inflammatory processes, may support, in part, its ethnopharmacological use.

  2. Effect on Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production and Antioxidant Ability of Black Alder, as Factors Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Acero, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Alders exhibit several uses in different areas and also offer some nutritional and medicinal values. The bark and leaves from black alder [Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn] are used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory processes and other health disorders. This study assessed if an extract of A. glutinosa stem bark exhibits some biological properties linked to improving the inflammatory state, which could partly justify its ethnopharmacological use. Therefore, various aspects of antioxidant activity as well as the effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production were evaluated. The phytochemical study revealed the presence of terpenes, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, and anthraquinones (by high-performance thin-layer chromatography). The betulinic acid content in the extract, determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (validated method), was 0.72±0.027%. In addition, high amounts for total phenols as well as flavonoids were determined. The extract exhibited a 2,2′-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity similar to that of ascorbic acid and had a significant effect on superoxide anion scavenging, superior to that of ascorbic acid. It was also able to protect HeLa cells from induced oxidative stress. In the TNF-α assay, levels of this citokine were depressed by the extract in HL-60 cells. To test the effect of the extract on cell proliferation, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed. According to the results, the antioxidant properties displayed by the extract of A. glutinosa stem bark, together with the effect on TNF-α levels, suggest that these activities, linked to a successful reduction in inflammatory processes, may support, in part, its ethnopharmacological use. PMID:22424456

  3. The Diels-Alder-Reaction with inverse-Electron-Demand, a very efficient versatile Click-Reaction Concept for proper Ligation of variable molecular Partners

    PubMed Central

    Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Kliem, Christian; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The ligation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) for working with image processing systems in diagnostics (MRT) attracts increasing notice and scientific interest. The Diels-Alder ligation Reaction with inverse electron demand (DARinv) turns out to be an appropriate candidate. The DARinv is characterized by a specific distribution of electrons of the diene and the corresponding dienophile counterpart. Whereas the reactants in the classical Diels-Alder Reaction feature electron-rich diene and electron-poor dienophile compounds, the DARinv exhibits exactly the opposite distribution of electrons. Substituents with pushing electrones increase and, with pulling electrons reduce the electron density of the dienes as used in the DARinv. We report here that the DARinv is an efficient route for coupling of multifunctional molecules like active peptides, re-formulated drugs or small molecules like the alkyalting agent temozolomide (TMZ). This is an example of our contribution to the "Click chemistry" technology. In this case TMZ is ligated by DARinv as a cargo to transporter molecules facilitating the passage across the cell membranes into cells and subsequently into subcellular components like the cell nucleus by using address molecules. With such constructs we achieved high local concentrations at the desired target site of pharmacological action. The DARinv ligation was carried out using the combination of several technologies, namely: the organic chemistry and the solid phase peptide synthesis which can produce 'tailored' solutions for questions not solely restricted to the medical diagnostics or therapy, but also result in functionalizations of various surfaces qualified amongst others also for array development. We like to acquaint you with the DARinv and we like to exemplify that all ligation products were generated after a rapid and complete reaction in organic solutions at room temperature, in high purity, but also, hurdles and difficulties on the way to the

  4. The Diels-Alder-reaction with inverse-electron-demand, a very efficient versatile click-reaction concept for proper ligation of variable molecular partners.

    PubMed

    Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Kliem, Christian; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus

    2009-12-05

    The ligation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) for working with image processing systems in diagnostics (MRT) attracts increasing notice and scientific interest. The Diels-Alder ligation Reaction with inverse electron demand (DAR(inv)) turns out to be an appropriate candidate. The DAR(inv) is characterized by a specific distribution of electrons of the diene and the corresponding dienophile counterpart. Whereas the reactants in the classical Diels-Alder Reaction feature electron-rich diene and electron-poor dienophile compounds, the DAR(inv) exhibits exactly the opposite distribution of electrons. Substituents with pushing electrones increase and, with pulling electrons reduce the electron density of the dienes as used in the DAR(inv).We report here that the DAR(inv) is an efficient route for coupling of multifunctional molecules like active peptides, re-formulated drugs or small molecules like the alkyalting agent temozolomide (TMZ). This is an example of our contribution to the "Click chemistry" technology. In this case TMZ is ligated by DAR(inv) as a cargo to transporter molecules facilitating the passage across the cell membranes into cells and subsequently into subcellular components like the cell nucleus by using address molecules. With such constructs we achieved high local concentrations at the desired target site of pharmacological action. The DAR(inv) ligation was carried out using the combination of several technologies, namely: the organic chemistry and the solid phase peptide synthesis which can produce 'tailored' solutions for questions not solely restricted to the medical diagnostics or therapy, but also result in functionalizations of various surfaces qualified amongst others also for array development.We like to acquaint you with the DAR(inv) and we like to exemplify that all ligation products were generated after a rapid and complete reaction in organic solutions at room temperature, in high purity, but also, hurdles and difficulties on

  5. The Diels-Alder-reaction with inverse-electron-demand, a very efficient versatile click-reaction concept for proper ligation of variable molecular partners.

    PubMed

    Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Kliem, Christian; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The ligation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) for working with image processing systems in diagnostics (MRT) attracts increasing notice and scientific interest. The Diels-Alder ligation Reaction with inverse electron demand (DAR(inv)) turns out to be an appropriate candidate. The DAR(inv) is characterized by a specific distribution of electrons of the diene and the corresponding dienophile counterpart. Whereas the reactants in the classical Diels-Alder Reaction feature electron-rich diene and electron-poor dienophile compounds, the DAR(inv) exhibits exactly the opposite distribution of electrons. Substituents with pushing electrones increase and, with pulling electrons reduce the electron density of the dienes as used in the DAR(inv).We report here that the DAR(inv) is an efficient route for coupling of multifunctional molecules like active peptides, re-formulated drugs or small molecules like the alkyalting agent temozolomide (TMZ). This is an example of our contribution to the "Click chemistry" technology. In this case TMZ is ligated by DAR(inv) as a cargo to transporter molecules facilitating the passage across the cell membranes into cells and subsequently into subcellular components like the cell nucleus by using address molecules. With such constructs we achieved high local concentrations at the desired target site of pharmacological action. The DAR(inv) ligation was carried out using the combination of several technologies, namely: the organic chemistry and the solid phase peptide synthesis which can produce 'tailored' solutions for questions not solely restricted to the medical diagnostics or therapy, but also result in functionalizations of various surfaces qualified amongst others also for array development.We like to acquaint you with the DAR(inv) and we like to exemplify that all ligation products were generated after a rapid and complete reaction in organic solutions at room temperature, in high purity, but also, hurdles and difficulties on

  6. A Near-Infrared Photothermal Effect-Responsive Drug Delivery System Based on Indocyanine Green and Doxorubicin-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Mediated by Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Junjie; Ke, Wendong; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-10-01

    Near-infrared light (NIR) possesses great advantages for light-responsive controllable drug release, such as deep tissue penetration and low damage to healthy tissues. Herein, a NIR-responsive drug delivery system is developed based on a NIR dye, indocyanine green (ICG), and anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded thermoresponsive block copolymer micelles, in which the drug release can be controlled via NIR irradiation. First, block copolymers, poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-block-poly(furfuryl methacrylate) (POEGMA-b-PFMA), are synthesized by sequential reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization, followed by modification with N-octyl maleimide through Diels-Alder (DA) reaction to produce POEGMA-b-POMFMA. The self-assembly of POEGMA-b-POMFMA by nano-precipitation in aqueous solution affords the polymeric micelles which are used to simultaneously encapsulate ICG and DOX. Upon irradiation by NIR light (805 nm), the loaded DOX is released rapidly from the micelles due to partial retro DA reaction and local temperature increase-induced faster drug diffusion by the photothermal effect. Cytotoxicity evaluation and intracellular distribution observation demonstrate significant synergistic effects of NIR-triggered drug release, photothermal, and chemotherapy toward cancer cells under NIR irradiation.

  7. Metabolic profiling of major vitamin D metabolites using Diels-Alder derivatization and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aronov, Pavel A; Hall, Laura M; Dettmer, Katja; Stephensen, Charles B; Hammock, Bruce D

    2008-07-01

    Biologically active forms of vitamin D are important analytical targets in both research and clinical practice. The current technology is such that each of the vitamin D metabolites is usually analyzed by individual assay. However, current LC-MS technologies allow the simultaneous metabolic profiling of entire biochemical pathways. The impediment to the metabolic profiling of vitamin D metabolites is the low level of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) in human serum (15-60 pg/mL). Here, we demonstrate that liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction of vitamin D metabolites in combination with Diels-Alder derivatization with the commercially available reagent 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) followed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-electrospray/tandem mass spectrometry analysis provides rapid and simultaneous quantification of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(2), 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D(2) in 0.5 mL human serum at a lower limit of quantification of 25 pg/mL. Precision ranged from 1.6-4.8 % and 5-16 % for 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) and 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), respectively, using solid-phase extraction.

  8. Novel N-allyl/propargyl tetrahydroquinolines: Synthesis via Three-component Cationic Imino Diels-Alder Reaction, Binding Prediction, and Evaluation as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Yeray A; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Ramírez, David; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bernal, Cristian C; Güiza, Fausto M; Romero Bohórquez, Arnold R

    2016-10-01

    New N-allyl/propargyl 4-substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines derivatives were efficiently synthesized using acid-catalyzed three components cationic imino Diels-Alder reaction (70-95%). All compounds were tested in vitro as dual acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase inhibitors and their potential binding modes, and affinity, were predicted by molecular docking and binding free energy calculations (∆G) respectively. The compound 4af (IC50 = 72 μm) presented the most effective inhibition against acetylcholinesterase despite its poor selectivity (SI = 2), while the best inhibitory activity on butyryl-cholinesterase was exhibited by compound 4ae (IC50 = 25.58 μm) with considerable selectivity (SI = 0.15). Molecular docking studies indicated that the most active compounds fit in the reported acetylcholinesterase and butyryl-cholinesterase active sites. Moreover, our computational data indicated a high correlation between the calculated ∆G and the experimental activity values in both targets. PMID:27085663

  9. Healable capacitive touch screen sensors based on transparent composite electrodes comprising silver nanowires and a furan/maleimide diels-alder cycloaddition polymer.

    PubMed

    Li, Junpeng; Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Ren, Fengbo; Hu, Wei; Li, Juan; Qi, Shuhua; Pei, Qibing

    2014-12-23

    A healable transparent capacitive touch screen sensor has been fabricated based on a healable silver nanowire-polymer composite electrode. The composite electrode features a layer of silver nanowire percolation network embedded into the surface layer of a polymer substrate comprising an ultrathin soldering polymer layer to confine the nanowires to the surface of a healable Diels-Alder cycloaddition copolymer and to attain low contact resistance between the nanowires. The composite electrode has a figure-of-merit sheet resistance of 18 Ω/sq with 80% transmittance at 550 nm. A surface crack cut on the conductive surface with 18 Ω is healed by heating at 100 °C, and the sheet resistance recovers to 21 Ω in 6 min. A healable touch screen sensor with an array of 8×8 capacitive sensing points is prepared by stacking two composite films patterned with 8 rows and 8 columns of coupling electrodes at 90° angle. After deliberate damage, the coupling electrodes recover touch sensing function upon heating at 80 °C for 30 s. A capacitive touch screen based on Arduino is demonstrated capable of performing quick recovery from malfunction caused by a razor blade cutting. After four cycles of cutting and healing, the sensor array remains functional.

  10. Lewis Acids as Activators in CBS-Catalysed Diels-Alder Reactions: Distortion Induced Lewis Acidity Enhancement of SnCl4.

    PubMed

    Nödling, Alexander R; Möckel, Robert; Tonner, Ralf; Hilt, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    The effect of several Lewis acids on the CBS catalyst (named after Corey, Bakshi and Shibata) was investigated in this study. While (2) H NMR spectroscopic measurements served as gauge for the activation capability of the Lewis acids, in situ FT-IR spectroscopy was employed to assess the catalytic activity of the Lewis acid oxazaborolidine complexes. A correlation was found between the Δδ((2) H) values and rate constants kDA , which indicates a direct translation of Lewis acidity into reactivity of the Lewis acid-CBS complexes. Unexpectedly, a significant deviation was found for SnCl4 as Lewis acid. The SnCl4 -CBS adduct was much more reactive than the Δδ((2) H) values predicted and gave similar reaction rates to those observed for the prominent AlBr3 -CBS adduct. To rationalize these results, quantum mechanical calculations were performed. The frontier molecular orbital approach was applied and a good correlation between the LUMO energies of the Lewis acid-CBS-naphthoquinone adducts and kDA could be found. For the SnCl4 -CBS-naphthoquinone adduct an unusual distortion was observed leading to an enhanced Lewis acidity. Energy decomposition analysis with natural orbitals for chemical valence (EDA-NOCV) calculations revealed the relevant interactions and activation mode of SnCl4 as Lewis acid in Diels-Alder reactions. PMID:27492791

  11. Origin of the synchronicity in bond formation in polar Diels-Alder reactions: an ELF analysis of the reaction between cyclopentadiene and tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez, Patricia; Sáez, Jose A

    2012-05-21

    The origin of the synchronicity in C-C bond formation in polar Diels-Alder (P-DA) reactions involving symmetrically substituted electrophilic ethylenes has been studied by an ELF analysis of the electron reorganization along the P-DA reaction of cyclopentadiene (Cp) with tetracyanoethylene (TCE) at the B3LYP/6-31G* level. The present study makes it possible to establish that the synchronicity in C-C bond formation in P-DA reactions is controlled by the symmetric distribution of the electron-density excess reached in the electrophile through the charge transfer process, which can be anticipated by an analysis of the spin electron-density at the corresponding radical anion. The ELF comparative analysis of bonding along the DA reactions of Cp with ethylene and with TCE asserts that these DA reactions, which have a symmetric electron reorganization, do not have a cyclic electron reorganization as the pericyclic mechanism states. Due to the very limited number of cases of symmetrically substituted ethylenes, we can conclude that the synchronous mechanism is an exception of DA reactions. PMID:22527420

  12. A Near-Infrared Photothermal Effect-Responsive Drug Delivery System Based on Indocyanine Green and Doxorubicin-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Mediated by Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Junjie; Ke, Wendong; Ge, Zhishen

    2015-10-01

    Near-infrared light (NIR) possesses great advantages for light-responsive controllable drug release, such as deep tissue penetration and low damage to healthy tissues. Herein, a NIR-responsive drug delivery system is developed based on a NIR dye, indocyanine green (ICG), and anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded thermoresponsive block copolymer micelles, in which the drug release can be controlled via NIR irradiation. First, block copolymers, poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-block-poly(furfuryl methacrylate) (POEGMA-b-PFMA), are synthesized by sequential reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization, followed by modification with N-octyl maleimide through Diels-Alder (DA) reaction to produce POEGMA-b-POMFMA. The self-assembly of POEGMA-b-POMFMA by nano-precipitation in aqueous solution affords the polymeric micelles which are used to simultaneously encapsulate ICG and DOX. Upon irradiation by NIR light (805 nm), the loaded DOX is released rapidly from the micelles due to partial retro DA reaction and local temperature increase-induced faster drug diffusion by the photothermal effect. Cytotoxicity evaluation and intracellular distribution observation demonstrate significant synergistic effects of NIR-triggered drug release, photothermal, and chemotherapy toward cancer cells under NIR irradiation. PMID:26274805

  13. Activation-strain analysis reveals unexpected origin of fast reactivity in heteroaromatic azadiene inverse-electron-demand diels-alder cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Austin; Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J; Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Ess, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Heteroaromatic azadienes, especially 1,2,4,5-tetrazines, are extremely reactive partners with alkenes in inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reactions. Azadiene cycloaddition reactions are used to construct heterocycles in synthesis and are popular as bioorthogonal reactions. The origin of fast azadiene cycloaddition reactivity is classically attributed to the inverse frontier molecular orbital (FMO) interaction between the azadiene LUMO and alkene HOMO. Here, we use a combination of ab initio, density functional theory, and activation-strain model calculations to analyze physical interactions in heteroaromatic azadiene-alkene cycloaddition transition states. We find that FMO interactions do not control reactivity because, while the inverse FMO interaction becomes more stabilizing, there is a decrease in the forward FMO interaction that is offsetting. Rather, fast cycloadditions are due to a decrease in closed-shell Pauli repulsion between cycloaddition partners. The kinetic-thermodynamic relationship found for these inverse-electron-demand cycloadditions is also due to the trend in closed-shell repulsion in the cycloadducts. Cycloaddition regioselectivity, however, is the result of differences in occupied-unoccupied orbital interactions due to orbital overlap. These results provide a new predictive model and correct physical basis for heteroaromatic azadiene reactivity and regioselectivity with alkene dieneophiles.

  14. Kinetic and spectrophotometric investigation of the diels-alder reaction between maleic anhydride derivatives and substituted anthracenes in the presence of gallium and aluminum chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.D.; Konovalov, A.I.; Shakirov, I.M.

    1986-10-01

    A comparison was made of the kinetic data for the normal Diels-Alder reaction of para-substituted N-arylmaleimides and substituted maleic anhydrides with meso-substituted anthracenes and of the reaction catalyzed by gallium and aluminum chlorides. The largely constant effects of gallium chloride (10/sup 4/) and aluminum chloride (10/sup 5/) in the acceleration of the reactions between the various pairs were demonstrated. The energies of charge transfer in the complexes between hexamethylbenzene and the dienophiles in the presence and absence of Lewis acids were determined by spectrophotometry. A significant decrease (to 1.2 eV) of the charge-transfer energy was found in the ..pi.., ..pi..-complexes and was attributed to the stabilization of the LUMO of the dienophile. From analysis of the obtained data it was concluded that the observed catalytic effect in the presence of Lewis acids can be explained by the approach of the frontier orbital levels and by a favorable change in the coefficients at the atomic orbitals responsible for the reaction.

  15. Determination of the energy storage capacity of the Diels-Alder reaction between methylfuran and maleic anhydride as applied to storing solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, B.G.

    1981-01-01

    The heat storage capacity of the Diels-Alder reaction between 2-methylfuran and maleic anhydride is calculated using reaction parameters obtained from solution calorimetry. An equilibrium constant of .614 1/mol and a heat of reaction of 14.33 kcal/mole were obtained from experiments at 45/sup 0/C. A reaction ..delta..C/sub p/ of -21.8 cal/mole was calculated from heat capacity information at 25/sup 0/C. From these parameters, a solution initially seven molar in methylfuran and maleic anhydride was found to have a maximum apparent volumetric heat capacity of about 1.85 times that of water. This maximum occurs at about 335/sup 0/K. Typical active solar energy schemes operate between 300 and 400/sup 0/K. When cycled between these temperatures, this system has an overall apparent heat capacity about 1.5 times that of water. The apparent heat capacity increases as the temperature range is narrowed.

  16. Enhancing reactivity of carbonyl compounds via hydrogen-bond formation. A DFT study of the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction between butadiene derivative and acetone in chloroform.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Andrés, Juan

    2003-10-31

    To examine how hydrogen-bond (HB) formation involving chloroform solvent molecules influences the chemical reactivity of ketones, the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of N,N-dimethyl-1-amino-3-methoxy-1,3-butadiene and acetone has been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G level. The effects of the chloroform on the activation energies have been modeled by means of discrete-continuum models. In the gas phase, the formation of specific HB between acetone and one and two chloroform molecules decreases the activation barriers from 19.3 to 13.6 and 8.5 kcal/mol, respectively. Inclusion of solvent effects by means of combined discrete and polarizable continuum models yields a change of molecular mechanism from a concerted to a two-step mechanism, and the first nucleophilic step is the rate-limiting step. The corresponding values of activation barriers in chloroform are 18.6 kcal/ mol (no HB), 13.5 kcal/mol (one HB), and 9.6 kcal/mol (two HBs). These theoretical results account for the experimental observation that chloroform accelerates the reaction more markedly than more polar aprotic solvent such as acetonitrile. A DFT analysis of the global electrophilicity power of the reagents provides a sound explanation about the catalytic effects of chloroform.

