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Sample records for aldh2 dehydrogenase activity

  1. Isoflurane Preconditioning Confers Cardioprotection by Activation of ALDH2

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Xiao-E; Wang, Xiong; Zhang, Ke-Rang; Lv, Ji-Yuan; Jin, Jian-Hua; Li, Qing-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The volatile anesthetic, isoflurane, protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is thought to be an endogenous mechanism against ischemia-reperfusion injury possibly through detoxification of toxic aldehydes. We investigated whether cardioprotection by isoflurane depends on activation of ALDH2.Anesthetized rats underwent 40 min of coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion and were randomly assigned to the following groups: untreated controls, isoflurane preconditioning with and without an ALDH2 inhibitor, the direct activator of ALDH2 or a protein kinase C (PKCε) inhibitor. Pretreatment with isoflurane prior to ischemia reduced LDH and CK-MB levels and infarct size, while it increased phosphorylation of ALDH2, which could be blocked by the ALDH2 inhibitor, cyanamide. Isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes were treated with hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and injury which were attenuated by isoflurane and forced the activation of ALDH2. In contrast, the effect of isoflurane-induced protection was almost abolished by knockdown of ALDH2. Activation of ALDH2 and cardioprotection by isoflurane were substantially blocked by the PKCε inhibitor. Activation of ALDH2 by mitochondrial PKCε plays an important role in the cardioprotection of isoflurane in myocardium I/R injury. PMID:23468836

  2. The impact of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) activation by Alda-1 on the behavioral and biochemical disturbances in animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, Aneta; Głombik, Katarzyna; Olszanecki, Rafał; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Suski, Maciej; Lasoń, Władysław; Korbut, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of depression remains still unclear. Recently, it has been proposed, that mitochondrial dysfunction may be associated with development of mood disorders, such as depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), an enzyme responsible for the detoxification of reactive aldehydes, is considered to exert protective function in mitochondria. We investigated the influence of Alda-1, a small-molecule activator of ALDH2, on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in an animal model of depression - the prenatally stressed rats - using behavioral, molecular and proteomic methods. Prolonged Alda-1 administration significantly increased the climbing time, tended to reduce the immobility time and increased the swimming time of the prenatally stressed rats in the forced swim test. Moreover, treatment of prenatally stressed rats with Alda-1 significantly increased number of entries into the open arms of the maze and the time spent therein, as assessed by elevated plus-maze test. Such actions were associated with reduction of plasma 4-HNE-protein content, decrease of TNF-α mRNA and increase of PGC-1α (regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis) mRNA level in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the prenatally stressed rats as well as with normalization of peripheral immune parameters and significant changes in expression of 6 and 4 proteins related to mitochondrial functions in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, respectively. Collectively, ALDH2 activation by Alda-1 led to a significant attenuation of depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in the prenatally stressed rats. The pattern of changes suggested mitoprotective effect of Alda-1, however the exact functional consequences of the revealed alterations require further investigation. PMID:26254233

  3. Malondialdehyde inhibits an AMPK-mediated nuclear translocation and repression activity of ALDH2 in transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ji-Woong; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Sung-Chun; Ha, Moon-Kyung; Song, Kye-Yong; Youn, Hong-Duk; Park, Sang Chul

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALDH2 is an MDA-modified protein in old rat kidney tissues. {yields} AMPK associates with ALDH2 and triggers the nuclear localization of ALDH2. {yields} ALDH2 serves as a general transcriptional repressor by associating with HDACs. {yields} MDA inhibits the AMPK-mediated translocation of ALDH2 and its repression activity. -- Abstract: Aging process results from deleterious damages by reactive oxygen species, in particular, various metabolic aldehydes. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is one of metabolic enzymes detoxifying various aldehydes under oxidative conditions. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in controlling metabolic process. However, little was known about the relationship of ALDH2 with AMPK under oxidative conditions. Here, we, by using MDA-specific monoclonal antibody, screened the tissues of young and old rats for MDA-modified proteins and identified an ALDH2 as a prominent MDA-modified protein band in the old rat kidney tissue. ALDH2 associates with AMPK and is phosphorylated by AMPK. In addition, AICAR, an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase, induces the nuclear translocation of ALDH2. ALDH2 in nucleus is involved in general transcription repression by association with histone deacetylases. Furthermore, MDA modification inhibited the translocation of ALDH2 and the association with AMPK, and ultimately led to de-repression of transcription in the reporter system analysis. In this study, we have demonstrated that ALDH2 acts as a transcriptional repressor in response to AMPK activation, and MDA modifies ALDH2 and inhibits repressive activity of ALDH2 in general transcription. We thus suggest that increasing amount of MDA during aging process may interrupt the nuclear function of ALDH2, modulated by AMPK.

  4. Impaired ALDH2 activity decreases the mitochondrial respiration in H9C2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Vishal R; Deshpande, Mandar; Pan, Guodong; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Palaniyandi, Suresh S

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated reactive aldehydes induce cellular stress. In cardiovascular diseases such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, lipid-peroxidation derived reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) are known to contribute to the pathogenesis. 4HNE is involved in ROS formation, abnormal calcium handling and more importantly defective mitochondrial respiration. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily contains NAD(P)(+)-dependent isozymes which can detoxify endogenous and exogenous aldehydes into non-toxic carboxylic acids. Therefore we hypothesize that 4HNE afflicts mitochondrial respiration and leads to cell death by impairing ALDH2 activity in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocyte cell lines. H9C2 cardiomyocytes were treated with 25, 50 and 75 μM 4HNE and its vehicle, ethanol as well as 25, 50 and 75 μM disulfiram (DSF), an inhibitor of ALDH2 and its vehicle (DMSO) for 4 h. 4HNE significantly decreased ALDH2 activity, ALDH2 protein levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity, and increased 4HNE adduct formation and cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes. ALDH2 inhibition by DSF and ALDH2 siRNA attenuated ALDH2 activity besides reducing ALDH2 levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity and increased cell death. Our results indicate that ALDH2 impairment can lead to poor mitochondrial respiration and increased cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes. PMID:26577527

  5. ALDH2 Activator Inhibits Increased Myocardial Infarction Injury by Nitroglycerin Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lihan; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Nitroglycerin, which helps impaired cardiac function as it is converted to nitric oxide, is used worldwide to treat patients with various ischemic and congestive cardiac diseases, including angina pectoris. Nevertheless, after continuous treatment, the benefits of nitroglycerin are limited by the development of tolerance to the drug. Nitroglycerin tolerance is a result of inactivation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), an enzyme essential for cardioprotection in animals subjected to myocardial infarction (MI). Here we tested the hypothesis that the tolerance that develops as a result of sustained nitroglycerin treatment increases cardiac injury by subsequent MI. In a rat model of MI, 16 hours of prior, sustained nitroglycerin treatment (7.2 mg/kg/day) resulted in infarcts that were twice as large as those in untreated control animals and in diminished cardiac function at 3 days and 2 weeks after the MI. We also sought to identify a potential treatment to protect against this increased cardiac damage. Nitroglycerin inhibited ALDH2 activity in vitro, an effect that was blocked by Alda-1, an activator of ALDH2. Co-administration of Alda-1 (16 mg/kg/day) with the nitroglycerin prevented the nitroglycerin-induced increase in cardiac dysfunction after MI in rats, at least in part by enhancing metabolism of reactive aldehyde adducts that impair normal protein functions. If our animal studies showing that nitroglycerin tolerance increases cardiac injury upon ischemic insult are corroborated in humans, activators of ALDH2 such as Alda-1 may help to protect MI patients from this nitroglycerin-induced increase in cardiac injury, while maintaining the cardiac benefits of the increased nitric oxide concentrations produced by nitroglycerin. PMID:22049071

  6. Pharmacological recruitment of aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) to assist ALDH2 in acetaldehyde and ethanol metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Cruz, Leslie A.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Correcting a genetic mutation that leads to a loss of function has been a challenge. One such mutation is in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), denoted ALDH2*2. This mutation is present in ∼0.6 billion East Asians and results in accumulation of toxic acetaldehyde after consumption of ethanol. To temporarily increase metabolism of acetaldehyde in vivo, we describe an approach in which a pharmacologic agent recruited another ALDH to metabolize acetaldehyde. We focused on ALDH3A1, which is enriched in the upper aerodigestive track, and identified Alda-89 as a small molecule that enables ALDH3A1 to metabolize acetaldehyde. When given together with the ALDH2-specific activator, Alda-1, Alda-89 reduced acetaldehyde-induced behavioral impairment by causing a rapid reduction in blood ethanol and acetaldehyde levels after acute ethanol intoxication in both wild-type and ALDH2-deficient, ALDH2*1/*2, heterozygotic knock-in mice. The use of a pharmacologic agent to recruit an enzyme to metabolize a substrate that it usually does not metabolize may represent a novel means to temporarily increase elimination of toxic agents in vivo. PMID:25713355

  7. Low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) polymorphism, alcohol-drinking behavior, and chromosome alterations in peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, K; Takeshita, T

    1996-01-01

    Excessive drinking of alcohol is now widely known to be one of the major lifestyle choices that ca effect health. Among the various effects of alcohol drinking, cytogenetic and other genotoxic effects are of major concern from the viewpoint of prevention of alcohol-related diseases. Alcohol is first metabolized to acetaldehyde, which directly causes various types of chromosomal DNA lesions and alcohol-related diseases, and is then further detoxified to the much less toxic metabolite acetate. About 50% of Oriental people are deficient in the aldehyde-dehydrogenase 2 isozyme (ALDH2) that can most efficiently detoxify acetaldehyde. We have performed a series of experiments to investigate how the genetic deficiency in ALDH2 affects the behavioral pattern for alcohol drinking and the sensitivity of peripheral lymphocytes to the induction of chromosome alterations by exposure to alcohol and alcohol-related chemicals. We found great effects of the ALDH2 genotypes on alcohol sensitivity and alcohol-drinking behavior. We also show that lymphocytes from habitual drinkers with the deficient ALDH2 enzyme had significantly higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges than those from ALDH2-proficient individuals. PMID:8781384

  8. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) Polymorphism and the Risk of Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis among East Asians: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Luo, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been implicated in the development of alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) in East Asians. However, the results are inconsistent. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations between the ALDH2 polymorphism and the risk of ALC. Materials and Methods Relevant studies were retrieved by searching PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI, Wanfang and Veipu databases up to January 10, 2015. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using either the fixed- or random effects model. Results A total of twelve case-control studies included 1003 cases and 2011 controls were included. Overall, the ALDH2 polymorphism was associated with a decreased risk of ALC (*1/*2 vs. *1/*1: OR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.61–0.99). However, in stratification analysis by country, we failed to detect any association among Chinese, Korean or Japanese populations. Conclusion The pooled evidence suggests that ALDH2 polymorphism may be an important protective factor for ALC in East Asians. PMID:27189280

  9. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) Ameliorates Chronic Alcohol Ingestion-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Inflammation: Role of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Xu, Xihui; Babcock, Sara A.; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) plays a critical role in the detoxification of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde. This study was designed to examine the impact of global ALDH2 overexpression on alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis. Methods Wild-type friendly virus B (FVB) and ALDH2 transgenic mice were placed on a 4% alcohol or control diet for 12 weeks. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), bilirubin and cholesterol, hepatic triglyceride, steatosis, fat metabolism-related proteins, pro-inflammatory cytokines, glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), autophagy and autophagy signaling were examined. The role of autophagy was evaluated in ADH1-transfected human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (VA-13) treated with or without autophagy inducer rapamycin and lysosomal inhibitors. Results Chronic alcohol intake led to elevated AST, ALT, bilirubin, AST/ALT ratio, cholesterol, hepatic triglycerides, hepatic fat deposition as evidenced by H&E and oil Red O staining, associated with disturbed fat metabolism-related proteins (fatty acid synthase, SCD1), upregulated interleukin-6, TNF-α, cyclooxygenase, oxidative stress, and loss of autophagy, the effects of which were attenuated or ablated by ALDH2 transgene. Moreover, ethanol (100 mM) and acetaldehyde (100, 500 μM) increased levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and suppressed autophagy in VA-13 cells, the effects of which were markedly alleviated by rapamycin. In addition, lysosomal inhibitors mimicked ethanol-induced p62 accumulation with little additive effect with ethanol. Ethanol significantly suppressed LC3 conversion in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors. Conclusions In summary, our results revealed that ALDH2 plays a beneficial role in ameliorating chronic alcohol intake-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation through regulation of autophagy. PMID:25457208

  10. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) polymorphisms exacerbate bladder cancer risk associated with alcohol drinking: gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hidemi; Soga, Norihito; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Tanaka, Hideo; Yokomizo, Akira; Hayashi, Norio; Eto, Masatoshi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-06-01

    Although a range of chemical exposures (cigarette smoking and occupational exposure) are recognized risk factors for the development of bladder cancer (BCa), many epidemiological studies have demonstrated that alcohol drinking is not associated with BCa risk. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2; rs671, Glu504Lys) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B; rs1229984, His47Arg) polymorphisms impact the accumulation of acetaldehyde, resulting in an increased risk of various cancers. To date, however, no studies evaluating the association between BCa risk and alcohol drinking have considered these polymorphisms. Here, we conducted a matched case-control study to investigate whether ALDH2 and ADH1B polymorphisms influence BCa risk associated with alcohol drinking. Cases were 74 BCa patients and controls were 740 first-visit outpatients without cancer at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005. Odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) and gene-environment interaction were assessed by conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for potential confounders. Results showed that ALDH2 Glu/Lys was associated with a significantly increased risk of BCa compared with Glu/Glu (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.14-3.62, P = 0.017). In contrast, ALDH2 Glu/Lys showed no increase in risk among the stratum of never drinkers compared with Glu/Glu, indicating a gene-environment interaction. ADH1B His/Arg had an OR of 1.98 (1.20-3.24, P = 0.007) compared with His/His. ADH1B Arg+ showed a similar OR and 95% CI. Individuals with ALDH2 Glu/Lys and ADH1B Arg+ had the highest risk of BCa compared with ALDH2 Glu/Glu and ADH1B His/His [OR 4.00 (1.81-8.87), P = 0.001]. PMID:26992901

  11. PKC-ALDH2 Pathway Plays a Novel Role in Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yu-Hsiang; Liao, Pei-Ru; Guo, Chien-Jung; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The ALDH2 gene encodes the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a critical enzyme involved in ethanol clearance through acetaldehyde metabolism. ALDH2 also catalyzes the metabolism of other bioreactive aldehydes, including propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and 4-hydroxykenals (4-HNE). Increased levels of 4-HNE in adipose tissue positively correlate with obesity and insulin resistance. However, it remains unclear whether ALDH2 is involved in regulation of adipocyte differentiation. Here, we found that ALDH2 protein levels were lower in white adipose tissue of high-fat diet-fed mice and ob/ob mice relative to lean mice. Knockdown of ALDH2 expression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes caused an increase in intracellular 4-HNE, thereby attenuated adipocyte differentiation. By contrast, an ALDH2 activator, Alda-1, significantly accelerated adipogenesis, which was accompanied by an increase in adipogenic gene expression. Consistently, adipogenesis was reduced when protein kinase C ε (PKCε), an ALDH2 phosphorylating activator, was silenced in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, whereas treatment with a PKCε agonist in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes enhanced adipogenesis. Whole-genome microarray profiling of Alda-1-treated cells demonstrated several upregulated transcripts encoding proteins involved in metabolism and the majority of these transcripts are for proteins involved in PPAR signaling pathways. Furthermore, PKCε-ALDH2 interaction alleviates 4-HNE induced aberrant PPARγ regulation on adipogenesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ALDH2 activation enhances adipogenesis and signaling pathways involving PPARγ. Thus, activation of PKCε-ALDH2 regulatory axis may be a therapeutic target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27575855

  12. PKC-ALDH2 Pathway Plays a Novel Role in Adipocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu-Hsiang; Liao, Pei-Ru; Guo, Chien-Jung; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The ALDH2 gene encodes the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a critical enzyme involved in ethanol clearance through acetaldehyde metabolism. ALDH2 also catalyzes the metabolism of other bioreactive aldehydes, including propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and 4-hydroxykenals (4-HNE). Increased levels of 4-HNE in adipose tissue positively correlate with obesity and insulin resistance. However, it remains unclear whether ALDH2 is involved in regulation of adipocyte differentiation. Here, we found that ALDH2 protein levels were lower in white adipose tissue of high-fat diet-fed mice and ob/ob mice relative to lean mice. Knockdown of ALDH2 expression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes caused an increase in intracellular 4-HNE, thereby attenuated adipocyte differentiation. By contrast, an ALDH2 activator, Alda-1, significantly accelerated adipogenesis, which was accompanied by an increase in adipogenic gene expression. Consistently, adipogenesis was reduced when protein kinase C ε (PKCε), an ALDH2 phosphorylating activator, was silenced in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, whereas treatment with a PKCε agonist in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes enhanced adipogenesis. Whole-genome microarray profiling of Alda-1-treated cells demonstrated several upregulated transcripts encoding proteins involved in metabolism and the majority of these transcripts are for proteins involved in PPAR signaling pathways. Furthermore, PKCε-ALDH2 interaction alleviates 4-HNE induced aberrant PPARγ regulation on adipogenesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ALDH2 activation enhances adipogenesis and signaling pathways involving PPARγ. Thus, activation of PKCε-ALDH2 regulatory axis may be a therapeutic target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27575855

  13. Strong Protective Effect of The Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene (ALDH2) 504lys (*2) Allele Against Alcoholism And Alcohol-Induced Medical Diseases in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Zhao, Hongyu; Gelernter, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is oxidized to acetaldehyde, which in turn is oxidized to acetate. The aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2) is the most important gene responsible for acetaldehyde metabolism. Individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the lys (A or *2) allele at the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) glu504lys (rs671) of ALDH2 have greatly reduced ability to metabolize acetaldehyde, which greatly decreases their risk for alcohol dependence (AD). Case-control studies have shown association between this SNP and alcohol dependence as well as alcohol-induced liver disease. However, some studies have produced insignificant results. Using cumulative data from the past 20 years predominately from Asian populations (from both English and Chinese publications), this meta-analysis sought to examine and update whether the aggregate data provide new evidence of statistical significance for the proposed association. Our results (9,678 cases and 7,331 controls from 53 studies) support a strong association of alcohol abuse and dependence, with allelic P value of 3×10−56 and OR of 0.23 (0.2, 0.28) under the random effects model. The dominant model (lys-lys + lys-glu vs. glu-glu) also showed strong association with P value of 1×10−44 and OR of 0.22 (0.18, 0.27). When stricter criteria and various sub-group analyses were applied, the association remained strong (for example, OR = 0.23 (0.18, 0.3) and P = 2×10−28 for the alcoholic patients with alcoholic liver disease, cirrhosis, or pancreatitis). These findings provide confirmation of the involvement of the human ALDH2 gene in the pathogenesis of AD as well as alcohol-induced medical illnesses in East-Asians. PMID:22102315

  14. The ALDH2 genotype, alcohol intake, and liver-function biomarkers among Japanese male workers.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, T; Yang, X; Morimoto, K

    2000-06-01

    A highly prevalent, atypical genotype in low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) may influence alcohol-induced liver injury because of higher production of acetaldehyde in the liver. In the present study, we examined relationships between the ALDH2 genotype, alcohol intake, and liver-function biomarkers among Japanese male workers. Study subjects were 385 male workers in a metal plant in Japan, who were free from hepatic viruses and did not have higher aminotransferase activities (<100). The subjects completed a questionnaire on alcohol drinking habits and other lifestyles. The ALDH2 genotype was determined by the PCR method followed by restriction-enzyme digestion. In the moderately and heavily drinking groups, those with ALDH2*1/*2 exhibited significantly lower levels than those with ALDH2*1/*1 for all three parameters of liver function, whereas no such differences were observed in the least-drinking group. Multiple linear-regression analysis, adjusting for age, obesity, and smoking habits, revealed that aspartate aminotransferase activity was positively associated with alcohol intake only in those with ALDH2*1/*1. On the other hand, alanine transferase activity was negatively associated with alcohol intake only in those with ALDH2*1/*2. The present study indicates that effects of alcohol intake on liver-function biomarkers are likely to be modified by the ALDH2 genotype in adult males. PMID:10942105

  15. ALDH2 modulates autophagy flux to regulate acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Whelan, Kelly A; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Kagawa, Shingo; Rustgi, Sabrina L; Noguchi, Chiaki; Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Muto, Manabu; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Noguchi, Eishi; Avadhani, Narayan G; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphic mutation in the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been epidemiologically linked to the high susceptibility to esophageal carcinogenesis for individuals with alcohol use disorders. Mice subjected to alcohol drinking show increased oxidative stress and DNA adduct formation in esophageal epithelia where Aldh2 loss augments alcohol-induced genotoxic effects; however, it remains elusive as to how esophageal epithelial cells with dysfunctional Aldh2 cope with oxidative stress related to alcohol metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in murine esophageal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) exposed to ethanol and acetaldehyde. We find that ethanol and acetaldehyde trigger oxidative stress via mitochondrial superoxide in esophageal keratinocytes. Aldh2-deficient cells appeared to be highly susceptible to ethanol- or acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity. Alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated acetaldehyde production was implicated in ethanol-induced cell injury in Aldh2 deficient cells as ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death was partially inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole. Acetaldehyde activated autophagy flux in esophageal keratinocytes where Aldh2 deficiency increased dependence on autophagy to cope with ethanol-induced acetaldehyde-mediated oxidative stress. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy flux by chloroquine stabilized p62/SQSTM1, and increased basal and acetaldehyde-mediate oxidative stress in Aldh2 deficient cells as documented in monolayer culture as well as single-cell derived three-dimensional esophageal organoids, recapitulating a physiological esophageal epithelial proliferation-differentiation gradient. Our innovative approach indicates, for the first time, that autophagy may provide cytoprotection to esophageal epithelial cells responding to oxidative stress that is induced by ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. Defining autophagymediated cytoprotection against alcohol-induced genotoxicity in the context of

  16. ALDH2 modulates autophagy flux to regulate acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity thresholds.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Whelan, Kelly A; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Kagawa, Shingo; Rustgi, Sabrina L; Noguchi, Chiaki; Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Amanuma, Yusuke; Ohashi, Shinya; Muto, Manabu; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Noguchi, Eishi; Avadhani, Narayan G; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphic mutation in the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene has been epidemiologically linked to the high susceptibility to esophageal carcinogenesis for individuals with alcohol use disorders. Mice subjected to alcohol drinking show increased oxidative stress and DNA adduct formation in esophageal epithelia where Aldh2 loss augments alcohol-induced genotoxic effects; however, it remains elusive as to how esophageal epithelial cells with dysfunctional Aldh2 cope with oxidative stress related to alcohol metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in murine esophageal epithelial cells (keratinocytes) exposed to ethanol and acetaldehyde. We find that ethanol and acetaldehyde trigger oxidative stress via mitochondrial superoxide in esophageal keratinocytes. Aldh2-deficient cells appeared to be highly susceptible to ethanol- or acetaldehyde-mediated toxicity. Alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated acetaldehyde production was implicated in ethanol-induced cell injury in Aldh2 deficient cells as ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death was partially inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole. Acetaldehyde activated autophagy flux in esophageal keratinocytes where Aldh2 deficiency increased dependence on autophagy to cope with ethanol-induced acetaldehyde-mediated oxidative stress. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy flux by chloroquine stabilized p62/SQSTM1, and increased basal and acetaldehyde-mediate oxidative stress in Aldh2 deficient cells as documented in monolayer culture as well as single-cell derived three-dimensional esophageal organoids, recapitulating a physiological esophageal epithelial proliferation-differentiation gradient. Our innovative approach indicates, for the first time, that autophagy may provide cytoprotection to esophageal epithelial cells responding to oxidative stress that is induced by ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. Defining autophagymediated cytoprotection against alcohol-induced genotoxicity in the context of

  17. Refined Geographic Distribution of the Oriental ALDH2*504Lys (nee 487Lys) Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Borinskaya, Svetlana; Yoshimura, Kimio; Kal’ina, Nina; Marusin, Andrey; Stepanov, Vadim A.; Qin, Zhendong; Khaliq, Shagufta; Lee, Mi-Young; Yang, Yajun; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Gurwitz, David; Mehdi, Syed Qasim; Rogaev, Evgeny; Jin, Li; Yankovsky, Nikolay K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is one of the most important enzymes in human alcohol metabolism. The oriental ALDH2*504Lys variant functions as a dominant negative greatly reducing activity in heterozygotes and abolishing activity in homozygotes. This allele is associated with serious disorders such as alcohol liver disease, late onset Alzheimer disease, colorectal cancer, and esophageal cancer, and is best known for protection against alcoholism. Many hundreds of papers in various languages have been published on this variant, providing allele frequency data for many different populations. To develop a highly refined global geographic distribution of ALDH2*504Lys, we have collected new data on 4,091 individuals from 86 population samples and assembled published data on a total of 80,691 individuals from 366 population samples. The allele is essentially absent in all parts of the world except East Asia. The ALDH2*504Lys allele has its highest frequency in Southeast China, and occurs in most areas of China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, and Indochina with frequencies gradually declining radially from Southeast China. As the indigenous populations in South China have much lower frequencies than the southern Han migrants from Central China, we conclude that ALDH2*504Lys was carried by Han Chinese as they spread throughout East Asia. Esophageal cancer, with its highest incidence in East Asia, may be associated with ALDH2*504Lys because of a toxic effect of increased acetaldehyde in the tissue where ingested ethanol has its highest concentration. While the distributions of esophageal cancer and ALDH2*504Lys do not precisely correlate, that does not disprove the hypothesis. In general the study of fine scale geographic distributions of ALDH2*504Lys and diseases may help in understanding the multiple relationships among genes, diseases, environments, and cultures. PMID:19456322

  18. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to carboxylic acids. Physiologic levels of Mg2+ ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements monitor the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to study ...

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in heart failure restores mitochondrial function and improves ventricular function and remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Campos, Juliane C.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Queliconi, Bruno; Lima, Vanessa M.; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Magno, Paulo; Chen, Che-Hong; Brum, Patricia C.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We previously demonstrated that pharmacological activation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects the heart against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Here, we determined the benefits of chronic activation of ALDH2 on the progression of heart failure (HF) using a post-myocardial infarction model. Methods and results We showed that a 6-week treatment of myocardial infarction-induced HF rats with a selective ALDH2 activator (Alda-1), starting 4 weeks after myocardial infarction at a time when ventricular remodelling and cardiac dysfunction were present, improved cardiomyocyte shortening, cardiac function, left ventricular compliance and diastolic function under basal conditions, and after isoproterenol stimulation. Importantly, sustained Alda-1 treatment showed no toxicity and promoted a cardiac anti-remodelling effect by suppressing myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis. Moreover, accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-protein adducts and protein carbonyls seen in HF was not observed in Alda-1-treated rats, suggesting that increasing the activity of ALDH2 contributes to the reduction of aldehydic load in failing hearts. ALDH2 activation was associated with improved mitochondrial function, including elevated mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and reduced H2O2 release. Importantly, selective ALDH2 activation decreased mitochondrial Ca2+-induced permeability transition and cytochrome c release in failing hearts. Further supporting a mitochondrial mechanism for ALDH2, Alda-1 treatment preserved mitochondrial function upon in vitro aldehydic load. Conclusions Selective activation of mitochondrial ALDH2 is sufficient to improve the HF outcome by reducing the toxic effects of aldehydic overload on mitochondrial bioenergetics and reactive oxygen species generation, suggesting that ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, have a potential therapeutic value for treating HF patients. PMID:24817685

  20. ALDH2 attenuates Dox-induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting cardiac apoptosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yawen; Xu, Yan; Hua, Songwen; Zhou, Shenghua; Wang, Kangkai

    2015-01-01

    The anthracycline chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX) is cardiotoxic. This study aimed to explore the effect of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a detoxifying protein, on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and unveil the underlying mechanisms. BALB/c mice were randomly divided in four groups: control group (no treatment), DOX group (DOX administration for myocardial damage induction), DOX + Daidzin group (DOX administration + Daidzin, an ALDH2 antagonist) and DOX + Alda-1 group (DOX administration + Alda-1, an ALDH2 agonist). Then, survival, haemodynamic parameters, expression of pro- and anti-apoptosis markers, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) levels, expression and localization of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and its cytoplasmic subunit p47PHOX, and ALDH2 expression and activity were assessed. Mortality rates of 0, 35, 5, and 70% were obtained in the control, DOX, DOX + Alda-1, and DOX + Daidzin groups, respectively, at the ninth weekend. Compared with control animals, DOX treatment resulted in significantly reduced left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and ± dp/dt, and overtly increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP); increased Bax expression and caspase-3/7 activity, and reduced Bcl-2 expression in the myocardium; increased ROS (about 2 fold) and 4-HNE adduct (3 fold) levels in the myocardium; increased NOX2 protein expression and membrane translocation of P47PHOX. These effects were aggravated in the DOX + Daidzin group, DOX + Alda-1 treated animals showed partial or complete alleviation. Finally, Daidzin further reduced the DOX-repressed ALDH2 activity, which was partially rescued by Alda-1. These results indicated that ALDH2 attenuates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting oxidative stress, NOX2 expression and activity, and reducing myocardial apoptosis. PMID:26221217

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in aged heart improves the autophagy by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Yu, Lu; Wang, Yishi; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Chen; Yin, Yue; Yang, Jingrun; Wang, Zhifa; Zheng, Qiangsun; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-19

    Cardiac aging is characterized by accumulation of damaged proteins and decline of autophagic efficiency. Here, by forestalling SIRT1 carbonylated inactivation in aged heart, we determined the benefits of activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) on the autophagy. In this study, the ALDH2 KO mice progressively developed age-related heart dysfunction and showed reduction in the life span, which strongly suggests that ALDH2 ablation leads to cardiac aging. What's more, aged hearts displayed a significant decrease ALDH2 activity, resulting in accumulation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and protein carbonyls, impairment in the autophagy flux, and, consequently, deteriorated cardiac function after starvation. Sustained Alda-1 (selective ALDH2 activator) treatment increased cardiac ALDH2 activity and abrogated these effects. Using SIRT1 deficient heterozygous (Sirt1+/-) mice, we found that SIRT1 was necessary for ALDH2 activation-induced autophagy. We further demonstrated that ALDH2 activation attenuated SIRT1 carbonylation and improved SIRT1 activity, thereby increasing the deacetylation of nuclear LC3 and FoxO1. Sequentially, ALDH2 enhanced SIRT1 regulates LC3-Atg7 interaction and FoxO1 increased Rab7 expression, which were both necessary and sufficient for restoring autophagy flux. These results highlight that both accumulation of proteotoxic carbonyl stress linkage with autophagy decline contribute to heart senescence. ALDH2 activation is adequate to improve the autophagy flux by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1, which in turn plays an important role in maintaining cardiac health during aging. PMID:26741505

  2. mTOR-STAT3-notch signalling contributes to ALDH2-induced protection against cardiac contractile dysfunction and autophagy under alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Wei; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) has been shown to benefit myopathic changes following alcohol intake, although the precise mechanism is still unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the role of ALDH2 on chronic alcohol intake-induced myocardial geometric and functional damage with a focus on autophagic signalling. Wild-type friendly virus B (FVB) and transgenic mice overexpressing ALDH2 driven by chicken β-actin promoter were fed a 4% alcohol liquid diet for 12 weeks. Cardiac geometry and function were assessed using echocardiographic and IonOptix systems. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the essential autophagy markers, Akt and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) as well as their downstream signalling mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Alcohol intake altered cardiac geometry and function as demonstrated by lessened LV wall and septal thickness, enlarged end systolic and diastolic diameters, decreased fractional shortening and cell shortening, the effects of which were mitigated by ALDH2 transgene. Chronic alcohol intake triggered myocardial autophagy as shown by LC3B II isoform switch, as well as decreased phosphorylation of mTOR, the effects of which were ablated by ALDH2. Chronic alcohol intake suppressed phosphorylation of Akt and AMPK, which was reconciled by ALDH2. Levels of Notch1 and STAT3 phosphorylation were dampened by chronic alcohol intake in FVB but not ALDH2 myocardium. Moreover, the γ-secretase Notch inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-1-alany1]-S-phenyglycine t-butyl ester exacerbated ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction, apoptosis and autophagy. In summary, these findings suggested that ALDH2 elicits cardioprotection against chronic alcohol intake-induced cardiac geometric and functional anomalies by inhibition of autophagy possibly via restoring the Akt-mTOR-STAT3-Notch signalling cascade. PMID:21609394

  3. Number of nitrate groups determines reactivity and potency of organic nitrates: a proof of concept study in ALDH-2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, P; Hink, U; Oelze, M; Seeling, A; Isse, T; Bruns, K; Steinhoff, L; Brandt, M; Kleschyov, A L; Schulz, E; Lange, K; Weiner, H; Lehmann, J; Lackner, K J; Kawamoto, T; Münzel, T; Daiber, A

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) has been shown to provide a pathway for bioactivation of organic nitrates and to be prone to desensitization in response to highly potent, but not to less potent, nitrates. We therefore sought to support the hypothesis that bioactivation by ALDH-2 critically depends on the number of nitrate groups within the nitrovasodilator. Experimental approach: Nitrates with one (PEMN), two (PEDN; GDN), three (PETriN; glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) and four (pentaerithrityl tetranitrate, PETN) nitrate groups were investigated. Vasodilatory potency was measured in isometric tension studies using isolated aortic segments of wild type (WT) and ALDH-2−/− mice. Activity of the cGMP-dependent kinase-I (reflected by levels of phosphorylated VAsodilator Stimulated Phosphoprotein, P-VASP) was quantified by Western blot analysis, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity by HPLC. Following incubation of isolated mitochondria with PETN, PETriN-chromophore and PEDN, metabolites were quantified using chemiluminescence nitrogen detection and mass spectrometry. Key results: Compared to WT, vasorelaxation in response to PETN, PETriN and GTN was attenuated about 10fold in ALDH-2−/− mice, identical to WT vessels preincubated with inhibitors of ALDH-2. Reduced vasodilator potency correlated with reduced P-VASP formation and diminished biotransformation of the tetranitrate- and trinitrate-compounds. None of these findings were observed for PEDN, GDN and PEMN. Conclusions and implications: Our results support the crucial role of ALDH-2 in bioactivating highly reactive nitrates like GTN, PETN and PETriN. ALDH-2-mediated relaxation by organic nitrates therefore depends mainly on the number of nitrate groups. Less potent nitrates like PEDN, GDN and PEMN are apparently biotransformed by other pathways. PMID:17220910

  4. Impaired Regulation of ALDH2 Protein Expression Revealing a Yet Unknown Epigenetic Impact of rs886205 on Specific Methylation of a Negative Regulatory Promoter Region in Alcohol-Dependent Patients.

    PubMed

    Haschemi Nassab, Mani; Rhein, Mathias; Hagemeier, Lars; Kaeser, Marius; Muschler, Marc; Glahn, Alexander; Pich, Andreas; Heberlein, Annemarie; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Acetaldehyde, the carcinogenic metabolite of ethanol known to provoke aversive symptoms of alcohol consumption, is predominantly eliminated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). Reduced ALDH2 activity correlates with low alcohol tolerance and low risk for alcohol dependence. The ALDH2 promoter polymorphism rs886205 (A>G) is associated with decreased promoter activity, but a molecular mechanism and allele-dependent ALDH2 protein expression has not been described yet. On the basis of allele-dependent epigenetic effects, we analyzed the rs886205 genotype, methylation rates of cytosine-phosphatidyl-guanine (CpG)-sites within a regulatory promoter region and ALDH2 protein levels in 82 alcohol-dependent patients during a 2-week withdrawal and compared them to 34 matched controls. Patients without the G-allele of rs886205 showed higher methylation of the promoter region than controls and readily adapted epigenetically as well as on protein level during withdrawal, while patients with the G-allele displayed retarded methylation readjustment and no change in ALDH2 protein levels. Our data provide novel insights into an unknown genetic-epigenetic interaction, revealing impaired ALDH2 protein expression in patients with the G-allele of rs886205. Additionally, we checked for an association between rs886205 and protection against alcohol dependence and found a trend association between the G-allele and protection against alcohol dependence that needs replication in a larger Caucasian cohort. PMID:26339786

  5. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W; Cang, Yong

    2015-07-21

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele-alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 activation by adenosine and histamine inhibits ischemic norepinephrine release in cardiac sympathetic neurons: mediation by protein kinase Cε.

    PubMed

    Robador, Pablo A; Seyedi, Nahid; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Koda, Kenichiro; Levi, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    During myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of toxic aldehydes that contribute to ischemic dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) alleviates ischemic heart damage and reperfusion arrhythmias via aldehyde detoxification. Because excessive norepinephrine release in the heart is a pivotal arrhythmogenic mechanism, we hypothesized that neuronal ALDH2 activation might diminish ischemic norepinephrine release. Incubation of cardiac sympathetic nerve endings with acetaldehyde, at concentrations achieved in myocardial ischemia, caused a concentration-dependent increase in norepinephrine release. A major increase in norepinephrine release also occurred when sympathetic nerve endings were incubated in hypoxic conditions. ALDH2 activation substantially reduced acetaldehyde- and hypoxia-induced norepinephrine release, an action prevented by inhibition of ALDH2 or protein kinase Cε (PKCε). Selective activation of G(i/o)-coupled adenosine A(1), A(3), or histamine H(3) receptors markedly inhibited both acetaldehyde- and hypoxia-induced norepinephrine release. These effects were also abolished by PKCε and/or ALDH2 inhibition. Moreover, A(1)-, A(3)-, or H(3)-receptor activation increased ALDH2 activity in a sympathetic neuron model (differentiated PC12 cells stably transfected with H(3) receptors). This action was prevented by the inhibition of PKCε and ALDH2. Our findings suggest the existence in sympathetic neurons of a protective pathway initiated by A(1)-, A(3)-, and H(3)-receptor activation by adenosine and histamine released in close proximity of these terminals. This pathway comprises the sequential activation of PKCε and ALDH2, culminating in aldehyde detoxification and inhibition of hypoxic norepinephrine release. Thus, pharmacological activation of PKCε and ALDH2 in cardiac sympathetic nerves may have significant protective effects by alleviating norepinephrine-induced life-threatening arrhythmias that

  7. Inhibition of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase by nitric oxide-mediated S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Kim, Bong-Jo; Song, Byoung J.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is responsible for the metabolism of acetaldehyde and other toxic lipid aldehydes. Despite many reports about the inhibition of ALDH2 by toxic chemicals, it is unknown whether nitric oxide (NO) can alter the ALDH2 activity in intact cells or in vivo animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NO on ALDH2 activity in H4IIE-C3 rat hepatoma cells. NO donors such as S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and 3-morpholinosydnonimine significantly increased the nitrite concentration while they inhibited the ALDH2 activity. Addition of GSH-ethylester (GSH-EE) completely blocked the GSNO-mediated ALDH2 inhibition and increased nitrite concentration. To directly demonstrate the NO-mediated S-nitrosylation and inactivation, ALDH2 was immunopurified from control or GSNO-treated cells and subjected to immunoblot analysis. The anti-nitrosocysteine antibody recognized the immunopurified ALDH2 only from the GSNO-treated samples. All these results indicate that S-nitrosylation of ALDH2 in intact cells leads to reversible inhibition of ALDH2 activity. PMID:16242127

  8. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Has Cardioprotective Effects on Myocardial Ischaemia/Reperfusion Injury via Suppressing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wenqing; Wei, Shujian; Hao, Panpan; Xing, Junhui; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Wang, Jiali; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Mitophagy, a selective form of autophagy, is excessively activated in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). The study investigated whether aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) exerted its cardioprotective effect by regulating mitophagy. Myocardial infarct size and apoptosis after I/R in rats were ameliorated by Alda-1, an ALDH2 activator, and aggravated by ALDH2 inhibition. Both in I/R rats and hypoxia/reoxygenation H9C2 cells, ALDH2 activation suppressed phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1)/Parkin expression, regulating mitophagy, by preventing 4-hydroxynonenal, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide accumulation. Furthermore, the effect was enhanced by ALDH2 inhibition. Thus, ALDH2 may protect hearts against I/R injury by suppressing PINK1/Parkin–dependent mitophagy. PMID:27148058

  9. Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin by Purified Mitochondrial and Cytosolic Aldehyde Dehydrogenases*

    PubMed Central

    Beretta, Matteo; Gruber, Karl; Kollau, Alexander; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Goessler, Walter; Keung, Wing Ming; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Metabolism of nitroglycerin (GTN) to 1,2-glycerol dinitrate (GDN) and nitrite by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is essentially involved in GTN bioactivation resulting in cyclic GMP-mediated vascular relaxation. The link between nitrite formation and activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is still unclear. To test the hypothesis that the ALDH2 reaction is sufficient for GTN bioactivation, we measured GTN-induced formation of cGMP by purified sGC in the presence of purified ALDH2 and used a Clark-type electrode to probe for nitric oxide (NO) formation. In addition, we studied whether GTN bioactivation is a specific feature of ALDH2 or is also catalyzed by the cytosolic isoform (ALDH1). Purified ALDH1 and ALDH2 metabolized GTN to 1,2- and 1,3-GDN with predominant formation of the 1,2-isomer that was inhibited by chloral hydrate (ALDH1 and ALDH2) and daidzin (ALDH2). GTN had no effect on sGC activity in the presence of bovine serum albumin but caused pronounced cGMP accumulation in the presence of ALDH1 or ALDH2. The effects of the ALDH isoforms were dependent on the amount of added protein and, like 1,2-GDN formation, were sensitive to ALDH inhibitors. GTN caused biphasic sGC activation with apparent EC50 values of 42 ± 2.9 and 3.1 ± 0.4 μm in the presence of ALDH1 and ALDH2, respectively. Incubation of ALDH1 or ALDH2 with GTN resulted in sustained, chloral hydrate-sensitive formation of NO. These data may explain the coupling of ALDH2-catalyzed GTN metabolism to sGC activation in vascular smooth muscle. PMID:18450747

  10. Alda-1 is an agonist and chemical chaperone for the common human aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 variant

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Miller, Samantha; Younus, Hina; Vanam, Ram; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-04-19

    In approximately one billion people, a point mutation inactivates a key detoxifying enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). This mitochondrial enzyme metabolizes toxic biogenic and environmental aldehydes, including the endogenously produced 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and the environmental pollutant acrolein, and also bioactivates nitroglycerin. ALDH2 is best known, however, for its role in ethanol metabolism. The accumulation of acetaldehyde following the consumption of even a single alcoholic beverage leads to the Asian alcohol-induced flushing syndrome in ALDH2*2 homozygotes. The ALDH2*2 allele is semidominant, and heterozygotic individuals show a similar but less severe phenotype. We recently identified a small molecule, Alda-1, that activates wild-type ALDH2 and restores near-wild-type activity to ALDH2*2. The structures of Alda-1 bound to ALDH2 and ALDH2*2 reveal how Alda-1 activates the wild-type enzyme and how it restores the activity of ALDH2*2 by acting as a structural chaperone.

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 regulates nociception in rodent models of acute inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Gross, Eric R.; Chen, Che-Hong; Gutierrez, Vanessa P.; Cury, Yara; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous aldehydes can cause pain in animal models, suggesting that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), which metabolizes many aldehydes, may regulate nociception. To test this hypothesis, we generated a knock-in mouse with an inactivating point mutation in ALDH2 (ALDH2*2), which is also present in human ALDH2 of ~540 million East Asians. The ALDH2*1/*2 heterozygotic mice exhibited a larger response to painful stimuli than their wild-type littermates, and this heightened nociception was inhibited by an ALDH2-selective activator (Alda-1). No effect on inflammation per se was observed. Using a rat model, we then showed that nociception tightly correlated with ALDH activity (R2=0.90) and that reduced nociception was associated with less early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the spinal cord and less reactive aldehyde accumulation at the insult site (including acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal). Further, acetaldehyde and formalin-induced nociceptive behavior was greater in the ALDH2*1/*2 mice than wild-type mice. Finally, Alda-1 treatment was also beneficial when given even after the inflammatory agent was administered. Our data in rodent models suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme ALDH2 regulates nociception and could serve as a molecular target for pain control, with ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, as potential non-narcotic cardiac-safe analgesics. Furthermore, our results suggest a possible genetic basis for East Asians’ apparent lower pain tolerance. PMID:25163478

  12. Single-dose ethanol administration downregulates expression of cytochrome p450 2E1 mRNA in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Horita, Mikako; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Isse, Toyohi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Ichiba, Masayoshi

    2007-12-01

    The polymorphism of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), denoted ALDH2*2, is very common in East Asian origin. Acetaldehyde, an intermediate metabolite of ethanol, is metabolized very slowly in people with ALDH2*2 because the mutant ALDH2 protein lacks the activity of acetaldehyde metabolism. On the other hand, it is well established that one of the cytochrome P450 enzymes, CYP2E1, is an activator of carcinogens (e.g., nitorosamines) and a generator of oxidative stress, and it is shown that CYP2E1 was induced by ethanol via gene transcriptional regulation. In the present study, to examine the consequences of ALDH2 polymorphism on transcriptional regulation of CYP2E1 in liver tissue, Aldh2+/+ and Aldh2-/- mice were orally administered 5 g/kg body weight of ethanol and the levels of CYP2E1 mRNA in liver tissue then analyzed. The level of CYP2E1 mRNA 12h after the ethanol administration tended to be higher than the 0-h group in Aldh2+/+ mice, however, it was significantly lower than the 0-h group in Aldh2-/- mice. These findings suggest that single-dose ethanol administration downregulates the expression of cytochrome p450 2E1 mRNA in the presence of inactive ALDH2. PMID:17980998

  13. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  14. A Personalized Medicine Approach for Asian Americans with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2*2 Variant

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Eric R.; Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Small, Bryce A.; Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the fastest-growing populations in the United States. A relatively large subset of this population carries a unique loss-of-function point mutation in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), ALDH2*2. Found in approximately 560 million people of East Asian descent, ALDH2*2 reduces enzymatic activity by approximately 60% to 80% in heterozygotes. Furthermore, this variant is associated with a higher risk for several diseases affecting many organ systems, including a particularly high incidence relative to the general population of esophageal cancer, myocardial infarction, and osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology associated with the ALDH2*2 variant, describe why this variant needs to be considered when selecting drug treatments, and suggest a personalized medicine approach for Asian American carriers of this variant. We also discuss future clinical and translational perspectives regarding ALDH2*2 research. PMID:25292432

  15. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    PubMed

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2 displayed a

  16. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Shinako; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Hirano, Atsushi; Nakamura, Udai; Kubo, Michiaki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671) was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity) and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers) was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2). The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76–1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80–1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54–0.93] in drinkers with *2). Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28–6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89–4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06–5.79] in drinkers with *2). In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  17. Impacts of common variants in ALDH2 on coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinzhao; You, Ling; Wang, Dao Wen; Cui, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) as a susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease (CAD) previously. However, the impacts of common variants in this gene on CAD and its outcomes have not been extensively studied. This study explored the association between the Tagging SNPs in ALDH2 and CAD as well as its main outcomes. Six common variants in ALDH2 were selected as tagging SNPs and two cohorts containing 7296 individuals were genotyped to investigate the impacts of ALDH2 on CAD and its main outcomes. The results show that the variant rs671 in ALDH2 is associated with an increased risk of CAD in southern Chinese (OR=1.26, 95%CI: 1.07-1.48, p=0.004), while not in northern Chinese (OR=1.00, 95%CI: 0.86-1.50, p=0.94). Meanwhile, we find that rs671 genotypes may not influence the outcomes of CAD (HR=1.11, 95%CI: 0.892-1.38, p=0.346). Additionally, we also tested the effect of rs671 genotype on CAD severity, while no significant association was found between them. In the subgroup analysis, the results revealed that rs671 were significantly associated with CAD (OR=1.24, 95%CI: 1.11-1.38, p<0.001) in non-alcoholic subjects. Overall, our findings indicate that the associations between rs671 in ALDH2 and CAD are regional disparity, and rs671 genotypes may not influence the main outcomes of CAD. PMID:26995653

  18. Fatal acute alcohol intoxication in an ALDH2 heterozygote: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Tanegashima, A; Hosoe, H; Fukunaga, T

    2000-08-14

    On an evening in November, a 25-year-old man was found dead in his bedroom. There were many empty snap-out sheets for flunitrazepam tablets in the trash at his bedside. He had been beaten by a gang of young people earlier in the morning of the same day. At the medico-legal autopsy, although there were many bruises and/or abrasions on the whole body, only slight subdural hemorrhage was observed, and none of them was thought to be the cause of death. Flunitrazepam and its metabolites were not detected in his body fluid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Marked lung edema and a severe congestion of organs were observed. His blood alcohol concentration from the femoral vein was 2.00 mg/ml. Fatal cases of acute alcohol intoxication usually have shown higher alcohol concentration (2.25-6.23 mg/ml). Although the genotype of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) has not previously been mentioned as a contributing factor in determining the cause of death, in this case the genotype of ALDH2 was ALDH2*1/2 and thus is important. Those who possess the ALDH2*2 gene show high concentrations of acetaldehyde (AcH) at even comparatively lower alcohol levels. Consequently, the cause of death was considered to be acute alcohol intoxication including AcH poisoning. PMID:10940605

  19. Molecular abnormality of an inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase variant commonly found in Orientals.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, A; Huang, I Y; Ikawa, M

    1984-01-01

    Usual human livers contain two major aldehyde dehydrogenase [(ALDH) aldehyde:NAD+ oxidoreductase] isozymes--i.e., a cytosolic ALDH1 component and a mitochondrial ALDH2 component--whereas approximately equal to 50% of Orientals are "atypical" and have only the ALDH1 isozyme and are missing the ALDH2 isozyme. We previously demonstrated that atypical livers contain an enzymatically inactive but immunologically crossreactive material (CRM) corresponding to the ALDH2 component. The enzymatically active ALDH2 obtained from a usual liver and the CRM obtained from an atypical liver were reduced, S-carboxymethylated, and digested by trypsin. Separation of their digests by high-performance reverse-phase chromatography and by two-dimensional paper chromatography and electrophoresis revealed that ALDH2 contained a peptide sequence of -Glu-Leu-Gly-Glu-Ala-Gly-Leu-Gln-Ala-Asn-Val-Gln-Val-Lys- and that the glutamine adjacent to lysine was substituted by lysine in CRM. All other tryptic peptides, including eight peptides containing S-carboxymethylcysteine, were common in ALDH2 and CRM. It is concluded that a point mutation in the human ALDH2 locus produced the glutamine leads to lysine substitution and enzyme inactivation. Images PMID:6582480

  20. Common ALDH2 genetic variants predict development of hypertension in the SAPPHIRe prospective cohort: Gene-environmental interaction with alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic variants near/within the ALDH2 gene encoding the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 have been associated with blood pressure and hypertension in several case–control association studies in East Asian populations. Methods Three common tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNP) in the ALDH2 gene were genotyped in 1,134 subjects of Chinese origin from the Stanford Asia-Pacific Program for Hypertension and Insulin Resistance (SAPPHIRe) family cohort. We examined whether the ALDH2 SNP genotypes predicted the development of hypertension in the prospective SAPPHIRe cohort. Results Over an average follow-up period of 5.7 years, carriers homozygous for the rs2238152 T allele in the ALDH2 gene were more likely to progress to hypertension than were non-carriers (hazard ratio [HR], 2.88, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-7.84, P = 0.03), corresponding to a population attributable risk of ~7.1%. The risk associated with the rs2238152 T allele were strongest in heavy/moderate alcohol drinkers and was reduced in non-drinkers, indicating an interaction between ALDH2 genetic variants and alcohol intake on the risk of hypertension (P for interaction = 0.04). The risk allele was associated with significantly lower ALDH2 gene expression levels in human adipose tissue. Conclusion ALDH2 genetic variants were associated with progression to hypertension in a prospective Chinese cohort. The association was modified by alcohol consumption. PMID:22839215

  1. NADH fluorescence lifetime analysis of the effect of magnesium ions on ALDH2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ALDH2 catalyzes oxidation of toxic aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Magnesium ions influence enzyme activity in part by increasing NADH binding affinity. Traditional fluorescence measurements have monitored the blue shift of the NADH fluorescence spectrum to elucidate the extent of...

  2. Reliability of a flushing questionnaire and the ethanol patch test in screening for inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 and alcohol-related cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, A; Muramatsu, T; Ohmori, T; Kumagai, Y; Higuchi, S; Ishii, H

    1997-12-01

    Molecular epidemiology of esophageal and upper aerodigestive tract cancers revealed that alcohol is more carcinogenic in persons with inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) than in those with active ALDH2. A simple questionnaire has been developed to screen for the facial flushing that occurs in persons with inactive ALDH2 when they drink even a single glass of beer. In this study, 266 of 284 consecutive male Japanese clinic patients (age > or = 50 years) completed the flushing questionnaire, and 239 underwent the ethanol patch test (a cutaneous model for the flushing response). Blinded genotyping showed inactive ALDH2 for 94.4% (102 of 108) of subjects who reported always flushing (early in their drinking history or currently) and for 47.7% (21 of 44) of those who reported sometimes flushing, whereas 95.6% (109 of 114) of subjects reporting that they never exhibited facial flushing had active ALDH2. When all three categories of flushing (current always, former always, and sometimes) were collapsed into one, the questionnaire's sensitivity and specificity for identifying inactive ALDH2 were 96.1 and 79.0%, respectively, compared with 72.4 and 71.4% for the ethanol patch test. The results suggest the utility of this simple flushing questionnaire in daily practice, as well as large-scale studies to assess cancer risks associated with drinking and ALDH2 and for activities aimed at preventing alcohol-related cancer. PMID:9419411

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 is associated with cognitive functions in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rwei-Ling; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Lu, Ying-Che; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter degradation has been proposed to cause the accumulation of neurotoxic metabolites. The metabolism of these metabolites involves aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). The Asian-specific single nucleotide polymorphism rs671 causes reduced enzyme activity. This study aims to explore whether Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with reduced ALDH2 activity owing to the rs671 polymorphism are at risk for neuropsychological impairments. A total of 139 PD patients were recruited. Each participant was assessed for medical characteristics and their ALDH2 genotype. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale and the Frontal Behavioral Inventory were used to measure neuropsychological functions. We found that the MMSE scores were significantly lower in patients with inactive ALDH2 (U = 1873.5, p = 0.02). The presence of cognitive impairments was significantly more frequent in the inactive ALDH2 group (46.0%) than in the active ALDH2 group (26.3%) (χ2 = 5.886, p = 0.01). The inactive group showed significant deterioration in hobbies and exhibited more severe “disorganization” and “hyper-sexuality” behaviours. The additive effects of the allele on the development of cognitive impairments in PD patients may be an important finding that provides further insight into the pathogenic mechanism of cognitive dysfunction in PD. PMID:27453488

  4. Structural and Functional Consequences of Coenzyme Binding to the Inactive Asian Variant of Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: Roles of Residues 475 and 487

    SciTech Connect

    Larson,H.; Zhou, J.; Chen, Z.; Stamler, J.; Weiner, H.; Hurley, T.

