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Sample records for aldose reductase ec

  1. Chicken muscle aldose reductase: purification, properties and relationship to other chicken aldo/keto reductases.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D G; Davidson, W S

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme that catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of a wide range of aromatic and hydroxy-aliphatic aldehydes was purified from chicken breast muscle. This enzyme shares many properties with mammalian aldose reductases including molecular weight, relative substrate specificity, Michaelis constants, an inhibitor specificity. Therefore, it seems appropriate to call this enzyme an aldose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21). Chicken muscle aldose reductase appears to be kinetically identical to an aldose reductase that has been purified from chicken kidney (Hara et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 133, 207-214) and to hen muscle L-glycol dehydrogenase (Bernado et al., Biochim. biophys. Acta 659, 189-198). The association of this aldose reductase with muscular dystrophy in the chick is discussed.

  2. Potential use of aldose reductase inhibitors to prevent diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Zenon, G J; Abobo, C V; Carter, B L; Ball, D W

    1990-06-01

    Reviewed are (1) the biochemical basis and pathophysiology of diabetic complications and (2) the structure-activity relationships, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and adverse effects of aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs). ARIs are a new class of drugs potentially useful in preventing diabetic complications, the most widely studied of which have been cataracts and neuropathy. ARIs inhibit aldose reductase, the first, rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol metabolic pathway. In nonphysiological hyperglycemia the activity of hexokinase becomes saturated while that of aldose reductase is enhanced, resulting in intracellular accumulation of sorbitol. Because sorbitol does not readily penetrate the cell membrane it can persist within cells, which may lead to diabetic complications. ARIs are a class of structurally dissimilar compounds that include carboxylic acid derivatives, flavonoids, and spirohydantoins. The major pharmacologic action of an ARI involves competitive binding to aldose reductase and consequent blocking of sorbitol production. ARIs delay cataract formation in animals, but the role of aldose reductase in cataract formation in human diabetics has not been established. The adverse effects of ARIs include hypersensitivity reactions. Although the polyol pathway may not be solely responsible for diabetic complications, studies suggest that therapy with ARIs could be beneficial. Further research is needed to determine the long-term impact and adverse effects of ARIs in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  3. [Inhibition of aldose reductase by Chinese herbal medicine].

    PubMed

    Mao, X M; Zhang, J Q

    1993-10-01

    Seven Chinese herbal drugs were screened for experimental inhibition of lens aldose reductase activity, among which quercetin exhibited potent enzyme-inhibitory activities in vitro. Its IC50 value was 3.44 x 10(-7) mol/L. It may be helpful in the prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic complications.

  4. Kinetic characteristics of ZENECA ZD5522, a potent inhibitor of human and bovine lens aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Cook, P N; Ward, W H; Petrash, J M; Mirrlees, D J; Sennitt, C M; Carey, F; Preston, J; Brittain, D R; Tuffin, D P; Howe, R

    1995-04-18

    Aldose reductase (aldehyde reductase 2) catalyses the conversion of glucose to sorbitol, and methylglyoxal to acetol. Treatment with aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) is a potential approach to decrease the development of diabetic complications. The sulphonylnitromethanes are a recently discovered class of aldose reductase inhibitors, first exemplified by ICI215918. We now describe enzyme kinetic characterization of a second sulphonylnitromethane, 3',5'-dimethyl-4'-nitromethylsulphonyl-2-(2-tolyl)acetanilide (ZD5522), which is at least 10-fold more potent against bovine lens aldose reductase in vitro and which also has a greater efficacy for reduction of rat nerve sorbitol levels in vivo (ED95 = 2.8 mg kg-1 for ZD5522 and 20 mg kg-1 for ICI 215918). ZD5522 follows pure noncompetitive kinetics against bovine lens aldose reductase when either glucose or methylglyoxal is varied (K(is) = K(ii) = 7.2 and 4.3 nM, respectively). This contrasts with ICI 215918 which is an uncompetitive inhibitor (K(ii) = 100 nM) of bovine lens aldose reductase when glucose is varied. Against human recombinant aldose reductase, ZD5522 displays mixed noncompetitive kinetics with respect to both substrates (K(is) = 41 nM, K(ii) = 8 nM with glucose and K(is) = 52 nM, K(ii) = 3.8 nM with methylglyoxal). This is the first report of the effects of a sulphonylnitromethane on either human aldose reductase or utilization of methylglyoxal. These results are discussed with reference to a Di Iso Ordered Bi Bi mechanism for aldose reductase, where the inhibitors compete with binding of both the aldehyde substrate and alcohol product. This model may explain why aldose reductase inhibitors follow noncompetitive or uncompetitive kinetics with respect to aldehyde substrates, and X-ray crystallography paradoxically locates an ARI within the substrate binding site. Aldehyde reductase (aldehyde reductase 1) is closely related to aldose reductase. Inhibition of bovine kidney aldehyde reductase by ZD5522

  5. A flavone from Manilkara indica as a specific inhibitor against aldose reductase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2003-09-01

    Isoaffinetin (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavone-6-C-glucoside) was isolated from Manilkara indica as a potent inhibitor of lens aldose reductase by bioassay-directed fractionation. This C-glucosyl flavone showed specific inhibition against aldose reductases (rat lens, porcine lens and recombinant human) with no inhibition against aldehyde reductase and NADH oxidase. Kinetic analysis showed that isoaffinetin exhibited uncompetitive inhibition against both dl-glyceraldehyde and NADPH. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the increasing number of hydroxy groups in the B-ring contributes to the increase in aldose reductase inhibition by C-glucosyl flavones.

  6. Aldose Reductase-catalyzed Reduction of Aldehyde Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Spite, Matthew; Trent, John O.; West, Matthew B.; Ahmed, Yonis; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids results in the generation of aldehyde side chains that remain esterified to the phospholipid backbone. Such “core” aldehydes elicit immune responses and promote inflammation. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which phospholipid aldehydes are metabolized or detoxified are not well understood. In the studies reported here, we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), which reduces hydrophobic aldehydes, metabolizes phospholipid aldehydes. Incubation with AR led to the reduction of 5-oxovaleroyl, 7-oxo-5-heptenoyl, 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-caproyl, and 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl phospholipids generated upon oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC). The enzyme also catalyzed the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes generated from the oxidation of 1-alkyl, and 1-alkenyl analogs of PAPC, and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid or phosphoglycerol. Aldose reductase catalyzed the reduction of chemically synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POVPC) with a Km of 10 μM. Addition of POVPC to the culture medium led to incorporation and reduction of the aldehyde in COS-7 and THP-1 cells. Reduction of POVPC in these cells was prevented by the AR inhibitors sorbinil and tolrestat and was increased in COS-7 cells overexpressing AR. Together, these observations suggest that AR may be a significant participant in the metabolism of several structurally diverse phospholipid aldehydes. This metabolism may be a critical regulator of the pro-inflammatory and immunogenic effects of oxidized phospholipids. PMID:15465833

  7. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  8. B-factor Analysis and Conformational Rearrangement of Aldose Reductase.

    PubMed

    Balendiran, Ganesaratnam K; Pandian, J Rajendran; Drake, Evin; Vinayak, Anubhav; Verma, Malkhey; Cascio, Duilio

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent reduction of glucose reaction that is catalyzed by Aldose Reductase (AR) follows a sequential ordered kinetic mechanism in which the co-factor NADPH binds to the enzyme prior to the aldehyde substrate. The kinetic/structural experiments have found a conformational change involving a hinge-like movement of a surface loop (residues 213-224) which is anticipated to take place upon the binding of the diphosphate moiety of NADPH. The reorientation of this loop, expected to permit the release of NADP(+), represents the rate-limiting step of the catalytic mechanism. This study reveals: 1) The Translation/Libration/Screw (TLS) analysis of absolute B-factors of apo AR crystal structures indicates that the 212-224 loop might move as a rigid group. 2) Residues that make the flexible loop slide in the AR binary and ternary complexes. 3) The normalized B-factors separate this segment into three different clusters with fewer residues.

  9. Erythrocyte aldose reductase activity and sorbitol levels in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, A.; Balakrishna, N.; Ayyagari, Radha; Padma, M.; Viswanath, K.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Activation of polyol pathway due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2) activity has been implicated in the development of diabetic complications including diabetic retinopathy (DR), a leading cause of blindness. However, the relationship between hyperglycemia-induced activation of polyol pathway in retina and DR is still uncertain. We investigated the relationship between ALR2 levels and human DR by measuring ALR2 activity and its product, sorbitol, in erythrocytes. Methods We enrolled 362 type 2 diabetic subjects (T2D) with and without DR and 66 normal subjects in this clinical case-control study. Clinical evaluation of DR in T2D patients was done by fundus examination. ALR2 activity and sorbitol levels along with glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in erythrocytes were determined. Results T2D patients with DR showed significantly higher specific activity of ALR2 as compared to T2D patients without DR. Elevated levels of sorbitol in T2D patients with DR, as compared to T2D patients without DR, corroborated the increased ALR2 activity in erythrocytes of DR patients. However, the increased ALR2 activity was not significantly associated with diabetes duration, age, and HbA1C in both the DR group and total T2D subjects. Conclusions Levels of ALR2 activity as well as sorbitol in erythrocytes may have value as a quantitative trait to be included among other markers to establish a risk profile for development of DR. PMID:18385795

  10. Effects of galactose feeding on aldose reductase gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, R R; Lyons, P A; Wang, A; Sainsbury, A J; Chung, S; Palmer, T N

    1993-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is implicated in the pathogenesis of the diabetic complications and osmotic cataract. AR has been identified as an osmoregulatory protein, at least in the renal medulla. An outstanding question relates to the response of AR gene expression to diet-induced galactosemia in extrarenal tissues. This paper shows that AR gene expression in different tissues is regulated by a complex multifactorial mechanism. Galactose feeding in the rat is associated with a complex and, on occasions, multiphasic pattern of changes in AR mRNA levels in kidney, testis, skeletal muscle, and brain. These changes are not in synchrony with the temporal sequence of changes in tissue galactitol, galactose, and myoinositol concentrations. Moreover, galactose feeding results in changes in tissue AR activities that are not related, temporally or quantitatively, to the alterations in tissue AR mRNA or galactitol levels. It is concluded that AR gene expression and tissue AR activities are regulated by mechanisms that are not purely dependent on nonspecific alterations in intracellular metabolite concentrations. This conclusion is supported by the finding that chronic xylose feeding, despite being associated with intracellular xylitol accumulation, does not result in alterations in AR mRNA levels, at least in the kidney. PMID:8325980

  11. α-Glucosidase and aldose reductase inhibitory activities from the fruiting body of Phellinus merrillii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chang, Heng-Yuan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lin, Ying-Chih; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2011-05-25

    The inhibitory activity from the isolated component of the fruiting body Phellinus merrillii (PM) was evaluated against α-glucosidase and lens aldose reductase from Sprague-Dawley male rats and compared to the quercetin as an aldose reductase inhibitor and acarbose as an α-glucosidase inhibitor. The ethanol extracts of PM (EPM) showed the strong α-glucosidase and aldose reductase activities. α-Glucosidase and aldose reductase inhibitors were identified as hispidin (A), hispolon (B), and inotilone (C), which were isolated from EtOAc-soluble fractions of EPM. The above structures were elucidated by their spectra and comparison with the literatures. Among them, hispidin, hispolon, and inotilone exhibited potent against α-glucosidase inhibitor activity with IC(50) values of 297.06 ± 2.06, 12.38 ± 0.13, and 18.62 ± 0.23 μg/mL, respectively, and aldose reductase inhibitor activity with IC(50) values of 48.26 ± 2.48, 9.47 ± 0.52, and 15.37 ± 0.32 μg/mL, respectively. These findings demonstrated that PM may be a good source for lead compounds as alternatives for antidiabetic agents currently used. The importance of finding effective antidiabetic therapeutics led us to further investigate natural compounds.

  12. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MSn. The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MSn. A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC) isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5 : 5 : 1 : 5, v/v and 3 : 7 : 5 : 5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2) (IC50 = 3.16 μM), rosmarinic acid (4) (IC50 = 2.77 μM), luteolin (5) (IC50 = 6.34 μM), and methyl rosmarinic acid (6) (IC50 = 4.03 μM). PMID:24308003

  13. Affinity purifications of aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the xylose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Bolen, P.L.; Roth, K.A.; Freer, S.N.

    1986-10-01

    Although xylose is a major product of hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, few yeasts are able to convert it to ethanol. In Pachysolen tannophilus, one of the few xylose-fermenting yeasts found, aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were found to be key enzymes in the metabolic pathway for xylose fermentation. This paper presents a method for the rapid and simultaneous purification of both aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from P. tannophilus. Preliminary studies indicate that this method may be easily adapted to purify similar enzymes from other xylose-fermenting yeasts.

  14. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract.

    PubMed

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J Mark

    2015-06-05

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis, respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  15. Prevention of hemodynamic and vascular albumin filtration changes in diabetic rats by aldose reductase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, R.G.; Chang, K.; Pugliese, G.; Eades, D.M.; Province, M.A.; Sherman, W.R.; Kilo, C.; Williamson, J.R. )

    1989-10-01

    This study investigated hemodynamic changes in diabetic rats and their relationship to changes in vascular albumin permeation and increased metabolism of glucose to sorbitol. The effects of 6 wk of streptozocin-induced diabetes and three structurally different inhibitors of aldose reductase were examined on (1) regional blood flow (assessed with 15-microns 85Sr-labeled microspheres) and vascular permeation by 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (2) glomerular filtration rate (assessed by plasma clearance of 57Co-labeled EDTA) and urinary albumin excretion (determined by radial immunodiffusion assay). In diabetic rats, blood flow was significantly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, and optic nerve), sciatic nerve, kidney, new granulation tissue, cecum, and brain. 125I-BSA permeation was increased in all of these tissues except brain. Glomerular filtration rate and 24-h urinary albumin excretion were increased 2- and 29-fold, respectively, in diabetic rats. All three aldose reductase inhibitors completely prevented or markedly reduced these hemodynamic and vascular filtration changes and increases in tissue sorbitol levels in the anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, sciatic nerve, and granulation tissue. These observations indicate that early diabetes-induced hemodynamic changes and increased vascular albumin permeation and urinary albumin excretion are aldose reductase-linked phenomena. Discordant effects of aldose reductase inhibitors on blood flow and vascular albumin permeation in some tissues suggest that increased vascular albumin permeation is not entirely attributable to hemodynamic change.

  16. Structural characterization and functional validation of aldose reductase from the resurrection plant Xerophyta viscosa.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-11-01

    Aldose reductases are key enzymes in the detoxification of reactive aldehyde compounds like methylglyoxal (MG) and malondialdehyde. The present study describes for first time the preliminary biochemical and structural characterization of the aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) enzyme from the resurrection plant Xerophyta viscosa. The ALDRXV4 cDNA was expressed in E. coli using pET28a expression vector, and the protein was purified using affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a molecular mass of ~36 kDa. The K M (1.2 mM) and k cat (14.5 s(-1)) of the protein determined using MG as substrate was found to be comparable with other reported homologs. Three-dimensional structure prediction based on homology modeling suggested several similarities with the other aldose reductases reported from plants. Circular dichroism spectroscopy results supported the bioinformatic prediction of alpha-beta helix nature of aldose reductase proteins. Subcellular localization studies revealed that the ALDRXV4-GFP fusion protein was localized both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The E. coli cells overexpressing ALDRXV4 exhibited improved growth and showed tolerance against diverse abiotic stresses induced by high salt (500 mM NaCl), osmoticum (10 % PEG 6000), heavy metal (20 mM CdCl2), and MG (5 mM). Based on these results, we propose that ALDRXV4 gene from X. viscosa could be a potential candidate for developing stress-tolerant crop plants.

  17. Aldose reductase induced by hyperosmotic stress mediates cardiomyocyte apoptosis: differential effects of sorbitol and mannitol.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Anita S; Ulloa, Juan Alberto; Chiong, Mario; Criollo, Alfredo; Eisner, Verónica; Barros, Luis Felipe; Lavandero, Sergio

    2003-10-03

    Cells adapt to hyperosmotic conditions by several mechanisms, including accumulation of sorbitol via induction of the polyol pathway. Failure to adapt to osmotic stress can result in apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we assessed the role of aldose reductase, the key enzyme of the polyol pathway, in cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmotic stress, elicited by exposure of cultured rat cardiac myocytes to the nonpermeant solutes sorbitol and mannitol, caused identical cell shrinkage and adaptive hexose uptake stimulation. In contrast, only sorbitol induced the polyol pathway and triggered stress pathways as well as apoptosis-related signaling events. Sorbitol resulted in activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p54 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and protein kinase B. Furthermore, sorbitol treatment resulting in induction and activation of aldose reductase, decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL, increased DNA fragmentation, and glutathione depletion. Apoptosis was attenuated by aldose reductase inhibition with zopolrestat and also by glutathione replenishment with N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, our data show that hypertonic shrinkage of cardiac myocytes alone is not sufficient to induce cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmolarity-induced cell death is sensitive to the nature of the osmolyte and requires induction of aldose reductase as well as a decrease in intracellular glutathione levels.

  18. Induction of aldose reductase gene expression in LEC rats during the development of the hereditary hepatitis and hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Hoshi, A; Fujii, J; Miyoshi, E; Kasahara, T; Suzuki, K; Aozasa, K; Taniguchi, N

    1996-04-01

    We examined age-related changes in the protein and the mRNA expression of aldose reductase in livers of Long-Evans with a cinnamon-like color (LEC) rats, which develop hereditary hepatitis and hepatoma with aging, using Long-Evans with an agouti color rats as controls. The levels of the protein and mRNA of aldose reductase increased after 20 weeks, at the stage of acute hepatitis, and were maintained at 60 weeks of age, while those of aldehyde reductase seemed to be constant at all ages. The expression of aldose reductase was marked in cancerous lesions in hepatoma-bearing LEC rat liver compared to uninvolved surrounding tissues. These results indicated that elevation of aldose reductase accompanied hepatocarcinogenesis and may be related to the acquisition of immortality of the cancer cells through detoxifying cytotoxic aldehyde compounds.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyota, Eduardo; Sousa, Sylvia Morais de; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da; Menossi, Marcelo; Yunes, José Andrés; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  20. Aldose reductases influence prostaglandin F2α levels and adipocyte differentiation in male mouse and human species.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Loubeau, Gaëlle; Dani, Christian; Slim, Karem; Martin, Gwenaëlle; Volat, Fanny; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Aldose reductases (AKR1B) are widely expressed oxidoreductases whose physiological function remains elusive. Some isoforms are genuine prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) synthases, suggesting they might influence adipose homeostasis because PGF2α inhibits adipogenesis. This was shown by Akr1b7 gene ablation in the mouse, which resulted in increased adiposity related to a lower PGF2α content in fat. Yet humans have no ortholog gene for Akr1b7, so the role of aldose reductases in human adipose homeostasis remains to be explored. We analyzed expression of genes encoding human and mouse aldose reductase isoforms in adipose tissues and differentiating adipocytes to assess conserved mechanisms regulating PGF2α synthesis and adipogenesis. The Akr1b3 gene encoded the most abundant isoform in mouse adipose tissue, whereas Akr1b7 encoded the only isoform enriched in the stromal vascular fraction. Most mouse aldose reductase gene expression peaked in early adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells and diminished with differentiation. In contrast with its mouse ortholog Akr1b3, AKR1B1 expression increased throughout differentiation of human multipotent adipose-derived stem cells, paralleling PGF2α release, whereas PGF2α receptor (FP) levels collapsed in early differentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of aldose reductase using Statil altered PGF2α production and enhanced human multipotent adipose-derived stem adipocyte differentiation. As expected, the adipogenic effects of Statil were counteracted by an FP agonist (cloprostenol). Thus, in both species aldose reductase-dependent PGF2α production could be important in early differentiation to restrict adipogenesis. PGF2α antiadipogenic signaling could then be toned down through the FP receptor or aldose reductases down-regulation in human and mouse cells, respectively. Our data suggest that aldose reductase inhibitors could have obesogenic potential.

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldose reductase is implied in the metabolism of methylglyoxal in response to stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, J; Prieto, J A

    2001-07-01

    The enzyme aldose reductase plays an important role in the osmo-protection mechanism of diverse organisms. Here, we show that yeast aldose reductase is encoded by the GRE3 gene. Expression of GRE3 is carbon-source independent and up-regulated by different stress conditions, such as NaCl, H2O2, 39 degrees C and carbon starvation. Measurements of enzyme activity and intracellular sorbitol in wild-type cells also indicate that yeast aldose reductase is stress-regulated. Overexpression of GRE3 increases methylglyoxal tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, high expression of GRE3 complements the deficiency of the glyoxalase system of a glo1delta mutant strain. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo assays of yeast aldose reductase activity indicate that methylglyoxal is an endogenous substrate of aldose reductase. Furthermore, addition of NaCl or H2O2 to exponential-phase cells triggers an initial transient increase in the intracellular level of methylglyoxal, which is dependent on the Gre3p and Glo1p function. These observations indicate that the metabolism of methylglyoxal is stimulated under stress conditions; and they support a methylglyoxal degradative pathway, in which this compound is metabolised by the action of aldose reductase.

  2. Inhibitory effects of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott constituents on aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Mei; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Beom Goo; Hong, Jae Seung; Lim, Soon Sung

    2014-08-27

    The goal of this study was to determine the rat lens aldose reductase-inhibitory effects of 95% ethanol extracts from the leaves of C. esculenta and, its organic solvent soluble fractions, including the dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (BuOH) and water (H2O) layers, using dl-glyceraldehyde as a substrate. Ten compounds, namely tryptophan (1), orientin (2), isoorientin (3), vitexin (4), isovitexin (5), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (6), luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (7), rosmarinic acid (8), 1-O-feruloyl-d-glucoside (9) and 1-O-caffeoyl-d-glucoside (10) were isolated from the EtOAc and BuOH fractions of C. esculenta. The structures of compounds 1-10 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparison with previous reports. All the isolates were subjected to an in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity against rat lens aldose reductase. Among tested compounds, compounds 2 and 3 significantly inhibited rat lens aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 1.65 and 1.92 μM, respectively. Notably, the inhibitory activity of orientin was 3.9 times greater than that of the positive control, quercetin (4.12 μM). However, the isolated compounds showed only moderate ABTS+ [2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] activity. These results suggest that flavonoid derivatives from Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott represent potential compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications.

  3. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficial effects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacification was observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fiber cells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficial cortical fibers during cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significantly inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers, via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  4. Inhibition of aldose reductase and anti-cataract action of trans-anethole isolated from Foeniculum vulgare Mill. fruits.

    PubMed

    Dongare, Vandana; Kulkarni, Chaitanya; Kondawar, Manish; Magdum, Chandrakant; Haldavnekar, Vivek; Arvindekar, Akalpita

    2012-05-01

    Foeniculum vulgare fruits are routinely consumed for their carminative and mouth freshening effect. The plant was evaluated for aldose reductase inhibition and anti-diabetic action. Bioguided fractionation using silica gel column chromatography, HPLC, and GC-MS analysis revealed trans-anethole as the bioactive constituent possessing potent aldose reductase inhibitory action, with an IC50 value of 3.8μg/ml. Prolonged treatment with the pet ether fraction of the F. vulgare distillate demonstrated improvement in blood glucose, lipid profile, glycated haemoglobin and other parameters in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Trans-anethole could effectively show anti-cataract activity through the increase in soluble lens protein, reduced glutathione, catalase and SOD activity on in vitro incubation of the eye lens with 55mM glucose. Trans-anethole demonstrated noncompetitive to mixed type of inhibition of lens aldose reductase using Lineweaver Burk plot.

  5. Phytochemical analysis with the antioxidant and aldose reductase inhibitory capacities of Tephrosia humilis aerial parts' extracts.

    PubMed

    Plioukas, Michael; Gabrieli, Chrysi; Lazari, Diamanto; Kokkalou, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    The aerial parts of Tephrosia humilis were tested about their antioxidant potential, their ability to inhibit the aldose/aldehyde reductase enzymes and their phenolic content. The plant material was exhaustively extracted with petroleum ether, dichloromethane and methanol, consecutively. The concentrated methanol extract was re-extracted, successively, with diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. All extracts showed significant antioxidant capacity, but the most effective was the ethyl acetate extract. As about the aldose reductase inhibition, all fractions, except the aqueous, were strong inhibitors of the enzyme, with the n-butanolic and ethyl acetate fractions to inhibit the enzyme above 75%. These findings provide support to the ethnopharmacological usage of the plant as antioxidant and validate its potential to act against the long-term diabetic complications. The phytochemical analysis showed the presence of 1,4-dihydroxy-3,4-(epoxyethano)-5-cyclohexene(1), cleroindicin E(2), lupeol(3), methyl p-coumarate(4), methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate(5), prunin(6), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxyflavanone 7-rutinoside(7), protocatechuic acid(8), luteolin 7-glucoside(9), apigenin(10), naringin(11), rhoifolin(12) and luteolin 7-glucuronate(13).

  6. Synthesis of organic nitrates of luteolin as a novel class of potent aldose reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qin; Cheng, Ning; Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Peng, Sheng-Ming; Zou, Xiao-Qing

    2013-07-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the design of drugs that prevent and treat diabetic complications. Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have received significant attentions as potent therapeutic drugs. Based on combination principles, three series of luteolin derivatives were synthesised and evaluated for their AR inhibitory activity and nitric oxide (NO)-releasing capacity in vitro. Eighteen compounds were found to be potent ARIs with IC50 values ranging from (0.099±0.008) μM to (2.833±0.102) μM. O(7)-Nitrooxyethyl-O(3'),O(4')-ethylidene luteolin (La1) showed the most potent AR inhibitory activity [IC50=(0.099±0.008) μM]. All organic nitrate derivatives released low concentrations of NO in the presence of l-cysteine. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that introduction of an NO donor, protection of the catechol structure, and the ether chain of a 2-carbon spacer as a coupling chain on the luteolin scaffold all help increase the AR inhibitory activity of the resulting compound. This class of NO-donor luteolin derivatives as efficient ARIs offer a new concept for the development and design of new drug for preventive and therapeutic drugs for diabetic complications.

  7. Aldose Reductase as a Drug Target for Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy: Promises and Challenges.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Heba; Munusamy, Shankar

    2016-11-28

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus and the leading cause of end stage renal disease. One of the key pathways activated in DN is the polyol pathway, in which glucose is converted to sorbitol (a relatively non-metabolizable sugar) by the enzyme aldose reductase (AR). Shunting of glucose into this pathway causes disruption to glucose metabolism and subsequently damages the tissues via increased oxidative stress, protein kinase c activation and production of advanced glycation end products (AGE) in the kidney. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the AR enzyme structure, substrate specificity and topology in normal physiology; to elaborate on the deleterious effects of AR activation in DN; and to summarize the potential therapeutic benefits and major challenges associated with AR inhibition in patients with DN.