  17. Origin of the synchronicity in bond formation in polar Diels-Alder reactions: an ELF analysis of the reaction between cyclopentadiene and tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez, Patricia; Sáez, Jose A

    2012-05-21

    The origin of the synchronicity in C-C bond formation in polar Diels-Alder (P-DA) reactions involving symmetrically substituted electrophilic ethylenes has been studied by an ELF analysis of the electron reorganization along the P-DA reaction of cyclopentadiene (Cp) with tetracyanoethylene (TCE) at the B3LYP/6-31G* level. The present study makes it possible to establish that the synchronicity in C-C bond formation in P-DA reactions is controlled by the symmetric distribution of the electron-density excess reached in the electrophile through the charge transfer process, which can be anticipated by an analysis of the spin electron-density at the corresponding radical anion. The ELF comparative analysis of bonding along the DA reactions of Cp with ethylene and with TCE asserts that these DA reactions, which have a symmetric electron reorganization, do not have a cyclic electron reorganization as the pericyclic mechanism states. Due to the very limited number of cases of symmetrically substituted ethylenes, we can conclude that the synchronous mechanism is an exception of DA reactions.

  18. Catalytic Activity of Cationic and Neutral Silver(I)-XPhos Complexes with Nitrogen Ligands or Tolylsulfonate for Mannich and Aza-Diels-Alder Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Grirrane, Abdessamad; Álvarez, Eleuterio; García, Hermenegildo; Corma, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    Cationic and neutral silver(I)-L complexes (L=Buchwald-type biaryl phosphanes) with nitrogen co-ligands or organosulfonate counter ions have been synthesised and characterised through their structural and spectroscopic properties. At room temperature, both cationic and neutral silver(I)-L complexes are extremely active catalysts in the promotion of the single and double A(3) coupling of terminal (di)alkynes, pyrrolidine and formaldehyde. In addition, the aza-Diels-Alder two- and three-component coupling reactions of Danishefsky's diene with an imine or amine and aldehyde are efficiently catalysed by these cationic or neutral silver(I)-L complexes. The solvent influences the catalytic performance due to limited complex solubility or solvent decomposition and reactivity. The isolation of new silver(I)-L complexes with reagents as ligands lends support to mechanistic proposals for such catalytic processes. The activity, stability and metal-distal arene interaction of these silver(I)-L catalysts have been compared with those of analogous cationic gold(I) and copper(I) complexes. PMID:26598792

  19. Whallwachsia illuminata n. gen., n. sp. (Trematoda: Digenea: Plagiorchiformes: Prosthogonimidae) in the steely-vented hummingbird Amazilia saucerrottei (Aves: Apodiformes: Trochilidae) and the yellow-olive flycatcher Tolmomyias sulphurescens (Aves: Passeriformes: Tyraninidae) from the Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Zamparo, David; Brooks, Daniel R; Causey, Douglas

    2003-08-01

    A new species of digenean found in the intestines of the steely-vented hummingbird Amazilia saucerrottei and the yellow-olive flycatcher Tolmomyias sulphurescens from the Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, resembles members of the Prosthogonimidae in having a highly lobate ovary; an elongate cirrus sac containing the cirrus, pars prostatica, and internal seminal vesicle; no external seminal vesicle; 2 fields of extracecal vitelline follicles restricted to the area between the intestinal bifurcation and testes; and uterine loops occupying all available space in the hind body. The new species differs from all other members of the family in having genital pores opening laterally to the cecum, immediately anterior to the acetabular level, and markedly oblique rather than symmetrical testes. Consequently, we propose the new genus Whallwachsia for the species. Preliminary phylogenetic assessment suggests that the species is the sister group of all other prosthogonimids.

  20. A complete guide on the influence of metal clusters in the Diels-Alder regioselectivity of I(h)-C80 endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Osuna, Sílvia; Luis, Josep M; Swart, Marcel; Solà, Miquel

    2013-10-25

    The chemical functionalization of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) has aroused considerable interest due to the possibility of synthesizing new species with potential applications in materials science and medicine. Experimental and theoretical studies on the reactivity of endohedral metallofullerenes are scarce. To improve our understanding of the endohedral metallofullerene reactivity, we have systematically studied with DFT methods the Diels-Alder cycloaddition between s-cis-1,3-butadiene and practically all X@I(h)-C80 EMFs synthesized to date: X=Sc3N, Lu3N, Y3N, La2, Y3, Sc3C2, Sc4C2, Sc3CH, Sc3NC, Sc4O2 and Sc4O3. We have studied both the thermodynamic and kinetic regioselectivity, taking into account the free rotation of the metallic cluster inside the fullerene. This systematic study has been made possible through the use of the frozen cage model (FCM), a computationally cheap approach to accurately predicting the exohedral regioselectivity of cycloaddition reactions in EMFs. Our results show that the EMFs are less reactive than the hollow I(h)-C80 cage. Except for the Y3 cluster, the additions occur predominantly at the [5,6] bond. In many cases, however, a mixture of the two possible regioisomers is predicted. In general, [6,6] addition is favored in EMFs that have a larger charge transfer from the metal cluster to the cage or a voluminous metal cluster inside. The present guide represents the first complete and exhaustive investigation of the reactivity of I(h)-C80-based EMFs.

  1. QM/MM Protocol for Direct Molecular Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Solution: The Water-Accelerated Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongyue; Doubleday, Charles; Houk, K N

    2015-12-01

    We describe a solvent-perturbed transition state (SPTS) sampling scheme for simulating chemical reaction dynamics in condensed phase. The method, adapted from Truhlar and Gao's ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory, includes the effect of instantaneous solvent configuration on the potential energy surface of the reacting system (RS) and allows initial conditions for the RS to be sampled quasiclassically by TS normal mode sampling. We use a QM/MM model with direct dynamics, in which QM forces of the RS are computed at each trajectory point. The SPTS scheme is applied to the acceleration of the Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene (CP) + methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) in water. We explored the effect of the number of SPTS and of solvent box size on the distribution of bond lengths in the TS. Statistical sampling of the sampling was achieved when distribution of forming bond lengths converged. We describe the region enclosing the partial bond lengths as the transition zone. Transition zones in the gas phase, SMD implicit solvent, QM/MM, and QM/MM+QM (3 water molecules treated by QM) vary according to the ability of the medium to stabilize zwitterionic structures. Mean time gaps between formation of C-C bonds vary from 11 fs for gas phase to 25 fs for QM/MM+QM. Mean H-bond lengths to O(carbonyl) in QM/MM+QM are 0.14 Å smaller at the TS than in MVK reactant, and the mean O(carbonyl)-H(water)-O(water) angle of H-bonds at the TS is 10° larger than in MVK reactant.

  2. Four mechanisms in the reactions of 3-aminopyrrole with 1,3,5-triazines: inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloadditions vs S(N)Ar reactions via uncatalyzed and acid-catalyzed pathways.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Michael; Arnold, David; Hartline, Douglas

    2013-09-01

    Reaction of 3-aminopyrrole with seven 1,3,5-triazines was studied in a one-step reaction (in situ formation of 3-aminopyrrole) and a two-step reaction (using the tetraphenylborate salt and an amine base). An inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder reaction (IEDDA) was observed with R1 = CF3, CO2Et, and H with the formation of 5H-pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives. S(N)Ar was observed when 2,4,6-trifluoro- or 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine were used--1,3,5-triazines that had leaving groups. If excess 1,3,5-triazine was present the initial S(N)Ar product reacted further, in the presence of acid and water, with another equivalent of 1,3,5-triazine to give compounds containing three linked heterocyclic rings. No reaction was observed with R1 = C6H5 and OCH3. Four mechanisms are proposed to explain the experimental results: uncatalyzed and acid catalyzed inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cascades leading to cycloaddition, and uncatalyzed and acid-catalyzed S(N)Ar reactions leading, respectively, to single and double substitution products. Acid catalysis was a factor when there was reduced reactivity in either reactant.

  3. Linear-dendritic supramolecular complexes as nanoscale reaction vessels for "green" chemistry. Diels-Alder reactions between fullerene C60 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Arsen; Gitsov, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This study describes the first Diels-Alder (DA) reaction performed in aqueous medium with highly hydrophobic compounds-fullerene (C 60) as the dienophile and anthracene (An) or tetracene (Tet) as the dienes, respectively. The reactions are performed in nanocontainers, constructed by self-assembly of linear-dendritic amphiphilic copolymers with poly(ethylene glycol), PEG or poly(ethylene oxide), PEO as the hydrophilic blocks and poly(benzyl ether) monodendrons as the hydrophobic fragments: G3PEO13k, dG3 and dG2. Comparative studies under identical conditions are carried out with an amphiphilic linear-linear copolymer, poly(styrene)1800- block-PEO2100, PSt-PEO, and the nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-720, IP720. The binding affinity of supermolecules built of these amphiphiles toward the DA reagents decreases in the following order: G3PEO13k > dG3 > PSt-PEO > dG2 > IP720. The kinetic constant of binding is evaluated for tetracene and decreases in a similar fashion: 5 x 10 (-7) M/min (G3PEO13k), through 4 x 10 (-7) M/min (PSt-PEO) down to 1.5 x 10 (-7) M/min for IP720. The mobility of substrates encapsulated in the micellar core, estimated by pyrene fluorescence decay, is 95-121 ns for the micelles of the linear-dendritic copolymers and notably higher for PSt-PEO (152 ns), revealing the much denser interior of the linear analogue. The apparent kinetic constant for the DA reaction of C 60 and Tet within the G3PEO13k supermolecule in aqueous medium is markedly higher than in organic solvent (toluene), 208 vs 1.82 M /min. With G3PEO13k the conversions reach 49% for the DA reaction between C 60 and An, and 55% for C 60 and Tet. Besides the monoadduct (26.5% yield) the reaction with An produces exclusively increasing amounts of D 2 h -symmetric antipodal bis-adduct, whose yield reaches up to 22.5% after 48 h. In addition to the environmentally friendly conditions notable advantages of the synthetic strategy described are the extended stability of the linear

  4. A technique to produce aluminum color bands for avian research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koronkiewicz, T.J.; Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a technique to produce metal (aluminum) color bands, in response to concerns about leg injuries caused by celluloid-plastic color bands applied to Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii). The technique involves color-anodized aluminum bands (unnumbered blanks and federal numbered bands), with auto pin-striping tape and flexible epoxy sealant, to create a variety of solid, half- and triple-split colors. This allows for hundreds of unique, high-contrast color combinations. During six consecutive years of application, these colored metal bands have resisted color fade compared to conventional celluloid-plastic bands, and have reduced leg injuries in the flycatcher. Although not necessarily warranted for all color-banding studies, these metal bands may provide a lower-impact option for studies of species known to be impacted by plastic color bands.

  5. Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takuya; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2011-10-01

    The dehydrogenative cycloaddition of dieneynes, which possess a diene in the form of a styrene moiety and a dienophile in the form of an alkyne moiety, produces naphthalene derivatives when heated. It was found that a key requirement of this process is the presence of a silyl group attached to the alkyne moiety, which forces a dehydrogenation reaction to occur. PMID:21905638

  6. Root tensile strength of grey alder and mountain maple grown on a coarse grained eco-engineered slope in the Swiss Alps related to wood anatomical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kink, Dimitri; Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Egli, Markus; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    . In order to confirm this assumption and possibly find more important root properties which have an influence on soil stabilization, the root systems of seven trees (three grey alder, four mountain maple) were excavated and analyzed. The study site is a catchment, where shallow landslides are common. It is located in the Prättigau valley in the Eastern Swiss Alps and was eco-engineered in 1997. The substrate is coarse-grained morainic material, mean annual air temperature reaches 4.64°C, average precipitation is 1170 mm, and the altitude is about 1000 m a.s.l.. The root system of each tree was uncovered carefully by hand to keep the roots undamaged, before removal it was photographed in situ to document the root distribution. The root systems were then cut into single root pieces of about 20 cm length and the position of each sample was documented. The root samples were then hierarchically classified in several root classes. The tensile strength of more than 500 samples was determined. In addition, the values for age, diameter, and root moisture were ascertained. Since it was assumed, that the cellular structure of the roots has an influence on the tensile strength, two microscopic thin-sections were prepared from all successfully tested root samples. The microscopic analysis focused on anatomical parameters such as the size and number of vessels, their distribution as well as their conductivity. The results for the final correlation between the anatomical characteristics and the root's tensile strength are presented for both tree species.

  7. Pressure Dependent Mass Fraction in Noble Gas Mass Spectrometers: A Possible Explanation for the Excessive Dispersion in the EARTHTIME Fish Canyon/Alder Creek Inter-Calibration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.; Mana, S.

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometer fractionation bias (mass discrimination) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in noble gas mass spectroscopy and must be corrected for in order to obtain accurate-high precision isotopic ratios that are used in isotopic age calculations. Temporal variations in mass fractionation are well known phenomena and have been reported in several studies (eg. Turrin et al., 2010 and references therein). Here we report on the pressure dependency on mass spectrometer fractionation bias. In our experiment, we varied by a factor of five the signal size of aliquots of atmospheric argon delivered from an automated air pipette system. The measured mass discrimination difference (MD) as determined by the 40Ar/36Ar ratio between the 1-fold and 5-fold air pipette shots is ~5%. The air 40Ar/36Ar aliquots were measured using a MAP 215-50 operating in pulse counting mode. The air measurements were interspersed with measurements of Alder Creek (AC) sanidine and Fish Canyon (FC) sanidine that were co-irradiated for 0.75 hours. The grain sizes for the two mineral standards were chosen such that the AC sample yielded 40Ar signals of about 50 kcps, similar to that delivered by a single aliquot delivered by the air pipette. The FC grains were about 5-10 times greater (150-600 kcps) than the single air aliquot. Following the analyses, we applied the MD correction to both the FC and AC analyses. When the MD as determined from the single pipette data (which matches 40Ar beam intensity of the AC sample) is applied to both the AC and FC data a "J" of 1.579±0.001x10-4 is obtained from the FC data and an age of 1183 ±4 ka for AC. However, when the MD as determined from the multiple aliquot pipette data (with an 40Ar beam similar to that of the FC analyses) is applied to the FC data a "J" of 1.588±0.001x10-4 is obtained and an AC age of 1189 ±4 ka the same age at the 95% confidence level, the reported age for AC. We conclude that variation in MD over signal sizes typically analyzed in 40Ar

  8. Gold-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization and Diels-Alder Reaction of 1,4,9-Dienyne Esters to 3 a,6-Methanoisoindole Esters with Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Antagonist Activity.

    PubMed

    Susanti, Dewi; Liu, Li-Juan; Rao, Weidong; Lin, Sheng; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Chan, Philip Wai Hong

    2015-06-15

    A synthetic method to prepare 3a,6-methanoisoindole esters efficiently by gold(I)-catalyzed tandem 1,2-acyloxy migration/Nazarov cyclization followed by Diels-Alder reaction of 1,4,9-dienyne esters is described. We also report the ability of one example to inhibit binding of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) to the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) site and TNF-α-induced nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation in cell at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) value of 6.6 μM. Along with this is a study showing the isoindolyl derivative to exhibit low toxicity toward human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells and its possible mode of activity based on molecular modeling analysis. PMID:25982956

  9. Why Nature Eschews the Concerted [2 + 2 + 2] Cycloaddition of a Nonconjugated Cyanodiyne. Computational Study of a Pyridine Synthesis Involving an Ene – Diels-Alder – Bimolecular Hydrogen Transfer Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yu; Danheiser, Rick L.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    An intramolecular formal metal-free intramolecular [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition for the formation of pyridines has been investigated with M06-2X and B3LYP density functional theory, and compared to the experimentally established three-step mechanism that involves ene reaction - Diels-Alder reaction -hydrogen transfer. The ene reaction of two alkynes is the rate-determining step. This is considerably easier than other possible mechanisms, such as those involving an ene reaction of an alkyne with a nitrile, a concerted [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition, or a 1,4-diradical mechanism. The relative facilities of these processes are analyzed with the distortion-interaction model. A bimolecular hydrogen transfer mechanism involving a radical pair intermediate is proposed rather than a concerted intramolecular 1,5-hydrogen shift for the last step in the mechanism. PMID:22188179

  10. High performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) - Evidence for the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material and a bismaleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.; Soucek, M. D.; Chang, A. C.; Partos, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept and demonstration of a new versatile synthetic reaction for making a large number of high-performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) were reported. The synthesis shows promise for providing polymers having an attractive combination of easy processability, good toughness, respectable high temperature mechanical performance, and excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The new chemistry involves the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material with a bismaleimide or benzoquinone. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism, model compound studies were undertaken in solutions as well as in the solid state. The reaction products were purified by flash chromatography and characterized by conventional analytical techniques including NMR, FT-IR, UV-visible, mass spectroscopy, and high pressure liquid chromatography. The results are presented of the model compound studies which strongly support the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated compound and a bismaleimide or benzoquinone.

  11. N-O Chemistry for Antibiotics: Discovery of N-Alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine Scaffolds as Selective Antibacterial Agents Using Nitroso Diels-Alder and Ene Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wencewicz, Timothy A.; Yang, Baiyuan; Rudloff, James R.; Oliver, Allen G.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery, syntheses, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a new family of heterocyclic antibacterial compounds based on N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine scaffolds are described. A structurally diverse library of ~100 heterocyclic molecules generated from Lewis acid-mediated nucleophilic ring opening reactions with nitroso Diels-Alder cycloadducts and nitroso ene reactions with substituted alkenes was evaluated in whole cell antibacterial assays. Compounds containing the N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine structure demonstrated selective and potent antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 (MIC90 = 2.0 μM or 0.41 μg/mL) and moderate activity against other Gram-positive strains including antibiotic resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). A new synthetic route to the active core was developed using palladium-catalyzed Buchwald-Hartwig amination reactions of N-alkyl-O-(4-methoxybenzyl)hydroxylamines with 2-halo-pyridines that facilitated SAR studies and revealed the simplest active structural fragment. This work shows the value of using a combination of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) and parallel synthesis for identifying new antibacterial scaffolds. PMID:21859126

  12. Time- and concentration-dependent reactivity of Cys, Hcy, and GSH on the Diels-Alder-grafted 1,3,5-tris conjugate of calix[6]arene to bring selectivity for Cys: spectroscopy, microscopy, and its reactivity in cells.