    2007-01-01

    The common mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) ALDH2*2 polymorphism is associated with impaired ethanol metabolism and decreased efficacy of nitroglycerin treatment. These physiological effects are due to the substitution of Lys for Glu-487 that reduces the k{sub cat} for these processes and increases the K{sub m} for NAD{sup +}, as compared with ALDH2. In this study, we sought to understand the nature of the interactions that give rise to the loss of structural integrity and low activity in ALDH2*2 even when complexed with coenzyme. Consequently, we have solved the crystal structure of ALDH2*2 complexed with coenzyme to 2.5 {angstrom}. We have also solved the structures of a mutated form of ALDH2 where Arg-475 is replaced by Gln (R475Q). The structural and functional properties of the R475Q enzyme are intermediate between those of wild-type and the ALDH2*2 enzymes. In both cases, the binding of coenzyme restores most of the structural deficits observed in the apoenzyme structures. The binding of coenzyme to the R475Q enzyme restores its structure and catalytic properties to near wild-type levels. In contrast, the disordered helix within the coenzyme binding pocket of ALDH2*2 is reordered, but the active site is only partially reordered. Consistent with the structural data, ALDH2*2 showed a concentration-dependent increase in esterase activity and nitroglycerin reductase activity upon addition of coenzyme, but the levels of activity do not approach those of the wild-type enzyme or that of the R475Q enzyme. The data presented shows that Glu-487 maintains a critical function in linking the structure of the coenzyme binding site to that of the active site through its interactions with Arg-264 and Arg-475, and in doing so, creates the stable structural scaffold conducive to catalysis.

  5. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shoucheng; Budas, Grant R.; Churchill, Eric N.; Chen, Che-Hong; Knox, Susan J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Ning, S., Budas, G. R., Churchill, E. N., Chen, C., Knox, S. J. and Mochly-Rosen, D. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice. Radiation-induced dermatitis is a debilitating clinical problem in cancer patients undergoing cancer radiation therapy. It is also a possible outcome of exposure to high levels of radiation due to accident or hostile activity. We report that activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) enzymatic activity using the allosteric agonist, Alda-1, significantly reduced 4-hydroxynonenal adducts accumulation, delayed the onset of radiation dermatitis and substantially reduced symptoms in a clinically-relevant model of radiation-induced dermatitis. Importantly, Alda-1 did not radioprotect tumors in mice. Rather, it increased the sensitivity of the tumors to radiation therapy. This is the first report of reactive aldehydes playing a role in the intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that ALDH2 represents a novel target for the treatment of radiation dermatitis without reducing the benefit of radiotherapy. PMID:22404739

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-02-15

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2. PMID:25576686

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2. PMID:25576686

  8. Ethanol and acetaldehyde differentially alter extracellular dopamine and serotonin in Aldh2-knockout mouse dorsal striatum: A reverse microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Ito, Asuka; Ono, Junichiro; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) seem to be involved in several of the effects of ethanol (EtOH). Acetaldehyde (AcH), especially in the brain, induces effects that mimic those of EtOH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of local perfusion of EtOH and AcH on extracellular DA and 5-HT in the dorsal striatum of Aldh2-knockout (Aldh2-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Aldh2-KO mice were used as a model of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency in humans to examine the effects of AcH. Mice were perfused with Ringer's solution (control), EtOH (100, 200, or 500mM) and AcH (100, 200, or 500μM) into the dorsal striatum. Dialysate samples were collected every 5min, and then analyzed with HPLC coupled to an ECD. We found that local perfusion with 500mM EtOH increased extracellular levels of DA (p<0.05) in both Aldh2-KO and WT mice, while 5-HT levels remain unchanged. EtOH at a dose of 200mM also increased DA in WT mice, but this was limited to a 30-40-min time-point. In contrast, perfusion with 200 and 500μM AcH decreased both DA and 5-HT (p<0.05) in Aldh2-KO mice, but this decrease was not found in WT mice at any AcH dose, indicating an effect of AcH on DA and 5-HT levels. There were no genotype effects on the basal levels of DA and 5-HT. These results indicate that high EtOH can stimulate DA, whereas high AcH can depress both DA and 5-HT in the dorsal striatum of mice. PMID:26711020

  9. Glu504Lys Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Gene and the Risk of Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Wang, Chuancai

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 is a mitochondrial enzyme that is known for its important role in oxidation and detoxification of ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde. ALDH2 also metabolizes other reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein. The Glu504Lys single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of ALDH2 gene, which is found in approximately 40% of the East Asian populations, causes defect in the enzyme activity of ALDH2, leading to alterations in acetaldehyde metabolism and alcohol-induced “flushing” syndrome. Evidence suggests that ALDH2 Glu504Lys SNP is a potential candidate genetic risk factor for a variety of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the association between ALDH2 Glu504Lys SNP and the development of these chronic diseases appears to be affected by the interaction between the SNP and lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption as well as by the presence of other genetic variations. PMID:26491656

  10. Single motoneuron succinate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, G R; Edgerton, V R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed a quantitative histochemical assay for measurement of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in single motoneurons. A computer image processing system was used to quantify the histochemical enzyme reaction product and to follow the time course of the reaction. The optimal concentration for each of the ingredients of the incubation medium for the SDH reaction was determined and the importance of using histochemical "blanks" in the determination of enzymatic activity was demonstrated. The enzymatic activity was linear with respect to reaction time and tissue thickness. The procedure described meets the criteria generally considered essential for establishment of a quantitative histochemical assay. The assay was then used to examine the SDH activity of cat and rat motoneurons. It was found that motoneurons with a small soma size had a wide range of SDH activity, whereas those with a large soma size were restricted to low SDH activity. PMID:2732457

  11. Polymorphisms in Alcohol Metabolism Genes ADH1B and ALDH2, Alcohol Consumption and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Rennert, Gad; Cuadras, Daniel; Salazar, Ramon; Cordero, David; Saltz Rennert, Hedy; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Kopelovich, Levy; Monroe Lipkin, Steven; Bernard Gruber, Stephen; Moreno, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Epidemiological risk factors for CRC included alcohol intake, which is mainly metabolized to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase and further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase; consequently, the role of genes in the alcohol metabolism pathways is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between SNPs in ADH1B and ALDH2 genes and CRC risk, and also the main effect of alcohol consumption on CRC risk in the study population. Methodology/Principal Findings SNPs from ADH1B and ALDH2 genes, included in alcohol metabolism pathway, were genotyped in 1694 CRC cases and 1851 matched controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study. Information on clinicopathological characteristics, lifestyle and dietary habits were also obtained. Logistic regression and association analysis were conducted. A positive association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk was observed in male participants from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer study (MECC) study (OR = 1.47; 95%CI = 1.18-1.81). Moreover, the SNPs rs1229984 in ADH1B gene was found to be associated with CRC risk: under the recessive model, the OR was 1.75 for A/A genotype (95%CI = 1.21-2.52; p-value = 0.0025). A path analysis based on structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of ADH1B gene polymorphisms on colorectal carcinogenesis and also an indirect effect mediated through alcohol consumption. Conclusions/Significance Genetic polymorphisms in the alcohol metabolism pathways have a potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably due to the differences in the ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde oxidation of these enzyme variants. PMID:24282520

  12. Role of aldehyde dehydrogenase in hypoxic vasodilator effects of nitrite in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Sayqa; Borgognone, Alessandra; Lin, Erica Lai-Sze; O'Sullivan, Aine G; Sharma, Vishal; Drury, Nigel E; Menon, Ashvini; Nightingale, Peter; Mascaro, Jorge; Bonser, Robert S; Horowitz, John D; Feelisch, Martin; Frenneaux, Michael P; Madhani, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hypoxic conditions favour the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) to elicit vasodilatation, but the mechanism(s) responsible for bioconversion remains ill defined. In the present study, we assess the role of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in nitrite bioactivation under normoxia and hypoxia in the rat and human vasculature. Experimental Approach The role of ALDH2 in vascular responses to nitrite was studied using rat thoracic aorta and gluteal subcutaneous fat resistance vessels from patients with heart failure (HF; 16 patients) in vitro and by measurement of changes in forearm blood flow (FBF) during intra-arterial nitrite infusion (21 patients) in vivo. Specifically, we investigated the effects of (i) ALDH2 inhibition by cyanamide or propionaldehyde and the (ii) tolerance-independent inactivation of ALDH2 by glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on the vasodilator activity of nitrite. In each setting, nitrite effects were measured via evaluation of the concentration–response relationship under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the absence or presence of ALDH2 inhibitors. Key Results Both in rat aorta and human resistance vessels, dilatation to nitrite was diminished following ALDH2 inhibition, in particular under hypoxia. In humans there was a non-significant trend towards attenuation of nitrite-mediated increases in FBF. Conclusions and Implications In human and rat vascular tissue in vitro, hypoxic nitrite-mediated vasodilatation involves ALDH2. In patients with HF in vivo, the role of this enzyme in nitrite bioactivation is at the most, modest, suggesting the involvement of other more important mechanisms. PMID:25754766

  13. Aldehydic load and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 profile during the progression of post-myocardial infarction cardiomyopathy: benefits of Alda-1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Lima, Vanessa M.; Ribeiro, Márcio A.C.; Campos, Juliane C.; Dourado, Paulo M.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives We previously demonstrated that reducing cardiac aldehydic load by aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for metabolizing the major lipid peroxidation product, protects against acute ischemia/reperfusion injury and chronic heart failure. However, time-dependent changes in ALDH2 profile, aldehydic load and mitochondrial bioenergetics during progression of post-myocardial infarction (post-MI) cardiomyopathy is unknown and should be established to determine the optimal time window for drug treatment. Methods Here we characterized cardiac ALDH2 activity and expression, lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) adduct formation, glutathione pool and mitochondrial energy metabolism and H2O2 release during the 4 weeks after permanent left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion in rats. Results We observed a sustained disruption of cardiac mitochondrial function during the progression of post-MI cardiomyopathy, characterized by >50% reduced mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and up to 2 fold increase in H2O2 release. Mitochondrial dysfunction was accompanied by accumulation of cardiac and circulating lipid peroxides and 4-HNE protein adducts and down-regulation of electron transport chain complexes I and V. Moreover, increased aldehydic load was associated with a 90% reduction in cardiac ALDH2 activity and increased glutathione pool. Further supporting an ALDH2 mechanism, sustained Alda-1 treatment (starting 24hrs after permanent LAD occlusion surgery) prevented aldehydic overload, mitochondrial dysfunction and improved ventricular function in post-MI cardiomyopathy rats. Conclusion Taken together, our findings demonstrate a disrupted mitochondrial metabolism along with an insufficient cardiac ALDH2-mediated aldehyde clearance during the progression of ventricular dysfunction, suggesting a potential therapeutic value of ALDH2 activators during the progression of post-myocardial infarction

  14. Subchronic exposure to ethyl tertiary butyl ether resulting in genetic damage in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2013-09-15

    Ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) is biofuel additive recently used in Japan and some other countries. Limited evidence shows that ETBE has low toxicity. Acetaldehyde (AA), however, as one primary metabolite of ETBE, is clearly genotoxic and has been considered to be a potential carcinogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ALDH2 gene on ETBE-induced genotoxicity and metabolism of its metabolites after inhalation exposure to ETBE. A group of wild-type (WT) and Aldh2 knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 500ppm ETBE for 1-6h, and the blood concentrations of ETBE metabolites, including AA, tert-butyl alcohol and 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, were measured. Another group of mice of WT and KO were exposed to 0, 500, 1750, or 5000ppm ETBE for 6h/day with 5 days per weeks for 13 weeks. Genotoxic effects of ETBE in these mice were measured by the alkaline comet assay, 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase modified comet assay and micronucleus test. With short-term exposure to ETBE, the blood concentrations of all the three metabolites in KO mice were significantly higher than the corresponding concentrations of those in WT mice of both sexes. After subchronic exposure to ETBE, there was significant increase in DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner in KO male mice, while only 5000ppm exposure significantly increased DNA damage in male WT mice. Overall, there was a significant sex difference in genetic damage in both genetic types of mice. These results showed that ALDH2 is involved in the detoxification of ETBE and lack of enzyme activity may greatly increase the sensitivity to the genotoxic effects of ETBE, and male mice were more sensitive than females. PMID:23810710

  15. Histamine H4-receptors inhibit mast cell renin release in ischemia/reperfusion via protein kinase C ε-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase type-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Aldi, Silvia; Takano, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Koda, Kenichiro; Chan, Noel Y-K; Marino, Alice; Salazar-Rodriguez, Mariselis; Thurmond, Robin L; Levi, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Renin released by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) from cardiac mast cells (MCs) activates a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causing arrhythmic dysfunction. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) inhibits MC renin release and consequent activation of this local RAS. We postulated that MC histamine H4-receptors (H4Rs), being Gαi/o-coupled, might activate a protein kinase C isotype-ε (PKCε)-aldehyde dehydrogenase type-2 (ALDH2) cascade, ultimately eliminating MC-degranulating and renin-releasing effects of aldehydes formed in I/R and associated arrhythmias. We tested this hypothesis in ex vivo hearts, human mastocytoma cells, and bone marrow-derived MCs from wild-type and H4R knockout mice. We found that activation of MC H4Rs mimics the cardioprotective anti-RAS effects of IPC and that protection depends on the sequential activation of PKCε and ALDH2 in MCs, reducing aldehyde-induced MC degranulation and renin release and alleviating reperfusion arrhythmias. These cardioprotective effects are mimicked by selective H4R agonists and disappear when H4Rs are pharmacologically blocked or genetically deleted. Our results uncover a novel cardioprotective pathway in I/R, whereby activation of H4Rs on the MC membrane, possibly by MC-derived histamine, leads sequentially to PKCε and ALDH2 activation, reduction of toxic aldehyde-induced MC renin release, prevention of RAS activation, reduction of norepinephrine release, and ultimately to alleviation of reperfusion arrhythmias. This newly discovered protective pathway suggests that MC H4Rs may represent a new pharmacologic and therapeutic target for the direct alleviation of RAS-induced cardiac dysfunctions, including ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. PMID:24696042

  16. Mitochondrial NAD Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenase either from Yeast or Human Replaces Yeast Cytoplasmic NADP Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenase for the Aerobic Growth of Yeast on Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhijit; Wei, Baoxian; Weiner, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Background In a previous study, we deleted three aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, involved in ethanol metabolism, from yeast S. cerevisiae and found that the triple deleted yeast strain did not grow on ethanol as sole carbon source. The ALDHs were NADP dependent cytosolic ALDH1, NAD dependent mitochondrial ALDH2 and NAD/NADP dependent mitochondrial ALDH5. Double deleted strain ΔALDH2+ΔALDH5 or ΔALDH1+ΔALDH5 could grow on ethanol. However, the double deleted strain ΔALDH1+ΔALDH2 did not grow in ethanol. Methods Triple deleted yeast strain was used. Mitochondrial NAD dependent ALDH from yeast or human was placed in yeast cytosol. Results In the present study we found that a mutant form of cytoplasmic ALDH1 with very low activity barely supported the growth of the triple deleted strain (ΔALDH1+ΔALDH2+ΔALDH5) on ethanol. Finding the importance of NADP dependent ALDH1 on the growth of the strain on ethanol we examined if NAD dependent mitochondrial ALDH2 either from yeast or human would be able to support the growth of the triple deleted strain on ethanol if the mitochondrial form was placed in cytosol. We found that the NAD dependent mitochondrial ALDH2 from yeast or human was active in cytosol and supported the growth of the triple deleted strain on ethanol. Conclusion This study showed that coenzyme preference of ALDH is not critical in cytosol of yeast for the growth on ethanol. PMID:23454351

  17. The thiocarbamate disulphide drug, disulfiram induces osteopenia in rats by inhibition of osteoblast function due to suppression of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monika; Khan, Kainat; Pal, Subhashis; Porwal, Konica; China, Shyamsundar Pal; Barbhuyan, Tarun K; Baghel, Khemraj S; Rawat, Tara; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Bhadauria, Smrati; Sharma, Vishnu L; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2014-05-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTC), a sulfhydryl group containing compounds, are extensively used by humans that include metam and thiram due to their pesticide properties, and disulfiram (DSF) as an alcohol deterrent. We screened these DTC in an osteoblast viability assay. DSF exhibited the highest cytotoxicity (IC50 488nM). Loss in osteoblast viability and proliferation was due to induction of apoptosis via G1 arrest. DSF treatment to osteoblasts reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and exogenous addition of GSH prevented DSF-induced reactive oxygen species generation and osteoblast apoptosis. DSF also inhibited osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and the effect was associated with inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. Out of various ALDH isozymes, osteoblasts expressed only ALDH2 and DSF downregulated its transcript as well as activity. Alda-1, a specific activator of ALDH2, stimulated osteoblast differentiation. Subcutaneous injection of DSF over the calvarium of new born rats reduced the differentiation phenotype of calvarial osteoblasts but increased the mRNA levels of Runx-2 and osteocalcin. DSF treatment at a human-equivalent dose of 30 mg/kg p.o. to adult Sprague Dawley rats caused trabecular osteopenia and suppressed the formation of mineralized nodule by bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, DSF diminished bone regeneration at the fracture site. In growing rats, DSF diminished growth plate height, primary and secondary spongiosa, mineralized osteoid and trabecular strength. Substantial decreased bone formation was also observed in the cortical site of these rats. We conclude that DSF has a strong osteopenia inducing effect by impairing osteoblast survival and differentiation due to the inhibition of ALDH2 function. PMID:24496638

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 in Turkish alcoholics: lack of association with alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Sezgin; Tekin, Fatih; Salman, Esin; Altintoprak, Ender; Coskunol, Hakan; Akarca, Ulus Salih

    2015-01-01

    No data exists regarding the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene polymorphisms in Turkish alcoholic cirrhotics. We studied the polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C and ALDH2 genes in alcoholic cirrhotics and compared the results with non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers. Overall, 237 subjects were included for the study: 156 alcoholic patients (78 cirrhotics, 78 non-cirrhotic alcoholics) and 81 healthy volunteers. Three different single-nucleotide-polymorphism genotyping methods were used. ADH1C genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The identified ADH1C genotypes were named according to the presence or absence of the enzyme restriction sites. ADH1B (Arg47Hys) genotyping was performed using the allele specific primer extension method, and ALDH2 (Glu487Lys) genotyping was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction using two allele-specific primer pairs. For ADH1B, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 97.4%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. For ADH1C, the frequency of allele *1 in the cirrhotics, non-cirrhotic alcoholics and healthy volunteers was 47%, 36.3% and 45%, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the groups for ADH1B and ADH1C (p>0.05). All alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects (100%) had the allele *1 for ALDH2. The obtained results for ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH gene polymorphisms in the present study are similar to the results of Caucasian studies. ADH1B and ADH1C genetic variations are not related to the development of alcoholism or susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis. ALDH2 gene has no genetic variation in the Turkish population. PMID:26042511

  19. ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guang; Naito, Mariko; Wakai, Kenji; Morita, Emi; Kawai, Sayo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takezaki, Toshiro; Tanaka, Keitaro; Morita, Makiko; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Etsuko; Hosono, Satoyo; Mikami, Haruo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Associations between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes risk are inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. This study investigated the associations of ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms with fasting blood glucose levels, and the impact of the associations of alcohol consumption with fasting blood glucose levels in Japanese individuals. This cross-sectional study included 907 men and 912 women, aged 35–69 years. The subjects were selected from among the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort study across six areas of Japan. The ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms were genotyped by Invader Assays. The ALDH2 Glu504Lys genotypes were associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose in men (P = 0.04). Mean fasting glucose level was positively associated with alcohol consumption in men with the ALDH2 504 Lys allele (Ptrend = 0.02), but not in men with the ALDH2 504Glu/Glu genotype (Ptrend = 0.45), resulting in no statistically significant interaction (P = 0.38). Alcohol consumption was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose levels compared with non-consumers in men (Ptrend = 0.002). The ADH1B Arg48His polymorphism was not associated with FBG levels overall or after stratification for alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that the ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men. The interaction of ALDH2 polymorphisms in the association between alcohol consumption and fasting blood glucose warrants further investigation. PMID:27303105

  20. Alcohol Dehydrogenase-1B (rs1229984) and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 (rs671) Genotypes Are Strong Determinants of the Serum Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels of Japanese Alcoholic Men

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Akira; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Matsui, Toshifumi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are common in drinkers. The fast-metabolizing alcohol dehydrogenase-1B encoded by the ADH1B*2 allele (vs. ADH1B*1/*1 genotype) and inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 encoded by the ALDH2*2 allele (vs. ALDH2*1/*1 genotype) modify ethanol metabolism and are prevalent (≈90% and ≈40%, respectively) in East Asians. We attempted to evaluate the associations between the ADH1B and ALDH2 genotypes and lipid levels in alcoholics. Methods The population consisted of 1806 Japanese alcoholic men (≥40 years) who had undergone ADH1B and ALDH2 genotyping and whose serum TG, total cholesterol, and HDL-C levels in the fasting state had been measured within 3 days after admission. Results High serum levels of TG (≥150 mg/dl), HDL-C (>80 mg/dl), and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C calculated by the Friedewald formula ≥140 mg/dl) were observed in 24.3%, 16.8%, and 15.6%, respectively, of the subjects. Diabetes, cirrhosis, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) affected the serum lipid levels. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of the ADH1B*2 allele and the active ALDH2*1/*1 genotype increased the odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval) for a high TG level (2.22 [1.67–2.94] and 1.39 [0.99–1.96], respectively), and decreased the OR for a high HDL-C level (0.37 [0.28–0.49] and 0.51 [0.37–0.69], respectively). The presence of the ADH1B*2 allele decreased the OR for a high LDL-C level (0.60 [0.45–0.80]). The ADH1B*2 plus ALDH2*1/*1 combination yielded the highest ORs for high TG levels and lowest OR for a high HDL-C level. The genotype effects were more prominent in relation to the higher levels of TG (≥220 mg/dl) and HDL-C (≥100 mg/dl). Conclusions The fast-metabolizing ADH1B and active ALDH2, and especially a combination of the two were strongly associated with higher serum TG levels and lower serum HDL-C levels of alcoholics. The fast

  1. Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activation by Alda‐1 Inhibits Atherosclerosis and Attenuates Hepatic Steatosis in Apolipoprotein E‐Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stachowicz, Aneta; Olszanecki, Rafał; Suski, Maciej; Wiśniewska, Anna; Totoń‐Żurańska, Justyna; Madej, Józef; Jawień, Jacek; Białas, Magdalena; Okoń, Krzysztof; Gajda, Mariusz; Głombik, Katarzyna; Basta‐Kaim, Agnieszka; Korbut, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), an enzyme responsible for the detoxification of reactive aldehydes, is considered to exert protective function in mitochondria. We investigated the influence of Alda‐1, an activator of ALDH2, on atherogenesis and on the liver steatosis in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE−/−) mice. Methods and Results Alda‐1 caused decrease of atherosclerotic lesions approximately 25% as estimated by “en face” and “cross‐section” methods without influence on plasma lipid profile, atherosclerosis‐related markers of inflammation, and macrophage and smooth muscle content in the plaques. Plaque nitrotyrosine was not changed upon Alda‐1 treatment, and there were no changes in aortic mRNA levels of factors involved in antioxidative defense, regulation of apoptosis, mitogenesis, and autophagy. Hematoxylin/eosin staining showed decrease of steatotic changes in liver of Alda‐1‐treated apoE−/− mice. Alda‐1 attenuated formation of 4‐hydroxy‐2‐nonenal (4‐HNE) protein adducts and decreased triglyceride content in liver tissue. Two‐dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry identified 20 differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins upon Alda‐1 treatment in liver of apoE−/− mice, mostly proteins related to metabolism and oxidative stress. The most up‐regulated were the proteins that participated in beta oxidation of fatty acids. Conclusions Collectively, Alda‐1 inhibited atherosclerosis and attenuated NAFLD in apoE−/− mice. The pattern of changes suggests a beneficial effect of Alda‐1 in NAFLD; however, the exact liver functional consequences of the revealed alterations as well as the mechanism(s) of antiatherosclerotic Alda‐1 action require further investigation. PMID:25392542

  2. Effects on sister chromatid exchange frequency of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 genotype and smoking in vinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, R H; Wang, J D; Hsieh, L L; Du, C L; Cheng, T J

    1998-12-01

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a human carcinogen. However, the exact mechanism of carcinogenesis remains unclear. VCM may be metabolized by cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Thus workers with inherited variant metabolic enzyme activities may have an altered risk of genotoxicity. This study was designed to investigate which risk factors might affect sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) workers. Study subjects were 44 male workers from three PVC factories. Questionnaires were administered to obtain detailed histories of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, occupations, and medications. SCE frequency in peripheral lymphocytes was determined using a standardized method, and CYP2E1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and ALDH2 genotypes were identified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Analysis revealed that smoking status and exposure to VCM were significantly associated with increased SCE frequency. The presence of ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes was also significantly associated with an elevation of SCE frequency (9. 5 vs. 8.1, p<0.01). However, CYP2E1, GSTM1 or GSTT1 genotypes were not significantly associated with SCE frequency. When various genotypes were considered together, combination of CYP2E1 c1c2/c2c2 with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 showed an additive effect on SCE frequency. Similar results were also found for the combination of smoking with CYP2E1, or smoking with ALDH2. These results suggest that VCM workers with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes, who also smoke, may have increased risk of DNA damage. PMID:9838066

  3. Interaction of DRD2TaqI, COMT, and ALDH2 genes associated with bipolar II disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders in Han Chinese in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Chuan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Chen-Lin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-06-01

    It is hypothesized that dopaminergic genes-dopamine type-2 receptor (DRD2), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-are associated with bipolar disorder (BP) and anxiety disorder (AD). Bipolar II (BP-II) is reported to be highly comorbid with AD. We examined whether interactions among these three genes are susceptibility factors in BP-II with AD (BP-II(+AD)) and without AD (BP-II(-AD)). In this study, we hypothesize that the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different. We recruited 1260 participants: 495 with BP-II(-AD), 170 with BP-II(+AD), and 595 healthy controls without BP-II or AD. Genotyping was done using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Genotypic frequencies of the DRD2TaqIA, COMT, and ALDH2 polymorphisms between the two BP-II groups were nonsignificant. In logistic regression, the ALDH2 and DRD2TaqIA genes showed a main effect that was protective against BP-II(-AD) (odds ratio [OR] = 0.497, p = 0.010, and OR = 0.415, p = 0.017, respectively). The interaction of DRD2TaqIA A1/A1 and ALDH2*1/*1 had a significant risk effect on the BP-II(-AD) group (OR = 7.177, p < 0.001). However, the interaction of DRD2TaqIA A1/A1, ALDH2*1/*1, and COMTMet/Met&Val/Met become a weak protective factor against BP-II(-AD) (OR = 0.205, p = 0.047). All of the significant results described above are found only in BP-II(-AD). This study supports the hypothesis the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different,, and provides additional evidence that the DRD2TaqIA A1/A1, ALDH2*1/*1 and COMT genes interact in BP-II(-AD) but not in BP-II(+AD). PMID:25430946

  4. Aldh2 knockout mice were more sensitive to DNA damage in leukocytes due to ethyl tertiary butyl ether exposure.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the genotoxicity of ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE), a gasoline additive, male and female C57BL/6 mice of Aldh2+/+ and Aldh2-/- genotypes, aged 8 wk, were exposed to 0, 500, 1,750, or 5,000 ppm ETBE for 6 h/day, 5 d per week for 13 wk. DNA damage in leukocytes was measured by the alkaline comet assay and expressed quantitatively as Tail Intensity (TI). For male mice, TI was significantly higher in all three groups exposed to ETBE than in those without exposure within Aldh2-/- mice, whereas within Aldh2+/+ mice, TI increased only in those exposed to 5,000 ppm of ETBE as compared with mice without exposure. For female mice, a significant increase in TI values was observed in the group exposed to 5,000 ppm of ETBE as compared with those without exposure within Aldh2-/- mice; TI in Aldh2-/- mice exposed to 1,750 and 5,000 ppm was significantly higher than in Aldh2+/+ mice without exposure. TI did not significantly increase in any of the groups exposed to ETBE within female Aldh2+/+ mice. Based on the results we suggest that Aldh2-/- mice are more sensitive to DNA damage caused by ETBE than Aldh2+/+ mice and that males seem more susceptible to this effect than females. PMID:21372431

  5. ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guang; Naito, Mariko; Wakai, Kenji; Morita, Emi; Kawai, Sayo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takezaki, Toshiro; Tanaka, Keitaro; Morita, Makiko; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Etsuko; Hosono, Satoyo; Mikami, Haruo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Associations between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes risk are inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. This study investigated the associations of ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms with fasting blood glucose levels, and the impact of the associations of alcohol consumption with fasting blood glucose levels in Japanese individuals. This cross-sectional study included 907 men and 912 women, aged 35-69 years. The subjects were selected from among the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort study across six areas of Japan. The ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms were genotyped by Invader Assays. The ALDH2 Glu504Lys genotypes were associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose in men (P = 0.04). Mean fasting glucose level was positively associated with alcohol consumption in men with the ALDH2 504 Lys allele (P trend = 0.02), but not in men with the ALDH2 504Glu/Glu genotype (P trend = 0.45), resulting in no statistically significant interaction (P = 0.38). Alcohol consumption was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose levels compared with non-consumers in men (P trend = 0.002). The ADH1B Arg48His polymorphism was not associated with FBG levels overall or after stratification for alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that the ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men. The interaction of ALDH2 polymorphisms in the association between alcohol consumption and fasting blood glucose warrants further investigation. PMID:27303105

  6. Vascular Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Barbara S.; Gorren, Antonius C. F.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Wenzl, M. Verena; Furdui, Cristina M.; Poole, Leslie B.; Mayer, Bernd; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes the bioactivation of nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) in blood vessels, resulting in vasodilation by nitric oxide (NO) or a related species. Because the mechanism of this reaction is still unclear we determined the three-dimensional structures of wild-type (WT) ALDH2 and of a triple mutant of the protein that exhibits low denitration activity (E268Q/C301S/C303S) in complex with GTN. The structure of the triple mutant showed that GTN binds to the active site via polar contacts to the oxyanion hole and to residues 268 and 301 as well as by van der Waals interactions to hydrophobic residues of the catalytic pocket. The structure of the GTN-soaked wild-type protein revealed a thionitrate adduct to Cys-302 as the first reaction intermediate, which was also found by mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. In addition, the MS data identified sulfinic acid as the irreversibly inactivated enzyme species. Assuming that the structures of the triple mutant and wild-type ALDH2 reflect binding of GTN to the catalytic site and the first reaction step, respectively, superposition of the two structures indicates that denitration of GTN is initiated by nucleophilic attack of Cys-302 at one of the terminal nitrate groups, resulting in formation of the observed thionitrate intermediate and release of 1,2-glyceryl dinitrate. Our results shed light on the molecular mechanism of the GTN denitration reaction and provide useful information on the structural requirements for high affinity binding of organic nitrates to the catalytic site of ALDH2. PMID:22988236

  7. Meta-Analyses of ALDH2 and ADH1B with Alcohol Dependence in Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Susan E.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Wall, Tamara J.

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the magnitude of relationships between polymorphisms in 2 genes, ALDH2 and ADH1B, with alcohol dependence in Asians. For each gene, possession of 1 variant [asterisk]2 allele was protective against alcohol dependence, and possession of a 2nd [asterisk]2 allele did not offer significant additional…

  8. Postischemic hyperoxia reduces hippocampal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Erica M.; Rosenthal, Robert E.; Kristian, Tibor; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and represents the sole bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. Previous studies demonstrating loss of PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia suggest that oxidative modifications are involved. This study tested the hypothesis that hyperoxic reperfusion exacerbates loss of PDHC enzyme activity, possibly due to tyrosine nitration or S-nitrosation. We used a clinically relevant canine ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest model in which, after resuscitation and ventilation on either 100% O2 (hyperoxic) or 21–30% O2 (normoxic), animals were sacrificed at 2 h reperfusion and the brains removed for enzyme activity and immunoreactivity measurements. Animals resuscitated under hyperoxic conditions exhibited decreased PDHC activity and elevated 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in the hippocampus but not the cortex, compared to nonischemic controls. These measures were unchanged in normoxic animals. In vitro exposure of purified PDHC to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent loss of activity and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to loss of hippocampal PDHC activity during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and suggest that PDHC is a target of peroxynitrite. PMID:16716897

  9. Neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction in mice lacking cytosolic and mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenases: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wey, Margaret Chia-Ying; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Martinez, Paul Anthony; Sullivan, Patricia; Goldstein, David S; Strong, Randy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have reported elevated levels of biogenic aldehydes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the brain, aldehydes are primarily detoxified by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Reduced ALDH1 expression in surviving midbrain dopamine neurons has been reported in brains of patients who died with PD. In addition, impaired complex I activity, which is well documented in PD, reduces the availability of the NAD(+) co-factor required by multiple ALDH isoforms to catalyze the removal of biogenic aldehydes. We hypothesized that chronically decreased function of multiple aldehyde dehydrogenases consequent to exposure to environmental toxins and/or reduced ALDH expression, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of PD. To address this hypothesis, we generated mice null for Aldh1a1 and Aldh2, the two isoforms known to be expressed in substantia nigra dopamine neurons. Aldh1a1(-/-)×Aldh2(-/-) mice exhibited age-dependent deficits in motor performance assessed by gait analysis and by performance on an accelerating rotarod. Intraperitoneal administration of L-DOPA plus benserazide alleviated the deficits in motor performance. We observed a significant loss of neurons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the substantia nigra and a reduction of dopamine and metabolites in the striatum of Aldh1a1(-/-)×Aldh2(-/-) mice. We also observed significant increases in biogenic aldehydes reported to be neurotoxic, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the aldehyde intermediate of dopamine metabolism, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). These results support the hypothesis that impaired detoxification of biogenic aldehydes may be important in the pathophysiology of PD and suggest that Aldh1a1(-/-)×Aldh2(-/-) mice may be a useful animal model of PD. PMID:22384032

  10. ALDH2 is associated to alcohol dependence and is the major genetic determinant of "daily maximum drinks" in a GWAS study of an isolated rural Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Quillen, Ellen E; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Almasy, Laura; Yang, Fang; He, Hao; Li, Xi; Wang, Xu-Yi; Liu, Tie-Qiao; Hao, Wei; Deng, Hong-Wen; Kranzler, Henry R; Gelernter, Joel

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is a moderately heritable phenotype with a small number of known risk genes mapped via linkage or candidate gene studies. We considered 313 males from among 595 members of documented, extended pedigrees in which AD segregates collected in Northern Hunan Province, China. A joint analysis of both males and females could not be performed as the difference in alcohol consumption variance was too large. Genome-wide association analyses were performed for approximately 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Significant associations found in the ALDH2 region for AD (minimum P = 4.73 × 10(-8)) and two AD-related phenotypes: flushing response (minimum P = 4.75 × 10(-26)) and maximum drinks in a 24-hr period (minimum P = 1.54 × 10(-16)). Association of previous candidate SNP, rs10774610 in CCDC63, was confirmed but resulted from linkage disequilibrium with ALDH2. ALDH2 is strongly associated with flushing response, AD, and maximum drinks in males, with nonsynonymous SNP rs671 explaining 29.2%, 7.9%, and 22.9% of phenotypic variation, respectively, in this sample. When rs671 was considered as a candidate SNP in females, it explained 23.6% of the variation in flushing response, but alcohol consumption rates were too low among females-despite familial enrichment for AD-for an adequate test of association for either AD or maximum drinks. These results support a mediating effect of aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency on alcohol consumption in males and a secondary, culturally mediated limitation on alcohol consumption by females that should be appropriately modeled in future studies of alcohol consumption in populations where this may be a factor. PMID:24277619

  11. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  12. Assessment of toxicity using dehydrogenases activity and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Matyja, Konrad; Małachowska-Jutsz, Anna; Mazur, Anna K; Grabas, Kazimierz

    2016-07-01

    Dehydrogenase activity is frequently used to assess the general condition of microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. Many studies have investigated the inhibition of dehydrogenase activity by various compounds, including heavy metal ions. However, the time after which the measurements are carried out is often chosen arbitrarily. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate how the toxic effects of compounds vary during the reaction and when the maximum of the effect would be reached. Hence, the aim of this study was to create simple and useful mathematical model describing changes in dehydrogenase activity during exposure to substances that inactivate enzymes. Our model is based on the Lagergrens pseudo-first-order equation, the rate of chemical reactions, enzyme activity, and inactivation and was created to describe short-term changes in dehydrogenase activity. The main assumption of our model is that toxic substances cause irreversible inactivation of enzyme units. The model is able to predict the maximum direct toxic effect (MDTE) and the time to reach this maximum (TMDTE). In order to validate our model, we present two examples: inactivation of dehydrogenase in microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. The model was applied successfully for cadmium and copper ions. Our results indicate that the predicted MDTE and TMDTE are more appropriate than EC50 and IC50 for toxicity assessments, except for long exposure times. PMID:27021434

  13. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  14. Identification of rs671, a common variant of ALDH2, as a gout susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Gout is a common disease resulting from hyperuricemia. Recently, a genome-wide association study identified an association between gout and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2188380, located on an intergenic region between MYL2 and CUX2 on chromosome 12. However, other genes around rs2188380 could possibly be gout susceptibility genes. Therefore, we performed a fine-mapping study of the MYL2-CUX2 region. From 8,595 SNPs in the MYL2-CUX2 region, 9 tag SNPs were selected, and genotyping of 1,048 male gout patients and 1,334 male controls was performed by TaqMan method. Eight SNPs showed significant associations with gout after Bonferroni correction. rs671 (Glu504Lys) of ALDH2 had the most significant association with gout (P = 1.7 × 10(-18), odds ratio = 0.53). After adjustment for rs671, the other 8 SNPs no longer showed a significant association with gout, while the significant association of rs671 remained. rs671 has been reportedly associated with alcohol drinking behavior, and it is well-known that alcohol drinking elevates serum uric acid levels. These data suggest that rs671, a common functional SNP of ALDH2, is a genuine gout-associated SNP in the MYL2-CUX2 locus and that "A" allele (Lys) of rs671 plays a protective role in the development of gout. PMID:27181629

  15. Identification of rs671, a common variant of ALDH2, as a gout susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Sakiyama, Masayuki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Gout is a common disease resulting from hyperuricemia. Recently, a genome-wide association study identified an association between gout and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2188380, located on an intergenic region between MYL2 and CUX2 on chromosome 12. However, other genes around rs2188380 could possibly be gout susceptibility genes. Therefore, we performed a fine-mapping study of the MYL2-CUX2 region. From 8,595 SNPs in the MYL2-CUX2 region, 9 tag SNPs were selected, and genotyping of 1,048 male gout patients and 1,334 male controls was performed by TaqMan method. Eight SNPs showed significant associations with gout after Bonferroni correction. rs671 (Glu504Lys) of ALDH2 had the most significant association with gout (P = 1.7 × 10−18, odds ratio = 0.53). After adjustment for rs671, the other 8 SNPs no longer showed a significant association with gout, while the significant association of rs671 remained. rs671 has been reportedly associated with alcohol drinking behavior, and it is well-known that alcohol drinking elevates serum uric acid levels. These data suggest that rs671, a common functional SNP of ALDH2, is a genuine gout-associated SNP in the MYL2-CUX2 locus and that “A” allele (Lys) of rs671 plays a protective role in the development of gout. PMID:27181629

  16. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  17. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  18. Impact of smoking on lung cancer risk is stronger in those with the homozygous aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 null allele in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ito, Hidemi; Hosono, Satoyo; Kawase, Takakazu; Watanabe, Miki; Oze, Isao; Hida, Toyoaki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Takezaki, Toshiro; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hideo

    2010-04-01

    The main lifestyle contributor to acetaldehyde exposure is the drinking of alcoholic beverages, but tobacco smoke also makes some contribution. Although acetaldehyde is associated with upper aerodigestive tract cancer risk, in accordance with genetically determined acetaldehyde metabolism, it is unclear whether lung cancer, a representative smoking-related cancer, is associated with acetaldehyde or genes impacting its metabolism. We conducted a case-control study to examine possible interaction between smoking and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) Glu504Lys polymorphism (rs671) on the risk of lung cancer in Japanese. Subjects were 718 lung cancer cases and 1416 non-cancer controls enrolled in the Hospital-based Epidemiologic Research Program at Aichi Cancer Center. Lifestyle factors, including smoking, were determined by self-administered questionnaire. We applied pack-years (PY; categorized into five levels: never, <15, <30, <45 and > or =45) as a marker of cumulative exposure to smoking. The impact of smoking, ALDH2 genotype, and their interaction on lung cancer risk were assessed by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval adjusted for potential confounders. Adjusted ORs for PY <15, <30, <45 and > or =45 relative to never smokers among those with Glu/Glu or Glu/Lys were 1.39, 1.80, 3.44 and 6.25, respectively (P-trend = 1.4 x 10(-30)). In contrast, ORs among Lys/Lys were 1.01, 10.2, 11.4 and 23.2, respectively (P-trend = 2.6 x 10(-7)). Interaction between ALDH2 genotype (Glu/Glu + Glu/Lys versus Lys/Lys) and cumulative smoking dose was statistically significant (P = 0.036) and was consistently observed in the analysis among never-drinkers (interaction P = 0.041). These results suggest that ALDH2 Lys/Lys, a null enzyme activity genotype, modifies the impact of smoking on the risk of lung cancer. PMID:20093384

  19. Evaluation of NAD(P)-Dependent Dehydrogenase Activities in Neutrophilic Granulocytes by the Bioluminescent Method.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescent method for measurements of the neutrophilic NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase, NADP-dependent decarboxylating malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) is developed. The sensitivity of the method allows minimization of the volume of biological material for measurements to 104 neutrophils per analysis. The method is tried in patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis. Low levels of NADPH synthesis enzymes and high levels of enzymes determining the substrate flow by the Krebs cycle found in these patients can lead to attenuation of functional activity of cells. PMID:26468025

  20. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    PubMed

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grünblatt, Edna; Riederer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; E.C. 1.2.1.3) gene, protein expression and activity are substantially decreased in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This holds especially true for cytosolic ALDH1A1, while mitochondrial ALDH2 is increased in the putamen of PD. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) several studies in genetic, transcriptomic, protein and animal models suggest ALDH involvement in the neurodegeneration processes. Such data are in line with findings of increased toxic aldehydes, like for example malondialdehyde, nonenal, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde and others. Genetic, transcriptomic and protein alterations may contribute to such data. Also in vitro and in vivo experimental work points to an important role of ALDH in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders. Aims at investigating dysfunctions of aldehyde detoxification are suitable to define genetic/molecular targets for new therapeutic strategies balancing amine metabolism in devastating disorders like PD and probably also AD. PMID:25298080

  2. The Crystal Structure of a Ternary Complex of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides New Insight Into the Reaction Mechansim and Shows A Novel Binding Mode of the 2'-Phosphate of NADP+ and A Novel Cation Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Segura, L.; Rudino-Pinera, E; Munoz-Clares, R; Horjales, E

    2009-01-01

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)+-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors-abundant at infection sites-and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP+ and one of the even fewer that require K+ ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP+ and K+ ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the 'oxyanion hole.' The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2?-phosphate of the NADP+, thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K+ binding sites per subunit. One is in an

  3. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity through a transient receptor potential channel vanilloid 1-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Yuan, Ming; Ceylan, Asli F; Wang, Xiaoming; Ren, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the major life-threatening effects encountered in cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin and other anthracyclines. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) may alleviate doxorubicin toxicity although the mechanism remains elusive. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of ALDH2 overexpression on doxorubicin-induced myocardial damage with a focus on mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice overexpressing ALDH2 driven by chicken β-actin promoter were challenged with doxorubicin (15mg/kg, single i.p. injection, for 6days) and cardiac mechanical function was assessed using the echocardiographic and IonOptix systems. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory and mitochondrial proteins, PKA and its downstream signal eNOS. Doxorubicin challenge altered cardiac geometry and function evidenced by enlarged left ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, decreased factional shortening, cell shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) rise, prolonged relengthening and intracellular Ca(2+) decay, the effects of which were attenuated by ALDH2. Doxorubicin challenge compromised mitochondrial integrity and upregulated 4-HNE and UCP-2 levels while downregulating levels of TRPV1, SERCA2a and PGC-1α, the effects of which were alleviated by ALDH2. Doxorubicin-induced cardiac functional defect and apoptosis were reversed by the TRPV1 agonist SA13353 and the ALDH-2 agonist Alda-1 whereas the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine nullified ALDH2/Alda-1-induced protection. Doxorubicin suppressed phosphorylation of PKA and eNOS, the effect of which was reversed by ALDH2. Moreover, 4-HNE mimicked doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte anomalies, the effect of which was ablated by SA13353. Taken together, our results suggested that ALDH2 may rescue against doxorubicin cardiac toxicity possibly through a TRPV1-mediated protection of mitochondrial integrity. PMID:26692169

  4. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase variation enhances effect of pesticides associated with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether environmental and genetic alterations of neuronal aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes were associated with increased Parkinson disease (PD) risk in an epidemiologic study. Methods: A novel ex vivo assay was developed to identify pesticides that can inhibit neuronal ALDH activity. These were investigated for PD associations in a population-based case-control study, the Parkinson's Environment & Genes (PEG) Study. Common variants in the mitochondrial ALDH2 gene were genotyped to assess effect measure modification (statistical interaction) of the pesticide effects by genetic variation. Results: All of the metal-coordinating dithiocarbamates tested (e.g., maneb, ziram), 2 imidazoles (benomyl, triflumizole), 2 dicarboxymides (captan, folpet), and 1 organochlorine (dieldrin) inhibited ALDH activity, potentially via metabolic byproducts (e.g., carbon disulfide, thiophosgene). Fifteen screened pesticides did not inhibit ALDH. Exposures to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides were associated with 2- to 6-fold increases in PD risk; genetic variation in ALDH2 exacerbated PD risk in subjects exposed to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides. Conclusion: ALDH inhibition appears to be an important mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis, especially in genetically vulnerable individuals, suggesting several potential interventions to reduce PD occurrence or slow or reverse its progression. PMID:24491970

  6. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  7. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Hernandez, G.; Lopez-Solache, I.; Rendon, J.L.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Diaz-Zagoya, J.C.

    1988-04-15

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively.

  8. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect. PMID:27266256

  9. A Case of Hyperammonemia Associated with High Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nagaharu, Keiki; Ikemura, Kenji; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Oda, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Mikiya; Sugawara, Yumiko; Tamaru, Satoshi; Mizuno, Toshiro; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been widely used to treat several types of carcinoma, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to its common side effects, including diarrhea, mucositis, neutropenia, and anemia, 5-FU treatment has also been reported to cause hyperammonemia. However, the exact mechanism responsible for 5-FU-induced hyperammonemia remains unknown. We encountered an esophageal carcinoma patient who developed hyperammonemia when receiving 5-FU-containing chemotherapy but did not exhibit any of the other common adverse effects of 5-FU treatment. At the onset of hyperammonemia, laboratory tests revealed high dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity and rapid 5-FU clearance. Our findings suggested that 5-FU hypermetabolism may be one of the key mechanisms responsible for hyperammonemia during 5-FU treatment. PMID:27195162

  10. A Case of Hyperammonemia Associated with High Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nagaharu, Keiki; Ikemura, Kenji; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Oda, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Mikiya; Sugawara, Yumiko; Tamaru, Satoshi; Mizuno, Toshiro; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been widely used to treat several types of carcinoma, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to its common side effects, including diarrhea, mucositis, neutropenia, and anemia, 5-FU treatment has also been reported to cause hyperammonemia. However, the exact mechanism responsible for 5-FU-induced hyperammonemia remains unknown. We encountered an esophageal carcinoma patient who developed hyperammonemia when receiving 5-FU-containing chemotherapy but did not exhibit any of the other common adverse effects of 5-FU treatment. At the onset of hyperammonemia, laboratory tests revealed high dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity and rapid 5-FU clearance. Our findings suggested that 5-FU hypermetabolism may be one of the key mechanisms responsible for hyperammonemia during 5-FU treatment. PMID:27195162

  11. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  12. Analysis of rat cytosolic 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity and enzymatic characterization of rat ADHII.

    PubMed

    Popescu, G; Napoli, J L

    2000-01-01

    We report the characterization of two enzymes that catalyze NAD(+)-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity in rat liver cystol. Alcohol dehydrogenase class I (ADHI) contributes > 80% of the NA D+-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity recovered, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase class II (ADHII), not identified previously at the protein level, nor characterized enzymatically in rat, accounts for approximately 2% of the activity. Rat ADHII exhibits properties different from those described for human ADHII. Moreover, rat ADHII-catalyzed rates of ethanol dehydrogenation are markedly lower than octanol or retinoid dehydrogenation rates. Neither ethanol nor 4-methylpyrazole inhibits the 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity of rat ADHII. We propose that ADHII represents the previously observed additional retinoid oxidation activity of rat liver cytosol which occurred in the presence of either ethanol or 4-methylpyrazole. We also show that human and rat ADHII differ considerably in enzymatic properties. PMID:10606766

  13. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity promotes survival of human muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Elise; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Notarnicola, Cécile; Rouger, Karl; Serratrice, Nicolas; Bonnieu, Anne; Gay, Stéphanie; Bacou, Francis; Duret, Cédric; Carnac, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a family of enzymes that efficiently detoxify aldehydic products generated by reactive oxygen species and might therefore participate in cell survival. Because ALDH activity has been used to identify normal and malignant cells with stem cell properties, we asked whether human myogenic precursor cells (myoblasts) could be identified and isolated based on their levels of ALDH activity. Human muscle explant-derived cells were incubated with ALDEFLUOR, a fluorescent substrate for ALDH, and we determined by flow cytometry the level of enzyme activity. We found that ALDH activity positively correlated with the myoblast-CD56+ fraction in those cells, but, we also observed heterogeneity of ALDH activity levels within CD56-purified myoblasts. Using lentiviral mediated expression of shRNA we demonstrated that ALDH activity was associated with expression of Aldh1a1 protein. Surprisingly, ALDH activity and Aldh1a1 expression levels were very low in mouse, rat, rabbit and non-human primate myoblasts. Using different approaches, from pharmacological inhibition of ALDH activity by diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of class I ALDH, to cell fractionation by flow cytometry using the ALDEFLUOR assay, we characterized human myoblasts expressing low or high levels of ALDH. We correlated high ALDH activity ex vivo to resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxic effect and in vivo to improved cell viability when human myoblasts were transplanted into host muscle of immune deficient scid mice. Therefore detection of ALDH activity, as a purification strategy, could allow non-toxic and efficient isolation of a fraction of human myoblasts resistant to cytotoxic damage. PMID:19840193

  14. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  15. Discovery of NCT-501, a Potent and Selective Theophylline-Based Inhibitor of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Shyh-Ming; Yasgar, Adam; Miller, Bettina; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Brimacombe, Kyle; Hu, Xin; Sun, Hongmao; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Nguyen, Kimloan; Oppermann, Udo; Ferrer, Marc; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J

    2015-08-13

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize reactive aldehydes and possess important physiological and toxicological functions in areas such as CNS, metabolic disorders, and cancers. Increased ALDH (e.g., ALDH1A1) gene expression and catalytic activity are vital biomarkers in a number of malignancies and cancer stem cells, highlighting the need for the identification and development of small molecule ALDH inhibitors. A new series of theophylline-based analogs as potent ALDH1A1 inhibitors is described. The optimization of hits identified from a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) campaign led to analogs with improved potency and early ADME properties. This chemotype exhibits highly selective inhibition against ALDH1A1 over ALDH3A1, ALDH1B1, and ALDH2 isozymes as well as other dehydrogenases such as HPGD and HSD17β4. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic evaluation of selected analog 64 (NCT-501) is also highlighted. PMID:26207746

  16. Furosemide and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity, in man.

    PubMed

    Palermo, M; Armanini, D; Shackleton, C H L; Sorba, G; Cossu, M; Roitman, E; Scaroni, C; Delitala, G

    2002-09-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors possess the same affinity for aldosterone and for cortisol and preferential binding of aldosterone is modulated by the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) enzyme, which converts cortisol to its inactive metabolite cortisone. Several endogenous or exogenous compounds able to inhibit the enzyme have been described and, as a consequence, produce the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, volume repletion and suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. High doses of furosemide, a diuretic that works in the luminal surface of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, have been reported to inhibit 11 beta-OHSD activity to the same extent as licorice in vivo and in vitro, in rat. The aim of our study was to verify the effect of the drug on 11 beta-OHSD activity in man at the doses currently used in clinical practice. We tested the activity of 11 beta-OHSD following both acute and protracted administration of furosemide. In the acute study, the drug was administered at low (40 mg i.v. in bolo) and high doses (infusion of 10 mg/kg bw i.v for six hours); the protracted furosemide administration consisted in 50 mg/day for 20 days, by mouth. The ratios between the cortisol metabolites tetrahydrocortisol plus allo-tetrahydrocortisol to tetra-hydrocortisone and urinary free cortisol to urinary free cortisone were used to measure the activity of 11 beta-OHSD. Urinary cortisol, cortisone and their metabolites were tested by a gas-chromatographic/mass spectrometric method. Neither acute nor prolonged administration of furosemide did affect the activity of 11 beta-OHSD although the drug was able to modify plasma aldosterone and PRA secretion and to determine hypokalemia. Our results suggest that furosemide does not play a significant role in 11 beta-OHSD modulation in humans, at least at the dosage used in clinical practice. PMID:12373630

  17. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in hypothalamic obesity.