  8. Inhibition of glycation and aldose reductase activity using dietary flavonoids: A lens organ culture studies.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kapil K; Gacche, Rajesh N

    2017-05-01

    On the eve of increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus and related complications, the search for novel, safe and alternatives therapeutic approaches are evolving. In the present investigation, a panel of ten dietary flavonoids such as 4'-methoxyflavanone, formononetin, hesperetin, hesperidin, naringenin, naringin, rutin, diadzin, silibinin and silymarin was evaluated as possible inhibitors of sugar induced cataractogenesis using bovine lens organ culture studies. The effect of selected flavonoids was observed on glycation induced lens opacity, AGE fluorescence, carbonyl group formation (a biomarker of glycation), protein aggregation and aldose reductase (AR) inhibition. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the efficacy of rutin and silibinin as promising leads for inhibition of glycation reaction and amelioration of sugar induced cataractogenesis. The findings of the present study may be useful for designing and development of the novel lead molecules for the management of diabetic cataract.

  9. Characterization of WY 14,643 and its Complex with Aldose Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Michael R.; Verma, Malkhey; Balendiran, Vaishnavi; Rath, Nigam P.; Cascio, Duilio; Balendiran, Ganesaratnam K.

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator, WY 14,643 exhibits a pure non-competitive inhibition pattern in the aldehyde reduction and in alcohol oxidation activities of human Aldose reductase (hAR). Fluorescence emission measurements of the equilibrium dissociation constants, Kd, of oxidized (hAR•NADP+) and reduced (hAR•NADPH) holoenzyme complexes display a 2-fold difference between them. Kd values for the dissociation of WY 14,643 from the oxidized (hAR•NADP+•WY 14,643) and reduced (hAR•NADPH•WY 14,643) ternary complexes are comparable to each other. The ternary complex structure of hAR•NADP+•WY 14,643 reveals the first structural evidence of a fibrate class drug binding to hAR. These observations demonstrate how fibrate molecules such as WY 14,643, besides being valued as agonists for PPAR, also inhibit hAR. PMID:27721416

  10. Effects of 15-month aldose reductase inhibition with fidarestat on the experimental diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, N; Mizuno, K; Makino, M; Suzuki, T; Yagihashi, S

    2000-10-01

    We examined the effects of long-term treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) fidarestat on functional, morphological and metabolic changes in the peripheral nerve of 15-month diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Slowed F-wave, motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities were corrected dose-dependently in fidarestat-treated diabetic rats. Morphometric analysis of myelinated fibers demonstrated that frequencies of abnormal fibers such as paranodal demyelination and axonal degeneration were reduced to the extent of normal levels by fidarestat-treatment. Axonal atrophy, distorted axon circularity and reduction of myelin sheath thickness were also inhibited. These effects were associated with normalization of increased levels of sorbitol and fructose and decreased level of myo-inositol in the peripheral nerve by fidarestat. Thus, the results demonstrated that long-term treatment with fidarestat substantially inhibited the functional and structural progression of diabetic neuropathy with inhibition of increased polyol pathway flux in diabetic rats.

  11. Berberine inhibits aldose reductase and oxidative stress in rat mesangial cells cultured under high glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Liu, Peiqinq; Tao, Sha; Deng, Yanhui; Li, Xuejuan; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Fenfen; Huang, Wenge; Chen, Fengying; Huang, Heqing; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2008-07-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus, is a major cause of end-stage renal disease. Berberine is one of the main constituents of Coptidis rhizoma and Cortex phellodendri. In the present study, we examined effects of berberine (BBR) on renal injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and on the changes of aldose reductase (AR) and oxidative stress in cultured rat mesangial cells exposed to high glucose. Fasting blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and urine protein over 24 h were detected by using the commercially available kits. Cell proliferation, collagen synthesis, aldose reductase (AR), superoxide anion, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected, respectively, by different methods. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, fasting blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and urine protein over 24 h were significantly decreased in rats treated with 200 mg/kg berberine for 12 weeks compared with diabetic control rats (P < 0.05). This was accompanied by a reduced AR activity and gene expression at both mRNA and protein levels. In cultured rat mesangial cells exposed to high glucose, incubation of BBR significantly decreased cell proliferation, collagen synthesis and AR activity as well as its mRNA and protein levels compared with control cells (P < 0.05). In vitro, BBR also significantly increased SOD activity and decreased superoxide anion and MDA compared with control cells (P < 0.05). These results suggested that BBR could ameliorate renal dysfunction in DN rats, which may be ascribed to inhibition of AR in mesangium, reduction of oxidative stress, and amelioration of extracellular matrix synthesis and cell proliferation. Further studies are warranted to explore the role of AR in DN and the therapeutic implications by AR inhibitors such as BBR.

  12. Aldose reductase (AKR1B) deficiency promotes phagocytosis in bone marrow derived mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahavir; Kapoor, Aniruddh; McCracken, James; Hill, Bradford; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2017-03-01

    Macrophages are critical drivers of the immune response during infection and inflammation. The pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cancer and sepsis has been linked with aldose reductase (AR), a member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. However, the role of AR in the early stages of innate immunity such as phagocytosis remains unclear. In this study, we examined the role of AR in regulating the growth and the phagocytic activity of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMMs) from AR-null and wild-type (WT) mice. We found that macrophages derived from AR-null mice were larger in size and had a slower growth rate than those derived from WT mice. The AR-null macrophages also displayed higher basal, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated phagocytic activity than WT macrophages. Moreover, absence of AR led to a marked increase in cellular levels of both ATP and NADPH. These data suggest that metabolic pathways involving AR suppress macrophage energy production, and that inhibition of AR could induce a favorable metabolic state that promotes macrophage phagocytosis. Hence, modulation of macrophage metabolism by inhibition of AR might represent a novel strategy to modulate host defense responses and to modify metabolism to promote macrophage hypertrophy and phagocytosis under inflammatory conditions.

  13. Thymol, a monoterpene, inhibits aldose reductase and high-glucose-induced cataract on isolated goat lens

    PubMed Central

    Kanchan, Divya M.; Kale, Smita S.; Somani, Gauresh S.; Kaikini, Aakruti A.; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Overactivation of aldose reductase (AR) enzyme has been implicated in the development of various diabetic complications. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of thymol was investigated on AR enzyme and its anti-cataract activity was also examined on isolated goat lens. Materials and Methods: Various concentrations of thymol were incubated with AR enzyme prepared from isolated goat lens. Molecular docking studies were carried out using Schrodinger software to verify the binding of thymol with AR as well as to understand their binding pattern. Further, thymol was evaluated for its anti-cataract activity in high-glucose-induced cataract in isolated goat lens in vitro. Quercetin was maintained as standard (positive control) throughout the study. Results: Thymol showed potent inhibitory activity against goat lens AR enzyme with an IC50 value of 0.65 μg/ml. Docking studies revealed that thymol binds with AR in similar binding pattern as that of quercetin. The high–glucose-induced cataract in isolated goat lens was also improved by thymol treatment. Thymol was also able to significantly (P < 0.001) reduce the oxidative stress associated with cataract. Conclusion: The results suggest that thymol may be a potential therapeutic approach in the prevention of diabetic complications through its AR inhibitory and antioxidant activities. PMID:28216950

  14. Bioactive fraction of Saraca indica prevents diabetes induced cataractogenesis: An aldose reductase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Gauresh; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Saraca indica (SI) flowers extract and different bioactive fraction on in vitro aldose reductase (AR) inhibitory activity, high glucose-induced cataract in goat lens and in vivo streptozotocin (STZ; 45 mg/kg, i.p) induced cataract in rats. Methods: Extract of flowers of SI tested for inhibition against rat lens AR. Furthermore, bioactive fraction was investigated against high glucose-induced opacification of the lens in vitro lens culture and STZ induced diabetic cataract in rats. Identification of the bioactive component was attempted through high-performance thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica (EASI) produced maximum inhibition that may be due to high phenolic content. Goat lenses in media containing glucose developed a distinctly opaque ring in 72 h and treatment with EASI fraction lowered lens opacity in 72 h. Prolonged treatment with EASI to STZ-induced diabetic rats inhibited the AR activity and delayed cataract progression in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica fraction has potential to inhibit rat lens AR enzyme and prevent cataractogenesis not only in goat lens model (in vitro), but also in STZ induced diabetic rats (in vivo). This study is suggestive of the anticataract activity of EASI fraction that could be attributed to the phytoconstituents present in the same. PMID:25709218

  15. Renoprotective Effects of Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Epalrestat against High Glucose-Induced Cellular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ali Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end stage renal disease worldwide. Increased glucose flux into the aldose reductase (AR) pathway during diabetes was reported to exert deleterious effects on the kidney. The objective of this study was to investigate the renoprotective effects of AR inhibition in high glucose milieu in vitro. Rat renal tubular (NRK-52E) cells were exposed to high glucose (30 mM) or normal glucose (5 mM) media for 24 to 48 hours with or without the AR inhibitor epalrestat (1 μM) and assessed for changes in Akt and ERK1/2 signaling, AR expression (using western blotting), and alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (using JC-1 staining), cell viability (using MTT assay), and cell cycle. Exposure of NRK-52E cells to high glucose media caused acute activation of Akt and ERK pathways and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane at 24 hours. Prolonged high glucose exposure (for 48 hours) induced AR expression and G1 cell cycle arrest and decreased cell viability (84% compared to control) in NRK-52E cells. Coincubation of cells with epalrestat prevented the signaling changes and renal cell injury induced by high glucose. Thus, AR inhibition represents a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent DN. PMID:28386557

  16. Identification of Novel Aldose Reductase Inhibitors from Spices: A Molecular Docking and Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Priya; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic patients results in a diverse range of complications such as diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases. The role of aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway, in these complications is well established. Due to notable side-effects of several drugs, phytochemicals as an alternative has gained considerable importance for the treatment of several ailments. In order to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dietary spices on AR, a collection of phytochemicals were identified from Zingiber officinale (ginger), Curcuma longa (turmeric) Allium sativum (garlic) and Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek). Molecular docking was performed for lead identification and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamic behaviour of these protein-ligand interactions. Gingerenones A, B and C, lariciresinol, quercetin and calebin A from these spices exhibited high docking score, binding affinity and sustained protein-ligand interactions. Rescoring of protein ligand interactions at the end of MD simulations produced binding scores that were better than the initially docked conformations. Docking results, ligand interactions and ADMET properties of these molecules were significantly better than commercially available AR inhibitors like epalrestat, sorbinil and ranirestat. Thus, these natural molecules could be potent AR inhibitors. PMID:26384019

  17. Phytochemical Analysis of Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb, Its Antioxidant Activity and Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Set Byeol; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine aldose reductase (AR) inhibitory activity and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of compounds from Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb (AP). We isolated agrimoniin (AM), four flavonoid glucosides and two flavonoid glucuronides from the n-butanol fraction of AP 50% methanol extract. In addition to isolated compounds, the AR-inhibitory activity and the DPPH free radical scavenging activity of catechin, 5-flavonoids, and 4-flavonoid glucosides (known components of AP) against rat lens AR (RLAR) and DPPH assay were measured. AM showed IC50 values of 1.6 and 13.0 μM against RLAR and DPPH scavenging activity, respectively. Additionally, AM, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide (LGN), quercitrin (QU), luteolin (LT) and afzelin (AZ) showed high inhibitory activity against AR and were first observed to decrease sorbitol accumulation in the rat lens under high-sorbitol conditions ex vivo with inhibitory values of 47.6%, 91.8%, 76.9%, 91.8% and 93.2%, respectively. Inhibition of recombinant human AR by AM, LGN and AZ exhibited a noncompetitive inhibition pattern. Based on our results, AP and its constituents may play partial roles in RLAR and oxidative radical inhibition. Our results suggest that AM, LGN, QU, LT and AZ may potentially be used as natural drugs for treating diabetic complications. PMID:28208627

  18. Epalrestat: an aldose reductase inhibitor for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Mary Ann; Borja, Nancy L

    2008-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common long-term complications in patients with diabetes mellitus, with a prevalence of 60-70% in the United States. Treatment options include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, tramadol, and capsaicin. These agents are modestly effective for symptomatic relief, but they do not affect the underlying pathology nor do they slow progression of the disease. Epalrestat is an aldose reductase inhibitor that is approved in Japan for the improvement of subjective neuropathy symptoms, abnormality of vibration sense, and abnormal changes in heart beat associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Unlike the current treatment options for diabetic neuropathy, epalrestat may affect or delay progression of the underlying disease process. Data from experimental studies indicate that epalrestat reduces sorbitol accumulation in the sciatic nerve, erythrocytes, and ocular tissues in animals, and in erythrocytes in humans. Data from six clinical trials were evaluated, and it was determined that epalrestat 50 mg 3 times/day may improve motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and subjective neuropathy symptoms as compared with baseline and placebo. Epalrestat is well tolerated, and the most frequently reported adverse effects include elevations in liver enzyme levels and gastrointestinal-related events such as nausea and vomiting. Epalrestat may serve as a new therapeutic option to prevent or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy. Long-term, comparative studies in diverse patient populations are needed for clinical application.

  19. Identification of Novel Aldose Reductase Inhibitors from Spices: A Molecular Docking and Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Antony, Priya; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic patients results in a diverse range of complications such as diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases. The role of aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway, in these complications is well established. Due to notable side-effects of several drugs, phytochemicals as an alternative has gained considerable importance for the treatment of several ailments. In order to evaluate the inhibitory effects of dietary spices on AR, a collection of phytochemicals were identified from Zingiber officinale (ginger), Curcuma longa (turmeric) Allium sativum (garlic) and Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek). Molecular docking was performed for lead identification and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamic behaviour of these protein-ligand interactions. Gingerenones A, B and C, lariciresinol, quercetin and calebin A from these spices exhibited high docking score, binding affinity and sustained protein-ligand interactions. Rescoring of protein ligand interactions at the end of MD simulations produced binding scores that were better than the initially docked conformations. Docking results, ligand interactions and ADMET properties of these molecules were significantly better than commercially available AR inhibitors like epalrestat, sorbinil and ranirestat. Thus, these natural molecules could be potent AR inhibitors.

  20. The Xerophyta viscosa aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) confers enhanced drought and salinity tolerance to transgenic tobacco plants by scavenging methylglyoxal and reducing the membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Preeti; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Roy, Suchandra Deb; Hohn, Thomas; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2013-06-01

    We report the efficacy of an aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) enzyme from Xerophyta viscosa Baker in enhancing the prospects of plant's survival under abiotic stress. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing ALDRXV4 cDNA showed alleviation of NaCl and mannitol-induced abiotic stress. The transgenic plants survived longer periods of water deficiency and salinity stress and exhibited improved recovery after rehydration as compared to the wild type plants. The increased synthesis of aldose reductase in transgenic plants correlated with reduced methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde accumulation and an elevated level of sorbitol under stress conditions. In addition, the transgenic lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency, less electrolyte damage, greater water retention, higher proline accumulation, and favorable ionic balance under stress conditions. Together, these findings suggest the potential of engineering aldose reductase levels for better performance of crop plants growing under drought and salt stress conditions.

  1. Deletion of Aldose Reductase from Mice Inhibits Diabetes-Induced Retinal Capillary Degeneration and Superoxide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Petrash, J. Mark; Sheibani, Nader; Kern, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacologic inhibition of aldose reductase (AR) previously has been studied with respect to diabetic retinopathy with mixed results. Since drugs can have off-target effects, we studied the effects of AR deletion on the development and molecular abnormalities that contribute to diabetic retinopathy. Since recent data suggests an important role for leukocytes in the development of the retinopathy, we determined also if AR in leukocytes contributes to leukocyte-mediated death of retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Methods Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6J) and AR deficient (AR−/−) mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin. Mice were sacrificed at 2 and 10 months of diabetes to evaluate retinal vascular histopathology, to quantify retinal superoxide production and biochemical and physiological abnormalities in the retina, and to assess the number of retinal endothelial cells killed by blood leukocytes in a co-culture system. Results Diabetes in WT mice developed the expected degeneration of retinal capillaries, and increased generation of superoxide by the retina. Leukocytes from diabetic WT mice also killed more retinal endothelial cells than did leukocytes from nondiabetic animals (p<0.0001). Deletion of AR largely (P<0.05) inhibited the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries, as well as the increase in superoxide production by retina. AR-deficiency significantly inhibited the diabetes-induced increase in expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in retina, but had no significant effect on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), phosphorylated p38 MAPK, or killing of retinal endothelial cells by leukocytes. Conclusions AR contributes to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetic mice. Deletion of the enzyme inhibits the diabetes-induced increase in expression of iNOS and of superoxide production, but does not correct a variety of other pro-inflammatory abnormalities associated with the development of

  2. Melatonin Reduces Cataract Formation and Aldose Reductase Activity in Lenses of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Marjan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Sharzad, Sahab; Beheshtitabar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between the high activity of aldose reductase (AR) and diabetic cataract formation has been previously investigated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the preventing effect of melatonin on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Methods: 34 adult healthy male Sprague-Dawely rats were divided into four groups. Diabetic control and diabetic+melatonin received a single dose of STZ (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas the normal control and normal+melatonin received vehicle. The melatonin groups were gavaged with melatonin (5 mg/kg) daily for a period of 8 weeks, whereas the rats in the normal control and diabetic control groups received only the vehicle. The rats’ eyes were examined every week and cataract formation scores (0-4) were determined by slit-lamp microscope. At the end of the eighth week, the rats were sacrificed and markers of the polyol pathway and antioxidative (Glutathione, GSH) in their lens were determined. The levels of blood glucose, HbA1c and plasma malondialdhyde (MDA), as a marker of lipid peroxidation, were also measured. Results: Melatonin prevented STZ-induced hyperglycemia by decreased blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Slit lamp examination indicated that melatonin delayed cataract progression in diabetic rats. The results revealed that melatonin feeding increased the GSH levels, decreased the activities of AR and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and sorbitol formation in catractous lenses as well as plasma MDA content. Conclusion: In summary, for the first time we demonstrated that melatonin delayed the formation and progression of cataract in diabetic rat lenses. PMID:27365552

  3. Bioactive constituents from Chinese natural medicines. XV. Inhibitory effect on aldose reductase and structures of Saussureosides A and B from Saussurea medusa.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haihui; Wang, Tao; Matsuda, Hisashi; Morikawa, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Tani, Tadato

    2005-11-01

    The 80% aqueous acetone extract from the whole plant of Saussurea medusa MAXIM. was found to inhibit rat lens aldose reductase (IC50=1.4 microg/ml). From this extract, flavonoids, lignans, and quinic acid derivatives were isolated together with two new ionone glycosides, saussureosides A and B. Their absolute stereostructures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence including the application of modified Mosher's method. In addition, some isolates were found to show an inhibitory effect on aldose reductase.

  4. Chemical Constituents of Smilax china L. Stems and Their Inhibitory Activities against Glycation, Aldose Reductase, α-Glucosidase, and Lipase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Eun; Kim, Jin Ah; Whang, Wan Kyunn

    2017-03-11

    The search for natural inhibitors with anti-diabetes properties has gained increasing attention. Among four selected Smilacaceae family plants, Smilax china L. stems (SCS) showed significant in vitro anti-glycation and rat lens aldose reductase inhibitory activities. Bioactivity-guided isolation was performed with SCS and four solvent fractions were obtained, which in turn yielded 10 compounds, including one phenolic acid, three chlorogenic acids, four flavonoids, one stilbene, and one phenylpropanoid glycoside; their structures were elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. All solvent fractions, isolated compounds, and stem extracts from plants sourced from six different provinces of South Korea were next tested for their inhibitory effects against advanced glycation end products, as well as aldose reductase. α-Glucosidase, and lipase assays were also performed on the fractions and compounds. Since compounds 3, 4, 6, and 8 appeared to be the superior inhibitors among the tested compounds, a comparative study was performed via high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection using a self-developed analysis method to confirm the relationship between the quantity and bioactivity of the compounds in each extract. The findings of this study demonstrate the potent therapeutic efficacy of SCS and its potential use as a cost-effective natural alternative medicine against type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  5. Structural and thermodynamic study on aldose reductase: nitro-substituted inhibitors with strong enthalpic binding contribution.

    PubMed

    Steuber, Holger; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2007-05-04

    To prevent diabetic complications derived from enhanced glucose flux via the polyol pathway the development of aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) has been established as a promising therapeutic concept. In order to identify novel lead compounds, a virtual screening (VS) was performed successfully suggesting carboxylate-type inhibitors of sub-micromolar to micromolar affinity. Here, we combine a structural characterization of the binding modes observed by X-ray crystallography with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements providing insights into the driving forces of inhibitor binding, particularly of the first leads from VS. Characteristic features of this novel inhibitor type include a carboxylate head group connected via an alkyl spacer to a heteroaromatic moiety, which is linked to a further nitro-substituted aromatic portion. The crystal structures of two enzyme-inhibitor complexes have been determined at resolutions of 1.43 A and 1.55 A. Surprisingly, the carboxylic group of the most potent VS lead occupies the catalytic pocket differently compared to the interaction geometry observed in almost all other crystal structures with structurally related ligands and obtained under similar conditions, as an interstitial water molecule is picked up upon ligand binding. The nitro-aromatic moiety of both leads occupies the specificity pocket of the enzyme, however, adopting a different geometry compared to the docking prediction: unexpectedly, the nitro group binds to the bottom of the specificity pocket and provokes remarkable induced-fit adaptations. A peptide group located at the active site orients in such a way that H-bond formation to one nitro group oxygen atom is enabled, whereas a neighbouring tyrosine side-chain performs a slight rotation off from the binding cavity to accommodate the nitro group. Identically constituted ligands, lacking this nitro group, exhibit an affinity drop of one order of magnitude. In addition, thermodynamic data suggest a

  6. Chemical constituents from the aerial parts of Aster koraiensis with protein glycation and aldose reductase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Lee, Yun Mi; Lee, Byong Won; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-02-24

    Two new eudesmane-type sesquiterpene glucosides, 9β-O-(E-p-hydroxycinnamoyl)-1β,6β-dihydroxy-trans-eudesm-3-en-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 9α-O-(E-p-hydroxycinnamoyl)-1α,6α-11-trihydroxy-trans-eudesm-3-en-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), were isolated by the activity-guidedfractionation of an EtOAc-soluble fraction from the aerial parts of Aster koraiensis. A new dihydrobenzofuran glucoside, (2R,3S)-6-acetyl-2-[1-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-propenyl]-5-hydroxy-3-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran (3), was also isolated, in addition to 15 known compounds. The structures of 1-3 were determined by spectroscopic data interpretation. All of the isolates were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against the formation of advanced glycation end-products and rat lens aldose reductase.

  7. Aldose reductase inhibitors for diabetic complications: Receptor induced atom-based 3D-QSAR analysis, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Bhawna; Singh, Manjinder; Kaur, Maninder; Bahia, Malkeet Singh; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Silakari, Om; Singh, Baldev

    2015-06-01

    Herein, atom-based 3D-QSAR analysis was performed using receptor-guided alignment of 46 flavonoid inhibitors of aldose reductase (ALR2) enzyme. 3D-QSAR models were generated in PHASE programme, and the best model corresponding to PLS factor four (QSAR4), was selected based on different statistical parameters (i.e., Rtrain(2), 0.96; Qtest(2) 0.81; SD, 0.26). The contour plots of different structural properties generated from the selected model were utilized for the designing of five new congener molecules. These designed molecules were duly synthesized, and evaluated for their in vitro ALR2 inhibitory activity that resulted in the micromolar (IC50<22μM) activity of all molecules. Thus, the newly designed molecules having ALR inhibitory potential could be employed for the management of diabetic complications.

  8. Dissociation between biochemical and functional effects of the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on peripheral nerve in diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, N. E.; Cotter, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to examine the effects in rats of two different doses of the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on functional measures of nerve conduction and sciatic nerve biochemistry. 2. After 1 month, streptozotocin-induced diabetes produced 22%, 23% and 15% deficits in conduction velocity of sciatic nerves supplying gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles and saphenous sensory nerve respectively compared to controls. These deficits were maintained over 2 months diabetes. 3. Slower-conducting motor fibres supplying the interosseus muscles of the foot did not show a diabetic deficit compared to onset controls, however, there was a 13% reduction in conduction velocity after 2 months diabetes relative to age-matched controls, indicating a maturation deficit. 4. Resistance to hypoxic conduction failure was investigated for sciatic nerve trunks in vitro. There was an increase in the duration of hypoxia necessary for an 80% reduction in compound action potential amplitude with diabetes. This was progressive; after 1 month, hypoxia time was increased by 22% and after 2 months by 57%. 5. The effect of 1-month treatment with the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on the abnormalities caused by an initial month of untreated diabetes was examined. Two doses of ponalrestat were employed, 8 mg kg-1 day-1 (which is equivalent to, or greater than, the blockade employed in clinical trials), and 100 mg kg-1 day-1. 6. Sciatic nerve sorbitol content was increased 7 fold by diabetes. Both doses were effective in reducing this; 70% for 8 mg kg-1 day-1, and to within the control range for 100 mg kg-1 day-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467842

  9. Administration of ascorbic acid and an aldose reductase inhibitor (tolrestat) in diabetes: effect on urinary albumin excretion.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, A V; Brooks, B A; Fisher, E J; Molyneaux, L M; Yue, D K

    1998-11-01

    The important role of ascorbic acid (AA) as an anti-oxidant is particularly relevant in diabetes mellitus where plasma concentrations of AA are reduced. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of treatment with AA or an aldose reductase inhibitor, tolrestat, on AA metabolism and urinary albumin excretion in diabetes. Blood and urine samples were collected at 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months from 20 diabetic subjects who were randomized into two groups to receive either oral AA 500 mg twice daily or placebo. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, HbA1c, plasma lipids, urinary albumin, and total glycosaminoglycan excretion were measured at all time points, and heparan sulphate (glycosaminoglycan) was measured at 0 and 12 months. The same parameters, as well as urinary AA excretion, were determined at 0 and 3 months for 16 diabetes subjects receiving 200 mg tolrestat/day. AA treatment increased plasma AA (ANOVA, F ratio = 12.1, p = 0.004) and reduced albumin excretion rate (AER) after 9 months (ANOVA, F ratio = 3.2, p = 0.03), but did not change the other parameters measured. Tolrestat lowered plasma AA (Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, p < 0.05), but did not change AER or the other parameters measured. The ability of AA treatment to decrease AER may be related to changes in extracellular matrix or improvement in oxidative defence mechanism. Unlike the rat model of diabetes, inhibition of aldose reductase did not normalize plasma AA or AER in humans. In fact, tolrestat reduced the plasma AA concentration, a phenomenon which may be due to increased utilization of AA. Dietary supplementation of AA in diabetic subjects may have long-term benefits in attenuating the progression of diabetic complications.