    PubMed

    Mummidivarapu, V V Sreenivasu; Yarramala, Deepthi S; Kondaveeti, Karuna Kumar; Rao, Chebrolu P

    2014-11-01

    Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of 7-oxanorbornadiene (OND)-appended 1,3,5-tris conjugate of calix[6]arene (L2). L2 has been shown to exhibit selective reactivity toward cysteine (Cys) over homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) under stoichiometric conditions. The selectivity of L2 is attributed to the steric crowding of three Diels-Alder centers possessing OND units present on the calix[6]arene platform, while a control molecular system possessing only one such unit without the calix[6]arene platform (L1) does not show any selectivity toward Cys. While L2 exhibited spherical particles, its reactivity with Cys resulted in flowerlike morphological features, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. However, the reaction with GSH did not result in any such morphological features, a result that is in agreement with that observed from fluorescence studies in solution. L2 has been shown to react with Cys present in HeLa and Jurkat E6 cells by fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Full exploration of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition on metallofullerenes M3N@C80 (M = Sc, Lu, Gd): the D(5h) versus I(h) isomer and the influence of the metal cluster.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Valencia, Ramón; Rodríguez-Fortea, Antonio; Swart, Marcel; Solà, Miquel; Poblet, Josep M

    2012-07-16

    In this work a detailed investigation of the exohedral reactivity of the most important and abundant endohedral metallofullerene (EMF) is provided, that is, Sc(3)N@I(h)-C(80) and its D(5h) counterpart Sc(3)N@D(5h)-C(80) , and the (bio)chemically relevant lutetium- and gadolinium-based M(3)N@I(h)/D(5h)-C(80) EMFs (M = Sc, Lu, Gd). In particular, we analyze the thermodynamics and kinetics of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition of s-cis-1,3-butadiene on all the different bonds of the I(h)-C(80) and D(5h)-C(80) cages and their endohedral derivatives. First, we discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the cycloaddition reaction on the hollow fullerenes and the two isomers of Sc(3)N@C(80). Afterwards, the effect of the nature of the metal nitride is analyzed in detail. In general, our BP86/TZP//BP86/DZP calculations indicate that [5,6] bonds are more reactive than [6,6] bonds for the two isomers. The [5,6] bond D(5h)-b, which is the most similar to the unique [5,6] bond type in the icosahedral cage, I(h)-a, is the most reactive bond in M(3)N@D(5h)-C(80) regardless of M. Sc(3)N@C(80) and Lu(3)N@C(80) give similar results; the regioselectivity is, however, significantly reduced for the larger and more electropositive M = Gd, as previously found in similar metallofullerenes. Calculations also show that the D(5h) isomer is more reactive from the kinetic point of view than the I(h) one in all cases which is in good agreement with experiments.

  14. Does nonrandom nest placement imply nonrandom nest predation? - A reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, R.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Zenitsky, G.D.; Mullin, S.J.; Dececco, J.D.; Marshall, M.R.; Wolf, D.J.; Pomara, L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the critique by Schmidt and Whelan (Condor 101(4):916-920, 1999), we find that the relationship between nest success and tree selectivity is dependent upon inclusion or exclusion of particular tree species, whether or not years are pooled, and the selectivity index used. We question their use of point estimates of nest success with extremely high variances, defend our index, question the application of the Chesson (1983) index to our data, and explain the need to analyze years separately. Bottomland hardwood forest systems are extremely variable; hydroperiods alter the suitability of nesting substrates, availability of alternative food, and behavior of predators and their prey. Given these features, actively searching for Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests is seldom an efficient predator foraging strategy. Therefore, these predation events are best described as random; nests are principally encountered opportunistically by generalist predators while searching for other prey.

  15. The seventy-second Christmas bird count. 302. Southern Dorchester County, Md

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    We located 511 Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests in bottomland hardwood forest of eastern Arkansas. Microhabitat characteristics were measured and their relationship with nest success evaluated. Fifty-two percent of all nesting attempts resulted in predation. Attributes of nest placement were similar between successful and unsuccessful nests, although successful nests were placed higher. Similarly, nonparasitized nests were typically higher than parasitized nests. Nests initiated late in the breeding season were placed in larger trees with higher canopy bases resulting in increased vegetation around the nest. Fifteen different tree species were used for nesting. Acadian Flycatchers chose nest trees in a nonrandom fashion, selecting Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii) and possumhaw (Ilex decidua) in greater proportions than their availability. However, there was no relationship between tree species used for nesting and nest success. Nest height was positively correlated with concealment at the nest site, supporting the predator-avoidance theory. No other attribute of nest placement differentiated successful nest sites, suggesting that nest predation is likely a function of random events in space and time.

  16. Urban flight: understanding individual and population-level responses of Nearctic-Neotropical migratory birds to urbanization.

    PubMed

    Rodewald, Amanda D; Shustack, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    1. Despite the fact that studies of urban ecology have become commonplace in the literature, ecologists still lack empirical evidence of the underlying mechanisms responsible for relationships between urbanization and animal community structure. In an effort to understand the processes that govern an apparent avoidance of urban landscapes by many Nearctic-Neotropical migratory birds, we examined population- and individual-level responses of the Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) to urbanization within the landscapes surrounding 35 riparian forest stands in Ohio, USA. 2. From May to August 2001-06 we surveyed birds, banded 175 territorial flycatchers to estimate both condition and survival, tracked nest initiation dates, monitored success of 387 nests and estimated annual reproductive productivity of 163 breeding pairs. 3. Neither apparent annual survival of males (phi = 0.53 +/- 0.056 SE) nor females (phi = 0.23 +/- 0.064 SE) was related to the amount of urban development within the landscape. Similarly, daily survival rates of nests, which ranged from 0.92 to 0.98 across sites, was not associated significantly with urbanization. In contrast, reproductive productivity was related negatively to the amount of urbanization surrounding riparian forests, perhaps due in part to the greater incidence of brood parasitism and fewer numbers of nesting attempts made by pairs in urban compared to rural forests. 4. Forests within urban landscapes experienced higher levels of turnover in site occupancy, and birds settling in urban areas initiated nests later, had marginally smaller body sizes and exhibited lower return rates following nest predation than birds in more rural landscapes. In this way, behavioural processes governing habitat selection, settlement patterns and site fidelity probably contributed to the lower levels of reproductive productivity achieved by pairs nesting in urban landscapes. 5. This study provides evidence that the negative association between

  17. Gas-phase intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions of 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofurans. II. Formation of anthracene and other polycyclic aromatic compounds in the pyrolysis of 1,5-bidenzocyclooctadienes and related compounds. III. Formation of 9-methylanthracene and anthracene in the pyrolysis of 5,6,11,12-tetrahydrodibenzo(A,E)cyclooctene and other related compounds. IV. Preparation of cyclopentadienones by flash vacuum pyrolysis and their dimerization and intramolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    The intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions of 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofurans have been investigated through the pyrolysis of 2-alkenyl-3-furylmethyl benzoates. Under flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) conditions each of the 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofurans can undergo an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction or 1,5-hydrogen shift to give the corresponding tricycles 4c,t, 5c,t, and 6c,t and 1,5-hydrogen shift products 36c,t and 37c,t. FVP of 1,5-dibenzocyclooctadienes containing heteroatoms and dibenzosuberanes gave the corresponding tricyclic compounds (benzodifuran (18), acridine (24), and anthracene) with exception of 6H, 11H-dibenzo(b,f)(1,4)-dioxocin (17). The FVP of 17 gave (2-hydroxybenzyl)-o-benzaldehyde (28) as a major product. A mechanistic study of the regiospecific formation of 9-methyl-anthracene from the sealed tube pyrolysis the (4 + 4) dimer of o-xylylene (1) is presented. This study was carried out by pyrolyzing several possible precursors for 9-methylanthracene (e.g., 5,6-dihydrodibenzo(a,e)cyclooctene, di-o-tolylethane, and 5-methyldibenzosuberane). Sealed tube pyrolyses of dibenzosuberanes and dibenzosuberones were also carried out. A new method of preparing cyclopentadienones by the pyrolysis of cyclic diethers is presented. Cyclopentadienones including inden-2-one have been utilized in the synthesis of polycyclic compounds. The transient existence of these intermediates has also been proven by the isolation of polycyclic compounds.

  18. Presumed consent for transplantation: a dead issue after Alder Hey?

    PubMed Central

    English, V; Sommerville, A

    2003-01-01

    In the wake of scandals about the unauthorised retention of organs following postmortem examination, the issue of valid consent (or the lack of it) has returned to the forefront. Emphasis is put on obtaining explicit authorisation from the patient or family prior to any medical intervention, including those involving the dead. Although the controversies in the UK arose from the retention of human material for education or research rather than therapy, concern has been expressed that public mistrust could also adversely affect organ donation for transplantation. At the same time, however, the British Medical Association (BMA) continues to call for a shift to a system of presumed consent for organ transplantation. This apparent inconsistency can be justified because valid distinctions exist between the reasons requiring explicit consent for retention and the acceptability of presumed consent for transplantation. This paper argues for introducing a system of presumed consent for organ donation, given the overwhelming expressions of public support for transplantation. Ongoing legislative review in the UK provides an ideal chance to alter the default position to one where potential donors can simply acquiesce or opt out of donation. Combined with consultation with their relatives, this could be a much better method of realising individuals' wishes. It would also achieve a better balance between the duties owed to the deceased and those owed to people awaiting a transplant. PMID:12796433

  19. Effects of reintroduced beaver (Castor canadensis) on riparian bird community structure along the upper San Pedro River, southeastern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Glenn E.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Chapter 1.—We measured bird abundance and richness along the upper San Pedro River in 2005 and 2006, in order to document how beavers (Castor canadensis) may act as ecosystem engineers after their reintroduction to a desert riparian area in the Southwestern United States. In areas where beavers colonized, we found higher bird abundance and richness of bird groups, such as all breeding birds, insectivorous birds, and riparian specialists, and higher relative abundance of many individual species—including several avian species of conservation concern. Chapter 2.—We conducted bird surveys in riparian areas along the upper San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona (United States) and northern Sonora (Mexico) in order to describe factors influencing bird community dynamics and the distribution and abundance of species, particularly those of conservation concern. These surveys were also used to document the effects of the ecosystem-altering activities of a recently reintroduced beavers (Castor canadensis). Chapter 3.—We reviewed Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nest records and investigated the potential for future breeding along the upper San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, where in July 2005 we encountered the southernmost verifiable nest attempt for the species. Continued conservation and management of the area’s riparian vegetation and surface water has potential to contribute additional breeding sites for this endangered Willow Flycatcher subspecies. Given the nest record along the upper San Pedro River and the presence of high-density breeding sites to the north, the native cottonwood-willow forests of the upper San Pedro River could become increasingly important to E. t. extimus recovery, especially considering the anticipated effect of the tamarisk leaf beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) on riparian habitat north of the region.

  20. Recommendations for cowbird management in recovery efforts for the southwestern willow flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rothstein, S.I.; Kus, B.E.; Whitfield, M.J.; Sferra, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Three generations of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed either a control diet or a diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury in the form of methylmercury. The levels of mercury in adult tissues and eggs remained about the same over 3 generations. The methylmercury diet had no effect on adult weights or weight changes during the reproductive season. Females fed a diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury laid a greater percentage of their eggs outside their nestboxes than did controls, and also laid fewer eggs and produced fewer ducklings. Methylmercury in the diet appeared to result in a small amount of eggshell thinning. Ducklings from parents fed methylmercury were less responsive than, controls to tape-recorded maternal calls, but were hyper-responsive to a frightening stimulus in avoidance tests; there were no significant differences in locomotor activity in an open-field test.

  1. Building hierarchical models of avian distributions for the State of Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, J.E.; Peterson, J.T.; Conroy, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    To predict the distributions of breeding birds in the state of Georgia, USA, we built hierarchical models consisting of 4 levels of nested mapping units of decreasing area: 90,000 ha, 3,600 ha, 144 ha, and 5.76 ha. We used the Partners in Flight database of point counts to generate presence and absence data at locations across the state of Georgia for 9 avian species: Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), brownheaded nuthatch (Sitta pusilla), Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor), yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyxus americanus), white-eyed vireo (Vireo griseus), and wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). At each location, we estimated hierarchical-level-specific habitat measurements using the Georgia GAP Analysis18 class land cover and other Geographic Information System sources. We created candidate, species-specific occupancy models based on previously reported relationships, and fit these using Markov chain Monte Carlo procedures implemented in OpenBugs. We then created a confidence model set for each species based on Akaike's Information Criterion. We found hierarchical habitat relationships for all species. Three-fold cross-validation estimates of model accuracy indicated an average overall correct classification rate of 60.5%. Comparisons with existing Georgia GAP Analysis models indicated that our models were more accurate overall. Our results provide guidance to wildlife scientists and managers seeking predict avian occurrence as a function of local and landscape-level habitat attributes.

  2. Tamarisk biocontrol using tamarisk beetles: Potential consequences for riparian birds in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Theimer, T.C.; Sogge, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    The tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda spp.), a non-native biocontrol agent, has been introduced to eradicate tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), a genus of non-native tree that has become a dominant component of riparian woodlands in the southwestern United States. Tamarisk beetles have the potential to spread widely and defoliate large expanses of tamarisk habitat, but the effects of such a widespread loss of riparian vegetation on birds remains unknown. We reviewed literature on the effects of other defoliating insects on birds to investigate the potential for tamarisk beetles to affect birds positively or negatively by changing food abundance and vegetation structure. We then combined data on the temporal patterns of tamarisk defoliation by beetles with nest productivity of a wellstudied riparian obligate, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus), to simulate the potential demographic consequences of beetle defoliation on breeding riparian birds in both the short and long term. Our results highlight that the effects of tamarisk biocontrol on birds will likely vary by species and population, depending upon its sensitivity to seasonal defoliation by beetles and net loss of riparian habitat due to tamarisk mortality. Species with restricted distributions that include areas dominated by tamarisk may be negatively affected both in the short and long term. The rate of regeneration and/or restoration of native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) relative to the rate of tamarisk loss will be critical in determining the long-term effect of this large-scale ecological experiment. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  3. Tamarisk biocontrol using tamarisk beetles: Potential consequences for riparian birds in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Theimer, Tad C.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    The tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda spp.), a non-native biocontrol agent, has been introduced to eradicate tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), a genus of non-native tree that has become a dominant component of riparian woodlands in the southwestern United States. Tamarisk beetles have the potential to spread widely and defoliate large expanses of tamarisk habitat, but the effects of such a widespread loss of riparian vegetation on birds remains unknown. We reviewed literature on the effects of other defoliating insects on birds to investigate the potential for tamarisk beetles to affect birds positively or negatively by changing food abundance and vegetation structure. We then combined data on the temporal patterns of tamarisk defoliation by beetles with nest productivity of a well-studied riparian obligate, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus), to simulate the potential demographic consequences of beetle defoliation on breeding riparian birds in both the short and long term. Our results highlight that the effects of tamarisk biocontrol on birds will likely vary by species and population, depending upon its sensitivity to seasonal defoliation by beetles and net loss of riparian habitat due to tamarisk mortality. Species with restricted distributions that include areas dominated by tamarisk may be negatively affected both in the short and long term. The rate of regeneration and/or restoration of native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) relative to the rate of tamarisk loss will be critical in determining the long-term effect of this large-scale ecological experiment.

  4. Tamarix and Diorhabda leaf beetle interactions: implications for Tamarix water use and riparian habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagler, Pamela; Glenn, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Tamarix leaf beetles (Diorhabda carinulata) have been widely released on western United States rivers to control introduced shrubs in the genus Tamarix, with the goals of saving water through removal of an assumed high water-use plant, and of improving habitat value by removing a competitor of native riparian trees. We review recent studies addressing three questions: (1) to what extent are Tamarix weakened or killed by recurrent cycles of defoliation; (2) can significant water salvage be expected from defoliation; and (3) what are the effects of defoliation on riparian ecology, particularly on avian habit? Defoliation has been patchy at many sites, and shrubs at some sites recover each year even after multiple years of defoliation. Tamarix evapotranspiration (ET) is much lower than originally assumed in estimates of potential water savings, and are the same or lower than possible replacement plants. There is concern that the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax trailli extimus) will be negatively affected by defoliation because the birds build nests early in the season when Tamarix is still green, but are still on their nests during the period of summer defoliation. Affected river systems will require continued monitoring and development of adaptive management practices to maintain or enhance riparian habitat values. Multiplatform remote sensing methods are playing an essential role in monitoring defoliation and rates of ET on affected river systems.

  5. Avian habitat relationships in pinyon-juniper woodland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Habitat relationships of breeding birds were examined in northwestern Colorado in pinyon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) woodland and in openings where most overstory trees had been knocked down by anchor chaining. Vegetation characteristics and physical habitat features were measured in 233 0.04-ha circular plots around singing males of 13 species of birds from 15 May to 15 July 1980. Thirteen-group discriminant function analysis ordinated bird species along three habitat dimensions described by (1) canopy height; (2) slope, shrub size, and shrub species diversity; and (3) percentage canopy cover, large tree density, distance from a habitat edge, litter cover, and green cover. Woodland, open-area, and intermediate edge species were clearly segregated along the first discriminant axis, and species' associations with shrubs, inclination, ground cover, and edges were revealed by the ordinations along the second and third discriminant axes. Two-group discriminant analyses comparing occupied and available plots identified additional and more specific habitat associations. For example, Hermit Thrushes (Catharus guttatus) were associated with mature forested habitats and forest interiors, Virginia's Warblers (Vermivora virginiae) favored steep, oak-covered draws, Rock Wrens (Salpinctes obsoletus) selected areas where percentage log cover and small tree density were high, and Dusky Flycatchers (Empidonax oberholseri) preferred shrubby slopes with scattered large trees near woodland edges.

  6. Nesting success of grassland and savanna birds on reclaimed surface coal mines of the midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Galligan, E.W.; DeVault, T.L.; Lima, S.L.

    2006-12-15

    Reclaimed surface coal mines in southwestern Indiana support many grassland and shrub/savanna bird species of conservation concern. We examined the nesting success of birds on these reclaimed mines to assess whether such 'unnatural' places represent productive breeding habitats for such species. We established eight study sites on two large, grassland-dominated mines in southwestern Indiana and classified them into three categories (open grassland, shrub/savanna, and a mixture of grassland and shrub/savanna) based on broad vegetation and landscape characteristics. During the 1999 and 2000 breeding seasons, we found and monitored 911 nests of 31 species. Daily nest survival for the most commonly monitored grassland species ranged from 0.903 (Dickcissel, Spiza americana) to 0.961 (Grasshopper Sparrow, Ammodramus savannarum). Daily survival estimates for the dominant shrub/savanna nesting species ranged from 0.932 (Brown Thrasher, Toxostoma rufum) to 0.982 (Willow Flycatcher, Empidonax traillii). Vegetation and landscape effects on nesting success were minimal, and only Eastern Meadowlarks (Sturnella magna) showed a clear time-of-season effect, with greater nesting success in the first half of the breeding season. Rates of Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism were only 2.1% for grassland species and 12.0% for shrub/savanna species. The nesting success of birds on reclaimed mine sites was comparable to that in other habitats, indicating that reclaimed habitats on surface mines do not necessarily represent reproductive traps for birds.