    PubMed

    Tiosano, Dov; Eisentein, Israel; Militianu, Daniela; Chrousos, George P; Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2003-01-01

    After extensive suprasellar operations for hypothalamic tumor removal, some patients develop Cushing-like morbid obesity while they receive replacement doses of glucocorticoids. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that target tissue conversion of inactive 11-ketosteroids to active 11 beta-OH glucocorticoids might explain the obesity of some patients with hypothalamic lesions. Toward this aim, we studied 10 patients with hypothalamic obesity and secondary adrenal insufficiency and 6 control Addisonian patients while they were on glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Pituitary hormone deficiencies were replaced when medically indicated. Twenty-four-hour urine was collected after a single oral dose of 12 mg/m(2) hydrocortisone acetate. The ratios of free and conjugated cortisol (F) to cortisone (E) and their metabolites, [tetrahydrocortisol (THF)+5 alpha THF]/tetrahyrdocortisone (THE), dihydrocortisols/dihydrocortisones, cortols/cortolones, and (F+E)/(THF+THE+5 alpha THF), were considered to represent 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity. The 11-OH/11-oxo ratios were significantly higher in the urine of patients with hypothalamic obesity. The 11-OH/11-oxo ratios, however, did not correlate with the degree of obesity, yet a significant correlation was found between conjugated F/E and the ratio of visceral fat to sc fat measured by computerized tomography at the umbilical level. The consequence of increased 11 beta-HSD1 activity and the shift of the interconversion toward cortisol may contribute to the effects of the latter in adipose tissue. We propose that deficiency of hypothalamic messengers after surgical injury induces a paracrine/autocrine effect of enhanced glucocorticoid activity due to up-regulated 11 beta-HSD1 activity. PMID:12519880

  18. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: a Comprehensive Review of the Pharmacology, Mechanism of Action, Substrate Specificity, and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.; Chen, Ying; Ellermann, Manuel; Nicolaou, Kyriacos C.; Juvonen, Risto O.; Petersen, Dennis; Deitrich, Richard A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) belong to a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in the metabolism of aldehydes of both endogenous and exogenous derivation. The human ALDH superfamily comprises 19 isozymes that possess important physiological and toxicological functions. The ALDH1A subfamily plays a pivotal role in embryogenesis and development by mediating retinoic acid signaling. ALDH2, as a key enzyme that oxidizes acetaldehyde, is crucial for alcohol metabolism. ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are lens and corneal crystallins, which are essential elements of the cellular defense mechanism against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage in ocular tissues. Many ALDH isozymes are important in oxidizing reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and thereby help maintain cellular homeostasis. Increased expression and activity of ALDH isozymes have been reported in various human cancers and are associated with cancer relapse. As a direct consequence of their significant physiological and toxicological roles, inhibitors of the ALDH enzymes have been developed to treat human diseases. This review summarizes known ALDH inhibitors, their mechanisms of action, isozyme selectivity, potency, and clinical uses. The purpose of this review is to 1) establish the current status of pharmacological inhibition of the ALDHs, 2) provide a rationale for the continued development of ALDH isozyme-selective inhibitors, and 3) identify the challenges and potential therapeutic rewards associated with the creation of such agents. PMID:22544865

  19. Microbial and xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitory activity of some flavones.

    PubMed

    Khobragade, C N; Bodade, Ragini G; Shinde, M S; Jaju, Deepa R; Bhosle, R B; Dawane, B S

    2008-06-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is responsible for the pathological condition called Gout. In the present study different flavones synthesized from chalcone were evaluated in vitro for their inhibitory activity. Inhibitory activity of flavones on XDH was determined in terms of inhibition of uric acid synthesis from Xanthine. The enzymatic activity was found maximum at pH 7.5 and temperature 40 degrees C. The flavones 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(1)) and 6-chloro-7methyl-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(2)),were noncompetitive and competitive inhibitor with Ki values 1.1 and 0.22 respectively. The flavones (F(1)), (F(2)), 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(3)), 8-bromo-6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(4)), 2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(5)) and 6-methyl-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(6)) were also screened for their antimicrobial activity, measured in terms of zone of inhibition. A broad spectrum antifungal activity was obtained against Trichoderma viridae, Candida albicans, Microsporum cannis, Penicillium chrysogenum and Fusarium moniliformae. In case of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavous only spore formation was affected, while antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Serratia marsecens only. The flavones were further analyzed for quantitative structural activity relationship study (QSAR) by using PASS, online software to determine their Pa value. Toxicity and drug relevant properties were revealed by PALLAS software in terms of their molecular weight. Log P values were also studied. The result showed both the F(1) and F(2) flavones as antigout and therefore supports the development of novel drugs for the treatment of gout. PMID:18569337

  20. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  1. Human gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity: effect of age, sex, and alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, H K; Egerer, G; Simanowski, U A; Waldherr, R; Eckey, R; Agarwal, D P; Goedde, H W; von Wartburg, J P

    1993-01-01

    As various isoenzymes of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase exist and as the effect of sex and age on these enzymes is unknown, this study measured the activity of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase at high and low ethanol concentrations in endoscopic biopsy specimens from a total of 290 patients of various ages and from 10 patients with chronic alcoholism. Gastric alcohol dehydrogenase was also detected by immunohistological tests in biopsy specimens from 40 patients by the use of a polyclonal rabbit antibody against class I alcohol dehydrogenase. A significant correlation was found between the immunohistological reaction assessed by the intensity of the colour reaction in the biopsy specimen and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase measured at 580 mM ethanol. While alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 16 mM ethanol was not significantly affected by age and sex, both factors influenced alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 580 mM ethanol. Young women below 50 years of age had significantly lower alcohol dehydrogenase activities in the gastric corpus and antrum when compared with age matched controls (SEM) (6.4 (0.7) v 8.8 (0.6) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001 and 6.0 (1.3) v 9.5 (1.3) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001). Over 50 years of age this sex difference was no longer detectable, as high Km gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity decreases with age only in men and not in women. In addition, extremely low alcohol dehydrogenase activities have been found in gastric biopsy specimens from young male alcoholics (2.2 (0.5) nmol/min/mg protein), which returned to normal after two to three weeks of abstinence. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the human stomach measured at 580 mM ethanol is decreased in young women, in elderly men, and in the subject with alcoholism. This decrease in alcohol dehydrogenase activity may contribute to the reduced first pass metabolism of ethanol associated with raised ethanol blood concentrations seen in these people. Images Figure

  2. The maximum activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, glycerol phosphate dehydrogenases, lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, nucleoside diphosphatekinase, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and arginine kinase in relation to carbohydrate utilization in muscles from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of the activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase in muscles from marine invertebrates indicates that they can be divided into three groups. First, the activities of the three enzymes are low in coelenterate muscles, catch muscles of molluscs and muscles of echinoderms; this indicates a low rate of carbohydrate (and energy) utilization by these muscles. Secondly, high activities of phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase relative to those of hexokinase are found in, for example, lobster abdominal and scallop snap muscles; this indicates that these muscles depend largely on anaerobic degradation of glycogen for energy production. Thirdly, high activities of hexokinase are found in the radular muscles of prosobranch molluscs and the fin muscles of squids; this indicates a high capacity for glucose utilization, which is consistent with the high activities of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in these muscles [Alp, Newsholme & Zammit (1976) Biochem. J. 154, 689-700]. 2. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, cytosolic and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase were measured in order to provide a qualitative indication of the importance of different processes for oxidation of glycolytically formed NADH. The muscles are divided into four groups: those that have a high activity of lactate dehydrogenase relative to the activities of phosphofructokinase (e.g. crustacean muscles); those that have high activities of octopine dehydrogenase but low activities of lactate dehydrogenase (e.g. scallop snap muscle); those that have moderate activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase (radular muscles of prosobranchs), and those that have low activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase, but which possess activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (oyster adductor muscles). It is

  3. Association between Carotid Intima-media Thickness and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Glu504Lys Polymorphism in Chinese Han with Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Xiang; Zheng, Shu-Zhan; Shu, Yan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is involved in the pathophysiological processes of cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies showed that mutant ALDH2 could increase oxidative stress and is a susceptible factor for hypertension. In addition, wild-type ALDH2 could improve the endothelial functions, therefore reducing the risk of developing atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to explore the frequency of the Glu504Lys polymorphism of the ALDH2 gene and its relation to carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in a group of patients with essential hypertension (EH) and to investigate the association between the Glu504Lys polymorphism and CIMT in Chinese Han patients with EH. Methods: In this study, 410 Chinese Han patients with EH who received physical examinations at the People's Hospital of Sichuan Province (China) were selected. DNA microarray chip was used for the genotyping of the Glu504Lys polymorphism of the ALDH2 gene. The differences in CIMT among patients with different Glu504Lys ALDH2 genotypes were analyzed. Results: The mean CIMT of the patients carrying AA/AG and GG genotypes was 1.02 ± 0.31 mm and 0.78 ± 0.28 mm, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that the CIMT of the patients carrying the AA/AG genotype was significantly higher than in the ones carrying the GG genotype (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the Glu504Lys AA/AG genotype of the ALDH2 gene was one of the major factors influencing the CIMT in patients with EH (odds ratio = 3.731, 95% confidence interval = 1.589–8.124, P = 0.001). Conclusions: The Glu504Lys polymorphism of the ALDH2 gene is associated with the CIMT of Chinese Han patients with EH in Sichuan, China. PMID:27270535

  4. Methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: demonstration of defective valine and beta-alanine metabolism and reduced malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.G.; Pollitt, R.J.; Webley, J.

    1987-08-01

    Intact cultured fibroblasts from a child with a new metabolic disorder, thought to be due to a deficiency of methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produced labeled CO/sub 2/ normally from (1-/sup 14/C)valine but not from (2-/sup 14/C)valine. CO/sub 2/ production from labeled beta-alanine was also much reduced, confirming the suspicion that malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is also deficient in this condition. An assay for malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in cell homogenates showed low activity but it was impossible to assess the degree of reduction.

  5. Construction of Mutant Glucose Oxidases with Increased Dye-Mediated Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Horaguchi, Yohei; Saito, Shoko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies on glucose oxidases (GOxs) were conducted to construct GOxs with reduced oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity. We focused on two representative GOxs, of which crystal structures have already been reported—Penicillium amagasakiense GOx (PDB ID; 1gpe) and Aspergillus niger GOx (PDB ID; 1cf3). We constructed oxygen-interacting structural models for GOxs, and predicted the residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen on the basis of the crystal structure of cholesterol oxidase as well as on the fact that both enzymes are members of the glucose/methanol/choline (GMC) oxidoreductase family. Rational amino acid substitution resulted in the construction of an engineered GOx with drastically decreased oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity, which was higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase ratio of the engineered enzyme was more than 11-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate that alteration of the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of GOxs is possible by introducing a mutation into the putative functional residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen of these enzymes, resulting in a further increased dehydrogenase activity. This is the first study reporting the alteration of GOx electron acceptor preference from oxygen to an artificial electron acceptor. PMID:23203056

  6. Folate, alcohol, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 polymorphism and the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Keitaro; Rossi, Marta; Negri, Eva; Oze, Isao; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Tajima, Kazuo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2012-03-01

    Folate consumption is inversely associated with the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer (OPC) and potentially interacts with alcohol drinking in the risk of OPC. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene polymorphism is known to interact with alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate potential interaction between folate, alcohol drinking, and ALDH2 polymorphism in the risk of OPC in a Japanese population. The study group comprised 409 head and neck cancer cases and 1227 age-matched and sex-matched noncancer controls; of these, 251 cases and 759 controls were evaluated for ALDH rs671 polymorphism. Associations were assessed by odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in multiple logistic regression models. We observed an inverse association between folate consumption and OPC risk. The odds ratio for high folate intake was 0.53 (95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.77) relative to low intake (P trend=0.003). This association was consistent across strata of sex, age, smoking, and ALDH2 genotypes. Interaction between folate consumption, drinking, and ALDH2 genotype was remarkable (three-way interaction, P<0.001). We observed significant interaction among folate, drinking, and ALDH2 genotype in the Japanese population. PMID:21946912

  7. Simulated ischaemia-reperfusion conditions increase xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Virgili, M; Abbondanza, A; Contestabile, A

    1998-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities increased by 87% in rat brain slices after 30 min in vitro ischaemia. A further 41% increase was induced by 30 min simulated reperfusion of ischaemic slices. No conversion from the dehydrogenase to the oxidase activity was observed. The increment of enzyme activity was not due to neosynthesis of the enzyme, since it was not affected by the addition of cycloheximide during the ischaemic incubation. The increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could aggravate the ischaemic brain injury by free radicals production, in particular after reperfusion. PMID:9460697

  8. SDHAF4 promotes mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity and prevents neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G.; Bricker, Daniel K.; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steven P.; Cox, James E.; Thummel, Carl S.; Rutter, Jared

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) occupies a central place in cellular energy production, linking the tricarboxylic cycle with the electron transport chain. As a result, a subset of cancers and neuromuscular disorders result from mutations affecting any of the four SDH structural subunits or either of two known SDH assembly factors. Herein we characterize a novel evolutionarily conserved SDH assembly factor designated Sdh8/SDHAF4, using yeast, Drosophila, and mammalian cells. Sdh8 interacts specifically with the catalytic Sdh1 subunit in the mitochondrial matrix, facilitating its association with Sdh2 and the subsequent assembly of the SDH holocomplex. These roles for Sdh8 are critical for preventing motility defects and neurodegeneration in Drosophila as well as the excess ROS generated by free Sdh1. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which SDH is assembled and raise the possibility that some forms of neuromuscular disease may be associated with mutations that affect this SDH assembly factor. PMID:24954416

  9. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity to body measurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to examine 1) relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of grazing beef cows, and 2) the association between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth weight (BRW), hip height (HH) at weaning, and adjusted weaning weight ...

  10. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity with body measeurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus x Charolais cows (n = 87) and their Angus-sired, spring-born calves (n = 86) were utilized to examine relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of beef cows; and the relationship between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth we...

  11. Characterization of polymorphisms of genes ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2 and CYP2E1 and relationship to the alcoholism in a Colombian population

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identify and characterize polymorphisms of genes ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2 and CYP2E1 in a Colombian population residing in the city of Bogotá and determine its possible relationship to the alcoholism. Methods: ADH2, ADH3, ALDH2, and CYP2E1 genotypes a population of 148 individuals with non-problematic alcohol and 65 individuals with alcoholism were determined with TaqMan probes and PCR-RFLP. DNA was obtained from peripheral blood white cells. Results: Significant difference was found in family history of alcoholism and use of other psychoactive substances to compare alcoholics with controls. When allelic frequencies for each category (gender) were considered, frequency of A2 allele carriers in ADH2 was found higher in male patients than controls. In women, the relative frequency for c1 allele in CYP2E1 was lower in controls than alcoholics. The ALDH2 locus is monomorphic. No significant differences in allele distributions of the loci examined to compare two populations were observed, however when stratifying the same trend was found that these differences tended to be significant. Conclusions: This study allows us to conclude the positive association between family history of alcoholism and alcoholism suggesting that there is a favourable hereditary predisposition. Since substance dependence requires interaction of multiple genes, the combination of genotypes ADH2 * 2, CYP2E1 * 1 combined with genotype homozygous ALDH2 * 1 found in this study could be leading to the population to a potential risk to alcoholism. PMID:26848198

  12. Amino ketone formation and aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity in rat-liver preparations

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. M.; Willetts, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    1. Rat tissue homogenates convert dl-1-aminopropan-2-ol into aminoacetone. Liver homogenates have relatively high aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity compared with kidney, heart, spleen and muscle preparations. 2. Maximum activity of liver homogenates is exhibited at pH9·8. The Km for aminopropanol is approx. 15mm, calculated for a single enantiomorph, and the maximum activity is approx. 9mμmoles of aminoacetone formed/mg. wet wt. of liver/hr.at 37°. Aminoacetone is also formed from l-threonine, but less rapidly. An unidentified amino ketone is formed from dl-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyrate, the Km for which is approx. 200mm at pH9·8. 3. Aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity in homogenates is inhibited non-competitively by dl-3-hydroxybutyrate, the Ki being approx. 200mm. EDTA and other chelating agents are weakly inhibitory, and whereas potassium chloride activates slightly at low concentrations, inhibition occurs at 50–100mm. 4. It is concluded that aminopropanol-dehydrogenase is located in mitochondria, and in contrast with l-threonine dehydrogenase can be readily solubilized from mitochondrial preparations by ultrasonic treatment. 5. Soluble extracts of disintegrated mitochondria exhibit maximum aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity at pH9·1 At this pH, Km values for the amino alcohol and NAD+ are approx. 200 and 1·3mm respectively. Under optimum conditions the maximum velocity is approx. 70mμmoles of aminoacetone formed/mg. of protein/hr. at 37°. Chelating agents and thiol reagents appear to have little effect on enzyme activity, but potassium chloride inhibits at all concentrations tested up to 80mm. dl-3-Hydroxybutyrate is only slightly inhibitory. 6. Dehydrogenase activities for l-threonine and dl-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyrate appear to be distinct from that for aminopropanol. 7. Intraperitoneal injection of aminopropanol into rats leads to excretion of aminoacetone in the urine. Aminoacetone excretion proportional to the amount of the amino alcohol

  13. Re-design of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flavocytochrome b2: introduction of L-mandelate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, R; Reid, G A; Chapman, S K

    1998-07-01

    Flavocytochrome b2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an l-lactate dehydrogenase which exhibits only barely detectable activity levels towards another 2-hydroxyacid, l-mandelate. Using protein engineering methods we have altered the active site of flavocytochrome b2 and successfully introduced substantial mandelate dehydrogenase activity into the enzyme. Changes to Ala-198 and Leu-230 have significant effects on the ability of the enzyme to utilize l-mandelate as a substrate. The double mutation of Ala-198-->Gly and Leu-230-->Ala results in an enzyme with a kcat value (25 degrees C) with L-mandelate of 8.5 s-1, which represents an increase of greater than 400-fold over the wild-type enzyme. Perhaps more significantly, the mutant enzyme has a catalytic efficiency (as judged by kcat/Km values) that is 6-fold higher with l-mandelate than it is with L-lactate. Closer examination of the X-ray structure of S. cerevisiae flavocytochrome b2 led us to conclude that one of the haem propionate groups might interfere with the binding of L-mandelate at the active site of the enzyme. To test this idea, the activity with l-mandelate of the independently expressed flavodehydrogenase domain (FDH), was examined and found to be higher than that seen with the wild-type enzyme. In addition, the double mutation of Ala-198-->Gly and Leu-230-->Ala introduced into FDH produced the greatest mandelate dehydrogenase activity increase, with a kcat value more than 700-fold greater than that seen with the wild-type holoenzyme. In addition, the enzyme efficiency (kcat/Km) of this mutant enzyme was more than 20-fold greater with L-mandelate than with l-lactate. We have therefore succeeded in constructing an enzyme which is now a better mandelate dehydrogenase than a lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:9639570

  14. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin. PMID:25772736

  15. The hormonal regulation of hepatic microsomal 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lax, E R; Ghraf, R; Schriefers, H

    1978-10-01

    Hepatic microsomal 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity is higher in male than in female rat liver. Gonadectomy on day 25 of life only affects the activity in the adult male animal, causing a decrease towards the normal female level. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized rats of either sex causes the induction of typical male activity levels. On the basis of these experiments, this enzyme activity may be classified as an drogen-dependent. However, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase differs from other known androgen-dependent activities in that administration of oestradiol to gonadectomized animals of either sex causes a further significant repression of the activity to levels close to the limits of detection. Hypophysectomy on day 50 of life does not affect the activity in 75 day-old male rats, but causes the appearance of typically male activity levels in females. These results indicate that the hypophysis exerts a repressive influence on hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in female rats. The facts that this activity is not influenced by androgen or oestrogen administration once the pituitary has been removed demonstrates the obligatory role of the hypophysis for sex hormone action. PMID:696183

  16. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  17. Activation of hepatic branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase by rat liver cytosolic supernatant.

    PubMed

    Hauschildt, S

    1986-10-29

    Hepatic branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase is inactivated by nutritional alterations. Reactivation occurs during preincubation of intact mitochondria in the presence of rat liver cytosolic supernatant. Cytosolic supernatant contains two factors capable of reactivating the enzyme. On gel-filtration (Sephadex G-100), one factor (AF1) elutes in the molecular range of 35,000-40,000 and the other factor (AF2) elutes slightly later than inorganic phosphate. AF2 is stable against heat denaturation and treatment with proteinases. It is destroyed by alkaline phosphatase and in the presence of Ap5A, atractyloside, CaCl2 and NaF its stimulatory effect on branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase activity is abolished. Inhibition of activation by NaF suggests that a phosphatase might be involved in the activation process. PMID:3768411

  18. Multichannel Simultaneous Determination of Activities of Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.

    2000-09-12

    It is very important to find the best conditions for some enzymes to do the best catalysis in current pharmaceutical industries. Based on the results above, we could say that this set-up could be widely used in finding the optimal condition for best enzyme activity of a certain enzyme. Instead of looking for the best condition for enzyme activity by doing many similar reactions repeatedly, we can complete this assignment with just one run if we could apply enough conditions.

  19. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  20. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  1. Protein expression of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2 in young patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaminagakura, E; Caris, A; Coutinho-Camillo, C; Soares, F A; Takahama-Júnior, A; Kowalski, L P

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of the enzymes involved in the biotransformation of tobacco and alcohol. A study group of 41 young patients (≤40 years old) with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was compared to 59 control subjects (≥50 years old) with tumours of similar clinical stages and topographies. The immunohistochemical expression of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2 was evaluated using the tissue microarray technique. There was a predominance of males, smokers, and alcohol drinkers in both groups. Most tumours were located in the tongue (43.9% vs. 50.8%), were well-differentiated (63.4% vs. 56.6%), and were in clinical stages III or IV (80.5% vs. 78.0%). No difference was observed in the expression of CYP1A1, ALDH1A1, or ALDH2 between the two groups. CYP1A1 and ALDH2 protein expression had no influence on the prognosis. The immunoexpression of CYP1B1 was significantly higher in the control group than in the young group (P<0.001). The 5-year relapse-free survival was better in patients with CYP1B1 overexpression vs. protein underexpression (64% vs. 25%; P<0.05), regardless of age. ALDH1A1 expression improved relapse-free survival in young patients. These results suggest a lower risk of recurrence with increased metabolism of carcinogens by CYP1B1. Further studies involving other genes and proteins are necessary to complement the results of this research. PMID:26944893

  2. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  3. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  4. Effect of amines as activators on the alcohol-oxidizing activity of pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Ishida, Takuya; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (PQQ-ADH) require ammonia or primary amines as activators in in vitro assays with artificial electron acceptors. We found that PQQ-ADH from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (PpADH) was activated by various primary amines, di-methylamine, and tri-methylamine. The alcohol oxidation activity of PpADH was strongly enhanced and the affinity for substrates was also improved by pentylamine as an activator. PMID:25229857

  5. Evolutionary origins of retinoid active short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases of SDR16C family.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Olga V; Chang, Chenbei; Berlett, Michael C; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2015-06-01

    Vertebrate enzymes that belong to the 16C family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR16C) were shown to play an essential role in the control of retinoic acid (RA) levels during development. To trace the evolution of enzymatic function of SDR16C family, and to examine the origins of the pathway for RA biosynthesis from vitamin A, we identified putative SDR16C enzymes through the extensive search of available genome sequencing data in a subset of species representing major metazoan phyla. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that enzymes from protostome, non-chordate deuterostome and invertebrate chordate species are found in three clades of SDR16C family containing retinoid active enzymes, which are retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10), retinol dehydrogenases E2 (RDHE2) and RDHE2-similar, and dehydrogenase reductase (SDR family) member 3 (DHRS3). For the initial functional analysis, we cloned RDH10- and RDHE2-related enzymes from the early developmental stages of a non-chordate deuterostome, green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, and an invertebrate chordate, sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. In situ hybridization revealed that these proteins are expressed in a pattern relevant to development, while assays performed on proteins expressed in mammalian cell culture showed that they possess retinol-oxidizing activity as their vertebrate homologs. The existence of invertebrate homologs of DHRS3 was inferred from the analysis of phylogeny and cofactor-binding residues characteristic of preference for NADP(H). The presence of invertebrate homologs in the DHRS3 group of SDR16C is interesting in light of the complex mutually activating interaction, which we have recently described for human RDH10 and DHRS3 enzymes. Further functional analysis of these homologs will establish whether this interaction evolved to control retinoid homeostasis only in vertebrates, or is also conserved in pre-vertebrates. PMID:25451586

  6. Escherichia coli d-Malate Dehydrogenase, a Generalist Enzyme Active in the Leucine Biosynthesis Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Vorobieva, Anastassia A.; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz; Soumillion, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase superfamily catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of d-malate-based substrates with various specificities. Here, we show that, in addition to its natural function affording bacterial growth on d-malate as a carbon source, the d-malate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli (EcDmlA) naturally expressed from its chromosomal gene is capable of complementing leucine auxotrophy in a leuB− strain lacking the paralogous isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an enzyme that contributes with a physiologically relevant level of activity to two distinct pathways of the core metabolism while expressed from its chromosomal locus. EcDmlA features relatively high catalytic activity on at least three different substrates (l(+)-tartrate, d-malate, and 3-isopropylmalate). Because of these properties both in vivo and in vitro, EcDmlA may be defined as a generalist enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis highlights an ancient origin of DmlA, indicating that the enzyme has maintained its generalist character throughout evolution. We discuss the implication of these findings for protein evolution. PMID:25160617

  7. The longitudinal effect of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2*2 allele on the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Oniki, K; Morita, K; Watanabe, T; Kajiwara, A; Otake, K; Nakagawa, K; Sasaki, Y; Ogata, Y; Saruwatari, J

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies toxic aldehydes and has a key role in protecting the liver. An elevated gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level is related to oxidative stress and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We herein investigated the association between inactive ALDH2*2 allele (rs671) and the risk of NAFLD, including the relationship to the GGT level. A retrospective follow-up study (mean 5.4±1.1 years) was conducted among 341 Japanese health screening program participants. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that the GGT level predicted the development of NAFLD (area under the curve: 0.65, P<0.05) with a cutoff value of 25.5 IUl(-1). The longitudinal risk of NAFLD was higher in the ALDH2*2 allele carriers than in the noncarriers (odds ratio (OR): 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21-4.40), and the risk was further increased among the *2 allele carriers with GGT values ⩾25.5 IUl(-1) (OR: 4.28, 95% CI: 1.80-10.19). On the other hand, there were no significant changes in the subjects' body weight and body mass index during observation period. The ALDH2*2 allele, in relation to the GGT level, may potentially be a novel risk factor for NAFLD. PMID:27214654

  8. The longitudinal effect of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2*2 allele on the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Oniki, K; Morita, K; Watanabe, T; Kajiwara, A; Otake, K; Nakagawa, K; Sasaki, Y; Ogata, Y; Saruwatari, J

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) detoxifies toxic aldehydes and has a key role in protecting the liver. An elevated gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level is related to oxidative stress and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We herein investigated the association between inactive ALDH2*2 allele (rs671) and the risk of NAFLD, including the relationship to the GGT level. A retrospective follow-up study (mean 5.4±1.1 years) was conducted among 341 Japanese health screening program participants. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that the GGT level predicted the development of NAFLD (area under the curve: 0.65, P<0.05) with a cutoff value of 25.5 IUl−1. The longitudinal risk of NAFLD was higher in the ALDH2*2 allele carriers than in the noncarriers (odds ratio (OR): 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21–4.40), and the risk was further increased among the *2 allele carriers with GGT values ⩾25.5 IUl−1 (OR: 4.28, 95% CI: 1.80–10.19). On the other hand, there were no significant changes in the subjects' body weight and body mass index during observation period. The ALDH2*2 allele, in relation to the GGT level, may potentially be a novel risk factor for NAFLD. PMID:27214654

  9. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme. PMID:24846734

  10. Modulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity in cultured hepatocytes by glucagon and n-octanoate.

    PubMed Central

    Fatania, H R; Vary, T C; Randle, P J

    1986-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase in extracts of mitochondria from rat hepatocytes cultured for 21 h in medium 199 was increased 2.5-fold by the presence of 55 nM-glucagon and 1 mM-sodium n-octanoate in the culture medium. The change was comparable with that induced in vivo by 48 h starvation. The potential contribution of branched-chain complex to estimates of PDH-complex activity in rat liver mitochondria has been defined. PMID:3707545

  11. Differential effects of acute and chronic fructose administration on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to distinguish between the acute and chronic effects of fructose administration. In vivo, liver lipogenesis, as measured by {sup 3}H{sub 2}O incorporation, was greater in rats fed 60% fructose than in their glucose fed controls. Both fructose feeding, and fructose feeding plus intraperitoneal fructose injection increased the activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. Liver PDH activity was increased by fructose feeding, and was increased even more by fructose feeding and injection of fructose, but this was not associated with any changes in hepatic ATP concentrations.

  12. Why are the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes so large? Generation of an active trimeric complex.

    PubMed

    Marrott, Nia L; Marshall, Jacqueline J T; Svergun, Dmitri I; Crennell, Susan J; Hough, David W; van den Elsen, Jean M H; Danson, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The four-component polypeptides of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum assemble to give an active multienzyme complex possessing activity with the branched-chain 2-oxoacids derived from leucine, isoleucine and valine, and with pyruvate. The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) core of the complex is composed of identical trimer-forming units that assemble into a novel 42-mer structure comprising octahedral and icosahedral geometric aspects. From our previously determined structure of this catalytic core, the inter-trimer interactions involve a tyrosine residue near the C-terminus secured in a hydrophobic pocket of an adjacent trimer like a ball-and-socket joint. In the present study, we have deleted the five C-terminal amino acids of the E2 polypeptide (IIYEI) and shown by equilibrium centrifugation that it now only assembles into a trimeric enzyme. This was confirmed by SAXS analysis, although this technique showed the presence of approximately 20% hexamers. The crystal structure of the trimeric truncated E2 core has been determined and shown to be virtually identical with the ones observed in the 42-mer, demonstrating that removal of the C-terminal anchor does not significantly affect the individual monomer or trimer structures. The truncated E2 is still able to bind both 2-oxoacid decarboxylase (E1) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) components to give an active complex with catalytic activity similar to the native multienzyme complex. This is the first report of an active mini-complex for this enzyme, and raises the question of why all 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes assemble into such large structures. PMID:25088564

  13. Effect of Hofmeister anions and protein concentration on the activity and stability of some immobilized made-independent dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, G.; Bovara, R.; Pasta, P.; Cremonesi, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of several factors on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, both free and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, was investigated. Enzymes were immobilized under different conditions including various degrees of matrix activation, variable amounts of protein, in the presence, or in the absence of, additives (coenzymes, dithiothreitol, salts). Activity recovery was in general satisfactorily high with 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, low with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and markedly linked to the concentration of immobilized protein with alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case the advantageous stabilizing effect of high enzyme concentrations was notably diminished by the paralled decrease of the effectiveness factor. The effect of high concentrations of anions of the Hofmeister series was examined. It was found that 1M phosphate and 0.5M sulfate dramatically stabilize both free and immobilized enzymes against inactivation by temperature and urea. Km values of apolar substrates were considerably lowered by the two anions while Km values of polar substrates were not affected. In some cases Vmax values also were influenced by high concentrations of these anions. The present results appear of interest particularly in view of enzyme utilization for analytical as well as for preparative purposes. (Refs. 13).

  14. [Activity of liver mitochondrial NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases of the krebs cycle in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis developed under conditions of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2016-01-01

    Activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and the NAD(+)/NADН ratio were studied in the liver mitochondrial fraction of rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen under conditions of alimentary protein deprivation. Acetaminophen-induced hepatitis was characterized by a decrease of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities, while the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio remained at the control level. Modeling of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis in rats with alimentary protein caused a more pronounced decrease in the activity of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases studied and a 2.2-fold increase of the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio. This suggests that alimentary protein deprivation potentiated drug-induced liver damage. PMID:27143375

  15. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  16. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: Effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bonam, D.; Lehman, L.; Roberts, G.P.; Ludden, P.W.

    1989-06-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of (/sup 35/S)methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase.

  17. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  18. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  19. The respiratory molybdo-selenoprotein formate dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli have hydrogen: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli synthesizes three membrane-bound molybdenum- and selenocysteine-containing formate dehydrogenases, as well as up to four membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the formate dehydrogenases (Fdh-N and Fdh-O) and two of the hydrogenases (Hyd-1 and Hyd-2) have their respective catalytic subunits located in the periplasm and these enzymes have been shown previously to oxidize formate and hydrogen, respectively, and thus function in energy metabolism. Mutants unable to synthesize the [NiFe]-hydrogenases retain a H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity. The aim of this study was to identify the enzyme or enzymes responsible for this activity. Results Here we report the identification of a new H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase enzyme activity in E. coli that is independent of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases. This enzyme activity was originally identified after non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualization of hydrogen-oxidizing activity by specific staining. Analysis of a crude extract derived from a variety of E. coli mutants unable to synthesize any [NiFe]-hydrogenase-associated enzyme activity revealed that the mutants retained this specific hydrogen-oxidizing activity. Enrichment of this enzyme activity from solubilised membrane fractions of the hydrogenase-negative mutant FTD147 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatographies followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified the enzymes Fdh-N and Fdh-O. Analysis of defined mutants devoid of selenocysteine biosynthetic capacity or carrying deletions in the genes encoding the catalytic subunits of Fdh-N and Fdh-O demonstrated that both enzymes catalyze hydrogen activation. Fdh-N and Fdh-O can also transfer the electrons derived from oxidation of hydrogen to other redox dyes. Conclusions The related respiratory molybdo-selenoproteins Fdh-N and Fdh-O of Escherichia coli have hydrogen-oxidizing activity. These findings demonstrate that the

  20. Inhibitory effects of ofloxacin and cefepime on enzyme activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Erat, Mustafa; Sakiroğlu, Halis

    2007-01-01

    In this study, effects of some antibiotics, namely, ofloxacin, cefepime, cefazolin, and ampicillin on the in vitro enzyme activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase have been investigated. For this purpose, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was purified from chicken liver 535-fold with a yield of 18% by using ammonium sulphate precipitation, 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. In order to check the purity of the enzyme, SDS polyacylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed. This analysis revealed a highly pure enzyme band on the gel. Among the antibiotics, ofloxacin and cefepime exhibited inhibitory effects, but cefazolin and ampicillin showed neither important inhibitory nor activatory effects on the enzyme activity. The measured I(50) values by plotting activity percent vs. inhibitor concentration, [I(50)] were 0.1713 mM for ofloxacin and 6.0028 mM for cefepime. Inhibition constants, K(i), for ofloxacin and cefepime were also calculated as 0.2740 +/- 0.1080 mM and 12.869 +/- 16.6540 mM by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs, and inhibition types of the antibiotics were found out to be non-competitive and competitive, respectively. It has been understood from the calculated inhibitory parameters that the purified chicken enzyme has been quite inhibited by these two antimicrobials. PMID:17305608

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ɣ activation induces 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Copin, Corinne; Duhem, Christian; Derudas, Bruno; Neve, Bernardette; Noel, Benoit; Eeckhoute, Jerome; Lefebvre, Philippe; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyses the intracellular reduction of inactive cortisone to active cortisol, the natural ligand activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor controlling inflammation, lipid metabolism and the macrophage polarization state. In this study, we investigated the impact of macrophage polarization on the expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 and the role of PPAR therein. Methods and Results 11β-HSD1 gene expression is higher in pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages than in resting macrophages (RM), whereas its activity is highest in M2 macrophages. Interestingly, PPARγ activation induces 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in M2 macrophages, but not in RM or M1 macrophages. Consequently, human M2 macrophages displayed enhanced responsiveness to the 11β-HSD1 substrate cortisone, an effect amplified by PPAR -induction of 11β-HSD1 activity, as illustrated by an increased expression of GR target genes. Conclusions Our data identify a positive cross-talk between PPARγ and GR in human M2 macrophages via the induction of 11β-HSD1 expression and activity. PMID:22207732

  2. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons in mouse spinal cords following 13 weeks of exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-10-01

    Cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of motoneurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn in the lumbar and cervical segments of the mouse spinal cord were assessed after long-term exposure to microgravity and compared with those of ground-based controls. Mice were housed in a mouse drawer system on the International Space Station for 13 weeks. The mice were transported to the International Space Station by the Space Shuttle Discovery and returned to Earth by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. No changes in the cell body size of motoneurons were observed in either segment after exposure to microgravity, but succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized (<300 μm(2)) gamma and medium-sized (300-700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, which have higher succinate dehydrogenase activity than large-sized (>700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, in both segments was lower than that of ground-based controls. We concluded that exposure to microgravity for longer than 3 months induced decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of both gamma and slow-type alpha motoneurons. In particular, the decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma motoneurons was observed only after long-term exposure to microgravity. PMID:23943522

  3. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  4. High blood alcohol levels in women. The role of decreased gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity and first-pass metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frezza, M; di Padova, C; Pozzato, G; Terpin, M; Baraona, E; Lieber, C S

    1990-01-11

    After consuming comparable amounts of ethanol, women have higher blood ethanol concentrations than men, even with allowance for differences in size, and are more susceptible to alcoholic liver disease. Recently, we documented significant "first-pass metabolism" of ethanol due to its oxidation by gastric tissue. We report a study of the possible contribution of this metabolism to the sex-related difference in blood alcohol concentrations in 20 men and 23 women. Six in each group were alcoholics. The first-pass metabolism was determined on the basis of the difference in areas under the curves of blood alcohol concentrations after intravenous and oral administration of ethanol (0.3 g per kilogram of body weight). Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also measured in endoscopic gastric biopsies. In nonalcoholic subjects, the first-pass metabolism and gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the women were 23 and 59 percent, respectively, of those in the men, and there was a significant correlation (rs = 0.659) between first-pass metabolism and gastric mucosal alcohol dehydrogenase activity. In the alcoholic men, the first-pass metabolism and gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity were about half those in the nonalcoholic men; in the alcoholic women, the gastric mucosal alcohol dehydrogenase activity was even lower than in the alcoholic men, and first-pass metabolism was virtually abolished. We conclude that the increased bioavailability of ethanol resulting from decreased gastric oxidation of ethanol may contribute to the enhanced vulnerability of women to acute and chronic complications of alcoholism. PMID:2248624

  5. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms in Chinese and Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ene-Choo; Lim, Leslie; Leong, Jern-Yi; Lim, Jing-Yan; Lee, Arthur; Yang, Jun; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Winslow, Munidasa

    2010-01-01

    The association between two functional polymorphisms in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2/ADH1B) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) genes and alcohol dependence was examined in 182 Chinese and Indian patients undergoing treatment for alcohol dependence and 184 screened control subjects from Singapore. All subjects were screened by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Patients were also administered the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ). Polymorphisms were genotyped by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and selected genotypes confirmed by DNA sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Our results showed that frequencies of ADH1B*2 and ALDH2*2 were higher in controls compared to alcohol-dependent subjects for both Chinese and Indians. Frequencies of these two alleles were also higher in the 104 Chinese controls compared to the 80 Indian controls. None of the eight Chinese who were homozygous for both protective alleles was alcohol dependent. The higher frequencies of the protective alleles could explain the lower rate of alcohol dependence in Chinese. PMID:20025435

  6. Lipid-mediated unfolding of 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase2 is essential for steroidogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Thomas, James L.; Streeter, Michael; Prasad, Manoj; Whittal, Randy M.; Bell, John D.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2011-01-01

    For inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteins that do not undergo N-terminal cleavage, their activity may occur in the absence of a receptor present in the mitochondrial membrane. One such protein is human 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (3βHSD2), the IMM resident protein responsible for catalyzing two key steps in steroid metabolism: the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione. Conversion requires that 3βHSD2 serves as both a dehydrogenase and isomerase. The dual functionality of 3βHSD2 results from a conformational change, but the trigger for this change remains unknown. Using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), we found that 3βHSD2 interacted strongly with a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). 3βHSD2 became less stable when incubated with the individual lipids, as indicated by the decrease in thermal denaturation (Tm), from 42° C to 37° C. DPPG, alone or in combination with DPPC, led to a decrease in α-helical content without affecting the β-sheet conformation. With the exception of the N-terminal 20 amino acids, mixed vesicles protected 3βHSD2 from trypsin digestion. However, protein incubated with DPPC was only partially protected. The lipid-mediated unfolding completely supports the model in which a cavity forms between the α-helix and β-sheet. As 3βHSD2 lacks a receptor, opening the conformation may activate the protein. PMID:22106846

  7. Distribution of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activities between Chloroplasts and Mitochondria from Leaves of Different Species.

    PubMed Central

    Lernmark, U.; Gardestrom, P.

    1994-01-01

    Protoplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare), pea (Pisum sativum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves were fractionated into chloroplast- and mitochondrion-enriched fractions. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex capacities in mitochondria (mtPDC) and chloroplasts (cpPDC) were measured in appropriate fractions under conditions optimal for each isozyme. The total cellular capacity of PDC was similar in barley and pea but about 50% lower in wheat and spinach. In pea a distribution of 87% mtPDC and 13% cpPDC was found on a cellular basis. In barley, wheat, and spinach the subcellular distribution was the opposite, with about 15% mtPDC and 85% cpPDC. cpPDC activity was constant at about 0.1 nmol cell-1 h-1 in cells from different regions along the developing barley leaf and showed no correlation with developmental patterns of photosynthetic parameters, such as increasing Chl and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Similarly, the capacity of the mitochondrial isoform did not change during barley leaf development and had a developmental pattern similar to that of citrate synthase and fumarase. Differences in subcellular distribution of PDCs in barley and pea are proposed to be due to differences in regulation, not to changes in isozyme proportions during leaf development or to species-specific differences in phosphorylation state of mtPDC after organelle separation. PMID:12232437

  8. SIRT3 DEACETYLATES AND INCREASES PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brett A.; Song, Ha Yong; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R.; Gius, David

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha (PDHE1α or PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321) and a PDHA1 mutant, mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1K321R) increases in PDH activity, as compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1K321Q) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1K321Q exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype as compared to PDHA1K321R. These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyl-lysine suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration. PMID:25152236

  9. Characterization and evolution of an activator-independent methanol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator N-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Yun; Chen, Chang-Ting; Liu, Jessica Tse-Jin; Bogorad, Igor W; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liao, James C

    2016-06-01

    Methanol utilization by methylotrophic or non-methylotrophic organisms is the first step toward methanol bioconversion to higher carbon-chain chemicals. Methanol oxidation using NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) is of particular interest because it uses NAD(+) as the electron carrier. To our knowledge, only a limited number of NAD-dependent Mdhs have been reported. The most studied is the Bacillus methanolicus Mdh, which exhibits low enzyme specificity to methanol and is dependent on an endogenous activator protein (ACT). In this work, we characterized and engineered a group III NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (Mdh2) from Cupriavidus necator N-1 (previously designated as Ralstonia eutropha). This enzyme is the first NAD-dependent Mdh characterized from a Gram-negative, mesophilic, non-methylotrophic organism with a significant activity towards methanol. Interestingly, unlike previously reported Mdhs, Mdh2 does not require activation by known activators such as B. methanolicus ACT and Escherichia coli Nudix hydrolase NudF, or putative native C. necator activators in the Nudix family under mesophilic conditions. This enzyme exhibited higher or comparable activity and affinity toward methanol relative to the B. methanolicus Mdh with or without ACT in a wide range of temperatures. Furthermore, using directed molecular evolution, we engineered a variant (CT4-1) of Mdh2 that showed a 6-fold higher K cat/K m for methanol and 10-fold lower K cat/K m for n-butanol. Thus, CT4-1 represents an NAD-dependent Mdh with much improved catalytic efficiency and specificity toward methanol compared with the existing NAD-dependent Mdhs with or without ACT activation. PMID:26846745

  10. Dosage Compensation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER Triploids. II. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Gustavo; Plaut, Walter

    1973-01-01

    The level of activity of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was determinel in flies having seven different chromosomic constitutions. All those having an integral number of chromosomes [XAA, XXAA, XAAA, XXAAA, and XXXAAA (X=X chromosome, A=set of autosomes)] were found to have similar units of enzyme activity/mg live weight, while diploid females with a duplication and triploid females with a deficiency showed dosage effect. The amount of enzyme activity per cell, on the other hand, is also independent of the number of X's present but appears roughly proportional to the number of sets of autosomes.—It is proposed that dosage-compensated sex-linked genes are controlled by a positively acting regulatory factor(s) of autosomal origin. With this hypothesis it is possible to explain dosage compensation as a consequence of general regulatory mechanisms without invoking a special device which applies only to the X chromosomes. PMID:17248620

  11. Designing a highly active soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase for efficient glucose biosensors and biofuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Fabien; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Flexer, Victoria; Andre, Isabelle; Mano, Nicolas

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} A new mutant of PQQ-GDH designed for glucose biosensors application. {yields} First mutant of PQQ-GDH with higher activity for D-glucose than the Wild type. {yields} Position N428 is a key point to increase the enzyme activity. {yields} Molecular modeling shows that the N428 C mutant displays a better interaction for PQQ than the WT. -- Abstract: We report for the first time a soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase that is twice more active than the wild type for glucose oxidation and was obtained by combining site directed mutagenesis, modelling and steady-state kinetics. The observed enhancement is attributed to a better interaction between the cofactor and the enzyme leading to a better electron transfer. Electrochemical experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the new mutant for glucose oxidation and make it a promising enzyme for the development of high-performance glucose biosensors and biofuel cells.

  12. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  13. Phenylbutyrate increases pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in cells harboring a variety of defects

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Boutron, Audrey; Brivet, Michele; Kerr, Douglas; Morava, Eva; Rodenburg, Richard J; Bonafé, Luisa; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Anikster, Yair; Braverman, Nancy E; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. PDHC deficiency is genetically heterogenous and most patients have defects in the X-linked E1-α gene but defects in the other components of the complex encoded by PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD genes or in the regulatory enzyme encoded by PDP1 have also been found. Phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases and thus, has potential for therapy of patients with PDHC deficiency. In the present study, we investigated response to phenylbutyrate of multiple cell lines harboring all known gene defects resulting in PDHC deficiency. Methods Fibroblasts of patients with PDHC deficiency were studied for their enzyme activity at baseline and following phenylbutyrate incubation. Drug responses were correlated with genotypes and protein levels by Western blotting. Results Large deletions affecting PDHA1 that result in lack of detectable protein were unresponsive to phenylbutyrate, whereas increased PDHC activity was detected in most fibroblasts harboring PDHA1 missense mutations. Mutations affecting the R349-α residue were directed to proteasome degradation and were consistently unresponsive to short-time drug incubation but longer incubation resulted in increased levels of enzyme activity and protein that may be due to an additional effect of phenylbutyrate as a molecular chaperone. Interpretation PDHC enzyme activity was enhanced by phenylbutyrate in cells harboring missense mutations in PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD, and PDP1 genes. In the prospect of a clinical trial, the results of this study may allow prediction of in vivo response in patients with PDHC deficiency harboring a wide spectrum of molecular defects. PMID:25356417

  14. Effect of different mulch materials on the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in an organic pepper crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Marta M.; Peco, Jesús; Campos, Juan; Villena, Jaime; González, Sara; Moreno, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The use biodegradable materials (biopolymers of different composition and papers) as an alternative to conventional mulches has increased considerably during the last years mainly for environmental reason. In order to assess the effect of these materials on the soil microbial activity during the season of a pepper crop organically grown in Central Spain, the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was measured in laboratory. The mulch materials tested were: 1) black polyethylene (PE, 15 μm); black biopolymers (15 μm): 2) Mater-Bi® (corn starch based), 3) Sphere 4® (potato starch based), 4) Sphere 6® (potato starch based), 5) Bioflex® (polylactic acid based), 6) Ecovio® (polylactic acid based), 7) Mimgreen® (black paper, 85 g/m2). A randomized complete block design with four replications was adopted. The crop was drip irrigated following the water demand of each treatment. Soil samples (5-10 cm depth) under the different mulches were taken at different dates (at the beginning of the crop cycle and at different dates throughout the crop season). Additionally, samples of bare soil in a manual weeding and in an untreated control were taken. The results obtained show the negative effect of black PE on the DHA activity, mainly as result of the higher temperature reached under the mulch and the reduction in the gas interchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The values corresponding to the biodegradable materials were variable, although highlighting the low DHA activity observed under Bioflex®. In general, the uncovered treatments showed higher values than those reached under mulches, especially in the untreated control. Keywords: mulch, biodegradable, biopolymer, paper, dehydrogenase activity (DHA). Acknowledgements: the research was funded by Project RTA2011-00104-C04-03 from the INIA (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  15. Active site dynamics in the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patrick J.; Britton, K. Linda; Fisher, Martin; Esclapez, Julia; Pire, Carmen; Bonete, Maria Jose; Ferrer, Juan; Rice, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being the subject of intensive investigations, many aspects of the mechanism of the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase (MDR) superfamily remain contentious. We have determined the high-resolution structures of a series of binary and ternary complexes of glucose dehydrogenase, an MDR enzyme from Haloferax mediterranei. In stark contrast to the textbook MDR mechanism in which the zinc ion is proposed to remain stationary and attached to a common set of protein ligands, analysis of these structures reveals that in each complex, there are dramatic differences in the nature of the zinc ligation. These changes arise as a direct consequence of linked movements of the zinc ion, a zinc-bound bound water molecule, and the substrate during progression through the reaction. These results provide evidence for the molecular basis of proton traffic during catalysis, a structural explanation for pentacoordinate zinc ion intermediates, a unifying view for the observed patterns of metal ligation in the MDR family, and highlight the importance of dynamic fluctuations at the metal center in changing the electrostatic potential in the active site, thereby influencing the proton traffic and hydride transfer events. PMID:19131516

  16. Increased activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in purified cell suspensions and single cells from the uterine cervix in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S. K.; Benedetto, C.; Flatman, A.; Hammond, R. H.; Micheletti, L.; Riley, C.; Riley, P. A.; Spargo, D. J.; Zonca, M.; Slater, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been measured in squamous epithelial cells of the uterine cervix from normal patients and cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A biochemical cycling method, which uses only simple equipment and is suited to routine use and to automation, was applied to cells separated by gradient centrifugation. In addition, cells were examined cytochemically, and the intensity of staining in the cytoplasm of single whole cells was measured using computerised microcytospectrophotometry. Twenty per cent of cells in samples from normal patients (n=61) showed staining intensities above an extinction of 0.15 at 540 nm, compared to 71% of cases of CIN 1 (n=14), 91% of cases of CIN 2 (n=11) and 67% of cases of CIN 3 (n=15). The cytochemical data do not allow definitive distinctions to be made between different grades of CIN whereas the biochemical assay applied to cell lysates shows convincing differences between normal samples and cases of CIN. There are no false negatives for CIN 3 (n=14) and CIN 2 (n=10) and 11% false negatives for CIN 1 (n=9) and 14% of false positives for normal cases (n=21). The results of this preliminary study with reference to automation are discussed [corrected]. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637668

  17. From Alcohol Dehydrogenase to a “One-way” Carbonyl Reductase by Active-site Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Directional preference in catalysis is often used to distinguish alcohol dehydrogenases from carbonyl reductases. However, the mechanistic basis underpinning this discrimination is weak. In mannitol 2-dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens, stabilization of (partial) negative charge on the substrate oxyanion by the side chains of Asn-191 and Asn-300 is a key feature of catalysis in the direction of alcohol oxidation. We have disrupted this ability through individual and combined substitutions of the two asparagines by aspartic acid. Kinetic data and their thermodynamic analysis show that the internal equilibrium of enzyme-NADH-fructose and enzyme-NAD+-mannitol (Kint) was altered dramatically (104- to 105-fold) from being balanced in the wild-type enzyme (Kint ≈ 3) to favoring enzyme-NAD+-mannitol in the single site mutants, N191D and N300D. The change in Kint reflects a selective slowing down of the mannitol oxidation rate, resulting because Asn → Asp replacement (i) disfavors partial abstraction of alcohol proton by Lys-295 in a step preceding catalytic hydride transfer, and (ii) causes stabilization of a nonproductive enzyme-NAD+-mannitol complex. N191D and N300D appear to lose fructose binding affinity due to deprotonation of the respective Asp above apparent pK values of 5.3 ± 0.1 and 6.3 ± 0.2, respectively. The mutant incorporating both Asn→Asp substitutions behaved as a slow “fructose reductase” at pH 5.2, lacking measurable activity for mannitol oxidation in the pH range 6.8–10. A mechanism is suggested in which polarization of the substrate carbonyl by a doubly protonated diad of Asp and Lys-295 facilitates NADH-dependent reduction of fructose by N191D and N300D under optimum pH conditions. Creation of an effectively “one-way” reductase by active-site redesign of a parent dehydrogenase has not been previously reported and holds promise in the development of carbonyl reductases for application in organic synthesis. PMID:20639204

  18. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and glucose metabolism in post-ischaemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Schöder, H; Knight, R J; Kofoed, K F; Schelbert, H R; Buxton, D B

    1998-02-27

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is regulated both by covalent modification and through modulation of the active enzyme by metabolites. In the isolated heart, post-ischaemic inhibition of PDH, leading to uncoupling of glycolysis and glucose oxidation and a decrease in cardiac efficiency, has been described. In vivo, post-ischaemic reperfusion leads to metabolic abnormalities consistent with PDH inhibition, but the effects of ischaemia/reperfusion on PDH are not well characterized. We therefore investigated PDH regulation following transient ischaemia in vivo. In 33 open-chest dogs, the left anterior descending (LAD) was occluded for 20 min followed by 4 h reperfusion. In 17 dogs, dichloroacetate (DCA) was injected prior to reperfusion, while 16 dogs served as controls. In dogs without DCA, glucose oxidation and lactate uptake were lower in reperfused than in remote tissue, suggesting reduced flux through PDH. However, percent active and total PDH measured in myocardial biopsies were similar in both territories, excluding covalent enzyme modification or loss of functional enzyme. DCA activated PDH activity similarly in both regions and abolished differences in glucose oxidation and lactate uptake. Thus, decreased PDH flux in reperfused myocardium does not result from covalent modification or loss of total enzyme activity, but more likely from metabolite inhibition of the active enzyme. DCA leads to essentially complete activation of PDH, increases overall glucose utilization and abolishes post-ischaemic inhibition of glucose oxidation. PMID:9545535

  19. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  20. Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Identification of New Sites of Promoter Activity in Transgenic Poplar.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, S.; Samaj, J.; Lauvergeat, V.; Boudet, A.; Grima-Pettenati, J.