  10. Bioactivity Focus of α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) Leads to Effective Multifunctional Aldose Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Laitao; Li, Yi-Fang; Yuan, Sheng; Zhang, Shijie; Zheng, Huanhuan; Liu, Jie; Sun, Pinghua; Gu, Yijun; Kurihara, Hiroshi; He, Rong-Rong; Chen, Heru

    2016-01-01

    Bioactivity focus on α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) scaffold results in a small library of novel multifunctional aldose reductase (ALR2) inhibitors. All the entities displayed good to excellent inhibition with IC50 72–405 nM. (R,E)-N-(3-(2-acetamido-3-(benzyloxy)propanamido)propyl)-2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy phenyl)acrylamide (5f) was confirmed as the most active inhibitor (IC50 72.7 ± 1.6 nM), and the best antioxidant. 5f bound to ALR2 with new mode without affecting the aldehyde reductase (ALR1) activity, implicating high selectivity to ALR2. 5f was demonstrated as both an effective ALR2 inhibitor (ARI) and antioxidant in a chick embryo model of hyperglycemia. It attenuated hyperglycemia-induced incidence of neural tube defects (NTD) and death rate, and significantly improved the body weight and morphology of the embryos. 5f restored the expression of paired box type 3 transcription factor (Pax3), and reduced the hyperglycemia-induced increase of ALR2 activity, sorbitol accumulation, and the generation of ROS and MDA to normal levels. All the evidences support that 5f may be a potential agent to treat diabetic complications. PMID:27109517

  11. Anti-neuroinflammatory efficacy of the aldose reductase inhibitor FMHM via phospholipase C/protein kinase C-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Li, Jun; Dong, Xin; Wang, Ying-Hong; Ma, Zhi-Zhong; Jiang, Yong; Jin, Hong-Wei; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2013-11-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) has a key role in several inflammatory diseases: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, AR inhibition seems to be a useful strategy for anti-inflammation therapy. In the central nervous system (CNS), microglial over-activation is considered to be a central event in neuroinflammation. However, the effects of AR inhibition in CNS inflammation and its underlying mechanism of action remain unknown. In the present study, we found that FMHM (a naturally derived AR inhibitor from the roots of Polygala tricornis Gagnep.) showed potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting microglial activation and expression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistic studies showed that FMHM suppressed the activity of AR-dependent phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling, which further resulted in downstream inactivation of the IκB kinase/IκB/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway. Therefore, AR inhibition-dependent NF-κB inactivation negatively regulated the transcription and expression of various inflammatory genes. AR inhibition by FMHM exerted neuroprotective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuron–microglia co-cultures. These findings suggested that AR is a potential target for neuroinflammation inhibition and that FMHM could be an effective agent for treating or preventing neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • FMHM is a natural-derived aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor. • FMHM inhibits various neuroinflammatory mediator productions in vitro and in vivo. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent NF-κB pathway. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent MAPK pathway. • FMHM protects neurons against inflammatory injury in microglia-neuron co-cultures.

  12. Electrostatic Fields Near the Active Site of Human Aldose Reductase: 2. New Inhibitors and Complications due to Hydrogen Bonds†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Cohen, Aina E.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy was used to measure electrostatic fields in the hydrophobic region of the active site of human aldose reductase (hALR2). A new nitrile-containing inhibitor was designed and synthesized, and the x-ray structure of its complex, along with cofactor NADP+, with wild-type hALR2 was determined at 1.3 Å resolution. The nitrile is found to be in close proximity to T113, consistent with a hydrogen bond interaction. Two vibrational absorption peaks were observed at room temperature in the nitrile region when the inhibitor binds to wild-type hALR2, indicating that the nitrile probe experiences two different microenvironments, and these could be empirically separated into a hydrogen bonded and non-hydrogen bonded population by comparison with the mutant T113A, where a hydrogen bond to the nitrile is not present. Classical molecular dynamics simulations based on the structure predict a double-peaked distribution in protein electric fields projected along the nitrile probe. The interpretation of these two peaks as a hydrogen bond formation-dissociation process between the probe nitrile group and a nearby amino acid side chain is used to explain the observation of two IR bands, and the simulations were used to investigate the molecular details of this conformational change. Hydrogen bonding complicates the simplest analysis of vibrational frequency shifts as being due solely to electrostatic interactions through the vibrational Stark effect, and the consequences of this complication are discussed. PMID:21859105

  13. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  14. Identification of flavonoids and flavonoid rhamnosides from Rhododendron mucronulatum for. albiflorum and their inhibitory activities against aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Mok, So-Youn; Lee, Sanghyun

    2013-01-15

    To investigate the therapeutic potential of compounds from natural sources, Rhododendron mucronulatum for. albiflorum flowers (RMAF) and R. mucronulatum flowers (RMF) were tested for inhibition of aldose reductase (AR). The methanol extracts of RMAF and RMF exhibited AR inhibitory activities (IC(50) values 1.07 and 1.29 μg/mL, respectively). The stepwise polarity fractions of RMAF were tested for in vitro inhibition of AR from rat lenses. Of these, the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction exhibited AR inhibitory activity (IC(50) 0.15 μg/mL). A chromatography of the active EtOAc fraction of RMAF led to the isolation of six flavonoids, which were identified by spectroscopic analysis as kaempferol (1), afzelin (2), quercetin (3), quercitrin (4), myricetin (5) and myricitrin (6). Compounds 1-6 exhibited high AR inhibitory activity, with IC(50) values of 0.79, 0.31, 0.48, 0.13, 11.92 and 2.67 μg/mL, respectively. HPLC/UV analysis revealed that the major flavonoids of RMAF and RMF are quercitrin (4) and myricitrin (6). Our results suggest that RMAF containing these six flavonoids could be a useful natural source in the development of a novel AR inhibitory agent against diabetic complications.

  15. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  16. Prevention of VEGF-induced growth and tube formation in human retinal endothelial cell by aldose reductase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh CS; Srivastava, SK; Ramana, KV

    2012-01-01

    Objective Since diabetes-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is implicated in retinal angiogenesis, we aimed to examine the role of aldose reductase (AR) in VEGF–induced human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) growth and tube formation. Materials and Methods HREC were stimulated with VEGF and cell-growth was determined by MTT assay. AR inhibitor, fidarestat, to block the enzyme activity and AR siRNA to ablate AR gene expression in HREC were used to investigate the role of AR in neovascularization using cell-migration and tube formation assays. Various signaling intermediates and angiogenesis markers were assessed by Western blot analysis. Immuno-histochemical analysis of diabetic rat eyes was performed to examine VEGF expression in the retinal layer. Results Stimulation of primary HREC with VEGF caused increased cell growth and migration, and AR inhibition with fidarestat or ablation with siRNA significantly prevented it. VEGF-induced tube formation in HREC was also significantly prevented by fidarestat. Treatment of HREC with VEGF also increased the expression of VCAM, AR, and phosphorylation and activation of Akt and p38-MAP kinase, which were prevented by fidarestat. VEGF-induced expression of VEGFRII in HREC was also prevented by AR inhibition or ablation. Conclusions Our results indicate that inhibition of AR in HREC prevents tube formation by inhibiting the VEGF-induced activation of the Akt and p38-MAPK pathway and suggest a mediatory role of AR in ocular neovascularization generally implicated in retinopathy and AMD. PMID:22658411

  17. Enhancing activity and selectivity in a series of pyrrol-1-yl-1-hydroxypyrazole-based aldose reductase inhibitors: The case of trifluoroacetylation.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Nikolaos; Chatzopoulou, Maria; Ballekova, Jana; Cappiello, Mario; Moschini, Roberta; Balestri, Francesco; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Ragno, Rino; Stefek, Milan; Nicolaou, Ioannis

    2017-04-21

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) has been the target of therapeutic intervention for over 40 years; first, for its role in long-term diabetic complications and more recently as a key mediator in inflammation and cancer. However, efforts to prepare small-molecule aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have mostly yielded carboxylic acids with rather poor pharmacokinetics. To address this limitation, the 1-hydroxypyrazole moiety has been previously established as a bioisostere of acetic acid in a group of aroyl-substituted pyrrolyl derivatives. In the present work, optimization of this new class of ARIs was achieved by the addition of a trifluoroacetyl group on the pyrrole ring. Eight novel compounds were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and selectivity against aldehyde reductase (ALR1). All compounds proved potent and selective inhibitors of ALR2 (IC50/ALR2 = 0.043-0.242 μΜ, Selectivity index = 190-858), whilst retaining a favorable physicochemical profile. The most active (4g) and selective (4d) compounds were further evaluated for their ability to inhibit sorbitol formation in rat lenses ex vivo and to exhibit substrate-specific inhibition.

  18. Aldose reductase from Schistosoma japonicum: crystallization and structure-based inhibitor screening for discovering antischistosomal lead compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease with high morbidity and mortality in the world. Currently, the treatment of this disease depends almost exclusively on praziquantel (PZQ); however, the emergence of drug resistance to PZQ in schistosomes makes the development of novel drugs an urgent task. Aldose reductase (AR), an important component that may be involved in the schistosome antioxidant defense system, is predicted as a potential drug target. Methods The tertiary structure of Schistosoma japonicum AR (SjAR) was obtained through X-ray diffraction method and then its potential inhibitors were identified from the Maybridge HitFinder library by virtual screening based on this structural model. The effects of these identified compounds on cultured adult worms were evaluated by observing mobility, morphological changes and mortality. To verify that SjAR was indeed the target of these identified compounds, their effects on recombinant SjAR (rSjAR) enzymatic activity were assessed. The cytotoxicity analysis was performed with three types of human cell lines using a Cell Counting Kit-8. Results We firstly resolved the SjAR structure and identified 10 potential inhibitors based on this structural model. Further in vitro experiments showed that one of the compounds, renamed as AR9, exhibited significant inhibition in the activity of cultured worms as well as inhibition of enzymatic activity of rSjAR protein. Cytotoxicity analysis revealed that AR9 had relatively low toxicity towards host cells. Conclusions The work presented here bridges the gap between virtual screening and experimental validation, providing an effective and economical strategy for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Additionally, this study also found that AR9 may become a new potential lead compound for developing novel antischistosomal drugs against parasite AR. PMID:23734964

  19. Deficiency of aldose reductase attenuates inner retinal neuronal changes in a mouse model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongjie; Nian, Shen; Li, Suk-Yee; Wong, David; Chung, Sookja K; Lo, Amy C Y

    2015-09-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a leading cause of childhood blindness where vascular abnormality and retinal dysfunction are reported. We showed earlier that genetic deletion of aldose reductase (AR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol pathway, reduced the neovascularization through attenuating oxidative stress induction in the mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) modeling ROP. In this study, we further investigated the effects of AR deficiency on retinal neurons in the mouse OIR. Seven-day-old wild-type and AR-deficient mice were exposed to 75 % oxygen for 5 days and then returned to room air. Electroretinography was used to assess the neuronal function at postnatal day (P) 30. On P17 and P30, retinal cytoarchitecture was examined by morphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry for calbindin, protein kinase C alpha, calretinin, Tuj1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. In OIR, attenuated amplitudes and delayed implicit time of a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potentials were observed in wild-type mice, but they were not significantly changed in AR-deficient mice. The morphological changes of horizontal, rod bipolar, and amacrine cells were shown in wild-type mice and these changes were partly preserved with AR deficiency. AR deficiency attenuated the Müller cell gliosis induced in OIR. Our observations demonstrated AR deficiency preserved retinal functions in OIR and AR deficiency could partly reduce the extent of retinal neuronal histopathology. These findings suggested a therapeutic potential of AR inhibition in ROP treatment with beneficial effects on the retinal neurons.

  20. Evaluation of in vitro aldose reductase inhibitory potential of different fraction of Hybanthus enneaspermus Linn F. Muell

    PubMed Central

    Patel, DK; Kumar, R; Kumar, M; Sairam, K; Hemalatha, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the aldose reductase inhibitory (ARI) activity of different fractions of Hybanthus enneaspermus for potential use in diabetic cataract. Methods Total phenol and flavonoid content of different fractions was determined. ARI activity of different fractions in rat lens was investigated in vitro. Results The results showed significant level of phenolic and flavonoid content in ethyl acetate fraction [total phenol (212.15±0.79 mg/g), total flavonoid (39.11±2.27 mg/g)] and aqueous fraction [total phenol (140.62±0.57 mg/g), total flavonoid (26.07±1.49 mg/g)] as compared with the chloroform fraction [total phenol (68.56±0.51 mg/g), total flavonoid (13.41±0.82 mg/g)] and petrolium ether fraction [total phenol (36.68±0.43 mg/g), total flavonoid (11.55±1.06 mg/g)]. There was a significant difference in the ARI activity of each fraction, and it was found to be the highest in ethyl acetate fraction [IC50 (49.26±1.76 µg/mL)] followed by aqueous extract [IC50 (70.83±2.82 µg/mL)] and it was least in the petroleum ether fraction [IC50 (118.89±0.71 µg/mL)]. Chloroform fraction showed moderate activity [IC50 (98.52±1.80 µg/mL)]. Conclusions Different fractions showed significanct amount of ARI activity, where in ethyl acetate fraction it was found to be maximum which may be due to its high phenolic and flavonoid content. The extract after further evaluation may be used in the treatment of diabetic cataract. PMID:23569883

  1. Quantum model of catalysis based on a mobile proton revealed by subatomic x-ray and neutron diffraction studies of h-aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Ruiz, Federico; Cachau, Raul; Hazemann, Isabelle; Meilleur, Flora; Mitschler, Andre; Ginell, Stephan; Afonine, Pavel; Ventura, Oscar N; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Haertlein, Michael; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Myles, Dean; Podjarny, Alberto

    2008-02-12

    We present results of combined studies of the enzyme human aldose reductase (h-AR, 36 kDa) using single-crystal x-ray data (0.66 A, 100K; 0.80 A, 15K; 1.75 A, 293K), neutron Laue data (2.2 A, 293K), and quantum mechanical modeling. These complementary techniques unveil the internal organization and mobility of the hydrogen bond network that defines the properties of the catalytic engine, explaining how this promiscuous enzyme overcomes the simultaneous requirements of efficiency and promiscuity offering a general mechanistic view for this class of enzymes.

  2. A defect in sodium-dependent amino acid uptake in diabetic rabbit peripheral nerve. Correction by an aldose reductase inhibitor or myo-inositol administration.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, D A; Lattimer, S A; Carroll, P B; Fernstrom, J D; Finegold, D N

    1990-01-01

    A myo-inositol-related defect in nerve sodium-potassium ATPase activity in experimental diabetes has been suggested as a possible pathogenetic factor in diabetic neuropathy. Because the sodium-potassium ATPase is essential for other sodium-cotransport systems, and because myo-inositol-derived phosphoinositide metabolites regulate multiple membrane transport processes, sodium gradient-dependent amino acid uptake was examined in vitro in endoneurial preparations derived from nondiabetic and 14-d alloxan diabetic rabbits. Untreated alloxan diabetes reduced endoneurial sodium-gradient dependent uptake of the nonmetabolized amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid by greater than 50%. Administration of an aldose reductase inhibitor prevented reductions in both nerve myo-inositol content and endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Myo-inositol supplementation that produced a transient pharmacological elevation in plasma myo-inositol concentration, but did not raise nerve myo-inositol content, reproduced the effect of the aldose reductase inhibitor on endoneurial sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. Phorbol myristate acetate, which acutely normalizes sodium-potassium ATPase activity in diabetic nerve, did not acutely correct 2-aminoisobutyric uptake when added in vitro. These data suggest that depletion of a small myo-inositol pool may be implicated in the pathogenesis of defects in amino acid uptake in diabetic nerve and that rapid correction of sodium-potassium ATPase activity with protein kinase C agonists in vitro does not acutely normalize sodium-dependent 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake. PMID:2185278

  3. Susceptibility to diabetic neuropathy in patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus is associated with a polymorphism at the 5' end of the aldose reductase gene

    PubMed Central

    Heesom, A.; Millward, A.; Demaine, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—There is evidence that the polyol pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Aldose reductase (ALR2) is the first and rate limiting enzyme of this pathway and recent studies have suggested that polymorphisms in and around the gene are associated with the development of diabetic microvascular disease. The aim was to examine the role of ALR2 in the susceptibility to diabetic neuropathy in patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).
METHODS—One hundred and fifty nine British white patients with IDDM and 102 normal healthy controls were studied using the polymerase chain reaction to test for a highly polymorphic microsatellite marker 2.1 kilobase (kb) upstream of the initiation site of the ALR2 gene.
RESULTS—Seven alleles were detected (Z-6, Z-4, Z-2, Z, Z+2, Z+4, and Z+6). There was a highly significant decrease in the frequency of the Z+2 allele in those patients with overt neuropathy compared with those with no neuropathy after 20 years duration of diabetes (14.1% v 38.2%, χ2 =17.3, p<0.00001). A similar difference was also found between the neuropathy group and those patients who have had diabetes for< five years with no overt neuropathy (14.1% v 30.2%, χ2=9.0, p<0.0025). The neuropathy group also had a significant decrease in the frequency of the Z/Z+2 genotype compared with those patients who have no neuropathy after 20 years duration of diabetes (14.0% v 44.7%, χ2=13.0, p<0.0005).
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that the aldose reductase gene is intimately involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

 PMID:9489533

  4. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Pajares, María A.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  5. Part 1: synthesis of irreversible inhibitors of aldose reductase with subsequent development of a carbon-13 NMR protein probe. Part 2: synthesis of selenium analogs of dopamine as potential dopamine receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Aldose reductase converts glucose into sorbitol using NADPH as a cofactor. Sorbitol accumulation in various tissues is believed to play a major role in the development of debilitating complications of diabetes; thus, much effort has been directed toward the preparation of aldose reductase inhibitors. Of the compounds prepared, the most active are the isothiocyanate and azide analogs of the reversible aldose reductase inhibitor alrestatin. The potency of the alrestatin isothiocyanate prompted the authors to examine the possibility that isothiocyanates enriched with carbon-13 could be used as carbon-13 NMR protein probes. Toward this end, a synthesis of carbon-13 enriched phenylisothiocyanate has been developed. This reagent has been successfully utilized to study peptides via carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy. Research in their laboratory over the years has focused on answering two fundamental questions regarding the interaction of dopamine with its receptor. First, can the concept of bioisosterism be applied to dopamine agonists. Secondly, what is the actual molecular species of dopamine which interacts with the dopamine receptor. In an effort to answer these questions, methyl selenide and dimethyl selenonium analogs of dopamine have been synthesized.

  6. The anti-necrosis role of hypoxic preconditioning after acute anoxia is mediated by aldose reductase and sorbitol pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Ying; Ma, Zi-Min; Fan, Xue-Lai; Zhao, Tong; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Huang, Xin; Li, Ming-Ming; Xiong, Lei; Zhang, Kuan; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Fan, Ming

    2010-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that hypoxic preconditioning (HP) enhances the survival ability of the organism against the subsequent acute anoxia (AA). However, it is not yet clear whether necrosis induced by AA can be prevented by HP, and what are the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we examined the effect of HP (10% O(2), 48 h) on necrosis induced by AA (0% O(2), 24 h) in PC12 cells. We found that HP delayed the regulatory volume decrease and reduced cell swelling after 24 h of exposure to AA. Since aldose reductase (AR) is involved in cell volume regulation, we detected AR mRNA expression with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. The AR mRNA level was dramatically elevated by HP. Furthermore, an HP-induced decrease in cell injury was reversed by berberine chloride (BB), the inhibitor of AR. In addition, sorbitol synthesized from glucose catalyzed by AR is directly related to cell volume regulation. Subsequently, we tested sorbitol content in the cytoplasm. HP clearly elevated sorbitol content, while BB inhibited the elevation induced by HP. Further study showed that a strong inhibitor of sorbitol permease, quinidine, completely reversed the protection induced by HP after AA. These data provide evidence that HP prevents necrosis induced by AA and is mediated by AR and sorbitol pathway.

  7. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of some structurally diverse flavonoids and design of new aldose reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chandra De, Utpal; Debnath, Tanusree; Sen, Debanjan; Debnath, Sudhan

    2015-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the development of several long-term diabetic complications. Inhibition of AR activities is a strategy for controlling complications arising from chronic diabetes. Several AR inhibitors have been reported in the literature. Flavonoid type compounds are shown to have significant AR inhibition. The objective of this study was to perform a computational work to get an idea about structural insight of flavonoid type compounds for developing as well as for searching new flavonoid based AR inhibitors. The data-set comprising 68 flavones along with their pIC50 values ranging from 0.44 to 4.59 have been collected from literature. Structure of all the flavonoids were drawn in Chembiodraw Ultra 11.0, converted into corresponding three-dimensional structure, saved as mole file and then imported to maestro project table. Imported ligands were prepared using LigPrep option of maestro 9.6 version. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies were performed with appropriate options of maestro 9.6 version installed in HP Z820 workstation with CentOS 6.3 (Linux). A model with partial least squares factor 5, standard deviation 0.2482, R2 = 0.9502 and variance ratio of regression 122 has been found as the best statistical model. PMID:25709964

  8. Structure-activity relationships and molecular modelling of new 5-arylidene-4-thiazolidinone derivatives as aldose reductase inhibitors and potential anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Maccari, Rosanna; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Ottanà, Rosaria; Rocchiccioli, Marco; Marrazzo, Agostino; Cardile, Venera; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Amodeo, Pietro; Mura, Umberto; Del Corso, Antonella

    2014-06-23

    A series of 5-(carbamoylmethoxy)benzylidene-2-oxo/thioxo-4-thiazolidinone derivatives (6-9) were synthesized as inhibitors of aldose reductase (AR), enzyme which plays a crucial role in the development of diabetes complications as well as in the inflammatory processes associated both to diabetes mellitus and to other pathologies. In vitro inhibitory activity indicated that compounds 6-9a-d were generally good AR inhibitors. Acetic acid derivatives 8a-d and 9a-d were shown to be the best enzyme inhibitors among the tested compounds endowed with significant inhibitory ability levels reaching submicromolar IC50 values. Moreover, some representative AR inhibitors (7a, 7c, 9a, 9c, 9d) were assayed in cultures of human keratinocytes in order to evaluate their capability to reduce NF-kB activation and iNOS expression. Compound 9c proved to be the best derivative endowed with both interesting AR inhibitory effectiveness and ability to reduce NF-kB activation and iNOS expression. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were undertaken to investigate the binding modes of selected compounds into the active site of AR in order to rationalize the inhibitory effectiveness of these derivatives.

  9. Discovery of novel aldose reductase inhibitors using a protein structure-based approach: 3D-database search followed by design and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Y; Arisawa, M; Hamada, R; Kita, Y; Mizutani, M Y; Tomioka, N; Itai, A; Miyamoto, S

    2001-05-24

    Aldose reductase (AR) has been implicated in the etiology of diabetic complications. Due to the limited number of currently available drugs for the treatment of diabetic complications, we have carried out structure-based drug design and synthesis in an attempt to find new types of AR inhibitors. With the ADAM&EVE program, a three-dimensional database (ACD3D) was searched using the ligand binding site of the AR crystal structure. Out of 179 compounds selected through this search followed by visual inspection, 36 compounds were purchased and subjected to a biological assay. Ten compounds showed more than 40% inhibition of AR at a 15 microg/mL concentration. In a subsequent lead optimization, a series of analogues of the most active compound were synthesized based on the docking mode derived by ADAM&EVE. Many of these congeners exhibited higher activities compared to the mother compound. Indeed, the most potent, synthesized compound showed an approximately 20-fold increase in inhibitory activity (IC(50) = 0.21 vs 4.3 microM). Furthermore, a hydrophobic subsite was newly inferred, which would be useful for the design of inhibitors with improved affinity for AR.

  10. 3D-QSAR (CoMFA and CoMSIA) and pharmacophore (GALAHAD) studies on the differential inhibition of aldose reductase by flavonoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio

    2010-11-01

    Inhibitory activities of flavonoid derivatives against aldose reductase (AR) enzyme were modelled by using CoMFA, CoMSIA and GALAHAD methods. CoMFA and CoMSIA methods were used for deriving quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. All QSAR models were trained with 55 compounds, after which they were evaluated for predictive ability with additional 14 compounds. The best CoMFA model included both steric and electrostatic fields, meanwhile, the best CoMSIA model included steric, hydrophobic and H-bond acceptor fields. These models had a good predictive quality according to both internal and external validation criteria. On the other hand, GALAHAD was used for deriving a 3D pharmacophore model. Twelve active compounds were used for deriving this model. The obtained model included hydrophobe, hydrogen bond acceptor and hydrogen bond donor features; it was able to identify the active AR inhibitors from the remaining compounds. These in silico tools might be useful in the rational design of new AR inhibitors.

  11. Triple aldose reductase/α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of antidiabetic constituents in crude extract of Radix Scutellariae.

    PubMed

    Tahtah, Yousof; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nyberg, Nils T; Jønsson, Louise H; Jäger, Anna K; Qinglei, Sun; Staerk, Dan

    2015-08-21

    In this work, development of a new microplate-based high-resolution profiling assay using recombinant human aldose reductase is presented. Used together with high-resolution radical scavenging and high-resolution α-glucosidase assays, it provided the first report of a triple aldose reductase/α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution inhibition profile - allowing proof of concept with Radix Scutellariae crude extract as a polypharmacological herbal drug. The triple bioactivity high-resolution profiles were used to pinpoint bioactive compounds, and subsequent structure elucidation was performed with hyphenated high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The only α-glucosidase inhibitor was baicalein, whereas main aldose reductase inhibitors in the crude extract were baicalein and skullcapflavone II, and main radical scavengers were ganhuangemin, viscidulin III, baicalin, oroxylin A 7-O-glucuronide, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and skullcapflavone II.

  12. Aldose Reductase Regulates Microglia/Macrophages Polarization Through the cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Bian, Ganlan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Ling; Yu, Caiyong; Liu, Fangfang; Xue, Qian; Chung, Sookja K; Song, Bing; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory reactions are the most critical pathological processes occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Activated microglia/macrophages have either detrimental or beneficial effects on neural regeneration based on their functional polarized M1/M2 subsets. However, the mechanism of microglia/macrophage polarization to M1/M2 at the injured spinal cord environment remains unknown. In this study, wild-type (WT) or aldose reductase (AR)-knockout (KO) mice were subjected to SCI by a spinal crush injury model. The expression pattern of AR, behavior tests for locomotor activity, and lesion size were assessed at between 4 h and 28 days after SCI. We found that the expression of AR is upregulated in microglia/macrophages after SCI in WT mice. In AR KO mice, SCI led to smaller injury lesion areas compared to WT. AR deficiency-induced microglia/macrophages induce the M2 rather than the M1 response and promote locomotion recovery after SCI in mice. In the in vitro experiments, microglia cell lines (N9 or BV2) were treated with the AR inhibitor (ARI) fidarestat. AR inhibition caused 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation, which induced the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to promote Arg1 expression. KG501, the specific inhibitor of phosphorylated CREB, could cancel the upregulation of Arg1 by ARI or HNE stimulation. Our results suggest that AR works as a switch which can regulate microglia by polarizing cells to either the M1 or the M2 phenotype under M1 stimulation based on its states of activity. We suggest that inhibiting AR may be a promising therapeutic method for SCI in the future.