  7. Breeding Phenology of Birds: Mechanisms Underlying Seasonal Declines in the Risk of Nest Predation

    PubMed Central

    Borgmann, Kathi L.; Conway, Courtney J.; Morrison, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal declines in avian clutch size are well documented, but seasonal variation in other reproductive parameters has received less attention. For example, the probability of complete brood mortality typically explains much of the variation in reproductive success and often varies seasonally, but we know little about the underlying cause of that variation. This oversight is surprising given that nest predation influences many other life-history traits and varies throughout the breeding season in many songbirds. To determine the underlying causes of observed seasonal decreases in risk of nest predation, we modeled nest predation of Dusky Flycatchers (Empidonax oberholseri) in northern California as a function of foliage phenology, energetic demand, developmental stage, conspecific nest density, food availability for nest predators, and nest predator abundance. Seasonal variation in the risk of nest predation was not associated with seasonal changes in energetic demand, conspecific nest density, or predator abundance. Instead, seasonal variation in the risk of nest predation was associated with foliage density (early, but not late, in the breeding season) and seasonal changes in food available to nest predators. Supplemental food provided to nest predators resulted in a numerical response by nest predators, increasing the risk of nest predation at nests that were near supplemental feeders. Our results suggest that seasonal changes in foliage density and factors associated with changes in food availability for nest predators are important drivers of temporal patterns in risk of avian nest predation. PMID:23776566

  8. Mesohabitat use of threatened hemlock forests by breeding birds of the Delaware River basin in northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, R.M.; Redell, L.A.; Bennett, R.M.; Young, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Avian biodiversity may be at risk in eastern parks and forests due to continued expansion of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), an exotic homopteran insect native to East Asia. To assess avian biodiversity, mesohabitat relations, and the risk of species loss with declining hemlock forests in Appalachian park lands, 80 randomly distributed fixed-radius plots were established in which territories of breeding birds were estimated on four forest-terrain types (hemlock and hardwood benches and ravines) in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Both species richness and number of territories were higher in hardwood than hemlock forest types and in bench than ravine terrain types. Four insectivorous species, Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), blue-headed vireo (Vireo solitarius), black-throated green warbler (Dendroica virens), and Blackburnian warbler (Dendroica fusca), showed high affinity for hemlock forest type and exhibited significantly greater numbers of territories in hemlock than hardwood sites. These species are hemlock-associated species at risk from continued hemlock decline in the Delaware River valley and similar forests of the mid-Atlantic east slope. Two of these species, the blue-headed vireo and Blackburnian warbler, appeared to specialize on ravine mesohabitats of hemlock stands, the vireo a low-to-mid canopy species, the warbler a mid-to-upper canopy forager. Unchecked expansion of the exotic adelgid and subsequent hemlock decline could negatively impact 3,600 pairs from the park and several million pairs from northeastern United States hemlock forests due to elimination of preferred habitat.

  9. Management by assertion: beavers and songbirds at Lake Skinner (Riverside County, California).

    PubMed

    Longcore, Travis; Rich, Catherine; Müller-Schwarze, Dietland

    2007-04-01

    Management of ecological reserve lands should rely on the best available science to achieve the goal of biodiversity conservation. "Adaptive Resource Management" is the current template to ensure that management decisions are reasoned and that decisions increase understanding of the system being managed. In systems with little human disturbance, certain management decisions are clear; steps to protect native species usually include the removal of invasive species. In highly modified systems, however, appropriate management steps to conserve biodiversity are not as readily evident. Managers must, more than ever, rely upon the development and testing of hypotheses to make rational management decisions. We present a case study of modern reserve management wherein beavers (Castor canadensis) were suspected of destroying habitat for endangered songbirds (least Bell's vireo, Vireo bellii pusillus, and southwestern willow flycatcher, Empidonax traillii extimus) and for promoting the invasion of an exotic plant (tamarisk, Tamarix spp.) at an artificial reservoir in southern California. This case study documents the consequences of failing to follow the process of Adaptive Resource Management. Managers made decisions that were unsupported by the scientific literature, and actions taken were likely counterproductive. The opportunity to increase knowledge of the ecosystem was lost. Uninformed management decisions, essentially "management by assertion," undermine the long-term prospects for biodiversity conservation. PMID:17318698

  10. ADVANCED INTRAMOLECULAR DIELS-ALDER STUDY TOWARD THE SYNTHESIS OF (-)-MORPHINE: STRUCTURE CORRECTION OF A PREVIOUSLY REPORTED DIELS-ALDER PRODUCT. (R826113)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Implications of Climate Change for Bird Conservation in the Southwestern U.S. under Three Alternative Futures.

    PubMed

    Friggens, Megan M; Finch, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Future expected changes in climate and human activity threaten many riparian habitats, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt3.3.3) modeling, we characterized habitat relationships and generated spatial predictions of habitat suitability for the Lucy's warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), the Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and the Western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Our goal was to provide site- and species-specific information that can be used by managers to identify areas for habitat conservation and/or restoration along the Rio Grande in New Mexico. We created models of suitable habitat for each species based on collection and survey samples and climate, biophysical, and vegetation data. We projected habitat suitability under future climates by applying these models to conditions generated from three climate models for 2030, 2060 and 2090. By comparing current and future distributions, we identified how habitats are likely to change as a result of changing climate and the consequences of those changes for these bird species. We also examined whether land ownership of high value sites shifts under changing climate conditions. Habitat suitability models performed well. Biophysical characteristics were more important that climate conditions for predicting habitat suitability with distance to water being the single most important predictor. Climate, though less important, was still influential and led to declines of suitable habitat of more than 60% by 2090. For all species, suitable habitat tended to shrink over time within the study area leaving a few core areas of high importance. Overall, climate changes will increase habitat fragmentation and reduce breeding habitat patch size. The best strategy for conserving bird species within the Rio Grande will include measures to maintain and restore critical habitat refugia. This study provides an example of a presence-only habitat model that can be used

  12. Planned flooding and Colorado River riparian trade-offs downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Lawrence E.; Ayers, T.J.; Bennett, J.B.; Christensen, K.; Kearsley, M.J.C.; Meretsky, V.J.; Phillips, A. M.; Parnell, R.A.; Spence, J.; Sogge, M.K.; Springer, A.E.; Wegner, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Regulated river restoration through planned flooding involves trade-offs between aquatic and terrestrial components, between relict pre-dam and novel post-dam resources and processes, and between management of individual resources and ecosystem characteristics. We review the terrestrial (wetland and riparian) impacts of a 1274 m3/s test flood conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in March/April 1996, which was designed to improve understanding of sediment transport and management downstream from Glen Canyon Dam in the Colorado River ecosystem. The test flood successfully restored sandbars throughout the river corridor and was timed to prevent direct impacts to species of concern. A total of 1275 endangered Kanab ambersnail (Oxyloma haydeni kanabensis) were translocated above the flood zone at Vaseys Paradise spring, and an estimated 10.7% of the total snail habitat and 7.7% of the total snail population were lost to the flood. The test flood scoured channel margin wetlands, including potential foraging habitats of endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). It also buried ground-covering riparian vegetation under >1 m of fine sand but only slightly altered woody sandbar vegetation and some return-current channel marshes. Pre-flood control efforts and appropriate flood timing limited recruitment of four common nonnative perennial plant species. Slight impacts on ethnobotanical resources were detected >430 km downstream, but those plant assemblages recovered rapidly. Careful design of planned flood hydrograph shape and seasonal timing is required to mitigate terrestrial impacts during efforts to restore essential fluvial geomorphic and aquatic habitats in regulated river ecosystems.

  13. Breeding birds in managed forests on public conservation lands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Wilson, R. Randy

    2017-01-01

    Managers of public conservation lands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley have implemented forest management strategies to improve bottomland hardwood habitat for target wildlife species. Through implementation of various silvicultural practices, forest managers have sought to attain forest structural conditions (e.g., canopy cover, basal area, etc.) within values postulated to benefit wildlife. We evaluated data from point count surveys of breeding birds on 180 silviculturally treated stands (1049 counts) that ranged from 1 to 20 years post-treatment and 134 control stands (676 counts) that had not been harvested for >20 years. Birds detected during 10-min counts were recorded within four distance classes and three time intervals. Avian diversity was greater on treated stands than on unharvested stands. Of 42 commonly detected species, six species including Prothonotary Warbler (Prothonotaria citrea) and Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) were indicative of control stands. Similarly, six species including Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) and Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) were indicative of treated stands. Using a removal model to assess probability of detection, we evaluated occupancy of bottomland forests at two spatial scales (stands and points within occupied stands). Wildlife-forestry treatment improved predictive models of species occupancy for 18 species. We found years post treatment (range = 1–20), total basal area, and overstory canopy were important species-specific predictors of occupancy, whereas variability in basal area was not. In addition, we used a removal model to estimate species-specific probability of availability for detection, and a distance model to estimate effective detection radius. We used these two estimated parameters to derive species densities and 95% confidence intervals for treated and unharvested stands. Avian densities differed between treated and control stands for 16 species, but only Common Yellowthroat

  14. Implications of Climate Change for Bird Conservation in the Southwestern U.S. under Three Alternative Futures

    PubMed Central

    Friggens, Megan M.; Finch, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Future expected changes in climate and human activity threaten many riparian habitats, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt3.3.3) modeling, we characterized habitat relationships and generated spatial predictions of habitat suitability for the Lucy’s warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), the Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and the Western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Our goal was to provide site- and species-specific information that can be used by managers to identify areas for habitat conservation and/or restoration along the Rio Grande in New Mexico. We created models of suitable habitat for each species based on collection and survey samples and climate, biophysical, and vegetation data. We projected habitat suitability under future climates by applying these models to conditions generated from three climate models for 2030, 2060 and 2090. By comparing current and future distributions, we identified how habitats are likely to change as a result of changing climate and the consequences of those changes for these bird species. We also examined whether land ownership of high value sites shifts under changing climate conditions. Habitat suitability models performed well. Biophysical characteristics were more important that climate conditions for predicting habitat suitability with distance to water being the single most important predictor. Climate, though less important, was still influential and led to declines of suitable habitat of more than 60% by 2090. For all species, suitable habitat tended to shrink over time within the study area leaving a few core areas of high importance. Overall, climate changes will increase habitat fragmentation and reduce breeding habitat patch size. The best strategy for conserving bird species within the Rio Grande will include measures to maintain and restore critical habitat refugia. This study provides an example of a presence-only habitat model that can be

  15. Monitoring avian productivity and survivorship (MAPS) 5-year summary, Naval Outlying Landing Field, Imperial Beach, southwestern San Diego County, California, 2009-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynn, Suellen; Madden, Melanie C.; Houston, Alexandra; Kus, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    During 2009–13, a Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) banding station was operated at the Naval Outlying Landing Field (NOLF), Imperial Beach, in southwestern San Diego County, California. The station was established as part of a long-term monitoring program of Neotropical migratory bird populations on NOLF and helps Naval Base Coronado (NOLF is a component) meet the goals and objectives of Department of Defense Partners in Flight program and the Birds and Migratory Birds Management Strategies of the Naval Base Coronado Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan. During 2009–13, captures averaged 644 ±155 per year. Fifty-seven species were captured, of which 44 are Neotropical migratory species and 33 breed at the MAPS station. Twenty-two sensitive species were detected, including Least Bell’s Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus), Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) and Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia). Local population trends varied among species and years, as did annual productivity (number of young per adult). We found no significant relationship between productivity and the observed population size in the subsequent year for any species, nor did we find an association between productivity and precipitation for the current bio-year. Similarly, survivorship varied across species and years, and there was no obvious relationship between adult survivorship and observed population size for any species except Wrentit (Chamaea fasciata), for which the relationship was positive. Adult survivorship was unrelated to precipitation at the MAPS station. Additional years of data will be required to generate sample sizes adequate for more rigorous analyses of survivorship and productivity as predictors of population growth.

  16. A removal model for estimating detection probabilities from point-count surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farnsworth, G.L.; Pollock, K.H.; Nichols, J.D.; Simons, T.R.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Use of point-count surveys is a popular method for collecting data on abundance and distribution of birds. However, analyses of such data often ignore potential differences in detection probability. We adapted a removal model to directly estimate detection probability during point-count surveys. The model assumes that singing frequency is a major factor influencing probability of detection when birds are surveyed using point counts. This may be appropriate for surveys in which most detections are by sound. The model requires counts to be divided into several time intervals. Point counts are often conducted for 10 min, where the number of birds recorded is divided into those first observed in the first 3 min, the subsequent 2 min, and the last 5 min. We developed a maximum-likelihood estimator for the detectability of birds recorded during counts divided into those intervals. This technique can easily be adapted to point counts divided into intervals of any length. We applied this method to unlimited-radius counts conducted in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. We used model selection criteria to identify whether detection probabilities varied among species, throughout the morning, throughout the season, and among different observers. We found differences in detection probability among species. Species that sing frequently such as Winter Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) and Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) had high detection probabilities (~90%) and species that call infrequently such as Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) had low detection probability (36%). We also found detection probabilities varied with the time of day for some species (e.g. thrushes) and between observers for other species. We used the same approach to estimate detection probability and density for a subset of the observations with limited-radius point counts.

  17. Implications of Climate Change for Bird Conservation in the Southwestern U.S. under Three Alternative Futures.

    PubMed

    Friggens, Megan M; Finch, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Future expected changes in climate and human activity threaten many riparian habitats, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt3.3.3) modeling, we characterized habitat relationships and generated spatial predictions of habitat suitability for the Lucy's warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), the Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and the Western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Our goal was to provide site- and species-specific information that can be used by managers to identify areas for habitat conservation and/or restoration along the Rio Grande in New Mexico. We created models of suitable habitat for each species based on collection and survey samples and climate, biophysical, and vegetation data. We projected habitat suitability under future climates by applying these models to conditions generated from three climate models for 2030, 2060 and 2090. By comparing current and future distributions, we identified how habitats are likely to change as a result of changing climate and the consequences of those changes for these bird species. We also examined whether land ownership of high value sites shifts under changing climate conditions. Habitat suitability models performed well. Biophysical characteristics were more important that climate conditions for predicting habitat suitability with distance to water being the single most important predictor. Climate, though less important, was still influential and led to declines of suitable habitat of more than 60% by 2090. For all species, suitable habitat tended to shrink over time within the study area leaving a few core areas of high importance. Overall, climate changes will increase habitat fragmentation and reduce breeding habitat patch size. The best strategy for conserving bird species within the Rio Grande will include measures to maintain and restore critical habitat refugia. This study provides an example of a presence-only habitat model that can be used

  18. Songbird response to increased willow (Salix spp.) growth in Yellowstone's northern range.

    PubMed

    Baril, Lisa M; Hansen, Andrew J; Renkin, Roy; Lawrence, Rick

    2011-09-01

    After nearly a century of height suppression, willows (Salix spp.) in the northern range of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., are increasing in height growth as a possible consequence of wolf (Canis lupus) restoration, climate change, or other factors. Regardless of the drivers, the recent release of this rare but important habitat type could have significant implications for associated songbirds that are exhibiting declines in the region. Our objective was to evaluate bird response to releasing willows by comparing willow structure and bird community composition across three willow growth conditions: height suppressed, recently released, and previously tall (i.e., tall prior to the height increase of released willows). Released and previously tall willows exhibited high and similar vertical structure, but released willows were significantly lower in horizontal structure. Suppressed willows were significantly shorter and lower in horizontal cover than released or previously tall willows. Bird richness increased along a gradient from lowest in suppressed to highest in previously tall willows, but abundance and diversity were similar between released and previously tall willows, despite lower horizontal cover in the released condition. Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) and Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) were found in all three growth conditions; however, Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia), Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus), Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), and Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodii) were present in released and previously tall willows only. Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) was found in previously tall willows only, appearing to specialize on tall, dense willows. The results of our a priori habitat models indicated that foliage height diversity was the primary driver of bird richness, abundance, and diversity. These results indicate that vertical structure was a more important driver of bird community variables than horizontal

  19. ISOPRENE/METHYL ACRYLATE DIELS-ALDER REACTION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE. (R826694C640)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Saprophytic growth of the alder rust fungus Melampsoridium hiratsukanum on artificial media.

    PubMed

    Moricca, Salvatore; Ginetti, Beatrice

    2015-07-01

    The first axenic culture of a free living saprophytic stage of the exotic rust fungus Melampsoridium hiratsukanum is reported. Colonies were obtained from one-celled, dikaryotic urediniospores on eight nutrient media out of twelve. Modified Harvey and Grasham (HG) and Schenk and Hildebrandt (HS) media HG1 and SH1 and their bovine serum albumin (BSA)-enriched derivatives gave abundant mycelial growth, but modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) QMS media and their BSA-enriched modifications performed poorly, colony growth being low on QMS-1 and QMS1+BSA, and nil on QMS-5 and QMS-6, with or without BSA. Colonies initially grew poorly when subcultured for one month in purity, but much better after re-transfer to fresh media later: presumably because only the most exploitative genotypes survived, best able to cope with an uncongenial medium. Stabilised cultures survived, and remained vegetative, but only few reproductive colonies produced spore-like bodies. Though the agarised medium remains an inhospitable environment for this biotrophic parasite, it is shown that non-living media can nevertheless sustain the growth and sporulation of this fungus outside its natural hosts and habitat. Axenic culture promises important advances in basic and applied research on this rust, leading to a better understanding of its nutrition, metabolism, diversity and pathogenicity.

  1. ISOPRENE/METHYL ACRYLATE DIELS-ALDER REACTION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE. (R822721C640)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Synthesis and Evaluation of 5-Lipoxygenase Translocation Inhibitors from Acylnitroso Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloadducts†

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Joshua K.; Tian, Wen; Wolter, William R.; Cho, Wonhwa; Suckow, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Acylnitroso cycloadducts have proven to be valuable intermediates in the syntheses of a plethora of biologically active molecules. Recently, organometallic reagents were shown to open bicyclic acylnitroso cycloadducts and, more interestingly, the prospect of highly regioselective openings was raised. This transformation was employed in the synthesis of a compound with excellent inhibitory activity against 5-lipoxygenase ((±)-4a, IC50 51 nM), an important mediator of inflammation intimately involved in a number of disease states including asthma and cancer. Optimization of the copper-mediated organometallic ring opening reaction was accomplished allowing the further exploration of the biological activity. Synthesis of a number of derivatives with varying affinity for metal binding as well as pendant groups in a range of sizes was accomplished. Analogues were tested in a whole cell assay which revealed a subset of the compounds to be inhibitors of enzyme translocation, a mode of action not previously known and, potentially, extremely important for better understanding of the enzyme and inhibitor development. Additionally, the lead compound was tested in vivo in an established colon cancer model and showed very encouraging anti-tumorogenic properties. PMID:21365098

  3. Multistep Synthesis of a Terphenyl Derivative Showcasing the Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Elizabeth A. Colby

    2015-01-01

    An adaptable multistep synthesis project designed for the culmination of a second-year organic chemistry laboratory course is described. The target compound is a terphenyl derivative that is an intermediate in the synthesis of compounds used in organic light-emitting devices. Students react a conjugated diene with dimethylacetylene dicarboxylate…

  4. Totally stereoselective synthesis of 1,3-disaccharides through Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Alessandra; Pacciani, Stefania; Benvenuti, Cecilia; Cacciarini, Martina; Liguori, Francesca; Menichetti, Stefano; Nativi, Cristina

    2003-10-31

    A nonclassical, totally stereoselective synthesis of orthogonally protected 1,3-disaccharides is reported. Enantiomerically pure beta-keto-delta-lactones, efficiently obtained from glucal and galactal, are transformed into electron-poor heterodienes and chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectively cycloadded to glycals as electron-rich dienophiles, to directly afford 2-thiodisaccharides. The reductive desulfurization of the latter smoothly gave the corresponding 2,2'-dideoxydisaccharides. PMID:14575481

  5. An intramolecular inverse electron demand Diels–Alder approach to annulated α-carbolines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Ni, Feng; Woo, Grace H C; Lo, Sie-Mun; Roveto, Philip M; Schaus, Scott E

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intramolecular inverse electron demand cycloadditions of isatin-derived 1,2,4-triazines with acetylenic dienophiles tethered by amidations or transesterifications proceed in excellent yields to produce lactam- or lactone-fused α-carbolines. Beginning with various isatins and alkynyl dienophiles, a pilot-scale library of eighty-eight α-carbolines was prepared by using this robust methodology for biological evaluation. PMID:23015831

  6. AQUEOUS AZA-DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS CATALYZED BY LANTHANIDE(III) TRIFLUOROMETHANESULFONATES. (R826123)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Synthesis of novel plant oil derivatives: Furan and Diels-Alder reaction products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant oils are useful sustainable raw materials for the development of new chemical products. In this work epoxidized soybean oil was treated with different acids, and variable amounts of furan structures were produced from the epoxidized linoleate moiety. From process studies, the highest yields of...