    1997-01-01

    Stem sections from poplar that were stably transformed with a eucalypt cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase promoter-[beta]-glucuronidase construct were prepared by using either a technique routinely used in herbaceous species or a technique designed to take into account the particular anatomy of woody plants. Although both preparation techniques confirmed the pattern of expression previously observed (C. Feuillet, V. Lauvergeat, C. Deswarte, G. Pilate, A. Boudet and J. Grima-Pettenati [1995] Plant Mol Biol 27: 651-657), the latter technique also allowed the detection of other sites of promoter activity not revealed by the first technique. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression pattern obtained with the second sample preparation technique. PMID:12223610

  1. The Hydrogenase Activity of the Molybdenum/Copper-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase of Oligotropha carboxidovorans*

    PubMed Central

    Wilcoxen, Jarett; Hille, Russ

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of the air-tolerant CO dehydrogenase from Oligotropha carboxidovorans with H2 has been examined. Like the Ni-Fe CO dehydrogenase, the enzyme can be reduced by H2 with a limiting rate constant of 5.3 s−1 and a dissociation constant Kd of 525 μm; both kred and kred/Kd, reflecting the breakdown of the Michaelis complex and the reaction of free enzyme with free substrate in the low [S] regime, respectively, are largely pH-independent. During the reaction with H2, a new EPR signal arising from the Mo/Cu-containing active site of the enzyme is observed which is distinct from the signal seen when the enzyme is reduced by CO, with greater g anisotropy and larger hyperfine coupling to the active site 63,65Cu. The signal also exhibits hyperfine coupling to at least two solvent-exchangeable protons of bound substrate that are rapidly exchanged with solvent. Proton coupling is also evident in the EPR signal seen with the dithionite-reduced native enzyme, and this coupling is lost in the presence of bicarbonate. We attribute the coupled protons in the dithionite-reduced enzyme to coordinated water at the copper site in the native enzyme and conclude that bicarbonate is able to displace this water from the copper coordination sphere. On the basis of our results, a mechanism for H2 oxidation is proposed which involves initial binding of H2 to the copper of the binuclear center, displacing the bound water, followed by sequential deprotonation through a copper-hydride intermediate to reduce the binuclear center. PMID:24165123

  2. Lipid-mediated unfolding of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 is essential for steroidogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Thomas, James L; Streeter, Michael; Prasad, Manoj; Whittal, Randy M; Bell, John D; Bose, Himangshu S

    2011-12-27

    For inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteins that do not undergo N-terminal cleavage, the activity may occur in the absence of a receptor present in the mitochondrial membrane. One such protein is human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2), the IMM resident protein responsible for catalyzing two key steps in steroid metabolism: the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone to androstenedione. Conversion requires that 3βHSD2 serve as both a dehydrogenase and an isomerase. The dual functionality of 3βHSD2 results from a conformational change, but the trigger for this change remains unknown. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we found that 3βHSD2 interacted strongly with a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). 3βHSD2 became less stable when incubated with the individual lipids, as indicated by the decrease in thermal denaturation (T(m)) from 42 to 37 °C. DPPG, alone or in combination with DPPC, led to a decrease in α-helical content without an effect on the β-sheet conformation. With the exception of the 20 N-terminal amino acids, mixed vesicles protected 3βHSD2 from trypsin digestion. However, protein incubated with DPPC was only partially protected. The lipid-mediated unfolding completely supports the model in which a cavity forms between the α-helix and β-sheet. As 3βHSD2 lacks a receptor, opening the conformation may activate the protein. PMID:22106846

  3. Effect of various chemicals on the aldehyde dehydrogenase activity of the rat liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Marselos, M; Vasiliou, V

    1991-01-01

    The cytosolic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was studied in the rat liver, after acute administration of various carcinogenic and chemically related compounds. Male Wistar rats were treated with 27 different chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitrosamines, azo dyes, as well as with some known direct-acting carcinogens. The cytosolic ALDH activity of the liver was determined either with propionaldehyde and NAD (P/NAD), or with benzaldehyde and NADP (B/NADP). The activity of ALDH remained unaffected after treatment with 1-naphthylamine, nitrosamines and also with the direct-acting chemical carcinogens tested. On the contrary, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls (Arochlor 1254) and 2-naphthylamine produced a remarkable increase of ALDH. In general, the response to the effectors was disproportionate between the two types of enzyme activity, being much in favour for the B/NADP activity. This fact resulted to an inversion of the ratio B/NADP vs. P/NAD, which under constitutive conditions is lower than 1. In this respect, the most potent compounds were found to be polychlorinated biphenyls, 3-methylcholanthrene, benzo(a)pyrene and 1,2,5,6-dibenzoanthracene. Our results suggest that the B/NADP activity of the soluble ALDH is greatly induced after treatment with compounds possessing aromatic ring(s) in their molecule. It is not known, if this response of the hepatocytes is related with the process of chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:2060039

  4. Muscular cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in deep-sea fish from the NW Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Samuel; Solé, Montserrat

    2014-03-01

    Organisms inhabiting submarine canyons can be potentially exposed to higher inputs of anthropogenic chemicals than their counterparts from the adjacent areas. To find out to what extend this observation applies to a NW Mediterranean canyon (i.e. Blanes canyon) off the Catalan coast, four deep-sea fish species were collected from inside the canyon (BC) and the adjacent open slope (OS). The selected species were: Alepocephalus rostratus, Lepidion lepidion, Coelorinchus mediterraneus and Bathypterois mediterraneus. Prior to the choice of an adequate sentinel species, the natural variation of the selected parameters (biomarkers) in relation to factors such as size, sex, sampling depth and seasonality need to be characterised. In this study, the activities of cholinesterases (ChEs) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes were determined in the muscle of the four deep-sea fish. Of all ChEs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was dominant and selected for further monitoring. Overall, AChE activity exhibited a significant relationship with fish size whereas LDH activity was mostly dependent on the sex and gonadal development status, although in a species-dependent manner. The seasonal variability of LDH activity was more marked than for AChE activity, and inside-outside canyon (BC-OS) differences were not consistent in all contrasted fish species, and in fact they were more dependent on biological traits. Thus, they did not suggest a differential stress condition between sites inside and outside the canyon. PMID:24296242

  5. Role and structural characterization of plant aldehyde dehydrogenases from family 2 and family 7.

    PubMed

    Končitíková, Radka; Vigouroux, Armelle; Kopečná, Martina; Andree, Tomáš; Bartoš, Jan; Šebela, Marek; Moréra, Solange; Kopečný, David

    2015-05-15

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are responsible for oxidation of biogenic aldehyde intermediates as well as for cell detoxification of aldehydes generated during lipid peroxidation. So far, 13 ALDH families have been described in plants. In the present study, we provide a detailed biochemical characterization of plant ALDH2 and ALDH7 families by analysing maize and pea ALDH7 (ZmALDH7 and PsALDH7) and four maize cytosolic ALDH(cALDH)2 isoforms RF2C, RF2D, RF2E and RF2F [the first maize ALDH2 was discovered as a fertility restorer (RF2A)]. We report the crystal structures of ZmALDH7, RF2C and RF2F at high resolution. The ZmALDH7 structure shows that the three conserved residues Glu(120), Arg(300) and Thr(302) in the ALDH7 family are located in the substrate-binding site and are specific to this family. Our kinetic analysis demonstrates that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde, a lysine catabolism intermediate, is the preferred substrate for plant ALDH7. In contrast, aromatic aldehydes including benzaldehyde, anisaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde are the best substrates for cALDH2. In line with these results, the crystal structures of RF2C and RF2F reveal that their substrate-binding sites are similar and are formed by an aromatic cluster mainly composed of phenylalanine residues and several nonpolar residues. Gene expression studies indicate that the RF2C gene, which is strongly expressed in all organs, appears essential, suggesting that the crucial role of the enzyme would certainly be linked to the cell wall formation using aldehydes from phenylpropanoid pathway as substrates. Finally, plant ALDH7 may significantly contribute to osmoprotection because it oxidizes several aminoaldehydes leading to products known as osmolytes. PMID:25734422

  6. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  7. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  8. Active-Loop Dynamics within the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Lodewyks, Kara; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel Z B; Callender, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Laser-induced temperature-jump relaxation spectroscopy was used to study the active site mobile-loop dynamics found in the binding of the NADH nucleotide cofactor and oxamate substrate mimic to lactate dehydrogenase in Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic bacteria (bsLDH). The kinetic data can be best described by a model in which NADH can bind only to the open-loop apoenzyme, oxamate can bind only to the bsLDH·NADH binary complex in the open-loop conformation, and oxamate binding is followed by closing of the active site loop preventing oxamate unbinding. The open and closed states of the loop are in dynamic equilibrium and interconvert on the submillisecond time scale. This interconversion strongly accelerates with an increase in temperature because of significant enthalpy barriers. Binding of NADH to bsLDH results in minor changes of the loop dynamics and does not shift the open-closed equilibrium, but binding of the oxamate substrate mimic shifts this equilibrium to the closed state. At high excess oxamate concentrations where all active sites are nearly saturated with the substrate mimic, all active site mobile loops are mainly closed. The observed active-loop dynamics for bsLDH is very similar to that previously observed for pig heart LDH. PMID:27319381

  9. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: application in cream cheese to moderate alcohol uptake.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-09-01

    Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. However, the ADH activity of Lactococcus spp., except Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, has not been widely determined, though they play an important role as the starter for most cheesemaking technologies. Cheese is a functional food recognized as an aid to digestion. In the current study, the ADH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 reference strains from the genus Lactococcus was determined. Only 5 strains, 3 of dairy origin, L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), L. lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T), and 2 of nondairy origin, Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) KCTC 13185(T), showed ADH activity and possessed the ADH gene. All these strains were capable of making cheese, but the highest level of ADH activity was found in L. chungangensis, with 45.9nmol/min per gram in tryptic soy broth and 65.8nmol/min per gram in cream cheese. The extent that consumption of cheese, following imbibing alcohol, reduced alcohol uptake was observed by following the level of alcohol in the serum of mice. The results show a potential novel benefit of cheese as a dairy functional food. PMID:26142864

  10. Cytochrome b5 augments 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Goosen, Pierre; Storbeck, Karl-Heinz; Swart, Amanda C; Conradie, Riaan; Swart, Pieter

    2011-11-01

    During adrenal steroidogenesis the competition between 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerase (3βHSD) and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase (CYP17A1) for Δ(5) steroid intermediates greatly influences steroidogenic output. Cytochrome-b(5) (Cyt-b(5)), a small electron transfer hemoprotein, known to augment the lyase activity of CYP17A1, has been shown to alter the steroidogenic outcome of this competition. In this study, the influence of Cyt-b(5) on 3βHSD activity was investigated. In COS-1 cells, Cyt-b(5) was shown to significantly increase the activity of both caprine and ovine 3βHSD towards pregnenolone, 17-OH pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone in a substrate and species specific manner. Furthermore, kinetic studies revealed Cyt-b(5) to have no influence on the K(m) values while significantly increasing the V(max) values of ovine 3βHSD for all its respective substrates. In addition, the activity of ovine 3βHSD in microsomal preparations was significantly influenced by the addition of either purified Cyt-b(5) or anti-Cyt-b(5) IgG. The results presented in this study indicate that Cyt-b(5) augments 3βHSD activity and represents the first documentation of such augmentation in any species. PMID:21930205

  11. Influence of spaceflight on succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of rat ventral horn neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities and soma cross-sectional areas (CSA) of neurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn at the L5 segmental level of the spinal cord in the rat were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after 9 days of recovery on earth. The results were compared to those in age-matched ground-based control rats. Spinal cords were quick-frozen, and the SDH activity and CSA of a sample of neurons with a visible nucleus were determined using a digitizer and a computer-assisted image analysis system. An inverse relationship between CSA and SDH activity of neurons was observed in all groups of rats. No change in mean CSA or mean SDH activity or in the size distribution of neurons was observed following spaceflight or recovery. However, there was a selective decrease in the SDH activity of neurons with soma CSA between 500 and 800 microns2 in the flight rats, and this effect persisted for at least 9 days following return to 1 g. It remains to be determined whether the selected population of motoneurons or the specific motor pools affected by spaceflight may be restricted to specific muscles.

  12. Effect of feeding and of DDT on the activity of hepatic glucose 6- phosphate dehydrogenase in two salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhler, Donald R.; Benville, P.

    1969-01-01

    The specific activity of liver glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in yearling rainbow trout remained unchanged when the fish were starved for periods as long as 8 weeks and when starved animals were fed diets of various compositions. Injection of insulin concurrently with refeeding also failed to alter the specific activity of the enzyme in trout. The absence of a dietary or insulin influence on the teleost enzyme system is to be contrasted with studies in mammals in which the activity of hepatic glucose 6-P dehydrogenase was markedly stimulated after refeeding starved animals or injection of insulin.Ingestion of the pesticide DDT by juvenile coho salmon or adult rainbow trout also had no effect on the specific activity of liver glucose 6-P dehydrogenase and DDT failed to inhibit the rainbow trout enzyme in vitro. These results also differ considerably from those found in higher animals.These results suggest that the glucose 6-P dehydrogenase enzyme in teleosts may be under a different type of regulatory control from that found in mammals.

  13. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  14. Effects of low molecular-weight organic acids and dehydrogenase activity in rhizosphere sediments of mangrove plants on phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ling; Lin, Li; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2014-03-01

    This work evaluated the roles of the low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) from root exudates and the dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere sediments of three mangrove plant species on the removal of mixed PAHs. The results showed that the concentrations of LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity changed species-specifically with the levels of PAH contamination. In all plant species, the concentration of citric acid was the highest, followed by succinic acid. For these acids, succinic acid was positively related to the removal of all the PAHs except Chr. Positive correlations were also found between the removal percentages of 4-and 5-ring PAHs and all LMWOAs, except citric acid. LMWOAs enhanced dehydrogenase activity, which positively related to PAH removal percentages. These findings suggested that LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity promoted the removal of PAHs. Among three mangrove plants, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, the plant with the highest root biomass, dehydrogenase activity and concentrations of LMWOAs, was most efficient in removing PAHs. PMID:24287262

  15. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  16. Glutamate dehydrogenase in brain mitochondria: do lipid modifications and transient metabolon formation influence enzyme activity?

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in brain, is complex and of paramount importance to overall brain function. Thus, understanding the regulation of enzymes involved in formation and disposal of glutamate and related metabolites is crucial to understanding glutamate metabolism. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a pivotal enzyme that links amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle activity in brain and other tissues. The allosteric regulation of GDH has been extensively studied and characterized. Less is known about the influence of lipid modifications on GDH activity, and the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes (metabolons) that can greatly influence metabolism by altering kinetic parameters and lead to channeling of metabolites. This review summarizes evidence for palmitoylation and acylation of GDH, information on protein binding, and information regarding the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes. Recent studies suggest that a number of other proteins can bind to GDH altering activity and overall metabolism. It is likely that these modifications and interactions contribute additional levels of regulation of GDH activity and glutamate metabolism. PMID:21771624

  17. Determination of beta-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase activity in meat by electrophoretically mediated microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; Mazorra-Manzano, Miguel A; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2003-01-01

    The combined use of an in-tube enzyme assay and capillary electrophoresis for determining beta-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase (beta-HADH) activity in meat was investigated. Beta-HADH is a significant mitochondrial enzyme in food muscle; thus, the determination of its activity is important in food analysis. The enzymatic assay and the separation of the reaction products were carried out by electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA) using a plug-plug reaction mode at variable potential. For the quantification of beta-HADH activity, the rate of conversion of reduced beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) was calculated by determining NAD+ at 260 nm. A calibration curve for NAD+ concentration versus normalized areas showed a highly significant (p < 0.001) linear relationship (R2 = 0.993). Accurate quantification of beta-HADH activity was achieved since on-line monitoring allowed us to account for the NAD+ produced from NADH degradation by applying a correction factor. An average reaction time of 0.66 +/- 0.06 sec was determined for a protein concentration in the range of 0.1-0.5 mg protein/mL. The assay was reproducible since coefficients of variation of less than 6.2% were calculated for triplicate analyses. PMID:14596340

  18. Unexpected Histone H3 Tail-clipping Activity of Glutamate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Papita; Verma, Naveen; Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Clipping of histone tails has been reported in several organisms. However, the significance and regulation of histone tail clipping largely remains unclear. According to recent discoveries H3 clipping has been found to be involved in regulation of gene expression and chromatin dynamics. Earlier we had provided evidence of tissue-specific proteolytic processing of histone H3 in White Leghorn chicken liver nuclei. In this study we identify a novel activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) as a histone H3-specific protease in chicken liver tissue. This protease activity is regulated by divalent ions and thiol-disulfide conversion in vitro. GDH specifically clips H3 in its free as well as chromatin-bound form. Furthermore, we have found an inhibitor that inhibits the H3-clipping activity of GDH. Like previously reported proteases, GDH too may have the potential to regulate/modulate post-translational modifications of histone H3 by removing the N-terminal residues of the histone. In short, our findings identify an unexpected proteolytic activity of GDH specific to histone H3 that is regulated by redox state, ionic concentrations, and a cellular inhibitor in vitro. PMID:23673664

  19. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and quantity decreases after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars W.; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Teng J.; Giberson, Tyler A.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key gatekeeper enzyme in aerobic metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to determine if PDH activity is affected by major stress in the form of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) which has previously been used as a model of critical illness. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients undergoing CABG at an urban, tertiary care hospital. We included adult patients undergoing CABG with or without concomitant valve surgery. Measurements of PDH activity and quantity and thiamine were obtained prior to surgery, at the completion of surgery, and 6 hours post-surgery. Results Fourteen patients were enrolled (age: 67 ± 10 years, 21 % female). Study subjects had a mean 41.7 % (SD: 27.7) reduction in PDH activity after surgery and a mean 32.0% (SD: 31.4) reduction 6 hours after surgery (p < 0.001). Eight patients were thiamine deficient (≤ 7 nmol/L) after surgery compared to none prior to surgery (p = 0.002). Thiamine level was a significantly associated with PDH quantity at all time points (p = 0.01). Post-surgery lactate levels were inversely correlated with post-surgery thiamine levels (r = −0.58 and p = 0.04). Conclusion The stress of major surgery causes decreased PDH activity and quantity, and depletion of thiamine levels. PMID:25526377

  20. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  1. IN VITRO ORGANIC NITRATE BIOACTIVATION TO NITRIC OXIDE BY RECOMBINANT ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE 3A1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shunxin; Page, Nathaniel A.; Fung, Sun Mi; Fung, Ho-Leung

    2013-01-01

    Organic nitrates (ORNs) are commonly used anti-ischemic and anti-anginal agents, which serve as an exogenous source of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Recently, both mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) and cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase-1a1 (ALDH1A1) have been shown to exhibit the ability to selectively bioactivate various ORNs in vitro. The objective of the present research was to examine the potential role of ALDH3A1, another major cytosolic isoform of ALDH, in the in vitro bioactivation of various ORNs, and to estimate the enzyme kinetic parameters toward ORNs through mechanistic modeling. The extent of bioactivation was assayed by exposing recombinant ALDH3A1 to various concentrations of ORNs, and measuring the concentration-time profiles of released NO via a NO-specific electrode. Metabolite formation kinetics was monitored for nitroglycerin (NTG) using LC/MS/MS. Our results showed that ALDH3A1 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in C57BL/6 mouse aortic, cardiac, and hepatic tissues, and it was able to release NO from several ORNs, including NTG, isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), isosorbide-2-mononitrate (IS-2-MN), and nicorandil with similar Vmax (0.175 – 0.503 nmol/min/mg of ALDH3A1), and Km values of 4.01, 46.5, 818 and 5.75 × 103 μM respectively. However, activation of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (IS-5-MN) by ALDH3A1 was undetectable in vitro. ALDH3A1 was also shown to denitrate NTG, producing primarily glyceryl 1, 2-dinitrate (1, 2-GDN) in preference to glyceryl 1, 3-dinitrate (1, 3-GDN). Therefore, ALDH3A1 may contribute to the bioactivation of ORNs in vivo. PMID:24126018

  2. Persistence of the effect of insulin on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in rat white and brown adipose tissue during the preparation and subsequent incubation of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Denton, R M; McCormack, J G; Marshall, S E

    1984-01-15

    Increases in the amount of the active non-phosphorylated form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat epididymal adipose tissue, as a result of incubation with insulin, persist not only during the preparation of mitochondria but also during subsequent incubation of coupled mitochondria in the presence of respiratory substrates. No effect on insulin was found if the hormone was added directly to mitochondria in the presence or absence of added plasma membranes. Concentrations of several possible regulators of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (ATP, ADP, NADH, NAD+, acetyl-CoA, CoA and potassium) were measured in rat epididymal-adipose-tissue mitochondria incubated under conditions where differences in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity persist as a result of insulin action. No alterations were found, and it is suggested that inhibition of the kinase is not the principal means by which insulin activates pyruvate dehydrogenase. The intramitochondrial concentration of magnesium was also unaffected. Differences in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in interscapular brown adipose tissue associated with manipulation of plasma insulin concentrations of cold-adapted rats were also shown to persist during the preparation and subsequent incubation of mitochondria in the presence or absence of GDP. It is pointed out that the persistence of the effect of insulin on pyruvate dehydrogenase in incubated mitochondria will facilitate the recognition of the mechanism of this action of the hormone. Evidence that the short-term action of insulin involves an increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase activity rather than inhibition of that of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase is discussed. PMID:6320807

  3. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  4. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC50 values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. PMID:27378425

  5. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant. PMID:17539607

  6. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  7. Validation of the in vivo assessment of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity using hyperpolarised 13C MRS.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Helen J; Schroeder, Marie A; Dodd, Michael S; Heather, Lisa C; Carter, Emma E; Cochlin, Lowri E; Nagel, Simon; Sibson, Nicola R; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-02-01

    Many diseases of the heart are characterised by changes in substrate utilisation, which is regulated in part by the activity of the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Consequently, there is much interest in the in vivo evaluation of PDH activity in a range of physiological and pathological states to obtain information on the metabolic mechanisms of cardiac diseases. Hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate, detected using MRS, is a novel technique for the noninvasive evaluation of PDH flux. PDH flux has been assumed to directly reflect in vivo PDH activity, although to date this assumption remains unproven. Control animals and animals undergoing interventions known to modulate PDH activity, namely high fat feeding and dichloroacetate infusion, were used to investigate the relationship between in vivo hyperpolarised MRS measurements of PDH flux and ex vivo measurements of PDH enzyme activity (PDH(a)). Further, the plasma concentrations of pyruvate and other important metabolites were evaluated following pyruvate infusion to assess the metabolic consequences of pyruvate infusion during hyperpolarised MRS experiments. Hyperpolarised MRS measurements of PDH flux correlated significantly with ex vivo measurements of PDH(a), confirming that PDH activity influences directly the in vivo flux of hyperpolarised pyruvate through cardiac PDH. The maximum plasma concentration of pyruvate reached during hyperpolarised MRS experiments was approximately 250 µM, equivalent to physiological pyruvate concentrations reached during exercise or with dietary interventions. The concentrations of other metabolites, including lactate, glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate, did not vary during the 60 s following pyruvate infusion. Hence, during the 60-s data acquisition period, metabolism was minimally affected by pyruvate infusion. PMID:20799252

  8. Stabilization of a formate dehydrogenase by covalent immobilization on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose supports.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan M; Wilson, Lorena; Ferrarotti, Susana Alicia; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisan, Jose M; Mateo, Cesar

    2006-03-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) is a stable enzyme that may be readily inactivated by the interaction with hydrophobic interfaces (e.g., due to strong stirring). This may be avoided by immobilizing the enzyme on a porous support by any technique. Thus, even if the enzyme is going to be used in an ultra-membrane reactor, the immobilization presents some advantages. Immobilization on supports activated with bromocianogen, polyethylenimine, glutaraldehyde, etc., did not promote any stabilization of the enzyme under thermal inactivation. However, the immobilization of FDH on highly activated glyoxyl agarose has permitted increasing the enzyme stability against any distorting agent: pH, T, organic solvent, etc. The time of support-enzyme reaction, the temperature of immobilization, and the activation of the support need to be optimized to get the optimal stability-activity properties. Optimized biocatalyst retained 50% of the offered activity and became 50 times more stable at high temperature and neutral pH. Moreover, the quaternary structure of this dimeric enzyme becomes stabilized by immobilization under optimized conditions. Thus, at acidic pH (conditions where the subunit dissociation is the first step in the enzyme inactivation), the immobilization of both subunits of the enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose has allowed the enzyme to be stabilized by hundreds of times. Moreover, the optimal temperature of the enzyme has been increased (even by 10 degrees C at pH 4.5). Very interestingly, the activity with NAD(+)-dextran was around 60% of that observed with free cofactor. PMID:16529396

  9. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro. PMID:25037415

  10. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoyl Dehydrogenase Activity Shapes Photosynthesis and Photorespiration of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Timm, Stefan; Wittmiß, Maria; Gamlien, Sabine; Ewald, Ralph; Florian, Alexandra; Frank, Marcus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bauwe, Hermann

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (mtLPD; L-protein) is an integral component of several multienzyme systems involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, photorespiration, and the degradation of branched-chain α-ketoacids. The majority of the mtLPD present in photosynthesizing tissue is used for glycine decarboxylase (GDC), necessary for the high-flux photorespiratory glycine-into-serine conversion. We previously suggested that GDC activity could be a signal in a regulatory network that adjusts carbon flux through the Calvin-Benson cycle in response to photorespiration. Here, we show that elevated GDC L-protein activity significantly alters several diagnostic parameters of cellular metabolism and leaf gas exchange in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpressor lines displayed markedly decreased steady state contents of TCA cycle and photorespiratory intermediates as well as elevated NAD(P)(+)-to-NAD(P)H ratios. Additionally, increased rates of CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, and plant growth were observed. Intriguingly, however, day respiration rates remained unaffected. By contrast, respiration was enhanced in the first half of the dark phase but depressed in the second. We also observed enhanced sucrose biosynthesis in the light in combination with a lower diel magnitude of starch accumulation and breakdown. These data thus substantiate our prior hypothesis that facilitating flux through the photorespiratory pathway stimulates photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in the Calvin-Benson cycle. They furthermore suggest that this regulation is, at least in part, dependent on increased light-capture/use efficiency. PMID:26116608

  11. Evaluation on the inhibition of pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives to lactate dehydrogenase and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na-Na; Weng, Zhao-Yue; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Boison, Daniel; Xiao, Xin-Xin; Gao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) is a potentially important metabolic target for the inhibition of the highly activated glycolysis pathway in cancer cells. In order to develop bifunctional compounds as inhibitor of LDH-A and anticancer agents, two pyrrol-2-yl methanone (or ethanone) derivatives (PM1 and PM2) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of LDH-A based on the enzyme assay and cell assay by spectroscopy analysis. Fluorescence and CD spectra results demonstrated that both the change of second structure of LDH-A and the affinity interaction for compounds to LDH-A gave great effect on the activity of LDH-A. In particular, low concentration of compounds (1 μμ-25 μμ) could change the level of pyruvate in cancer cells. Moreover, the in vitro assay results demonstrated that pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Therefore, pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives (PM2) can be both LDH-A inhibitor and anticancer agents.

  12. Rotenone Decreases Intracellular Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Sullivan, Patti; Cooney, Adele; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated systemic administration of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone produces a rodent model of Parkinson disease (PD). Mechanisms of relatively selective rotenone-induced damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons remain incompletely understood. According to the “catecholaldehyde hypothesis,” buildup of the autotoxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) contributes to PD pathogenesis. Vesicular uptake blockade increases DOPAL levels, and DOPAL is detoxified mainly by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We tested whether rotenone interferes with vesicular uptake and intracellular ALDH activity. Endogenous and F-labeled catechols were measured in PC12 cells incubated with rotenone (0-1000 nM, 180 minutes), without or with F-dopamine (2 μM) to track vesicular uptake and catecholamine metabolism. Rotenone dose-dependently increased DOPAL, F-DOPAL, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) levels while decreasing dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and the ratio of dopamine to the sum of its deaminated metabolites. In test tubes, rotenone did not affect conversion of DOPAL to DOPAC by ALDH when NAD+ was supplied, whereas the direct-acting ALDH inhibitor benomyl markedly increased DOPAL and decreased DOPAC concentrations in the reaction mixtures. We propose that rotenone builds up intracellular DOPAL by decreasing ALDH activity and attenuating vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic catecholamines. The results provide a novel mechanism for selective rotenone-induced toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25645689

  13. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    PubMed Central

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  14. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours.

    PubMed

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V; Swanson, Benjamin J; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N; Denko, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  15. Characterization of 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus reveals cascaded enzymatic activity in iridoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Krithika, Ramakrishnan; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Rani, Bajaj; Kolet, Swati P; Chopade, Manojkumar; Soniya, Mantri; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)(+) dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial. This work describes the cloning and functional characterization of Cr10HGO from C. roseus and its role in the iridoid biosynthesis. Substrate specificity studies indicated that, Cr10HGO has good activity on substrates such as 10-hydroxygeraniol, 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial over monohydroxy linear terpene derivatives. Further it was observed that incubation of 10-hydroxygeraniol with Cr10HGO and iridoid synthase (CrIDS) in the presence of NADP(+) yielded a major metabolite, which was characterized as (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol by comparing its retention time, mass fragmentation pattern, and co-injection studies with that of the synthesized compound. These results indicate that there is concerted activity of Cr10HGO with iridoid synthase in the formation of (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol, an important intermediate in iridoid biosynthesis. PMID:25651761

  16. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Population of Human Skeletal Muscle Cells With High Myogenic Capacities

    PubMed Central

    Vauchez, Karine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Schmid, Michel; Khattar, Patricia; Chapel, Alain; Catelain, Cyril; Lecourt, Séverine; Larghéro, Jérôme; Fiszman, Marc; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH) activity is one hallmark of human bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and peripheral blood (PB) primitive progenitors presenting high reconstitution capacities in vivo. In this study, we have identified ALDH+ cells within human skeletal muscles, and have analyzed their phenotypical and functional characteristics. Immunohistofluorescence analysis of human muscle tissue sections revealed rare endomysial cells. Flow cytometry analysis using the fluorescent substrate of ALDH, Aldefluor, identified brightly stained (ALDHbr) cells with low side scatter (SSClo), in enzymatically dissociated muscle biopsies, thereafter abbreviated as SMALD+ (for skeletal muscle ALDH+) cells. Phenotypical analysis discriminated two sub-populations according to CD34 expression: SMALD+/CD34− and SMALD+/CD34+ cells. These sub-populations did not initially express endothelial (CD31), hematopoietic (CD45), and myogenic (CD56) markers. Upon sorting, however, whereas SMALD+/CD34+ cells developed in vitro as a heterogeneous population of CD56− cells able to differentiate in adipoblasts, the SMALD+/CD34− fraction developed in vitro as a highly enriched population of CD56+ myoblasts able to form myotubes. Moreover, only the SMALD+/CD34− population maintained a strong myogenic potential in vivo upon intramuscular transplantation. Our results suggest that ALDH activity is a novel marker for a population of new human skeletal muscle progenitors presenting a potential for cell biology and cell therapy. PMID:19738599

  17. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoyl Dehydrogenase Activity Shapes Photosynthesis and Photorespiration of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Stefan; Wittmiß, Maria; Gamlien, Sabine; Ewald, Ralph; Florian, Alexandra; Frank, Marcus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Bauwe, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (mtLPD; L-protein) is an integral component of several multienzyme systems involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, photorespiration, and the degradation of branched-chain α-ketoacids. The majority of the mtLPD present in photosynthesizing tissue is used for glycine decarboxylase (GDC), necessary for the high-flux photorespiratory glycine-into-serine conversion. We previously suggested that GDC activity could be a signal in a regulatory network that adjusts carbon flux through the Calvin-Benson cycle in response to photorespiration. Here, we show that elevated GDC L-protein activity significantly alters several diagnostic parameters of cellular metabolism and leaf gas exchange in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpressor lines displayed markedly decreased steady state contents of TCA cycle and photorespiratory intermediates as well as elevated NAD(P)+-to-NAD(P)H ratios. Additionally, increased rates of CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, and plant growth were observed. Intriguingly, however, day respiration rates remained unaffected. By contrast, respiration was enhanced in the first half of the dark phase but depressed in the second. We also observed enhanced sucrose biosynthesis in the light in combination with a lower diel magnitude of starch accumulation and breakdown. These data thus substantiate our prior hypothesis that facilitating flux through the photorespiratory pathway stimulates photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in the Calvin-Benson cycle. They furthermore suggest that this regulation is, at least in part, dependent on increased light-capture/use efficiency. PMID:26116608

  18. Modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by surface functionalized quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Ray, Manju; Das, Mahua Rani; Chakrabarti, Adrita; Khan, Ali Hossain; Sarma, D D; Acharya, Somobrata

    2014-03-21

    Enzymatic regulation is a fast and reliable diagnosis tool via identification and design of inhibitors for modulation of enzyme function. Previous reports on quantum dots (QDs)-enzyme interactions reveal a protein-surface recognition ability leading to promising applications in protein stabilization, protein delivery, bio-sensing and detection. However, the direct use of QDs to control enzyme inhibition has never been revealed to date. Here we show that a series of biocompatible surface-functionalized metal-chalcogenide QDs can be used as potent inhibitors for malignant cells through the modulation of enzyme activity, while normal cells remain unaffected. The in vitro activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme involved critically in the glycolysis of cancer cells, is inactivated selectively in a controlled way by the QDs at a significantly low concentration (nM). Cumulative kinetic studies delineate that the QDs undergo both reversible and irreversible inhibition mechanisms owing to the site-specific interactions, enabling control over the inhibition kinetics. These complementary loss-of-function probes may offer a novel route for rapid clinical diagnosis of malignant cells and biomedical applications. PMID:24496476

  19. Gossypol enantiomers potently inhibit human placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and aromatase activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaoyao; Mao, Baiping; Li, Linxi; Guan, Hongguo; Su, Ying; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Gossypol is a chemical isolated from cotton seeds. It exists as (+) or (-) enantiomer and has been tested for anticancer, abortion-inducing, and male contraception. Progesterone formed from pregnenolone by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1) and estradiol from androgen by aromatase (CYP19A1) are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy or associated with some cancers. In this study we compared the potencies of (+)- and (-)-gossypol enantiomers in the inhibition of HSD3B1 and aromatase activities as well as progesterone and estradiol production in human placental JEG-3 cells. (+) Gossypol showed potent inhibition on human placental HSD3B1 with IC50 value of 2.3 μM, while (-) gossypol weakly inhibited it with IC50 over 100 μM. In contrast, (-) gossypol moderately inhibited CYP19A1 activity with IC50 of 23 μM, while (+) gossypol had no inhibition when the highest concentration (100 μM) was tested. (+) Gossypol enantiomer competitively inhibited HSD3B1 against substrate pregnenolone and showed mixed mode against NAD(+). (-) Gossypol competitively inhibited CYP19A1 against substrate testosterone. Gossypol enantiomers showed different potency related to their inhibition on human HSD3B1 and CYP19A1. Whether gossypol enantiomer is used alone or in combination relies on its application and beneficial effects. PMID:26709042

  20. Characterization of 10-Hydroxygeraniol Dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus Reveals Cascaded Enzymatic Activity in Iridoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krithika, Ramakrishnan; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Rani, Bajaj; Kolet, Swati P.; Chopade, Manojkumar; Soniya, Mantri; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)+ dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial. This work describes the cloning and functional characterization of Cr10HGO from C. roseus and its role in the iridoid biosynthesis. Substrate specificity studies indicated that, Cr10HGO has good activity on substrates such as 10-hydroxygeraniol, 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial over monohydroxy linear terpene derivatives. Further it was observed that incubation of 10-hydroxygeraniol with Cr10HGO and iridoid synthase (CrIDS) in the presence of NADP+ yielded a major metabolite, which was characterized as (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol by comparing its retention time, mass fragmentation pattern, and co-injection studies with that of the synthesized compound. These results indicate that there is concerted activity of Cr10HGO with iridoid synthase in the formation of (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol, an important intermediate in iridoid biosynthesis. PMID:25651761

  1. Evaluation on the inhibition of pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives to lactate dehydrogenase and anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Na-Na; Weng, Zhao-Yue; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Boison, Daniel; Xiao, Xin-Xin; Gao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) is a potentially important metabolic target for the inhibition of the highly activated glycolysis pathway in cancer cells. In order to develop bifunctional compounds as inhibitor of LDH-A and anticancer agents, two pyrrol-2-yl methanone (or ethanone) derivatives (PM1 and PM2) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of LDH-A based on the enzyme assay and cell assay by spectroscopy analysis. Fluorescence and CD spectra results demonstrated that both the change of second structure of LDH-A and the affinity interaction for compounds to LDH-A gave great effect on the activity of LDH-A. In particular, low concentration of compounds (1μμ-25μμ) could change the level of pyruvate in cancer cells. Moreover, the in vitro assay results demonstrated that pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Therefore, pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives (PM2) can be both LDH-A inhibitor and anticancer agents. PMID:27104676

  2. Acyl carrier protein-specific 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase activates 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kyle C; Hoeferlin, L Alexis; Oleinik, Natalia V; Krupenko, Natalia I; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2010-01-15

    4'-Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTs) catalyze the transfer of 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP) from coenzyme A to a conserved serine residue of their protein substrates. In humans, the number of pathways utilizing the 4-PP post-translational modification is limited and may only require a single broad specificity PPT for all phosphopantetheinylation reactions. Recently, we have shown that one of the enzymes of folate metabolism, 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH), requires a 4-PP prosthetic group for catalysis. This moiety acts as a swinging arm to couple the activities of the two catalytic domains of FDH and allows the conversion of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate and CO2. In the current study, we demonstrate that the broad specificity human PPT converts apo-FDH to holoenzyme and thus activates FDH catalysis. Silencing PPT by small interfering RNA in A549 cells prevents FDH modification, indicating the lack of alternative enzymes capable of accomplishing this transferase reaction. Interestingly, PPT-silenced cells demonstrate significantly reduced proliferation and undergo strong G(1) arrest, suggesting that the enzymatic function of PPT is essential and nonredundant. Our study identifies human PPT as the FDH-modifying enzyme and supports the hypothesis that mammals utilize a single enzyme for all phosphopantetheinylation reactions. PMID:19933275

  3. The role of cysteine in the alteration of bovine liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Nanjo, H; Adachi, H; Aketa, M; Mizoguchi, T; Nishihara, T; Terada, T

    1995-01-01

    Bovine liver NADP(+)-dependent dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD3) is extremely sensitive to SH reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). NEM produced time- and concentration-dependent inactivation of DD3 in a pseudo-first-order reaction manner. This inactivation was prevented by NADP+, 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide phosphate, 2',5'-ADP and 2'-AMP but not by substrates, NAD+, nicotinamide mononucleotide or 5'-ADP.DD3 was absorbed by an affinity column of thiopropyl-Sepharose 6B, but enzyme incubated with both NEM and NADP+ was not. Moreover, one [14C]NEM molecule was incorporated into a cysteine of DD3 in the presence, and two cysteines of DD3 in the absence, of NADP+. These results suggested that two cysteine residues were modified per enzyme molecule by NEM, one was protected by NADP+ and the other had no significant function for the enzyme activity. Two radiolabelled peptides (P1 and P2) produced by the digestion with lysyl endopeptidase of [14C]NEM-modified DD3 could be separated by reverse-phase HPLC. P1, which was radiolabelled by [14C]NEM only in the absence of NADP+, showed the following sequence; H2N-Tyr-Lys-Pro-Val-Xaa-Asn-Gln-Val-Glu- NEM.Cys-His-Pro-Tyr-Phe-Asn-Gln-Ser-Lys-COOH (Xaa indicates a possible cysteine residue). This sequence was very similar to that of rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD/DD) (residues 184 to 201) and was also highly conserved in the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The sequence of P2, which had radioactivity in both the absence and presence of NADP+, also contained an NEM-modified cysteine and was similar in sequence to the regions located in loop A of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD. The present study suggests that P1, which may have a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys-193 of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD, functions in the alteration of DD3 activity depending on the modulation of NADP(+)-binding ability through a thiol/disulphide exchange reaction similar to that of

  4. Biophysical and mutagenic analysis of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D S; Secundo, F; Phillips, R S; Dong, J; Scott, R A; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E adhB gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (secondary ADH) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli at more than 10% of total protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified in high yield (67%) by heat-treatment at 85 degrees C and (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. Site-directed mutants (C37S, H59N, D150N, D150Eand D150C were analysed to test the peptide sequence comparison-based predictions of amino acids responsible for putative catalytic Zn binding. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a protein-bound Zn atom with ZnS1(imid)1(N,O)3 co-ordination sphere. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry measured 0.48 Zn atoms per wild-type secondary ADH subunit. The C37S, H59N and D150N mutant enzymes bound only 0.11, 0.13 and 0.33 Zn per subunit respectively,suggesting that these residues are involved in Zn liganding. The D150E and D150C mutants retained 0.47 and 1.2 Zn atoms per subunit, indicating that an anionic side-chain moiety at this position preserves the bound Zn. All five mutant enzymes had activity, suggesting that the T. ethanolicus secondary ADH requires a properly co-ordinated catalytic Zn atom. The His-59 and Asp-150 mutations also altered secondary ADH affinity for propan-2-ol over a 140-fold range, whereas the overall change in affinity for ethanol spanned a range of only 7-fold, supporting the importance of the metal in secondary ADH substrate binding. The lack of significant changes in cofactor affinity as a result of these catalytic Zn ligand mutations suggested that secondary ADH substrate-and cofactor-binding sites are structurally distinct. Altering Gly198 to Asp reduced the enzyme specific activity 2.7-fold, increased the Km(app) for NADP+ 225-fold, and decreased the Km(app) for NAD+ 3-fold, supporting the prediction that the enzyme binds nicotinamide cofactor in a Rossmann fold. Our data indicate therefore that, unlike the liver primary ADH

  5. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  6. Functional response of the isolated, perfused normoxic heart to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate and pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes, Rafael; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Brooks, Daina M.; Swift, Luther M.; Posnack, Nikki G.; Kay, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and pyruvate activate pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key enzyme that modulates glucose oxidation and mitochondrial NADH production. Both compounds improve recovery after ischemia in isolated hearts. However, the action of DCA and pyruvate in normoxic myocardium is incompletely understood. We measured the effect of DCA and pyruvate on contraction, mitochondrial redox state, and intracellular calcium cycling in isolated rat hearts during normoxic perfusion. Normalized epicardial NADH fluorescence (nNADH) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) were measured before and after administering DCA (5 mM) or pyruvate (5 mM). Optical mapping of Rhod-2AM was used to measure cytosolic calcium kinetics. DCA maximally activated PDH, increasing the ratio of active to total PDH from 0.48±0.03 to 1.03 ±0.03. Pyruvate sub-maximally activated PDH to a ratio of 0.75±0.02. DCA and pyruvate increased LVDP. When glucose was the only exogenous fuel, pyruvate increased nNADH by 21.4±2.9 % while DCA reduced nNADH by 21.4±6.1 % and elevated the incidence of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). When lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were provided together as exogenous fuels, nNADH increased with DCA, indicating that PDH activation with glucose as the only exogenous fuel depletes PDH substrate. Calcium transient time-to-peak was shortened by DCA and pyruvate and SR calcium re-uptake was 30 % longer. DCA and pyruvate increased SR calcium load in myocyte monolayers. Overall, during normoxia when glucose is the only exogenous fuel, DCA elevates SR calcium, increases LVDP and contractility, and diminishes mitochondrial NADH. Administering DCA with plasma levels of lactate and pyruvate mitigates the drop in mitochondrial NADH and prevents PVCs. PMID:26142699

  7. Subcellular Characterization of Porcine Oocytes with Different Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dong-Jie; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Guo, Yun-Yun; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro maturation (IVM) efficiency of porcine embryos is still low because of poor oocyte quality. Although brilliant cresyl blue positive (BCB+) oocytes with low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity have shown superior quality than BCB negative (−) oocytes with high G6PDH activity, the use of a BCB staining test before IVM is still controversial. This study aimed to shed more light on the subcellular characteristics of porcine oocytes after selection using BCB staining. We assessed germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, cortical granule (CG) migration, mitochondrial distribution, the levels of acetylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (AcH3K9) and nuclear apoptosis features to investigate the correlation between G6PDH activity and these developmentally related features. A pattern of chromatin surrounding the nucleoli was seen in 53.0% of BCB+ oocytes and 77.6% of BCB+ oocytes showed peripherally distributed CGs. After IVM, 48.7% of BCB+ oocytes had a diffused mitochondrial distribution pattern. However, there were no significant differences in the levels of AcH3K9 in the nuclei of blastocysts derived from BCB+ and BCB− oocytes; at the same time, we observed a similar incidence of apoptosis in the BCB+ and control groups. Although this study indicated that G6PDH activity in porcine oocytes was correlated with several subcellular characteristics such as germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, CG migration and mitochondrial distribution, other features such as AcH3K9 level and nuclear apoptotic features were not associated with G6PDH activity and did not validate the BCB staining test. In using this test for selecting porcine oocytes, subcellular characteristics such as the AcH3K9 level and apoptotic nuclear features should also be considered. Adding histone deacetylase inhibitors or apoptosis inhibitors into the culture medium used might improve the efficiency of IVM of BCB+ oocytes. PMID:26580437

  8. Redox balance and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase activity in trained rats.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Lopes, Gustavo; Ramos, Dionizio; Sorenson, Martha M; Salerno, Verônica P

    2012-11-01

    Free radical production is increased in many disease states and during exercise, but in the latter the concurrent stimulation of the antioxidant defense system seems to protect the organism from excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Chronic exercise can exert negative effects on the activity of mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPdH), which may offer some explanation for the antioxidant effects of training, since this enzyme is a relevant producer of free radicals. To test this correlation, we compared mGPdH activity, two antioxidant defense markers and two markers of oxidative stress in sedentary and trained (Tr) rats. Training was through a swimming exercise 3 days a week. After 8 weeks, Tr rats lasted twice as long as controls in an acute swimming test with a 5% load. Forty-eight hours after the last exercise, the animals were killed to collect blood and tissues. Tr animals presented lower body weight and visceral fat mass with lower triglyceride content in visceral fat and plasma (p < 0.05). The specific activity of mGPdH in muscle mitochondria was reduced in Tr rats by 88% (p < 0.05). Total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) in liver and muscle were unaltered, while plasma GSH increased by 21% (p < 0.05). These data suggest a profile of successful redox equilibrium maintenance in Tr rats, with a potentially significant contribution from the lower level of mGPdH activity in muscle. This training protocol appears to be suitable for use in detailed studies of biochemical adaptations to oxidative stress. PMID:22391683

  9. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-01

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with 14C-glucose and 3H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD+] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation. PMID:15550462

  10. Lack of Skeletal Muscle IL-6 Affects Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity at Rest and during Prolonged Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla Lindgren; Bertholdt, Lærke; Joensen, Ella; Knudsen, Jakob G.; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) plays a key role in the regulation of skeletal muscle substrate utilization. IL-6 is produced in skeletal muscle during exercise in a duration dependent manner and has been reported to increase whole body fatty acid oxidation, muscle glucose uptake and decrease PDHa activity in skeletal muscle of fed mice. The aim of the present study was to examine whether muscle IL-6 contributes to exercise-induced PDH regulation in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle-specific IL-6 knockout (IL-6 MKO) mice and floxed littermate controls (control) completed a single bout of treadmill exercise for 10, 60 or 120 min, with rested mice of each genotype serving as basal controls. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was overall higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice during the 120 min of treadmill exercise, while RER decreased during exercise independent of genotype. AMPK and ACC phosphorylation also increased with exercise independent of genotype. PDHa activity was in control mice higher (P<0.05) at 10 and 60 min of exercise than at rest but remained unchanged in IL-6 MKO mice. In addition, PDHa activity was higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice at rest and 60 min of exercise. Neither PDH phosphorylation nor acetylation could explain the genotype differences in PDHa activity. Together, this provides evidence that skeletal muscle IL-6 contributes to the regulation of PDH at rest and during prolonged exercise and suggests that muscle IL-6 normally dampens carbohydrate utilization during prolonged exercise via effects on PDH. PMID:27327080

  11. [Effect of temperature acclimation on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in various tissues of the Mullus barbatus ponticus].