  13. Effects of the New Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Benzofuroxane Derivative BF-5m on High Glucose Induced Prolongation of Cardiac QT Interval and Increase of Coronary Perfusion Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, C.; Ferraro, B.; Maisto, R.; Trotta, M. C.; Di Carluccio, N.; Sartini, S.; La Motta, C.; Ferraraccio, F.; Rossi, F.; D'Amico, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the new aldose reductase inhibitor benzofuroxane derivative 5(6)-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylmethoxy)benzofuroxane (BF-5m) on the prolongation of cardiac QT interval and increase of coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) in isolated, high glucose (33.3 mM D-glucose) perfused rat hearts. BF-5m was dissolved in the Krebs solution at a final concentration of 0.01 μM, 0.05 μM, and 0.1 μM. 33.3 mM D-glucose caused a prolongation of the QT interval and increase of CPP up to values of 190 ± 12 ms and 110 ± 8 mmHg with respect to the values of hearts perfused with standard Krebs solution (11.1 mM D-glucose). The QT prolongation was reduced by 10%, 32%, and 41%, respectively, for the concentration of BF-5m 0.01 μM, 0.05 μM, and 0.1 μM. Similarly, the CPP was reduced by 20% for BF-5m 0.05 μM and by 32% for BF-5m 0.1 μM. BF-5m also increased the expression levels of sirtuin 1, MnSOD, eNOS, and FOXO-1, into the heart. The beneficial actions of BF-5m were partly abolished by the pretreatment of the rats with the inhibitor of the sirtuin 1 activity EX527 (10 mg/kg/day/7 days i.p.) prior to perfusion of the hearts with high glucose + BF-5m (0.1 μM). Therefore, BF-5m supplies cardioprotection from the high glucose induced QT prolongation and increase of CPP. PMID:26839893

  14. Inhibitory Activities of Stauntonia hexaphylla Leaf Constituents on Rat Lens Aldose Reductase and Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products and Antioxidant

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kwon, Shin Hwa; Kim, Set Byeol

    2017-01-01

    Stauntonia hexaphylla (Thunb.) Decne. (Lardizabalaceae) leaves (SHL) have been used traditionally as analgesics, sedatives, diuretics, and so on, in China. To date, no data have been reported on the inhibitory effect of SHL and its constituents on rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Therefore, the inhibitory effect of compounds isolated from SHL extract on RLAR and AGEs was investigated to evaluate potential treatments of diabetic complications. The ethyl acetate (EtOAC) fraction of SHL extract showed strong inhibitory activity on RLAR and AGEs; therefore, EtOAc fraction (3.0 g) was subjected to Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, for further fractionation, with 100% MeOH solvent system to investigate its effect on RLAR and AGEs. Phytochemical investigation of SHL led to the isolation of seven compounds. Among the isolated compounds, chlorogenic acid, calceolarioside B, luteolin-3′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside exhibited significant inhibitory activity against RLAR with IC50 in the range of 7.34–23.99 μM. In addition, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid, neochlorogenic acid, and luteolin-3′-O-β-D-glucopyranoside exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against formation of AGEs, with an IC50 value of 115.07–184.06 μM, compared to the positive control aminoguanidine (820.44 μM). Based on these findings, SHL dietary supplements could be considered for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetes complication. PMID:28326319

  15. Aldose reductase (AKR1B3) regulates the accumulation of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) and the expression of AGE receptor (RAGE).

    PubMed

    Baba, Shahid P; Hellmann, Jason; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2011-05-30

    Diabetes results in enhanced chemical modification of proteins by advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) precursors. These modifications have been linked to the development of several secondary diabetic complications. Our previous studies showed that aldose reductase (AR; AKR1B3) catalyzes the reduction of ALEs and AGEs precursors; however, the in vivo significance of this metabolic pathway during diabetes and obesity has not been fully assessed. Therefore we examined the role of AR in regulating ALEs and AGEs formation in murine models of diet-induced obesity and streptozotocin-induced diabetes. In comparison with wild-type (WT) and AR-null mice fed normal chow, mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet (42% kcal fat) showed increased accumulation of AGEs and protein-acrolein adducts in the plasma. AGEs and acrolein adducts were also increased in the epididymal fat of WT and AR-null mice fed a HF diet. Deletion of AR increased the accumulation of 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) protein adduct in the plasma and increased the expression of the AGE receptor (RAGE) in HF fed mice. No change in AGEs formation was observed in the kidneys of HF-fed mice. In comparison, renal tissue from AR-null mice treated with streptozotocin showed greater AGE accumulation than streptozotocin-treated WT mice. These data indicated that AR regulated the accumulation of lipid peroxidation derived aldehydes and AGEs under conditions of severe, but not mild, hyperglycemia and that deletion of AR increased RAGE-induction via mechanisms that were independent of AGEs accumulation.

  16. Aldose reductase inhibitor counteracts the enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-10 and improves corneal wound healing in galactose-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takafumi; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Matsumura, Takehiro; Takihara, Yuji; Inatani, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the effect of an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) and the role of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-10 on recovery after corneal epithelium removal in a rat diabetic keratopathy model. Methods Three-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the following diets for 6 weeks: normal MF chow (MF), 50% galactose (Gal), and 50% Gal containing 0.01% ARI (Gal +ARI). The corneal epithelium was removed using n-heptanol, and the area of epithelial defects was photographed and measured every 24 h. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression profile of MMP-10 and integrin α3. Results Compared to the MF control group, the amount of galactitol in the Gal group increased approximately 200-fold, which was reduced to sevenfold by ARI treatment. The area of corneal erosion in the Gal group was significantly larger than in the MF group at 72 h and thereafter (p<0.01, unpaired t test). The expression level of MMP-10 was enhanced at both the protein and mRNA levels by exposure to a high concentration of Gal, while integrin α3 expression decreased at the protein level but remained unchanged at the mRNA level. Delayed epithelial wound healing and alterations in the expression levels of MMP-10 and integrin α3 were normalized by ARI. The corneal erosion closure rate was significantly decreased with topical recombinant MMP-10. Conclusions These studies confirm that the increased expression of MMP-10 induced by Gal feeding is counteracted by ARI treatment and suggest a role of MMP-10 in modulating corneal epithelial wound healing. PMID:24339723

  17. A meta-analysis of trials on aldose reductase inhibitors in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The Italian Study Group. The St. Vincent Declaration.

    PubMed

    Nicolucci, A; Carinci, F; Cavaliere, D; Scorpiglione, N; Belfiglio, M; Labbrozzi, D; Mari, E; Benedetti, M M; Tognoni, G; Liberati, A

    1996-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common and disabling long-term sequelae of diabetes mellitus. Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have been proposed and are increasingly used in many countries for the prevention and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to review existing evidence on the effectiveness of ARIs in the treatment of peripheral diabetic neuropathy, with particular reference to the type and clinical relevance of the end point used and to the consistency of results across studies. Thirteen randomized clinical trials (RTCs) comparing ARIs with placebo, published between 1981 and 1993 were included in the meta-analysis. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was the only end point reported in all trials. Treatment effect was thus evaluated in terms of NCV mean difference in four different nerves: median motor, median sensory, peroneal motor, and sural sensory. A statistically significant reduction in decline of median motor NCV was present in the treated group as compared to the control group (mean 0.91 ms-1; 95% CI 0.41-1.42 ms-1). For peroneal motor, median sensory, and sural sensory nerves results did not show any clear benefit for patients treated with ARIs. When the analysis was limited to trials with at least 1-year treatment duration, a significant effect was present for peroneal motor NCV (mean 1.24 ms-1; 95% CI 0.32-2.15 ms-1) and a benefit of borderline statistical significance was also present for median motor NCV (mean 0.69 ms-1; 95% CI-0.07-1.45 ms-1). A heterogeneous picture emerged when looking at the results of different studies and serious inconsistencies were also present in the direction of treatment effects among nerves in the same studies. Although the results of 1-year treatment on motor NCV seem encouraging, the uncertainty about the reliability of the end-point employed and the short treatment duration do not allow any clear conclusion about the efficacy of ARIs in the treatment of peripheral diabetic

  18. Identification of a novel polyfluorinated compound as a lead to inhibit the human enzymes aldose reductase and AKR1B10: structure determination of both ternary complexes and implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X; Mitschler, André; Porté, Sergio; de Lera, Ángel R; Martín, María J; Manzanaro, Sonia; de la Fuente, Jesús A; Terwesten, Felix; Betz, Michael; Klebe, Gerhard; Farrés, Jaume; Parés, Xavier; Podjarny, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are mostly monomeric enzymes which fold into a highly conserved (α/β)8 barrel, while their substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity are determined by interaction with residues located in three highly variable external loops. The closely related human enzymes aldose reductase (AR or AKR1B1) and AKR1B10 are of biomedical interest because of their involvement in secondary diabetic complications (AR) and in cancer, e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and smoking-related lung cancer (AKR1B10). After characterization of the IC50 values of both AKRs with a series of polyhalogenated compounds, 2,2',3,3',5,5',6,6'-octafluoro-4,4'-biphenyldiol (JF0064) was identified as a lead inhibitor of both enzymes with a new scaffold (a 1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol). An ultrahigh-resolution X-ray structure of the AR-NADP(+)-JF0064 complex has been determined at 0.85 Å resolution, allowing it to be observed that JF0064 interacts with the catalytic residue Tyr48 through a negatively charged hydroxyl group (i.e. the acidic phenol). The non-competitive inhibition pattern observed for JF0064 with both enzymes suggests that this acidic hydroxyl group is also present in the case of AKR1B10. Moreover, the combination of surface lysine methylation and the introduction of K125R and V301L mutations enabled the determination of the X-ray crystallographic structure of the corresponding AKR1B10-NADP(+)-JF0064 complex. Comparison of the two structures has unveiled some important hints for subsequent structure-based drug-design efforts.

  19. Expression of constitutive cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1) in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes; effects of treatment with evening primrose oil or an aldose reductase inhibitor on COX-1 mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Fang, C; Jiang, Z; Tomlinson, D R

    1997-02-01

    Altered prostanoid metabolism participates in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The rate-limiting enzyme in the control of prostanoid metabolism is constitutive cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1). This study examined the possibility that altered prostanoid metabolism derives from altered COX-1 expression in those tissues from diabetic rats, with characteristic changes in prostanoid production and related haemodynamics. This account also describes a procedure for estimation of minute amounts of COX-1 mRNA by reverse transcription and competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-cPCR) amplification. In streptozotocin-diabetic rats (STZ-D, 55 mg/kg body weight), compared with age-matched controls, the level of COX-1 mRNA (in attomoles/micrograms tRNA +/- 1SD) was significantly decreased in sciatic nerve (0.50 +/- 0.26 versus 0.89 +/- 0.32 in controls; P < 0.05) and thoracic aorta (3.99 +/- 1.67 versus 8.80 +/- 2.37 in controls; P < 0.05). There were no differences in COX-1 mRNA in diabetic and control rat kidney and retina, though there was a trend towards increased expression with diabetes in the latter. Evening primrose oil (EPO) treatment increased COX-1 mRNA in nerve and retina to levels in diabetic rats that were higher than those of non-diabetic controls (1.21 +/- 0.28 for nerve and 0.065 +/- 0.017 for retina, where control retinae gave 0.031 +/- 0.020-see above for nerve). Treatment of diabetic rats with an aldose reductase inhibitor was without effect on COX-1 mRNA levels in the tissues examined. This study demonstrates that the changes in COX-1 mRNA levels in diabetic rats are organ specific and suggests that altered prostanoid metabolism can, in part, be explained by altered COX-1 expression. Apart from providing arachidonate as substrate for COX, EPO stimulates COX-1 expression in some tissues.

  20. Sulphur flux through the sulphate assimilation pathway is differently controlled by adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase under stress and in transgenic poplar plants overexpressing gamma-ECS, SO, or APR.

    PubMed

    Scheerer, Ursula; Haensch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Kopriva, Stanislav; Rennenberg, Heinz; Herschbach, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Sulphate assimilation provides reduced sulphur for the synthesis of cysteine, methionine, and numerous other essential metabolites and secondary compounds. The key step in the pathway is the reduction of activated sulphate, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate (APS), to sulphite catalysed by APS reductase (APR). In the present study, [(35)S]sulphur flux from external sulphate into glutathione (GSH) and proteins was analysed to check whether APR controls the flux through the sulphate assimilation pathway in poplar roots under some stress conditions and in transgenic poplars. (i) O-Acetylserine (OAS) induced APR activity and the sulphur flux into GSH. (ii) The herbicide Acetochlor induced APR activity and results in a decline of GSH. Thereby the sulphur flux into GSH or protein remained unaffected. (iii) Cd treatment increased APR activity without any changes in sulphur flux but lowered sulphate uptake. Several transgenic poplar plants that were manipulated in sulphur metabolism were also analysed. (i) Transgenic poplar plants that overexpressed the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) gene, the enzyme catalysing the key step in GSH formation, showed an increase in sulphur flux into GSH and sulphate uptake when gamma-ECS was targeted to the cytosol, while no changes in sulphur flux were observed when gamma-ECS was targeted to plastids. (ii) No effect on sulphur flux was observed when the sulphite oxidase (SO) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, which catalyses the back reaction of APR, that is the reaction from sulphite to sulphate, was overexpressed. (iii) When Lemna minor APR was overexpressed in poplar, APR activity increased as expected, but no changes in sulphur flux were observed. For all of these experiments the flux control coefficient for APR was calculated. APR as a controlling step in sulphate assimilation seems obvious under OAS treatment, in gamma-ECS and SO overexpressing poplars. A possible loss of control under certain conditions, that is Cd treatment

  1. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase, HdRed, from the Pacific Abalone Haliotis discus hannai, Which Reduces Alginate-derived 4-Deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid to 2-Keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate*

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Shogo; Nishiyama, Ryuji; Inoue, Akira; Ojima, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Abalone feeds on brown seaweeds and digests seaweeds' alginate with alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3). However, it has been unclear whether the end product of alginate lyases (i.e. unsaturated monouronate-derived 4-deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH)) is assimilated by abalone itself, because DEH cannot be metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway of animals. Under these circumstances, we recently noticed the occurrence of an NADPH-dependent reductase, which reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate, in hepatopancreas extract of the pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai. In the present study, we characterized this enzyme to some extent. The DEH reductase, named HdRed in the present study, could be purified from the acetone-dried powder of hepatopancreas by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by conventional column chromatographies. HdRed showed a single band of ∼40 kDa on SDS-PAGE and reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate with an optimal temperature and pH at around 50 °C and 7.0, respectively. HdRed exhibited no appreciable activity toward 28 authentic compounds, including aldehyde, aldose, ketose, α-keto-acid, uronic acid, deoxy sugar, sugar alcohol, carboxylic acid, ketone, and ester. The amino acid sequence of 371 residues of HdRed deduced from the cDNA showed 18–60% identities to those of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily enzymes, such as human aldose reductase, halophilic bacterium reductase, and sea hare norsolorinic acid (a polyketide derivative) reductase-like protein. Catalytic residues and cofactor binding residues known in AKR superfamily enzymes were fairly well conserved in HdRed. Phylogenetic analysis for HdRed and AKR superfamily enzymes indicated that HdRed is an AKR belonging to a novel family. PMID:26555267

  2. Extreme ultraviolet photoionization of aldoses and ketoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Dong, Feng; Grisham, Michael E.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2011-04-01

    Gas phase monosaccharides (2-deoxyribose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, lyxose, glucose galactose, fructose, and tagatose), generated by laser desorption of solid sample pellets, are ionized with extreme ultraviolet photons (EUV, 46.9 nm, 26.44 eV). The resulting fragment ions are analyzed using a time of flight mass spectrometer. All aldoses yield identical fragment ions regardless of size, and ketoses, while also generating same ions as aldoses, yields additional features. Extensive fragmentation of the monosaccharides is the result the EUV photons ionizing various inner valence orbitals. The observed fragmentation patterns are not dependent upon hydrogen bonding structure or OH group orientation.

  3. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  4. Catalytic Isomerization of Biomass‐Derived Aldoses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Delidovich, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Selected aldohexoses (d‐glucose, d‐mannose, and d‐galactose) and aldopentoses (d‐xylose, l‐arabinose, and d‐ribose) are readily available components of biopolymers. Isomerization reactions of these substances are very attractive as carbon‐efficient processes to broaden the portfolio of abundant monosaccharides. This review focuses on the chemocatalytic isomerization of aldoses into the corresponding ketoses as well as epimerization of aldoses at C2. Recent advances in the fields of catalysis by bases and Lewis acids are considered. The emphasis is laid on newly uncovered catalytic systems and mechanisms of carbohydrate transformations. PMID:26948404

  5. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product.

  6. A kinetic estimate of the free aldehyde content of aldoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The relative free aldehyde content of eight hexoses and four pentoses has been estimated within about 10% from the rate constants for their reaction with urazole (1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione). These values of the percent free aldehyde are in agreement with those estimated from CD measurements, but are more accurate. The relative free aldehyde contents for the aldoses were then correlated to various literature NMR measurements to obtain the absolute values. This procedure was also done for three deoxyaldoses, which react much more rapidly than can be accounted for by the free aldehyde content. This difference in reactivity between aldoses and deoxyaldoses is due to the inductive effect of the H versus the OH on C-2'. This may help explain why deoxyribonucleosides hydrolyze much more rapidly than ribonucleosides.

  7. Identification of a 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid reductase, FlRed, in an alginolytic bacterium Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akira; Nishiyama, Ryuji; Mochizuki, Shogo; Ojima, Takao

    2015-01-16

    In alginate-assimilating bacteria, alginate is depolymerized to unsaturated monosaccharide by the actions of endolytic and exolytic alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3 and EC 4.2.2.11). The monosaccharide is non-enzymatically converted to 4-deoxy-L-ery thro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH), then reduced to 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate (KDG) by a specific reductase, and metabolized through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Recently, the NADPH-dependent reductase A1-R that belongs to short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) superfamily was identified as the DEH-reductase in Sphingomonas sp. A1. We have subsequently noticed that an SDR-like enzyme gene, flred, occurred in the genome of an alginolytic bacterium Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01. In the present study, we report on the deduced amino-acid sequence of flred and DEH-reducing activity of recombinant FlRed. The deduced amino-acid sequence of flred comprised 254 residues and showed 34% amino-acid identities to that of A1-R from Sphingomonas sp. A1 and 80%-88% to those of SDR-like enzymes from several alginolytic bacteria. Common sequence motifs of SDR-superfamily enzymes, e.g., the catalytic tetrad Asn-Lys-Tyr-Ser and the cofactor-binding sequence Thr-Gly-x-x-x-Gly-x-Gly in Rossmann fold, were completely conserved in FlRed. On the other hand, an Arg residue that determined the NADPH-specificity of Sphingomonas A1-R was replaced by Glu in FlRed. Thus, we investigated cofactor-preference of FlRed using a recombinant enzyme. As a result, the recombinant FlRed (recFlRed) was found to show high specificity to NADH. recFlRed exhibited practically no activity toward variety of aldehyde, ketone, keto ester, keto acid and aldose substrates except for DEH. On the basis of these results, we conclude that FlRed is the NADH-dependent DEH-specific SDR of Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01.

  8. The structure of apo and holo forms of xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase from Candida tenuis.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-07-16

    Xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase dependent on NADPH or NADH and belongs to the largely monomeric aldo-keto reductase superfamily of proteins. It catalyzes the first step in the assimilation of xylose, an aldose found to be a major constituent monosaccharide of renewable plant hemicellulosic material, into yeast metabolic pathways. It does this by reducing open chain xylose to xylitol, which is reoxidized to xylulose by xylitol dehydrogenase and metabolically integrated via the pentose phosphate pathway. No structure has yet been determined for a xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase or a family 2 aldo-keto reductase. The structures of the Candida tenuis xylose reductase apo- and holoenzyme, which crystallize in spacegroup C2 with different unit cells, have been determined to 2.2 A resolution and an R-factor of 17.9 and 20.8%, respectively. Residues responsible for mediating the novel dimeric interface include Asp-178, Arg-181, Lys-202, Phe-206, Trp-313, and Pro-319. Alignments with other superfamily members indicate that these interactions are conserved in other dimeric xylose reductases but not throughout the remainder of the oligomeric aldo-keto reductases, predicting alternate modes of oligomerization for other families. An arrangement of side chains in a catalytic triad shows that Tyr-52 has a conserved function as a general acid. The loop that folds over the NAD(P)H cosubstrate is disordered in the apo form but becomes ordered upon cosubstrate binding. A slow conformational isomerization of this loop probably accounts for the observed rate-limiting step involving release of cosubstrate. Xylose binding (K(m) = 87 mM) is mediated by interactions with a binding pocket that is more polar than a typical aldo-keto reductase. Modeling of xylose into the active site of the holoenzyme using ordered waters as a guide for sugar hydroxyls suggests a convincing mode of substrate binding.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new piplartine analogues as potent aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs)

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubba Rao, Vidadala; Muthenna, Puppala; Shankaraiah, Gundeti; Akileshwari, Chandrasekhar; Hari Babu, Kothapalli; Suresh, Ganji; Suresh Babu, Katragadda; Chandra Kumar, Rotte Sateesh; Rajendra Prasad, Kothakonda; Ashok Yadav, Potharaju; Petrash, J. Mark; Bhanuprakash Reddy, Geereddy; Madhusudana Rao, Janaswamy

    2013-01-01

    As a continuation of our efforts directed towards the development of anti-diabetic agents from natural sources, piplartine was isolated from Piper chaba, and was found to inhibit recombinant human ALR2 with an IC50 of 160 µM. To improve the efficacy, a series of analogues have been synthesized by modification of the styryl/aromatic and heterocyclic ring functionalities of this natural product lead. All the derivatives were tested for their ALR2 inhibitory activity, and results indicated that adducts 3c, 3e and 2j prepared by the Michael addition of piplartine with indole derivatives displayed potent ARI activity, while the other compounds displayed varying degrees of inhibition. The active compounds were also capable of preventing sorbitol accumulation in human red blood cells. PMID:23124161

  10. Syringic Acid Extracted from Herba dendrobii Prevents Diabetic Cataract Pathogenesis by Inhibiting Aldose Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dan; Yi, Yanchun; Qi, Hui; Gao, Xinxin; Fang, Hua; Gu, Qiong; Wang, Ling; Gu, Lianquan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Effects of Syringic acid (SA) extracted from dendrobii on diabetic cataract (DC) pathogenesis were explored. Methods. Both in vitro and in vivo DC lens models were established using D-gal, and proliferation of HLEC exposed to SA was determined by MMT assay. After 60-day treatment with SA, rat lens transparency was observed by anatomical microscopy using a slit lamp. SA protein targets were extracted and isolated using 2-DE and MALDI TOF/TOF. AR gene expression was investigated using qRT-PCR. Interaction sites and binding characteristics were determined by molecule-docking techniques and dynamic models. Results. Targeting AR, SA provided protection from D-gal-induced damage by consistently maintaining lens transparency and delaying lens turbidity development. Inhibition of AR gene expression by SA was confirmed by qRT-PCR. IC50 of SA for inhibition of AR activity was 213.17 μg/mL. AR-SA binding sites were Trp111, His110, Tyr48, Trp20, Trp79, Leu300, and Phe122. The main binding modes involved hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding. The stoichiometric ratio of non-covalent bonding between SA and AR was 1.0 to 13.3. Conclusion. SA acts to prevent DC in rat lenses by inhibiting AR activity and gene expression, which has potential to be developed into a novel drug for therapeutic management of DC. PMID:23365598

  11. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-01-01

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  12. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-09-15

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  13. Three-dimensional structure of rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase: a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Hoog, S S; Pawlowski, J E; Alzari, P M; Penning, T M; Lewis, M

    1994-01-01

    The 3.0-A-resolution x-ray structure of rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD, EC 1.1.1.50) was determined by molecular replacement using human placental aldose reductase as the search model. The protein folds into an alpha/beta or triose-phosphate isomerase barrel and lacks a canonical Rossmann fold for binding pyridine nucleotide. The structure contains a concentration of hydrophobic amino acids that lie in a cavity near the top of the barrel and that are presumed to be involved in binding hydrophobic substrates (steroids, prostaglandins, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and inhibitors (nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs). At the distal end of this cavity lie three residues in close proximity that have been implicated in catalysis by site-directed mutagenesis--Tyr-55, Asp-50, and Lys-84. Tyr-55 is postulated to act as the general acid. 3 alpha-HSD shares significant sequence identity with other HSDs that belong to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily and these may show similar architecture. Other members of this family include prostaglandin F synthase and rho-crystallin. By contrast, 3 alpha-HSD shares no sequence identity with HSDs that are members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family but does contain the Tyr-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Lys consensus sequence implicated in catalysis in this family. In the 3 alpha-HSD structure these residues are on the periphery of the barrel and are unlikely to participate in catalysis. Images PMID:8146147

  14. EC declaration of conformity.

    PubMed

    Donawa, M E

    1996-05-01

    The CE-marking procedure requires that manufacturers draw up a written declaration of conformity before placing their products on the market. However, some companies do not realize that this is a requirement for all devices. Also, there is no detailed information concerning the contents and format of the EC declaration of conformity in the medical device Directives or in EC guidance documentation. This article will discuss some important aspects of the EC declaration of conformity and some of the guidance that is available on its contents and format.

  15. ECS communications success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddy, S. E.

    1985-09-01

    The European Communications Satellite (ECS) which supplies satellite links for national telecommunication, long-distance international telephone traffic, and the distribution of television programs is described. The ECS concept was tested by the Orbital Test Satellite and proved the applicability of the ECS for television transmission and high-speed data links provided by small earth stations. The industrial development, operation, and cost of the project, which was shared by the European Space Agency members, are discussed. Extra repeater chains for small-dish services employed by ECS operate in the 14.0-14.25 GHz uplink and 12.5-12.75 GHz downlink frequency band and are utilized by small earth stations. The advantages and disadvantages of transmission services provided by the small earth stations are studied. The utilization of the point-to-multipoint service of the small earth station for the transmission of data is analyzed. The television distribution services available with the ECS system are examined; the ECS provides ten 20-W channels for a lifetime of seven years.

  16. ECS DAAC Data Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiebuzinski, A. B.; Bories, C. M.; Kalluri, S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of its Earth Observing System (EOS), NASA supports operations for several satellites including Landsat 7, Terra, and Aqua. ECS (EOSDIS Core System) is a vast archival and distribution system and includes several Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) located around the United States. EOSDIS reached a milestone in February when its data holdings exceeded one petabyte (1,000 terabytes) in size. It has been operational since 1999 and originally was intended to serve a large community of Earth Science researchers studying global climate change. The Synergy Program was initiated in 2000 with the purpose of exploring and expanding the use of remote sensing data beyond the traditional research community to the applications community including natural resource managers, disaster/emergency managers, urban planners and others. This included facilitating data access at the DAACs to enable non-researchers to exploit the data for their specific applications. The combined volume of data archived daily across the DAACs is of the order of three terabytes. These archived data are made available to the research community and to general users of ECS data. Currently, the average data volume distributed daily is two terabytes, which combined with an ever-increasing need for timely access to these data, taxes the ECS processing and archival resources for more real-time use than was previously intended for research purposes. As a result, the delivery of data sets to users was being delayed in many cases, to unacceptable limits. Raytheon, under the auspices of the Synergy Program, investigated methods at making data more accessible at a lower cost of resources (processing and archival) at the DAACs. Large on-line caches (as big as 70 Terabytes) of data were determined to be a solution that would allow users who require contemporary data to access them without having to pull it from the archive. These on-line caches are referred to as "Data Pools." In the Data Pool concept

  17. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems.

  18. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  19. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  20. Inhibition of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 by unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Soda, Midori; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Yashiro, Koji

    2016-11-01

    A human member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, AKR1B10, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase toward various carbonyl compounds including reactive aldehydes, and is normally expressed in intestines. The enzyme is overexpressed in several extraintestinal cancers, and suggested as a potential target for cancer treatment. We found that saturated and cis-unsaturated fatty acids inhibit AKR1B10. Among the saturated fatty acids, myristic acid was the most potent, showing the IC50 value of 4.2 μM cis-Unsaturated fatty acids inhibited AKR1B10 more potently, and linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids showed the lowest IC50 values of 1.1 μM. The inhibition by these fatty acids was reversible and kinetically competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the Ki values of 0.24-1.1 μM. These fatty acids, except for α-linoleic acid, were much less inhibitory to structurally similar aldose reductase. Site-directed mutagenesis study suggested that the fatty acids interact with several active site residues of AKR1B10, of which Gln114, Val301 and Gln303 are responsible for the inhibitory selectivity. Linoleic and arachidonic acids also effectively inhibited AKR1B10-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in HCT-15 cells. Thus, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids may be used as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of cancers that up-regulate AKR1B10.