  8. FATE AND EFFECTS OF PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS IN SOILS UNDER N2-FIXING RED ALDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil phosphorus (P) dynamics are controlled by the interaction of geochemical, biochemical and biological processes, and changing species composition or management may alter the relative importance of these processes. We examined the role of these processes in two plantations of...

  9. Chiral holmium complex-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of silyloxyvinylindoles: stereoselective synthesis of hydrocarbazoles.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinji; Morikawa, Takahiro; Nishida, Atsushi

    2013-10-18

    The catalytic and asymmetric cycloaddition between 3-[1-(silyloxy)vinyl]indoles and electron-deficient olefins gave substituted hydrocarbazoles in up to 99% yield and 94% ee. This reaction was catalyzed by a novel chiral holmium(III) complex. Alkylation of the cycloadduct gave a tricyclic compound with four continuous chiral centers, one of which was a quaternary carbon.

  10. Red Alder (Alnus rubra) Distribution Influences Nitrate Discharge to Coastal Estuaries: Comparison of Two Oregon Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We determined nutrient export from the Yaquina and Alsea Rivers as part of a larger program for evaluating nutrient sources to coastal waters. The Yaquina and Alsea data indicated that one river typically contained twice the amount of dissolved nitrate-N, although temperature, co...

  11. Improved HRGC separation of cis, trans CLA isomers as Diels-Alder adducts of alkyl esters.

    PubMed

    Blasi, F; Giua, L; Lombardi, G; Codini, M; Simonetti, M S; Damiani, P; Cossignani, L

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports the separation of four isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), c,t/t,c-8,10; c,t/t,c-9,11; c,t/t,c-10,12; c,t/t,c-11,13, after reaction of esterification with aliphatic alcohols of different chain length and adduct formation with 4-methyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (MTAD). The high resolution gas chromatographic analyses were carried out using a simple 50-m cyanopropyl polysiloxane capillary column both with a flame ionization detector and a mass spectrometer. The resolution between the two pair of isomers: c,t/t,c-9,11 and c,t/t,c-10,12 and between c,t/t,c-10,12 and c,t/t,c-11,13 isomers were good for all the investigated alkyl esters and increased with the chain length of alcohol esterified to carboxylic moiety of CLA isomers. The most interesting result was relative to the c,t/t,c-8,10 and c,t/t,c-9,11 isomers, critical pair of isomers also when analyzed with a 120-m cyanopropyl polysiloxane capillary column; their resolution also increased from methyl to hexyl esters of CLA isomers and reached an acceptable value (0.8) in the case of hexyl esters. The best resolutions of the four considered CLA isomers were obtained with the hexyl esters of MTAD adducts of the isomers, without excessive analysis time. This method was useful and simple to evaluate the profile of the four main c,t isomers in commercial CLA samples.

  12. Alder Expansion as a Coastal Warming Signal - Linking Coastal Alaskan Carbon to Vegetation Change with Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peteet, D. M.; Nichols, J. E.; Moy, C. M.; McGeachy, A.

    2014-12-01

    Corser Bog (60.5296364oN, 145.453858oW), 21 km east of Cordova, AK is a sphagnum-dominated peatland 42 m asl. adjacent to Sheridan Glacier and the Copper River Delta. Deglaciation at 11.5 ka began with shallow pond deposition, reflecting regional warmth with the pioneers Alnus crispa subsp. sinuata, Salix, and ferns colonizing the fresh, mineral soils on the landscape. Continued early Holocene warming/melting of glaciers led to the foundation species Alnus dominance and peatland formation, surrounded by shrubs such as Rubus spectabilis, Sambucus racemosa, and wetland species such as Myrica gale and Potentilla palustris. As Sphagnum peat accumulated, the highest rates of carbon accumulation for a few centuries are represented at 50 g/m2/a, similar to short-term very high rates in the early Holocene throughout the circumboreal region but varying within the early Holocene due to development of local wet, bryophytic environments. A shift to sedge peat regionally along the South-Central Alaskan coast 7.6 - 3.7 ka is paralleled by a more evaporative, drier climate with Rhododendron groenlandicum presence, lower carbon accumulation (13 g/m2/a), and minimal macrofossil preservation, which is paralleled regionally in coastal muskegs both to the northwest and southeast and by a hiatus in a nearby lake record. A cooler, moister climate is evident in Corser Bog with the shift to Sphagnum peat at 3.7 ka, regional shifts from sedge to Sphagnum peat throughout the entire coastline from Yakutat to Girdwood, AK and the demonstration of glacial advances in the region. Alnus pollen markedly increases to 60% in the uppermost sample, indicative of a major signal for glacial recession in this region.

  13. Discussion of Alfred Alder's preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky.

    PubMed

    Ansbacher, H L

    1981-07-01

    In his preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky, Alfred Adler (1) found his theory of the dynamics of schizophrenia supported in the Diary, (2) alluded to Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, and (3) briefly touched on the possibility and conditions of recovery. To add to the understanding of Adler's "Preface," this discussion (1) expands his theory of schizophrenia, (2) gives some concrete data of Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, (3) describes two episodes of recovery subsequent to the "Preface," and (4) introduces an important aspect of Adler's theory, which he had to omit out of consideration for Nijinsky's wife, Romola-namely, her role in her husband's disorder. With the larger theoretical and historical context established. Adler's "Preface" can be appreciated for its predictive validity.

  14. Seasonal differences in riparian consumer diet and insect communities in an Oregon Coast Range watershed food web.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robillard, A.; Li, J.

    2005-05-01

    In riparian areas, terrestrial and aquatic habitats overlap creating zones where they interact as an aquatic-terrestrial interface. This coupling allows energy to move between systems and generates intertwining food webs. Thus, vertebrate riparian consumers, such as fish or birds, potentially have alternative prey from sources external to their habitats. The purpose of our study was to explore this reciprocal exchange in an alder dominated riparian forest of the Oregon Coast Range. Diet samples were collected from birds and fish in summer and fall 2003 with a suite of insect samples at Honeygrove Creek and two of its small tributaries. In a comparison of emerging aquatic insects and flying terrestrial insects during June and again in September, we detected seasonal differences in terrestrial and aquatic insects available to riparian consumers. Despite this availability of externally derived prey, fish depended more on resources derived from within their respective habitats during summer. Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kitsutch) ate more juvenile aquatic than adult aquatic or terrestrial insects. During fall, the same pattern was exhibited by Coho but Cutthroat trout appeared to consume a slightly greater number of terrestrial insects. The preliminary analysis of bird diet samples from commonly encountered species such as, Swainson's thrush, Song Sparrow, and Pacific-slope Flycatcher, showed more terrestrial derived prey in their diets than aquatic during the summer sampling season.

  15. Factors affecting songbird nest survival in riparian forests in a midwestern agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peak, R.G.; Thompson, F. R.; Shaffer, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting nest success of songbirds in riparian forest and buffers in northeastern Missouri. We used an information-theoretic approach to determine support for hypotheses concerning effects of nest-site, habitat-patch, edge, and temporal factors on nest success of songbirds in three narrow (55-95 m) and three wide (400-530 m) riparian forests with adjacent grassland-shrub buffer strips and in three narrow and three wide riparian forests without adjacent grassland-shrub buffer strips. We predicted that temporal effects would have the most support and that habitat-patch and edge effects would have little support, because nest predation would be great across all sites in the highly fragmented, predominantly agricultural landscape. Interval nest success was 0.404, 0.227, 0.070, and 0.186, respectively, for Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea), and forest interior species pooled (Acadian Flycatcher [Empidonax virescens], Wood Thrush [Hylocichla mustelina], Ovenbird [Seiurus aurocapillus], and Kentucky Warbler [Oporornis formosus]). The effect of nest stage on nest success had the most support; daily nest success for Gray Catbird and Indigo Bunting were lowest in the laying stage. We found strong support for greater nest success of Gray Catbird in riparian forests with adjacent buffer strips than in riparian forests without adjacent buffer strips. Patch width also occurred in the most-supported model for Gray Catbird, but with very limited support. The null model received the most support for Northern Cardinal. Riparian forests provided breeding habitat for area-sensitive forest species and grassland-shrub nesting species. Buffer strips provided additional breeding habitat for grassland-shrub nesting species. Interval nest success for Indigo Bunting and area-sensitive forest species pooled, however, fell well below the level that is likely necessary to balance juvenile

  16. Factors affecting songbird nest survival in riparian forests in a Midwestern agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peak, R.G.; Thompson, F. R.; Shaffer, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting nest success of songbirds in riparian forest and buffers in northeastern Missouri. We used an information-theoretic approach to determine support for hypotheses concerning effects of nest-site, habitat-patch, edge, and temporal factors on nest success of songbirds in three narrow (55DS95 m) and three wide (400DS530 m) riparian forests with adjacent grasslandDSshrub buffer strips and in three narrow and three wide riparian forests without adjacent grasslandDSshrub buffer strips. We predicted that temporal effects would have the most support and that habitat-patch and edge effects would have little support, because nest predation would be great across all sites in the highly fragmented, predominantly agricultural landscape. Interval nest success was 0.404, 0.227, 0.070, and 0.186, respectively, for Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea), and forest interior species pooled (Acadian Flycatcher [Empidonax virescens], Wood Thrush [Hylocichla mustelina], Ovenbird [Seiurus aurocapillus], and Kentucky Warbler [Oporornis formosus]). The effect of nest stage on nest success had the most support; daily nest success for Gray Catbird and Indigo Bunting were lowest in the laying stage. We found strong support for greater nest success of Gray Catbird in riparian forests with adjacent buffer strips than in riparian forests without adjacent buffer strips. Patch width also occurred in the most supported model for Gray Catbird, but with very limited support. The null model received the most support for Northern Cardinal. Riparian forests provided breeding habitat for areas sensitive forest species and grassland-shrub nesting species. Buffer strips provided additional breeding habitat for grassland-shrub nesting species. Interval nest success for Indigo Bunting and area-sensitive forest species pooled, however, fell well below the level that is likely necessary to balance

  17. Landscape structure in a managed forest mosaic of the Southern Appalachian Mountains and its influence on songbirds and small mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimgruber, Peter

    Forests in the Appalachian Mountains have been severely affected by logging in the past and little old-growth is left. The remaining forests form a heterogeneous mosaic of different forest successions. A concern for conservation is how additional logging will alter the mosaic and its fauna. I studied the effects of logging on the landscape mosaic and how changes in the landscape structure influence small mammals and birds in the George Washington National Forest, Virginia. My dissertation also included research on how to improve techniques for landscape ecological studies, such as roadside monitoring of birds and mapping of forest resources using remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Because of the scale dependency of landscape-ecological relationships, I investigated how landscape structure in the forest mosaic changes with increasing scales. I determined threshold scales at which structure changed markedly. After establishing a baseline, I examined how logging affected the intensity and location of such thresholds. I found thresholds in landscape structure exist at 400-, 500-, and 800-m intervals from the outer edge of the cut. While logging did not change threshold location and intensity for global landscape indices, such as dominance and contagion, thresholds for focal indices, such as mean patch size and percent cover for early-successional forest, changed markedly. Using GIS, I determined how logging affected small mammals and birds at the landscape scale. I divided the landscape into three zones (zone 1, inside logged areas; zone 2, 20--400 m from logged areas; zone 3, 1000--1500 m from logged areas). Logging changed species presence and richness more drastically in close proximity of cuts than on the landscape and influenced birds more strongly than mammals. In the cuts, edge-adapted birds, such as the indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), replaced forest interior species, such as the Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens). Most

  18. LANDSCAPE CHARACTERISTICS AND HIGH STREAM NITROGEN IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: RED ALDER COMPLICATES USE OF NUTRIENT CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream nitrogen concentrations are variable and often high in the Oregon Coast Range, uncharacteristic for a predominantly forested region. We compiled stream nitrogen data and GIS-derived landscape characteristics in order to examine variation in nitrogen across the region. In s...

  19. Biogeography of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with alders (Alnus spp.) in relation to biotic and abiotic variables at the global scale.

    PubMed

    Põlme, Sergei; Bahram, Mohammad; Yamanaka, Takashi; Nara, Kazuhide; Dai, Yu Cheng; Grebenc, Tine; Kraigher, Hojka; Toivonen, Mika; Wang, Pi-Han; Matsuda, Yosuke; Naadel, Triin; Kennedy, Peter G; Kõljalg, Urmas; Tedersoo, Leho

    2013-06-01

    · Much of the macroecological information about microorganisms is confounded by the lack of standardized methodology, paucity of metadata and sampling effect of a particular substrate or interacting host taxa. · This study aims to disentangle the relative effects of biological, geographical and edaphic variables on the distribution of Alnus-associated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi at the global scale by using comparable sampling and analysis methods. · Ribosomal DNA sequence analysis revealed 146 taxa of ECM fungi from 22 Alnus species across 96 sites worldwide. Use of spatial and phylogenetic eigenvectors along with environmental variables in model selection indicated that phylogenetic relations among host plants and geographical links explained 43 and 10%, respectively,in ECM fungal community composition, whereas soil calcium concentration positively influenced taxonomic richness. · Intrageneric phylogenetic relations among host plants and regional processes largely account for the global biogeographic distribution of Alnus-associated ECM fungi. The biogeography of ECM fungi is consistent with ancient host migration patterns from Eurasia to North America and from southern Europe to northern Europe after the last glacial maximum, indicating codispersal of hosts and their mycobionts.

  20. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme cells with temozolomide-BioShuttle ligated by the inverse Diels-Alder ligation chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Spring, Herbert; Debus, Juergen; Didinger, Bernd; Koch, Mario; Muller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), insensitive against most therapeutic interventions, has low response and survival rates. Temozolomide (TMZ) was approved for second-line therapy of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. However, TMZ therapy in GBM patients reveals properties such as reduced tolerability and inauspicious hemogram. The solution addressed here concerning GBM therapy consolidates and uses the potential of organic and peptide chemistry with molecular medicine. We enhanced the pharmacologic potency with simultaneous reduction of unwanted adverse reactions of the highly efficient chemotherapeutic TMZ. The TMZ connection to transporter molecules (TMZ-BioShuttle) was investigated, resulting in a much higher pharmacological effect in glioma cell lines and also with reduced dose rate. From this result we can conclude that a suitable chemistry could realize the ligation of pharmacologically active, but sensitive and highly unstable pharmaceutical ingredients without functional deprivation. The TMZ-BioShuttle dramatically enhanced the potential of TMZ for the treatment of brain tumors and is an attractive drug for combination chemotherapy. PMID:19920915

  1. Design and preparation of novel polyarylene ether materials based on Diels-Alder reaction as the crosslinker for electrooptical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wu; Hou, Wenjun; Zhen, Zhen; Liu, Xinhou; Liu, Jialei; Fedorchuk, A. A.; Czaja, P.

    2016-07-01

    Novel crosslinkable organic linear electro-optical (EO) material based on polyarylene ether as the main chain host polymer was designed and prepared. The host polymer with rigid aromatic has demonstrated a good compatibility with the guest chromophore. Long side chain with anthracene ensured the crosslinkable reaction and appropriate glass transition temperature of the host polymer (55 °C). The EO r33 tensor coefficient for this novel EO material has been magnitude of 66 pm/V at 1310 nm and the excellent long term stability at 85 °C. These parameters permit to consider their application in fabrication of organic electro optical devices. The semi-empirical and DFT quantum chemical simulations were performed for 4 principal chromophores to clarify a role of cross-linker in the enhancement of the ground state dipole moments and effective hyperpolarizabilities.

  2. SYNTHESIS OF AZASUGARS VIA LANTHANIDE-PROMOTED AZA DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION. (R826123)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated o-Xylenols: Application in the Synthesis of Novel Organic Molecules and Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Bis(o-xylenol) equivalents are useful synthetic intermediates in the construction of polymers and hydroxyl substituted organic molecules which can organize by hydrogen bonded self-assembly into unique supramolecular structures. These polymers and supramolecular materials have potential use as coatings and thin films in aerospace, electronic and biomedical applications.

  4. Energy storage capacity of reversible liquid-phase Diels Alder reaction between maleic anhydride and 2- methyl furan

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, B.G.; Poling, B.E.

    1983-07-01

    Calorimetry was used to determine the heat of reaction and equilibrium constant at 318 K for the reaction between maleic anhydride (A) and 2-methyl furan (B). The values were-60 kJ/gmol and 614 cm/sup 3//gmol, respectively. The motivation for this work was to find a single phase-reacting system that could be used to store solar energy. Thus, the energy storage capacity was calculated for a mixture of A and B, both initially at 7 kmol/m/sup 3/, in dioxane. The maximum apparent heat capacity of 7.37 J/cm/sup 3/ X K occurred at 334 K. This maximum value is 76% higher than the heat capacity of pure water.

  5. YTTERBIUM(III) TRIFLUOROMETHANESULFONATE CATALYZED SOLID PHASE AZA DIELS-ALDER REACTION AND SUBSEQUENT FACILE ADDUCT RELEASE. (R826123)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Positive feedback between ecological and reproductive character displacement in a young avian hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Vallin, Niclas; Rice, Amber M; Bailey, Richard I; Husby, Arild; Qvarnström, Anna

    2012-04-01

    Character displacement can reduce costly interspecific interactions between young species. We investigated the mechanisms behind divergence in three key traits-breeding habitat choice, timing of breeding, and plumage coloration-in Ficedula flycatchers. We found that male pied flycatchers became expelled from the preferred deciduous habitat into mixed forest as the superior competitor, collared flycatchers, increased in numbers. The peak in food abundance differs between habitats, and the spatial segregation was paralleled by an increased divergence in timing of breeding between the two species. Male pied flycatchers vary from brown to black with brown coloration being more frequent in sympatry with collared flycatchers, a pattern often proposed to result from selection against hybridization, that is, reinforcement. In contrast to this view, we show that brown male pied flycatchers more often hybridize than black males. Male pied flycatcher plumage coloration influenced the territory obtained in areas of co-occurrence with collared flycatchers, and brown male pied flycatchers experienced higher relative fitness than black males when faced with heterospecific competition. We suggest that allopatric divergence in resource defense ability causes a feedback loop at secondary contact where male pied flycatchers with the most divergent strategy compared to collared flycatchers are favored by selection.