    PubMed

    Rusinova, O S

    1997-01-01

    Acclimation of the Mullus barbatus ponticus to the temperature fall (from 16 to 8 degrees C) induces an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase both in summer and in autumn. These changes are more expressed in the liver and red muscle than in the white ones. The values of Km of glucose-6-phosphate (only in autumn) and NADP are also higher at 8 than at 16 degrees C. Actinomycin D does not prevent from cold activation of this enzyme in liver only in autumn, when the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is 8-10 times higher than in summer, and in the red muscle in the both seasons, although this injection decreases the level of enzyme activity in this muscle. This injection does not change the values of Km for glucose-6-phosphate and NADP. It is supposed that the activation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the liver and red muscle during cold adaptation may be a result of change of substrate-binding ability and enzyme interaction with NADP without changes in the enzyme biosynthesis. PMID:9606826

  12. Estimating the number of viable animal cells in multi-well cultures based on their lactate dehydrogenase activities.

    PubMed

    Haslam, G; Wyatt, D; Kitos, P A

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for estimating the numbers ofanimal cells in multi-well culture by simultaneouslymeasuring the lactate dehydrogenase activity of thetotal culture and the medium. The difference betweenthe two reflects the dehydrogenase content of thecells and correlates with cell number. This LDH/INTmethod was tested using several lines of normal andtransformed suspension and adherent cells. Thelactate dehydrogenase activities of duplicate cultureswere determined colourimetrically using reactioncocktails containing lactate, NAD(+), diaphorase,and p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet, with and withoutTriton X-100. The difference in absorbance at 490 nm(DeltaA(490) = A(490, test) - A(490, control)) was used to calculate the lactatedehydrogenase activity of the total culture (+ Triton)and the medium (- Triton). The cellular lactatedehydrogenase activity (difference between totaland medium dehydrogenaseactivities) was proportional to viable cell number. The effects on cell growth of four metabolicinhibitors, sodium azide, actinomycin D,cycloheximide, and taxol, were determined using theLDH/INT assay and direct cell counting. The inhibitorconcentrations that caused decreases in the LDHactivity and cell number by 50% were similar. TheLDH/INT assay is quick and sensitive, works equallywell for adherent and suspension cells, and providesinformation about LDH activities of both the mediumand cells. It is particularly useful for screeningpotential cell-growth inhibitors. PMID:19002967

  13. Revascularization of ischemic limbs after transplantation of human bone marrow cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Robson, Debra L.; Levac, Krysta D.; Maxwell, Dustin J.; Hohm, Sarah A.; Neelamkavil, Marian J.; Bell, Gillian I.; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Link, Daniel C.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Nolta, Jan A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of cell therapies to treat peripheral vascular disease has proven difficult because of the contribution of multiple cell types that coordinate revascularization. We characterized the vascular regenerative potential of transplanted human bone marrow (BM) cells purified by high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHhi) activity, a progenitor cell function conserved between several lineages. BM ALDHhi cells were enriched for myelo-erythroid progenitors that produced multipotent hematopoietic reconstitution after transplantation and contained nonhematopoietic precursors that established colonies in mesenchymal-stromal and endothelial culture conditions. The regenerative capacity of human ALDHhi cells was assessed by intravenous transplantation into immune-deficient mice with limb ischemia induced by femoral artery ligation/transection. Compared with recipients injected with unpurified nucleated cells containing the equivalent of 2- to 4-fold more ALDHhi cells, mice transplanted with purified ALDHhi cells showed augmented recovery of perfusion and increased blood vessel density in ischemic limbs. ALDHhi cells transiently recruited to ischemic regions but did not significantly integrate into ischemic tissue, suggesting that transient ALDHhi cell engraftment stimulated endogenous revascularization. Thus, human BM ALDHhi cells represent a progenitor-enriched population of several cell lineages that improves perfusion in ischemic limbs after transplantation. These clinically relevant cells may prove useful in the treatment of critical ischemia in humans. PMID:19324906

  14. Not only osmoprotectant: betaine increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and L-lactate production in lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huibin; Wu, Zaiqiang; Xian, Mo; Liu, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Yujin

    2013-11-01

    Lactobacilli are commonly used for industrial production of polymer-grade L-lactic acid. The present study tested the Tween 80 alternative betaine in L-lactate production by several industrial lactobacilli. In flask fermentation of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus lactis and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, the betaine addition (2g/l) had similar osmoprotectant effect with Tween 80 but had increased the lactate dehydrogenase activities and L-lactate production than Tween 80 control. In fed-batch fermentation of L. casei, betaine supplementation improved the L-lactic acid titer to 190 g/l, the yield to 95.5% (g L-lactic acid/g glucose), the productivity to 2.6g/lh, and the optical purity to 97.0%. The results demonstrated that supplementation of Tween 80 alternative - betaine in the fermentation medium is feasible for industrial l-lactic acid fermentation by lactobacilli, which will improve the lactate production but will not increase the process costs and modify any process conditions. PMID:24035452

  15. Estrogen-related receptor alpha modulates lactate dehydrogenase activity in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine; Le Pennec, Soazig; Jacques, Caroline; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Gueguen, Naig; Boutet-Bouzamondo, Nathalie; Donnart, Audrey; Malthièry, Yves; Savagner, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic modifications of tumor cells are hallmarks of cancer. They exhibit an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates in hostile environment outside the cell. In thyroid tumors, the expression of the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), a major factor of metabolic adaptation, is closely related to the oxidative metabolism and the proliferative status of the cells. To elucidate the role played by ERRα in the glycolytic adaptation of tumor cells, we focused on the regulation of lactate dehydrogenases A and B (LDHA, LDHB) and the LDHA/LDHB ratio. Our study included tissue samples from 10 classical and 10 oncocytic variants of follicular thyroid tumors and 10 normal thyroid tissues, as well as samples from three human thyroid tumor cell lines: FTC-133, XTC.UC1 and RO82W-1. We identified multiple cis-acting promoter elements for ERRα, in both the LDHA and LDHB genes. The interaction between ERRα and LDH promoters was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and in vitro analysis for LDHB. Using knock-in and knock-out cellular models, we found an inverse correlation between ERRα expression and LDH activity. This suggests that thyroid tumor cells may reprogram their metabolic pathways through the up-regulation of ERRα by a process distinct from that proposed by the recently revisited Warburg hypothesis. PMID:23516535

  16. Prognostic Value of Drinking Status and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Polymorphism in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kawakita, Daisuke; Oze, Isao; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Murakami, Shingo; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between alcohol drinking, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) polymorphism, and survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unclear. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 267 HNSCC patients at Aichi Cancer Center. Of these, 65 patients (24%) were non-drinkers, 104 (39%) were light drinkers (ethanol <46 g or <5 days/week), 46 (17%) were moderate drinkers (ethanol intake 46–68 g/day and ≥5 days/week), and 52 (20%) were heavy drinkers (ethanol intake ≥69 g and ≥5 days/week). The prognostic value of pre-treatment drinking status and ALDH2 polymorphism was investigated using multivariate proportional hazard models. Results Drinking status was associated with disease-free survival (DFS) in HNSCC patients, with marginal statistical significance (5-year DFS: 67.9% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 53.8–78.4%] for non-drinkers, 57.6% [95% CI, 47.4–66.6%] for light drinkers, 46.1% [95% CI, 30.8–60.1%] for moderate drinkers, and 43.5% [95% CI, 29.3–56.9%] for heavy drinkers; P = 0.088). However, this association lost significance when multivariate analyses were adjusted for established prognostic factors. ALDH2 genotype was not significantly associated with DFS in HNSCC patients (5-year DFS: 85.7% [95% CI, 53.9–96.2%] for Lys/Lys, 56.2% [95% CI, 47.4–64.1%] for Glu/Lys, and 50.5% [95% CI, 40.3–59.7%] for Glu/Glu; P = 0.154). After stratification by ALDH2 genotype, we observed a significant positive dose-response relationship between drinking status and DFS in HNSCC patients with ALDH2 Glu/Glu (P trend = 0.029). Conclusions In this study, we identified a significant positive dose-response relationship between pre-treatment drinking status and DFS in HNSCC patients with ALDH2 Glu/Glu. To confirm this association, further study is warranted. PMID:26804037

  17. Regulation of the Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenases from Four Lactic Acid Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Hering, Silvio; Messiha, Hanan L.; Veith, Nadine; Cojocaru, Vlad; Sieg, Antje; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C.; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the effects of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphate (Pi), and ionic strength (NaCl concentration) on six LDHs from four LABs studied at pH 6 and pH 7. We found that 1) the extent of activation by FBP (Kact) differs. Lactobacillus plantarum LDH is not regulated by FBP, but the other LDHs are activated with increasing sensitivity in the following order: Enterococcus faecalis LDH2 ≤ Lactococcus lactis LDH2 < E. faecalis LDH1 < L. lactis LDH1 ≤ Streptococcus pyogenes LDH. This trend reflects the electrostatic properties in the allosteric binding site of the LDH enzymes. 2) For L. plantarum, S. pyogenes, and E. faecalis, the effects of Pi are distinguishable from the effect of changing ionic strength by adding NaCl. 3) Addition of Pi inhibits E. faecalis LDH2, whereas in the absence of FBP, Pi is an activator of S. pyogenes LDH, E. faecalis LDH1, and L. lactis LDH1 and LDH2 at pH 6. These effects can be interpreted by considering the computed binding affinities of Pi to the catalytic and allosteric binding sites of the enzymes modeled in protonation states corresponding to pH 6 and pH 7. Overall, the results show a subtle interplay among the effects of Pi, FBP, and pH that results in different regulatory effects on the LDHs of different LABs. PMID:23720742

  18. Cytotoxicity and characterization of an active metabolite of benzamide riboside, a novel inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Paull, K D; Kelley, J A; Barchi, J J; Marquez, V E; Cooney, D A; Monks, A; Scudiero, D; Krohn, K; Jayaram, H N

    1994-03-15

    Benzamide riboside exhibits significant cytotoxicity against a variety of human tumor cells in culture. On the basis of metabolic studies, the primary target of this drug's action appears to be IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Incubation of human myelogenous leukemia K562 cells with an IC50 concentration of benzamide riboside resulted in an expansion of IMP pools (5.9-fold), with a parallel reduction in the concentration of GMP (90%), GDP (63%), GTP (55%) and dGTP (40%). On kinetic grounds, it was deduced that benzamide riboside (whose Ki versus IMPDH is 6.4 mM, while that of its 5'-monophosphate is 3.9 mM) or its 5'-monophosphate were unlikely to be responsible for inhibition of this target enzyme, IMPDH, since only micromolar concentrations of benzamide riboside were needed to exert potent inhibition of tumor-cell growth. Studies on the metabolism of this C-nucleoside have revealed the presence of a new peak eluting in the nucleoside diphosphate area on HPLC. Treatment of this peak with venom phosphodiesterase degraded it and concurrently nullified its inhibitory activity versus IMPDH; alkaline phosphatase, on the other hand, totally failed to digest the anabolite. These results suggest that the metabolite in question is the phosphodiester, benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD). Evidence that the inhibitor was an analog of NAD, wherein the nicotinamide moiety has been replaced by benzamide, was provided by both NMR and mass spectrometric analysis and confirmed by enzymatic synthesis. Further insight into the nature of the active principle was obtained from kinetic studies, which established that BAD competitively inhibited NAD utilization by partially purified IMPDH from K562 cells with a Ki of 0.118 microM. In concert, these studies establish that benzamide riboside exhibits potent antiproliferative activity by inhibiting IMPDH through BAD. PMID:7907081

  19. Enhanced aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by regenerating NAD+ in Klebsiella pneumoniae and implications for the glycerol dissimilation pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Su, Mingyue; Ge, Xizhen; Tian, Pingfang

    2013-10-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae, 3-hydroxypropaldehyde is converted to 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Although ALDH overexpression stimulates the formation of 3-HP, it ceases to accumulate when NAD(+) is exhausted. Here we show that NAD(+) regeneration, together with ALDH overexpression, facilitates 3-HP production and benefits cell growth. Three distinct NAD(+)-regenerating enzymes: NADH oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase from K. pneumoniae, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were individually expressed in K. pneumoniae. In vitro assay showed their higher activities than that of the control, indicating their capacities to regenerate NAD(+). When they were respectively co-expressed with ALD4, an ALDH from S. cerevisiae, the activities of ALD4 were significantly elevated compared with that expressing ALD4 alone, suggesting that the regenerated NAD(+) enhanced the activity of ALD4. More interestingly, the growth rates of all NAD(+)-regenerating strains were prolonged in comparison with the control, indicating that NAD(+) regeneration stimulated cell proliferation. This study not only reveals the reliance of ALD4 activity on NAD(+) availability but also provides a method for regulating the dha regulon. PMID:23794046

  20. Induction of Xylose Reductase and Xylitol Dehydrogenase Activities in Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis on Mixed Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Bicho, Paul A.; Runnals, P. Lynn; Cunningham, J. Douglas; Lee, Hung

    1988-01-01

    The induction of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities on mixed sugars was investigated in the yeasts Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis. Enzyme activities induced on d-xylose served as the controls. In both yeasts, d-glucose, d-mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose inhibited enzyme induction by d-xylose to various degrees. Cellobiose, l-arabinose, and d-galactose were not inhibitory. In liquid batch culture, P. tannophilus utilized d-glucose and d-mannose rapidly and preferentially over d-xylose, while d-galactose consumption was poor and lagged behind that of the pentose sugar. In P. stipitis, all three hexoses were used preferentially over d-xylose. The results showed that the repressibility of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase may limit the potential of yeast fermentation of pentose sugars in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic substrates. PMID:16347538

  1. Effect of metals and other inorganic ions on soil microbial activity: soil dehydrogenase assay as a simple toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.E.; Li, S.W.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate the utility of the soil dehydrogenase assay as an effective primary test for assessing the potential toxicity of chemicals to soil microbial activity. In this manuscript the authors describe their use of the soil dehydrogenase assay in determining the effects of a number of potential toxic inorganic ions on soil microbial activity. The ions include Cu/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 32/, F/sup -/, AsO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, BO/sub 3//sup 3 -/, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/.

  2. Structural shifts of aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes were instrumental for the early evolution of retinoid-dependent axial patterning in metazoans.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Tiago J P; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Simões-Costa, Marcos; Schechtman, Deborah; Pereira, Alexandre C; Brunet, Frédéric; Sweeney, Sarah; Pani, Ariel; Aronowicz, Jochanan; Lowe, Christopher J; Davidson, Bradley; Laudet, Vincent; Bronner, Marianne; de Oliveira, Paulo S L; Schubert, Michael; Xavier-Neto, José

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) catabolize toxic aldehydes and process the vitamin A-derived retinaldehyde into retinoic acid (RA), a small diffusible molecule and a pivotal chordate morphogen. In this study, we combine phylogenetic, structural, genomic, and developmental gene expression analyses to examine the evolutionary origins of ALDH substrate preference. Structural modeling reveals that processing of small aldehydes, such as acetaldehyde, by ALDH2, versus large aldehydes, including retinaldehyde, by ALDH1A is associated with small versus large substrate entry channels (SECs), respectively. Moreover, we show that metazoan ALDH1s and ALDH2s are members of a single ALDH1/2 clade and that during evolution, eukaryote ALDH1/2s often switched between large and small SECs after gene duplication, transforming constricted channels into wide opened ones and vice versa. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that during the evolutionary emergence of RA signaling, the ancestral, narrow-channeled metazoan ALDH1/2 gave rise to large ALDH1 channels capable of accommodating bulky aldehydes, such as retinaldehyde, supporting the view that retinoid-dependent signaling arose from ancestral cellular detoxification mechanisms. Our analyses also indicate that, on a more restricted evolutionary scale, ALDH1 duplicates from invertebrate chordates (amphioxus and ascidian tunicates) underwent switches to smaller and narrower SECs. When combined with alterations in gene expression, these switches led to neofunctionalization from ALDH1-like roles in embryonic patterning to systemic, ALDH2-like roles, suggesting functional shifts from signaling to detoxification. PMID:21169504

  3. Structural shifts of aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes were instrumental for the early evolution of retinoid-dependent axial patterning in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Simões-Costa, Marcos; Schechtman, Deborah; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Brunet, Frédéric; Sweeney, Sarah; Pani, Ariel; Aronowicz, Jochanan; Lowe, Christopher J.; Davidson, Bradley; Laudet, Vincent; Bronner, Marianne; de Oliveira, Paulo S. L.; Schubert, Michael; Xavier-Neto, José

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) catabolize toxic aldehydes and process the vitamin A-derived retinaldehyde into retinoic acid (RA), a small diffusible molecule and a pivotal chordate morphogen. In this study, we combine phylogenetic, structural, genomic, and developmental gene expression analyses to examine the evolutionary origins of ALDH substrate preference. Structural modeling reveals that processing of small aldehydes, such as acetaldehyde, by ALDH2, versus large aldehydes, including retinaldehyde, by ALDH1A is associated with small versus large substrate entry channels (SECs), respectively. Moreover, we show that metazoan ALDH1s and ALDH2s are members of a single ALDH1/2 clade and that during evolution, eukaryote ALDH1/2s often switched between large and small SECs after gene duplication, transforming constricted channels into wide opened ones and vice versa. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that during the evolutionary emergence of RA signaling, the ancestral, narrow-channeled metazoan ALDH1/2 gave rise to large ALDH1 channels capable of accommodating bulky aldehydes, such as retinaldehyde, supporting the view that retinoid-dependent signaling arose from ancestral cellular detoxification mechanisms. Our analyses also indicate that, on a more restricted evolutionary scale, ALDH1 duplicates from invertebrate chordates (amphioxus and ascidian tunicates) underwent switches to smaller and narrower SECs. When combined with alterations in gene expression, these switches led to neofunctionalization from ALDH1-like roles in embryonic patterning to systemic, ALDH2-like roles, suggesting functional shifts from signaling to detoxification. PMID:21169504

  4. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adeleke M; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Casey, David B; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was approximately 1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat. PMID:20543077

  5. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Badejo, Adeleke M.; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S.; Casey, David B.; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Hyman, Albert L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was ∼1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat. PMID:20543077

  6. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and Biological Characterization of Human NAD+-dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Duveau, Damien Y.; Yasgar, Adam; Wang, Yuhong; Hu, Xin; Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Thomas, Craig J.; Maloney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of two chemotypes identified as inhibitors of the human NAD+-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD, 15-PGDH) was conducted. Top compounds from both series displayed potent inhibition (IC50 <50 nM), demonstrate excellent selectivity towards HPGD and potently induce PGE2 production in A549 lung cancer and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. PMID:24360556

  7. Inhibition of Cancer-Associated Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Synthesis, Structure–Activity Relationship, and Selective Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. Different from the wild-type (WT) IDH1, the mutant enzymes catalyze the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG), leading to cancer initiation. Several 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds were identified to be inhibitors of IDH1(R132H). A total of 61 derivatives were synthesized, and their structure–activity relationships were investigated. Potent IDH1(R132H) inhibitors were identified with Ki values as low as 140 nM, while they possess weak or no activity against WT IDH1. Activities of selected compounds against IDH1(R132C) were found to be correlated with their inhibitory activities against IDH1(R132H), as well as cellular production of D2HG, with R2 of 0.83 and 0.73, respectively. Several inhibitors were found to be permeable through the blood–brain barrier in a cell-based model assay and exhibit potent and selective activity (EC50 = 0.26–1.8 μM) against glioma cells with the IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:25271760

  8. Inhibition of cancer-associated mutant isocitrate dehydrogenases: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and selective antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Yao, Yuan; Kogiso, Mari; Zheng, Baisong; Deng, Lisheng; Qiu, Jihui J; Dong, Shuo; Lv, Hua; Gallo, James M; Li, Xiao-Nan; Song, Yongcheng

    2014-10-23

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. Different from the wild-type (WT) IDH1, the mutant enzymes catalyze the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG), leading to cancer initiation. Several 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds were identified to be inhibitors of IDH1(R132H). A total of 61 derivatives were synthesized, and their structure-activity relationships were investigated. Potent IDH1(R132H) inhibitors were identified with Ki values as low as 140 nM, while they possess weak or no activity against WT IDH1. Activities of selected compounds against IDH1(R132C) were found to be correlated with their inhibitory activities against IDH1(R132H), as well as cellular production of D2HG, with R(2) of 0.83 and 0.73, respectively. Several inhibitors were found to be permeable through the blood-brain barrier in a cell-based model assay and exhibit potent and selective activity (EC50 = 0.26-1.8 μM) against glioma cells with the IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:25271760

  9. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:26178068

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase activity of rat epididymis and spermatozoa: effect of constant light.

    PubMed

    Ponc, R H; Carriazo, C S; Vermouth, N T

    2001-01-01

    During its passage through the epididymis, the gamete undergoes a process of "maturation" leading to the acquisition of its fertilizing ability. The epididymis displays regional variations in the morphology and metabolic properties of its epithelium which are relevant for the progressive development of mature sperm characteristics. The epididymis has spontaneous peristaltic contractions and receives sympathetic innervation that is modulated by melatonin, a hormone synthesized and released by the pineal gland. Constant lighting disrupts melatonin synthesis and secretion. We have studied the effect of constant light on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) and its isozyme C4 activities and protein content in whole epididymis, epididymal tissue and in spermatozoa from caput and cauda segments. Animals were exposed from birth to an illumination schedule of 14 h light:10 h dark (group L:D). At 60 days of age one group of animals was submitted to constant light over 50 days (group L:L). In order to test the fertilizing ability, the rats of each group were mated with soliciting estrous females. The percentage of pregnancies in females mated with males maintained in L:L was remarkably lower than those in females mated with males maintained in the L:D photoperiod (44% and 88% respectively). Constant light increased protein concentration and LDH activity in caput as well as in cauda of total epididymis. On the contrary, in epididymal tissue, the protein content decreased in both epididymal sections compared with controls. When enzymatic activity was expressed in Units per spermatozoa, constant light induced a significant reduction of total LDH and LDHC4 in caput and cauda spermatozoa while LDH activity of epididymal tissue was not affected. In spite of the decrease in LDH per sperm cell when rats were exposed to constant light, in total epididymis (epididymis tissue plus sperm cells content) and in spermatozoa, values of enzyme activities expressed per weight unit were

  11. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Methods Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Results Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. Conclusions A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid

  12. Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Is an Important Component of CXCL10-Mediated Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Kirsten M.; Fisher, Debra J.; Burdick, Marie D.; Mehrad, Borna; Mathers, Amy J.; Mann, Barbara J.; Nakamoto, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are best recognized for their role within the innate immune system as chemotactic cytokines, signaling and recruiting host immune cells to sites of infection. Certain chemokines, such as CXCL10, have been found to play an additional role in innate immunity, mediating CXCR3-independent killing of a diverse array of pathogenic microorganisms. While this is still not clearly understood, elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies effective against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Here, we show that CXCL10 exerts antibacterial effects on clinical and laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and report that disruption of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), which converts pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A, enables E. coli to resist these antimicrobial effects. Through generation and screening of a transposon mutant library, we identified two mutants with increased resistance to CXCL10, both with unique disruptions of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of PDHc, aceE. Resistance to CXCL10 also occurred following deletion of either aceF or lpdA, genes that encode the remaining two subunits of PDHc. Although PDHc resides within the bacterial cytosol, electron microscopy revealed localization of immunogold-labeled CXCL10 to the bacterial cell surface in both the E. coli parent and aceE deletion mutant strains. Taken together, our findings suggest that while CXCL10 interacts with an as-yet-unidentified component on the cell surface, PDHc is an important mediator of killing by CXCL10. To our knowledge, this is the first description of PDHc as a key bacterial component involved in the antibacterial effect of a chemokine. PMID:26553462

  13. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of ascites tumour. Activation by AMP and other properties of potential significance in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, P A; Sols, A

    1980-01-01

    1. AMP is an activator of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of the Ehrlich--Lettré ascites tumour, increasing its V up to 2-fold, with Ka of 40 microM at pH 7.4. This activation appears to be an allosteric effect on the decarboxylase subunit of the complex. 2. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex has a Km for pyruvate within the range 17--36 microM depending on the pH, the optimum pH being approx. 7.4, with a V of approx. 0.1 unit/g of cells. The rate-limiting step is dependent on the transformation of the enzyme--substrate complex. The Km for CoA is 15 microM. The Km for NAD+ is 0.7 mM for both the complex and the lipoamide dehydrogenase. The complex is inhibited by acetyl-CoA competitively with CoA; the Ki is 60 microM. The lipoamide dehydrogenase is inhibited by NADH and NADPH competitively with NAD+, with Ki values of 80 and 90 microM respectively. In the reverse reaction the Km values for NADH and NADPH are essentially equal to their Ki values for the forward reaction, the V for the latter being 0.09 of that of the former. Hence the reaction rate of the complex in vivo is likely to be markedly affected by feedback isosteric inhibition by reduced nicotinamide nucleotides and possibly acetyl-CoA. PMID:7193456

  14. Threonine-Insensitive Homoserine Dehydrogenase From Soybean: Genomic Organization, Kinetic Mechanism, and In vivo Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate kinase (AK) and homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) functions as key regulatory enzymes at branch points in the aspartate amino acid pathway and are feedback inhibited by threonine. In plants, the biochemical properties of AK and bifunctional AK-HSD enzymes have been characterized, but the mol...

  15. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: Biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in meristems isolated from field-g...

  16. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for the holoclone phenotype in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R.E.; Haywood-Small, S.L.; Sisley, K.; Cross, N.A.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated ALDH{sup Hi} PC3 cells preferentially form primitive holoclone-type colonies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primitive holoclone colonies are predominantly ALDH{sup Lo} but contain rare ALDH{sup Hi} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Holoclone-forming cells are not restricted to the ALDH{sup Hi} population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH phenotypic plasticity occurs in PC3 cells (ALDH{sup Lo} to ALDH{sup Hi} and vice versa). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH{sup Hi} cells are observed but very rare in PC3 spheroids grown in stem cell medium. -- Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH) activity is considered to be a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in many tumour models, since these cells are more proliferative and tumourigenic than ALDH{sup Lo} cells in experimental models. However it is unclear whether all CSC-like cells are within the ALDH{sup Hi} population, or whether all ALDH{sup Hi} cells are highly proliferative and tumourigenic. The ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in vitro, whereby sub-populations of cells have differing proliferative and differentiation capacities, is an alternate indication of the presence of stem cell-like populations within cell lines. In this study, we have examined the interaction between ALDH status and the ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that PC3 cells contain a stem cell hierarchy, and isolation of ALDH{sup Hi} cells enriches for the most primitive holoclone population, however holoclone formation is not restricted to ALDH{sup Hi} cells. In addition, we show that ALDH activity undergoes phenotypic plasticity, since the ALDH{sup Lo} population can develop ALDH{sup Hi} populations comparable to parental cells within 2 weeks in culture. Furthermore, we show that the majority of ALDH{sup Hi} cells are found within the least primitive paraclone population, which is circumvented by culturing PC3 cells as spheroids in

  17. Behaviour of mesotrione in maize and soil system and its influence on soil dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaczynski, Piotr; Lozowicka, Bozena; Hrynko, Izabela; Wolejko, Elzbieta

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dissipation of mesotrione and effect on dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in maize and soil system. The paper for the first time describes behaviour of this herbicide applied at various doses (separately or in mixture with other herbicide) in acidic and alkaline environment. The experiments were conducted using the method randomized blocks in four repetition cycles. Chemical application in seven variants at recommended doses of herbicide were performed. The sample preparation was performed by a modified QuEChERS method and the concentrations of mesotrione in maize and soil were determined by the liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limit of detection was 0.0005mgkg(-1) and quantification 0.001mgkg(-1). The dissipation of mesotrione were described according to first-order (FO) kinetics equation with R(2) were between 0.8794 and 0.9934. The initial deposit of herbicide in soil and maize was higher in an acidic environment (0.06-0.18mgkg(-1)). A positive correlation between an alkaline pH and the rate of dissipation in soil was observed. The results showed that the time after which 50% (DT50) of substance has been degraded was different for both plant and soil. DT50 for soil was within the range 3.2-6.0days and 2.9-4.4days, for the maize 3.9-4.8days and 3.4-4.5days in an alkaline and an acidic environment, respectively. Concentration of mesotrione at applicable MRL level of 0.05mgkg(-1) in maize was achieved at 0.5-5.9days and at proposed MRL of 0.01mgkg(-1) at 8.8-15.8days. The results indicate that the application of mesotrione affected on DHA in the soil. One day after application this herbicide, concentration of DHA in soil was lower than in control plots, but after 21days was observed trend of increasing DHA. PMID:27492351

  18. Biological activity of pyrazole and imidazole-dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives on the activity of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Posada, Alejandro; Sánchez-Márquez, Araceli; Heuze, Yvonne; Moreno, Isabel; Soriano, Juan; Garrido, Mariana; Cortés, Francisco; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 5 (17β-HSD5) catalyzes the transformation of androstenedione (4-dione) to testosterone (T) in the prostate. This metabolic pathway remains active in cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy. Since physicians seek to develop advantageous and better new treatments to increase the average survival of these patients, we synthesized several different dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives. These compounds have a pyrazole or imidazole function at C-17 and an ester moiety at C-3 and were studied as inhibitors of 17β-HSD5. The kinetic parameters of this enzyme were determined for use in inhibition assays. Their pharmacological effect was also determined on gonadectomized hamsters treated with Δ(4)-androstenedione (4-dione) or testosterone (T) and/or the novel compounds. The results indicated that the incorporation of a heterocycle at C-17 induced strong 17β-HSD5 inhibition. These derivatives decreased flank organ diameter and prostate weight in castrated hamsters treated with T or 4-dione. Inhibition of 17β-HSD5 by these compounds could have therapeutic potential for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:25690043

  19. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results/Methodology We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Conclusion Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease. PMID:25826140

  20. [Activity of NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in wheat leaves under water stress].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I; Monakhova, O F

    2006-01-01

    The activities of NADP: glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme complex comprising of phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPK; EC 4.1.1.31) in seedlings and leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants of the cultivars Mironovskaya 808 and Lutescens 758 have been compared under conditions of normal water supply, water deficiency, and subsequent rehydration. GAPDH activity, which determines the carbohydrate route of photosynthetic metabolism at the initial stages, is decreased by water stress to a greater extent than that of PEPK, on the activity of which non-carbohydrate metabolic pathways depend. Pretreatment of seedlings and mature plants with natural (6-benzylaminopurine) and synthetic (tidiazuron, kartolin-2, and kartolin-4) cytokinins attenuates the loss of enzyme activities during drought and facilitates their recovery within the period of rehydration; both effects are underlain by augmentation of reparation processes. The relative intensification of non-carbohydrate pathways of photosynthetic metabolism, observed under conditions of water deficiency, is accompanied by an increase in the osmotic pressure of cell sap. Possible mechanisms of this protector effect of cytokinin preparations are discussed. PMID:16878554

  1. The effect of five fasciolicides on malate dehydrogenase activity and mortality of Fasciola gigantica, Fasciolopsis buski and Paramphistomum explanatum.

    PubMed

    Probert, A J; Sharma, R K; Singh, K; Saxena, R

    1981-06-01

    The effect of oxyclozanide, hexachlorophene, nitroxynil, rafoxanide and diamphenethide on malate dehydrogenase activity of homogenates of Fasciola gigantica, Fasciolopsis buski and Paramphistomum explanatum was investigated. The ratio of oxaloacetate reduction to malate oxidation in homogenates of Fasciola gigantica, Fasciolopsis buski and P. explanatum was 4.5:1, 3.6:1 and 5.2:1 respectively. Oxyclozanide and rafoxanide at 10(-3) M inhibited enzyme activity by 100% in homogenates from all three species while hexachlorophene at 10(-3) M also caused 100% inhibition in homogenates from Fasciola gagantica and P. explanatum but only 65% of malate oxidation in Fasciolopsis buski homogenates. Nitroxynil at 10(-3) M produced 60% inhibition in F. buski homogenates yet had little effect at this concentration on preparations from the other species. Little inhibition was seen with diamphenethide, even at high concentrations. Rapid death of Fasicola gigantica and P. explanatum resulted in vitro when 10(-3) M oxyclozanide, hexachlorophene, nitroxynil or rafoxanide, were added to the incubation medium. Fasciolopsis buski was killed by 10(-3) M oxyclozanide but at this concentration the remaining compounds only caused reduced activity. Assay of malate dehydrogenase following drug treatment in vitro failed to show any appreciable reduction in enzyme activity in Fasciola gigantica and P. explanatum but oxyclozanide and hexachlorophene produced inhibition in Fasciolopsis buski. The mode of action of these compounds is discussed. PMID:7264272

  2. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive. PMID:26820767

  3. Effects of Alda-1, an Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Agonist, on Hypoglycemic Neuronal Death

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tetsuhiko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Tsujita, Mika; Kanazawa, Masato; Toriyabe, Masafumi; Koyama, Misaki; Itoh, Kosuke; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemic encephalopathy (HE) is caused by a lack of glucose availability to neuronal cells, and no neuroprotective drugs have been developed as yet. Studies on the pathogenesis of HE and the development of new neuroprotective drugs have been conducted using animal models such as the hypoglycemic coma model and non-coma hypoglycemia model. However, both models have inherent problems, and establishment of animal models that mimic clinical situations is desirable. In this study, we first developed a short-term hypoglycemic coma model in which rats could be maintained in an isoelectric electroencephalogram (EEG) state for 2 min and subsequent hyperglycemia without requiring anti-seizure drugs and an artificial ventilation. This condition caused the production of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a cytotoxic aldehyde, in neurons of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, and a marked increase in neuronal death as evaluated by Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining. We also investigated whether N-(1,3-benzodioxole-5-ylmethyl)-2,6-dichlorobenzamide (Alda-1), a small-molecule agonist of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2, could attenuate 4-HNE levels and reduce hypoglycemic neuronal death. After confirming that EEG recordings remained isoelectric for 2 min, Alda-1 (8.5 mg/kg) or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) was administered intravenously with glucose to maintain a blood glucose level of 250 to 270 mg/dL. Fewer 4-HNE and FJB-positive cells were observed in the cerebral cortex of Alda-1-treated rats than in DMSO-treated rats 24 h after glucose administration (P = 0.002 and P = 0.020). Thus, activation of the ALDH2 pathway could be a molecular target for HE treatment, and Alda-1 is a potentially neuroprotective agent that exerts a beneficial effect on neurons when intravenously administered simultaneously with glucose. PMID:26083658

  4. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  5. SAXS fingerprints of aldehyde dehydrogenase oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily catalyze the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDHs are important in detoxification of aldehydes, amino acid metabolism, embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and cancer. Mutations in genes encoding ALDHs cause metabolic disorders, including alcohol flush reaction (ALDH2), Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (ALDH3A2), hyperprolinemia type II (ALDH4A1), γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria (ALDH5A1), methylmalonic aciduria (ALDH6A1), pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1), and hyperammonemia (ALDH18A1). We previously reported crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses of ALDHs exhibiting dimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric oligomeric states (Luo et al., Biochemistry 54 (2015) 5513-5522; Luo et al., J. Mol. Biol. 425 (2013) 3106-3120). Herein I provide the SAXS curves, radii of gyration, and distance distribution functions for the three types of ALDH oligomer. The SAXS curves and associated analysis provide diagnostic fingerprints that allow rapid identification of the type of ALDH oligomer that is present in solution. The data sets provided here serve as a benchmark for characterizing oligomerization of ALDHs. PMID:26693506

  6. 3D-QSAR Studies on a Series of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: Analogues of the Active Metabolite of Leflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun-Lai; He, Mao-Yu; Du, Hong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of the novel immunosuppressive agent leflunomide has been shown to inhibit the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). This enzyme catalyzes the fourth step in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Self-organizing molecular field analysis (SOMFA), a simple three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) method is used to study the correlation between the molecular properties and the biological activities of a series of analogues of the active metabolite. The statistical results, cross-validated rCV2 (0.664) and non cross-validated r2 (0.687), show a good predictive ability. The final SOMFA model provides a better understanding of DHODH inhibitor-enzyme interactions, and may be useful for further modification and improvement of inhibitors of this important enzyme. PMID:21686163

  7. Enhanced photosynthetic performance and growth as a consequence of decreasing mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Carrari, Fernando; Lytovchenko, Anna; Smith, Anna M O; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Ratcliffe, R George; Sweetlove, Lee J; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2005-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase gene in the antisense orientation and exhibiting reduced activity of this isoform of malate dehydrogenase show enhanced photosynthetic activity and aerial growth under atmospheric conditions (360 ppm CO2). In comparison to wild-type plants, carbon dioxide assimilation rates and total plant dry matter were up to 11% and 19% enhanced in the transgenics, when assessed on a whole-plant basis. Accumulation of carbohydrates and redox-related compounds such as ascorbate was also markedly elevated in the transgenics. Also increased in the transgenic plants was the capacity to use L-galactono-lactone, the terminal precursor of ascorbate biosynthesis, as a respiratory substrate. Experiments in which ascorbate was fed to isolated leaf discs also resulted in increased rates of photosynthesis providing strong indication for an ascorbate-mediated link between the energy-generating processes of respiration and photosynthesis. This report thus shows that the repression of this mitochondrially localized enzyme improves both carbon assimilation and aerial growth in a crop species. PMID:15665243

  8. Increased Expression of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Reduces Renal Cell Apoptosis During Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury After Hypothermic Machine Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zibiao; Hu, Qianchao; Fu, Zhen; Wang, Ren; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Zhongzhong; Wang, Yanfeng; Ye, Qifa

    2016-06-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) can reduce graft's injury after kidney transplantation; however, the mechanism has not been elucidated. In the past decade, many studies showed that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a protease which can inhibit cell apoptosis. Therefore, this study aims to explore whether ALDH2 takes part in reducing organ damage after MP. Eighteen healthy male New Zealand rabbits (12 weeks old, weight 3.0 ± 0.3 kg) were randomly divided into three groups: normal group, MP group, and cold storage (CS) group (n = 6). The left kidney of rabbits underwent warm ischemia for 35 min through clamping the left renal pedicle and then reperfusion for 1 h. Left kidneys were preserved by MP or CS (4°C for 4 h) in vivo followed by the right nephrectomy and 24-h reperfusion, and then the specimens and blood were collected. Finally, concentration of urine creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and 4-HNE were tested. Renal apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining, and the expression of ALDH2, cleaved-caspase 3, bcl-2/ bax, MAPK in renal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry or Western blot; 24 h after surgery, the concentration of Cr in MP group was 355 ± 71μmol/L, in CS group was 511 ± 44 μmol/L (P < 0.05), while the BUN was 15.02 ± 2.34 mmol/L in MP group, 22.64 ± 3.58 mmol/L in CS group (P < 0.05). The rate of apoptosis and expression of cleaved caspase-3, p-P38, p-ERK, and p-JNK in MP group was significantly lower than that in CS group (P < 0.05), while expression of ALDH2 and bcl-2/bax in MP group was significantly higher than that in CS group (P < 0.05); expression of cleaved caspase-3 in both MP and CS group significantly increased as compared with that in normal group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, increased expression of ALDH2 can reduce the renal cell apoptosis through inhibiting MAPK pathway during ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) after hypothermic MP. PMID:26582147

  9. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) protein regulates long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by deacetylating conserved lysines near the active site.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E; Rardin, Matthew J; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2013-11-22

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  10. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) Protein Regulates Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase by Deacetylating Conserved Lysines Near the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  11. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Methods: Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1–3, respectively, and 18% in week 4–7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Results: Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Conclusion: Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24998256

  12. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-4 Structures Reveal a Metastable Open Conformation Fostering Robust Core-free Basal Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, R. Max; Kato, Masato; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tso, Shih-Chia; Li, Jun; Chuang, David T.

    2008-10-21

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is down-regulated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoforms 1-4. PDK4 is overexpressed in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes, resulting in impaired glucose utilization. Here we show that human PDK4 has robust core-free basal activity, which is considerably higher than activity levels of other PDK isoforms stimulated by the PDC core. PDK4 binds the L3 lipoyl domain, but its activity is not significantly stimulated by any individual lipoyl domains or the core of PDC. The 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structures of the PDK4 dimer with bound ADP reveal an open conformation with a wider active-site cleft, compared with that in the closed conformation epitomized by the PDK2-ADP structure. The open conformation in PDK4 shows partially ordered C-terminal cross-tails, in which the conserved DW (Asp{sup 394}-Trp{sup 395}) motif from one subunit anchors to the N-terminal domain of the other subunit. The open conformation fosters a reduced binding affinity for ADP, facilitating the efficient removal of product inhibition by this nucleotide. Alteration or deletion of the DW-motif disrupts the C-terminal cross-tail anchor, resulting in the closed conformation and the nearly complete inactivation of PDK4. Fluorescence quenching and enzyme activity data suggest that compounds AZD7545 and dichloroacetate lock PDK4 in the open and the closed conformational states, respectively. We propose that PDK4 with bound ADP exists in equilibrium between the open and the closed conformations. The favored metastable open conformation is responsible for the robust basal activity of PDK4 in the absence of the PDC core.

  13. Bioinformatics based structural characterization of glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene and growth promoting activity of Leclercia sp. QAU-66

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Muhammad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.1. 5.2) is the member of quinoproteins group that use the redox cofactor pyrroloquinoline quinoine, calcium ions and glucose as substrate for its activity. In present study, Leclercia sp. QAU-66, isolated from rhizosphere of Vigna mungo, was characterized for phosphate solubilization and the role of GDH in plant growth promotion of Phaseolus vulgaris. The strain QAU-66 had ability to solubilize phosphorus and significantly (p ≤ 0.05) promoted the shoot and root lengths of Phaseolus vulgaris. The structural determination of GDH protein was carried out using bioinformatics tools like Pfam, InterProScan, I-TASSER and COFACTOR. These tools predicted the structural based functional homology of pyrroloquinoline quinone domains in GDH. GDH of Leclercia sp. QAU-66 is one of the main factor that involved in plant growth promotion and provides a solid background for further research in plant growth promoting activities. PMID:25242947

  14. 20-alpha-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from pseudopregnant rat ovary: obtention and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against the enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    De La Llosa-Hermier, M P; Nocart, M; Paly, J; Hermier, C

    1992-12-01

    The enzyme 20-alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20-alpha-HSD) was purified from pseudopregnant rat ovaries and used as antigen for the development of a monoclonal antibody by the hybridoma technique. Spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with purified 20-alpha-HSD were fused with SP2/0 mouse myeloma cells. Among the colonies of hybrid cells, one (designated mAb-HSD 11) was found to be secreting antibodies (IgM) able to inhibit 20-alpha-HSD activity. The antibody-secreting hybridome was amplified by ascitic fluid production and the monoclonal antibody purified by Bakerbond ABx procedure. Purified mAb-HSD 11 was able to inhibit 20-alpha-HSD activity in a dose-dependent manner. Studies of Michaelis constants of 20-alpha-HSD indicate that this monoclonal antibody increases the Km for 20-alpha-dihydroprogesterone and decreases the Vmax. PMID:1292619

  15. Bioinformatics based structural characterization of glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene and growth promoting activity of Leclercia sp. QAU-66.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.1. 5.2) is the member of quinoproteins group that use the redox cofactor pyrroloquinoline quinoine, calcium ions and glucose as substrate for its activity. In present study, Leclercia sp. QAU-66, isolated from rhizosphere of Vigna mungo, was characterized for phosphate solubilization and the role of GDH in plant growth promotion of Phaseolus vulgaris. The strain QAU-66 had ability to solubilize phosphorus and significantly (p ≤ 0.05) promoted the shoot and root lengths of Phaseolus vulgaris. The structural determination of GDH protein was carried out using bioinformatics tools like Pfam, InterProScan, I-TASSER and COFACTOR. These tools predicted the structural based functional homology of pyrroloquinoline quinone domains in GDH. GDH of Leclercia sp. QAU-66 is one of the main factor that involved in plant growth promotion and provides a solid background for further research in plant growth promoting activities. PMID:25242947

  16. Identification of a long-range protein network that modulates active site dynamics in extremophilic alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Zachary D; Cun, Shujian; Klinman, Judith P

    2013-05-17

    A tetrameric thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (ht-ADH) has been mutated at an aromatic side chain in the active site (Trp-87). The ht-W87A mutation results in a loss of the Arrhenius break seen at 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme and an increase in cold lability that is attributed to destabilization of the active tetrameric form. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are nearly temperature-independent over the experimental temperature range, and similar in magnitude to those measured above 30 °C for the wild-type enzyme. This suggests that the rigidification in the wild-type enzyme below 30 °C does not occur for ht-W87A. A mutation at the dimer-dimer interface in a thermolabile psychrophilic homologue of ht-ADH, ps-A25Y, leads to a more thermostable enzyme and a change in the rate-determining step at low temperature. The reciprocal mutation in ht-ADH, ht-Y25A, results in kinetic behavior similar to that of W87A. Collectively, the results indicate that flexibility at the active site is intimately connected to a subunit interaction 20 Å away. The convex Arrhenius curves previously reported for ht-ADH (Kohen, A., Cannio, R., Bartolucci, S., and Klinman, J. P. (1999) Nature 399, 496-499) are proposed to arise, at least in part, from a change in subunit interactions that rigidifies the substrate-binding domain below 30 °C, and impedes the ability of the enzyme to sample the catalytically relevant conformational landscape. These results implicate an evolutionarily conserved, long-range network of dynamical communication that controls C-H activation in the prokaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:23525111

  17. Influence of hexaconazole, carbofuran and ethion on soil microflora and dehydrogenase activities in soil and intact cell.

    PubMed

    Kalam, A; Mukherjee, A K

    2001-01-01

    Total microbial count was highly affected (up to 61% at 1000 micrograms level) in presence of hexaconazole and persisted up to 21 days. Bacteria were more susceptible than actinomycetes. Carbofuran and ethion were moderately toxic to soil microflora. Inhibitory effects of all the three pesticides gradually decreased after 21 days as was evident by increase in total microbial count except in carbofuran. GDH activity in soil was also affected initially (up to 14 days) by all the three pesticides (60.3% in hexaconazole at 1000 micrograms level) and inhibition gradually decreased to zero except in carbofuran (15-20% toxicity persisted up to 35 days). GDH and LDH activity in presence of hexaconazole was strongly affected in intact cells of some standard culture of bacteria like Rhizobium sp. (host Dolichos sp., 32.1 and 72.5%), Bacillus subtilis Cohn (86.75 and 76.5%), Azotobacter sp. (36.9 and 55.4%) and B. sphaericus (67.6% GDH) respectively. Carbofuran inhibited the enzyme activity in B. subtilis (55.55 and 35.3%) and to some extent in B. sphaericus. Ethion moderately inhibited LDH activity in Rhodococcus sp. AK1 (17.1 and 33.3%), Rhizobium (27.6% LDH), E. coli HB 101 (34.2% LDH) as evidenced by formazan formation. From the result, it might be concluded that among the above three pesticides tested hexaconazole strongly inhibited the dehydrogenase system in bacteria including nitrogen fixing bacteria of soil and thus may affect soil fertility. It was concluded that hexaconazole was more toxic than ethion to dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:11349536

  18. Activation of the nickel-deficient carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum: Kinetic characterization and reductant requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Ensign, S.A.; Campbell, M.J.; Ludden, P.W. )

    1990-02-27

    The requirements for and kinetics of the activation of the nickel-deficient (apo) CO dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum by exogenous nickel have been investigated. The activation is strictly dependent upon the presence of a low-potential one-electron reductant. Sodium dithionite and reduced methylviologen are suitable reductants, whereas reduced indigo carmine and the two-electron reductants sodium borohydride, NADH, and dithiothreitol are ineffective in stimulating activation. The midpoint potential for activation was observed at approximately {minus}475 mV. The ability of a reductant to stimulate activation is correlated with the reduced state of the enzyme Fe{sub 4}-S{sub 4} centers. The activation follows apparent first-order kinetics in a saturable fashion, yielding a rate constant of 0.157 min{sup {minus}1} at saturating concentration of nickel. The initial rate at which the enzyme is activated by NiCl{sub 2} is also a saturable process, yielding a dissociation constant (K{sub D}) of 755 {mu}M for the initial association of nickel and enzyme. Cadmium(II), zinc(II), cobalt(II), and iron(II) are competitive inhibitors of nickel activation with inhibition constants of 2.44, 4.16, 175, and 349 {mu}M, respectively. Manganese(II), calcium(II), and magnesium(II) exhibit no inhibition of activation.

  19. Cloning and heterologous expression of two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomofumi; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-09

    We identified two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenase proteins (PcALDH1 and PcALDH2) from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Both PcALDHs were translationally up-regulated in response to exogenous addition of vanillin, one of the key aromatic compounds in the pathway of lignin degradation by basidiomycetes. To clarify the catalytic functions of PcALDHs, we isolated full-length cDNAs encoding these proteins and heterologously expressed the recombinant enzymes using a pET/Escherichia coli system. The open reading frames of both PcALDH1 and PcALDH2 consisted of 1503 nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of both proteins showed high homologies with aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from other organisms and contained ten conserved domains of ALDHs. Moreover, a novel glycine-rich motif 'GxGxxxG' was located at the NAD{sup +}-binding site. The recombinant PcALDHs catalyzed dehydrogenation reactions of several aryl-aldehyde compounds, including vanillin, to their corresponding aromatic acids. These results strongly suggested that PcALDHs metabolize aryl-aldehyde compounds generated during fungal degradation of lignin and various aromatic xenobiotics.

  20. Determination of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate with the concomitant reduction of NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H or vice versa. GDH activity is subject to complex allosteric regulation including substrate inhibition. To determine GDH kinetics in situ, we assessed the effects of various glutamate concentrations in combination with either the coenzyme NAD+ or NADP+ on GDH activity in mouse liver cryostat sections using metabolic mapping. NAD+-dependent GDH Vmax was 2.5-fold higher than NADP+-dependent Vmax, whereas the Km was similar, 1.92 mM versus 1.66 mM, when NAD+ or NADP+ was used, respectively. With either coenzyme, Vmax was determined at 10 mM glutamate and substrate inhibition was observed at higher glutamate concentrations with a Ki of 12.2 and 3.95 for NAD+ and NADP+ used as coenzyme, respectively. NAD+- and NADP+-dependent GDH activities were examined in various mouse tissues. GDH activity was highest in liver and much lower in other tissues. In all tissues, the highest activity was found when NAD+ was used as a coenzyme. In conclusion, GDH activity in mice is highest in the liver with NAD+ as a coenzyme and highest GDH activity was determined at a glutamate concentration of 10 mM. PMID:25124006

  1. Ontogenetic changes in citrate synthase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the jumping muscle of the American locust (Schistocerca americana).

    PubMed

    Kirkton, Scott D; Nyberg, Elizabeth T; Fox, Kristin M

    2011-10-01

    Intraspecific studies have repeatedly shown that muscle-specific oxidative enzyme activities scale negatively with body mass while muscle-specific glycolytic enzyme activities scale positively. However, most of these studies have not included juveniles. In this study, we examined how citrate synthase (CS, EC 2.3.3.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) activity in the jumping muscle of Schistocerca americana grasshoppers varied with ontogeny across a 40-fold increase in body size. In contrast to the pattern observed when adult conspecifics are compared, we show that jumping muscle CS activity increased more than 2-fold from 2nd instars to adults, while jumping muscle LDH activity increased more than 5-fold. The increased LDH activity in older grasshoppers supports previous data that older grasshoppers have a reduced jumping endurance. The increased CS activity with age may help older grasshoppers efficiently produce aerobic ATP to bend cuticular springs for energy storage before a jump or alternatively recover from anaerobic metabolism after jumping. Metabolic changes in S. americana jumping muscle are similar to other developing taxa and highlight the importance of including juveniles within intraspecific studies. When compared to adults, juvenile locomotion may have increased selection pressure because of both greater energetic demands during growth and higher predation rates. PMID:21807111

  2. At5g50600 encodes a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase reductase superfamily with 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities associated with Arabidopsis thaliana seed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    d'Andréa, S; Canonge, M; Beopoulos, A; Jolivet, P; Hartmann, M A; Miquel, M; Lepiniec, L; Chardot, T

    2007-02-01

    In a previous work, we presented evidence for the presence of a protein encoded by At5g50600 in oil bodies (OBs) from Arabidopsis thaliana [P. Jolivet, E. Roux, S. D'Andrea, M. Davanture, L. Negroni, M. Zivy, T. Chardot, Protein composition of oil bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype WS, Plant Physiol. Biochem. 42 (2004) 501-509]. Using specific antibodies and proteomic techniques, we presently confirm the existence of this protein, which is a member of the short-chain steroid dehydrogenase reductase superfamily. We have measured its activity toward various steroids (cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone, cortisol, corticosterone, estradiol, estrone) and NAD(P)(H), either within purified OBs or as a purified bacterially expressed chimera. Both enzymatic systems (OBs purified from A. thaliana seeds as well as the chimeric enzyme) exhibited hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity toward estradiol (17beta-hydroxysteroid) with NAD+ or NADP+, NADP+ being the preferred cofactor. Low levels of activity were observed with cortisol or corticosterone (11beta-hydroxysteroids), but neither cholesterol nor DHEA (3beta-hydroxysteroids) were substrates, whatever the cofactor used. Similar activity profiles were found for both enzyme sources. Purified OBs were found to be also able to catalyze estrone reduction (17beta-ketosteroid reductase activity) with NADPH. The enzyme occurring in A. thaliana OBs can be classified as a NADP+-dependent 11beta-,17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/17beta-ketosteroid reductase. This enzyme probably corresponds to AtHSD1, which is encoded by At5g50600. However, its physiological role and substrates still remain to be determined. PMID:17074428

  3. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. PMID:25743073

  4. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  5. Alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3 activates glucose alcoholic fermentation in genetically engineered Dekkera bruxellensis yeast.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Siurkus, Juozas; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Joerck-Ramberg, Dorte; Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Nerve; Blevins, James E; Sibirny, Andriy A; Piškur, Jure; Ishchuk, Olena P

    2016-04-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a non-conventional Crabtree-positive yeast with a good ethanol production capability. Compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its tolerance to acidic pH and its utilization of alternative carbon sources make it a promising organism for producing biofuel. In this study, we developed an auxotrophic transformation system and an expression vector, which enabled the manipulation of D. bruxellensis, thereby improving its fermentative performance. Its gene ADH3, coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, was cloned and overexpressed under the control of the strong and constitutive promoter TEF1. Our recombinant D. bruxellensis strain displayed 1.4 and 1.7 times faster specific glucose consumption rate during aerobic and anaerobic glucose fermentations, respectively; it yielded 1.2 times and 1.5 times more ethanol than did the parental strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The overexpression of ADH3 in D. bruxellensis also reduced the inhibition of fermentation by anaerobiosis, the "Custer effect". Thus, the fermentative capacity of D. bruxellensis could be further improved by metabolic engineering. PMID:26743658

  6. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  7. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru; Yasutake, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  8. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  9. The Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin recovers lactate dehydrogenase activity inhibited by copper with the contribution of His residues.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masakazu; Monna, Shuhei; Murata, Takae; Nakano, Taiyo; Amano, Shono; Nachbar, Markus; Wätzig, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Dehydrin, which is one of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, is involved in the ability of plants to tolerate the lack of water. Although many reports have indicated that dehydrins bind heavy metals, the physiological role of this metal binding has not been well understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin (AtHIRD11) recovered the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity denatured by Cu(2+). The LDH activity was partially inhibited by 0.93 μM Cu(2+) but totally inactivated by 9.3 μM Cu(2+). AtHIRD11 recovered the activity of LDH treated with 9.3 μM Cu(2+) in a dose-dependent manner. The recovery activity of AtHIRD11 was significantly higher than those of serum albumin and lysozyme. The conversion of His residues to Ala in AtHIRD11 resulted in the loss of the Cu(2+) binding of the protein as well as the disappearance of the conformational change induced by Cu(2+) that is observed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The mutant protein showed lower recovery activity than the original AtHIRD11. These results indicate that AtHIRD11 can reactivate LDH inhibited by Cu(2+) via the His residues. This function may prevent physiological damage to plants due to heavy-metal stress. PMID:26940498

  10. DFT study of the active site of the XoxF-type natural, cerium-dependent methanol dehydrogenase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lewis, Andrew J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-01-19

    Rare-earth metal cations have recently been demonstrated to be essential co-factors for the growth of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. A crystal structure of the rare-earth-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) includes a cerium cation in the active site. Herein, the Ce-MDH active site has been analyzed through DFT calculations. The results show the stability of the Ce(III)-pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) semiquinone configuration. Calculations on the active oxidized form of this complex indicate a 0.81 eV stabilization of the PQQ(0) LUMO at cerium versus calcium, supporting the observation that the cerium cation in the active site confers a competitive advantage to Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV. Using reported aqueous electrochemical data, a semi-empirical correlation was established based on cerium(IV/III) redox potentials. The correlation allowed estimation of the cerium oxidation potential of +1.35 V versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in the active site. The results are expected to guide the design of functional model complexes and alcohol-oxidation catalysts based on lanthanide complexes of biologically relevant quinones. PMID:25421364

  11. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  12. Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1000 and 2000 microns2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

  13. Burst of succinate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity in concert with the expression of genes coding for respiratory chain proteins underlies short-term beneficial physiological stress in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zakharchenko, Marina V; Zakharchenko, A V; Khunderyakova, N V; Tutukina, M N; Simonova, M A; Vasilieva, A A; Romanova, O I; Fedotcheva, N I; Litvinova, E G; Maevsky, E I; Zinchenko, V P; Berezhnov, A V; Morgunov, I G; Gulayev, A A; Kondrashova, M N

    2013-01-01

    Conditions for the realization in rats of moderate physiological stress (PHS) (30-120 min) were selected, which preferentially increase adaptive restorative processes without adverse responses typical of harmful stress (HST). The succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KDH) activity and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria were measured in lymphocytes by the cytobiochemical method, which detects the regulation of mitochondria in the organism with high sensitivity. These mitochondrial markers undergo an initial 10-20-fold burst of activity followed by a decrease to a level exceeding the quiescent state 2-3-fold by 120 min of PHS. By 30-60 min, the rise in SDH activity was greater than in KDH activity, while the activity of KDH prevailed over that of SDH by 120 min. The attenuation of SDH hyperactivity during PHS occurs by a mechanism other than oxaloacetate inhibition developed under HST. The dynamics of SDH and KDH activity corresponds to the known physiological replacement of adrenergic regulation by cholinergic during PHS, which is confirmed here by mitochondrial markers because their activity reflects these two types of nerve regulation, respectively. The domination of cholinergic regulation provides the overrestoration of expenditures for activity. In essence, this phenomenon corresponds to the training of the organism. It was first revealed in mitochondria after a single short-time stress episode. The burst of ROS formation was congruous with changes in SDH and KDH activity, as well as in ucp2 and cox3 expression, while the activity of SDH was inversely dependent on the expression of the gene of its catalytic subunit in the spleen. As the SDH activity enhanced, the expression of the succinate receptor decreased with subsequent dramatic rise when the activity was becoming lower. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaption and therapy. PMID:22814171

  14. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases and complex I and II of electron transport chain in the brain of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A; Sudheesh, N P; Roshny, D; Abishek, G; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-03-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being direct intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in the pathogenesis of number of ageing associated human disorders. Effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases; complex I and II of electron transport chain have been evaluated in the aged rat brain. Aged male Wistar rats were administered with ethanol extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg, p.o) once daily for 15 days. Similarly DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100mg/kg, p.o) administered group was kept as the reference standard. Young and aged rats administered with water were kept as young and aged control, respectively. The effect of treatment was assessed by estimating the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alpha-KGDH), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), complex I and II in the mitochondria of rat brain. Results of the study demonstrated that the extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg) significantly (p<0.01) enhanced the activities of PDH, alpha-KGDH, SDH, complex I and II when compared to that of the aged control animals. The level of the lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered (p<0.01) in the G. lucidum treated group with respect to that of aged control. However, we could not find any statistically significant difference between the activities of enzymes in groups treated with 50 and 250mg/kg of G. lucidum. The activity exhibited by the extract of G. lucidum in the present study can be partially correlated to its antioxidant activity. The results of the study concluded that the extract of G. lucidum may effective to improve the function of mitochondria in aged rat brain, suggest its possible therapeutic application against ageing associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19041385

  15. Substitution of valine for histidine 265 in carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum affects activity and spectroscopic states.