  1. Argonne's SpEC Module

    ScienceCinema

    Harper, Jason

    2016-07-12

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  2. Argonne's SpEC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jason

    2014-05-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  3. Regulation of Nitrate Reductase Activity in Corn (Zea mays L.) Seedlings by Endogenous Metabolites 1

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, L. E.; Hageman, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Primary and secondary metabolites of inorganic nitrogen metabolism were evaluated as inhibitors of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) induction in green leaf tissue of corn seedlings. Nitrite, nitropropionic acid, ammonium ions, and amino acids were not effective as inhibitors of nitrate reductase activity or synthesis. Increasing α-amino nitrogen and protein content of intact corn seedlings by culture techniques significantly enhanced rather than decreased the potential for induction of nitrate reductase activity in excised seedlings. Secondary metabolites, derived from phenylalanine and tyrosine, were tested as inhibitors of induction of nitrate reductase. Of the 9 different phenylpropanoid compounds tested, only coumarin, trans-cinnamic and trans-o-hydroxycinnamic acids inhibited induction of nitrate reductase. While coumarin alone exhibited a relatively greater inhibitory effect on enzyme induction than on general protein synthesis (the latter measured by incorporation of labeled amino acids), this differential effect may have been dependent upon unequal rates of synthesis and accumulation with respect to the initial levels of nitrate reductase and general proteins. Because of the short half-life of nitrate reductase, inhibitors of protein synthesis in general could still achieve differential regulation of nitrogen metabolism. Coumarin did not inhibit nitrate reductase activity when added directly to the assay mixture at 5 mm. Carbamyl phosphate and its chemical derivative, cyanate, were found to be competitive (with nitrate) inhibitors of nitrate reductase. The data suggest that cyanate is the active inhibitor in the carbamyl phosphate preparations. PMID:16656715

  4. Overexpression and enhanced specific activity of aldoketo reductases (AKR1B1 & AKR1B10) in human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ashok; Kumar, P Uday; Srinivasulu, M; Triveni, B; Sharada, K; Ismail, Ayesha; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in India is on the rise and is rapidly becoming the primary cancer in Indian women. The aldoketo reductase (AKR) family has more than 190 proteins including aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and aldose reductase like protein (AKR1B10). Apart from liver cancer, the status of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 with respect to their expression and activity has not been reported in other human cancers. We studied the specific activity and expression of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 in breast non tumor and tumor tissues and in the blood. Fresh post-surgical breast cancer and non-cancer tissues and blood were collected from the subjects who were admitted for surgical therapy. Malignant, benign and pre-surgical chemotherapy samples were evaluated by histopathology scoring. Expression of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 was carried out by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) while specific activity was determined spectrophotometrically. The specific activity of AKR1B1 was significantly higher in red blood cells (RBC) in all three grades of primary surgical and post-chemotherapy samples. Specific activity of both AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 increased in tumor samples compared to their corresponding non tumor samples (primary surgical and post-chemotherapy). Immunoblotting and IHC data also indicated overexpression of AKR1B1 in all grades of tumors compared to their corresponding non tumor samples. There was no change in the specific activity of AKR1B1 in benign samples compared to all grades of tumor and non-tumors.

  5. Integrated one-pot enrichment and immobilization of styrene monooxygenase (StyA) using SEPABEAD EC-EA and EC-Q1A anion-exchange carriers.

    PubMed

    Ruinatscha, Reto; Karande, Rohan; Buehler, Katja; Schmid, Andreas

    2011-07-18

    A straightforward one-pot procedure combining enrichment and immobilization of recombinantely expressed FADH₂ dependent styrene monooxygenase (StyA) directly from Escherichia coli cell extracts was investigated. Sepabeads EC-EA and EC-Q1A anion-exchange carriers were employed to non-covalently adsorb StyA from the cell extracts depending on basic parameters such as varying initial protein concentrations and pH. The protein fraction of the cell extract contained around 25% StyA. At low initial protein concentrations (2.5 mg mL⁻¹) and pH 6, the enzyme could be enriched up to 52.4% on Sepabeads EC-EA and up to 46.0% on Sepabeads EC-Q1A, accounting for an almost complete StyA adsorption from the cell extracts. Higher initial protein concentrations were necessary to exploit the high loading capacity of the beads. At 20 mg mL⁻¹, up to 37.6% of the theoretical bead loading capacity could be utilized for StyA binding using Sepabeads EC-EA, and 34.0% using Sepabeads EC-Q1A. For both carriers, protein leakage under reaction conditions could be reduced to less than 2%. During assays, the FADH₂ cofactor necessary for StyA activity was supplied by the NADH-FAD reductase component styrene monooxygenase B (StyB). StyA immobilized on Sepabeads EC-Q1A displayed twice as high styrene epoxidation rates (0.2 U mg(StyA)⁻¹) as compared to Sepabeads EC-EA. This activity could be increased to 0.7 U mg(StyA)⁻¹ by co-immobilizing StyB on Sepabeads EC-Q1A, which corresponds to 33% of the soluble StyA activity.

  6. Asteroseismology of EC14026 Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpinet, Stephane; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Billères, M.

    2001-05-01

    EC14026 stars form a class of pulsating stars which recent discovery originates back to 1997 (Kilkenny et al. 1997, MNRAS, 285,640). These are hot, relatively compact objets belonging to the class of subdwarf B (or sdB) stars and showing rapid multiperiodic (P 80-600 seconds), low amplitude (a few millimags) luminosity variations. These stars are identified to Extended Horizontal Branch (EHB) models, and thus are evolved, low mass (M 0.5 Modot) core helium burning objects (Dorman et al. 1993, ApJ, 415, 596). The theory of EC14026 stars, which origin is anterior to their "observational discovery" (their existence was predicted on these theoretical basis; Charpinet et al. 1996, ApJ, 471, L103), is nowadays in a relatively mature state. The mode driving mechanism identified is a kappa-mechanism caused by the formation, due to microscopic chemical diffusion processes, of a strongly overabundant reservoir of iron in the envelope of these stars. This theory has been remarkably consistent with the rapidly growing amounts of observational data so far, thus opening the way to a potentially very fruitful application of the tools of asteroseismology to probe the structure of these objects. In this context, I will present a method to constrain, with asteroseismology, the stellar parameters of EC14026 stars. This method is based on the construction of large grids of pulsating subdwarf B star models, each model being analysed with a linear nonadiabatic pulsation code, aimed at deriving the most appropriate set of model parameters that can best reproduce the observed periods of a given pulsating sdB star. With this method, fundamental quantities such as the effective temperature, the surface gravity, the total mass, and the mass of the H-rich envelope can be inferred.

  7. Interactive EC control of synthesized timbre.

    PubMed

    McDermott, James; O'Neill, Michael; Griffith, Niall J L

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the biggest limitation of interactive EC is the fitness evaluation bottleneck, caused by slow user evaluation and leading to small populations and user fatigue. In this study these problems are addressed through the proposal of new user interface techniques for interactive EC, which allow faster evaluation of large numbers of individuals and the combination of interactive with noninteractive evaluation. For the first time in the interactive EC literature a set of rigorous usability experiments compares these techniques with existing interactive EC and non-EC interfaces, for the application domain of sound synthesis. The results show that a new user interface for interactive EC improves performance, and further experiments lead to refinement of its design. The experimental protocol shows, again for the first time, that formal usability experiments are useful in the interactive EC setting. Statistically significant results are obtained on clearly-defined performance metrics, and the protocol is general enough to be of potential interest to all interactive EC researchers.

  8. Cotton Benzoquinone Reductase: Up-regulation During Early Cotton Fiber Developement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benzoquinone reductase (BR; EC 1.6.5.7) is an enzyme that catalyzes the bivalent redox reactions of quinones without the production of free radical intermediates. Using 2-D PAGE comparisons, two proteins were found to be up-regulated in wild-type cotton ovules during the fiber initiation stage but ...

  9. Asymmetric assembly of aldose carbohydrates from formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde by tandem biocatalytic aldol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekrenyi, Anna; Garrabou, Xavier; Parella, Teodor; Joglar, Jesús; Bujons, Jordi; Clapés, Pere

    2015-09-01

    The preparation of multifunctional chiral molecules can be greatly simplified by adopting a route via the sequential catalytic assembly of achiral building blocks. The catalytic aldol assembly of prebiotic compounds into stereodefined pentoses and hexoses is an as yet unmet challenge. Such a process would be of remarkable synthetic utility and highly significant with regard to the origin of life. Pursuing an expedient enzymatic approach, here we use engineered D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase from Escherichia coli to prepare a series of three- to six-carbon aldoses by sequential one-pot additions of glycolaldehyde. Notably, the pertinent selection of the aldolase variant provides control of the sugar size. The stereochemical outcome of the addition was also altered to allow the synthesis of L-glucose and related derivatives. Such engineered biocatalysts may offer new routes for the straightforward synthesis of natural molecules and their analogues that circumvent the intricate enzymatic pathways forged by evolution.

  10. EC decay of 244Bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodaye, Suparna; Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sharma, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.; Palit, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    Berkelium isotopes have been produced in 11B-induced reaction on 238U. The EC decay of 244Bk → 244Cm has been studied by carrying out the single and coincidence measurements of the γ-rays emitted during the de-excitation of the 244Cm levels. Radiochemical separations have been carried out to minimize the contribution from the fission products and target. The new half-life of 244Bk is obtained as 5.02 ± 0.03 h, which is close to the theoretically calculated value. The relative intensities of the decay γ-rays have been re-evaluated. Based on the coincidence measurements, a tentative partial level scheme for 244Bk → 244Cm decay has been proposed.

  11. An electron transport system in maize roots for reactions of glutamate synthase and nitrite reductase : physiological and immunochemical properties of the electron carrier and pyridine nucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Oaks, A; Jacquot, J P; Vidal, J; Gadal, P

    1985-06-01

    A non-heme iron containing protein which bears an antigenic similarity to ferredoxin from spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.) has been identified in extracts prepared from young roots of maize (Zea mays L., hybrid W64A x W182E). The ferredoxin-like root electron carrier could substitute for ferredoxin in a cytochrome c reduction system in which pyridine nucleotide (NADPH) reduces the root electron carrier in a reaction catalyzed by ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (EC 1.6.7.1) from spinach leaves. However, the root electron carrier did not mediate the photoreduction of NADP(+) in an illuminated reconstituted chloroplast system.A pyridine nucleotide reductase which shares identical immunological determinants with the ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase from spinach leaves has also been characterized from maize roots. Root pyridine nucleotide reductase mediated the transfer of electrons from either NADPH or NADH to cytochrome c via ferredoxin or the root electron carrier. Under chemical reducing conditions with sodium dithionite and bicarbonate, the ferredoxin-like root electron carrier served as an electron carrier for the ferredoxin-requiring glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.7.1) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1) obtained from maize roots or leaves. In the presence of root pyridine nucleotide reductase and root electron carrier, either NADPH or NADH served as the primary electron donor for glutamate synthesis in extracts from maize roots or leaves. The electron transport system originating with NADH or NADPH, was, however, not able to mediate the reduction of NO(2) (-) to NH(3).

  12. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  13. Developing Electrocaloric (EC) Materials with Giant EC Response and Chip-Scale EC Cooling Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiming

    2015-03-01

    The direct and efficient coupling between the electric signals and the elastic, thermal, optical and magnetic signals in ferroelectric based electroactive materials makes them attractive for exploiting a broad range of cross-coupling phenomena which have great promise for new device technologies. This talk will present the recent advances at Penn State in developing electrocaloric materials which may provide alternative cooling technology to replace the century old vapor compression cycle (VCC) based cooling which employs strong greenhouse gases as the refrigerants. Electrocaloric effect (ECE), which is the temperature and entropy change of insulating dielectric materials under electric fields, is attractive to realize efficient cooling devices. However, the relatively small ECE observed in dielectrics in the last century make it unimpressive for any practical applications. Experimental results on the ECE in the relaxor ferroelectric polymers and general theoretical considerations for achieving large ECE will be presented. This talk will also discuss considerations on and present recent works in using nanocomposites to further enhancing the ECE beyond the pure relaxor polymers, on the giant ECE in a class of dielectric liquid, and in bulk ferroelectric ceramics near the invariant critical point. The works related to developing the chip-scale EC cooling devices, exploiting the newly discovered large ECE in ferroelectric materials and featuring high cooling power density and high efficiency, will also be presented. This work has been supported by DoE BES and by ARO.

  14. Assimilatory nitrate reductase from the green alga Ankistrodesmus braunii.

    PubMed

    De la Rosa, M A

    1983-01-01

    Assimilatory nitrate reductase (NAD(P)H-nitrate oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.6.2) from the green alga Ankistrodesmus braunii can be purified to homogeneity by dye-ligand chromatography on blue-Sepharose. The purified enzyme, whose turnover number is 623 s-1, presents an optimum pH of 7.5 and Km values of 13 microM, 23 microM and 0.15 mM for NADH, NADPH and nitrate, respectively. The NADH-nitrate reductase activity exhibits an iso ping pong bi bi kinetic mechanism. The molecular weight of the native nitrate reductase is 467 400, while that of its subunits is 58 750. These values suggest an octameric structure for the enzyme, which has been confirmed by electron microscopy. As deduced from spectrophotometric and fluorimetric studies, the enzyme contains FAD and cytochrome b-557 as prosthetic groups. FAD is not covalently bound to the protein and is easily dissociated in diluted solutions from the enzyme. Its apparent Km value is 4 nM, indicative of a high affinity of the enzyme for FAD. The results of the quantitative analyses of prosthetic groups indicate that nitrate reductase contains four molecules of flavin, four heme irons, and two atoms of molybdenum. The three components act sequentially transferring electrons from reduced pyridine nucleotides to nitrate, thus forming a short electron transport chain along the protein. A mechanism is proposed for the redox interconversion of the nitrate reductase activity. Inactivation seems to occur by formation of a stable complex of reduced enzyme with cyanide or superoxide, while reactivation is a consequence of reoxidation of the inactive enzyme. Both reactions imply the transfer of only one electron.

  15. Molecular distribution and degradation status of combined aldoses in sinking particulate organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, C.; Sempéré, R.

    2003-04-01

    Particulate samples were collected by using floating sediment traps (50--300 m) and in situ pumps (30 and 200 m) in the Southern Indian Ocean (Polar Front Zone (PFZ) and Sub-Tropical Zone (STZ)), Mediterranean Sea (Ligurian and Ionian Seas) and Atlantic Ocean (Upwelling (UPW) of Agadir-Morocco). They were studied for monosaccharide composition after acid hydrolysis (HCl 0.09 M, 20 h, 100^oC) by using High Performance Anion Exchange Chromatography followed by Pulsed Amperometric Detection (HPAEC-PAD). Our results indicated that higher PCHO yields (calculated as PCHO-C/POC ratios) were associated to higher C:N ratios (Med. Sea sample, PCHO yields = 12.7 ± 7.7%; C:N ratios = 8.3 ± 1.6; n = 12) whether the opposite trend was found for Southern Ocean samples (PCHO yields = 3.3 ± 0.75%; C:N ratios = 5.7 ± 0.59, n = 5) indicating significant variability in the sugar content of particles which might be due to the degradation degree of the particles as well as to the initial chemical composition of plankton. Alternatively, other processes such as high production of extracellular polysaccharides (type transparent exopolymer polysaccharides (TEP)) due to phosphorus limitation of some phytoplanktonic species may increase the sugar content in Mediterranean particles and the C/N ratio. In any case, glucose appeared to be the most abundant monosaccharide in Mediterranean Sea or UPW samples (range 23--59 wt% of the total aldoses) whereas ribose (17--39 wt%) and galactose (range 10--28 wt%) were the predominant aldoses in Southern Indian Ocean. These sugars (glucose + ribose) exhibited a strong negative relationship with C:N (r = -0.53, p >0.01; n = 30) in sediment traps (data from this study) and sediment (data from literature) particulate material which further indicates that these two monosaccharides are selectively extracted from the carbohydrate pool in sediment. In vitro biodegradation experiments performed with large particles (>60 μm) sampled using in situ pumps in

  16. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, G; Hellebust, J A

    1989-11-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent K(m) values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments.

  17. ECS Prepares to Set Agenda, Find President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The ECS, like other nonprofit groups serving state officials, has faced financial difficulties in recent years, starting when states faced severe revenue shortfalls early in the decade. But its problems became public this spring when Kathy Christie, the group's No. 2 official and a 17-year ECS employee, resigned and said in a letter to the ECS…

  18. Ascorbate synthesis pathway, dual role of ascorbate in bone homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using mouse gene knock-out models, we identify aldehyde reductase (EC 1.1.1.2, Akr1a4 (GR)) and aldose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21, Akr1b3 (AR)) as the enzymes responsible for conversion of D-glucuronate to L-gulonate, a key step in the ascorbate (ASC) synthesis pathway in mice. The gene knock-out (KO) m...

  19. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  20. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  1. A Gas Chromatographic Method for the Determination of Aldose and Uronic Acid Constituents of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides 1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Thomas M.; Albersheim, Peter

    1972-01-01

    A major problem in determining the composition of plant cell wall polysaccharides has been the lack of a suitable method for accurately determining the amounts of galacturonic and glucuronic acids in such polymers. A gas chromatographic method for aldose analysis has been extended to include uronic acids. Cell wall polysaccharides are depolymerized by acid hydrolysis followed by treatment with a mixture of fungal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. The aldoses and uronic acids released by this treatment are then reduced with NaBH4 to alditols and aldonic acids, respectively. The aldonic acids are separated from the alditols with Dowex-1 (acetate form) ion exchange resin, which binds the aldonic acids. The alditols, which do not bind, are washed from the resin and then acetylated with acetic anhydride to form the alditol acetate derivatives. The aldonic acids are eluted from the resin with HCl. After the resin has been removed, the HCl solution of the aldonic acids is evaporated to dryness, converting the aldonic acids to aldonolactones. The aldonolactones are reduced with NaBH4 to the corresponding alditols, dried and acetylated. The resulting alditol acetate mixtures produced from the aldoses and those from the uronic acids are analyzed separately by gas chromatography. This technique has been used to determine the changes in composition of Red Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) hypocotyl cell walls during growth, and to compare the cell wall polysaccharide compositions of several parts of bean plants. Galacturonic acid is found to be a major component of all the cell wall polysaccharides examined. PMID:16658086

  2. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  3. Purification and properties of a dissimilatory nitrate reductase from Haloferax denitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Lang, F.

    1991-01-01

    A membrane-bound nitrate reductase (nitrite:(acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.7.99.4) from the extremely halophilic bacterium Haloferax denitrificans was solubilized by incubating membranes in buffer lacking NaCl and purified by DEAE, hydroxylapatite, and Sepharose 6B gel filtration chromatography. The purified nitrate reductase reduced chlorate and was inhibited by azide and cyanide. Preincubating the enzyme with cyanide increased the extent of inhibition which in turn was intensified when dithionite was present. Although cyanide was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to nitrate, nitrate protected against inhibition. The enzyme, as isolated, was composed of two subunits (Mr 116,000 and 60,000) and behaved as a dimer during gel filtration (Mr 380,000). Unlike other halobacterial enzymes, this nitrate reductase was most active, as well as stable, in the absence of salt.

  4. Dihydrofolate reductase as a model for studies of enzyme dynamics and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) serves as a model system for investigating the role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis. We discuss calculations predicting a network of dynamic motions that is coupled to the chemical step catalyzed by this enzyme. Kinetic studies testing these predictions are presented, and their potential use in better understanding the role of these dynamics in enzyme catalysis is considered. The cumulative results implicate motions across the entire protein in catalysis. PMID:26918149

  5. LC-MS-MS Characterization of Forced Degradation Products of Fidarestat, a Novel Aldose Reductase Inhibitor: Development and Validation of a Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Talluri, M V N Kumar; Khatoon, Lubna; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Chavan, Balasaheb B; Ragampeta, Srinivas

    2015-10-01

    An accurate, precise, robust and selective stability-indicating liquid chromatographic (LC) method has been developed for the monitoring of fidarestat in the presence of its forced degradants. The drug was subjected to hydrolysis (acid, alkali and neutral degradation), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress conditions. The drug degraded significantly under hydrolytic (basic, acidic and neutral) and oxidative stress conditions, whereas it was found to be stable in photolytic and thermal conditions. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Grace C18, (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5 μm) column using gradient mobile phase system consisting of 10 mM of ammonium acetate buffer at pH 4 and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 1 mL/min with UV detection at 283 nm. The developed method was extended to liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS-MS) for characterization of all the degradation products. A total of five new degradation products were identified and characterized by LC-QTOF-MS-MS. The developed LC method was validated as per ICH guideline Q2 (R1). The proposed method was found to be successively applied for the quality control of fidarestat in bulk drug analysis.

  6. Insights from modeling the 3D structure of NAD(P)H-dependent D-xylose reductase of Pichia stipitis and its binding interactions with NAD and NADP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Wei, Dong-Qing; Lin, Ying; Wang, Yong-Hua; Du, Hong-Li; Li, Yi-Xve; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2007-07-27

    NAD(P)H-dependent d-xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase that belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The enzyme has the special function to catalyze the first step in the assimilation of xylose into yeast metabolic pathways. Performing this function via reducing the open chain xylose to xylitol, the xylose reductase of Pichia stipitis is one of the most important enzymes that can be used to construct recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for utilizing xylose and producing alcohol. To investigate into the interaction mechanism of the enzyme with its ligand NAD and NADP, the 3D structure was developed for the NAD(P)H-dependent d-xylose reductase from P. stipitis. With the 3D structure, the molecular docking operations were conducted to find the most stable bindings of the enzyme with NAD and NADP, respectively. Based on these results, the binding pockets of the enzyme for NAD and NADP have been explicitly defined. It has been found that the residues in forming the binding pockets for both NAD and NADP are almost the same and mainly hydrophilic. These findings may be used to guide mutagenesis studies, providing useful clues to modify the enzyme to improve the utilization of xylose for producing alcohol. Also, because human aldose reductases have the function to reduce the open chain form of glucose to sorbitol, a process physiologically significant for diabetic patients at the time that their blood glucose levels are elevated, the information gained through this study may also stimulate the development of new strategies for therapeutic treatment of diabetes.

  7. EC Transmission Line Risk Identification and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to assist in evaluating and planning for the cost, schedule, and technical project risks associated with the delivery and operation of the EC (Electron cyclotron) transmission line system. In general, the major risks that are anticipated to be encountered during the project delivery phase associated with the implementation of the Procurement Arrangement for the EC transmission line system are associated with: (1) Undefined or changing requirements (e.g., functional or regulatory requirements) (2) Underperformance of prototype, first unit, or production components during testing (3) Unavailability of qualified vendors for critical components Technical risks associated with the design and operation of the system are also identified.

  8. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  9. ECS Program Unit Funding: A Handbook for ECS Operators. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Educational Services Branch.

    This handbook is written specifically for Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta (Canada) to apply for Program Unit Funding. It is also designed to enhance the understanding of how assistance is provided to ECS children with severe disabilities by teachers, special needs assistants, parents, and supporting agency personnel. ECS…

  10. ECS Program Unit Funding: A Handbook of ECS Operators, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This handbook is written specifically for Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta, Canada, applying for Program Unit Funding. It is also designed to enhance the understanding of how assistance is provided to ECS children with severe disabilities by teachers, special needs assistants, parents, and supporting agency personnel. ECS…

  11. ECS Program Unit Funding: A Handbook for ECS Operators, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This handbook discusses the Program Unit Funding that is provided to approved Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta (Canada) for children with severe disabilities who require additional support above that offered in a regular ECS program. Funding is available for a maximum of 3 years for each eligible child who is two and a half…

  12. Environmental Adaptation of Dihydrofolate Reductase from Deep-Sea Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Eiji; Gekko, Kunihiko; Kato, Chiaki

    2015-01-01

    In order to elucidate the molecular adaptation mechanisms of enzymes to the high hydrostatic pressure of the deep sea, we cloned, purified, and characterized more than ten dihydrofolate reductases (DHFRs) from bacteria living in deep-sea and ambient atmospheric pressure environments. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these DHFRs indicate the deep-sea bacteria are adapted to their environments after the differentiation of their genus from ancestors inhabiting atmospheric pressure environments. In particular, the backbone structure of the deep-sea DHFR from Moritella profunda (mpDHFR) almost overlapped with the normal homolog from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR). Thus, those of other DHFRs would also overlap on the basis of their sequence similarities. However, the structural stability of both DHFRs was quite different: compared to ecDHFR, mpDHFR was more thermally stable but less stable against urea and pressure unfolding. The smaller volume changes due to unfolding suggest that the native structure of mpDHFR has a smaller cavity and/or enhanced hydration compared to ecDHFR. High hydrostatic pressure reduced the enzymatic activity of many DHFRs, but three deep-sea DHFRs and the D27E mutant of ecDHFR exhibited pressure-dependent activation. The inverted activation volumes from positive to negative values indicate the modification of their structural dynamics, conversion of the rate-determining step of the enzymatic reaction, and different contributions of the cavity and hydration to the transition-state structure. Since the cavity and hydration depend on amino acid side chains, DHFRs would adapt to the deep-sea environment by regulating the cavity and hydration by substituting their amino acid side chains without altering their backbone structure. The results of this study clearly indicate that the cavity and hydration play important roles in the adaptation of enzymes to the deep-sea environment.

  13. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  14. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants.

  15. EC Vacuum Vessel Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.; Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1992-02-04

    This Note contains a summary of the results of the finite element analysis of the EC Cryostat vacuum vessel performed by Dave Rudland in 1987. The results are used in the structural evaluation of the EC cryostats presented in Engineering Note 194. It should also be noted that the adequacy of the design of the vacuum vessels was reviewed and verified by the Battelle Memorial Institute. Battelle used a shell of revolution program to essentially duplicate the FEA analysis with similar results. It should be noted that no plots of the finite element mesh were retained from the analysis, and these can not be easily reproduced due to a change in the version of the ANSYS computer program shortly after the analysis was completed.

  16. Preliminary conceptual design of DEMO EC system

    SciTech Connect

    Garavaglia, S. Bin, W.; Bruschi, A.; Granucci, G.; Moro, A.; Rispoli, N.; Grossetti, G.; Strauss, D.; Jelonnek, J.; Tran, Q. M.; Franke, T.

    2015-12-10

    In the framework of EUROfusion Consortium the Work Package Heating and Current Drive addresses the engineering design and R&D for the electron cyclotron, ion cyclotron and neutral beam systems. This paper reports the activities performed in 2014, focusing on the work done regarding the input for the conceptual design of the EC system, particularly for the gyrotron, the transmission line and the launchers.