  7. Sequential Diels–Alder/[3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement reactions of β-nitrostyrene with 3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene

    PubMed Central

    Pipic, Alma; Zeller, Matthias; Tsetsakos, Panagiota

    2013-01-01

    Summary The tin(IV)-catalyzed reaction of β-nitrostyrene with (E)-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene in toluene afforded two major nitronic ester cycloadducts in 27% and 29% yield that arise from the reaction at the less substituted diene double bond. Also present were four cycloadducts from the reaction at the higher substituted diene double bond, two of which were the formal cycloadducts of (Z)-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene. A Friedel–Crafts alkylation product from the reaction of the diene, β-nitrostyrene, and toluene was also obtained in 10% yield. The tin(IV)-catalyzed reaction of β-nitrostyrene with (Z)-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene in dichloromethane afforded four nitronic ester cycloadducts all derived from the reaction at the higher substituted double bond. One cycloadduct was isolated in 45% yield and two others are formal adducts of the E-isomer of the diene. The product formation in these reactions is consistent with a stepwise mechanism involving a zwitterionic intermediate. The initially isolated nitronic ester cycloadducts underwent tin(IV)-catalyzed interconversion, presumably via zwitterion intermediates. Cycloadducts derived from the reaction at the less substituted double bond of (E)-3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene underwent a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement on heating to afford 4-nitrocyclohexenes. Cycloadducts derived from the reaction at the higher substituted diene double bond of either diene failed to undergo a thermal rearrangement. Rates and success of the rearrangement are consistent with a concerted mechanism possessing a dipolar transition state. An initial assessment of substituent effects on the rearrangement process is presented. PMID:24204426

  8. Synthesis of an Imidazolidinone Organocatalyst and Its Application in a Diels-Alder Cycloaddition: A Multistep Experiment for the Organic Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John J.; Driver, Ross B.; Walsh, Ria; Stephens, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel, high-yielding, and selective methodologies for the asymmetric synthesis of stereocenters is at the forefront of modern synthetic chemistry research. Organocatalysis can now be viewed as a viable alternative to the use of the sometimes toxic transition-metal catalysts. In this experiment, the simple synthesis of an achiral…

  9. From tolerance to acute metabolic deregulation: contribution of proteomics to dig into the molecular response of alder species under a polymetallic exposure.

    PubMed

    Printz, Bruno; Sergeant, Kjell; Lutts, Stanley; Guignard, Cédric; Renaut, Jenny; Hausman, Jean-Francois

    2013-11-01

    Alnus spp. are actinorhizal trees commonly found in wet habitats and able to grow effectively in soil slightly contaminated with metal trace- elements. Two clones belonging to two Alnus species, namely, A. incana and A. glutinosa, were grown in hydroponics and exposed for 9 weeks to a Cd + Ni + Zn polymetallic constraint. Although responding by a similar decrease in total biomass production, the proteomic analysis associated with the study of various biochemical parameters including carbohydrate and mineral analyses revealed that the two clones have a distinct stress-responsive behavior. All parameters indicated that the roots, the organ in direct contact with the media, are more affected than the leaves. In fact, in A. glutinosa the response was almost completely confined to the roots, whereas many proteins change significantly in the roots and in the leaves of the treated A. incana. In both clones, the changes affected a broad range of metabolic processes such as redox regulation and energy metabolism and induced the production of pathogenesis-related proteins. In particular, changes in the accumulation of bacterial proteins that were not identified as coming from the known symbionts of Alnus were reported. Further investigation should be performed to identify their origin and exact role in the plant response to the polymetallic exposure tested here. PMID:24015726

  10. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) as a Tool for Probing the Reactivity of Polyynes Relevant to Hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) Cascades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) behavior of a number of alkyne-rich compounds is described. The DSC trace for each compound exhibits an exothermic event at a characteristic onset temperature. For the tri- and tetraynes whose [4 + 2] HDDA reactivity in solution has been determined, these onset temperatures show a strong correlation with the cyclization activation energy. The studies reported here exemplify how the data available through this operationally simple analytical technique can give valuable insights into the thermal behavior of small molecules. PMID:25470072

  11. Identifying important spatial and temporal scales and patterns of soil properties in a tidal saltmarsh situated in a mixed red alder and Douglas fir watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea level rise is expected to drive a loss in salt marsh area and a change in marsh habitat composition, potentially leading to changes in the nitrogen source/sink dynamics of these systems. Estuaries in the Pacific Northwest might be particularly vulnerable to the effect of sal...

  12. Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction with Aqueous Glyoxylic Acid: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Analysis for Advanced Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augé, Jacques; Lubin-Germain, Nadège

    1998-10-01

    As an application of the use of water as solvent in organic synthesis, a convenient synthesis of a-hydroxy-g-lactones from an aqueous solution of glyoxylic acid is described. The mechanism of the reaction leading to the lactones goes through cycloadducts which rearrange in situ. The NMR analysis of the diastereomeric lactones is particularly interesting; such an analysis illustrates the importance of modern techniques including 2-D NMR spectroscopy. Complete assignments of the signals are mentioned and NOESY spectra are enclosed. The full experiment is addressed to advanced undergraduate students who are trained in organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as a tool for probing the reactivity of polyynes relevant to hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) cascades.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brian P; Hoye, Thomas R

    2014-12-19

    The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) behavior of a number of alkyne-rich compounds is described. The DSC trace for each compound exhibits an exothermic event at a characteristic onset temperature. For the tri- and tetraynes whose [4 + 2] HDDA reactivity in solution has been determined, these onset temperatures show a strong correlation with the cyclization activation energy. The studies reported here exemplify how the data available through this operationally simple analytical technique can give valuable insights into the thermal behavior of small molecules.

  14. Studies on the Himbert intramolecular arene/allene Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Mechanistic studies and expansion of scope to all-carbon tethers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Lam, Jonathan K; Pham, Hung V; Houk, K N; Vanderwal, Christopher D

    2013-05-15

    The unusual intramolecular arene/allene cycloaddition described 30 years ago by Himbert permits rapid access to strained polycyclic compounds that offer great potential for the synthesis of complex scaffolds. To more fully understand the mechanism of this cycloaddition reaction, and to guide efforts to extend its scope to new substrates, quantum mechanical computational methods were employed in concert with laboratory experiments. These studies indicated that the cycloadditions likely proceed via concerted processes; a stepwise biradical mechanism was shown to be higher in energy in the cases studied. The original Himbert cycloaddition chemistry is also extended from heterocyclic to carbocyclic systems, with computational guidance used to predict thermodynamically favorable cases. Complex polycyclic scaffolds result from the combination of the cycloaddition and subsequent ring-rearrangement metathesis reactions.

  15. Torquoselective ring closures of chiral amido trienes derived from allenamides. A tandem allene isomerization-pericyclic ring-closure-intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryuji; Feltenberger, John B; Hsung, Richard P

    2010-03-19

    A new torquoselective ring-closure of chiral amide-substituted 1,3,5-hexatrienes and its application in tandem with [4 + 2] cycloaddition are described. The trienes were derived via either a 1,3-H or 1,3-H-1,7-H shift of alpha-substituted allenamides, and the entire sequence through the [4 + 2] cycloaddition could be in tandem from allenamides.

  16. Studies on the Himbert Intramolecular Arene/ Allene Diels – Alder Cycloaddition. Mechanistic Studies and Expansion of Scope to All-Carbon Tethers

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Lam, Jonathan K.; Pham, Hung V.; Houk, K. N.; Vanderwal, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    The unusual intramolecular arene/allene cycloaddition described thirty years ago by Himbert permits rapid access to strained polycyclic compounds that offer great potential for the synthesis of complex scaffolds. To more fully understand the mechanism of this cycloaddition reaction, and to guide efforts to extend its scope to new substrates, quantum mechanical computational methods were employed in concert with laboratory experiments. These studies indicated that the cycloadditions likely proceed via concerted processes; a stepwise biradical mechanism was shown to be higher in energy in the cases studied. The original Himbert cycloaddition chemistry is also extended from heterocyclic to carbocyclic systems, with computational guidance used to predict thermodynamically favorable cases. Complex polycyclic scaffolds result from the combination of the cycloaddition and subsequent ring-rearrangement metathesis reactions. PMID:23634642

  17. Streamflow and Endangered Species Habitat in the Lower Isleta Reach of the Middle Rio Grande

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bovee, Ken D.; Waddle, Terry J.; Spears, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    San Acacia Dam is located in a reach of the Rio Grande that has been designated as critical habitat for two endangered species, the Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) and the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). Under present operations, the Rio Grande upstream from the dam is used to convey irrigation water to the Socorro main canal at San Acacia Dam. In order to increase operational flexibility and improve irrigation delivery efficiency, the 'Bernardo Siphon' has been proposed to intercept up to 150 cubic feet per second from the Lower San Juan Riverside Drain on the east side of the Rio Grande and transport it under the river into a drainage canal on the west side. Irrigation deliveries to the Socorro main canal would be conveyed by way of the drainage canal rather than the Rio Grande. The objective of this study was to provide the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and other stakeholders with a tool to evaluate the effects of different operational modes of the Bernardo siphon on habitat for H. amarus and E. t. extimus in this section of river. We used a two-dimensional hydraulic simulation model to simulate hydraulic conditions for a range of discharges at three study sites in the Rio Grande between the proposed siphon location and San Acacia Dam. Suitable habitat characteristics were defined for H. amarus by consensus of a panel of experts and for E. t. extimus on the basis of a study conducted in 2003 by BOR. Habitat suitability maps for each targeted life stage and simulated discharge were constructed using a Geographic Information System (ArcGIS) and the results compiled into tables relating discharge to areas of suitable habitat. A separate analysis was conducted to calculate an index of connectivity among habitat patches at low flows. A hydrologic model was constructed to synthesize flows, by reach, without the siphon, which was used as a baseline for comparison with similarly-synthesized discharges with the siphon under

  18. Nest survival of forest birds in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.; Hamilton, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    vimns, 7%), eastern towhee (14%), indigo bunting (14%), and northern cardinal (17%) did not differ from nest success in cottonwood plantations that were coppiced from root sprouts following pulpwood harvest. Within bottomland hardwood forests, uneven-aged group-selection timber harvest reduced the combined daily nest survival of all species from 0.958 to 0.938, which reduced nest success by about 14%. Specifically, timber harvest reduced nest success of species that nest in the forest midstory and canopy, such as Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens)--from 32% before harvest to 14% after harvest. Conversely, those species that nest primarily in the shrubby understory--such as northern cardinal--were not affected by timber harvest and maintained an overall nest success of about 33%. Thus, birds nesting in the understory of bottomland hardwood forests are not adversely impacted by selective timber harvest, but there is a short-term reduction in nest success for birds that nest in the canopy and midstory.

  19. Temporal pattern shifts to avoid acoustic interference in singing birds.

    PubMed

    Ficken, R W; Ficken, M S; Hailman, J P

    1974-02-22

    Two species of forest birds, the least flycatcher and the red-eyed vireo, when breeding in the same season in the same habitat, adjust their temporal pattern of singing to avoid the overlapping of songs. The avoidance of acoustic interference is more marked in the flycatcher, which has a briefer song than the vireo. PMID:17790627

  20. Quill mites of the genus Syringophilopsis Kethley, 1970 (Acari: Syringophilidae) from North American birds.

    PubMed

    Skoracki, Maciej; Flannery, Maureen E; Spicer, Greg S

    2008-12-01

    Seven mite species belonging to the genus Syringophilopsis Kethley, 1970 (Acari: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea) are recorded from 10 passeriform host species from the USA. Three new species are described and illustrated: Syringophilopsis polioptilus sp. n. from Polioptila caerulea (Linnaeus) (Polioptilidae); S. empidonax sp. n. from Empidonax hamrnmondii (Vesey) and Empidonax wrightii Baird (Tyrannidae); and S. sialiae sp. n. from Sialia mexicana Swainson (Turdidae). In addition, records of new hosts are given: Turdus migratorius Linnaeus (Turdidae) for Syringophilopsis turdus (Fritsch, 1958); three tyrannid species (Tyrannidae), Myiarchus crinitus (Linnaeus), M. cinerascens (Lawrence) and Tyrannus verticalis Say for S. tyranni Bochkov et Galloway, 2004; Euphagus cyanocephalus (Wagler) (Icteridae) for S. elongatus (Ewing, 1911); and two parulid species (Parulidae), Dendroica graciae Baird and Wilsonia pusilla (Wilson) for S. dendroicae Bochkov et Galloway, 2001. All known species of the genus Syringophilopsis from the Nearctic Region are summarized in tabular form. Syringophilopsis porzanae Bochkov et Galloway, 2004 is reassigned to the genus Ascetonmylla Kethley, 1970. PMID:19175207

  1. Habitat selection as an antipredator behaviour in a multi-predator landscape: all enemies are not equal.

    PubMed

    Morosinotto, Chiara; Thomson, Robert L; Korpimäki, Erkki

    2010-03-01

    1. Breeding territory choice constitutes a crucial antipredator behaviour for animals that determines reproductive success and survival during the breeding season. On arrival to breeding grounds migrant prey face a multitude of 'waiting' predators already settled within the landscape. 2. We studied territory selection and reproductive investment of migrant pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) relative to breeding pygmy owls (POs) (Glaucidium passerinum) and Tengmalm's owls (TOs) (Aegolius funereus). Diurnal POs present a greater predation threat to adult flycatchers (up to 80% songbirds in diet) compared with nocturnal TOs (up to 36%). 3. During territory selection, pied flycatchers strongly avoided POs (occupation: 42% in presence vs. 92% in absence of owl nest) but not TOs (80% vs. 75%). This suggests that flycatchers are able to distinguish between two potential predators, avoiding dangerous POs but not obviously responding to the less risky TOs. 4. Flycatchers responded to presence of PO nests with c. 4-day delay in the start of egg-laying. A significantly prolonged nest building period contributed to this potentially costly breeding delay. Flycatchers further significantly reduced initial reproductive investment in presence of POs by laying 8.2% smaller clutch sizes, even if laying date was controlled. No breeding delay and clutch size reduction was found relative to TO presence. 5. Our results highlight flexibility in breeding territory selection and reproductive strategies as antipredator responses to perceived risk in a multi-predator environment. This supports the idea that for prey, not all predators are equal. PMID:19912426

  2. A retro Diels-Alder route to diphosphorus chemistry: molecular precursor synthesis, kinetics of P2 transfer to 1,3-dienes, and detection of P2 by molecular beam mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Velian, Alexandra; Nava, Matthew; Temprado, Manuel; Zhou, Yan; Field, Robert W; Cummins, Christopher C

    2014-10-01

    The transannular diphosphorus bisanthracene adduct P2A2 (A = anthracene or C14H10) was synthesized from the 7-phosphadibenzonorbornadiene Me2NPA through a synthetic sequence involving chlorophosphine ClPA (28-35%) and the tetracyclic salt [P2A2Cl][AlCl4] (65%) as isolated intermediates. P2A2 was found to transfer P2 efficiently to 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD), 1,3-butadiene (BD), and (C2H4)Pt(PPh3)2 to form P2(CHD)2 (>90%), P2(BD)2 (69%), and (P2)[Pt(PPh3)2]2 (47%), respectively, and was characterized by X-ray diffraction as the complex [CpMo(CO)3(P2A2)][BF4]. Experimental and computational thermodynamic activation parameters for the thermolysis of P2A2 in a solution containing different amounts of CHD (0, 4.75, and 182 equiv) have been obtained and suggest that P2A2 thermally transfers P2 to CHD through two competitive routes: (i) an associative pathway in which reactive intermediate [P2A] adds the first molecule of CHD before departure of the second anthracene, and (ii) a dissociative pathway in which [P2A] fragments to P2 and A prior to addition of CHD. Additionally, a molecular beam mass spectrometry study on the thermolysis of solid P2A2 reveals the direct detection of molecular fragments of only P2 and anthracene, thus establishing a link between solution-phase P2-transfer chemistry and production of gas-phase P2 by mild thermal activation of a molecular precursor.

  3. Pedagogical Comparison of Five Reactions Performed under Microwave Heating in Multi-Mode versus Mono-Mode Ovens: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Salt Formation, E2 Dehydrohalogenation to Form an Alkyne, Williamson Ether Synthesis, and Fischer Esterification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Gammerdinger, William; Leap, Jennifer; Morales, Erin; Shikora, Jonathan; Weber, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Five reactions were rate-accelerated relative to the standard reflux workup in both multi-mode and mono-mode microwave ovens, and the results were compared to determine whether the sequential processing of a mono-mode unit could provide for better lab logistics and pedagogy. Conditions were optimized so that yields matched in both types of…

  4. Iptycene synthesis: A new method for attaching a 2,3-anthracene moiety to the 9,10-positions of another anthracene moiety - Exceptional conditions for a Lewis acid catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yong-Shing; Hart, Harold

    1989-01-01

    An efficient three-step method for appending a 2,3-anthracene moiety to the 9,10-positions of an existing anthracene moiety is described. The first step uses excess 1,4-anthraquinone (3 equiv) and aluminum chloride (6 equiv) to obtain the anthracene-quinone cycloadduct (omission of the AlCl3 resulted in no adduct). The resulting diketone was reduced to the corresponding diol (excess LiAlH4), which was dehydrated to the arene with phosphorus oxychloride and pyridine. Specific examples include the preparation of heptipycene 8 from pentiptycene 6 (66 percent overall yield) and a similar conversion of 8 to the noniptycene 13 (75 percent overall yield). The methodology led to a markedly improved synthesis of tritriptycene 9 and the first synthesis of undecaiptycene 14.

  5. Nasal mites from birds of a Guatemalan cloud forest (Acarina: rhinonyssidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the nasal mites from Guatemalan cloud forest birds is reported. Seventy-eight birds, representing 10 families and 18 species, were examined. Prevalence of infection was 24%. Two new species are described: Sternostoma darlingi from Mitrephanes phaeocercus (Tyrannidae) and S. pencei from Empidonax flavescens (Tyrannidae). New host records are reported for S. priangae from Chlorospingus opthalmicus (Thraupidae), S. hutsoni from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), Ptilonyssus sairae from Chlorospingus opthalmicus (Thraupidae), and Myioborus miniatus (Parulidae), P. euroturdi from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), P. tyrannus from Empidonax flavescens and Mitrephanes phaeocercus (both Tyannidae), and Tinaminyssus ixoreus from Catharus dryas (Turdidae). The subspecies Ptilonyssus euroturdi mimicola Fain and Hyland is synonymized with the nominate subspecies. Data are presented to suggest that the Rhinonyssidae may be a polyphyletic assemblage. 35 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  6. Nasal mites from birds of a Guatemalan cloud forest (Acarina: Rhinonyssidae).

    PubMed

    Spicer, G S

    1984-10-01

    A survey of the nasal mites from Guatemalan cloud forest birds is reported. Seventy-eight birds, representing 10 families and 18 species, were examined. Prevalance of infection was 24%. Two new species are described: Sternostoma darlingi from Mitrephanes phaeocercus (Tyrannidae) and S. pencei from Empidonax flavescens (Tyrannidae). New host records are reported for S. pirangae from Chlorospingus ophthalmicus (Thraupidae), S. hutsoni from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), Ptilonyssus sairae from Chlorospingus opthalmicus (Thraupidae) and Myioborus miniatus (Parulidae), P. euroturdi from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), P. tyrannus from Empidonax flavescens and Mitrephanes phaeocercus (both Tyrannidae), and Tinaminyssus ixoreus from Catharus dryas (Turdidae). The subspecies Ptilonyssus euroturdi mimicola Fain and Hyland is synonymized with the nominate subspecies. Data are presented to suggest that the Rhinonyssidae may be a polyphyletic assemblage. PMID:6536265

  7. Great price spike of '93: An analysis of lumber and stumpage prices in the pacific northwest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Sohngen, B.L.; Haynes, R.W.

    1994-08-01

    The report includes prices for red alder hardwood logs which are published and analyzed for reliability consistency, and robustness. Timberland managers can use these prices to make decisions regarding land management. They show that values for red alder logs have been increasing steadily for the past 11 years.