    PubMed

    Spangler, N J; Meyers, M R; Gierke, K L; Kerby, R L; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1998-02-13

    In carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) from Rhodospirillum rubrum, histidine 265 was replaced with valine by site-directed mutagenesis of the cooS gene. The altered form of CODH (H265V) had a low nickel content and a dramatically reduced level of catalytic activity. Although treatment with NiCl2 and CoCl2 increased the activity of H265V CODH by severalfold, activity levels remained more than 1000-fold lower than that of wild-type CODH. Histidine 265 was not essential for the formation and stability of the Fe4S4 clusters. The Km and KD for CO as well as the KD for cyanide were relatively unchanged as a result of the amino acid substitution in CODH. The time-dependent reduction of the [Fe4S4]2+ clusters by CO occurred on a time scale of hours, suggesting that, as a consequence of the mutation, a rate-limiting step had been introduced prior to the transfer of electrons from CO to the cubanes in centers B and C. EPR spectra of H265V CODH lacked the gav = 1.86 and gav = 1.87 signals characteristic of reduced forms of the active site (center C) of wild-type CODH. This indicates that the electronic properties of center C have been modified possibly by the disruption or alteration of the ligand-mediated interaction between the nickel site and Fe4S4 chromophore. PMID:9461598

  16. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-08-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  17. Spaceflight exposure effects on transcription, activity, and localization of alcohol dehydrogenase in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Matthews, S. W.; Daugherty, C. J.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Although considerable research and speculation have been directed toward understanding a plant's perception of gravity and the resulting gravitropic responses, little is known about the role of gravity-dependent physical processes in normal physiological function. These studies were conducted to determine whether the roots of plants exposed to spaceflight conditions may be experiencing hypoxia. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants were grown in agar medium during 6 or 11 d of spaceflight exposure on shuttle missions STS-54 (CHROMEX-03) and STS-68 (CHROMEX-05), respectively. The analysis included measurement of agar redox potential and root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity, localization, and expression. ADH activity increased by 89% as a result of spaceflight exposure for both CHROMEX-03 and -05 experiments, and ADH RNase protection assays revealed a 136% increase in ADH mRNA. The increase in ADH activity associated with the spaceflight roots was realized by a 28% decrease in oxygen availability in a ground-based study; however, no reduction in redox potential was observed in measurements of the spaceflight bulk agar. Spaceflight exposure appears to effect a hypoxic response in the roots of agar-grown plants that may be caused by changes in gravity-mediated fluid and/or gas behavior.

  18. Activity and electrophoretic profiles of liver aldehyde dehydrogenases from mice of inbred strains with different alcohol preference.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Nishiguchi, K; Miyamoto, R; Ogita, Z I; Nakanishi, S

    1983-01-01

    1. The activity of low Km-aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the liver mitochondrial fraction (MT-fraction) from male C57BL/6J strain mice (alcohol preferring) was significantly higher than that from DBA/2 mice (alcohol avoiding). The F1 hybrids (C57BL/6J X DBA/2) did not exhibit the intermediate activity to these two strains. 2. Strain differences in liver mitochondrial ALDH isozymes were observed by isoelectric focusing. C57BL/6J strain had two isozymes at pH 7.1 while DBA/2 had no band at this pH. F1 hybrid mice had similar two bands with lower density to those of C57BL/6J at pH 7.1. There was no difference in zymograms of the soluble fraction between C57BL/6J and DBA/2 strains. 3. The present results suggest that the difference in alcohol preference of mice may depend on some restricted ALDH isozymes with different pl or electric mobility rather than the enzymatic activity in the liver MT-fraction. PMID:6822317

  19. Assessment of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase activities in cow's milk as an indicator of subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Babaei, H; Mansouri-Najand, L; Molaei, M M; Kheradmand, A; Sharifan, M

    2007-05-01

    This study examined the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in the milk of lactating Holstein cows in association with subclinical mastitis (SCM). A total of 94 milk samples were collected from 58 lactating dairy cows representing stages of lactation from the second to the tenth week after calving. Those which were classified as positive by California mastitis test (CMT) were deemed to have subclinical mastitis. All the milk samples were skimmed by centrifugation at 10 000g at 0 degrees C and were used for enzyme activities estimations. The mean activities of LDH and ALP were higher in the milk from udders with SCM than in the milk from healthy udders (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in AST values. The maximum agreement rates between the CMT results and LDH and ALP values were seen at thresholds of > 180 IU/L and > 40 IU/L respectively (kappa values 0.65 and 0.79, respectively). However, the sensitivity of the tests for identifying SCM at these thresholds was higher for ALP (96.4%) than for LDH (68.5%). In this study, LDH and ALP tests were standardized for cow's milk and results showed that only the ALP test was reliable in the early diagnosis of subclinical mastitis. PMID:17268916

  20. Spaceflight exposure effects on transcription, activity, and localization of alcohol dehydrogenase in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, D M; Matthews, S W; Daugherty, C J; Musgrave, M E

    1997-01-01

    Although considerable research and speculation have been directed toward understanding a plant's perception of gravity and the resulting gravitropic responses, little is known about the role of gravity-dependent physical processes in normal physiological function. These studies were conducted to determine whether the roots of plants exposed to spaceflight conditions may be experiencing hypoxia. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants were grown in agar medium during 6 or 11 d of spaceflight exposure on shuttle missions STS-54 (CHROMEX-03) and STS-68 (CHROMEX-05), respectively. The analysis included measurement of agar redox potential and root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity, localization, and expression. ADH activity increased by 89% as a result of spaceflight exposure for both CHROMEX-03 and -05 experiments, and ADH RNase protection assays revealed a 136% increase in ADH mRNA. The increase in ADH activity associated with the spaceflight roots was realized by a 28% decrease in oxygen availability in a ground-based study; however, no reduction in redox potential was observed in measurements of the spaceflight bulk agar. Spaceflight exposure appears to effect a hypoxic response in the roots of agar-grown plants that may be caused by changes in gravity-mediated fluid and/or gas behavior. PMID:9085569

  1. Effect of organic solvents on the activity and stability of halophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2) from Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Alsafadi, Diya; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The effect of various organic solvents on the catalytic activity, stability and substrate specificity of alchohol dehydrogenase from Haloferax volcanii (HvADH2) was evaluated. The HvADH2 showed remarkable stability and catalysed the reaction in aqueous-organic medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH). Tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile were also investigated and adversely affected the stability of the enzyme. High concentration of salt, essential to maintain the enzymatic activity and structural integrity of the halophilic enzyme under standard conditions may be partially replaced by DMSO and MeOH. The presence of organic solvents did not induce gross changes in substrate specificity. DMSO offered a protective effect for the stability of the enzyme at nonoptimal pHs such as 6 and 10. Salt and solvent effects on the HvADH2 conformation and folding were examined through fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence findings were consistent with the activity and stability results and corroborated the denaturing properties of some solvents. The intrinsic tolerance of this enzyme to organic solvent makes it highly attractive to industry. PMID:23179592

  2. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities and ethanol tolerance in Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae) fruit-fly species and their hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) system is one of the earliest known models of molecular evolution, and is still the most studied in Drosophila. Herein, we studied this model in the genus Anastrepha (Diptera, Tephritidae). Due to the remarkable advantages it presents, it is possible to cross species with different Adh genotypes and with different phenotype traits related to ethanol tolerance. The two species studied here each have a different number of Adh gene copies, whereby crosses generate polymorphisms in gene number and in composition of the genetic background. We measured certain traits related to ethanol metabolism and tolerance. ADH specific enzyme activity presented gene by environment interactions, and the larval protein content showed an additive pattern of inheritance, whilst ADH enzyme activity per larva presented a complex behavior that may be explained by epistatic effects. Regression models suggest that there are heritable factors acting on ethanol tolerance, which may be related to enzymatic activity of the ADHs and to larval mass, although a pronounced environmental effect on ethanol tolerance was also observed. By using these data, we speculated on the mechanisms of ethanol tolerance and its inheritance as well as of associated traits. PMID:21637665

  3. Human liver mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase: three-dimensional structure and the restoration of solubility and activity of chimeric forms.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L.; Zhou, J.; Hurley, T. D.; Weiner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Human liver cytosolic and mitochondrial isozymes of aldehyde dehydrogenase share 70% sequence identity. However, the first 21 residues are not conserved between the human isozymes (15% identity). The three-dimensional structures of the beef mitochondrial and sheep cytosolic forms have virtually identical three-dimensional structures. Here, we solved the structure of the human mitochondrial enzyme and found it to be identical to the beef enzyme. The first 21 residues are found on the surface of the enzyme and make no contact with other subunits in the tetramer. A pair of chimeric enzymes between the human isozymes was made. Each chimera had the first 21 residues from one isozyme and the remaining 479 from the other. When the first 21 residues were from the mitochondrial isozyme, an enzyme with cytosolic-like properties was produced. The other was expressed but was insoluble. It was possible to restore solubility and activity to the chimera that had the first 21 cytosolic residues fused to the mitochondrial ones by making point mutations to residues at the N-terminal end. When residue 19 was changed from tyrosine to a cysteine, the residue found in the mitochondrial form, an active enzyme could be made though the Km for NAD+ was 35 times higher than the native mitochondrial isozyme and the specific activity was reduced by 75%. This residue interacts with residue 203, a nonconserved, nonactive site residue. A mutation of residue 18, which also interacts with 203, restored solubility, but not activity. Mutation to residue 15, which interacts with 104, also restored solubility but not activity. It appears that to have a soluble or active enzyme a favorable interaction must occur between a residue in a surface loop and a residue elsewhere in the molecule even though neither make contact with the active site region of the enzyme. PMID:10631996

  4. Mitochondrial 3β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Enzyme Activity Requires Reversible pH-dependent Conformational Change at the Intermembrane Space*

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Manoj; Thomas, James L.; Whittal, Randy M.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2012-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane protein 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2) synthesizes progesterone and androstenedione through its dehydrogenase and isomerase activities. This bifunctionality requires 3βHSD2 to undergo a conformational change. Given its proximity to the proton pump, we hypothesized that pH influences 3βHSD2 conformation and thus activity. Circular dichroism (CD) showed that between pH 7.4 and 4.5, 3βHSD2 retained its primarily α-helical character with a decrease in α-helical content at lower pH values, whereas the β-sheet content remained unchanged throughout. Titrating the pH back to 7.4 restored the original conformation within 25 min. Metabolic conversion assays indicated peak 3βHSD2 activity at pH 4.5 with ∼2-fold more progesterone synthesized at pH 4.5 than at pH 3.5 and 7.4. Increasing the 3βHSD2 concentration from 1 to 40 μg resulted in a 7-fold increase in progesterone at pH 4.5, but no change at pH 7.4. Incubation with guanidinum hydrochloride (GdmHCl) showed a three-step cooperative unfolding of 3βHSD2 from pH 7.4 to 4.5, possibly due to the native state unfolding to the intermediate ion core state. With further decreases in pH, increasing concentrations of GdmHCl led to rapid two-step unfolding that may represent complete loss of structure. Between pH 4 and 5, the two intermediate states appeared stable. Stopped-flow kinetics showed slower unfolding at around pH 4, where the protein is in a pseudostable state. Based on our data, we conclude that at pH 4–5, 3βHSD2 takes on a molten globule conformation that promotes the dual functionality of the enzyme. PMID:22262841

  5. Loss of NADH Oxidase Activity in Streptococcus mutans Leads to Rex-Mediated Overcompensation in NAD+ Regeneration by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J. L.; Derr, A. M.; Faustoferri, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans have determined that this Gram-positive facultative anaerobe mounts robust responses to both acid and oxidative stresses. The water-forming NADH oxidase (Nox; encoded by nox) is thought to be critical for the regeneration of NAD+, for use in glycolysis, and for the reduction of oxygen, thereby preventing the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species. In this study, the free NAD+/NADH ratio in a nox deletion strain (Δnox) was discovered to be remarkably higher than that in the parent strain, UA159, when the strains were grown in continuous culture. This unanticipated result was explained by significantly elevated lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh; encoded by ldh) activity and ldh transcription in the Δnox strain, which was mediated in part by the redox-sensing regulator Rex. cDNA microarray analysis of S. mutans cultures exposed to simultaneous acid stress (growth at a low pH) and oxidative stress (generated through the deletion of nox or the addition of exogenous oxygen) revealed a stress response synergistically heightened over that with either stress alone. In the Δnox strain, this elevated stress response included increased glucose phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity, which appeared to be due to elevated manL transcription, mediated in part, like elevated ldh transcription, by Rex. While the Δnox strain does possess a membrane composition different from that of the parent strain, it did not appear to have defects in either membrane permeability or ATPase activity. However, the altered transcriptome and metabolome of the Δnox strain were sufficient to impair its ability to compete with commensal peroxigenic oral streptococci during growth under aerobic conditions. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans is an oral pathogen whose ability to outcompete commensal oral streptococci is strongly linked to the formation of dental caries. Previous work has demonstrated that the S

  6. Phagocytosis of M. paratuberculosis fails to activate expression of NADH dehydrogenase and nucleolin-related protein in bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tooker, B C; Coussens, P M

    2004-05-15

    similarity to a Rattus norvegicus nucleolin-related protein (NRP). Amplicon 5-2-10, which increased expression moderately following M. paratuberculosis phagocytosis, was a near perfect match to bovine nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (FNADH dehydrogenase) subunit 1 (ND1). Failure to activate these two genes at levels observed following phagocytosis of either E. coli or latex beads may uncover new mechanisms for the survival of M. paratuberculosis within bovine macrophage cells. PMID:15158609

  7. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  8. Validation of the In Vivo Assessment of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity Using Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Michael S.; Heather, Lisa C.; Carter, Emma E.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; Nagel, Simon; Sibson, Nicola R.; Radda, George K.; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Many diseases of the heart are characterised by changes in substrate utilisation, which is in part regulated by the activity of the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Consequently, there is much interest in the in vivo evaluation of PDH activity in a range of physiological and pathological states to obtain information regarding the metabolic mechanisms of cardiac diseases. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, detected using MRS, is a novel technique for evaluating PDH flux non-invasively. PDH flux has been assumed to directly reflect in vivo PDH activity, although to date this assumption remains unproven. Methods Control animals and animals undergoing interventions known to modulate PDH activity, namely high fat feeding and dichloroacetate infusion, were used to investigate the relationship between in vivo hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux and ex vivo measurements of PDH enzyme activity (PDHa). Further, the plasma concentrations of pyruvate and other important metabolites were evaluated following pyruvate infusion to assess the metabolic consequences of the pyruvate infusion during hyperpolarized MRS experiments. Results Hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux significantly correlated with ex vivo measurements of PDHa, confirming that PDH activity directly influences the in vivo flux of hyperpolarized pyruvate through cardiac PDH. The maximum plasma concentration of pyruvate reached during hyperpolarized MRS experiments was ~250 μM, equivalent to physiological pyruvate concentrations reached during exercise or with dietary interventions. Concentrations of other metabolites, including lactate, glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), did not vary during the 60 s following pyruvate infusion. Hence, during the 60 s data acquisition period, metabolism was minimally affected by pyruvate infusion. PMID:20799252

  9. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. Deficient activity of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase component of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, W B; Craft, D A

    1991-01-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is an inherited disorder associated with impaired fatty alcohol oxidation due to deficient activity of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAO). FAO is a complex enzyme which consists of two separate proteins that sequentially catalyze the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty aldehyde and fatty acid. To determine which enzymatic component of FAO was deficient in SLS, we assayed fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) and fatty alcohol dehydrogenase in cultured fibroblasts from seven unrelated SLS patients. All SLS cells were selectively deficient in the FALDH component of FAO, and had normal activity of fatty alcohol dehydrogenase. The extent of FALDH deficiency in SLS cells depended on the aliphatic aldehyde used as substrate, ranging from 62% of mean normal activity using propionaldehyde as substrate to 8% of mean normal activity with octadecanal. FALDH activity in obligate SLS heterozygotes was partially decreased to 49 +/- 7% of mean normal activity using octadecanal as substrate. Differential centrifugation studies in fibroblasts indicated that this FALDH enzyme was largely particulate; soluble FALDH activity was normal in SLS cells. Intact SLS fibroblasts oxidized octadecanol to fatty acid at less than 10% of the normal rate, but oxidized free octadecanal normally, suggesting that the FALDH affected in SLS is chiefly involved in the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty acid. These results show that the primary enzymatic defect in SLS is the FALDH component of the FAO complex, which leads to deficient oxidation of fatty aldehyde derived from fatty alcohol. PMID:1939650

  10. The level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity strongly influences xylose fermentation and inhibitor sensitivity in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Jeppsson, Marie; Johansson, Björn; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2003-11-01

    Disruption of the ZWF1 gene encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) has been shown to reduce the xylitol yield and the xylose consumption in the xylose-utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TMB3255. In the present investigation we have studied the influence of different production levels of G6PDH on xylose fermentation. We used a synthetic promoter library and the copper-regulated CUP1 promoter to generate G6PDH-activities between 0% and 179% of the wild-type level. G6PDH-activities of 1% and 6% of the wild-type level resulted in 2.8- and 5.1-fold increase in specific xylose consumption, respectively, compared with the ZWF1-disrupted strain. Both strains exhibited decreased xylitol yields (0.13 and 0.19 g/g xylose) and enhanced ethanol yields (0.36 and 0.34 g/g xylose) compared with the control strain TMB3001 (0.29 g xylitol/g xylose, 0.31 g ethanol/g xylose). Cytoplasmic transhydrogenase (TH) from Azotobacter vinelandii has previously been shown to transfer NADPH and NAD(+) into NADP(+) and NADH, and TH-overproduction resulted in lower xylitol yield and enhanced glycerol yield during xylose utilization. Strains with low G6PDH-activity grew slower in a lignocellulose hydrolysate than the strain with wild-type G6PDH-activity, which suggested that the availability of intracellular NADPH correlated with tolerance towards lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. Low G6PDH-activity strains were also more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than the control strain TMB3001. PMID:14618564

  11. Adenine nucleotide-dependent and redox-independent control of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is important for sustaining cellular growth and maintenance; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying individual processes in plant mitochondria remain largely uncharacterized. Previous redox-proteomics studies have suggested that mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and redox shuttling, is under thiol-based redox regulation as a target candidate of thioredoxin (Trx). In addition, the adenine nucleotide status may be another factor controlling mitochondrial metabolism, as respiratory ATP production in mitochondria is believed to be influenced by several environmental stimuli. Using biochemical and reverse-genetic approaches, we addressed the redox- and adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of mMDH in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recombinant mMDH protein formed intramolecular disulfide bonds under oxidative conditions, but these bonds did not have a considerable effect on mMDH activity. Mitochondria-localized o-type Trx (Trx-o) did not facilitate re-reduction of oxidized mMDH. Determination of the in vivo redox state revealed that mMDH was stably present in the reduced form even in Trx-o-deficient plants. Accordingly, we concluded that mMDH is not in the class of redox-regulated enzymes. By contrast, mMDH activity was lowered by adenine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Each adenine nucleotide suppressed mMDH activity with different potencies and ATP exerted the largest inhibitory effect with a significantly lower K(I). Correspondingly, mMDH activity was inhibited by the increase in ATP/ADP ratio within the physiological range. These results suggest that mMDH activity is finely controlled in response to variations in mitochondrial adenine nucleotide balance. PMID:26946085

  12. In vivo ethanol elimination in man, monkey and rat: A lack of relationship between the ethanol metabolism and the hepatic activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Zorzano, A. ); Herrera, E. )

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo ethanol elimination in human subjects, monkeys and rats was investigated after an oral ethanol dosage. After 0.4 g. ethanol/kg of body weight, ethanol elimination was much slower in human subjects than in monkeys. In order to detect a rise in monkey plasma ethanol concentrations as early as observed in human subjects, ethanol had to be administered at a dose of 3 g/kg body weight. Ethanol metabolism in rats was also much faster than in human subjects. However, human liver showed higher alcohol dehydrogenase activity and higher low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than rat liver. Thus, our data suggest a lack of relationship between hepatic ethanol-metabolizing activities and the in vivo ethanol elimination rate.

  13. Comparison of endogenous cytokinins and cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase activity in germinating and thermoinhibited Tagetes minuta achenes.

    PubMed

    Stirk, Wendy A; Novák, Ondřej; Zižková, Eva; Motyka, Vaclav; Strnad, Miroslav; van Staden, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    Tagetes minuta L. achenes are thermoinhibited at temperatures above 35°C and have accelerated radicle emergence (germination) when subsequently transferred to an optimal temperature (25°C). Endogenous cytokinins and cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX) activity were compared in normally germinating (25°C) and thermoinhibited (72h at 36°C then transferred to 25°C) T. minuta achenes. Following imbibition, endogenous cytokinin concentrations changed in normally germinating T. minuta achenes, with a gradual decrease in dihydrozeatin-type (DHZ) cytokinins, a large increase in cis-zeatin-type (cZ) cytokinins, a smaller increase in N⁶-(2-isopentenyl)adenine-type (iP) cytokinins and a peak of trans-zeatin-type (tZ) cytokinins at 13 h. These changes in the isoprenoid cytokinin profile were similar in the thermoinhibited achenes imbibed at 36°C, despite the thermal block preventing radicle emergence. The exception was the iP-type cytokinins that only increased when transferred to 25°C. Profiles of the physiologically active free bases showed an increase in tZ prior to radical emergence in both normally germinating (13 h) and thermoinhibited achenes. A large transient peak in aromatic cytokinins [N⁶-benzyladenine-type (BA)] occurred during early seedling establishment in normally germinating achenes (40 h) while a transient maximum in BA-type cytokinins was found prior to radicle emergence in the thermoinhibited achenes (24 h). The CKX activity was enhanced in normally germinating achenes as the cytokinin concentration increased following imbibition. In thermoinhibited achenes, an elevated temperature negatively affected the CKX activity that only increased when the achenes were transferred to 25°C, corresponding to an increase in iP-type cytokinins. However, the favored cytokinin deactivation pathway in T. minuta appears to be 9-glycosylation, as 9-glucosides accounted for over 50% of the total cytokinin pool in both normal and thermoinhibited achenes. PMID

  14. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  15. Effect of diet and starvation on the activity state of branched-chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex in rat liver and heart.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M; Cook, K G; Yeaman, S J

    1987-12-10

    In rats fed a high-protein diet, the branched-chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex in liver was essentially fully active and its activity state was unaffected by subsequent starvation for 48 h. Feeding with a low-protein diet led to a decrease in the activity state which was essentially reversed by 48 h of starvation. In heart, the enzyme was primarily inactive (activity state 18%) in rats fed a high-protein diet, with both low-protein diet and starvation leading to a further decrease in the activity state. PMID:3676350

  16. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a (13)CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1 The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and (13)C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  17. Purification of human dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase and its inhibition by A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide.

    PubMed Central

    Bruneau, J M; Yea, C M; Spinella-Jaegle, S; Fudali, C; Woodward, K; Robson, P A; Sautès, C; Westwood, R; Kuo, E A; Williamson, R A; Ruuth, E

    1998-01-01

    Leflunomide is currently in phase-III clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we have focused our efforts on the study of the mechanism of action of the active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, in cells and tissue of human origin. The human high-affinity binding protein for radiolabelled A77 1726 was purified from solubilized U937 membranes by following the binding activity through the purification process and was characterized as the mitochondrial enzyme dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHO-DH). The human and murine enzyme displayed identical pI and molecular mass values on SDS/PAGE (43 kDa), which contrasts notably with previous reports suggesting a molecular mass of 50 kDa for the human enzyme. DHO-DH activity was inhibited by A77 1726 and its analogue HR325 with similar potency in U937 and human spleen membrane preparations. HR325 was found to be anti-proliferative for phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, at the same concentrations that caused accumulation of DHO and depletion of uridine. Supplementation of the cultures with exogenous uridine led to partial abrogation of the anti-proliferative effect. This is in line with our recent demonstration that the anti-proliferative effect in vitro of A77 1726 on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse spleen cells was mediated by DHO-DH inhibition [Williamson, Yea, Robson, Curnock, Gadher, Hambleton, Woodward, Bruneau, Hambleton, Moss et al., (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 22467-22472]. Thus, DHO-DH inhibition by A77 1726 and its analogues is responsible for the anti-proliferative effects in vitro of the compounds on human cells and is likely to be responsible for some of its effects in vivo. PMID:9820804

  18. Oxygen uptake on-kinetics in dog gastrocnemius in situ following activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Bruno; Hogan, Michael C; Greenhaff, Paul L; Hamann, Jason J; Kelley, Kevin M; Aschenbach, William G; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Gladden, L Bruce

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by dichloroacetate (DCA) is associated with faster O(2) uptake (V(O2)) on-kinetics. V(O2) on-kinetics was determined in isolated canine gastrocnemius muscles in situ (n = 6) during the transition from rest to 4 min of electrically stimulated isometric tetanic contractions, corresponding to approximately 60-70 % of peak V(O2). Two conditions were compared: (1) control (saline infusion, C); and (2) DCA infusion (300 mg (kg body mass)(-1), 45 min before contraction). Muscle blood flow (Q) was measured continuously in the popliteal vein; arterial and popliteal vein O(2) contents were measured at rest and at 5-7 s intervals during the transition. Muscle V(O2) was calculated as Q multiplied by the arteriovenous O(2) content difference. Muscle biopsies were taken before and at the end of contraction for determination of muscle metabolite concentrations. DCA activated PDC at rest, as shown by the 9-fold higher acetylcarnitine concentration in DCA (vs. C; P < 0.0001). Phosphocreatine degradation and muscle lactate accumulation were not significantly different between C and DCA. DCA was associated with significantly less muscle fatigue. Resting and steady-state V(O2) values during contraction were not significantly different between C and DCA. The time to reach 63 % of the V(O2) difference between the resting baseline and the steady-state V(O2) values during contraction was 22.3 +/- 0.5 s in C and 24.5 +/- 1.4 s in DCA (n.s.). In this experimental model, activation of PDC by DCA resulted in a stockpiling of acetyl groups at rest and less muscle fatigue, but it did not affect 'anaerobic' energy provision and V(O2) on-kinetics. PMID:11773328

  19. The complex structures of isocitrate dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermocellum and Desulfotalea psychrophila suggest a new active site locking mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S.; Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Leiros, Ingar; Steen, Ida Helene

    2012-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the oxidative NAD(P)+-dependent decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate and CO2 and is present in organisms spanning the biological range of temperature. We have solved two crystal structures of the thermophilic Clostridium thermocellum IDH (CtIDH), a native open apo CtIDH to 2.35 Å and a quaternary complex of CtIDH with NADP+, isocitrate and Mg2+ to 2.5 Å. To compare to these a quaternary complex structure of the psychrophilic Desulfotalea psychrophila IDH (DpIDH) was also resolved to 1.93 Å. CtIDH and DpIDH showed similar global thermal stabilities with melting temperatures of 67.9 and 66.9 °C, respectively. CtIDH represents a typical thermophilic enzyme, with a large number of ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds per residue combined with stabilization of the N and C termini. CtIDH had a higher activity temperature optimum, and showed greater affinity for the substrates with an active site that was less thermolabile compared to DpIDH. The uncompensated negative surface charge and the enlarged methionine cluster in the hinge region both of which are important for cold activity in DpIDH, were absent in CtIDH. These structural comparisons revealed that prokaryotic IDHs in subfamily II have a unique locking mechanism involving Arg310, Asp251′ and Arg255 (CtIDH). These interactions lock the large domain to the small domain and direct NADP+ into the correct orientation, which together are important for NADP+ selectivity. PMID:23650595

  20. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  1. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  2. Assay method for monitoring the inhibitory effects of antimetabolites on the activity of inosinate dehydrogenase in intact human CEM lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1992-01-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to monitor the inhibition of inosinate (IMP) dehydrogenase by antimetabolites in intact human CEM lymphocytes. This method is based on the determination of 3H release from [2,8-3H]hypoxanthine ([2,8-3H]Hx) or [2,8-3H]inosine ([2,8-3H]Ino). The validity of this procedure was assessed by evaluating IMP dehydrogenase inhibition in intact CEM cells by the well-known IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors ribavirin, mycophenolic acid and tiazofurin. As reference materials, several compounds that are targeted at other enzymes in de novo purine nucleotide anabolism (i.e. hadacidine, acivicin) or catabolism (i.e. 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) were evaluated. There was a strong correlation between the inhibitory effects of the IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors (ribavirin, mycophenolic acid, tiazofurin) on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx and [2,8-3H]Ino in intact CEM cells and their ability to decrease intracellular GTP pool levels. The other compounds (hadacidine, acivicin, 8-aminoguanosine, allopurinol) had no marked effect on 3H release from [2,8-3H]Hx. Using this method, we demonstrated that the novel ribavirin analogue, 5-ethynyl-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylimidazole-4-carboxamide, is a potent inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase in intact cells. PMID:1359876

  3. Dehydrogenase activity and quality of leachates in Technosols with gossan and sulfide materials from the São Domingos mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Erika; Abreu, Manuela; Macías, Felipe; de Varennes, Amarílis

    2014-05-01

    Wastes produced by mining activity in São Domingos (Portuguese Iberian Pyrite Belt) were disposed over a large area. To speed up the ecological rehabilitation in this mine, an integrative strategy using different amendments+mine wastes was used to produce Technosols with enhanced soil functions. To evaluate the efficiency of these Technosols the dehydrogenase activity and chemical quality of leachates were monitored. Technosols were composed of different mine wastes (gossan and sulfide materials), collected at the São Domingos mine, and mixtures of amendments applied at 30 and 75 Mg/ha (rockwool+agriculture wastes+wastes from liquors distillation of strawberry tree fruits (Arbutus unedo L.) and/or carobs (Ceratonia siliqua L. fruits)). Three assays, under controlled conditions, were carried out: (1 and 2) Sulfide or gossan materials with/without amendments; (3) Sulfide wastes, with/without amendments, incubated during four months and then with application of an overlayer of gossan (~3 cm thick) with/without the same amendments. Dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and chemical characteristics of leachates (multielemental concentration, pH, and electric conductivity) were determined after four/seven/thirteen months of incubation. Sulfide wastes had more hazardous characteristics (pH~2 and total concentrations (g/kg) of Al (58.1), As (1.1), Cu (2.1), Fe (107.3), Pb (11.7), S (65.3) and Zn (1.1) than the gossan materials (pH=4.3; g/kg, Al: 24.8, As: 3.0, Cu: 0.2, Fe: 129, Pb: 9.2, S: 13.7, Zn: 0.04). Amendments application to gossan (assay 2) enhanced DHA in both sampling periods (µg TPF g dry weight 16 h-1, Control: 0,72-1,78; Amended treatments: 2.49-16.36 depending on mixture/application rate/sampling period). Greater application rates stimulated DHA (more than 1.5-fold with 75 Mg/ha). No differences were observed in DHA in the gossan layer with/without amendments (assay 3) suggesting a negative impact on gossan microrganisms from sulfide materials located below. In

  4. Inhibition of telomerase activity preferentially targets aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cancer stem-like cells in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mortality rates for advanced lung cancer have not declined for decades, even with the implementation of novel chemotherapeutic regimens or the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for resistance to chemo/radiotherapy. Therefore, targeting CSCs with novel compounds may be an effective approach to reduce lung tumor growth and metastasis. We have isolated and characterized CSCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and measured their telomerase activity, telomere length, and sensitivity to the novel telomerase inhibitor MST312. Results The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive lung cancer cell fraction is enriched in markers of stemness and endowed with stem cell properties. ALDH+ CSCs display longer telomeres than the non-CSC population. Interestingly, MST312 has a strong antiproliferative effect on lung CSCs and induces p21, p27 and apoptosis in the whole tumor population. MST312 acts through activation of the ATM/pH2AX DNA damage pathway (short-term effect) and through decrease in telomere length (long-term effect). Administration of this telomerase inhibitor (40 mg/kg) in the H460 xenograft model results in significant tumor shrinkage (70% reduction, compared to controls). Combination therapy consisting of irradiation (10Gy) plus administration of MST312 did not improve the therapeutic efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor alone. Treatment with MST312 reduces significantly the number of ALDH+ CSCs and their telomeric length in vivo. Conclusions We conclude that antitelomeric therapy using MST312 mainly targets lung CSCs and may represent a novel approach for effective treatment of lung cancer. PMID:21827695

  5. Murine and Human Myogenic Cells Identified by Elevated Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for Muscle Regeneration and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Joseph B.; Thompson, Seth D.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Song, Minjung; Huard, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the initial promise of myoblast transfer therapy to restore dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, clinical efficacy has been limited, primarily by poor cell survival post-transplantation. Murine muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) isolated from slowly adhering cells (SACs) via the preplate technique, induce greater muscle regeneration than murine myoblasts, primarily due to improved post-transplantation survival, which is conferred by their increased stress resistance capacity. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) represents a family of enzymes with important morphogenic as well as oxidative damage mitigating roles and has been found to be a marker of stem cells in both normal and malignant tissue. In this study, we hypothesized that elevated ALDH levels could identify murine and human muscle derived cell (hMDC) progenitors, endowed with enhanced stress resistance and muscle regeneration capacity. Methodology/Principal Findings Skeletal muscle progenitors were isolated from murine and human skeletal muscle by a modified preplate technique and unfractionated enzymatic digestion, respectively. ALDHhi subpopulations isolated by fluorescence activate cell sorting demonstrated increased proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacities compared to their ALDHlo counterparts when cultivated in oxidative and inflammatory stress media conditions. This behavior correlated with increased intracellular levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase. ALDHhi murine myoblasts were observed to exhibit an increased muscle regenerative potential compared to ALDHlo myoblasts, undergo multipotent differentiation (osteogenic and chondrogenic), and were found predominately in the SAC fraction, characteristics that are also observed in murine MDSCs. Likewise, human ALDHhi hMDCs demonstrated superior muscle regenerative capacity compared to ALDHlo hMDCs. Conclusions The methodology of isolating myogenic cells on the basis of elevated ALDH activity

  6. Local Glucocorticoid Activation by 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 in Keratinocytes: The Role in Hapten-Induced Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mika; Itoi, Saori; Matsumura, Sayaka; Yang, Lingli; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, extra-adrenal cortisol production was reported in various tissues. The enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of hormonally inactive cortisone into active cortisol in cells is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1). We recently reported that 11β-HSD1 is also expressed in keratinocytes and regulates inflammation and keratinocyte proliferation. To investigate the function of 11β-HSD1 in keratinocytes during inflammation in vivo, we created keratinocyte-specific 11β-HSD1 knockout (K5-Hsd11b1-KO) mice and analyzed the inflammatory response in models of hapten-induced contact irritant dermatitis. K5-Hsd11b1-KO mice showed enhanced ear swelling in low-dose oxazolone-, 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB)-, and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced irritant dermatitis associated with increased inflammatory cell infiltration. Topical application of corticosterone dose dependently suppressed TNCB-induced ear swelling and cytokine expression. Similarly in mouse keratinocytes in vitro, corticosterone dose dependently suppressed 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced IL-1α and IL-1β expression. The effect of 11-dehydrocorticosterone was attenuated in TNCB-induced irritant dermatitis in K5-Hsd11b1-KO mice compared with wild-type mice. In human samples, 11β-HSD1 expression was decreased in epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris compared with healthy skin. Taken together, these data suggest that corticosterone activation by 11β-HSD1 in keratinocytes suppresses hapten-induced irritant dermatitis through suppression of expression of cytokines, such as IL-1α and IL-1β, in keratinocytes. PMID:27070821

  7. New insights into the mechanism of nickel insertion into carbon monoxide dehydrogenase: analysis of Rhodospirillum rubrum carbon monoxide dehydrogenase variants with substituted ligands to the [Fe3S4] portion of the active-site C-cluster.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Won Bae; Singer, Steven W; Ludden, Paul W; Rubio, Luis M

    2005-12-01

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) from Rhodospirillum rubrum catalyzes the oxidation of CO to CO2. A unique [NiFe4S4] cluster, known as the C-cluster, constitutes the active site of the enzyme. When grown in Ni-deficient medium R. rubrum accumulates a Ni-deficient apo form of CODH that is readily activated by Ni. It has been previously shown that activation of apo-CODH by Ni is a two-step process involving the rapid formation of an inactive apo-CODH*Ni complex prior to conversion to the active holo-CODH. We have generated CODH variants with substitutions in cysteine residues involved in the coordination of the [Fe3S4] portion of the C-cluster. Analysis of the variants suggests that the cysteine residues at positions 338, 451, and 481 are important for CO oxidation activity catalyzed by CODH but not for Ni binding to the C-cluster. C451S CODH is the only new variant that retains residual CO oxidation activity. Comparison of the kinetics and pH dependence of Ni activation of the apo forms of wild-type, C451S, and C531A CODH allowed us to develop a model for Ni insertion into the C-cluster of CODH in which Ni reversibly binds to the C-cluster and subsequently coordinates Cys531 in the rate-determining step. PMID:16283394

  8. Effects of the cofactor binding sites on the activities of secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiangjun; Han, Jun; Ma, Sichun; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    SADHs from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are enzymes that, together with various cofactors, catalyze the reversible reduction of carbonyl compounds to their corresponding alcohols. To explore how cofactors bind to SADH, TeSADH was cloned in this study, and Ser(199) and Arg(200) were replaced by Tyr and Asp, respectively. Both sites were expected to be inside or adjacent to the cofactor-binding domain according to computational a prediction. Analysis of TeSADH activities revealed that the enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the S199Y mutant was noticeably enhanced using by NADH, NADPH as cofactors, and similar with that of wild-type using by NADP(+), NAD(+). Conversely, the activity of the R200D mutant significantly decreased with all cofactors. Furthermore, in yeast, the S199Y mutant substantially elevated the ethanol concentration compared with the wild type. Molecular dynamics simulation results indicated the H-bonding network between TeSADH and the cofactors was stronger for the S199Y mutant and the binding energy was simultaneously increased. Moreover, the fluorescence results indicated the S199Y mutant exhibited an increased preference for NAD(P)H, binding with NAD(P)H more compactly compared with wild type. PMID:27016086

  9. The two active sites in human branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase operate independently without an obligatory alternating-site mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Machius, Mischa; Chuang, Jacinta L; Wynn, R Max; Chuang, David T

    2007-04-20

    A long standing controversy is whether an alternating activesite mechanism occurs during catalysis in thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes. We address this question by investigating the ThDP-dependent decarboxylase/dehydrogenase (E1b) component of the mitochondrial branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC). Our crystal structure reveals that conformations of the two active sites in the human E1b heterotetramer harboring the reaction intermediate are identical. Acidic residues in the core of the E1b heterotetramer, which align with the proton-wire residues proposed to participate in active-site communication in the related pyruvate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, are mutated. Enzyme kinetic data show that, except in a few cases because of protein misfolding, these alterations are largely without effect on overall activity of BCKDC, ruling out the requirement of a proton-relay mechanism in E1b. BCKDC overall activity is nullified at 50% phosphorylation of E1b, but it is restored to nearly half of the pre-phosphorylation level after dissociation and reconstitution of BCKDC with the same phosphorylated E1b. The results suggest that the abolition of overall activity likely results from the specific geometry of the half-phosphorylated E1b in the BCKDC assembly and not due to a disruption of the alternating active-site mechanism. Finally, we show that a mutant E1b containing only one functional active site exhibits half of the wild-type BCKDC activity, which directly argues against the obligatory communication between active sites. The above results provide evidence that the two active sites in the E1b heterotetramer operate independently during the ThDP-dependent decarboxylation reaction. PMID:17329260

  10. Dual Role of the Active Site Residues of Thermus thermophilus 3-Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase: Chemical Catalysis and Domain Closure.

    PubMed

    Gráczer, Éva; Szimler, Tamás; Garamszegi, Anita; Konarev, Petr V; Lábas, Anikó; Oláh, Julianna; Palló, Anna; Svergun, Dmitri I; Merli, Angelo; Závodszky, Péter; Weiss, Manfred S; Vas, Mária

    2016-01-26

    The key active site residues K185, Y139, D217, D241, D245, and N102 of Thermus thermophilus 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (Tt-IPMDH) have been replaced, one by one, with Ala. A drastic decrease in the kcat value (0.06% compared to that of the wild-type enzyme) has been observed for the K185A and D241A mutants. Similarly, the catalytic interactions (Km values) of these two mutants with the substrate IPM are weakened by more than 1 order of magnitude. The other mutants retained some (1-13%) of the catalytic activity of the wild-type enzyme and do not exhibit appreciable changes in the substrate Km values. The pH dependence of the wild-type enzyme activity (pK = 7.4) is shifted toward higher values for mutants K185A and D241A (pK values of 8.4 and 8.5, respectively). For the other mutants, smaller changes have been observed. Consequently, K185 and D241 may constitute a proton relay system that can assist in the abstraction of a proton from the OH group of IPM during catalysis. Molecular dynamics simulations provide strong support for the neutral character of K185 in the resting state of the enzyme, which implies that K185 abstracts the proton from the substrate and D241 assists the process via electrostatic interactions with K185. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations revealed a significant increase in the activation energy of the hydride transfer of the redox step for both D217A and D241A mutants. Crystal structure analysis of the molecular contacts of the investigated residues in the enzyme-substrate complex revealed their additional importance (in particular that of K185, D217, and D241) in stabilizing the domain-closed active conformation. In accordance with this, small-angle X-ray scattering measurements indicated the complete absence of domain closure in the cases of D217A and D241A mutants, while only partial domain closure could be detected for the other mutants. This suggests that the same residues that are important for catalysis are also

  11. Detection of L-lactate in polyethylene glycol solutions confirms the identity of the active-site ligand in a proline dehydrogenase structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Tanner, John J

    2004-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is often used in protein crystallography as a low-ionic-strength precipitant for crystallization and as a cryoprotectant for low-temperature data collection. Prompted by the discovery of an apparent L-lactate molecule bound in the active site of the Escherichia coli PutA proline dehydrogenase domain crystal structure, the L-lactate concentration of several PEG solutions was measured. 50%(w/v) solutions of PEGs with molecular weight 3000, 4000 and 8000 contain millimolar levels of L-lactate. In contrast, L-lactate was not detected in solutions of PEG monomethyl ethers or PEG 3350. These results help to explain why L-lactate was present in the proline dehydrogenase domain crystal structure. This work also has implications for the crystallization of enzymes that bind L-lactate. PMID:15103160

  12. Subunits of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Cluster of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Are Surface-Displayed Proteins that Bind and Activate Human Plasminogen

    PubMed Central

    Gründel, Anne; Friedrich, Kathleen; Pfeiffer, Melanie; Jacobs, Enno; Dumke, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The dual role of glycolytic enzymes in cytosol-located metabolic processes and in cell surface-mediated functions with an influence on virulence is described for various micro-organisms. Cell wall-less bacteria of the class Mollicutes including the common human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae possess a reduced genome limiting the repertoire of virulence factors and metabolic pathways. After the initial contact of bacteria with cells of the respiratory epithelium via a specialized complex of adhesins and release of cell-damaging factors, surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes may facilitate the further interaction between host and microbe. In this study, we described detection of the four subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHA-D) among the cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins of M. pneumoniae. Subunits of PDH were cloned, expressed and purified to produce specific polyclonal guinea pig antisera. Using colony blotting, fractionation of total proteins and immunofluorescence experiments, the surface localization of PDHA-C was demonstrated. All recombinant PDH subunits are able to bind to HeLa cells and human plasminogen. These interactions can be specifically blocked by the corresponding polyclonal antisera. In addition, an influence of ionic interactions on PDHC-binding to plasminogen as well as of lysine residues on the association of PDHA-D with plasminogen was confirmed. The PDHB subunit was shown to activate plasminogen and the PDHB-plasminogen complex induces degradation of human fibrinogen. Hence, our data indicate that the surface-associated PDH subunits might play a role in the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae infections by interaction with human plasminogen. PMID:25978044

  13. Effect of Follicular Fluid and Platelet-Activating Factor on Lactate Dehydrogenase C Expression in Human Asthenozoospermic Samples

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Zarei, Mohmmad-Reza; Bahmanpour, Soghra; Aliabadi, Elham; Hosseini, Ahmad; Jaberipour, Mansooreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Application of follicular fluid (FF) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) in artificial insemination improves sperm motility. Lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C) is a key enzyme for sperm motility. In this study, the effects of FF and PAF on the sperm motility index and LDH-C expression were investigated. Moreover, LDH-C expression was compared between asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic samples. Methods: The expression of LDH-C was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT PCR) and western blotting after it was treated with optimized concentrations of FF and PAF in twenty asthenozoospermic samples. Also, LDH-C expression was evaluated in five normozoospermic samples. Results: Samples with 75% FF and 100 nM of PAF had an increase in their percentages of progressive and slowly motile sperms and a decrease in their percentages of non-progressive and non-motile sperms. Moreover, LDH-C mRNA transcripts were not changed following PAF and FF treatment, and LDH-C protein was detected in highly progressive motile specimens treated with FF in the asthenozoospermic samples. Furthermore, LDH-C expression was more detectable in the normal sperms. Conclusion: Our results indicated that PAF had more beneficial effects than FF on sperm motility in the asthenozoospermic samples (P=0.0001), although the LDH-C expressions of the sperms were not changed significantly in both groups. We found no association between LDH-C expression and sperm motility after FF and PAF actions. This finding, however, requires further investigation. The fact that LDH-C protein was detected in the normozoospermic, but not asthenozoospermic, samples could be cited as a reason for the infertility in these patients. PMID:24453390

  14. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chien-Jen; Li, Wan-Fen; Hsu, Ling-I; Tsai, Li-Yu; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Sun, Chien-Wen; Chen, Wei J.; Wang, Shu-Li

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ► We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ► LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ► Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  15. In vivo and in vitro effects of some plant hormones on rat erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities.

    PubMed

    Ciftçi, Mehmet; Demir, Yavuz; Ozmen, Ismail; Atici, Okkeş

    2003-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine in vivo and in vitro effects of some plant growth regulators on rat erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase (CA) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activities. Both in vivo and in vitro, spermidine and kinetin did not affect enzymatic activities of CA and G6PD, whereas putrescine decreased these activities, and abscisic acid increased them. Since plants use such growth regulators, their effects should be considered on mammals consuming them since they may possess important biological effects. PMID:12751824

  16. Development of Selective Inhibitors for Human Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) for the Enhancement of Cyclophosphamide Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Bibek; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M.; Fishel, Melissa L.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) plays an important role in many cellular oxidative processes, including cancer chemo-resistance by metabolizing activated forms of oxazaphosphorine drugs such as cyclophosphamide (CP) and its analogues such as mafosfamide (MF), ifosfamide (IFM), 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HPCP). Compounds that can selectively target ALDH3A1 may permit delineation of its roles in these processes and could restore chemosensitivity in cancer cells that express this isoenzyme. Here we report the detailed kinetic and structural characterization of an ALDH3A1 selective inhibitor, CB29, previously identified in a high throughput screen. Kinetic and crystallographic studies demonstrate that CB29 binds within the aldehyde substrate-binding site of ALDH3A1. Cellular proliferation of ALDH3A1-expressing lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and glioblastoma (SF767) cell lines, as well as the ALDH3A1 non-expressing lung fibroblast cells, CCD-13Lu, is unaffected by treatment with CB29 and its analogues alone. However, the sensitivity toward the anti-proliferative effects of mafosfamide is enhanced by treatment with CB29 and its analogue in the tumour cells. In contrast, the sensitivity of CCD-13Lu cells toward mafosfamide was unaffected by the addition of these same compounds. CB29 is chemically distinct from the previously reported small molecule inhibitors of ALDH isoenzymes and does not inhibit ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3, ALDH1B1 or ALDH2 isoenzymes at concentrations up to 250 μM. Thus, CB29 is a novel small molecule inhibitor of ALDH3A1, which may be useful as a chemical tool to delineate the role of ALDH3A1 in numerous metabolic pathways, including sensitizing ALDH3A1-positive cancer cells to oxazaphosphorines. PMID:24677340

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  18. Identification of active site lysyl residues of phenylalanine dehydrogenase by chemical modification with methyl acetyl phosphate combined with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, K; Tanizawa, K; Fukui, T; Ueno, H; Yoshimura, T; Esaki, N; Soda, K

    1994-12-01

    A monoanionic acetylation reagent, methyl acetyl phosphate, was used to acetylate lysyl residues of the recombinant thermostable phenylalanine dehydrogenase from Thermoactinomyces intermedius. The enzyme was irreversibly inactivated with the reagent in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous addition of substrate and coenzyme markedly protected the enzyme from inactivation. Acetylated lysyl residues presumably occurring at the active site were determined by differential modification; the enzyme was first modified with a cold reagent in the presence of both substrate and coenzyme and, after removal of the added substances by gel filtration, was then labeled with a radioactive reagent. At least 7 lysyl residues per enzyme subunit were radiolabeled by this method. To further specify the lysyl residue(s) whose modification results in inactivation of the enzyme, 5 lysyl residues highly conserved in various amino acid dehydrogenase sequences were replaced with Ala by site-directed mutagenesis. Although all of the single mutant enzymes were inactivated with the reagent as effectively as the wild-type enzyme, a double mutant enzyme in which both Lys-69 and Lys-81 were replaced with Ala was found to be inactivated very slowly. These results suggest that the reagent can acetylate both of these lysyl residues and inactivate the enzyme. Kinetic analyses of the single Lys-69 and Lys-81 mutant enzymes revealed that they are involved in substrate binding and catalysis, respectively, like the corresponding residues in the homologous leucine dehydrogenase. PMID:7706231

  19. Marked reduction of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and creatine kinase activities induced by acute lysine administration in glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Seminotti, Bianca; Zanatta, Ângela; Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Braga, Luisa Macedo; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Woontner, Michael; Koeller, David M; Goodman, Stephen; Wajner, Moacir

    2012-09-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I (GA I) is an inherited neurometabolic disorder caused by a severe deficiency of the mitochondrial glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity leading to accumulation of predominantly glutaric (GA) and 3-hydroxyglutaric (3HGA) acids in the brain and other tissues. Affected patients usually present with hypotonia and brain damage and acute encephalopathic episodes whose pathophysiology is not yet fully established. In this study we investigated important parameters of cellular bioenergetics in brain, heart and skeletal muscle from 15-day-old glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice (Gcdh(-/-)) submitted to a single intra-peritoneal injection of saline (Sal) or lysine (Lys - 8 μmol/g) as compared to wild type (WT) mice. We evaluated the activities of the respiratory chain complexes II, II-III and IV, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (α-KGDH), creatine kinase (CK) and synaptic Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. No differences of all evaluated parameters were detected in the Gcdh(-/-) relatively to the WT mice injected at baseline (Sal). Furthermore, mild increases of the activities of some respiratory chain complexes (II-III and IV) were observed in heart and skeletal muscle of Gcdh(-/-) and WT mice after Lys administration. However, the most marked effects provoked by Lys administration were marked decreases of the activities of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in brain and CK in brain and skeletal muscle of Gcdh(-/-) mice. In contrast, brain α-KGDH activity was not altered in WT and Gcdh(-/-) injected with Sal or Lys. Our results demonstrate that reduction of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and CK activities may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative changes in GA I. PMID:22578804

  20. The Effects of Piper Sarmentosum Water Extract on the Expression and Activity of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 in the Bones with Excessive Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Suhana Mohd Ramli, Elvy; Nirwana Soelaiman, Ima; Othman, Faizah; Ahmad, Fairus; Nazrun Shuib, Ahmad; Mohamed, Norazlina; Muhammad, Norliza; Hj Suhaimi, Farihah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Long-term glucocorticoid therapy causes secondary osteoporosis leading to pathological fractures. Glucocorticoid action in bone is dependant upon the activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 enzyme (11β-HSD1). Piper sarmentosum is a local herb that possesses the ability to inhibit 11-βHSD1 enzyme activity. We aimed to determine the effects of Piper sarmentosum water extract on 11-βHSD1 expressions and activity in the bones of glucocorticoid-treated adrenalectomized rats. Methods: Forty male Sprague–Dawley rats (200-250 g) were used. Twenty-four animals were adrenalectomized and received intramuscular injection of dexamethasone (120 μg/kg/day). They were simultaneously administered with either Piper sarmentosum water extract (125 mg/kg/day), GCA (120 mg/kg/day) or distilled water as vehicle by oral gavage for two months. Eight animals were sham-operated and given vehicle daily, i.e. intramuscular olive oil and oral distilled water. Results: Following two months treatment, dexamethasone-treated adrenalectomized rats had significantly lower 11β-HSD1 dehydrogenase activity and higher 11β-HSD1 expression in the femoral bones compared to the sham-operated and baseline group. The rats supplemented with Piper sarmentosum water extract had significantly higher 11β-HSD1 dehydrogenase activity and lower 11β-HSD1 expression in the bones. Conclusion: The results showed that Piper sarmentosum water extract had the ability to prevent glucocorcoticoid excess in the bones of glucocorticoid-treated adrenalectomized rats through the local modulation of 11β-HSD1 expression and activity, and may be used as prophylaxis for osteoporosis in patients on long-term glucocorticoid treatment. PMID:23115429

  1. Engineering activity and stability of Thermotoga maritima glutamate dehydrogenase. II: construction of a 16-residue ion-pair network at the subunit interface.