  17. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  18. Optical observation of correlated motions in dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengyang; Niessen, Katherine; Pace, James; Cody, Vivian; Markelz, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Enzyme function relies on its structural flexibility to make conformational changes for substrate binding and product release. An example of a metabolic enzyme where such structural changes are vital is dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). DHFR is essential in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for the nucleotide biosynthesis by catalyzing the reduction of dihydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate. NMR dynamical measurements found large amplitude fast dynamics that could indicate rigid-body, twisting-hinge motion for ecDHFR that may mediate flux. The role of such long-range correlated motions in function was suggested by the observed sharp decrease in enzyme activity for the single point mutation G121V, which is remote from active sites. This decrease in activity may be caused by the mutation interfering with the long-range intramolecular vibrations necessary for rapid access to functional configurations. We use our new technique of crystal anisotropy terahertz microscopy (CATM), to observe correlated motions in ecDHFR crystals with the bonding of NADPH and methotrexate. We compare the measured intramolecular vibrational spectrum with calculations using normal mode analysis.

  19. NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity of carbonyl reductase on glutathionylhydroxynonanal as a new pathway for hydroxynonenal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Moschini, Roberta; Peroni, Eleonora; Rotondo, Rossella; Renzone, Giovanni; Melck, Dominique; Cappiello, Mario; Srebot, Massimo; Napolitano, Elio; Motta, Andrea; Scaloni, Andrea; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    An NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity on 3-glutathionyl-4-hydroxynonanal (GSHNE) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from a line of human astrocytoma cells (ADF). Proteomic analysis identified this enzymatic activity as associated with carbonyl reductase 1 (EC 1.1.1.184). The enzyme is highly efficient at catalyzing the oxidation of GSHNE (KM 33 µM, kcat 405 min(-1)), as it is practically inactive toward trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and other HNE-adducted thiol-containing amino acid derivatives. Combined mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of the reaction products revealed that carbonyl reductase oxidizes the hydroxyl group of GSHNE in its hemiacetal form, with the formation of the corresponding 3-glutathionylnonanoic-δ-lactone. The relevance of this new reaction catalyzed by carbonyl reductase 1 is discussed in terms of HNE detoxification and the recovery of reducing power.

  20. The anaerobic ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Escherichia coli requires S-adenosylmethionine as a cofactor.

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, R; Fontecave, M; Jörnvall, H; Krook, M; Pontis, E; Reichard, P

    1990-01-01

    Extracts from anaerobically grown Escherichia coli contain an oxygen-sensitive activity that reduces CTP to dCTP in the presence of NADPH, dithiothreitol, Mg2+ ions, and ATP, different from the aerobic ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase (2'-deoxyribonucleoside-diphosphate: oxidized-thioredoxin 2'-oxidoreductase, EC 1.17.4.1) present in aerobically grown E. coli. After fractionation, the activity required at least five components, two heat-labile protein fractions and several low molecular weight fractions. One protein fraction, suggested to represent the actual ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase was purified extensively and on denaturing gel electrophoresis gave rise to several defined protein bands, all of which were stained by a polyclonal antibody against one of the two subunits (protein B1) of the aerobic reductase but not by monoclonal anti-B1 antibodies. Peptide mapping and sequence analyses revealed partly common structures between two types of protein bands but also suggested the presence of an additional component. Obviously, the preparations are heterogeneous and the structure of the reductase is not yet established. The second, crude protein fraction is believed to contain several ancillary enzymes required for the reaction. One of the low molecular weight components is S-adenosylmethionine; a second component is a loosely bound metal. We propose that S-adenosylmethionine together with a metal participates in the generation of the radical required for the reduction of carbon 2' of the ribosyl moiety of CTP. Images PMID:2185465

  1. Summary of ECE Presentations at EC-15

    SciTech Connect

    Caughman, John B

    2009-01-01

    The presentations in the area of electron cyclotron emission continued a tradition of high quality and variety for EC-15. There were a total of 20 presentations/posters in this area. The topics included a review of the history of ECE diagnostics and modeling, unresolved issues in the area of temperature measurements via ECE compared to Thomson Scattering, and many applications of ECE for understanding plasma physics in fusion experiments, including ITER. ECE is being used to study temperature fluctuations, ELMs, MHD instabilities, transport, and feedback control of tearing modes. In addition, the emission of electron Bernstein waves is also being used to understand mode conversion physics on several experiments.

  2. Binary NS simulations using SpEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Roland; Szilagyi, Bela; Kaplan, Jeffrey; Ott, Christian; Lippuner, Jonas; Scheel, Mark; Barkett, Kevin; Muhlberger, Curran; Foucart, Francois; Duez, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    NSNS binaries are expected to be one of the major sources of gravitational radiation detectable by Advanced LIGO. Together with neutrinos, gravitational waves are our only means to learn about the processes deep within a merging pair of NS, shedding light on the as yet poorly understood, equation of state governing matter at nuclear densities and beyond. We report on binary neutron star simulations using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) developed by the Caltech-Cornell-CITA-WSU collaboration. We simulate the inspiral through many orbits, follow the post-merger evolution, and compute the full gravitational wave signal.

  3. Human endothelial dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Rangel Filho, Artur; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH₄) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from endothelial NO synthase. Clinical trials using BH₄ to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH₄. One of the oxidation products of BH₄, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH₂), is recycled back to BH₄ by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH₄ treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multielectrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH₂ and BH₄, which is not possible with fluorescence-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH₄ and 7,8-BH₂ concentrations in human endothelial cells (ECs) are lower than in bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH₄ transiently increased intracellular BH₄ while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH₂. This was different from bovine or murine ECs, which resulted in preferential BH₄ increase. Using BH₄ diastereomers, 6S-BH₄ and 6R-BH₄, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH₄ was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH₂ to BH₄ occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supraphysiological levels of 7,8-BH₂, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that human DHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH₂ (DHF7,8-BH₂) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH₂ recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies, which may be further aggravated by folate supplements.

  4. Design of Deinococcus radiodurans thioredoxin reductase with altered thioredoxin specificity using computational alanine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Obiero, Josiah; Sanders, David A R

    2011-06-01

    In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase (EC TrxR) and its substrate thioredoxin (Trx) was used as a guide to design a Deinococcus radiodurans TrxR (DR TrxR) mutant with altered Trx specificity. Previous studies have shown that TrxRs have higher affinity for cognate Trxs (same species) than that for Trxs from different species. Computational alanine scanning mutagenesis and visual inspection of the EC TrxR-Trx interface suggested that only four residues (F81, R130, F141, and F142) account for the majority of the EC TrxR-Trx interface stability. Individual replacement of equivalent residues in DR TrxR (M84, K137, F148, and F149) with alanine resulted in drastic changes in binding affinity, confirming that the four residues account for most of TrxR-Trx interface stability. When M84 and K137 were changed to match equivalent EC TrxR residues (K137R and M84F), the DR TrxR substrate specificity was altered from its own Trx to that of EC Trx. The results suggest that a small subset of the TrxR-Trx interface residues is responsible for the majority of Trx binding affinity and species-specific recognition.

  5. Neuroprotective role for carbonyl reductase?

    PubMed

    Maser, Edmund

    2006-02-24

    Oxidative stress is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Creutzfeld-Jakob diseases or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Reactive oxygen species seem to play a significant role in neuronal cell death in that they generate reactive aldehydes from membrane lipid peroxidation. Several neuronal diseases are associated with increased accumulation of abnormal protein adducts of reactive aldehydes, which mediate oxidative stress-linked pathological events, including cellular growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. Combining findings on neurodegeneration and oxidative stress in Drosophila with studies on the metabolic characteristics of the human enzyme carbonyl reductase (CR), it is clear now that CR has a potential physiological role for neuroprotection in humans. Several lines of evidence suggest that CR represents a significant pathway for the detoxification of reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and that CR in humans is essential for neuronal cell survival and to confer protection against oxidative stress-induced brain degeneration.

  6. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the adenosylcobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase from Lactobacillus leichmannii.

    PubMed Central

    Booker, S; Stubbe, J

    1993-01-01

    Ribonucleoside-triphosphate reductase (RTPR, EC 1.17.4.2) from Lactobacillus leichmannii, a monomeric adenosylcobalamin-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside triphosphates to deoxynucleoside triphosphates. The gene for this enzyme has been cloned and sequenced. In contrast to expectations based on mechanistic considerations, there is no statistically significant sequence homology with the Escherichia coli reductase that requires a dinuclear-iron center and tyrosyl radical cofactor. The RTPR has been overexpressed and purified to homogeneity, yielding 90 mg of protein from 2.5 g of bacteria. Initial characterization of the recombinant RTPR indicates that its properties are identical to those of the RTPR isolated from L. leichmannii. PMID:8397403

  7. Preliminary joint X-ray and neutron protein crystallographic studies of ecDHFR complexed with folate and NADP+.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qun; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Wilson, Mark A; Bennett, Brad C; Langan, Paul; Dealwis, Chris

    2014-06-01

    A crystal of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) complexed with folate and NADP+ of 4×1.3×0.7 mm (3.6 mm3) in size was obtained by sequential application of microseeding and macroseeding. A neutron diffraction data set was collected to 2.0 Å resolution using the IMAGINE diffractometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor within Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A 1.6 Å resolution X-ray data set was also collected from a smaller crystal at room temperature. The neutron and X-ray data were used together for joint refinement of the ecDHFR-folate-NADP+ ternary-complex structure in order to examine the protonation state, protein dynamics and solvent structure of the complex, furthering understanding of the catalytic mechanism.

  8. Preliminary joint X-ray and neutron protein crystallographic studies of ecDHFR complexed with folate and NADP+

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qun; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Wilson, Mark A.; Bennett, Brad C.; Langan, Paul; Dealwis, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A crystal of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) complexed with folate and NADP+ of 4 × 1.3 × 0.7 mm (3.6 mm3) in size was obtained by sequential application of microseeding and macroseeding. A neutron diffraction data set was collected to 2.0 Å resolution using the IMAGINE diffractometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor within Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A 1.6 Å resolution X-ray data set was also collected from a smaller crystal at room temperature. The neutron and X-ray data were used together for joint refinement of the ecDHFR–folate–NADP+ ternary-complex structure in order to examine the protonation state, protein dynamics and solvent structure of the complex, furthering understanding of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:24915100

  9. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  10. The EC4 register of European clinical chemists and EC4 activities.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Rob T P

    2002-05-21

    The freedom of movement of people and goods within the European Union (EU) has a large impact for the member states. Particularly within health care it is important to recognize, or if necessary obtain, an adequate level of the quality of profession and practice, so that citizens know that health care is offered in their country at a level comparable to other countries. The importance of recognition also applies to laboratory medicine. European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry (EC4) is the organization of societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in the EU. In Europe, health care develops in the direction where patients are treated in a health care chain environment. In this chain, patients move quickly from primary health institutes to secondary and tertiary institutes, and vice versa. This situation involves many health care workers including several laboratories. Diagnosis and therapy are now 'core business' of health care. Medical laboratories play an essential role in this. The broad spectrum of medical laboratory investigations make consultancy of medical laboratory specialists ever more important. The quality of both professionals and laboratories, as well as continuity of laboratory data within and between laboratories, are of utmost importance.EC4 is active in giving support to attain such quality. In most countries, this is the case at present. EC4 plays a central role in the Coordination of Automatic Recognition of Equivalence of Standards (CARE), if such a level exists or is achieved. Such CARE is focussed at three levels, the profession, quality of laboratories and calibration of laboratory data. The EC4 Register of European Clinical Chemists is open for colleagues educated in (bio)chemistry, pharmacy, biology as well as medicine, and trained according to the EC4 Syllabus. Equivalence of standards has been granted to national training schemes of 13 European Union countries. Since its opening in 1998, the number of

  11. Summary of ECE presentations at EC-18

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.

    2015-03-12

    There were nine ECE and one EBE presentation at EC-18. Four of the presentations were on various aspects of ECE on ITER. The ITER ECE diagnostic has entered an important detailed preliminary design phase and faces several design challenges in the next 2-3 years. Most of the other ECE presentations at the workshop were focused on applications of ECE diagnostics to plasma measurements, rather than improvements in technology, although it was apparent that heterodyne receiver technology continues to improve. CECE, ECE imaging and EBE imaging are increasingly providing valuable insights into plasma behavior that is important to understand if future burning plasma devices, such as ITER, FNSF and DEMO, are to be successful.

  12. Summary of ECE presentations at EC-18

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, G.

    2015-03-12

    There were nine ECE and one EBE presentation at EC-18. Four of the presentations were on various aspects of ECE on ITER. The ITER ECE diagnostic has entered an important detailed preliminary design phase and faces several design challenges in the next 2-3 years. Most of the other ECE presentations at the workshop were focused on applications of ECE diagnostics to plasma measurements, rather than improvements in technology, although it was apparent that heterodyne receiver technology continues to improve. CECE, ECE imaging and EBE imaging are increasingly providing valuable insights into plasma behavior that is important to understand if futuremore » burning plasma devices, such as ITER, FNSF and DEMO, are to be successful.« less

  13. Binary NS simulations using SpEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Roland; Kaplan, Jeffrey; Ott, Christian; Szilagyi, Bela; Scheel, Mark; Moesta, Philipp; Duez, Matthew; Foucart, Francois

    2012-03-01

    NSNS binaries are expected to be one of the major sources of gravitational radiation detectable by Advanced LIGO. Together with neutrinos, gravitational waves are our only means to learn about the processes deep within a merging pair of NS, shedding light on the as yet poorly understood, equation of state governing matter at nuclear densities and beyond. We report on binary neutron star simulations using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) developed by the Caltech-Cornell-CITA-WSU collaboration. We simulate the inspiral through many orbits, follow the post-merger evolution, and compute the full gravitational wave signal. We provide estimates on the accuracy required for the LIGO scientific goals of constraining EOS parameters.

  14. Binary NS simulations using SpEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Roland; Kaplan, Jeffrey; Szilagyi, Bela; Muhlberger, Curran; Foucart, Francois; Lippuner, Jonas; Scheel, Mark; Duez, Matthew; Ott, Christian

    2013-04-01

    NSNS binaries are expected to be one of the major sources of gravitational radiation detectable by Advanced LIGO. Together with neutrinos, gravitational waves are our only means to learn about the processes deep within a merging pair of NS, shedding light on the as yet poorly understood, equation of state governing matter at nuclear densities and beyond. We report on binary neutron star simulations using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) developed by the Caltech-Cornell-CITA-WSU collaboration. We simulate the inspiral through many orbits, follow the post-merger evolution, and compute the full gravitational wave signal. We provide estimates on the accuracy required for the LIGO scientific goals of constraining EOS parameters.

  15. Summary of ECE Presentations at EC-18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.

    2015-03-01

    There were nine ECE and one EBE presentation at EC-18. Four of the presentations were on various aspects of ECE on ITER. The ITER ECE diagnostic has entered an important detailed preliminary design phase and faces several design challenges in the next 2-3 years. Most of the other ECE presentations at the workshop were focused on applications of ECE diagnostics to plasma measurements, rather than improvements in technology, although it was apparent that heterodyne receiver technology continues to improve. CECE, ECE imaging and EBE imaging are increasingly providing valuable insights into plasma behavior that is important to understand if future burning plasma devices, such as ITER, FNSF and DEMO, are to be successful.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... About half of these individuals adopt a male gender role in adolescence or early adulthood. Related Information ... 1730-5. Citation on PubMed Cohen-Kettenis PT. Gender change in 46,XY persons with 5alpha-reductase- ...

  17. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  18. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  19. Si pixel detectors in the detection of EC/EC decay

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, J. M.; Čermák, P.; Fajt, L.; Štekl, I.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Shitov, Yu. A.

    2015-08-17

    The SPT collaboration has been investigating the applicability of pixel detectors in the detection of two neutrino double electron capture (2νEC/EC) in{sup 106}Cd. The collaboration has proposed a Silicon Pixel Telescope (SPT) where a pair of Si pixel detectors with enriched Cd foil in the middle forms the detection unit. The Pixel detector gives spatial information along with energy of the particle, thus helps to identify and remove the background signals. Four units of SPT prototype (using 0.5 and 1 mm Si sensors) were fabricated and installed in the LSM underground laboratory, France. Recent progress in the SPT experiment and preliminary results from background measurements are presented.

  20. Overexpression of human NADPH:cytochrome c (P450) reductase confers enhanced sensitivity to both tirapazamine (SR 4233) and RSU 1069.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. V.; Saunders, M. P.; Chinje, E. C.; Talbot, D. C.; Harris, A. L.; Strafford, I. J.

    1997-01-01

    P450 reductase (NADPH: cytochrome c (P450) reductase, EC 1.6.2.4) plays an important role in the reductive activation of the bioreductive drug tirapazamine (SR4233). Thus, in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines, expression of P450 reductase correlated with both the hypoxic toxicity and the metabolism of tirapazamine [Patterson et al (1995) Br J Cancer 72: 1144-1150]. To examine this dependence in more detail, the MDA231 cell line, which has the lowest activity of P450 reductase in our breast cell line panel, was transfected with the human P450 reductase cDNA. Isolated clones expressed a 78-kDa protein, which was detected with anti-P450 reductase antibody, and were shown to have up to a 53-fold increase in activity of the enzyme. Using six stable transfected clones covering the 53-fold range of activity of P450 reductase, it was shown that the enzyme activity correlated directly with both hypoxic and aerobic toxicity of tirapazamine, and metabolism of the drug under hypoxic conditions. No metabolism was detected under aerobic conditions. For RSU1069, toxicity was also correlated with P450 reductase activity, but only under hypoxic conditions. Measurable activity of P450 reductase was found in a selection of 14 primary human breast tumours. Activity covered an 18-fold range, which was generally higher than that seen in cell lines but within the range of activity measured in the transfected clones. These results suggest that if breast tumours have significant areas of low oxygen tension, then they are likely to be highly sensitive to the cytotoxic action of tirapazamine and RSU 1069. Images Figure 1 PMID:9374381

  1. Possible role of the Ec peptide of IGF-1Ec in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Armakolas, Nikolaos; Dimakakos, Andreas; Armakolas, Athanasios; Antonopoulos, Athanasios; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Ec peptide (PEc) of insulin-like growth factor 1 Ec (IGF-1Ec) induces human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) mobilization and activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) in various cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of PEc on the mobilization and differentiation of hMSCs, as well as the possibility of its implementation in combination with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) for cartilage repair. The effects of the exogenous administration of PEc and TGF-β1, alone and in combination, on hMSCs were assessed using a trypan blue assay, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, Alcian blue staining, wound healing assays and migration/invasion assays. It was determined that PEc is involved in the differentiation process of hMSCs towards hyaline cartilage. Treatment of hMSCs with either PEc, TGF-β1 or both, demonstrated comparable cartilage matrix deposition. Furthermore, treatment with PEc in combination with TGF-β1 was associated with a significant increase in hMSC mobilization when compared with treatment with TGF-β1 or PEc alone (P<0.05). Thus, PEc appears to facilitate in vitro hMSC mobilization and differentiation towards chondrocytes, enhancing the role of TGF-β1. PMID:27571686

  2. Increased Dynamic Effects in a Catalytically Compromised Variant of Escherichia coli Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Isotopic substitution (15N, 13C, 2H) of a catalytically compromised variant of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase, EcDHFR-N23PP/S148A, has been used to investigate the effect of these mutations on catalysis. The reduction of the rate constant of the chemical step in the EcDHFR-N23PP/S148A catalyzed reaction is essentially a consequence of an increase of the quasi-classical free energy barrier and to a minor extent of an increased number of recrossing trajectories on the transition state dividing surface. Since the variant enzyme is less well set up to catalyze the reaction, a higher degree of active site reorganization is needed to reach the TS. Although millisecond active site motions are lost in the variant, there is greater flexibility on the femtosecond time scale. The “dynamic knockout” EcDHFR-N23PP/S148A is therefore a “dynamic knock-in” at the level of the chemical step, and the increased dynamic coupling to the chemical coordinate is in fact detrimental to catalysis. This finding is most likely applicable not just to hydrogen transfer in EcDHFR but also to other enzymatic systems. PMID:24252106

  3. Alteration of organic matter during infaunal polychaete gut passage and links to sediment organic geochemistry. Part II: Fatty acids and aldoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Middelburg, Jack J.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    The activities of sediment-dwelling fauna are known to influence the rates of and pathways through which organic matter is cycled in marine sediments, and thus to influence eventual organic carbon burial or decay. However, due to methodological constraints, the role of faunal gut passage in determining the subsequent composition and thus degradability of organic matter is relatively little studied. Previous studies of organic matter digestion by benthic fauna have been unable to detect uptake and retention of specific biochemicals in faunal tissues, and have been of durations too short to fit digestion into the context of longer-term sedimentary degradation processes. Therefore this study aimed to investigate the aldose and fatty acid compositional alterations occurring to organic matter during gut passage by the abundant and ubiquitous polychaetes Hediste diversicolor and Arenicola marina, and to link these to longer-term changes typically observed during organic matter decay. This aim was approached through microcosm experiments in which selected polychaetes were fed with 13C-labelled algal detritus, and organisms, sediments, and faecal pellets were sampled at three timepoints over ∼6 weeks. Samples were analysed for their 13C-labelled aldose and fatty acid contents using GC-MS and GC-IRMS. Compound-selective net accumulation of biochemicals in polychaete tissues was observed for both aldoses and fatty acids, and the patterns of this were taxon-specific. The dominant patterns included an overall loss of glucose and polyunsaturated fatty acids; and preferential preservation or production of arabinose, microbial compounds (rhamnose, fucose and microbial fatty acids), and animal-synthesised fatty acids. These patterns may have been driven by fatty acid essentiality, preferential metabolism of glucose, and A. marina grazing on bacteria. Fatty acid suites in sediments from faunated microcosms showed greater proportions of saturated fatty acids and bacterial markers

  4. Atomic structure of salutaridine reductase from the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum).

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yasuhiro; Kutchan, Toni M; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-02-25

    The opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) is one of the oldest known medicinal plants. In the biosynthetic pathway for morphine and codeine, salutaridine is reduced to salutaridinol by salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248) using NADPH as coenzyme. Here, we report the atomic structure of SalR to a resolution of ∼1.9 Å in the presence of NADPH. The core structure is highly homologous to other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. The major difference is that the nicotinamide moiety and the substrate-binding pocket are covered by a loop (residues 265-279), on top of which lies a large "flap"-like domain (residues 105-140). This configuration appears to be a combination of the two common structural themes found in other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Previous modeling studies suggested that substrate inhibition is due to mutually exclusive productive and nonproductive modes of substrate binding in the active site. This model was tested via site-directed mutagenesis, and a number of these mutations abrogated substrate inhibition. However, the atomic structure of SalR shows that these mutated residues are instead distributed over a wide area of the enzyme, and many are not in the active site. To explain how residues distal to the active site might affect catalysis, a model is presented whereby SalR may undergo significant conformational changes during catalytic turnover.

  5. Atomic Structure of Salutaridine Reductase from the Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum)

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, Yasuhiro; Kutchan, Toni M.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2011-11-18

    The opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) is one of the oldest known medicinal plants. In the biosynthetic pathway for morphine and codeine, salutaridine is reduced to salutaridinol by salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248) using NADPH as coenzyme. Here, we report the atomic structure of SalR to a resolution of {approx}1.9 {angstrom} in the presence of NADPH. The core structure is highly homologous to other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. The major difference is that the nicotinamide moiety and the substrate-binding pocket are covered by a loop (residues 265-279), on top of which lies a large 'flap'-like domain (residues 105-140). This configuration appears to be a combination of the two common structural themes found in other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Previous modeling studies suggested that substrate inhibition is due to mutually exclusive productive and nonproductive modes of substrate binding in the active site. This model was tested via site-directed mutagenesis, and a number of these mutations abrogated substrate inhibition. However, the atomic structure of SalR shows that these mutated residues are instead distributed over a wide area of the enzyme, and many are not in the active site. To explain how residues distal to the active site might affect catalysis, a model is presented whereby SalR may undergo significant conformational changes during catalytic turnover.

  6. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  7. Composition and structure of assimilatory nitrate reductase from Ankistrodesmus braunii.

    PubMed

    De la Rosa, M A; Vega, J M; Zumft, W G

    1981-06-10

    Assimilatory NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) from Ankistrodesmus braunii has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on blue Sepharose. The specific activity of the purified enzyme is in the range of 72 to 80 units/mg of protein. The electronic spectrum of the native enzyme shows absorption maxima at 278, 414 (Soret), 532 (beta), 562 (alpha), and 669 nm and shoulders at 455 and 484 nm, with an A278/A414 ratio of 2.56. The reduced enzyme shows absorption maxima at 424 (Soret), 528 (beta), 557 (alpha),and 669 n. The enzyme complex (Mr = 467,400) is composed of eight similar subunits (Mr = 58,750) and contains 4 molecules of FAD, 4 heme groups, and 2 atoms of molybdenum. Labile sulfide and nonheme iron were not detected. Electron micrographs show the eight subunits arranged alternately in two planes, and an 8-fold rotational symmetry was deduced from highly magnified images processed by optical superposition.