  8. 75 FR 4056 - Claire Fay and Charlie Hotchkin; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... capacity of 7.0 kilowatts (kW); and (4) a 170-foot-long transmission line from the shed to the barn. The...: August 4, 2009. d. Applicant: Claire Fay and Charlie Hotchkin. e. Name of Project: Alder Brook Mini Hydro Project. f. Location: On the Alder Brook, near the town of Richford, Franklin County, Vermont....

  9. Redox-mediated reactions of vinylferrocene: toward redox auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Alan A; Zhang, Xiaolu; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Long, De-Liang; Macgregor, Stuart A; Cooke, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    Chemical redox reactions have been exploited to transform unreactive vinylferrocene into a powerful dienophile for the Diels-Alder reaction and reactive substrate for thiol addition reactions upon conversion to its ferrocenium state. We have further investigated the ability of these reactions to facilitate redox-auxiliary-like reactivity by further hydrogenolyisis of the Diels-Alder adduct to the corresponding cyclopentane derivative.

  10. Enantioselective synthesis of helicenequinones and -bisquinones.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Antonio; Carreño, M Carmen

    2013-02-01

    A convergent approach based on Diels-Alder reactions between polycyclic dienes and benzoquinones has emerged as a powerful tool for the construction of helicenequinones and bisquinones. Chemical resolution and asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with sulfinyl quinones provide direct access to enantiopure derivatives. Biaryl or ferrocenyl dienes can be resolved leading to helicenequinones having additional axial or planar chirality.

  11. Total synthsis of (+)-ambuic acid: α-bromination with 1,2-dibromotetrachloroethane.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sun Hee; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Lee, Sung Il; Ryu, Do Hyun

    2012-03-01

    Total synthesis of (+)-ambuic acid has been accomplished from the readily available stereocontrolled Diels-Alder adduct of cyclopentadiene and iodo-1,4-benzoquinone monoketal through an efficient series of steps. A new method for the highly commendable synthesis of α-brominated Diels-Alder adduct is described. PMID:22280015

  12. 77 FR 41147 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Revised Critical Habitat for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... the Federal Register on August 15, 2011 (76 FR 50542). We are accepting comments regarding additional... flycatcher critical habitat designation (70 FR 60886, October 19, 2005) and lands to be newly considered for... complete and accurate. If you submitted comments or information on the proposed revised rule (76 FR...

  13. Females discriminate against heterospecific sperm in a natural hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Emily R A; Ålund, Murielle; McFarlane, S Eryn; Johnsen, Arild; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    When hybridization is maladaptive, species-specific mate preferences are selectively favored, but low mate availability may constrain species-assortative pairing. Females paired to heterospecifics may then benefit by copulating with multiple males and subsequently favoring sperm of conspecifics. Whether such mechanisms for biasing paternity toward conspecifics act as important reproductive barriers in socially monogamous vertebrate species remains to be determined. We use a combination of long-term breeding records from a natural hybrid zone between collared and pied flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis and F. hypoleuca), and an in vitro experiment comparing conspecific and heterospecific sperm performance in female reproductive tract fluid, to evaluate the potential significance of female cryptic choice. We show that the females most at risk of hybridizing (pied flycatchers) frequently copulate with multiple males and are able to inhibit heterospecific sperm performance. The negative effect on heterospecific sperm performance was strongest in pied flycatcher females that were most likely to have been previously exposed to collared flycatcher sperm. We thus demonstrate that a reproductive barrier acts after copulation but before fertilization in a socially monogamous vertebrate. While the evolutionary history of this barrier is unknown, our results imply that there is opportunity for it to be accentuated via a reinforcement-like process. PMID:27312694

  14. Molecular cytogenetics of the california condor: evolutionary and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Modi, W S; Romanov, M; Green, E D; Ryder, O

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary cytogenetic comparisons involved 5 species of birds (California condor, chicken, zebra finch, collared flycatcher and black stork) belonging to divergent taxonomic orders. Seventy-four clones from a condor BAC library containing 80 genes were mapped to condor chromosomes using FISH, and 15 clones containing 16 genes were mapped to the stork Z chromosome. Maps for chicken and finch were derived from genome sequence databases, and that for flycatcher from the published literature. Gene content and gene order were highly conserved when individual condor, chicken, and zebra finch autosomes were compared, confirming that these species largely retain karyotypes close to the ancestral condition for neognathous birds. However, several differences were noted: zebra finch chromosomes 1 and 1A are homologous to condor and chicken chromosomes 1, the CHUNK1 gene appears to have transposed on condor chromosome 1, condor chromosomes 4 and 9 and zebra finch chromosomes 4 and 4A are homologous to chicken chromosome arms 4q and 4p, and novel inversions on chromosomes 4, 12 and 13 were found. Condor and stork Z chromosome gene orders are collinear and differentiated by a series of inversions/transpositions when compared to chicken, zebra finch, or flycatcher; phylogenetic analyses suggest independent rearrangement along the chicken, finch, and flycatcher lineages.

  15. 78 FR 343 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Southwestern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... analysis and draft environmental assessment in the Federal Register on July 12, 2012 (77 FR 41147... seq.) on February 27, 1995 (60 FR 10694). On July 22, 1997, we published a final critical habitat designation for the flycatcher along 964 river km (599 river mi) in Arizona, California, and New Mexico (62...

  16. Relative fitness of a generalist parasite on two alternative hosts: a cross-infestation experiment to test host specialization of the hen flea Ceratophyllus gallinae (Schrank).

    PubMed

    Appelgren, A; McCoy, K D; Richner, H; Doligez, B

    2016-05-01

    Host range is a key element of a parasite's ecology and evolution and can vary greatly depending on spatial scale. Generalist parasites frequently show local population structure in relation to alternative sympatric hosts (i.e. host races) and may thus be specialists at local scales. Here, we investigated local population specialization of a common avian nest-based parasite, the hen flea Ceratophyllus gallinae (Schrank), exploiting two abundant host species that share the same breeding sites, the great tit Parus major (Linnaeus) and the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis (Temminck). We performed a cross-infestation experiment of fleas between the two host species in two distinct study areas during a single breeding season and recorded the reproductive success of both hosts and parasites. In the following year, hosts were monitored again to assess the long-term impact of cross-infestation. Our results partly support the local specialization hypothesis: in great tit nests, tit fleas caused higher damage to their hosts than flycatcher fleas, and in collared flycatcher nests, flycatcher fleas had a faster larval development rates than tit fleas. However, these results were significant in only one of the two studied areas, suggesting that the location and history of the host population can modulate the specialization process. Caution is therefore called for when interpreting single location studies. More generally, our results emphasize the need to explicitly account for host diversity in order to understand the population ecology and evolutionary trajectory of generalist parasites.

  17. The Role of MC1R in Speciation & Phylogeny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2013-01-01

    A point mutation in the MC1R gene, a G-protein-coupled receptor, has been found that could have led to the formation of two subspecies of Solomon Island flycatcher from a single ancestral population. I discuss the many roles that G-protein-coupled receptors play in vertebrate physiology and how one particular point mutation can have enormous…

  18. 76 FR 50541 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Revised Critical Habitat for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... agricultural and urban run-off, treated water outflow, irrigation or diversion ditches, reservoirs, and dam... excluding the area due to potential impacts to water operations outweigh the benefits to the subspecies of... flycatcher critical habitat rule published in the Federal Register on October 19, 2005 (70 FR 60886);...

  19. Vigilance against predators induced by eavesdropping on heterospecific alarm calls in a non-vocal lizard Oplurus cuvieri cuvieri (Reptilia: Iguania).

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryo; Mori, Akira

    2010-04-22

    Prey animals can reduce their risk of predation by detecting potential predators before encounters occur. Some animals gain information about nearby predators by eavesdropping on heterospecific alarm calls. Despite having well-developed ears, most lizards do not use vocal information for intraspecific communication, and few studies have shown practical use of the ears in wild lizards. Here, we show that the Madagascan spiny-tailed iguana (Oplurus cuvieri cuvieri) obtains auditory signals for predator detection. The Madagascan spiny-tailed iguana and the Madagascar paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone mutata) are syntopic inhabitants of the Ampijoroa dry deciduous forest of Madagascar. The iguana and the flycatcher have neither a predator-prey relationship nor resource competition, but they have shared predators such as raptors and snakes. Using playback experiments, we demonstrated that the iguana discriminates mobbing alarm calls of the flycatcher from its songs and then enhances its vigilance behaviour. Our results demonstrate the occurrence of an asymmetrical ecological relationship between the Madagascan spiny-tailed iguana and the paradise flycatcher through eavesdropping on information about the presence of predators. This implies that indirect interspecific interactions through information recognition may be more common than generally thought in an animal community.

  20. Molecular cytogenetics of the california condor: evolutionary and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Modi, W S; Romanov, M; Green, E D; Ryder, O

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary cytogenetic comparisons involved 5 species of birds (California condor, chicken, zebra finch, collared flycatcher and black stork) belonging to divergent taxonomic orders. Seventy-four clones from a condor BAC library containing 80 genes were mapped to condor chromosomes using FISH, and 15 clones containing 16 genes were mapped to the stork Z chromosome. Maps for chicken and finch were derived from genome sequence databases, and that for flycatcher from the published literature. Gene content and gene order were highly conserved when individual condor, chicken, and zebra finch autosomes were compared, confirming that these species largely retain karyotypes close to the ancestral condition for neognathous birds. However, several differences were noted: zebra finch chromosomes 1 and 1A are homologous to condor and chicken chromosomes 1, the CHUNK1 gene appears to have transposed on condor chromosome 1, condor chromosomes 4 and 9 and zebra finch chromosomes 4 and 4A are homologous to chicken chromosome arms 4q and 4p, and novel inversions on chromosomes 4, 12 and 13 were found. Condor and stork Z chromosome gene orders are collinear and differentiated by a series of inversions/transpositions when compared to chicken, zebra finch, or flycatcher; phylogenetic analyses suggest independent rearrangement along the chicken, finch, and flycatcher lineages. PMID:20051671

  1. Tall shrub expansion facilitated by patterned ground in the northwest Siberian Low Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. V.; Epstein, H. E.; Walker, D. A.; Matyshak, G.; Ermokhina, K.

    2011-12-01

    We integrated field observations with a time-series of satellite imagery to identify key biophysical attributes associated with tall shrub expansion and increased vegetation productivity within a forest-tundra ecotone near Kharp, northwest Siberia. Comparison of high-resolution Corona and QuickBird satellite photography indicates that alder (Alnus fruticosa) cover increased by ~10% since 1968. Additionally, areas of sharply increasing productivity detected using a Landsat TM/ETM+ time-series for 1985-2009 are consistently co-located with expanding shrub stands. Field observations made in 2011 revealed that most of the shrub expansion has occurred in areas of patterned ground in which abundant mineral-dominated microsites ("circles") have been maintained by cryogenic disturbance. In order to test whether shrub expansion was facilitated by circles, we established a series of transects according to categories of alder stand age and circle density. Along the transects, we mapped the location of alders and circles, measured soil organic depth and leaf area index (LAI), and characterized plant communities. In recent expansion areas, young alders occur almost exclusively on silt-rich circles that lack vegetation and surface organic matter. Alder abundance and LAI increased with the total area occupied by exposed circles. Analyses using spatial statistics indicate that young alders tend to occur in evenly-spaced groups that mirror the spacing of circles. This distribution pattern persists in older alder stands, especially where circles are large and widely-spaced. Stands on closely-spaced circles quickly develop dense canopies and low species-diversity. Based on ground- and satellite-based observations, we conclude that the abundance of mineral-dominated circles at Kharp has facilitated rapid alder expansion and associated alterations in plant community structure, composition, and productivity. Physical processes in areas of patterned ground promote continuous, rather than

  2. A convenient tandem one-pot synthesis of donor-acceptor-type triphenylene 2,3-dicarboxylic esters from diarylacetylene.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun; Tian, Xian-Li; Zhou, Jing; Xiang, Shi-Kai; Yu, Wen-Hao; Wang, Bi-Qin; Hu, Ping; Redshaw, Carl; Zhao, Ke-Qing

    2014-09-28

    A tandem one-pot method for the direct synthesis of polysubstituted triphenylene 2,3-dicarboxylic esters with different substitution patterns was developed by enyne metathesis of diarylacetylene, followed by Diels-Alder, aromatization and a cyclization cascade.

  3. Preliminary correlation of organic molecular tracers in residential wood smoke with the source of fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standley, Laurel J.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Polar cyclic di- and triterpenoids were analyzed in the extracts of residential wood combustion aerosols collected in suburban sections of Eugene, Oakridge and Corvallis, Oregon. Additional samples collected included alder wood, smoke from two wood stoves burning only alder or pine as fuel, soot from a stove burning alder and a fireplace where oak was the predominant fuel. Due to the relatively cooler temperatures present under the smoldering conditions of residential wood combustion, as compared to the active burning of forest fires and slash burns, incomplete combustion resulted in the preservation of high levels of the natural products. There were three distinct signatures which could be used to trace relative input from coniferous, alder and oak combustion products, i.e. diterpenoids, lupane-derived triterpenoids and friedelin, respectively. Conifer combustion products dominated the suburban smoke aerosols.

  4. A Valence Isomer Trapping Procedure for Introductory Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, David W.; Johnson, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which illustrates valence isomerization, the trapping of a reactive intermediate and retrosynthetic analysis applied to the Diels-Alder reaction. Included is a background discussion, experimental procedures, and a discussion of the analysis. (CW)

  5. Total syntheses of chelidonine and norchelidonine via an enamide-benzyne-[2 + 2] cycloaddition cascade.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-Xiong; Feltenberger, John B; Hsung, Richard P

    2012-06-01

    Total syntheses of chelidonine and norchelidonine featuring an enamide-benzyne-[2 + 2] cycloaddition initiated cascade is described. The cascade includes a pericyclic ring-opening and intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  6. Total synthesis of a thromboxane receptor antagonist, terutroban.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wasim; Mainkar, Prathama S; Pabbaraja, Srihari; Chandrasekhar, Srivari

    2015-03-14

    A total synthesis of terutroban is achieved using the Claisen rearrangement, Friedel-Crafts acylation and Heck coupling as key reactions, avoiding the classical Diels-Alder approach used before. PMID:25611989

  7. Phytochemicals from Echinacea and Hypericum

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jaehoon; Kim, Junwon

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of trienes with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes produces bicyclic products via a tandem Diels-Alder/ene reaction. The adduct from tiglic aldehyde was converted into isoligularone by conversion to a furan followed by benzylic oxidation. PMID:17917688

  8. "Inosaminoacids": novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures accessed by microbial arene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Sarah; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Lloyd, Matthew D; Lewis, Simon E

    2011-04-28

    Microbial 1,2-dihydroxylation of sodium benzoate permits the rapid construction of novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures. Both β- and γ-amino acids are accessible by means of an acylnitroso Diels-Alder cycloaddition.

  9. Experiments probing the viability of donor-acceptor norbornenes for (5 + 2)-annulation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Morgan M; Goodman, C Guy; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2014-10-01

    This Note details experiments that probe the mechanism by which donor-acceptor norbornene systems epimerize. A number of mechanistic studies indicate that epimerization in these systems occurs via a Lewis acid catalyzed retro-Diels-Alder/Diels-Alder sequence, rather than bond rotation in an intimate ion pair. These results suggest that, under the reaction conditions examined, the ring strain present in norbornene is inadequate to induce zwitterion formation analogous to that observed with donor-acceptor cyclopropanes.

  10. A Sustainable Route to a Terephthalic Acid Precursor.

    PubMed

    Banella, Maria Barbara; Gioia, Claudio; Vannini, Micaela; Colonna, Martino; Celli, Annamaria; Gandini, Alessandro

    2016-05-10

    A new synthetic pathway for the production of p-toluic acid has been developed starting from reagents derived from renewable resources. A Diels-Alder reaction between sorbic and acrylic acids is followed by a combined dehydrogenation/ decarboxylation process, providing p-toluic acid in high yields. This route permits to use milder conditions compared to other Diels-Alder approaches reported in the literature, and therefore can contribute to a more sustainable terephthalic acid production.

  11. A Sustainable Route to a Terephthalic Acid Precursor.

    PubMed

    Banella, Maria Barbara; Gioia, Claudio; Vannini, Micaela; Colonna, Martino; Celli, Annamaria; Gandini, Alessandro

    2016-05-10

    A new synthetic pathway for the production of p-toluic acid has been developed starting from reagents derived from renewable resources. A Diels-Alder reaction between sorbic and acrylic acids is followed by a combined dehydrogenation/ decarboxylation process, providing p-toluic acid in high yields. This route permits to use milder conditions compared to other Diels-Alder approaches reported in the literature, and therefore can contribute to a more sustainable terephthalic acid production. PMID:27072163

  12. How can effect the synergy of climate change, soil units and vegetation groups the potential global distribution of plants up to 2300: a modelling study for prediction of potential global distribution and migration of the N2 fixing species Alnus spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant migration is a well known adaptation strategy of plant groups or species with evidence from historical to present observation and monitoring studies. Importance of N2-fixing plants has increased in last decades. Alnus (alder) is an important plant group because of its nitrogen fixation ability. Alders are generally distributed in humid locations of boreal, temperate and tropical climate zones, where the nitrogen fixation is an important nitrogen source for other plants. To model the nitrogen fixation by alder, data about the global distribution of alder is absolutely required. In this study a new method and model are presented to predict the distribution of N2-fixing genus on global scale and its migration in the future by using climate change scenarios. Three linear functions were defined for the determination of climate niche of alders. The distribution and migration model (Alnus-Distribution-Model (ADM)) was improved with the aid of the soil units from FAO-Unesco Soil Database, and vegetation types from Schmithüsen's biogeographical atlas. The model was also developed to predict the impact of climate change on alder distribution by using climate data from experiments performed by the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) including the representative concentration pathways (RCPs) mitigation scenarios, and extensions of the scenarios beyond 2100 to 2300. The model covered basic approaches to understand the combine effect of climate, soil and vegetation on plant distribution and migration in the current time and future.

  13. Spatial and temporal controls on Alnus-derived nutrients and stream stoichiometry: Implications for aquatic ecosystem productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devotta, D.; Fraterrigo, J.; Walsh, P.; Hu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting how nutrient fluxes that cross ecosystem boundaries will respond to future climate change is one of the greatest challenges for ecology in the 21st century. In southwestern (SW) Alaska, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and nitrogen (N)-fixation by alder (Alnus spp.) provide key nutrient subsidies to freshwater systems. The importance of alder-derived nutrients (ADN) to aquatic systems will increase as alder cover expands under climate warming and salmon harvesting reduces marine-derived nutrients. We investigate broad-scale spatial and temporal drivers of ADN and stream N:P in 26 streams in SW Alaska. Alder cover and watershed features were measured using satellite images and topographic maps in ArcGIS. Stream water samples were collected in each spring and summer from 2010-2013 and analyzed for dissolved N and total phosphorus (TP). We obtained annual growing season length (AGSL) and sum of growing degree days (GDD) data from weather stations. Elevation was inversely related to alder cover, stream N, and N:P (ρ=-0.802, -0.65, and -0.71 resp., p<0.01, n=208). Alder cover had the largest influence on stream N (mean β estimate=0.402, 90% CIs). Stream N increased with alder cover, under longer AGSL, and lower GDD (interaction effect sizes between alder and stream N=0.196 and -0.185 resp., 90% CIs), suggesting that long growing seasons with minimal heat accumulation during the spring and fall increased ADN export. Higher P was associated with lower temperatures, possibly reflecting reduced P demand under low rates of metabolic activity. Structural equation modeling revealed significant causal relationships among elevation, alder cover, and stream N:P across multiple years (r2=0.94, X2=742.8, df=9, p<0.01). All paths in the model were significant (p<0.01) except between stream N:P and weather (p=0.165). These results demonstrate that spatial variation in alder cover associated with elevation is a stronger regulator of ADN fluxes and stream N:P than

  14. Evidence of involvement of aluminum in causation of defective formation of eggshells and of impaired breeding in wild passerine birds

    SciTech Connect

    Nyholm, N.E.I.