    PubMed

    Lebbink, J H; Knapp, S; van der Oost, J; Rice, D; Ladenstein, R; de Vos, W M

    1999-06-01

    The role of an 18-residue ion-pair network, that is present in the glutamate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, in conferring stability to other, less stable homologous enzymes, has been studied by introducing four new charged amino acid residues into the subunit interface of glutamate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. These two GDHs are 55 % identical in amino acid sequence, differ greatly in thermo-activity and stability and derive from microbes with different phylogenetic positions. Amino acid substitutions were introduced as single mutations as well as in several combinations. Elucidation of the crystal structure of the quadruple mutant S128R/T158E/N117R/S160E T. maritima glutamate dehydrogenase showed that all anticipated ion-pairs are formed and that a 16-residue ion-pair network is present. Enlargement of existing networks by single amino acid substitutions unexpectedly resulted in a decrease in resistance towards thermal inactivation and thermal denaturation. However, combination of destabilizing single mutations in most cases restored stability, indicating the need for balanced charges at subunit interfaces and high cooperativity between the different members of the network. Combination of the three destabilizing mutations in triple mutant S128R/T158E/N117R resulted in an enzyme with a 30 minutes longer half-life of inactivation at 85 degrees C, a 3 degrees C higher temperature optimum for catalysis, and a 0.5 degrees C higher apparent melting temperature than that of wild-type glutamate dehydrogenase. These findings confirm the hypothesis that large ion-pair networks do indeed stabilize enzymes from hyperthermophilic organisms. PMID:10366510

  2. A membrane-bound form of glutamate dehydrogenase possesses an ATP-dependent high-affinity microtubule-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rajas, F; Rousset, B

    1993-01-01

    We previously identified a 50 kDa membrane protein which bound to in vitro assembled microtubules [Mithieux and Rousset (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 4664-4668]. This protein exhibited the expected properties for mediating the ATP-dependent association of vesicles with microtubules [Mithieux, Audebet and Rousset (1988) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 969, 121-130]. The 50 kDa membrane protein (MP50), initially extracted in very low amount from isolated pig thyroid lysosomes/endosomes, has now been purified from membrane preparations of crude vesicle fractions from pig liver and brain. MP50 was isolated from detergent-solubilized membrane protein by affinity chromatography on immobilized ATP; 3-5 mg of MP50 was obtained from 100 g of liver tissue. Phase partitioning in Triton X-114 indicated that MP50 is a peripheral membrane protein. Radioiodinated liver MP50 bound to microtubules assembled in vitro. The binding was inhibited by ATP (Ki = 0.76 mM) and displaced by unlabelled liver or brain MP50. Equilibrium binding studies yielded KD values of 1.8 x 10(-7) M. By N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, MP50 was identified as glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), by comparison of V8 protease peptide maps of MP50 with purified liver GDH. Liver MP50 exhibited a low GDH activity; 4-5 units/mg compared with 18 and 34 units/mg for purified bovine and rat liver GDH respectively. Bovine and rat liver GDH yielded six spots from pI 5.7 to 7.2 when analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; in contrast, MP50 gave one main spot (corresponding to spot 2 of liver GDH) with a pI of approx. 6.5. Soluble liver GDH from commercial sources exhibited a very low or no microtubule-binding activity. In conclusion, we have found a membrane-bound form of GDH capable of specific and nucleotide-sensitive interaction with microtubules. Our data suggest that GDH isoproteins, the number of which has been undervalued up to now, could have cellular functions other than that of an enzyme. Images Figure 1 Figure 3

  3. Protein Conformational Landscapes and Catalysis. Influence of Active Site Conformations in the Reaction Catalyzed by L-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) has become an extremely useful marker in both clinical diagnosis and in monitoring the course of many human diseases. It has been assumed from the 80s that the full catalytic process of LDH starts with the binding of the cofactor and the substrate followed by the enclosure of the active site by a mobile loop of the protein before the reaction to take place. In this paper we show that the chemical step of the LDH catalyzed reaction can proceed within the open loop conformation, and the different reactivity of the different protein conformations would be in agreement with the broad range of rate constants measured in single molecule spectrometry studies. Starting from a recently solved X-ray diffraction structure that presented an open loop conformation in two of the four chains of the tetramer, QM/MM free energy surfaces have been obtained at different levels of theory. Depending on the level of theory used to describe the electronic structure, the free energy barrier for the transformation of pyruvate into lactate with the open conformation of the protein varies between 12.9 and 16.3 kcal/mol, after quantizing the vibrations and adding the contributions of recrossing and tunneling effects. These values are very close to the experimentally deduced one (14.2 kcal·mol−1) and ~2 kcal·mol−1 smaller than the ones obtained with the closed loop conformer. Calculation of primary KIEs and IR spectra in both protein conformations are also consistent with our hypothesis and in agreement with experimental data. Our calculations suggest that the closure of the active site is mainly required for the inverse process; the oxidation of lactate to pyruvate. According to this hypothesis H4 type LDH enzyme molecules, where it has been propose that lactate is transformed into pyruvate, should have a better ability to close the mobile loop than the M4 type LDH molecules. PMID:25705562

  4. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  5. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Experimental Approach Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Key Results Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Conclusions and Implications Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. PMID:25161074

  6. Structural insights into the efficient CO2-reducing activity of an NAD-dependent formate dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hyunjun; Ha, Jung Min; Joo, Jeong Chan; Kim, Hyunook; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Seonghoon; Son, Sang Hyeon; Gengan, Robert M; Jeon, Seung Taeg; Chang, Rakwoo; Jung, Kwang Deog; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2015-02-01

    CO2 fixation is thought to be one of the key factors in mitigating global warming. Of the various methods for removing CO2, the NAD-dependent formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) has been widely used in various biological CO2-reduction systems; however, practical applications of CbFDH have often been impeded owing to its low CO2-reducing activity. It has recently been demonstrated that the NAD-dependent formate dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH) has a higher CO2-reducing activity compared with CbFDH. The crystal structure of TsFDH revealed that the biological unit in the asymmetric unit has two conformations, i.e. open (NAD(+)-unbound) and closed (NAD(+)-bound) forms. Three major differences are observed in the crystal structures of TsFDH and CbFDH. Firstly, hole 2 in TsFDH is blocked by helix α20, whereas it is not blocked in CbFDH. Secondly, the sizes of holes 1 and 2 are larger in TsFDH than in CbFDH. Thirdly, Lys287 in TsFDH, which is crucial for the capture of formate and its subsequent delivery to the active site, is an alanine in CbFDH. A computational simulation suggested that the higher CO2-reducing activity of TsFDH is owing to its lower free-energy barrier to CO2 reduction than in CbFDH. PMID:25664741

  7. Effect of sinusoidal modulated currents and acute hypoxia on corticosterone content and activity of certain dehydrogenases in tissues of different rat organs during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melik-Aslanova, L. L.; Frenkel, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The state of hypokinesia in rats was reproduced by keeping them for 30 days in special box cages that restricted their mobility in all directions. Results show the resistance to acute hypoxic hypoxia is increased. This is linked to the considerable rise in the reduced level of corticosterone in different organs and the succinate dehydrogenase activity in the liver and brain. The letter indicated the primary oxidation of succinate, which has great importance in the adaptation of the oxidative metabolism to acute oxygen insufficiency. The use of sinusoidal modulated currents in the period of hypokinesia promotes normalization of the indices for resistance of the rats to acute hypoxia.

  8. Site directed immobilization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase via thiol-disulfide interchange: influence on catalytic activity of cysteines introduced at different positions.

    PubMed

    Simons, J R; Mosisch, M; Torda, A E; Hilterhaus, L

    2013-08-10

    This study shows the effect of site-directed enzyme immobilization upon the enzyme activity of covalently bound glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Immobilization points were introduced at sterically accessible sites in order to control the protein's orientation and twice as much activity was recovered in comparison to conventionally immobilized enzyme. Immobilization of G6PDH via genetically engineered cysteine provided a simple, but effective method to control the immobilization process. G6PDH variants with cysteine close to the active center (L218C), close to the dimer interface (D205C) as well as far from the active center (D453C) showed changes in activity and the efficacy of immobilization. PMID:23770076

  9. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase. PMID:27054466

  10. KlGcr1 controls glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and responses to H2O2, cadmium and arsenate in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Becerra, Manuel; González-Siso, Ma Isabel; Cerdán, Ma Esperanza

    2015-09-01

    It has been previously reported that Gcr1 differentially controls growth and sugar utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, although the regulatory mechanisms causing activation of glycolytic genes are conserved (Neil et al., 2004). We have found that KlGCR1 deletion diminishes glucose consumption and ethanol production, but increases resistance to oxidative stress caused by H2O2, cadmium and arsenate, glucose 6P dehydrogenase activity, and the NADPH/NADP(+) and GSH/GSSG ratios in K. lactis. The gene KlZWF1 that encodes for glucose 6P dehydrogenase, the first enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, is transcriptionally regulated by KlGcr1. The high resistance to oxidative stress observed in the ΔKlgcr1 mutant strain, could be explained as a consequence of an increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway. Since mitochondrial respiration decreases in the ΔKlgcr1 mutant (García-Leiro et al., 2010), the reoxidation of the NADPH, produced through the pentose phosphate pathway, has to be achieved by the reduction of other molecules implied in the defense against oxidative stress, like GSSG. The higher GSH/GSSG ratio in the mutant would explain its phenotype of increased resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:26164373

  11. Mild reductions in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in altered nitrate assimilation and pigmentation but do not impact growth.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Sulpice, Ronan; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Leisse, Andrea; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Hodges, Michael; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlIDH1) in the antisense orientation. The transgenic plants displayed a mild reduction in the activity of the target enzyme in the leaves but essentially no visible alteration in growth from the wild-type. Fruit size and yield were, however, reduced. These plants were characterized by relatively few changes in photosynthetic parameters, but they displayed a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm). Furthermore, a clear reduction in flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed in the transformants. Additionally, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited considerably altered metabolism, being characterized by slight decreases in the levels of amino acids, intermediates of the TCA cycle, photosynthetic pigments, starch, and NAD(P)H levels, but increased levels of nitrate and protein. Results from these studies show that even small changes in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in nitrate assimilation and suggest the presence of different strategies by which metabolism is reprogrammed to compensate for this deficiency. PMID:20035036

  12. Conformational Change Near the Redox Center of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Induced by NAD(+) to Regulate the Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Fukamichi, Tomoe; Nishimoto, Etsuko

    2015-05-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) transfers two electrons from dihydrolipoamide (DHL) to NAD(+) mediated by FAD. Since this reaction is the final step of a series of catalytic reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase multi-enzyme complex (PDC), LipDH is a key enzyme to maintain the fluent metabolic flow. We reported here the conformational change near the redox center of LipDH induced by NAD(+) promoting the access of the DHL to FAD. The increase in the affinity of DHL to redox center was evidenced by the decrease in K M responding to the increase in the concentration of NAD(+) in Lineweaver-Burk plots. The fluorescence intensity of FAD transiently reduced by the addition of DHL was not recovered but rather reduced by the binding of NAD(+) with LipDH. The fluorescence decay lifetimes of FAD and Trp were prolonged in the presence of NAD(+) to show that FAD would be free from the electron transfer from the neighboring Tyrs and the resonance energy transfer efficiency between Trp and FAD lowered. These results consistently reveal that the conformation near the FAD and the surroundings would be so rearranged by NAD(+) to allow the easier access of DHL to the redox center of LipDH. PMID:25757537

  13. Purification and characterization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from the wing-polymorphic cricket, Gryllus firmus, and assessment of causes of morph-differences in enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zera, Anthony J; Wehrkamp, Cody; Schilder, Rudolf; Black, Christine; Gribben, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Considerable information exists on the physiological correlates of life history adaptation, while molecular data on this topic are rapidly accumulating. However, much less is known about the enzymological basis of life history adaptation in outbred populations. In the present study, we compared developmental profiles of fat body specific activity, kinetic constants of homogeneously purified and unpurified enzyme, and fat body enzyme concentration of the pentose-shunt enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH, E.C.1.1.1.44) between the dispersing [long-winged, LW(f)] and flightless [short-winged, SW] genotypes of the cricket Gryllus firmus. Neither kcat nor the Michaelis constant for 6-phosphogluconate differed between 6PGDH from LW(f) versus SW morphs for either homogeneously purified or unpurified enzyme. Purified enzyme from the LW(f) morph exhibited reduced KM for NADP(+), but this was not observed for multiple KM(NADP+) estimates for unpurified enzyme. A polyclonal antibody was generated against 6PGDH which was used to develop a chemiluminescence assay to quantify 6PGDH concentration in fat body homogenates. Elevated enzyme concentration accounted for all of the elevated 6PGDH specific activity in the LW(f) morph during the juvenile and adult stages. Finally, activity of another pentose-shunt enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, strongly covaried with 6PGDH activity suggesting that variation in 6PGDH activity gives rise to variation in pentose shunt flux. This is one of the first life-history studies and one of the few studies of intraspecific enzyme adaptation to identify the relative importance of evolutionary change in enzyme concentration vs. kinetic constants to adaptive variation in enzyme activity in an outbred population. PMID:24726622

  14. Enhancement of L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels by pantethine. Relevance to dopaminergic injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The administration of the ketone bodies hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate is known to exert a protective effect against metabolic disorders associated with cerebral pathologies. This suggests that the enhancement of their endogenous production might be a rational therapeutic approach. Ketone bodies are generated by fatty acid beta-oxidation, a process involving a mitochondrial oxido-reductase superfamily, with fatty acid-CoA thioesters as substrates. In this report, emphasis is on the penultimate step of the process, i.e. L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. We determined changes in enzyme activity and in circulating ketone body levels in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Since the active moiety of CoA is pantetheine, mice were treated with pantethine, its naturally-occurring form. Pantethine has the advantage of being known as an anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic agent with very few side effects. Results We found that dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels were drastically reduced by the neurotoxin MPTP, whereas treatment with pantethine overcame these adverse effects. Pantethine prevented dopaminergic neuron loss and motility disorders. In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that the protection was associated with enhancement of glutathione (GSH) production as well as restoration of respiratory chain complex I activity and mitochondrial ATP levels. Remarkably, pantethine treatment boosted the circulating ketone body levels in MPTP-intoxicated mice, but not in normal animals. Conclusions These finding demonstrate the feasibility of the enhancement of endogenous ketone body production and provide a promising therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease as well as, conceivably, to other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20416081

  15. Hydroperoxidic inhibitor of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity, tightly bound to the enzyme-NAD+ complex, characteristically degrades the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Skurský, L; Rezác, M; Khan, A N; Zídek, L; Rocek, J

    1992-01-01

    The strong inhibition of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLAD) by p-methylbenzyl hydroperoxide (XyHP) is only transient, XyHP behaves also as a pseudo-substrate of the enzyme and in the presence of NAD+, is degraded by HLAD to (as yet unidentified) non-inhibiting products while the NAD+ is converted to a derivative similar to the "NADX", originally observed in an analogous reaction of HLAD with hydrogen peroxide. The apparent KM for XyHP is approximately 10(4) times smaller than that for H2O2. The catalytic constant kcat for HLAD degradation of XyHP is two orders of magnitude less than that for ethanol dehydrogenation. XyHP inhibits both directions of the alcohol-aldehyde interconversion with equal potency. The first step of the inhibition mechanism is a tight binding of XyHP to the binary HLAD-NAD+ complex. PMID:1284958

  16. Maternal coordination of the daily rhythm of malate dehydrogenase activity in testes from young rats: effect of maternal sympathetic denervation of the pineal gland and administration of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Carriazo, C S; Gallará, R V; Carpentieri, A R; Bellavía, S L

    1995-02-01

    Chronic sympathetic denervation of the pineal gland by bilateral removal of the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) was performed on female rats 30 days before impregnation. The offspring, maintained in the dark from birth, had disruption of the malate dehydrogenase circadian rhythm in the testes at 25 days of age. A daily injection of melatonin (1 mg/kg s.c. at 10:00 or 18:00 h) to denervated mothers from the 14th day of pregnancy up to the 10th day postpartum produced one daily phase in the enzyme activity of tests in the offspring. Entrainment of daily enzyme activity also was obtained when the hormone was administered orally to the pups during the postnatal period or when pups were reared by intact (not denervated) foster mothers. The results indicate the involvement of the maternal pineal gland in the maternal transfer of photoperiodic information necessary for the coordination of the circadian system in young rats. PMID:7750160

  17. High-Affinity Inhibitors of Human NAD+-Dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase: Mechanisms of Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, Frank H.; Schultz, Lena; Jadhav, Ajit; Bhatia, Chitra; Guo, Kunde; Maloney, David J.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Wang, Minghua; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH, EC 1.1.1.141) is the key enzyme for the inactivation of prostaglandins, regulating processes such as inflammation or proliferation. The anabolic pathways of prostaglandins, especially with respect to regulation of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes have been studied in detail; however, little is known about downstream events including functional interaction of prostaglandin-processing and -metabolizing enzymes. High-affinity probes for 15-PGDH will, therefore, represent important tools for further studies. Principal Findings To identify novel high-affinity inhibitors of 15-PGDH we performed a quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) by testing >160 thousand compounds in a concentration-response format and identified compounds that act as noncompetitive inhibitors as well as a competitive inhibitor, with nanomolar affinity. Both types of inhibitors caused strong thermal stabilization of the enzyme, with cofactor dependencies correlating with their mechanism of action. We solved the structure of human 15-PGDH and explored the binding modes of the inhibitors to the enzyme in silico. We found binding modes that are consistent with the observed mechanisms of action. Conclusions Low cross-reactivity in screens of over 320 targets, including three other human dehydrogenases/reductases, suggest selectivity of the present inhibitors for 15-PGDH. The high potencies and different mechanisms of action of these chemotypes make them a useful set of complementary chemical probes for functional studies of prostaglandin-signaling pathways. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S2. PMID:21072165

  18. Increased 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 and 17α-hydroxylase activities in a virilized adolescent female with adrenal adenoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GUOQING; DOU, JINGTAO; ZHANG, XIAOLIN; GU, WEIJUN; LV, ZHAOHUI; DU, JIN; BA, JIANMING; MU, YIMING; LU, JUMING

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the case of a female patient with pseudo-hermaphrodism caused by an androgen-producing adrenocortical tumor is presented, and the possible mechanism is investigated. The expression of the luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin (LH/hCG) receptor in tumor tissues and normal adrenal tissues was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the activities of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (HSD2), cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase (CYP17) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (HSD3) enzymes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expression levels of 3β-HSD2, 17β-HSD3, CYP17 and LH/hCG receptor mRNA were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Immunohistochemical staining for the LH/hCG receptor was negative in the tumor tissue and positive in the normal adrenal tissue. The activities of 3β-HSD2 and CYP17 in the tumor tissue were higher than those in the normal tissue (P<0.01), whereas the activity of 17β-HSD3 was lower (P<0.01). The mRNA levels of 3β-HSD2 and CYP17 were higher (P<0.01) and the levels of 17β-HSD3 and LH/hCG receptor were lower (P<0.01) in the tumor tissue compared with those of the normal tissue. In conclusion, in the present study, a rare case of virilization by an androgen-producing adrenocortical tumor is present. The results indicate that it may be associated with increased activities of 3β-HSD2 and CYP17 but not with the expression of the LH/hCG receptor. PMID:26893641

  19. Evidence that the C-terminal domain of a type B PutA protein contributes to aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and substrate channeling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Min; Christgen, Shelbi; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Arentson, Benjamin W; Becker, Donald F; Tanner, John J

    2014-09-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. Structures of type A PutAs have revealed the catalytic core consisting of proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) modules connected by a substrate-channeling tunnel. Type B PutAs also have a C-terminal domain of unknown function (CTDUF) that is absent in type A PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), mutagenesis, and kinetics are used to determine the contributions of this domain to PutA structure and function. The 1127-residue Rhodobacter capsulatus PutA (RcPutA) is used as a representative CTDUF-containing type B PutA. The reaction progress curve for the coupled PRODH-P5CDH activity of RcPutA does not exhibit a time lag, implying a substrate channeling mechanism. RcPutA is monomeric in solution, which is unprecedented for PutAs. SAXS rigid body modeling with target-decoy validation is used to build a model of RcPutA. On the basis of homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), the CTDUF is predicted to consist of a β-hairpin fused to a noncatalytic Rossmann fold domain. The predicted tertiary structural interactions of the CTDUF resemble the quaternary structural interactions in the type A PutA dimer interface. The model is tested by mutagenesis of the dimerization hairpin of a type A PutA and the CTDUF hairpin of RcPutA. Similar functional phenotypes are observed in the two sets of variants, supporting the hypothesis that the CTDUF mimics the type A PutA dimer interface. These results suggest annotation of the CTDUF as an ALDH superfamily domain that facilitates P5CDH activity and substrate channeling by stabilizing the aldehyde-binding site and sealing the substrate-channeling tunnel from the bulk medium. PMID:25137435

  20. Evidence That the C-Terminal Domain of a Type B PutA Protein Contributes to Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity and Substrate Channeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. Structures of type A PutAs have revealed the catalytic core consisting of proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) modules connected by a substrate-channeling tunnel. Type B PutAs also have a C-terminal domain of unknown function (CTDUF) that is absent in type A PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), mutagenesis, and kinetics are used to determine the contributions of this domain to PutA structure and function. The 1127-residue Rhodobacter capsulatus PutA (RcPutA) is used as a representative CTDUF-containing type B PutA. The reaction progress curve for the coupled PRODH–P5CDH activity of RcPutA does not exhibit a time lag, implying a substrate channeling mechanism. RcPutA is monomeric in solution, which is unprecedented for PutAs. SAXS rigid body modeling with target–decoy validation is used to build a model of RcPutA. On the basis of homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), the CTDUF is predicted to consist of a β-hairpin fused to a noncatalytic Rossmann fold domain. The predicted tertiary structural interactions of the CTDUF resemble the quaternary structural interactions in the type A PutA dimer interface. The model is tested by mutagenesis of the dimerization hairpin of a type A PutA and the CTDUF hairpin of RcPutA. Similar functional phenotypes are observed in the two sets of variants, supporting the hypothesis that the CTDUF mimics the type A PutA dimer interface. These results suggest annotation of the CTDUF as an ALDH superfamily domain that facilitates P5CDH activity and substrate channeling by stabilizing the aldehyde-binding site and sealing the substrate-channeling tunnel from the bulk medium. PMID:25137435

  1. MUC1-C Oncoprotein Activates ERK→C/EBPβ Signaling and Induction of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 in Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Maroof; Ahmad, Rehan; Rajabi, Hasan; Kharbanda, Akriti; Kufe, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) activity is used as a marker of breast cancer stem cells; however, little is known about the regulation of ALDH1A1 expression. Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a heterodimeric protein that is aberrantly overexpressed in most human breast cancers. In studies of breast cancer cells stably silenced for MUC1 or overexpressing the oncogenic MUC1-C subunit, we demonstrate that MUC1-C is sufficient for induction of MEK→ERK signaling and that treatment with a MUC1-C inhibitor suppresses ERK activation. In turn, MUC1-C induces ERK-mediated phosphorylation and activation of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) transcription factor. The results further show that MUC1-C and C/EBPβ form a complex on the ALDH1A1 gene promoter and activate ALDH1A1 gene transcription. MUC1-C-induced up-regulation of ALDH1A1 expression is associated with increases in ALDH activity and is detectable in stem-like cells when expanded as mammospheres. These findings demonstrate that MUC1-C (i) activates a previously unrecognized ERK→C/EBPβ→ALDH1A1 pathway, and (ii) promotes the induction of ALDH activity in breast cancer cells. PMID:24043631

  2. Real-time monitoring of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity using liquid droplet arrays and its application to human plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Jung, Se-Hui; Ji, Su-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-05-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) regulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) levels and is related to the pathogenesis of various diseases, including G6PD deficiency, type 2 diabetes, aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, and cancer. Therefore, a highly sensitive array-based assay for determining quantitative G6PD activity is required. Here, we developed an on-chip G6PD activity assay using liquid droplet fluorescence arrays. Quantitative G6PD activity was determined by calculating reduced resorufin concentrations in liquid droplets. The limit of detection (LOD) of this assay was 0.162 mU/ml (2.89 pM), which is much more sensitive than previous assays. We used our activity assay to determine kinetic parameters, including Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) and maximum rates of enzymatic reaction (Vmax) for NADP(+) and G6P, and half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50). We successfully applied this new assay to determine G6PD activity in human plasma from normal healthy individuals (n=30) and patients with inflammation (n=30). The inflammatory group showed much higher G6PD activities than did the normal group (p<0.001), with a high area under the curve value of 0.939. Therefore, this new activity assay has the potential to be used for diagnosis of G6PD-associated diseases and utilizing kinetic studies. PMID:26802575

  3. Annotated compound data for modulators of detergent-solubilised or lipid-reconstituted respiratory type II NADH dehydrogenase activity obtained by compound library screening

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Elyse A.; Cook, Gregory M.; Heikal, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The energy-generating membrane protein NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2), a proposed antibacterial drug target (see “Inhibitors of type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase represent a class of antitubercular drugs” Weinstein et al. 2005 [1]), was screened for modulators of activity in either detergent-solublised or lipid reconstituted (proteolipsome) form. Here we present an annotated list of compounds identified in a small-scale screen against NDH-2. The dataset contains information regarding the libraries screened, the identities of hit compounds and the physicochemical properties governing solubility and permeability. The implications of these data for future antibiotic discovery are discussed in our associated report, “Comparison of lipid and detergent enzyme environments for identifying inhibitors of membrane-bound energy-transducing proteins” [2]. PMID:26862571

  4. Prostate cancer cells metabolize d-lactate inside mitochondria via a D-lactate dehydrogenase which is more active and highly expressed than in normal cells.

    PubMed

    de Bari, Lidia; Moro, Loredana; Passarella, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Although D-lactate metabolism has been shown to occur in a variety of mitochondria, the metabolic fate of D-lactate in cancer cells has never been investigated, as it is believed to be exported to the extracellular phase. We show that mitochondria from both cancer (PC-3) and normal (PNT1A) prostate cells can metabolize D-lactate in an energy competent manner. This is due to the mitochondrial D-lactate dehydrogenase, a membrane flavoprotein, the activity and protein level of which are higher in PC-3 than in PNT1A cells, as detected by both kinetic and immunological analysis. D-Lactate can enter prostate mitochondria and cause the export of newly synthesized malate in a carrier-mediated manner, with the rate of malate efflux from mitochondria twofold higher in cancer. PMID:23333299

  5. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  6. Structure of a bacterial enzyme regulated by phosphorylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J H; Thorsness, P E; Ramalingam, V; Helmers, N H; Koshland, D E; Stroud, R M

    1989-11-01

    The structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase [threo-DS-isocitrate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42] from Escherichia coli has been solved and refined at 2.5 A resolution and is topologically different from that of any other dehydrogenase. This enzyme, a dimer of identical 416-residue subunits, is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-113, which lies at the edge of an interdomain pocket that also contains many residues conserved between isocitrate dehydrogenase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Isocitrate dehydrogenase contains an unusual clasp-like domain in which both polypeptide chains in the dimer interlock. Based on the structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase and conservation with isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, we suggest that the active site lies in an interdomain pocket close to the phosphorylation site. PMID:2682654

  7. Tetrahydro-2-naphthyl and 2-Indanyl Triazolopyrimidines Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Display Potent and Selective Antimalarial Activity.

    PubMed

    Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Deng, Xiaoyi; White, Karen L; Coteron, Jose M; Marco, Maria; de Las Heras, Laura; White, John; El Mazouni, Farah; Tomchick, Diana R; Manjalanagara, Krishne; Rudra, Kakali Rani; Chen, Gong; Morizzi, Julia; Ryan, Eileen; Kaminsky, Werner; Leroy, Didier; Martínez-Martínez, María Santos; Jimenez-Diaz, Maria Belen; Bazaga, Santiago Ferrer; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Waterson, David; Burrows, Jeremy N; Matthews, Dave; Charman, Susan A; Phillips, Margaret A; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2016-06-01

    Malaria persists as one of the most devastating global infectious diseases. The pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has been identified as a new malaria drug target, and a triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitor 1 (DSM265) is in clinical development. We sought to identify compounds with higher potency against Plasmodium DHODH while showing greater selectivity toward animal DHODHs. Herein we describe a series of novel triazolopyrimidines wherein the p-SF5-aniline was replaced with substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl or 2-indanyl amines. These compounds showed strong species selectivity, and several highly potent tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives were identified. Compounds with halogen substitutions displayed sustained plasma levels after oral dosing in rodents leading to efficacy in the P. falciparum SCID mouse malaria model. These data suggest that tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives have the potential to be efficacious for the treatment of malaria, but due to higher metabolic clearance than 1, they most likely would need to be part of a multidose regimen. PMID:27127993

  8. Salt-induction of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity in sugar beet. [Beta vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    In Chenopodiaceae such as sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), glycine betaine (betaine) accumulates in response to drought or salinity stress and functions in the cytoplasm as a compatible osmolyte. The last enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH), increases as much as 4-fold in response to rising salinity in the external medium. This increase is accompanied by an increase in both protein and mRNA levels. The steady state increases in BADH were examined at a series of NaCl concentrations from 100 to 500 mM NaCl. BADH protein levels were examined by native PAGE, and by western blot analysis using antibodies raised against BADH purified from spinach. mRNA levels were examined by northern plot analysis of total RNA isolated from the leaves and hybridized with a sugar beet BADH cDNA clone. The time course for BADH mRNA induction was determined in a salt shock experiment utilizing 400 mM NaCl added to the external growth medium. Disappearance of BADH was examined in a salt relief experiment using plants step-wise salinized to 500 mM NaCl and then returned to 0 mM NaCl.

  9. Tetrahydro-2-naphthyl and 2-Indanyl Triazolopyrimidines Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Display Potent and Selective Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Malaria persists as one of the most devastating global infectious diseases. The pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has been identified as a new malaria drug target, and a triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitor 1 (DSM265) is in clinical development. We sought to identify compounds with higher potency against Plasmodium DHODH while showing greater selectivity toward animal DHODHs. Herein we describe a series of novel triazolopyrimidines wherein the p-SF5-aniline was replaced with substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl or 2-indanyl amines. These compounds showed strong species selectivity, and several highly potent tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives were identified. Compounds with halogen substitutions displayed sustained plasma levels after oral dosing in rodents leading to efficacy in the P. falciparum SCID mouse malaria model. These data suggest that tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives have the potential to be efficacious for the treatment of malaria, but due to higher metabolic clearance than 1, they most likely would need to be part of a multidose regimen. PMID:27127993

  10. Requirement of the expression of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase for traversing S phase in murine T lymphocytes following immobilized anti-CD3 activation.

    PubMed

    Jun, Do Youn; Taub, Dennis; Chrest, Francis J; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-02-01

    Murine resting (G(0)) T lymphocytes contained no detectable mRNA of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) catalyzing the first step in the phosphorylated pathway of l-serine biosynthesis. Immobilized anti-CD3 activation of G(0) T cells expressed the PHGDH mRNA in G(1) with a maximum level in S phase. G(0) T cells activated with either immobilized anti-CD3 plus CsA or PBu(2), which failed to drive the activated T cells to enter S phase, did not express the PHGDH mRNA unless exogenous rIL-2 was added. Blocking of IL-2R signaling by adding anti-IL-2 and anti-IL-2Rα resulted in no expression of the PHGDH mRNA during immobilized anti-CD3 activation of G(0) T cells. Deprivation of l-serine from culture medium or addition of antisense PHGDH oligonucleotide significantly reduced [(3)H]TdR incorporation of activated T cells. These results indicate that the PHGDH gene expression, dictated by IL-2R signaling, is a crucial event for DNA synthesis during S phase of activated T cells. PMID:24434753

  11. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis implementing a Mendelian randomization approach.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Stefania; Hashibe, Mia; Gallì, Paola; De Feo, Emma; Asakage, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Hiraki, Akio; Katoh, Takahiko; Nomura, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Boffetta, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol drinking at high doses is a risk factor for head and neck cancer, and exposure to acetaldehyde, the principle metabolite of alcohol, is supposed to account for the increased risk. Individuals homozygous for the 2 variant allele of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) are unable to metabolize acetaldehyde, which prevents them from alcohol drinking, whereas 1 2 have 6-fold higher blood acetaldehyde concentration postalcohol consumption with respect to 1 1. According to the concept of Mendelian randomization, because this polymorphism is distributed randomly during gamete formation, its association with head and neck cancer should be not confounded by smoking. We carried out a meta-analysis of ALDH2 and head and neck cancer searching for relevant studies on Medline and Embase up to January 31, 2008, and investigated the consistency between the expected odds ratio (OR) among drinkers from the largest pooled analysis among never smokers and the observed OR from this meta-analysis by an interaction test. Six studies were selected (945 cases, 2,917 controls). The OR of head and neck cancer among 2 2 was 0.53 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.28-1.00] relative to 1 1 and 1.83 (95% CI, 1.21-2.77) among 1 2. The expected OR for head and neck cancer due to alcohol intake among 1 1 was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.88-2.17) and the observed OR among 1 1 compared with 2*2 from this meta-analysis was 1.88 (95% CI, 1.00-3.57; P for interaction = 0.43). Besides showing the effectiveness of the Mendelian randomization approach, these findings support the theory that alcohol increases head and neck cancer risk through the carcinogenic action of acetaldehyde. PMID:19124505

  12. Formaldehyde dehydrogenase preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) comprise methanol dehydrogenase and methylene tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Adeosun, Ekundayo K; Smith, Thomas J; Hoberg, Anne-Mette; Velarde, Giles; Ford, Robert; Dalton, Howard

    2004-03-01

    In methylotrophic bacteria, formaldehyde is an important but potentially toxic metabolic intermediate that can be assimilated into biomass or oxidized to yield energy. Previously reported was the purification of an NAD(P)(+)-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) from the obligate methane-oxidizing methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), presumably important in formaldehyde oxidation, which required a heat-stable factor (known as the modifin) for FDH activity. Here, the major protein component of this FDH preparation was shown by biophysical techniques to comprise subunits of 64 and 8 kDa in an alpha(2)beta(2) arrangement. N-terminal sequencing of the subunits of FDH, together with enzymological characterization, showed that the alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer was a quinoprotein methanol dehydrogenase of the type found in other methylotrophs. The FDH preparations were shown to contain a highly active NAD(P)(+)-dependent methylene tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase that was the probable source of the NAD(P)(+)-dependent formaldehyde oxidation activity. These results support previous findings that methylotrophs possess multiple pathways for formaldehyde dissimilation. PMID:14993320

  13. Sca-1+ cells from fetal heart with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity exhibit enhanced gene expression for self-renewal, proliferation, and survival.

    PubMed

    Dey, Devaveena; Pan, Guodong; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S; Palaniyandi, Suresh Selvaraj

    2015-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cells from multiple tissues have been isolated based on enhanced activity of cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme. ALDH activity has emerged as a reliable marker for stem/progenitor cells, such that ALDH(bright/high) cells from multiple tissues have been shown to possess enhanced stemness properties (self-renewal and multipotency). So far though, not much is known about ALDH activity in specific fetal organs. In this study, we sought to analyze the presence and activity of the ALDH enzyme in the stem cell antigen-1-positive (Sca-1+) cells of fetal human heart. Biochemical assays showed that a subpopulation of Sca-1+ cells (15%) possess significantly high ALDH1 activity. This subpopulation showed increased expression of self-renewal markers compared to the ALDH(low) fraction. The ALDH(high) fraction also exhibited significant increase in proliferation and pro-survival gene expression. In addition, only the ALDH(high) and not the ALDH(low) fraction could give rise to all the cell types of the original population, demonstrating multipotency. ALDH(high) cells showed increased resistance against aldehyde challenge compared to ALDH(low) cells. These results indicate that ALDH(high) subpopulation of the cultured human fetal cells has enhanced self-renewal, multipotency, high proliferation, and survival, indicating that this might represent a primitive stem cell population within the fetal human heart. PMID:25861413

  14. A Conserved Active Site Tyrosine Residue of Proline Dehydrogenase Helps Enforce the Preference for Proline over Hydroxyproline as the Substrate†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Ostrander, Elizabeth L.; Larson, John D.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to Delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. PRODHs exhibit a pronounced preference for proline over hydroxyproline (trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline) as the substrate, but the basis for specificity is unknown. The goal of this study, therefore, is to gain insights into the structural determinants of substrate specificity of this class of enzyme, with a focus on understanding how PRODHs discriminate between the two closely related molecules, proline and hydroxyproline. Two site-directed mutants of the PRODH domain of Escherichia coli PutA were created: Y540A and Y540S. Kinetics measurements were performed with both mutants. Crystal structures of Y540S complexed with hydroxyproline, proline, and the proline analog L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid were determined at resolutions of 1.75 Å, 1.90 Å and 1.85 Å. Mutation of Tyr540 increases the catalytic efficiency for hydroxyproline three-fold and decreases the specificity for proline by factors of twenty (Y540S) and fifty (Y540A). The structures show that removal of the large phenol side chain increases the volume of the substrate-binding pocket, allowing sufficient room for the 4-hydroxyl of hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the introduced serine residue participates in recognition of hydroxyproline by forming a hydrogen bond with the 4-hydroxyl. This result has implications for understanding substrate specificity of the related enzyme human hydroxyproline dehydrogenase, which has serine in place of tyrosine at this key active site position. The kinetic and structural results suggest that Tyr540 is an important determinant of specificity. Structurally, it serves as a negative filter for hydroxyproline by clashing with the 4-hydroxyl group of this potential substrate. PMID:19140736

  15. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived From a Reproductive Tissue Niche Under Oxidative Stress Have High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Gina D; Abumaree, Mohamed H; Pertile, Mark D; Perkins, Anthony V; Brennecke, Shaun P; Kalionis, Bill

    2016-06-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) in regenerative medicine often requires MSC to function in environments of high oxidative stress. Human pregnancy is a condition where the mother's tissues, and in particular her circulatory system, are exposed to increased levels of oxidative stress. MSC in the maternal decidua basalis (DMSC) are in a vascular niche, and thus would be exposed to oxidative stress products in the maternal circulation. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a large family of enzymes which detoxify aldehydes and thereby protect stem cells against oxidative damage. A subpopulation of MSC express high levels of ALDH (ALDH(br)) and these are more potent in repairing and regenerating tissues. DMSC was compared with chorionic villous MSC (CMSC) derived from the human placenta. CMSC reside in vascular niche and are exposed to the fetal circulation, which is in lower oxidative state. We screened an ALDH isozyme cDNA array and determined that relative to CMSC, DMSC expressed high levels of ALDH1 family members, predominantly ALDH1A1. Immunocytochemistry gave qualitative confirmation at the protein level. Immunofluorescence detected ALDH1 immunoreactivity in the DMSC and CMSC vascular niche. The percentage of ALDH(br) cells was calculated by Aldefluor assay and DMSC showed a significantly higher percentage of ALDH(br) cells than CMSC. Finally, flow sorted ALDH(br) cells were functionally potent in colony forming unit assays. DMSC, which are derived from pregnancy tissues that are naturally exposed to high levels of oxidative stress, may be better candidates for regenerative therapies where MSC must function in high oxidative stress environments. PMID:26880140

  16. Loss of Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Activity Alters Seed Metabolism Impairing Seed Maturation and Post-Germination Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37) has multiple roles; the most commonly described is its catalysis of the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The roles of mMDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development and germination were investigated in mMDH1 and mMDH2 double knockout plants. A significant proportion of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds were nonviable and developed only to torpedo-shaped embryos, indicative of arrested seed embryo growth during embryogenesis. The viable mmdh1mmdh2 seeds had an impaired maturation process that led to slow germination rates as well as retarded post-germination growth, shorter root length, and decreased root biomass. During seed development, mmdh1mmdh2 showed a paler green phenotype than the wild type and exhibited deficiencies in reserve accumulation and reduced final seed biomass. The respiration rate of mmdh1mmdh2 seeds was significantly elevated throughout their maturation, consistent with the previously reported higher respiration rate in mmdh1mmdh2 leaves. Mutant seeds showed a consistently higher content of free amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, alanine, serine, glycine, proline, and threonine), differences in sugar and sugar phosphate levels, and lower content of 2-oxoglutarate. Seed-aging assays showed that quiescent mmdh1mmdh2 seeds lost viability more than 3 times faster than wild-type seeds. Together, these data show the important role of mMDH in the earliest phases of the life cycle of Arabidopsis. PMID:27208265

  17. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  18. Differential decolorization of textile dyes in mixtures and the joint effect of laccase and cellobiose dehydrogenase activities present in extracellular extracts from Funalia trogii.

    PubMed

    Tilli, Silvia; Ciullini, Ilaria; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2011-10-10

    The largest part of the bio-decolorization investigations have been performed to date on a single dye without exploring the behavior in complex mixtures as the real dyeing baths. Therefore, mixtures of dyes belonging to azo and anthraquinonic classes, chosen among the most utilized in textile wool dyeing, were employed for comparative enzymatic decolorization studies using the extracellular extracts from the white rot fungus Funalia trogii, to understand how the concomitant presence of more than one dye could influence their degradation course and yield. Fungal extracts containing laccase activity only were capable to partially decolorize dyes mixtures from the different classes analyzed. The deconvolution of the decolorization with time allowed to monitor the degradation of the single dyes in the mixtures evidencing a time dependent differential decolorization not observed for the singles alone. Some dyes in the blend were in fact decolorized only when the most easily converted dyes were largely transformed. These experiments would allow to help the dyeing factories in the selection of the most readily degraded dyes. Since F. trogii grown on different media and activators shows diverse levels of expression of the redox enzymes laccase and cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH), the dyes mixtures recalcitrant to decolorization by laccase activity alone, were subjected to the combined action of extracts containing laccase and CDH. The use of CDH, in support to the activity of laccase, resulted in substantial decolorization increases (>84%) for all the refractory dyes mixtures. PMID:22112619

  19. Age-related responses of right ventricle in swim-trained rats: changes in lactate and pyruvate contents and lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Anitha, V; Asha Devi, S

    1996-09-18

    Age related changes in carbohydrate substrates such as, glucose, glycogen, pyruvic acid and lactic acid and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and LDH isoenzyme profile were evaluated in the right ventricle (RV) of swim-trained rats of 6- (adult), 12- (middle-aged) and 18- (old) months-of-age. Moderate hypertrophy was seen in the heart and RV in response to training in all age groups with the 12 months exhibiting a significant increase. While resting levels of pyruvate and glucose in the RV showed small elevations in adult and middle-aged rats, lactic acid showed reductions in all ages. Glycogen supercompensation was seen in the RV of trained animals. These age-related alterations in RV were associated with decreases in blood lactic acid and glucose in the trained rats belonging to all ages. Total protein of the RV decreased with age and exercise increased the content. Total LDH and M4-LDH activities decreased with age. However, training increased their activities in all ages. These changes in the RV suggests that swimming activity produces adaptations (e.g. increased LDH and M4) in all age groups. Considering the degree of adaptations, it can be suggested that adult and middle-aged are suitable for initiating swim-training programs, but not in old age. PMID:8869911

  20. Examining the anti-candidal activity of 10 selected Indian herbs and investigating the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on germ tube formation, protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Sripathy; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to identify potential anti-candidal agents from natural resources and elucidate the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on major virulent factors of Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Plants, the most abundant and readily available resource of diverse bioactives, were chosen for the anti-candidal screening study. Ten different plants that were proven to have antimicrobial activity but not explored much for anti-candidal activity were chosen for this study. Ethyl acetate extract of these plant leaves were tested for the anti-candidal activity. Extracts with good anti-candidal activity were further screened for its effect in C. albicans germ tube formation and enzyme (protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase) activity. Results: Among 10 plants screened, L. inermis extract showed complete inhibition of C. albicans. On further evaluation, this extract completely inhibited C. albicans germ tube formation in serum until the end of incubation period (3 h). This extract also exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against two major virulent enzymes of C. albicans, proteases (27–33%) and phospholipases (44.5%). In addition to it, this extract completely inhibited both the isoforms of constitutive candidal enzyme aspartate dehydrogenase, thereby affecting amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusion: Thus, this study confirms the anti-candidal potential of L. inermis and hence can be considered further for development of anti-candidal drug. PMID:26997722

  1. Exploring the evolutionary route of the acquisition of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by plant ALDH10 enzymes: implications for the synthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant ALDH10 enzymes are aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases (AMADHs) that oxidize different ω-amino or trimethylammonium aldehydes, but only some of them have betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity and produce the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB). The latter enzymes possess alanine or cysteine at position 441 (numbering of the spinach enzyme, SoBADH), while those ALDH10s that cannot oxidize betaine aldehyde (BAL) have isoleucine at this position. Only the plants that contain A441- or C441-type ALDH10 isoenzymes accumulate GB in response to osmotic stress. In this work we explored the evolutionary history of the acquisition of BAL specificity by plant ALDH10s. Results We performed extensive phylogenetic analyses and constructed and characterized, kinetically and structurally, four SoBADH variants that simulate the parsimonious intermediates in the evolutionary pathway from I441-type to A441- or C441-type enzymes. All mutants had a correct folding, average thermal stabilities and similar activity with aminopropionaldehyde, but whereas A441S and A441T exhibited significant activity with BAL, A441V and A441F did not. The kinetics of the mutants were consistent with their predicted structural features obtained by modeling, and confirmed the importance of position 441 for BAL specificity. The acquisition of BADH activity could have happened through any of these intermediates without detriment of the original function or protein stability. Phylogenetic studies showed that this event occurred independently several times during angiosperms evolution when an ALDH10 gene duplicate changed the critical Ile residue for Ala or Cys in two consecutive single mutations. ALDH10 isoenzymes frequently group in two clades within a plant family: one includes peroxisomal I441-type, the other peroxisomal and non-peroxisomal I441-, A441- or C441-type. Interestingly, high GB-accumulators plants have non-peroxisomal A441- or C441-type isoenzymes, while low-GB accumulators

  2. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Naoya . E-mail: nakai@hss.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-05-19

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 ({alpha}2{beta}2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1{alpha} subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex.

  3. Structural characterization of a β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase from Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens with succinic semialdehyde reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Wang, Shihua; Buchko, Garry W.; Garavito, Michael R.

    2014-07-30

    Beta-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (β-HAD) genes have been identified in all sequenced genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Their gene products catalyze the NAD+- or NADP+-dependent oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates into their corresponding semialdehyde. In many fungal and bacterial genomes, multiple β-HAD genes are observed leading to the hypothesis that these gene products may have unique, uncharacterized metabolic roles specific to their species. The genomes of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Geobacter metallireducens each contain two potential β-HAD genes. The protein sequences of one pair of these genes, Gs-βHAD (Q74DE4) and Gm-βHAD (Q39R98), have 65% sequence identity and 77% sequence similarity with each other. Both proteins reduce succinic semialdehyde, a metabolite of the GABA shunt. To further explore the structural and functional characteristics of these two β-HADs with a potentially unique substrate specificity, crystal structures for Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD in complex with NADP+ were determined to a resolution of 1.89 Å and 2.07 Å, respectively. The structure of both proteins are similar, composed of 14 α-helices and nine β-strands organized into two domains. Domain One (1-165) adopts a typical Rossmann fold composed of two α/β units: a six-strand parallel β-sheet surrounded by six α-helices (α1 – α6) followed by a mixed three-strand β-sheet surrounded by two α-helices (α7 and α8). Domain Two (166-287) is composed of a bundle of seven α-helices (α9 – α14). Four functional regions conserved in all β-HADs are spatially located near each other at the interdomain cleft in both Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD with a buried molecule of NADP+. The structural features of Gs-βHAD and Gm-βHAD are described in relation to the four conserved consensus sequences characteristic of β-HADs and the potential biochemical importance of these enzymes as an alternative pathway for the degradation of succinic semialdehyde.

  4. Multiple retinoid dehydrogenases in testes cytosol from alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice.

    PubMed

    Posch, K C; Napoli, J L

    1992-05-28

    Retinoic acid syntheses from retinol by cytosol from testes of alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice were similar in specific activity and in their insensitivity to 1 M ethanol or 100 mM 4-methylpyrazole. Anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography revealed multiple and similarly migrating peaks in each cytosol that had both retinol and retinal dehydrogenase activities. Thus, the effects of ethanol on testes cannot be caused by direct inhibition of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis because retinoid dehydrogenases distinct from mouse class A2 alcohol dehydrogenases, which corresponds to human class I, occurred in testes and they were not inhibited by ethanol. These data also demonstrate the occurrence of multiple cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis activities and indicate that the two reactions of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis, retinol and retinal dehydrogenation, may be catalyzed by enzymes that occur as complexes. PMID:1599517

  5. NdhV subunit regulates the activity of type-1 NAD(P)H dehydrogenase under high light conditions in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; He, Zhihui; Xu, Min; Peng, Lianwei; Mi, Hualing

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play crucial roles in variety of bioenergetic reactions. However, the regulative mechanism of NDH-1 under stressed conditions is still unclear. In this study, we detected that the NDH-1 activity is partially impaired, but the accumulation of NDH-1 complexes was little affected in the NdhV deleted mutant (ΔndhV) at low light in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. ΔndhV grew normally at low light but slowly at high light under inorganic carbon limitation conditions (low pH or low CO2), meanwhile the activity of CO2 uptake was evidently lowered than wild type even at pH 8.0. The accumulation of NdhV in thylakoids strictly relies on the presence of the hydrophilic subcomplex of NDH-1. Furthermore, NdhV was co-located with hydrophilic subunits of NDH-1 loosely associated with the NDH-1L, NDH-1MS' and NDH-1M complexes. The level of the NdhV was significantly increased at high light and deletion of NdhV suppressed the up-regulation of NDH-1 activity, causing the lowered the photosynthetic oxygen evolution at pH 6.5 and high light. These data indicate that NdhV is an intrinsic subunit of hydrophilic subcomplex of NDH-1, required for efficient operation of cyclic electron transport around photosystem I and CO2 uptake at high lights. PMID:27329499

  6. Expression of 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase in Human Chorion Is Associated with Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Isoform Expression in Term Labor.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Li, Yuan; Ding, Xiaoying; Sun, Qianqian; Huang, Ying; Gu, Hang; Ni, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Chorionic NAD-dependent 15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH) plays a pivotal role in controlling the amount of prostaglandins in the uterus. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are implicated to be involved in parturition. In this study, we investigated whether PPARs are involved in control of PGDH expression in chorion. The chorionic tissues were collected from the following groups of the women with singleton pregnancy: term no labor (TNL), term labor (TL) and preterm labor (PTL). Chorionic trophoblasts were isolated and cultured in vitro. Immunocytochemistry analysis showed that PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ were localized to trophoblasts in chorion. The protein levels of PGDH, PPARβ, and PPARγ were localized to trophoblasts in chorion. The protein levels of PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ were reduced in TL tissues compared to that of TNL group. PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ expression correlated to PGDH in TNL tissues, whereas only PPARγ expression correlated to PGDH in TL chorion tissues. PGDH expression was decreased in PTL tissues compared with TL group, whereas the expression of PPARs was not significantly different between TL and PTL groups. The agonists of three PPARs dose-dependently stimulated PGDH activity, mRNA, and protein expression in cultured chorionic cells. PPARs did not affect the stability of PGDH mRNA but stimulated the transcriptional activity of HPGD gene. Our results suggest that PPARs play pivotal roles in maintenance of PGDH expression in chorion during human pregnancy. PMID:26093984

  7. NdhV subunit regulates the activity of type-1 NAD(P)H dehydrogenase under high light conditions in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; He, Zhihui; Xu, Min; Peng, Lianwei; Mi, Hualing

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes play crucial roles in variety of bioenergetic reactions. However, the regulative mechanism of NDH-1 under stressed conditions is still unclear. In this study, we detected that the NDH-1 activity is partially impaired, but the accumulation of NDH-1 complexes was little affected in the NdhV deleted mutant (ΔndhV) at low light in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. ΔndhV grew normally at low light but slowly at high light under inorganic carbon limitation conditions (low pH or low CO2), meanwhile the activity of CO2 uptake was evidently lowered than wild type even at pH 8.0. The accumulation of NdhV in thylakoids strictly relies on the presence of the hydrophilic subcomplex of NDH-1. Furthermore, NdhV was co-located with hydrophilic subunits of NDH-1 loosely associated with the NDH-1L, NDH-1MS′ and NDH-1M complexes. The level of the NdhV was significantly increased at high light and deletion of NdhV suppressed the up-regulation of NDH-1 activity, causing the lowered the photosynthetic oxygen evolution at pH 6.5 and high light. These data indicate that NdhV is an intrinsic subunit of hydrophilic subcomplex of NDH-1, required for efficient operation of cyclic electron transport around photosystem I and CO2 uptake at high lights. PMID:27329499

  8. Bioisosteric transformations and permutations in the triazolopyrimidine scaffold to identify the minimum pharmacophore required for inhibitory activity against Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, Alka; White, John; El_Mazouni, Farah; Creason, Sharon A; Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Buckner, Frederick S.; Charman, Susan A.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes approximately 1 million deaths annually. However increasing resistance imposes a continuous threat to existing drug therapies. We previously reported a number of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase that inhibit parasite in vitro growth with similar activity. Lead optimization of this series led to the recent identification of a preclinical candidate, showing good activity against P. falciparum in mice. As part of a backup program around this scaffold, we explored heteroatom rearrangement and substitution in the triazolopyrimidine ring and have identified several other ring configurations that are active as PfDHODH inhibitors. The imidazo[1,2-α]pyrimidines were shown to bind somewhat more potently than the triazolopyrimidines depending on the nature of the amino aniline substitution. DSM151, the best candidate in this series, binds with 4-fold better affinity (PfDHODH IC50 = 0.077 μM) than the equivalent triazolopyrimidine and suppresses parasites in vivo in the P. berghei model. PMID:22877245

  9. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  10. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of the G81A mutant form of the chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and of its complexes with two of its substrates reveal productive and non-productive modes of binding for the catalytic reaction. The structure also indicates the role of G81A in lowering the redox potential of the flavin co-factor leading to an ∼200-fold slower catalytic rate of substrate oxidation. (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed ∼100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by

  11. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  12. Communication between thiamin cofactors in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component active centers: evidence for a "direct pathway" between the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-04-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu(571), Glu(235), and Glu(237)) and Arg(606) resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu(235) makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu(571) residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  13. Efficient CO2-Reducing Activity of NAD-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA for Formate Production from CO2 Gas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dae Haeng; Kim, Min Hoo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kwang Deog; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    NAD-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) has been widely used in various CO2-reduction systems but its practical applications are often impeded due to low CO2-reducing activity. In this study, we demonstrated superior CO2-reducing properties of FDH from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH) for production of formate from CO2 gas. To discover more efficient CO2-reducing FDHs than a reference enzyme, i.e. CbFDH, five FDHs were selected with biochemical properties and then, their CO2-reducing activities were evaluated. All FDHs including CbFDH showed better CO2-reducing activities at acidic pHs than at neutral pHs and four FDHs were more active than CbFDH in the CO2 reduction reaction. In particular, the FDH from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH) exhibited the highest CO2-reducing activity and had a dramatic preference for the reduction reaction, i.e., a 84.2-fold higher ratio of CO2 reduction to formate oxidation in catalytic efficiency (kcat/KB) compared to CbFDH. Formate was produced from CO2 gas using TsFDH and CbFDH, and TsFDH showed a 5.8-fold higher formate production rate than CbFDH. A sequence and structural comparison showed that FDHs with relatively high CO2-reducing activities had elongated N- and C-terminal loops. The experimental results demonstrate that TsFDH can be an alternative to CbFDH as a biocatalyst in CO2 reduction systems. PMID:25061666

  14. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (<100 μm), their relationship, and this relationship's association with the oxygen concentration and microplanktonic biomass in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas of the Humboldt Current System water column. Our results demonstrate significant potential enzymatic activity of catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  15. SIRT3 and SIRT5 Regulate the Enzyme Activity and Cardiolipin Binding of Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  16. SIRT3 and SIRT5 regulate the enzyme activity and cardiolipin binding of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  17. An Orange Ripening Mutant Links Plastid NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Complex Activity to Central and Specialized Metabolism during Tomato Fruit Maturation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Nashilevitz, Shai; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Izkovich, Yinon; Rogachev, Ilana; Osorio, Sonia; Itkin, Maxim; Adato, Avital; Pankratov, Ilya; Hirschberg, Joseph; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Wolf, Shmuel; Usadel, Björn; Levy, Avraham A.; Rumeau, Dominique; Aharoni, Asaph

    2010-01-01

    In higher plants, the plastidial NADH dehydrogenase (Ndh) complex supports nonphotochemical electron fluxes from stromal electron donors to plastoquinones. Ndh functions in chloroplasts are not clearly established; however, its activity was linked to the prevention of the overreduction of stroma, especially under stress conditions. Here, we show by the characterization of OrrDs, a dominant transposon-tagged tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant deficient in the NDH-M subunit, that this complex is also essential for the fruit ripening process. Alteration to the NDH complex in fruit changed the climacteric, ripening-associated metabolites and transcripts as well as fruit shelf life. Metabolic processes in chromoplasts of ripening tomato fruit were affected in OrrDs, as mutant fruit were yellow-orange and accumulated substantially less total carotenoids, mainly β-carotene and lutein. The changes in carotenoids were largely influenced by environmental conditions and accompanied by modifications in levels of other fruit antioxidants, namely, flavonoids and tocopherols. In contrast with the pigmentation phenotype in mature mutant fruit, OrrDs leaves and green fruits did not display a visible phenotype but exhibited reduced Ndh complex quantity and activity. This study therefore paves the way for further studies on the role of electron transport and redox reactions in the regulation of fruit ripening and its associated metabolism. PMID:20571113

  18. Crystal Structures of CO and NO Adducts of MauG in Complex with Pre-Methylamine Dehydrogenase: Implications for the Mechanism of Dioxygen Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yukl, Erik T.; Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Davidson, Victor L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2011-09-28

    MauG is a diheme enzyme responsible for the post-translational formation of the catalytic tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor in methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). MauG can utilize hydrogen peroxide, or molecular oxygen and reducing equivalents, to complete this reaction via a catalytic bis-Fe(IV) intermediate. Crystal structures of diferrous, Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-NO forms of MauG in complex with its preMADH substrate have been determined and compared to one another as well as to the structure of the resting diferric MauG-preMADH complex. CO and NO each bind exclusively to the 5-coordinate high-spin heme with no change in ligation of the 6-coordinate low-spin heme. These structures reveal likely roles for amino acid residues in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme in oxygen binding and activation. Glu113 is implicated in the protonation of heme-bound diatomic oxygen intermediates in promoting cleavage of the O-O bond. Pro107 is shown to change conformation on the binding of each ligand and may play a steric role in oxygen activation by positioning the distal oxygen near Glu113. Gln103 is in a position to provide a hydrogen bond to the Fe(IV){double_bond}O moiety that may account for the unusual stability of this species in MauG.