  8. The tyrosyl free radical in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Gräslund, A; Sahlin, M; Sjöberg, B M

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase, catalyses the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, a reaction essential for DNA synthesis in all living cells. The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase, which is the prototype of all known eukaryotic and virus-coded enzymes, consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins B1 and B2. The B2 subunit contains an antiferromagnetically coupled pair of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of an electron, has its unpaired spin density delocalized in the aromatic ring of tyrosine. Effects of iron-radical interaction indicate a relatively close proximity between the iron center and the radical. The EPR signal of the radical can be studied directly in frozen packed cells of E. coli or mammalian origin, if the cells are made to overproduce ribonucleotide reductase. The hypothetic role of the tyrosyl free radical in the enzymatic reaction is not yet elucidated, except in the reaction with the inhibiting substrate analogue 2'-azido-CDP. In this case, the normal tyrosyl radical is destroyed with concomitant appearance of a 2'-azido-CDP-localized radical intermediate. Attempts at spin trapping of radical reaction intermediates have turned out negative. In E. coli the activity of ribonucleotide reductase may be regulated by enzymatic activities that interconvert a nonradical containing form and the fully active protein B2. In synchronized mammalian cells, however, the cell cycle variation of ribonucleotide reductase, studied by EPR, was shown to be due to de novo protein synthesis. Inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase are of medical interest because of their ability to control DNA synthesis. One example is hydroxyurea, used in cancer therapy, which selectively destroys the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:3007085

  9. Endothelial human dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Filho, Artur Rangel; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from eNOS. Clinical trials using BH4 to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH4. One of the oxidation products of BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2), is recycled back to BH4 by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH4 treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multi-electrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH2 and BH4 which is not possible with fluorescent-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH4 and 7,8-BH2 concentrations in human ECs is lower than bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH4 transiently increased intracellular BH4 while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH2. This was different from bovine or murine ECs that resulted in preferential BH4 increase. Using BH4 diastereomers, 6S-BH4 and 6R-BH4, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH4 was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH2 to BH4 occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supra-physiological levels of 7,8-BH2, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that hDHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH2 (DHF7,8-BH2) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH2 recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies which may be further aggravated by folate supplements. PMID:23707606

  10. The crystal structure of NADPH:ferredoxin reductase from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar Prasad, G.; Kresge, N.; Muhlberg, A. B.; Shaw, A.; Jung, Y. S.; Burgess, B. K.; Stout, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    NADPH:ferredoxin reductase (AvFPR) is involved in the response to oxidative stress in Azotobacter vinelandii. The crystal structure of AvFPR has been determined at 2.0 A resolution. The polypeptide fold is homologous with six other oxidoreductases whose structures have been solved including Escherichia coli flavodoxin reductase (EcFldR) and spinach, and Anabaena ferredoxin:NADP+ reductases (FNR). AvFPR is overall most homologous to EcFldR. The structure is comprised of a N-terminal six-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel domain, which binds FAD, and a C-terminal five-stranded parallel beta-sheet domain, which binds NADPH/NADP+ and has a classical nucleotide binding fold. The two domains associate to form a deep cleft where the NADPH and FAD binding sites are juxtaposed. The structure displays sequence conserved motifs in the region surrounding the two dinucleotide binding sites, which are characteristic of the homologous enzymes. The folded over conformation of FAD in AvFPR is similar to that in EcFldR due to stacking of Phe255 on the adenine ring of FAD, but it differs from that in the FNR enzymes, which lack a homologous aromatic residue. The structure of AvFPR displays three unique features in the environment of the bound FAD. Two features may affect the rate of reduction of FAD: the absence of an aromatic residue stacked on the isoalloxazine ring in the NADPH binding site; and the interaction of a carbonyl group with N10 of the flavin. Both of these features are due to the substitution of a conserved C-terminal tyrosine residue with alanine (Ala254) in AvFPR. An additional unique feature may affect the interaction of AvFPR with its redox partner ferredoxin I (FdI). This is the extension of the C-terminus by three residues relative to EcFldR and by four residues relative to FNR. The C-terminal residue, Lys258, interacts with the AMP phosphate of FAD. Consequently, both phosphate groups are paired with a basic group due to the simultaneous interaction of the FMN

  11. Comparative transcript and alkaloid profiling in Papaver species identifies a short chain dehydrogenase/reductase involved in morphine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jörg; Voigtländer, Susan; Schmidt, Jürgen; Kramell, Robert; Miersch, Otto; Ammer, Christian; Gesell, Andreas; Kutchan, Toni M

    2006-10-01

    Plants of the order Ranunculales, especially members of the species Papaver, accumulate a large variety of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with about 2500 structures, but only the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and Papaver setigerum are able to produce the analgesic and narcotic morphine and the antitussive codeine. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for this exceptional biosynthetic capability by comparison of alkaloid profiles with gene expression profiles between 16 different Papaver species. Out of 2000 expressed sequence tags obtained from P. somniferum, 69 show increased expression in morphinan alkaloid-containing species. One of these cDNAs, exhibiting an expression pattern very similar to previously isolated cDNAs coding for enzymes in benzylisoquinoline biosynthesis, showed the highest amino acid identity to reductases in menthol biosynthesis. After overexpression, the protein encoded by this cDNA reduced the keto group of salutaridine yielding salutaridinol, an intermediate in morphine biosynthesis. The stereoisomer 7-epi-salutaridinol was not formed. Based on its similarities to a previously purified protein from P. somniferum with respect to the high substrate specificity, molecular mass and kinetic data, the recombinant protein was identified as salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248). Unlike codeinone reductase, an enzyme acting later in the pathway that catalyses the reduction of a keto group and which belongs to the family of the aldo-keto reductases, the cDNA identified in this study as SalR belongs to the family of short chain dehydrogenases/reductases and is related to reductases in monoterpene metabolism.

  12. ECS Special Education Handbook: 2008/2009 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This handbook explains basic funding requirements for Early Childhood Services (ECS) and how to complete application forms required for the services. It also outlines the age of eligibility for funding for all types of ECS programming. The handbook explains other funding that is provided for children identified with mild to moderate…

  13. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  14. Evaluation and comparison of the relationship between NOEC and EC10 or EC20 values in chronic Daphnia toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Amy; Belanger, Scott E; Brill, Jessica L; Otter, Ryan R

    2015-10-01

    Hypothesis-based no-effect-concentration (NOEC) and regression-based x% effect concentration (ECx) values are common statistical approaches used to summarize ecotoxicological effects. Controversy over the NOEC model has prompted a movement toward discontinuation of the NOEC in favor of ECx, but the best x% effect surrogate for NOEC has not yet been determined. Historically, 10% and 20% effect concentrations (EC10 and EC20) have been treated as NOEC analogs. Given these measurements' importance to ecotoxicology, further understanding of the relationships between NOEC and EC10 or EC20 is crucial. In the present study, a metadataset of daphnid chronic toxicity tests was compiled to analyze the strength and significance of NOEC:EC10 and NOEC:EC20 relationships. The impact of endpoint (e.g., mortality, reproduction) and test condition parameters (e.g., pH, temperature) on NOEC:EC10 and NOEC:EC20 was evaluated. Mortality endpoints were most sensitive 51% of the time, with growth and reproductive endpoints constituting the remainder, underscoring the value of using multiple endpoints to evaluate toxic effects rather than relying on reproduction as the a priori most sensitive endpoint. When test condition parameters were less restricted (e.g., pH, hardness), the NOEC:EC20 association was more robust, suggesting that variability introduced by test implementation increased variability in ECx calculation. The analysis revealed that, overall, EC10 was a more suitable analog than EC20 for NOEC. Recommendations include refinement and reporting of the test parameters pH and hardness to minimize variability in ECx calculation.

  15. Metabolism and drug interactions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors in transplant patients: are the statins mechanistically similar?

    PubMed

    Christians, U; Jacobsen, W; Floren, L C

    1998-10-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) inhibitors are the most effective drugs to lower cholesterol in transplant patients. However, immunosuppressants and several other drugs used after organ transplantation are cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A, EC 1.14.14.1) substrates. Pharmacokinetic interaction with some of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, specifically lovastatin and simvastatin, leads to an increased incidence of muscle skeletal toxicity in transplant patients. It is our objective to review the role of drug metabolism and drug interactions of lovastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, and cerivastatin. In the treatment of transplant patients, from a drug interaction perspective, pravastatin, which is not significantly metabolized by CYP enzymes, and fluvastatin, presumably a CYP2C9 substrate, compare favorably with the other statins for which the major metabolic pathways are catalyzed by CYP3A.

  16. Isolation, sequence identification and tissue expression profile of two novel soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y

    2009-09-01

    The complete mRNA sequences of two soybean (glycine max) genes-vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase, were amplified using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. The sequence analysis of these two genes revealed that soybean vestitone reductase gene encodes a protein of 327 amino acids which has high homology with the vestitone reductase of Medicago sativa (77%). The soybean chalcone reductase gene encodes a protein of 314 amino acids that has high homology with the chalcone reductase of kudzu vine (88%) and medicago sativa (83%). The expression profiles of the soybean vestitone reductase and chalcone reductase genes were studied and the results indicated that these two soybean genes were differentially expressed in detected soybean tissues including leaves, stems, roots, inflorescences, embryos and endosperm. Our experiment established the foundation for further research on these two soybean genes.

  17. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  18. Fumarate Reductase Activity of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Aue, B. J.; Diebel, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Some characteristics of a fumarate reductase from Streptococcus faecalis are described. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.4; optimal activity was observed when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer was adjusted to 0.088. The Km value of the enzyme for reduced flavin mononucleotide was 2 × 10−4 m as determined with a 26-fold preparation. In addition to fumarate, the enzyme reduced maleate and mesaconate. No succinate dehydrogenase activity was detected, but succinate did act as an inhibitor of the fumarate reductase activity. Other inhibitors were malonate, citraconate, and trans-, trans-muconate. Metal-chelating agents did not inhibit the enzyme. A limited inhibition by sulfhydryl-binding agents was observed, and the preparations were sensitive to air oxidation and storage. Glycine, alanine, histidine, and possibly lysine stimulated fumarate reductase activity in the cell-free extracts. However, growth in media supplemented with glycine did not enhance fumarate reductase activity. The enzymatic activity appears to be constitutive. PMID:4960892

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Tomomi; Goda, Yuko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005 has been crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and microseeding. The crystals contained one dimeric molecule per asymmetric unit and diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution. Maleylacetate reductase (EC 1.3.1.32), which catalyzes the reduction of maleylacetate to 3-oxoadipate, plays an important role in the aerobic microbial catabolism of resorcinol. The enzyme has been crystallized at 293 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method supplemented with a microseeding technique, using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.85, b = 121.13, c = 94.09 Å, β = 101.48°, and contained one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. It diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution.

  20. Light-regulated expression of the nitrate-reductase and nitrite-reductase genes in tomato and in the phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato.

    PubMed

    Becker, T W; Foyer, C; Caboche, M

    1992-08-01

    The phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum (L.) Mill) was used to investigate if phytochrome plays a role in the regulation of nitrate-reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) and nitrite-reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.7.1) gene expression. We show that the expression of the tomato NR and NiR genes is stimulated by light and that this light response is mediated by the photoreceptor phytochrome. The red-light response of the NR and NiR genes was reduced in etiolated aurea seedlings when compared to isogenic wild-type cotyledons. The relative levels of NR mRNA and NiR transcripts and their diurnal fluctuations were identical in mature white-light-grown leaves of the wild-type and of the aurea mutant. The transcript levels for cab and RbcS (genes for the chlorophyll-a/b-binding protein of PSII and the small subunit of the enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, respectively) in aurea leaves grown in white light were indistinguishable from the respective transcript levels in the leaves of the wildtype grown under the same conditions. Despite a severe reduction in the chlorophyll content, the rate of net CO2 uptake by leaves of the aurea mutant was only slightly reduced when compared to the rate of net photosynthesis of wild-type leaves. This difference in the photosynthetic performances of wild-type and aurea mutant plants disappeared during aging of the plants. The increase in zeaxanthin and the concomitant decrease in violaxanthin in leaves of the aurea mutant compared with the same pigment levels in leaves of the wild-type indicate that the activity of the xanthophyll cycle is increased in aurea leaves as a consequence of the reduced CO2-fixation capacity of the mutant leaves.

  1. Carbohydrate utilization in Streptococcus thermophilus: characterization of the genes for aldose 1-epimerase (mutarotase) and UDPglucose 4-epimerase.

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, B; Royer, T J; Mainzer, S E; Schmidt, B F

    1990-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding aldose 1-epimerase (mutarotase) (galM) and UDPglucose 4-epimerase (galE) and flanking regions of Streptococcus thermophilus have been determined. Both genes are located immediately upstream of the S. thermophilus lac operon. To facilitate the isolation of galE, a special polymerase chain reaction-based technique was used to amplify the region upstream of galM prior to cloning. The galM protein was homologous to the mutarotase of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, whereas the galE protein was homologous to UDPglucose 4-epimerase of Escherichia coli and Streptomyces lividans. The amino acid sequences of galM and galE proteins also showed significant similarity with the carboxy-terminal and amino-terminal domains, respectively, of UDPglucose 4-epimerase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that the yeast enzymes contain an additional, yet unidentified (mutarotase) activity. In accordance with the open reading frames of the structural genes, galM and galE were expressed as polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 39 and 37 kilodaltons, respectively. Significant activities of mutarotase and UDPglucose 4-epimerase were detected in lysates of E. coli cells containing plasmids encoding galM and galE. Expression of galE in E. coli was increased 300-fold when the gene was placed downstream of the tac promoter. The gene order for the gal-lac gene cluster of S. thermophilus is galE-galM-lacS-lacZ. The flanking regions of these genes were searched for consensus promoter sequences and further characterized by primer extension analysis. Analysis of mRNA levels for the gal and lac genes in S. thermophilus showed a strong reduction upon growth in medium containing glucose instead of lactose. The activities of the lac (lactose transport and beta-galactosidase) and gal (UDPglucose 4-epimerase) proteins of lactose- and glucose-grown S. thermophilus cells matched the mRNA levels. Images PMID:1694527

  2. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  3. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o−) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o− cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions. PMID:26637637

  4. A Method of EC Model Implementation Using Web Service Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Jun; Koizumi, Hisao; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Dasai, Takashi

    In recent years, advances in computer and communication technology and the associated rapid increase in the number of Internet users are encouraging advances in Electronic Commerce (EC). Business models of EC are being actively developed by many different enterprises and engineers, and implemented in many kinds of fields. Meanwhile Web services that reuse remote components over the Internet are drawing attention. Web services are based on SOAP/WSDL/UDDI and are given an important position as the infrastructure of the EC systems. The article analyzes the functions and structures of various business models, establishing the patterns of their distinctive and common features, and proposes a method of determining the implementation specifications of business models utilizing these patterns and Web service functions. This method has been applied to a parts purchasing system, which is a typical pattern of the B to B (Business to Business) EC applications. The article also discusses the results of evaluating this prototype system.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of salutaridine reductase from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yasuhiro; Smith, Thomas J; Jez, Joseph M; Kutchan, Toni M

    2010-02-01

    The opium poppy Papaver somniferum is the source of the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine. Salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248) reduces the C-7 keto group of salutaridine to the C-7 (S)-hydroxyl group of salutaridinol in the biosynthetic pathway that leads to morphine in the opium poppy plant. P. somniferum SalR was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified using cobalt-affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Hexagonal crystals belonging to space group P6(4)22 or P6(2)22 were obtained using ammonium sulfate as precipitant and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 A.

  6. FRUCTOSE-6-PHOSPHATE REDUCTASE FROM SALMONELLA GALLINARUM

    PubMed Central

    Zancan, Glaci T.; Bacila, Metry

    1964-01-01

    Zancan, Glaci T. (Universidade do Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil), and Metry Bacila. Fructose-6-phosphate reductase from Salmonella gallinarum. J. Bacteriol. 87:614–618. 1964.—A fructose-6-phosphate reductase present in cell-free extracts of Salmonella gallinarum was purified approximately 42 times. The optimal pH for this enzyme is 8.0. The enzyme is specific for fructose-6-phosphate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The dissociation constants are 1.78 × 10−4m for fructose-6-phosphate and 8.3 × 10−5m for NADH. The Q10, reaction order, and equilibrium constant were determined. The enzyme is sensitive to p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, but not to o-iodosobenzoic acid nor to N-ethylmaleimide. PMID:14127579

  7. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  9. A mediated glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell based on printed carbon inks containing aldose dehydrogenase and laccase as anode and cathode.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Peter; Tuurala, Saara; Vaari, Anu; Valkiainen, Matti; Smolander, Maria; Leech, Dónal

    2012-03-10

    Enzyme electrodes show great potential for many applications, as biosensors and more recently as anodes and cathodes in biocatalytic fuel cells for power generation. Enzymes have advantages over metal catalysts, as they provide high specificity and reaction rates, while operating under mild conditions. Here we report on studies related to development of mass-producible, completely enzymatic printed glucose/oxygen biofuel cells. The cells are based on filter paper coated with conducting carbon inks containing mediators and laccase, for reduction of oxygen, or aldose dehydrogenase, for oxidation of glucose. Mediator performance in these printed formats is compared to relative rate constants for the enzyme-mediator reaction in solution, for a range of anode and cathode mediators. The power output and stability of fuels cells using an acidophilic laccase isolated from Trametes hirsuta is greater, at pH 5, than that for cells based on Melanocarpus albomyces laccase, that shows optimal activity closer to neutral pH, at pH 6. Highest power output, although of limited stability, was observed for ThL/ABTS cathodes, providing a maximum power density of 3.5 μWcm(-2) at 0.34 V, when coupled to an ALDH glucose anode mediated by an osmium complex. The stability of cell voltage above a threshold of 200 mV under a moderate 75 kΩ load is used to benchmark printed fuel cell performance. Highest stability was obtained for a printed fuel cell using osmium complexes as mediators of glucose oxidation by aldose dehydrogenase, and oxygen reduction by T. hirsuta laccase, maintaining cell voltage above 200 mV for 137 h at pH 5. These results provide promising directions for further development of mass-producible, completely enzymatic, printed biofuel cells.

  10. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26536144

  11. Protein Mass-Modulated Effects in the Catalytic Mechanism of Dihydrofolate Reductase: Beyond Promoting Vibrations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The role of fast protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis has been of great interest in the past decade. Recent “heavy enzyme” studies demonstrate that protein mass-modulated vibrations are linked to the energy barrier for the chemical step of catalyzed reactions. However, the role of fast dynamics in the overall catalytic mechanism of an enzyme has not been addressed. Protein mass-modulated effects in the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) are explored by isotopic substitution (13C, 15N, and non-exchangeable 2H) of the wild-type ecDHFR (l-DHFR) to generate a vibrationally perturbed “heavy ecDHFR” (h-DHFR). Steady-state, pre-steady-state, and ligand binding kinetics, intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEint) on the chemical step, and thermal unfolding experiments of both l- and h-DHFR show that the altered protein mass affects the conformational ensembles and protein–ligand interactions, but does not affect the hydride transfer at physiological temperatures (25–45 °C). Below 25 °C, h-DHFR shows altered transition state (TS) structure and increased barrier-crossing probability of the chemical step compared with l-DHFR, indicating temperature-dependent protein vibrational coupling to the chemical step. Protein mass-modulated vibrations in ecDHFR are involved in TS interactions at cold temperatures and are linked to dynamic motions involved in ligand binding at physiological temperatures. Thus, mass effects can affect enzymatic catalysis beyond alterations in promoting vibrations linked to chemistry. PMID:24820793

  12. Methionine sulfoxide reductase contributes to meeting dietary methionine requirements

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are present in all aerobic organisms. They contribute to antioxidant defenses by reducing methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. However, the actual in vivo roles of these reductases are not well defined. Since methionine is an essential amino acid in mammals, we hypothesized that methionine sulfoxide reductases may provide a portion of the dietary methionine requirement by recycling methionine sulfoxide. We used a classical bioassay, the growth of weanling mice fed diets varying in methionine, and applied it to mice genetically engineered to alter the levels of methionine sulfoxide reductase A or B1. Mice of all genotypes were growth retarded when raised on chow containing 0.10% methionine instead of the standard 0.45% methionine. Retardation was significantly greater in knockout mice lacking both reductases. We conclude that the methionine sulfoxide reductases can provide methionine for growth in mice with limited intake of methionine, such as may occur in the wild. PMID:22521563

  13. Insights into anticancer activity and mechanism of action of a ruthenium(II) complex in human esophageal squamous carcinoma EC109 cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liubin; Lv, Gaochao; Qiu, Ling; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Li; Yu, Huixin; Zou, Meifen; Lin, Jianguo

    2016-09-05

    A ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(p-cymene)(NHC)Cl2] (NHC=1,3-bis(4-(tert-butyl)benzylimidazol-2-ylidene), referred to as L-4, has been designed and synthesized recently in order to look for new anticancer drugs with high efficacy and low side effects. The anticancer activity and mechanism of action of L-4 in human esophageal squamous carcinoma EC109 cells were systematically investigated. The results revealed that L-4 exerted strong inhibitory effect on the proliferation of EC109 cells, and it arrested EC109 cells at G2/M phase, accompanied with the up-regulation of p53 and p21 and the down-regulation of cyclin D1. The results also showed that the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptosis of EC109 can be induced by L-4 via inhibiting the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), decreasing the ratio of glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), and leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. The mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of EC109 induced by L-4 was also observed from the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, overload of Ca(2+), disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), redistribution of cytochrome c, and activation of caspase-3/-9. However, the effects of L-4 on the cell viability, GR activity, GSH/GSSG ratio, reactive oxygen species level, mitochondria dysfunction and apoptosis induction were remarkably attenuated by adding the reactive oxygen species scavenger, NAC. Therefore, it was concluded that L-4 can inhibit the proliferation of EC109 cells via blocking cell cycle progression and inducing reactive oxygen species-dependent and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. These findings suggested that the ruthenium(II) complex might be a potential effective chemotherapeutic agent for human esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC) and worthy of further investigation.

  14. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding wheat 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, K; Beyou, A; Moon, K; Fang, L; Ulrich, T

    1993-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, EC 1.1.1.34) is a key enzyme in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. We have isolated partial cDNAs from wheat (Triticum aestivum) using the polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of these cDNAs shows that they represent a small family of genes that share a high degree of sequence homology among themselves as well as among genes from other organisms including tomato, Arabidopsis, hamster, human, Drosophila, and yeast. Southern blot analysis reveals the presence of at least four genes. Our results concerning the tissue-specific expression as well as developmental regulation of these HMGR cDNAs highlight the important role of this enzyme in the growth and development of wheat. PMID:8108513

  15. Barrier crossing in dihydrofolate reductase does not involve a rate-promoting vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dametto, Mariangela; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2012-05-01

    We have studied atomic motions during the chemical reaction catalysed by the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase of Escherichia coli (EcDHFR), an important enzyme for nucleic acid synthesis. In our earlier work on the enzymes human lactate dehydrogenase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, we had identified fast sub-ps motions that are part of the reaction coordinate. We employed Transition Path Sampling (TPS) and our recently developed reaction coordinate identification methodology to investigate if such fast motions couple to the reaction in DHFR on the barrier-crossing timescale. While we identified some protein motions near the barrier crossing event, these motions do not constitute a compressive promoting vibration, and do not appear as a clearly identifiable protein component in reaction.

  16. The effect of electron transport (ET) inhibitors and thiabendazole on the fumarate reductase (FR) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) of Strongyloides ratti infective (L3) larvae.

    PubMed

    Armson, A; Grubb, W B; Mendis, A H

    1995-02-01

    The fumarate reductase (FR) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities of isolated submitochondrial particles (SMPs) prepared from axenised L3 larvae of S. ratti were characterised with respect to their response to a selected range of inhibitors. Rotenone (a specific inhibitor of electron transport Complex I) inhibited the S. ratti FR (EC50 = 3.0 x 10(-7) M) but not SDH. This strongly suggests that the S. ratti FR is functionally linked with the S. ratti ET-Complex I. 2-Thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA, an inhibitor of ET-Complex II) inhibited FR (EC50 = 2.6 x 10(-5) M) and SDH (EC50 = 2.8 x 10(-5) M) with similar effectiveness. Sodium malonate (substrate analogue of succinate) had a greater affinity for SDH (EC50 = 6.8 x 10(-4) M), than FR (EC50 = 1.9 x 10(-2) M). Sodium fumarate was ca. 8-fold more effective in inhibiting the S. ratti FR (EC50 = 6.0 x 10(-4) M) than SDH (EC50 = 4.8 x 10(-3) M). The S. ratti FR was more sensitive to inhibition by thiabendazole (TBZ; EC50 = 4.6 x 10(-4) M) than SDH (EC50 > 1.0 x 10(-3) M), suggesting that one of the sites-of-action of TBZ to be the FR of S. ratti mitochondria. More potent inhibitors of S. ratti FR, if developed, may prove to be effective chemotherapeutic agents in the management of human strongloidiasis.

  17. Structural Elucidation of Chalcone Reductase and Implications for Deoxychalcone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bomati, Erin K.; Austin, Michael B.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    4,2′,4′,6′-tetrahydroxychalcone (chalcone) and 4,2′,4′-trihydroxychalcone (deoxychalcone) serve as precursors of ecologically important flavonoids and isoflavonoids. Deoxychalcone formation depends on chalcone synthase and chalcone reductase; however, the identity of the chalcone reductase substrate out of the possible substrates formed during the multistep reaction catalyzed by chalcone synthase remains experimentally elusive. We report here the three-dimensional structure of alfalfa chalcone reductase bound to the NADP+ cofactor and propose the identity and binding mode of its substrate, namely the non-aromatized coumaryl-trione intermediate of the chalcone synthase-catalyzed cyclization of the fully extended coumaryl-tetraketide thioester intermediate. In the absence of a ternary complex, the quality of the refined NADP+-bound chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for computer-assisted docking to evaluate the likelihood of possible substrates. Interestingly, chalcone reductase adopts the three-dimensional structure of the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. The aldo/keto reductase fold is structurally distinct from all known ketoreductases of fatty acid biosynthesis, which instead belong to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. The results presented here provide structural support for convergent functional evolution of these two ketoreductases that share similar roles in the biosynthesis of fatty acids/polyketides. In addition, the chalcone reductase structure represents the first protein structure of a member of the aldo/ketoreductase 4 family. Therefore, the chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for the homology modeling of other aldo/ketoreductase 4 family members, including the reductase involved in morphine biosynthesis, namely codeinone reductase. PMID:15970585

  18. Limited proteolysis of the nitrate reductase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Y; Ogura, N; Nakagawa, H

    1988-12-25

    The functional structure of assimilatory NADH-nitrate reductase from spinach leaves was studied by limited proteolysis experiments. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with trypsin, two stable products of 59 and 45 kDa were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The fragment of 45 kDa was purified by Blue Sepharose chromatography. NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were associated with this 45-kDa fragment which contains FAD, heme, and NADH binding fragment. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, two major peaks were observed by high performance liquid chromatography size exclusion gel filtration. FMNH2-nitrate reductase and reduced methyl viologen-nitrate reductase activities were associated with the first peak of 170 kDa which consists of two noncovalently associated (75-90-kDa) fragments. NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, however, was associated with the second peak which consisted of FAD and NADH binding sites. Incubation of the 45-kDa fragment with S. aureus V8 protease produced two major fragments of 28 and 14 kDa which contained FAD and heme, respectively. These results indicate that the molybdenum, heme, and FAD components of spinach nitrate reductase are contained in distinct domains which are covalently linked by exposed hinge regions. The molybdenum domain appears to be important in the maintenance of subunit interactions in the enzyme complex.

  19. Calmodulin-mediated suppression of 2-ketoisovalerate reductase in Beauveria bassiana beauvericin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Deok-Hyo; Oh, Junsang; Hyun, Min-Woo; Han, Jae-Gu; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Ketoisovalerate reductase (KIVR, E.C. 1.2.7.7) mediates the specific reduction of 2-ketoisovalerate (2-Kiv) to d-hydroxyisovalerate (d-Hiv), a precursor for beauvericin biosynthesis. Beauvericin, a famous mycotoxin produced by many fungi, is a cyclooligomer depsipeptide, which has insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, and cytotoxic activities. In this report, we demonstrated that Beauveria bassiana 2-ketoisovalerate reductase (BbKIVR) acts as a typical KIVR enzyme in the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana. In addition, we found that BbKIVR interacts with calmodulin (CaM) in vitro and in vivo. The functional role of CaM-binding to BbKIVR was to negatively regulate the BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress suppressed BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Interestingly, this negative effect of BbKIVR activity by light and salt stress was recovered by CaM inhibitors, suggesting that the inhibitory mechanism is mediated through stimulation of CaM activity. Therefore, this work suggests that BbKIVR plays an important role in the beauvericin biosynthetic pathway mediated by environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress via the CaM signaling pathway.

  20. Role of the conserved Ser-Tyr-Lys triad of the SDR family in sepiapterin reductase.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K; Hara, M; Yamada, H; Sakurai, M; Inaba, A; Tomomura, A; Katoh, S

    2001-01-30

    Sepiapterin reductase (EC 1.1.1.153; SPR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin; and SPR has been identified as a member of the NADP(H)-preferring short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family based on its catalytic properties for exogenous carbonyl compounds and molecular structure. To examine possible differences in the catalytic sites of SPR for exogenous carbonyl compounds and the native pteridine substrates, we investigated by site-directed mutagenesis the role of the highly conserved Ser-Tyr-Lys triad (Ser and YXXXK motif) in SPR, which was shown to be the catalytic site of SDR-family enzymes. From the analysis of catalytic constants for single- and double-point mutants against the triad, Ser and YXXXK motif, in the SPR molecule, participate in the reduction of the carbonyl group of both pteridine and exogenous carbonyl compounds. The Ser and the Tyr of the triad may co-act in proton transfer and stabilization for the carbonyl group of substrates, as was demonstrated for those in the SDR family. But either the Tyr or the Ser of SPR can function alone for proton transfer to a certain extent and show low activity for both substrates.