    1981-12-01

    Aluminum was found in the bone marrow tissue of humeri of wild pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), specifically in birds with impaired breeding. Production of only small cluthes, defective eggshell formation, and intrauterine bleeding were characteristic impairments shown by the aluminum-contaminated birds. These impairments agree with the symptoms of aluminum intoxication of mammals (including man) reported in the literature. A possible route of transport of aluminum to the birds is presented, in which acid precipitation is the proximate link.

  15. Birds prefer to breed in sites with low radioactivity in Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; Mousseau, T A

    2007-06-01

    Low-level radioactive contamination may affect choice of breeding site and life-history decisions if (i) radioactivity directly affects body condition or (ii) it affects resource abundance that then secondarily influences reproductive decisions. We tested the effects of radioactive contamination on nest-site choice and reproduction in a community of hole nesting birds by putting up nest boxes in areas differing in levels of background radiation. Great tit Parus major and pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca significantly avoided nest boxes in heavily contaminated areas, with a stronger effect in flycatchers than in tits. These preferences could not be attributed to variation in habitat quality or resource abundance, as determined by analyses of habitat use and the relationship between radiation and life-history characters. Likewise, none of these effects could be attributed to individuals of a specific age breeding in the most contaminated areas. Laying date and clutch size were not significantly related to dose rate in either species. Hatching success was depressed by elevated radioactive contamination, interacting with habitat in the great tit and with laying date in the pied flycatcher. Interspecific differences in effects of radiation on nest-site choice suggest that species respond in a species-specific manner to radiation, perhaps related to differences in migratory habits. We suggest that individual body condition rather than secondary effects of radiation on resource abundance account for the effects on nest box use and hatching success.

  16. Assessing the passerine "Tapestry": phylogenetic relationships of the Muscicapoidea inferred from nuclear DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Cibois, Alice; Cracraft, Joel

    2004-07-01

    This study presents new comparative sequence data from the nuclear RAG-1 gene for an increased taxon sample in order to investigate phylogenetic relationships among a diverse songbird superfamily, the Muscicapoidea, which has variously included the waxwings, silky flycatchers, Palm Chat, dippers, starlings, mockingbirds, thrushes, chats, and Old World flycatchers. At the same time, our results provide a test of the often-cited relationships inferred from the phenetic studies of Sibley and Ahlquist [Phylogeny and Classification of Birds: A Study in Molecular Evolution. Yale University Press, New Haven, 1990] using DNA hybridization distances. Nuclear DNA sequences confirm the monophyly of the "core muscicapoid" group, as defined by Barker et al. [Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 269 (2002) 295] and also support the sister-group relationship of the Sturnidae and Mimidae, on the one hand, and the large-bodied thrushes (Turdini)+the Old World flycatchers and robins, on the other. The results of the phylogenetic analysis allow preliminary inferences about muscicapoid biogeographic history.

  17. Effects of invasive European bird cherry (Prunus padus) on leaf litter processing by aquatic invertebrate shredder communities in urban Alaskan streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roon, David A.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Wurtz, Tricia L.

    2014-01-01

    European bird cherry (Prunus padus) (EBC) is an invasive ornamental tree that is spreading rapidly in riparian forests of urban Alaska. To determine how the spread of EBC affects leaf litter processing by aquatic invertebrate shredders, we conducted complementary leaf pack experiments in two streams located in Anchorage, Alaska. The first experiment contrasted invasive EBC with three native tree species—thin-leaf alder (Alnus tenuifolia), paper birch (Betula neoalaskana), and black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)—in one reach of Chester Creek; finding that EBC leaf litter broke down significantly faster than birch and cottonwood, but at a similar rate to alder. The second experiment contrasted EBC with alder in four reaches of Campbell and Chester creeks; finding that while EBC leaf litter broke down significantly faster than alder in Chester Creek, EBC broke down at a similar rate to alder in Campbell Creek. Although EBC sometimes supported fewer shredders by both count and mass, shredder communities did not differ significantly between EBC and native plants. Collectively, these data suggest that invasive EBC is not currently exhibiting strong negative impacts on leaf litter processing in these streams, but could if it continues to spread and further displaces native species over time.

  18. Growth and N2 fixation in an Alnus hirsuta (Turcz.) var. sibirica stand in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shigeaki F; Yazaki, Kenichi; Komatsu, Masabumi; Kitao, Mitsutoshi

    2013-11-01

    To estimate the N2 fixation ability of the alder (Alnus hirsuta (Turcz.) var. sibirica), we examined the seasonal variation in nitrogenase activity of nodules using the acetylene reduction method in an 18-year-old stand naturally regenerated after disturbance by road construction in Japan. To evaluate the contribution of N2 fixation to the nitrogen (N) economy in this alder stand, we also measured the phenology of the alder, the litterfall, the decomposition rate of the leaf litter, and N accumulation in the soil. The acetylene reduction activity per unit nodule mass (ARA) under field conditions appeared after bud break, peaked the maximum in midsummer after full expansion of the leaves, and disappeared after all leaves had fallen. There was no consistent correlation between ARA and tree size (dbh). The amount of N2 fixed in this alder stand was estimated at 56.4 kg ha-1 year-1 when a theoretical molar ratio of 3 was used to convert the amount of reduced acetylene to the amount of fixed N2. This amount of N2 fixation corresponded to the 66.4 percent of N in the leaf litter produced in a year. These results suggested that N2 fixation still contributed to the large portion of N economy in this alder stand. PMID:24287656

  19. Benthic invertebrate community structure is influenced by forest succession after clearcut logging in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez, O.; Merritt, R.W.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effects of timber harvesting on headwater streams in upland forests, benthic community structure was contrasted among four dominant forest management types (old growth, red alder-dominated young growth, conifer-dominated young growth, clearcut) and instream habitats (woody debris, cobble, gravel) in southeastern Alaska. Benthos in streams of previously harvested areas resulted in increased richness, densities and biomass relative to old growth types, particularly in young growth stands with a red alder-dominated riparian canopy. Woody debris and gravel habitats supported a combination of higher densities and biomass of invertebrates than cobble habitats. In addition, woody debris also supported a richer and more diverse invertebrate fauna than either cobble or gravel substrates. Maintaining both a woody debris source and a red alder component in regenerating riparian forests following timber harvesting should support greater invertebrate densities and diversity following clearcutting. ?? Springer 2005.

  20. "Clickable" Polymeric Nanofibers through Hydrophilic-Hydrophobic Balance: Fabrication of Robust Biomolecular Immobilization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Kalaoglu-Altan, Ozlem I; Sanyal, Rana; Sanyal, Amitav

    2015-05-11

    Fabrication of hydrophilic polymeric nanofibers that undergo facile and selective functionalization through metal catalyst-free Diels-Alder "click" reaction in aqueous environment is outlined. Electrospinning of copolymers containing an electron-rich furan moiety, hydrophobic methyl methacrylate units and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol)s as side chains provide specifically functionalizable yet antibiofouling fibers that remain stable in aqueous media due to appropriate hydrophobic hydrophilic balance. Efficient functionalization of these nanofibers is accomplished through the Diels-Alder reaction by exposing them to maleimide-containing molecules and ligands. Diels-Alder conjugation based functionalization is demonstrated through attachment of fluorescein-maleimide and a maleimide tethered biotin ligand. Biotinylated nanofibers were utilized to mediate immobilization of the protein streptavidin, as well as streptavidin coated quantum dots. Facile fabrication from readily available polymers and their effective functionalization under mild and reagent-free conditions in aqueous media make these "clickable" nanofibers attractive candidates as functionalizable scaffolds for various biomedical applications.

  1. Controlling porosity in bridged polysilsesquioxanes through elimination reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, M.D.; Loy, D.A.; Prabakar, S.

    1996-06-01

    The retro Diels-Alder reaction was used to modify porosity in hydrocarbon-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Microporous polysilsesquioxanes incorporating a thermally labile Diels-Alder adduct as the hydrocarbon bridging group were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of trans-2,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)norbornene. Upon heating the 2,3-norbornenylene-bridges polymers at temperatures above 250 C, the norbornenylene-bridging group underwent a retro Diels-Alder reaction losing cyclopentadiene and leaving behind a ethenylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane. Less than theoretical quantities of cyclopentadiene were volatilized indicating that some of the diene was either reacting with the silanol and olefinic rich material or undergoing oligomerization. Both scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry revealed net coarsening of pores (and reduction of surface area) in the materials with thermolysis.

  2. Widespread Expansion of Boreal Shrublands in the Siberian Low Arctic Is Linked to Cryogenic Disturbance and Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. V.; Epstein, H. E.; Walker, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Declassified imagery from the KH-4B "Corona" and KH-7 "Gambit" Cold War satellite surveillance systems (1963-1972) are a unique, high-resolution dataset that establishes a baseline for landcover-change studies in the Russian Arctic spanning 6 decades. We co-registered Corona/Gambit and modern high-resolution imagery for seven ~65 km2 Low Arctic sites in northwest Siberia and Chukotka and quantified changes in the extent of tall shrublands dominated by Siberian alder (Alnus fruticosa) using a point-intercept sampling approach. We made ground observations at two sites to identify important geomorphic processes and physiographic units associated with shrub expansion. Alder shrubland cover increased at all sites; relative to the 1960s extent, shrubland extent increased by 5-31% at the northwest Siberian sites and by 9% at both Chukotkan sites,. In northwest Siberia, alder expansion was closely linked to cryogenic disturbances related to patterned-ground and active-layer detachments. At the Chukotkan sites, most alder expansion occurred on hillslope colluvium and floodplains; we also observed modest increases in Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila). The close correspondence between expanding shrub patches and disturbance processes indicates that sparsely-vegetated, mineral-rich seedbeds strongly facilitate alder recruitment, and that the spatio-temporal attributes of disturbance mechanisms are a key determinant of landscape susceptibility to shrub expansion. Shrub expansion, in turn, initiates a cascade of effects on permafrost thermal regime and disturbance, promoting the accumulation of biomass and potentially buffering permafrost from climate warming.; Recently-established alder shrubs growing on non-sorted circles in patterned ground near Obskaya, northwest Siberia.

  3. Parameterised local spin density exchange-correlation energies and potentials for electronic structure calculations I. Zero temperature formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, J. M.; Clougherty, D. P.; McHenry, M. E.; Donovan, M. M.

    1991-09-01

    Commonly used approximate forms for the exchange-correlation energy and potential within the local density approximation are summarised, and FORTRAN code is included for the evaluation of these various forms. Included are the following: Xα, Kohn-Sham-Gaspàr, Hedin-Lundqvist-Wilkins, Janak-Moruzzi-Williams, Von Barth-Hedin, Ceperley-Alder (Perdew-Zunger), and Ceperley-Alder (Vosko-Wilk-Nusair). Both the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair and the Von Barth-Hedin expressions for spin interpolation between paramagnetic and ferromagnetic limits are also provided.

  4. Ynamide Carbopalladation: A Flexible Route to Mono-, Bi- and Tricyclic Azacycles

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Craig D; Greenaway, Rebecca L; Holton, Oliver T; Walker, P Ross; Chapman, Helen A; Russell, C Adam; Carr, Greg; Thomson, Amber L; Anderson, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Bromoenynamides represent precursors to a diversity of azacycles by a cascade sequence of carbopalladation followed by cross-coupling/electrocyclization, or reduction processes. Full details of our investigations into intramolecular ynamide carbopalladation are disclosed, which include the first examples of carbopalladation/cross-coupling reactions using potassium organotrifluoroborate salts; and an understanding of factors influencing the success of these processes, including ring size, and the nature of the coupling partner. Additional mechanistic observations are reported, such as the isolation of triene intermediates for electrocyclization. A variety of hetero-Diels–Alder reactions using the product heterocycles are also described, which provide insight into Diels–Alder regioselectivity. PMID:26189754

  5. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  6. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  7. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  8. Collective Total Syntheses of Atisane-Type Diterpenes and Atisine-Type Diterpenoid Alkaloids: (±)-Spiramilactone B, (±)-Spiraminol, (±)-Dihydroajaconine, and (±)-Spiramines C and D.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hang; Zeng, Fan-Hao; Yang, Xue; Meng, Yin-Juan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The first total syntheses of the architecturally complex atisane-type diterpenes and biogenetically related atisine-type diterpenoid alkaloids (±)-spiramilactone B, (±)-spiraminol, (±)-dihydroajaconine, and (±)-spiramines C and D are reported. Highlights of the synthesis include a late-stage biomimetic transformation of spiramilactone B, a facile formal lactone migration from the pentacyclic skeleton of spiramilactone E, a highly efficient and diastereoselective 1,7-enyne cycloisomerization to construct the functionalized tetracyclic atisane skeleton, and a tandem retro-Diels-Alder/intramolecular Diels-Alder sequence to achieve the tricyclo[6.2.2.0] ring system.

  9. Preparation and Reaction Chemistry of Novel Silicon-Substituted 1,3-Dienes.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Partha P; Welker, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    2-Silicon-substituted 1,3-dienes containing non transferrable groups known to promote transmetallation were prepared by Grignard chemistry and enyne metathesis. These dienes participated in one pot metathesis/Diels-Alder reactions in regio- and diastereoselective fashions. Electron-rich alkenes showed the fastest rates in metathesis reactions, and ethylene, a commonly used metathesis promoter slowed enyne metathesis. 2-Pyridyldimethylsilyl and 2-thienyldimethylsilyl substituted Diels-Alder cycloadducts participated in cross-coupling chemistry and the 2-thienyldimethylsilyl substituted cycloadducts underwent cross-coupling under very mild reaction conditions. PMID:26389877

  10. Organocatalytic Michael addition/intramolecular Julia-Kocienski olefination for the preparation of nitrocyclohexenes.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Eduardo; García Ruano, José Luis; Cid, M Belén

    2013-11-01

    An asymmetric organocatalytic [3 + 3] annulation strategy based on a Michael addition/intramolecular Julia-Kocienski olefination sequence has been developed for the synthesis of 4-substituted-5-nitrocyclohex-1-ene compounds. The strategy is an alternative to the direct reluctant enantioselective Diels-Alder approach. The potential of the methodology has been demonstrated with a concise enantioselective formal synthesis of trandolapril.

  11. Synthesis of cyclic sulfones by ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-02-01

    A general and highly efficient synthesis of cyclic sulfones based on ring-closing metathesis has been developed. The synthetic utility of the resulting cyclic sulfones was demonstrated by their participation in stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions and transformation to cyclic dienes by the Ramberg-Bäcklund reaction. PMID:11820896

  12. Study of improved methods for predicting chemical equilibria. Final report, January 1, 1990--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, T.G.; Vaughan, J.D.

    1993-09-01

    Objective was to develop computational methods for equilibrium constants of Diels-Alder reactions in gas and liquid solution phases. Approach was to calculate standard enthalpies of formation at 298 K and standard thermodynamic functions for a range of temperatures for reactants and products, and then to calculate standard enthalpies, entropies, Gibbs free energies, and equilibrium constants at various temperatures.

  13. Progenesis in the evolution of the nudibranch mollusks genus Dendronotus (Gastropoda: Nudibranchia).

    PubMed

    Ekimova, I A; Malakhov, V V

    2016-03-01

    The morphology and postlarval ontogenesis of the radula in 11 species of the genus Dendronotus Alder et Hancock, 1845, has been studied. Four types of radula are recognized in adult mollusks. Proposed evidence suggests that small species of Dendronotus have evolved by progenesis. PMID:27193883

  14. Synthesis of the C(18) -norditerpenoid alkaloid neofinaconitine: a lesson in convergent synthesis planning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Chen, David Y-K

    2014-01-20

    Hexacyclic framework: The total synthesis of the complex C18 -norditerpenoid alkaloid neofinaconitine has been achieved by a convergent approach. This remarkable synthesis featured two Diels-Alder cycloadditions and subsequent Mannich-type N-acyliminium and radical cyclizations to establish the unique hexacyclic core structure of the target molecule.

  15. An Asymmetric Total Synthesis of Brevisamide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianfeng

    2009-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of marine alkaloid brevisamide was accomplished in a convergent manner. The synthesis utilized an enantioselective hetero-Diels-Alder reaction which sets three chiral centers in compound 11. The synthesis also features a modified Wolff-Kishner reduction, Rubottom oxidation and Suzuki-Miyaura coupling to furnish brevisamide. PMID:19694486

  16. 75 FR 81641 - Odessa Subarea Special Study; Adams, Franklin, Grant, and Lincoln Counties, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Ritzville Public Library, 302 West Main, Ritzville, WA 99169. Basin City Branch, Mid-Columbia Library, Basin... Public Library, 405 West Main Street, Coulee City, WA 99115. Ephrata City Library, 45 Alder Street... 5th Avenue, Moses Lake, WA 98837-1797. Odessa Public Library, 21 East 1st Avenue, Odessa, WA...

  17. Asymmetric Total Syntheses of (+)- and (−)-Versicolamide B and Biosynthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kenneth A.; Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Williams, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most well-studied, synthetically useful organic transformations. While a significant number of naturally occurring substances are postulated to arise by biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions, rigorous confirmation of a mechanistically distinct natural Diels-Alderase enzyme remains elusive. Within this context, several related fungi within the Aspergillus genus produce a number of metabolites of opposite absolute configuration including (+)- or (−)-versicolamide B. These alkaloids are hypothesized to arise via biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions implying that each Aspergillus species possesses enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. Herein, experimental validation of these biosynthetic proposals via deployment of the IMDA reaction as a key step in the asymmetric total syntheses of (+)- and (−)-versicolamide B is described. Laboratory validation of the proposed biosynthetic Diels-Alder construction, coupled with the secondary metabolite profile of the producing fungi, reveals that each Aspergillus species has evolved enantiomerically distinct indole oxidases, as well as enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. PMID:20300443

  18. Total Synthesis of (±)-Maoecrystal V

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Feng; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2012-01-01

    The total synthesis of racemic maoecrystal V has been accomplished. Key steps include an intramolecular Diels-Alder cyclization to rapidly construct the core system from simple starting materials and the creation of the A–C ring trans-fusion through intramolecular delivery of a hydrogen to the hindered β-face of the ring system. PMID:23126440

  19. A cyclopropene-modified nucleotide for site-specific RNA labeling using genetic alphabet expansion transcription.

    PubMed

    Eggert, F; Kath-Schorr, S

    2016-06-01

    Site-specific RNA modification with methyl cyclopropene moieties is performed by T7 in vitro transcription. An existing unnatural base is functionalized with a cyclopropene moiety and used in transcription reactions to produce site-specifically cyclopropene-modified RNA molecules. The posttranscriptional inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction with a selected tetrazine-fluorophore conjugate is demonstrated.

  20. Synthesis of cyclic sulfones by ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-02-01

    A general and highly efficient synthesis of cyclic sulfones based on ring-closing metathesis has been developed. The synthetic utility of the resulting cyclic sulfones was demonstrated by their participation in stereoselective Diels-Alder reactions and transformation to cyclic dienes by the Ramberg-Bäcklund reaction.