  19. Evaluation of Milk Trace Elements, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alkaline Phosphatase and Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity of Subclinical Mastitis as and Indicator of Subclinical Mastitis in Riverine Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Anirban; Gera, Sandeep; Sharma, Anshu

    2012-01-01

    Mastitis is a highly morbid disease that requires detection at the subclinical stage. Tropical countries like India mainly depend on milch buffaloes for milk. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the trace minerals viz. copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), cobalt (Co) and manganese (Mn) and enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in riverine buffalo milk can be used as an indicator of subclinical mastitis (SCM) with the aim of developing suitable diagnostic kit for SCM. Trace elements and enzyme activity in milk were estimated with Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer, GBC 932 plus and biochemical methods, respectively. Somatic cell count (SCC) was done microscopically. The cultural examination revealed Gram positive bacteria as the most prevalent etiological agent. A statistically significant (p<0.01) increase in SCC, Fe, Zn, Co and LDH occurred in SCM milk containing gram positive bacterial agents only. ALP was found to be elevated in milk infected by both gram positive and negative bacteria. The percent sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, predictive values and likelihood ratios were calculated taking bacterial culture examination and SCC≥2×105 cells/ml of milk as the benchmark. Only ALP and Zn, the former being superior, were found to be suitable for diagnosis of SCM irrespective of etiological agents. LDH, Co and Fe can be introduced in the screening programs where Gram positive bacteria are omnipresent. It is recommended that both ALP and Zn be measured together in milk to diagnose buffalo SCM, irrespective of etiology. PMID:25049573

  20. Synthesis and antifungal activity of 5-iodo-1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole derivatives as pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Bo; He, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Li; You, Ge-Yun; Feng, Ling-Ling; Wan, Jian; He, Hong-Wu

    2015-04-01

    To identify new antifungal lead compound based on inhibitors of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1, a series of 5-iodo-1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole derivatives 3 were prepared and evaluated for their Escherichia coli PDHc-E1 inhibitory activity and antifungal activity. The in vitro bioassay for the PDHc-E1 inhibition indicated all the compounds exhibited significant inhibition against E. coli PDHc-E1 (IC50<21μM), special compound 3g showed the most potent inhibitory activity (IC50=4.21±0.11μM) and was demonstrated to act as a competitive inhibitor of PDHc-E1. Meanwhile, inhibitor 3g exhibited very good enzyme-selective inhibition of PDHc-E1 between pig heart and E. coli. The assay of antifungal activity showed compounds 3e, 3g, and 3n exhibited fair to good activity against Rhizoctonia solani and Botrytis cinerea even at 12.5μg/mL. Especially compound 3n (EC50=5.4μg/mL; EC90=21.1μg/mL) exhibited almost 5.50 times inhibitory potency against B. cinerea than that of pyrimethanil (EC50=29.6μg/mL; EC90=113.4μg/mL). Therefore, in this study, compound 3n was found to be a novel lead compound for further optimization to find more potent antifungal compounds as microbial PDHc-E1 inhibitors. PMID:25766628

  1. Elevation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 activity in Holocaust survivor offspring: evidence for an intergenerational effect of maternal trauma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, Linda M.; Bader, Heather N.; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.; Lehrner, Amy; Makotkine, Iouri; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background Adult offspring of Holocaust survivors comprise an informative cohort in which to study intergenerational transmission of the effects of trauma exposure. Lower cortisol and enhanced glucocorticoid sensitivity have been previously demonstrated in Holocaust survivors with PTSD, and in offspring of Holocaust survivors in association with maternal PTSD. In other work, reduction in the activity of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD-2), which inactivates cortisol, was identified in Holocaust survivors in comparison to age-matched, unexposed Jewish controls. Therefore, we investigated glucocorticoid metabolism in offspring of Holocaust survivors to evaluate if similar enzymatic decrements would be observed that might help to explain glucocorticoid alterations previously shown for Holocaust offspring. Methods Holocaust offspring (n=85) and comparison subjects (n=27) were evaluated with clinical diagnostic interview and self-rating scales, and asked to collect a 24-hr urine sample from which concentrations of cortisol and glucocorticoid metabolites were assayed by GCMS. 11β-HSD-2 activity was determined as the ratio of urinary cortisone to cortisol. Results Significantly reduced cortisol excretion was observed in Holocaust offspring compared to controls (p=.046), as had been shown for Holocaust survivors. However, 11β-HSD-2 activity was elevated for offspring compared to controls (p=.008), particularly among those whose mothers had been children, rather than adolescents or adults, during World War II (p=.032). The effect of paternal Holocaust exposure could not be reliably investigated in the current sample. Conclusions The association of offspring 11β-HSD-2 activity with maternal age at Holocaust exposure is consistent with the influence of glucocorticoid programming. Whereas a long standing reduction in 11β-HSD-2 activity among survivors is readily interpreted in the context of Holocaust related deprivation, understanding the

  2. Decreased 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 Level and Activity in Murine Pancreatic Islets Caused by Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Subrata; Grimm, Larson; Gong, Ying Jia Kate; Wang, Beixi; Li, Bing; Srikant, Coimbatore B.; Gao, Zu-hua; Liu, Jun-Li

    2015-01-01

    We have reported a high expression of IGF-I in pancreatic islet β-cells of transgenic mice under the metallothionein promoter. cDNA microarray analysis of the islets revealed that the expression of 82 genes was significantly altered compared to wild-type mice. Of these, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1), which is responsible for the conversion of inert cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone, DHC in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone) in the liver and adipose tissues, has not been identified previously as an IGF-I target in pancreatic islets. We characterized the changes in its protein level, enzyme activity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In freshly isolated islets, the level of 11β-HSD1 protein was significantly lower in MT-IGF mice. Using dual-labeled immunofluorescence, 11β-HSD1 was observed exclusively in glucagon-producing, islet α-cells but at a lower level in transgenic vs. wild-type animals. MT-IGF islets also exhibited reduced enzymatic activities. Dexamethasone (DEX) and DHC inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from freshly isolated islets of wild-type mice. In the islets of MT-IGF mice, 48-h pre-incubation of DEX caused a significant decrease in insulin release, while the effect of DHC was largely blunted consistent with diminished 11β-HSD1 activity. In order to establish the function of intracrine glucocorticoids, we overexpressed 11β-HSD1 cDNA in MIN6 insulinoma cells, which together with DHC caused apoptosis and a significant decrease in proliferation. Both effects were abolished with the treatment of an 11β-HSD1 inhibitor. Our results demonstrate an inhibitory effect of IGF-I on 11β-HSD1 expression and activity within the pancreatic islets, which may mediate part of the IGF-I effects on cell proliferation, survival and insulin secretion. PMID:26305481

  3. Eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes: human polymorphisms, and recommended nomenclature based on divergent evolution and chromosomal mapping.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, V; Bairoch, A; Tipton, K F; Nebert, D W

    1999-08-01

    As currently being performed with an increasing number of superfamilies, a standardized gene nomenclature system is proposed here, based on divergent evolution, using multiple alignment analysis of all 86 eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) amino-acid sequences known at this time. The ALDHs represent a superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes having similar primary structures that oxidize a wide spectrum of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. To date, a total of 54 animal, 15 plant, 14 yeast, and three fungal ALDH genes or cDNAs have been sequenced. These ALDHs can be divided into a total of 18 families (comprising 37 subfamilies), and all nonhuman ALDH genes are named here after the established human ALDH genes, when possible. An ALDH protein from one gene family is defined as having approximately < or = 40% amino-acid identity to that from another family. Two members of the same subfamily exhibit approximately > or = 60% amino-acid identity and are expected to be located at the same subchromosomal site. For naming each gene, it is proposed that the root symbol 'ALDH' denoting 'aldehyde dehydrogenase' be followed by an Arabic number representing the family and, when needed, a letter designating the subfamily and an Arabic number denoting the individual gene within the subfamily; all letters are capitalized in all mammals except mouse and fruit fly, e.g. 'human ALDH3A1 (mouse, Drosophila Aldh3a1).' It is suggested that the Human Gene Nomenclature Guidelines (http://++www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature/guidelines.h tml) be used for all species other than mouse and Drosophila. Following these guidelines, the gene is italicized, whereas the corresponding cDNA, mRNA, protein or enzyme activity is written with upper-case letters and without italics, e.g. 'human, mouse or Drosophila ALDH3A1 cDNA, mRNA, or activity'. If an orthologous gene between species cannot be identified with certainty, sequential naming of these genes will be carried out

  4. Psoriatic therapeutics and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D W; van Rossum, E

    1975-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of various agents on the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been studied in vitro. Stress is laid on the calculation of kinetic parameters such as true K-I values. The most active inhibitor was methotrexate, closely followed by cGMP. The increase in inhibitory activity after incubation of methotrexate with liver slices is discussed. PMID:167665

  5. Effects of L-carnitine and Pentoxifylline on the Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase C4 isozyme and Motility of Testicular Spermatozoa in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliabadi, Elham; Karimi, Fatemeh; Rasti, Mozhgan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracted sperm from the testis have poor motility. Moreover, their motility changes during their journey through epidydimis. Meanwhile, they face high concentration of L-carnitin. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase C4 (LDH-C4) gene disorders has been shown to cause impaired sperm motility, leading to infertility in male mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate sperm motility and LDH-C4 enzyme activity upon L-carnitine (LC) and Pentoxifylline (PTX) administrations in mice. Methods We extracted testicular sperm of 48 mice and divided them into three equal parts. One part was incubated with Ham's F10 medium (control), the other parts were treated with Ham's F10 containing LC and PTX with a final concentration of 1.76 mM, for 30 min at room temperature. Sperm motility was assessed according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Sperm LDH-C4 enzyme activity was measured by spectrophotometery method. Statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test, and a p-value less than 0.05 was considered as a statistically significant difference. Results Sperm motility increased after 30 min of incubation in LC- and PTX-treated group (p<0.001). LC and PTX administrations showed a significant increase in the LDHC4 enzyme activity of sperm compared to that of the controls after 30 min (P=0.04 and 0.01, respectively). Conclusion The effects of LC and PTX on motility of sperm can be explained by an increase in LDH-C4 enzyme activity that may influence male fertility status. We suggest that LC as a non-toxic antioxidant is more suitable for use in assisted reproductive technique protocols than PTX. PMID:23926565

  6. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  7. Effect of alkyl polyglucoside and nitrilotriacetic acid combined application on lead/pyrene bioavailability and dehydrogenase activity in co-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingru; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xinying; Chen, Xiao; Tao, Kaiyun; Hu, Xiaoxin

    2016-07-01

    At present, few research focus on the phytoremediation for organic pollutants and heavy metals enhanced by surfactants and chelate agents in the combined contaminated soils or sediments. In this study, the effect of a novel combined addition of alkyl polyglucoside (APG) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) into pyrene and lead (Pb) co-contaminated soils on bioaccessiblity of pyrene/Pb and dehydrogenase activities (DHA) was studied. Through the comparison of the results with the alone and combined application, synergistic effect on bioaccessiblity of pyrene and Pb was found while APG and NTA was applied together. Results also indicated a significant promotion on the DHA in mixed addition of APG and NTA. In addition, correlation and principal component analysis were performed to better understand the relationship among APG/NTA, bioaccessiblity of pyrene/Pb and the DHA. Results showed that APG and NTA can affect DHA directly by themselves but also can affect DHA indirectly by changing bioaccessible pyrene and exchangeable Pb. PMID:27085066

  8. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J; Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD(+), which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in V max (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves. PMID:24233354

  9. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J.; Bell, Ryan A. V.; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD+, which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in Vmax (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves. PMID:24233354

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Levalbuterol-Induced 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Activity in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Matthew J.; Kostin, Shannon F.; Burgess, Edward J.; Hoyt, Laura R.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Lundblad, Lennart K.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial NF-κB activation is observed in asthmatic subjects and is a cause of airway inflammation in mouse models of allergic asthma. Combination therapy with inhaled short-acting β2-agonists and corticosteroids significantly improves lung function and reduces inflammation in asthmatic subjects. Corticosteroids operate through a number of mechanisms to potently inhibit NF-κB activity. Since β2-agonists can induce expression of 11β-HSD1, which converts inactive 11-keto corticosteroids into active 11-hydroxy corticosteroids, thereby potentiating the effects of endogenous glucocorticoids, we examined whether this mechanism is involved in the inhibition of NF-κB activation induced by the β-agonist albuterol in airway epithelial cells. Treatment of transformed murine Club cells (MTCC) with (R)-albuterol (levalbuterol), but not with (S)- or a mixture of (R + S)- (racemic) albuterol, augmented mRNA expression of 11β-HSD1. MTCC were stably transfected with luciferase (luc) reporter constructs under transcriptional regulation by NF-κB (NF-κB/luc) or glucocorticoid response element (GRE/luc) consensus motifs. Stimulation of NF-κB/luc MTCC with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) induced luc activity, which was inhibited by pretreatment with (R)-, but not (S)- or racemic albuterol. Furthermore, pretreatment of GRE/luc MTCC with (R)-, but not with (S)- or racemic albuterol, augmented 11-keto corticosteroid (cortisone) induced luc activity, which was diminished by the 11β-HSD inhibitor glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA), indicating that there was a conversion of inactive 11-keto to active 11-hydroxy corticosteroids. LPS- and TNFα-induced NF-κB/luc activity was diminished in MTCC cells treated with a combination of cortisone and (R)-albuterol, an effect that was inhibited by 18β-GA. Finally, pretreatment of MTCC cells with the combination of cortisone and (R)-albuterol diminished LPS- and TNFα-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of levalbuterol-induced 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Kostin, Shannon F; Burgess, Edward J; Hoyt, Laura R; Ather, Jennifer L; Lundblad, Lennart K; Poynter, Matthew E

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelial NF-κB activation is observed in asthmatic subjects and is a cause of airway inflammation in mouse models of allergic asthma. Combination therapy with inhaled short-acting β2-agonists and corticosteroids significantly improves lung function and reduces inflammation in asthmatic subjects. Corticosteroids operate through a number of mechanisms to potently inhibit NF-κB activity. Since β2-agonists can induce expression of 11β-HSD1, which converts inactive 11-keto corticosteroids into active 11-hydroxy corticosteroids, thereby potentiating the effects of endogenous glucocorticoids, we examined whether this mechanism is involved in the inhibition of NF-κB activation induced by the β-agonist albuterol in airway epithelial cells. Treatment of transformed murine Club cells (MTCC) with (R)-albuterol (levalbuterol), but not with (S)- or a mixture of (R + S)- (racemic) albuterol, augmented mRNA expression of 11β-HSD1. MTCC were stably transfected with luciferase (luc) reporter constructs under transcriptional regulation by NF-κB (NF-κB/luc) or glucocorticoid response element (GRE/luc) consensus motifs. Stimulation of NF-κB/luc MTCC with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) induced luc activity, which was inhibited by pretreatment with (R)-, but not (S)- or racemic albuterol. Furthermore, pretreatment of GRE/luc MTCC with (R)-, but not with (S)- or racemic albuterol, augmented 11-keto corticosteroid (cortisone) induced luc activity, which was diminished by the 11β-HSD inhibitor glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA), indicating that there was a conversion of inactive 11-keto to active 11-hydroxy corticosteroids. LPS- and TNFα-induced NF-κB/luc activity was diminished in MTCC cells treated with a combination of cortisone and (R)-albuterol, an effect that was inhibited by 18β-GA. Finally, pretreatment of MTCC cells with the combination of cortisone and (R)-albuterol diminished LPS- and TNFα-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine

  12. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  13. Characterization of a novel PQQ-dependent quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea classified into auxiliary activities family 12 in carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper), which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ)-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall. PMID:25679509

  14. Characterization of a Novel PQQ-Dependent Quinohemoprotein Pyranose Dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea Classified into Auxiliary Activities Family 12 in Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper), which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ)-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall. PMID:25679509

  15. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase: evidence for a very divergent long-chain dehydrogenase family.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2003-02-01

    Mannitol 2-dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens (pfMDH) is a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that catalyzes the reversible NAD(P)-dependent oxidation of D-mannitol to D-fructose, D-arabinitol to D-xylulose, and D-sorbitol to L-sorbose. It is a member of the mostly prokaryotic family of long-chain mannitol dehydrogenases that so far includes 66 members. Unlike other alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases that utilize metal cofactors or a conserved active-site tyrosine for catalysis, an invariant lysine is the general base. The crystal structure of pfMDH in a binary complex with NAD(H) and a ternary complex with NAD(H) and D-mannitol have been determined to 1.7 and 1.8 A resolution respectively. Comparison of secondary structure assignment to sequence alignments suggest the shortest members of this family, mannitol-1-phosphate 5-dehydrogenases, retain core elements but lack secondary structural components found on the surface of pfMDH. The elements predicted to be absent are distributed throughout the primary sequence, implying that a simple truncation or fusion did not occur. The closest structural neighbors are 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, N-(1-D-carboxyethyl)-L-norvaline dehydrogenase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Although sequence identity is only a barely recognizable 7-10%, conservation of secondary structural elements as well as homologous residues that are contributed to the active site indicates they may be related by divergent evolution. PMID:12604241

  16. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-12

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed {approx}100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  17. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases in the mesocarp of ripening fruit of Prunus persica genotypes with different flesh characteristics: changes in activity and protein and transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Gabotti, Damiano; Negrini, Noemi; Morgutti, Silvia; Nocito, Fabio F; Cocucci, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    Development of fruit flesh texture quality traits may involve the metabolism of phenolic compounds. This study presents molecular and biochemical results on the possible role played by cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) during ripening [S3, S4 I (pre-climacteric) and S4 III (climacteric) stages] of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] fruit with different flesh firmness [non-melting flesh (NMF) 'Oro A'/melting flesh (MF) 'Springcrest' and 'Sanguinella'] and color (blood-flesh Sanguinella). A total of 24 putative full-length PRUPE_CAD genes were identified (in silico analysis) in the peach genome. The most abundant CAD isoforms, encoded by genes located on scaffolds 8 and 6, were probed by specifically developed anti-PRUPE_CAD sc8 and by anti-FaCAD (PRUPE_CAD sc6) polyclonal antibodies, respectively. PRUPE_CAD sc8 proteins (SDS-PAGE and native-PAGE/western blot) appeared responsible for the CAD activity (in vitro/in-gel assays) that increased with ripening (parallel to PRUPE_ACO1 transcripts accumulation and ethylene evolution) only in the mesocarp of Oro A and blood-flesh Sanguinella. Accumulation of PRUPE_CAD sc8 transcripts (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) occurred in all three cultivars, but in Oro A and Springcrest it was not always accompanied by that of the related proteins, suggesting possible post-transcriptional regulation. Flesh firmness, as well as levels of lignin, total phenolics and, where present (Sanguinella), anthocyanins, declined with ripening, suggesting that, at least in the studied peach cultivars, CAD activity is related to neither lignification nor differences in flesh firmness (NMF/MF). Further studies are necessary to clarify whether the high levels of CAD activity/expression in Sanguinella play a role in determining the characteristics of this blood-flesh fruit. PMID:25534876

  18. Local corticosterone activation by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 in keratinocytes: the role in narrow-band UVB-induced dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Itoi-Ochi, Saori; Terao, Mika; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Keratinocytes are known to synthesize cortisol through activation of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1). To confirm the function of 11β-HSD1 in keratinocytes during inflammation in vivo, we created keratinocyte-specific-11β-HSD1 knockout mice (K5-Hsd11b1-KO mice) and analyzed the response to narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) irradiation. Firstly, we measured the mRNA and protein levels of 11β-HSD1 following NB-UVB irradiation and found that the expression of 11β-HSD1 in keratinocytes of mouse ear skin was enhanced at 3 and 24 hours after 250 mJ/cm2, 500 mJ/cm2, 1 J/cm2, and 2 J/cm2 NB-UVB irradiation. Next, we determined that 24 hours after exposure to 1 J/cm2 NB-UVB irradiation, the numbers of F4/80-, CD45-, and Gr-1-positive cells were increased in K5-Hsd11b1-KO mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. Furthermore, the expression of the chemokine (C-X-C-motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and interleukin (IL)-6 was also significantly enhanced in NB-UVB-irradiated K5-Hsd11b1-KO mice compared with WT mice. In addition, activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) after NB-UVB irradiation was enhanced in K5-Hsd11b1-KO mice compared to that in WT mice. Thus, NB-UVB-induced inflammation is augmented in K5-Hsd11b1-KO mice compared with WT mice. These results indicate that 11β-HSD1 may suppress NB-UVB-induced inflammation via inhibition of NF-κB activation. PMID:27195053

  19. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  20. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a reactive metabolite of acetaminophen and mass spectral characterization of an arylated active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Dietze, E C; Schäfer, A; Omichinski, J G; Nelson, S D

    1997-10-01

    Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide, APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that can cause hepatic necrosis under some circumstances via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation to a reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Although the mechanism of hepatocellular injury caused by APAP is not fully understood, it is known that NAPQI forms covalent adducts with several hepatocellular proteins. Reported here is the identification of one of these proteins as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12]. Two hours after the administration of hepatotoxic doses of [14C]APAP to mice, at a time prior to overt cell damage, hepatocellular GAPDH activity was significantly decreased concurrent with the formation of a 14C-labeled GAPDH adduct. A nonhepatotoxic regioisomer of APAP, 3'-hydroxyacetanilide (AMAP), was found to decrease GAPDH activity to a lesser extent than APAP, and radiolabel from [14C]AMAP bound to a lesser extent to GAPDH at a time when its overall binding to hepatocellular proteins was almost equivalent to that of APAP. In order to determine the nature of the covalent adduct between GAPDH and APAP, its major reactive and toxic metabolite, NAPQI, was incubated with purified porcine muscle GAPDH. Microsequencing analysis and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) with collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to characterize one of the adducts as APAP bound to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl group of Cys-149 in the active site peptide of GAPDH. PMID:9348431

  1. Separation of dehydrogenases on polyaminomethylstyrene.

    PubMed

    Schöpp, W; Meinert, S; Thyfronitou, J; Aurich, H

    1975-01-29

    The binding of dehydrogenases, especially alcohol dehydrogenase, and other proteins to several ion exchangers and hydrophobic polymers was investigated. Quantitative parameters for the stability of the polymer-protein complexes (obtained form double reciprocal plots) indicate a high but different affinity of many proteins for polyaminomethylstyrene. The chromatography of a mixture of five dehydrogenases and human serum albumin on polyaminomethylstyrene is described. PMID:237012

  2. Application of nicotin amide-adenine dinucleotide analogs for clinical enzymology: alcohol dehydrogenase activity in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, K; Kimura, A; Minato, S; Tamaoki, H; Mizushima, H

    1976-06-01

    The activities of alcohol dehydrogease(ADH) in serum and in the subcellular fractions of rat liver were determined with n-amyl alcohol or ethanol as substrate and thionicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme. It was found that the enzyme's activity ratio on the amyl alcohol and ethanol(A/E value) of serum and on the particulate fractions of the liver were different, but the A/E value of the soluble fraction was similar to that of serum. The A/E value of the particulate fractions were higher than that of the soluble fraction. From the results of experimental liver damage in the rat, it seems that estimation of the A/E value of ADH activity in serum is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of active liver injury. Since the A/E values of patients' sera differed from those of the normal subjects, the estimation of the A/E value of serum may give diagnostic information on liver injury, especially in chronic liver injury. PMID:179739

  3. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  4. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  5. NAD + -dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A.A.; Savin, S.S.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2) widely occurs in nature. FDH consists of two identical subunits and contains neither prosthetic groups nor metal ions. This type of FDH was found in different microorganisms (including pathogenic ones), such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. As opposed to microbiological FDHs functioning in cytoplasm, plant FDHs localize in mitochondria. Formate dehydrogenase activity was first discovered as early as in 1921 in plant; however, until the past decade FDHs from plants had been considerably less studied than the enzymes from microorganisms. This review summarizes the recent results on studying the physiological role, properties, structure, and protein engineering of plant formate dehydrogenases. PMID:22649703

  6. Hibernation impact on the catalytic activities of the mitochondrial D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase in liver and brain tissues of jerboa (Jaculus orientalis)

    PubMed Central

    Kabine, Mostafa; El Kebbaj, M'hammed Saïd; Hafiani, Assia; Latruffe, Norbert; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha

    2003-01-01

    Background Jerboa (Jaculus orientalis) is a deep hibernating rodent native to subdesert highlands. During hibernation, a high level of ketone bodies i.e. acetoacetate (AcAc) and D-3-hydroxybutyrate (BOH) are produced in liver, which are used in brain as energetic fuel. These compounds are bioconverted by mitochondrial D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) E.C. 1.1.1.30. Here we report, the function and the expression of BDH in terms of catalytic activities, kinetic parameters, levels of protein and mRNA in both tissues i.e brain and liver, in relation to the hibernating process. Results We found that: 1/ In euthemic jerboa the specific activity in liver is 2.4- and 6.4- fold higher than in brain, respectively for AcAc reduction and for BOH oxidation. The same differences were found in the hibernation state. 2/ In euthermic jerboa, the Michaelis constants, KM BOH and KM NAD+ are different in liver and in brain while KM AcAc, KM NADH and the dissociation constants, KD NAD+and KD NADH are similar. 3/ During prehibernating state, as compared to euthermic state, the liver BDH activity is reduced by half, while kinetic constants are strongly increased except KD NAD+. 4/ During hibernating state, BDH activity is significantly enhanced, moreover, kinetic constants (KM and KD) are strongly modified as compared to the euthermic state; i.e. KD NAD+ in liver and KM AcAc in brain decrease 5 and 3 times respectively, while KD NADH in brain strongly increases up to 5.6 fold. 5/ Both protein content and mRNA level of BDH remain unchanged during the cold adaptation process. Conclusions These results cumulatively explained and are consistent with the existence of two BDH enzymatic forms in the liver and the brain. The apoenzyme would be subjected to differential conformational folding depending on the hibernation state. This regulation could be a result of either post-translational modifications and/or a modification of the mitochondrial membrane state, taking into account that

  7. Intratumoral localization and activity of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in non-small cell lung cancer: a potent prognostic factor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Estrogens were recently demonstrated to be synthesized in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) via aromatase activity and aromatase inhibitor (AI) did suppressed estrogen receptor (ER) positive NSCLC growth. However, other enzymes involved in intratumoral production and metabolism of estrogens, i.e. 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (i.e. 17βHSD1 and 17βHSD2) and others have not been studied. Therefore, in this study, we examined the clinical/ biological significance of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in NSCLCs. Methodology Archival materials obtained from 103 NSCLC patients were immunohistochemically evaluated using anti-17βHSD1 and anti-17βHSD2 antibodies. The findings of immunohistochemistry were then correlated with intratumoral estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) concentration, clinicopathological factors and overall survival of the patients. We further employed NSCLC cell lines, A549 and LK87 to study the functional significance of 17βHSD1, in vitro. Results A higher 17βHSD1 immunoreactivity tended to be positively associated with aromatase (p=0.057) and tumor stage (p=0.055) whereas a higher 17βHSD2 immunoreactivity was positively associated with a squamous cell and adenosquamous cell carcinomas subtypes (p=0.031), tumor stage (p=0.004), T factor of TNM classification (p=0.010), maximum tumor diameter (p=0.002) and tended to be associated with N factor of TMN classification (p=0.065). A higher 17βHSD1 immunoreactivity was also significantly associated with lower intratumoral E1 concentration (p=0.040) and a higher intratumoral E2/E1 concentration ratio (p=0.028). On the other hand a higher 17βHSD2 immunoreactivity was significantly associated with higher intratumoral E1 concentration (p=0.035). Results of multivariate regression analysis demonstrated an increased 17βHSD1 immunoreactivity in tumor cells as an independent negative prognostic factor (HR= 2.83, p=0.007). E1 treatment in 17βHSD1 positive NSCLC cells, A549 and LK87

  8. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K M and V max values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K i value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation. PMID:26676512

  9. Monocotyledonous C4 NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase is efficiently synthesized, targeted to chloroplasts and processed to an active form in transgenic plants of the C3 dicotyledon tobacco.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, F; Miginiac-Maslow, M; Sangwan, R S; Decottignies, P; Keryer, E; Dubois, F; Bismuth, E; Galvez, S; Sangwan-Norreel, B; Gadal, P

    1995-01-01

    Chloroplastic NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase (cpMDH, EC 1.1.1.82) is a key enzyme in the carbon-fixation pathway of some C4 plants such as the monocotyledons maize or Sorghum. We have expressed cpMDH from Sorghum vulgare Pers. in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) (a dicotyledonous C3 plant) by using a gene composed of the Sorghum cpMDH cDNA under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. High steady-state levels of cpMDH mRNA were observed in isogenic dihaploid transgenic tobacco lines. Sorghum cpMDH protein was detected in transgenic leaf extracts, where a threefold higher cpMDH activity could be measured, compared with control tobacco leaves. The recombinant protein was identical in molecular mass and in N-terminal sequence to Sorghum cpMDH. The tobacco cpMDH protein which has a distinct N-terminal sequence, could not be detected in transgenic plants. Immunocytochemical analyses showed that Sorghum cpMDH was specifically localized in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts. These data indicate that Sorghum cpMDH preprotein was efficiently synthesized, transported into and processed in tobacco chloroplasts. Thus, C3-C4 photosynthesis specialization or monocotyledon-dicotyledon evolution did not affect the chloroplastic protein-import machinery. The higher levels of cpMDH in transgenic leaves resulted in an increase of L-malate content, suggesting that carbon metabolism was altered by the expression of the Sorghum enzyme. PMID:8547818

  10. The asymmetric distribution of enzymic activity between the six subunits of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase. Use of D- and L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketones (4-amino-6-chloro-5-oxohexanoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, C G; Nicolaidis, S; Akhtar, M

    1976-01-01

    A method for the preparation of D- and L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketones (4-amino-6-chloro-5-oxohexanoic acid) is described. These chloromethyl ketones irreversibly inactivated bovine glutamate dehydrogenase, whereas several other related compounds had no adverse effect on the activity of the enzyme. The inactivation process was shown to be due to the modification of lysine-126. The time-courses for the inactivation and the incorporation of radioactivity from tritiated L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketone into the glutamate dehydrogenase were biphasic. The results were interpreted to suggest the involvement of 'negative co-operative' interactions in the reactivity of lysine-126. From the cumulative evidence it is argued that the first subunit of the enzyme, which takes part in catalysis, makes the largest, and the last the smallest, contribution to the overall catalysis. It is emphasized that three of the six subunits of the enzyme may possess as much as 80% of the total activity of bovine glutamate dehydrogenase. PMID:10889

  11. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  13. The Type I NADH Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Counters Phagosomal NOX2 Activity to Inhibit TNF-α-Mediated Host Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica L.; Velmurugan, Kamalakannan; Cowan, Mark J.; Briken, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The capacity of infected cells to undergo apoptosis upon insult with a pathogen is an ancient innate immune defense mechanism. Consequently, the ability of persisting, intracellular pathogens such as the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to inhibit infection-induced apoptosis of macrophages is important for virulence. The nuoG gene of Mtb, which encodes the NuoG subunit of the type I NADH dehydrogenase, NDH-1, is important in Mtb-mediated inhibition of host macrophage apoptosis, but the molecular mechanism of this host pathogen interaction remains elusive. Here we show that the apoptogenic phenotype of MtbΔnuoG was significantly reduced in human macrophages treated with caspase-3 and -8 inhibitors, TNF-α-neutralizing antibodies, and also after infection of murine TNF−/− macrophages. Interestingly, incubation of macrophages with inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduced not only the apoptosis induced by the nuoG mutant, but also its capacity to increase macrophage TNF-α secretion. The MtbΔnuoG phagosomes showed increased ROS levels compared to Mtb phagosomes in primary murine and human alveolar macrophages. The increase in MtbΔnuoG induced ROS and apoptosis was abolished in NOX-2 deficient (gp91−/−) macrophages. These results suggest that Mtb, via a NuoG-dependent mechanism, can neutralize NOX2-derived ROS in order to inhibit TNF-α-mediated host cell apoptosis. Consistently, an Mtb mutant deficient in secreted catalase induced increases in phagosomal ROS and host cell apoptosis, both of which were dependent upon macrophage NOX-2 activity. In conclusion, these results serendipitously reveal a novel connection between NOX2 activity, phagosomal ROS, and TNF-α signaling during infection-induced apoptosis in macrophages. Furthermore, our study reveals a novel function of NOX2 activity in innate immunity beyond the initial respiratory burst, which is the sensing of persistent intracellular pathogens and subsequent induction of host

  14. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  15. Platform engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum with reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity for improved production of L-lysine, L-valine, and 2-ketoisovalerate.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Jens; Schwentner, Andreas; Brunnenkan, Britta; Gabris, Christina; Grimm, Simon; Gerstmeir, Robert; Takors, Ralf; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Blombach, Bastian

    2013-09-01

    Exchange of the native Corynebacterium glutamicum promoter of the aceE gene, encoding the E1p subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), with mutated dapA promoter variants led to a series of C. glutamicum strains with gradually reduced growth rates and PDHC activities. Upon overexpression of the l-valine biosynthetic genes ilvBNCE, all strains produced l-valine. Among these strains, C. glutamicum aceE A16 (pJC4 ilvBNCE) showed the highest biomass and product yields, and thus it was further improved by additional deletion of the pqo and ppc genes, encoding pyruvate:quinone oxidoreductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, respectively. In fed-batch fermentations at high cell densities, C. glutamicum aceE A16 Δpqo Δppc (pJC4 ilvBNCE) produced up to 738 mM (i.e., 86.5 g/liter) l-valine with an overall yield (YP/S) of 0.36 mol per mol of glucose and a volumetric productivity (QP) of 13.6 mM per h [1.6 g/(liter × h)]. Additional inactivation of the transaminase B gene (ilvE) and overexpression of ilvBNCD instead of ilvBNCE transformed the l-valine-producing strain into a 2-ketoisovalerate producer, excreting up to 303 mM (35 g/liter) 2-ketoisovalerate with a YP/S of 0.24 mol per mol of glucose and a QP of 6.9 mM per h [0.8 g/(liter × h)]. The replacement of the aceE promoter by the dapA-A16 promoter in the two C. glutamicum l-lysine producers DM1800 and DM1933 improved the production by 100% and 44%, respectively. These results demonstrate that C. glutamicum strains with reduced PDHC activity are an excellent platform for the production of pyruvate-derived products. PMID:23835179

  16. Cytokinins in the Bryophyte Physcomitrella patens: Analyses of Activity, Distribution, and Cytokinin Oxidase/Dehydrogenase Overexpression Reveal the Role of Extracellular Cytokinins1[W

    PubMed Central

    von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Núñez, Marta Fernández; Blaschke, Hanna; Dobrev, Petre I.; Novák, Ondrej; Motyka, Václav; Strnad, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to establish the cytokinin profile of the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S.G.; of 40 analyzed cytokinins, 20 were detected. cis-Zeatin-riboside-O-glucoside, N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine-5′-monophosphate (iPRMP), and trans-zeatin-riboside-O-glucoside were the most abundant intracellular cytokinins. In addition, the aromatic cytokinins N6-benzyladenosine (BAR), N6-benzyladenine, meta-, and ortho-topolin were detected. Unexpectedly, the most abundant extracellular cytokinin was the nucleotide iPRMP, and its identity was confirmed by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The effects of overexpressing a heterologous cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX; EC 1.4.3.18/1.5.99.12) gene (AtCKX2 from Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]) on the intracellular and extracellular distribution of cytokinins was assessed. In cultures of CKX-transformed plants, ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry measurements showed that there were pronounced reductions in the extracellular concentrations of N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine (iP) and N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine (iPR), but their intracellular cytokinin concentrations were only slightly affected. In vitro and in vivo measured CKX activity was shown to be strongly increased in the transformants. Major phenotypic changes observed in the CKX-overexpressing plants included reduced and retarded budding, absence of sexual reproduction, and abnormal protonema cells. In bud-induction bioassays with wild-type Physcomitrella, the nucleotides iPRMP, trans-zeatin-riboside-5′-monophosphate, BAR monophosphate, and the cis-zeatin forms cZ and cZR had no detectable effects, while the activities displayed by other selected cytokinins were in the following order: iP > tZ > N6-benzyladenine > BAR > iPR > tZR > meta-topolin > dihydrozeatin > ortho-topolin. The results on wild type and CKX transgenics suggest that extracellular iP and i

  17. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  19. A low-molecular-mass protein from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is responsible for the regulation of formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tate, S; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    An 8.6 kDa protein, which the authors call a modifin, has been purified from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and has been shown to alter the substrate specificity and kinetics of NAD+-linked formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) isolated from the same organism. Purification methods for both the modifin and FDH are presented which reliably produced pure protein for further analysis. Analysis of the molecular mass and N-terminal sequence of both FDH and the modifin indicate that they are unique proteins and show no similarity to alcohol or aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes isolated from methylotrophic bacteria. Substrate specificity studies demonstrated that FDH oxidized formaldehyde exclusively in the presence of the modifin; a diverse range of aldehydes and alcohols were oxidized by FDH in the absence of the modifin. No formaldehyde oxidation was detected in the absence of the modifin. Attempts to replace the modifin with glutathione or high concentrations of methanol to stimulate formaldehyde oxidation failed. With acetaldehyde as substrate, FDH showed standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics; interaction of FDH with the modifin using formaldehyde as substrate altered the kinetics of the reaction to sigmoidal. Kinetic analysis during turnover experiments indicated that the FDH may be associated with bound formaldehyde following enzyme isolation and that NAD may also be associated with the enzyme but in a form that is less tightly bound than found with the methanol dehydrogenase from Bacillus methanolicus. Data are presented which indicate that the modifin may play an important role in regulating formaldehyde concentration in vivo. PMID:10206695

  20. Pigs fed camelina meal increase hepatic gene expression of cytochrome 8b1, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and thiosulfate transferase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Camelina sativa is an oil seed crop which can be grown on marginal lands. Camelina seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids (>35%) and γ-tocopherol but is also high in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Camelina meal, is the by-product after the oil has been extracted. Camelina meal was fed to 28 d old weaned pigs at 3.7% and 7.4% until age 56 d. The camelina meal supplements in the soy based diets, improved feed efficiency but also significantly increased the liver weights. Gene expression analyses of the livers, using intra-species microarrays, identified increased expression of phase 1 and phase 2 drug metabolism enzymes. The porcine versions of the enzymes were confirmed by real time PCR. Cytochrome 8b1 (CYP8B1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2), and thiosulfate transferase (TST) were all significantly stimulated. Collectively, these genes implicate the camelina glucosinolate metabolite, methyl-sulfinyldecyl isothiocyanate, as the main xeniobiotic, causing increased hepatic metabolism and increased liver weight. PMID:24383433

  1. Pigs fed camelina meal increase hepatic gene expression of cytochrome 8b1, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and thiosulfate transferase.

    PubMed

    Meadus, William Jon; Duff, Pascale; McDonald, Tanya; Caine, William R

    2014-01-01

    Camelina sativa is an oil seed crop which can be grown on marginal lands. Camelina seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids (>35%) and γ-tocopherol but is also high in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Camelina meal, is the by-product after the oil has been extracted. Camelina meal was fed to 28 d old weaned pigs at 3.7% and 7.4% until age 56 d. The camelina meal supplements in the soy based diets, improved feed efficiency but also significantly increased the liver weights. Gene expression analyses of the livers, using intra-species microarrays, identified increased expression of phase 1 and phase 2 drug metabolism enzymes. The porcine versions of the enzymes were confirmed by real time PCR. Cytochrome 8b1 (CYP8B1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2), and thiosulfate transferase (TST) were all significantly stimulated. Collectively, these genes implicate the camelina glucosinolate metabolite, methyl-sulfinyldecyl isothiocyanate, as the main xeniobiotic, causing increased hepatic metabolism and increased liver weight. PMID:24383433

  2. Lactate dehydrogenase in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Stankovic Stojanovic, Katia; Lionnet, François

    2016-07-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity is elevated in many pathological states. Interest in LDH activity in sickle cell disease (SCD) has developed out of an increased comprehension of the pathophysiological process and the clinical course of the disease. Elevated LDH activity in SCD comes from various mechanisms, especially intravascular hemolysis, as well as ischemia-reperfusion damage and tissular necrosis. Intravascular hemolysis is associated with vasoconstriction, platelet activation, endothelial damage, and vascular complications. LDH has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic factor of acute and chronic complications. In this review we have evaluated the literature where LDH activity was examined during steady-state or acute conditions in SCD. PMID:27138446

  3. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes. PMID:25542170

  4. Quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from ethanol-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, B; Frank, J; Duine, J A

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, grown on ethanol, showed dye-linked alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The enzyme responsible for this activity was purified to homogeneity. It appeared to contain two molecules of pyrroloquinoline quinone per enzyme molecule. In many respects, it resembled other quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.99.8), having a substrate specificity intermediate between that of methanol dehydrogenases and ethanol dehydrogenases in this group. On the other hand, it also showed dissimilarities: the enzyme was found to be a monomer (Mr 101 000), to need only one molecule of the suicide substrate cyclopropanol to become fully inactivated, and to have a different aromatic amino acid composition. PMID:6439190

  5. Hairpin Ribozyme Genes Curtail Alcohol Drinking: from Rational Design to in vivo Effects in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Sapag, Amalia; Irrazábal, Thergiory; Lobos-González, Lorena; Muñoz-Brauning, Carlos R; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2016-01-01

    Ribozyme genes were designed to reduce voluntary alcohol drinking in a rat model of alcohol dependence. Acetaldehyde generated from alcohol in the liver is metabolized by the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) such that diminishing ALDH2 activity leads to the aversive effects of blood acetaldehyde upon alcohol intake. A stepwise approach was followed to design genes encoding ribozymes targeted to the rat ALDH2 mRNA. In vitro studies of accessibility to oligonucleotides identified suitable target sites in the mRNA, one of which fulfilled hammerhead and hairpin ribozyme requirements (CGGUC). Ribozyme genes delivered in plasmid constructs were tested in rat cells in culture. While the hairpin ribozyme reduced ALDH2 activity 56% by cleavage and blockade (P < 0.0001), the hammerhead ribozyme elicited minor effects by blockade. The hairpin ribozyme was tested in vivo by adenoviral gene delivery to UChB alcohol drinker rats. Ethanol intake was curtailed 47% for 34 days (P < 0.0001), while blood acetaldehyde more than doubled upon ethanol administration and ALDH2 activity dropped 25% in liver homogenates, not affecting other ALDH isoforms. Thus, hairpin ribozymes targeted to 16 nt in the ALDH2 mRNA provide durable and specific effects in vivo, representing an improvement on previous work and encouraging development of gene therapy for alcoholism. PMID:27404720

  6. Isozyme multiplicity with anomalous dimer patterns in a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Effects on the activity and quaternary structure of residue exchanges at "nonfunctional" sites in a native protein.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, O; Shafqat, J; Estonius, M; el-Ahmad, M; Jörnvall, H

    1996-11-19

    The isozymes of class III alcohol dehydrogenase/glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase from cod were characterized. They exhibited three unexpected properties of general interest. First, these dimeric isozymes, derived from two types of subunit (h and l, for high- and low-activity forms), were recovered from liver preparations in only the homodimeric ll and heterodimeric hl combinations. Dissociation and reassociation of the isolated hl form in vitro also resulted in lower yields of the hh than the ll homodimer, although class III subunits are usually freely associable over wide borders of divergence (human and Drosophila). The h and l primary structures show that both chain types are characteristic of class III enzymes, without large amino acid replacements at positions of known subunit interactions. Hence, the hh dimer partial restriction indicates nontraditional alterations at h-subunit interfaces. The structure provides a possible explanation, in the form of h-chain modifications that may influence the anchoring of a loop at positions of two potentially deamidative beta-aspartyl shifts at distant Asn-Gly structures. Second the ll and hl forms differ in enzymatic properties, having 5-fold different K(m) values for NAD+ at pH 8, different K(m) values for S-(hydroxymethyl)glutathione (10 versus 150 microM), and different specific activities (4.5 versus 41 units/mg), with ll resembling and hl deviating from human and other class III alcohol dehydrogenases. However, functional residues lining substrate and coenzyme pockets in the known conformations of homologous forms are largely identical in the two isozymes [only minor conservative exchanges of Val/Leu116, Val/Leu203, Ile/Val224, and Ile/Val269 (numbering system of the human class I enzyme)], again indicating effects from distantly positioned h-chain replacements. Third, the two isozymes differ a surprising amount in amino acid sequence (18%, the same as the piscine/ human difference), reflecting a

  7. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  8. Diversity of organotrophic bacteria, activity of dehydrogenases and urease as well as seed germination and root growth Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum and Sinapis alba under the influence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lipińska, Aneta; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga; Kucharski, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are organic compounds with highly toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties, which adversely affect the basic biological parameters of the soil, including the count of microorganisms, and the enzymatic activity. In addition to disturbances to the biological activity of the soil, PAHs may also exhibit toxic effects on plants. In view of the above, the study involved testing aimed at the determination of the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a form of naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene and pyrene on the count, colony development (CD) index, ecophysiological (EP) diversity index of organotrophic bacteria, and the activity of soil dehydrogenases and soil urease. Moreover, an attempt was made to determine the soil's resistance based on the activity of the above-listed enzymes, and the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on seed germination and root growth was assessed by Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum, and Sinapis alba. In addition, the species of bacteria found in a soil subjected to strong pressure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were isolated. The experiment was performed in a laboratory on samples of loamy sand. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were introduced into the soil in an amount of 0, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg kg(-1) of soil dry matter. Germination and growth of cress (L. sativum), white mustard (S. alba), and sweet sorghum (S. saccharatum) were determined using Phytotoxkit tests. It was found that the tested PAHs increased the average colony counts of organotrophic soil bacteria; pyrene did so to the greatest extent (2.2-fold relative to non-contaminated soil), phenanthrene to the smallest extent (1.4-fold relative to non-contaminated soil). None of the PAHs changed the value of the bacterial colony development (CD) index, while anthracene and pyrene increased the value of the eco-physiological (EP) diversity indicator. PAHs lowered the activity of the tested enzymes. The activity of

  9. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Brozic, P; Lanisnik Risner, T; Gobec, S

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis of hormone-related cancers involves hormone-stimulated cell proliferation, which increases the number of cell divisions and the opportunity for random genetic errors. In target tissues, steroid hormones are interconverted between their potent, high affinity forms for their respective receptors and their inactive, low affinity forms. One group of enzymes responsible for these interconversions are the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, which regulate ligand access to steroid receptors and thus act at a pre-receptor level. As part of this group, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze either oxidation of hydroxyl groups or reduction of keto groups at steroid position C17. The thoroughly characterized 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activates the less active estrone to estradiol, a potent ligand for estrogen receptors. This isoform is expressed in gonads, where it affects circulating levels of estradiol, and in peripheral tissue, where it regulates ligand occupancy of estrogen receptors. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 are thus highly interesting potential therapeutic agents for the control of estrogen-dependent diseases such as endometriosis, as well as breast and ovarian cancers. Here, we present the review on the recent development of inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 published and patented since the previous review of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors of Poirier (Curr. Med. Chem., 2003, 10, 453). These inhibitors are divided into two separate groups according to their chemical structures: steroidal and non-steroidal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors. Their estrogenic/ proliferative activities and selectivities over other 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that are involved in local regulation of estrogen action (types 2, 7 and 12) are also presented. PMID:18220769

  10. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from Clostridium formicoaceticum and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (combined) from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungdahl, L.G.; O'Brien, W.E.; Moore, M.R.; Liu, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase is widely distributed and has been found in every cell type investigated. The NAD-specific enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from Clostridium formicoaceticum and the NADP-specific enzyme has been obtained from Clostridium thermoaceticum. Other sources of the NADP-specific enzyme are Streptococcus species, Escherichia coli, Clostridium cylindrosporum, Salmonella typhimurium, yeast, liver from various animals, calf thymus, and plants. The NAD-specific enzyme has been demonstrated in Acetobacterium woodii, some methane bacteria, and in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. Of considerable interest are the observations that in porcine and ovine livers, as well as in yeast, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase purified to homogeneity also contains methylenetetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase and formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase activities. Now it appears that the purified methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from C. thermoaceticum also has cyclohydrolase but not synthetase activity. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase has been discussed previously in this series, as has methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase. In C. formicoaceticum and C. thermoaceticum these tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes participate in a sequence of metabolic reactions by which carbon dioxide is reduced to the methyl group of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate which in turn is utilized for the synthesis of acetate. This pathway provides the mechanism for disposing of reducing equivalents generated in glycolysis.

  11. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  12. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  13. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  14. From Ancient Chinese Medicine to a Novel Approach to Treat Cocaine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Ivan; Yao, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic agents for CNS disorders are often inhibitors that occupy receptors, with frequent unavoidable side effects likely due to continuous binding. This review summarizes development of a novel aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) inhibitor that specifically targets unique drug related episodic surges in dopamine (DA), a pathophysiologic mechanism that appears to underlie much of drug-seeking behavior. We have synthesized highly selective novel ALDH2 inhibitors (ALDH2i) that block alcohol- and cocaine cue-induced surges in nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA and prevent reinstatement of alcohol heavy drinking, cocaine self-administration and reinstatement of cocaine relapse-like behavior. The mechanism of action of ALDH2i depends on inhibiting dopamine aldehyde (DOPAL) clearance by ALDH2, enabling unmetabolized DOPAL to condense with DA to generate tetrahydropapaveroline (THP). THP selectively inhibits the activated (phosphorylated) tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) to suppress DA synthesis. Selective inhibition of ALDH2 appears to have therapeutic potential for treating cue-induced drug relapse, a major unmet need for treating addicted subjects. PMID:26022266

  15. Light modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by photosynthetic electron flow in pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Akamba, L.M.; Anderson, L.E.

    1981-02-01

    Light activation of NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) and light inactivation of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) appear to be modulated within pea leaf chloroplasts by mediators which are reduced by photosynthetic electron flow from the photosystem I reaction center. Dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea inhibition of this modulation can be completely reversed by ascorbate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol in broken chloroplasts, but not in intact chloroplasts. Intact chloroplasts are impermeable to 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol at pH 7.5. Studies on the effect of light in reconstituted chloroplasts with photosystem I-enriched particles in the place of whole thylakoids revealed that photosystem I participants in the light modulation of NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase and of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase.

  16. Marked differences in drug-induced methemoglobinemia in sheep are not due to RBC glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, reduced glutathione, or methemoglobin reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Guertler, A.T.; Lagutchik, M.S.; Woodard, C.L.; Leonard, D.A.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine is a commonly used topical anesthetic that is structurally similar to current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis. Benzocaine induces profound methemoglobinemia in some sheep but not others. After topical benzocaine administration certain sheep respond to form MHb (elevated MHb 16-50% after a 56-280 mg dose, a 2-10 second spray with benzocine), while other phenotypically similar sheep fail to significantly form MHb (less than a 2% increase from baseline). Deficiencies in Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and MHb reductase increase the susceptibility to methemoglobinemia in man and animals. Sheep are used as a model for G-6-PD deficiency in man, and differences in this enzyme level could cause the variable response seen in these sheep. Similarly, differences in GSH and MHb reductase could be responsible for the observed differences in MHb formation.

  17. Inhibition of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity by histamine H2-receptor antagonists has no influence on the pharmacokinetics of ethanol after a moderate dose.

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, A; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Bergmann, J F; Trout, H; Simonneau, G; Dutreuil, C; Blanc, L E; Dhumeaux, D; Delchier, J C

    1994-01-01

    Ethanol undergoes gastric first pass metabolism by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). We have shown that cimetidine and famotidine both cause competitive inhibition of human gastric ADH in vitro. However, in a randomized 4-way cross-over study in 12 healthy subjects a 7-day course of treatment with cimetidine (800 mg day-1), ranitidine (300 mg day-1) or famotidine (40 mg day-1), did not modify the pharmacokinetics of ethanol given as a post-prandial 0.3 g kg-1 dose. We conclude that gastric mucosal concentrations of histamine H2-receptor blockers achieved after oral dosing are probably too low to cause significant inhibition of gastric ADH in vivo. PMID:7910473

  18. Increased mtPDH Activity Through Antisense Inhibition of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Enhances Inflorescence Initiation, and Inflorescence Growth and Harvest Index at Elevated CO2 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Weraduwage, Sarathi M.; Micallef, Malgre C.; Marillia, Elizabeth-France; Taylor, David C.; Grodzinski, Bernard; Micallef, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) is a key respiratory enzyme that links glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and it is negatively regulated by mtPDH kinase (mtPDHK). Arabidopsis lines carrying either a constitutive or seed-specific antisense construct for mtPDHK were used to test the hypothesis that alteration of mtPDH activity in a tissue- and dosage-dependent manner will enhance reproductive growth particularly at elevated CO2 (EC) through a combined enhancement of source and sink activities. Constitutive transgenic lines showed increased mtPDH activity in rosette leaves at ambient