  1. Pb deposition on I-coated Au(111). UHV-EC and EC-STM studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn-Geun; Kim, Jay Yu; Thambidurai, Chandru; Stickney, John L

    2007-02-27

    This article concerns the growth of an atomic layer of Pb on the Au(111)( radical3 x radical3)R30 degrees -I structure. The importance of this study lies in the use of Pb underpotential deposition (UPD) as a sacrificial layer in surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). SLRR reactions are being applied in the formation of metal nanofilms via electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ALD). Pb UPD is a surface-limited reaction, and if it is placed in a solution of ions of a more noble metal, redox replacement can occur, but limited by the amount of Pb present. Pb UPD is a candidate for use as a sacrificial layer for replacement by any more noble element. It has been used by this group for both Cu and Pt nanofilm formation using electrochemical ALD. The I atom layer was intended to facilitate electrochemical annealing during nanofilm growth. Two distinctly different Pb atomic layer structures are reported, studied using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with an electrochemical flow cell and ultrahigh vacuum surface analysis combined directly with electrochemical reactions (UHV-EC). Starting with the initial Au(111)( radical3 x radical3)R30 degrees -I, 1/3 monolayer of I on the Au(111) surface, Pb deposition began at approximately 0.1 V. The first Pb UPD structure was observed just below -0.2 V and displayed a (2 x radical3)-rect unit cell, for a structure composed of 1/4 monolayer each of Pb and I. The I atoms fit in Pb 4-fold sites, on the Au(111) surface. The structure was present in domains rotated by 120 degrees. Deposition to -0.4 V resulted in complete loss of the I atoms and formation of a Pb monolayer on the Au(111), which produced a Moiré pattern, due to the Pb and Au lattice mismatch. These structures represent two well-defined starting points for the growth of nanofilms of other more noble elements. It is apparent from these studies that the adsorption of I- on Pb is weak, and it will rinse away. If Pb is used as a sacrificial metal in an

  2. On the neutrinoless double β{sup +}/EC decays

    SciTech Connect

    Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    The neutrinoless double positron-emission/electron-capture (0νβ{sup +}/EC) decays are studied for the magnitudes of the involved nuclear matrix elements (NMEs). Decays to the ground state, 0{sub gs}{sup +}, and excited 0{sup +} states are discussed. The participant many-body wave functions are evaluated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. The channels β{sup +}β{sup +}, β{sup +}EC, and the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0νECEC) are discussed.

  3. ECS: Efficient Communication Scheduling for Underwater Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lu; Hong, Feng; Guo, Zhongwen; Li, Zhengbao

    2011-01-01

    TDMA protocols have attracted a lot of attention for underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWSNs), because of the unique characteristics of acoustic signal propagation such as great energy consumption in transmission, long propagation delay and long communication range. Previous TDMA protocols all allocated transmission time to nodes based on discrete time slots. This paper proposes an efficient continuous time scheduling TDMA protocol (ECS) for UWSNs, including the continuous time based and sender oriented conflict analysis model, the transmission moment allocation algorithm and the distributed topology maintenance algorithm. Simulation results confirm that ECS improves network throughput by 20% on average, compared to existing MAC protocols. PMID:22163775

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Jun Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hideo; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2006-06-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductases are responsible for bacterial type II fatty-acid biosynthesis and are attractive targets for developing novel antibiotics. The S. pneumoniae enoyl-ACP reductase (FabK) was crystallized and selenomethionine MAD data were collected to 2 Å resolution. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (FabK; EC 1.3.1.9) is responsible for catalyzing the final step in each elongation cycle of fatty-acid biosynthesis. Selenomethionine-substituted FabK was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.26, b = 126.70, c = 53.63 Å, β = 112.46°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.00 Å resolution using synchrotron beamline BL32B2 at SPring-8. Two molecules were estimated to be present in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 45.1%.

  5. EC-LEDS Mexico: Advancing Clean Energy Goals

    SciTech Connect

    2016-07-01

    EC-LEDS works with the government of Mexico to help meet its goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector. The program targets specific, highly technical areas where Mexico has indicated the program can add value and make an impact.

  6. EC-LEDS Supports the Low-Carbon Transition

    SciTech Connect

    2016-09-01

    EC-LEDS is a flagship U.S. government-led effort that assists countries to create and implement low emission development strategies, or LEDS -- development frameworks that promote sustainable social and economic development while reducing greenhouse gas emissions over the medium to long term.

  7. Enzyme toolbox: novel enantiocomplementary imine reductases.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Philipp N; Fademrecht, Silvia; Hofelzer, Sebastian; Pleiss, Jürgen; Leipold, Friedemann; Turner, Nicholas J; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-10-13

    Reducing reactions are among the most useful transformations for the generation of chiral compounds in the fine-chemical industry. Because of their exquisite selectivities, enzymatic approaches have emerged as the method of choice for the reduction of C=O and activated C=C bonds. However, stereoselective enzymatic reduction of C=N bonds is still in its infancy-it was only recently described after the discovery of enzymes capable of imine reduction. In our work, we increased the spectrum of imine-reducing enzymes by database analysis. By combining the currently available knowledge about the function of imine reductases with the experimentally uncharacterized diversity stored in protein sequence databases, three novel imine reductases with complementary enantiopreference were identified along with amino acids important for catalysis. Furthermore, their reducing capability was demonstrated by the reduction of the pharmaceutically relevant prochiral imine 2-methylpyrroline. These novel enzymes exhibited comparable to higher catalytic efficiencies than previously described enzymes, and their biosynthetic potential is highlighted by the full conversion of 2-methylpyrroline in whole cells with excellent selectivities.

  8. Soluble ascorbate free radical reductase in the human lens.

    PubMed

    Bando, M; Obazawa, H

    1994-01-01

    A major and a minor ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase were separated from the soluble fraction in the human lens cortex by DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange column chromatography. These AFR reductases also exhibited diaphorase activity using dichlorophenolindophenol and ferricyanide as electron acceptors. The major AFR reductase was partially purified by 5'AMP-Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography. This partially purified AFR reductase showed a single band of diaphorase activity in native polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. This activity band corresponded to the major protein observed in protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue. However, the protein staining by Coomassie Brilliant Blue showed this activity band surrounded by diffused staining. Molecular weight of the partially purified AFR reductase was determined to be 32 kDa by gel filtration, and the apparent Km value for AFR was about 15 microM. This major lens AFR reductase could be distinguished from soluble Neurospora, Euglena and cucumber AFR reductases, and from two ubiquitous enzymes with reduction activity of AFR and/or foreign compounds, ie, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and DT-diaphorase, by their molecular weights, Km values and/or ion-exchange chromatographic behaviors.

  9. Functional and Phylogenetic Divergence of Fungal Adenylate-Forming Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    A key step in fungal l-lysine biosynthesis is catalyzed by adenylate-forming l-α-aminoadipic acid reductases, organized in domains for adenylation, thiolation, and the reduction step. However, the genomes of numerous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes contain an unexpectedly large number of additional genes encoding similar but functionally distinct enzymes. Here, we describe the functional in vitro characterization of four reductases which were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. The Ceriporiopsis subvermispora serine reductase Nps1 features a terminal ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) domain and thus belongs to a hitherto undescribed class of fungal multidomain enzymes. The second major class is characterized by the canonical terminal short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain and represented by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora Nps3 as the first biochemically characterized l-α-aminoadipic acid reductase of basidiomycete origin. Aspergillus flavus l-tyrosine reductases LnaA and LnbA are members of a distinct phylogenetic clade. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that fungal adenylate-forming reductases are more diverse than previously recognized and belong to four distinct classes. PMID:25085485

  10. Purification and properties of two different dihydroxyacetone reductases in Gluconobacter suboxydans grown on glycerol.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Osao; Ano, Yoshitaka; Shinagawa, Emiko; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2008-08-01

    It is well known that in oxidative fermentation microbial growth is improved by the addition of glycerol. In a wild strain, glycerol was converted rapidly to dihydroxyacetone (DHA) quantitatively in the early growth phase by the action of quinoprotein glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH), and then DHA was incorporated into the cells by the early stationary phase. Two DHA reductases (DHARs), NADH-dependent (NADH-DHAR) (EC 1.1.1.6) and NADPH-dependent (NADPH-DHAR) (EC 1.1.1.156), were detected in the same cytoplasm of Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 3255. The former appeared to be inducible and labile in nature while the latter was constitutive and stable. The two DHARs were separated each other and were finally purified to crystalline enzymes. This report might be the first one dealing with NADPH-DHAR that has been crystallized. The two DHARs were specific only to DHA reduction to glycerol and thus contributed to cytoplasmic DHA metabolism, resulting in an improved biomass yield with the addition of glycerol.

  11. Effect of pH on hydride transfer by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Loveridge, E Joel; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2011-05-16

    The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) on hydride transfer in the reaction catalysed by dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (EcDHFR) is known to be temperature dependent at pH 7, but essentially independent of temperature at elevated pH. Here, we show that the transition from the temperature-dependent regime to the temperature-independent regime occurs sharply between pH 7.5 and 8. The activation energy for hydride transfer is independent of pH. The mechanism leading to the change in behaviour of the KIEs is not clear, but probably involves a conformational change in the enzyme brought about by deprotonation of a key residue (or residues) at high pH. The KIE on hydride transfer at low pH suggests that the rate constant for the reaction is not limited by a conformational change to the enzyme under these conditions. The effect of pH on the temperature dependence of the rate constants and KIEs for hydride transfer catalysed by EcDHFR suggests that enzyme motions and conformational changes do not directly influence the chemistry, but that the reaction conditions affect the conformational ensemble of the enzyme prior to reaction and control the reaction though this route.

  12. Measuring Eating Competence: Psychometric Properties and Validity of the ecSatter Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohse, Barbara; Satter, Ellyn; Horacek, Tanya; Gebreselassie, Tesfayi; Oakland, Mary Jane

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Assess validity of the ecSatter Inventory (ecSI) to measure eating competence (EC). Design: Concurrent administration of ecSI with validated measures of eating behaviors using on-line and paper-pencil formats. Setting: The on-line survey was completed by 370 participants; 462 completed the paper version. Participants: Participants…

  13. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    PubMed

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes.

  14. The quasicatalytic mechanism: a variation of the catalytic (EC') mechanism.

    PubMed

    Feldberg, Stephen W; Campbell, Jennifer F

    2009-11-01

    The classic electrochemical catalytic mechanism, often referred to as the EC' mechanism, is traditionally represented by the two reactions A + e <==> B (E(A/B)(0), k(A/B)(0), alpha(A/B)) and B + P <==> A + Q (K(eq), k(f), k(b)). Implicit in this mechanism is the additional heterogeneous electron transfer P + e <==> Q (E(P/Q)(0), k(P/Q)(0), alpha(P/Q)). To observe EC' behavior, the following conditions must be met (we focus on cyclic voltammetric responses): (1) E(P/Q)(0) > E(A/B)(0) (ensuring that K(eq) > 1), (2) k(P/Q)(0)c(P) exp[-alpha(P/Q)(F/RT)(E - E(P/Q)(0))]/(0.446c(A)(FD(A)|v|/RT)(1/2)) < 1 over the potential range of interest (ensuring that the reaction P + e <==> Q does not occur to any significant extent relative to the peak current for reaction A + e <==> B alone), (3) k(f)c(P)RT/F|v| > 1 (ensuring that the catalytic effect is significant). We offer arguments based on Marcus theory that when condition 2 is met, fulfilling condition 3 will be difficult. This could explain why EC' behavior is rare. In the present work we show that EC'-like cyclic voltammetric responses can be obtained even when P + e <==> Q is facile if D(P,Q) (the diffusion coefficient for the substrate-couple species P and Q) is much smaller than D(A,B) (the diffusion coefficient for the mediator-couple species A and B). When D(P,Q)/D(A,B) is sufficiently small, the system behavior becomes identical to that seen for the classical EC' system. We suggest that this "quasicatalytic" behavior should be considered when EC'-like behavior is observed and when the electrochemical system involves a substrate couple whose diffusion coefficients are much smaller than those of the mediator couple. As has been known for some time, when the diffusion coefficients of species A, B, P, and Q are identical (an assumption commonly made to simplify theoretical analysis) and when both heterogeneous electron transfers are reversible, the homogeneous kinetics have no effect on the cyclic voltammetric response

  15. Binding to DNA protects Neisseria meningitidis fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR) from oxygen.

    PubMed

    Edwards, James; Cole, Lindsay J; Green, Jasper B; Thomson, Melanie J; Wood, A Jamie; Whittingham, Jean L; Moir, James W B

    2010-01-08

    Here, we report the overexpression, purification, and characterization of the transcriptional activator fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator from the pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis (NmFNR). Like its homologue from Escherichia coli (EcFNR), NmFNR binds a 4Fe-4S cluster, which breaks down in the presence of oxygen to a 2Fe-2S cluster and subsequently to apo-FNR. The kinetics of NmFNR cluster disassembly in the presence of oxygen are 2-3x slower than those previously reported for wild-type EcFNR, but similar to constitutively active EcFNR* mutants, consistent with earlier work in which we reported that the activity of FNR-dependent promoters in N. meningitidis is only weakly inhibited by the presence of oxygen (Rock, J. D., Thomson, M. J., Read, R. C., and Moir, J. W. (2007) J. Bacteriol. 189, 1138-1144). NmFNR binds to DNA containing a consensus FNR box sequence, and this binding stabilizes the iron-sulfur cluster in the presence of oxygen. Partial degradation of the 4Fe-4S cluster to a 3Fe-4S occurs, and this form remains bound to the DNA. The 3Fe-4S cluster is converted spontaneously back to a 4Fe-4S cluster under subsequent anaerobic reducing conditions in the presence of ferrous iron. The finding that binding to DNA stabilizes FNR in the presence of oxygen such that it has a half-life of approximately 30 min on the DNA has implications for our appreciation of how oxygen switches off FNR activatable genes in vivo.

  16. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  17. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  18. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: biochemical characterization and medical significance.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylenetetrahydofolate (CH2-H4folate) to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (CH3-H4folate). The enzyme employs a noncovalently-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which accepts reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H and transfers them to CH2-H4folate. The reaction provides the sole source of CH3-H4folate, which is utilized by methionine synthase in the synthesis of methionine from homocysteine. MTHFR plays a key role in folate metabolism and in the homeostasis of homocysteine; mutations in the enzyme lead to hyperhomocyst(e)inemia. A common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and depression in adults, and of neural tube defects in the fetus. The mutation also confers protection for certain types of cancers. This review presents the current knowledge of the enzyme, its biochemical characterization, and medical significance.

  20. Nanoscale Bio-Molecular Control Using EC-OWLS

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Voros, J; Hubbell, J A; Textor, M

    2002-11-20

    A recently developed technique termed ''Electrochemical Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy'' (EC-OWLS) [1] combines evanescent-field optical sensing with electrochemical control of surface adsorption processes. Initial EC-OWLS investigations efficiently monitored molecular surface adsorption and layer thickness changes of an adsorbed polymer layer examined in situ as a function of potential applied to a waveguide1. A layer of indium tin oxide (ITO) served as both a high refractive index waveguide for optical sensing, and a conductive electrode; an electrochemical flow-through fluid cell incorporated working, reference and counter electrodes. Poly(L-lysine)-grafted-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) served as a model, polycation adsorbate. Results indicate that adsorption and desorption of PLL-g-PEG from aqueous buffer are a function of applied potential, and that binding events subsequent to PLL-g-PEG functionalization are dependent on reorganization in the molecular adlayer.

  1. Computational Electromagnetic Modeling of SansEC(Trade Mark) Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Laura J.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary effort to apply computational design tools to aid in the development of an electromagnetic SansEC resonant sensor composite materials damage detection system. The computational methods and models employed on this research problem will evolve in complexity over time and will lead to the development of new computational methods and experimental sensor systems that demonstrate the capability to detect, diagnose, and monitor the damage of composite materials and structures on aerospace vehicles.

  2. Emergency EC-IC bypass for symptomatic atherosclerotic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Nitta, Junpei; Ishizaka, Shigetoshi; Kanaya, Kohei; Yanagawa, Takao; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery has no preventive effect on subsequent ipsilateral ischemic stroke in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid occlusion and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. A few studies have assessed whether an urgent EC-IC bypass surgery is an effective treatment for main trunk stenosis or occlusion in acute stage. The authors retrospectively reviewed 58 consecutive patients who underwent urgent EC-IC bypass for symptomatic internal carotid artery or the middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion between January 2003 and December 2011. Clinical characteristics and neuroimagings were evaluated and analyzed. Based on preoperative angiogram, responsible lesions were the internal carotid artery in 19 (32.8%) patients and the middle cerebral artery in 39 (67.2%). No hemorrhagic complication occurred. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed improvement of neurological function after surgery, and 74.1% of patients had favorable outcome. Unfavorable outcome was associated with insufficient collateral flow and new infarction after bypass surgery.

  3. Enhanced silver nanoparticle synthesis by optimization of nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Gopalram, Shubaash; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Deepak, Venkataraman; Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructure materials are attracting a great deal of attention because of their potential for achieving specific processes and selectivity, especially in biological and pharmaceutical applications. The generation of silver nanoparticles using optimized nitrate reductase for the reduction of Ag(+) with the retention of enzymatic activity in the complex is being reported. This report involves the optimization of enzyme activity to bring about enhanced nanoparticle synthesis. Response surface methodology and central composite rotary design (CCRD) were employed to optimize a fermentation medium for the production of nitrate reductase by Bacillus licheniformis at pH 8. The four variables involved in the study of nitrate reductase were Glucose, Peptone, Yeast extract and KNO(3). Glucose had a significant effect on nitrate reductase production. The optimized medium containing (%) Glucose: 1.5, Peptone: 1, Yeast extract: 0.35 and KNO(3): 0.35 resulted in a nitrate reductase activity of 452.206 U/ml which is same as that of the central level. The medium A (showing least nitrate reductase activity) and the medium B (showing maximum nitrate reductase activity) were compared for the synthesis. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the particles exhibited a peak at 431 nm and the A(431) for the medium B was 2-fold greater than that of the medium A. The particles were also characterized using TEM. The particles synthesized using the optimized enzyme activity ranged from 10 to 80 nm and therefore can be extended to various medicinal applications.

  4. A comparison of glucose oxidase and aldose dehydrogenase as mediated anodes in printed glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cells using ABTS/laccase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Peter; Tuurala, Saara; Vaari, Anu; Valkiainen, Matti; Smolander, Maria; Leech, Dónal

    2012-10-01

    Current generation by mediated enzyme electron transfer at electrode surfaces can be harnessed to provide biosensors and redox reactions in enzymatic fuel cells. A glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell can provide power for portable and implantable electronic devices. High volume production of enzymatic fuel cell prototypes will likely require printing of electrode and catalytic materials. Here we report on preparation and performance of, completely enzymatic, printed glucose/oxygen biofuel cells. The cells are based on filter paper coated with conducting carbon inks, enzyme and mediator. A comparison of cell performance using a range of mediators for either glucose oxidase (GOx) or aldose dehydrogenase (ALDH) oxidation of glucose at the anode and ABTS and a fungal laccase, for reduction of oxygen at the cathode, is reported. Highest power output, although of limited stability, is observed for ALDH anodes mediated by an osmium complex, providing a maximum power density of 3.5 μW cm(-2) at 0.34 V, when coupled to a laccase/ABTS cathode. The stability of cell voltage in a biobattery format, above a threshold of 200 mV under a moderate 75 kΩ load, is used to benchmark printed fuel cell performance. Highest stability is obtained for printed fuel cells using ALDH, providing cell voltages over the threshold for up to 74 h, compared to only 2 h for cells with anodes using GOx. These results provide promising directions for further development of mass-producible, completely enzymatic, printed biofuel cells.

  5. Biochemical and structural characterization of quinoprotein aldose sugar dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HJ6: Mutational analysis of Tyr156 in the substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Woo; Wang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Ae-Kyung; Park, Hyun; Jeon, Sung-Jong

    2016-10-15

    The gene encoding a quinoprotein aldose sugar dehydrogenase (ASD) from Thermus thermophilus HJ6 (Tt_ASD) was cloned and sequenced; it comprised 1059 nucleotides encoding a protein containing 352 amino acids that had a predicted molecular mass of 38.9 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 42.9% and 33.9% identities to the ASD proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical properties of Tt_ASD were characterized. The optimum pH for the oxidation of glucose was 7.0-7.5 and the optimum temperature was 70 °C. The half-life of heat inactivation for the apoenzyme was about 25 min at 85 °C. The enzyme was highly thermostable, and the activity of the pyrroloquinoline quinone-bound holoenzyme was not lost after incubation at 85 °C for 100 min. Tt_ASD could oxidize various sugars, including hexoses, pentoses, disaccharides, and polysaccharides, in addition to alcohols. Structural analysis suggested that Tyr156 would be the substrate-binding residue. Two mutants, Y156A and Y156K, had impaired activities and affinities for all substrates and completely lost their activities for alcohols. This structural and mutational analysis of Tt_ASD demonstrates the crucial role of Tyr156 in determining substrate specificity.

  6. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  7. Enantioselective imine reduction catalyzed by imine reductases and artificial metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Gamenara, Daniela; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2014-05-21

    Adding value to organic synthesis. Novel imine reductases enable the enantioselective reduction of imines to afford optically active amines. Likewise, novel bioinspired artificial metalloenzymes can perform the same reaction as well. Emerging proof-of-concepts are herein discussed.

  8. Exploration of Nitrate Reductase Metabolic Pathway in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Vinícius; Diniz, Carlos; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Barh, Debmalya

    2017-01-01

    Based on the ability of nitrate reductase synthesis, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is classified into two biovars: Ovis and Equi. Due to the presence of nitrate reductase, the Equi biovar can survive in absence of oxygen. On the other hand, Ovis biovar that does not have nitrate reductase is able to adapt to various ecological niches and can grow on certain carbon sources. Apart from these two biovars, some other strains are also able to carry out the reduction of nitrate. The enzymes that are involved in electron transport chain are also identified by in silico methods. Findings about pathogen metabolism can contribute to the identification of relationship between nitrate reductase and the C. pseudotuberculosis pathogenicity, virulence factors, and discovery of drug targets. PMID:28316974

  9. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  10. Requirement of a Relatively High Threshold Level of Mg2+ for Cell Growth of a Rhizoplane Bacterium, Sphingomonas yanoikuyae EC-S001

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Henny; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Islam, Md. Tofazzal; Tahara, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Mg2+ is one of the essential elements for bacterial cell growth. The presence of the magnesium cation (Mg2+) in various concentrations often affects cell growth restoration in plant-associating bacteria. This study attempted to determine whether Mg2+ levels in Sphingomonas yanoikuyae EC-S001 affected cell growth restoration in the host plant and what the threshold level is. S. yanoikuyae EC-S001, isolated from the rhizoplane of spinach seedlings grown from surface-sterilized seeds under aseptic conditions, displayed uniform dispersion and attachment throughout the rhizoplane and phylloplane of the host seedlings. S. yanoikuyae EC-S001 did not grow in potato-dextrose broth medium but grew well in an aqueous extract of spinach leaves. Chemical investigation of the growth factor in the spinach leaf extract led to identification of the active principle as the magnesium cation. A concentration of ca. 0.10 mM Mg2+ or more allowed S. yanoikuyae EC-S001 to grow in potato-dextrose broth medium. Some saprophytic and/or diazotrophic bacteria used in our experiment were found to have diverse threshold levels for their Mg2+ requirements. For example, Burkholderia cepacia EC-K014, originally isolated from the rhizoplane of a Melastoma sp., could grow even in Mg2+-free Hoagland's no. 2 medium with saccharose and glutamine (HSG medium) and requires a trace level of Mg2+ for its growth. In contrast, S. yanoikuyae EC-S001, together with Bacillus subtilis IFO12113, showed the most drastic restoring responses to subsequent addition of 0.98 mM Mg2+ to Mg2+-free HSG medium. Our studies concluded that Mg2+ is more than just the essential trace element needed for cell growth restoration in S. yanoikuyae EC-S001 and that certain nonculturable bacteria may require a higher concentration of Mg2+ or another specific essential element for their growth. PMID:15345402

  11. Savannah River Site ECS-2 tests uncertainty report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.C.; Larson, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    This document presents a measurement uncertainty analysis for the instruments used in the ECS-2 test series conducted for the Savannah River Site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The tests are a series of downflow dryout heat transfer experiments designed to support computer code development and verification in setting limits for the Savannah River Production reactors. The measurements include input current, voltage, and power; air and water flows, fluid and metal temperatures, and absolute and differential pressures. An analysis of the data acquisition system as it relates to these measurements is also included. 18 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Molybdenum effector of fumarate reductase repression and nitrate reductase induction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S; Lin, E C

    1987-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the presence of nitrate prevents the utilization of fumarate as an anaerobic electron acceptor. The induction of the narC operon encoding the nitrate reductase is coupled to the repression of the frd operon encoding the fumarate reductase. This coupling is mediated by nitrate as an effector and the narL product as the regulatory protein (S. Iuchi and E. C. C. Lin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:3901-3905, 1987). The protein-ligand complex appears to control narC positively but frd negatively. In the present study we found that a molybdenum coeffector acted synergistically with nitrate in the regulation of frd and narC. In chlD mutants believed to be impaired in molybdate transport (or processing), full repression of phi(frd-lac) and full induction of phi(narC-lac) by nitrate did not occur unless the growth medium was directly supplemented with molybdate (1 microM). This requirement was not clearly manifested in wild-type cells, apparently because it was met by the trace quantities of molybdate present as a contaminant in the mineral medium. In chlB mutants, which are known to accumulate the Mo cofactor because of its failure to be inserted as a prosthetic group into proteins such as nitrate reductase, nitrate repression of frd and induction of narC were also intensified by molybdate supplementation. In this case a deficiency of the molybdenum coeffector might have resulted from enhanced feedback inhibition of molybdate transport (or processing) by the elevated level of the unutilized Mo cofactor. In addition, mutations in chlE, which are known to block the synthesis of the organic moiety of the Mo cofactor, lowered the threshold concentration of nitrate (< 1 micromole) necessary for frd repression and narC induction. These changes could be explained simply by the higher intracellular nitrate attainable in cells lacking the ability to destroy the effector. PMID:3301812

  13. Distribution of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activity among microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouji; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Yoda, Koji; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nimura-Matsune, Kaori; Mura, Kiyoshi; Tokue, Chiyoko; Katoh, Tetzuya; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) constitutes a large family of enzymes found in microorganisms, animals, and plants, but the detection of the activities of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductases (peroxiredoxin reductases) in cell extracts, and the purification based on peroxide reductase activity, have only been done in bacteria and Trypanosomatidae. A peroxiredoxin reductase (NADH oxidase) from a bacterium, Amphibacillus, displayed only poor activities in the presence of purified Prx from Saccharomyces or Synechocystis, while it is highly active in the presence of bacterial Prx. These results suggested that an enzyme system different from that in bacteria might exist for the reduction of Prx in yeast and cyanobacteria. Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activities were detected in cell extracts of Saccharomyces, Synechocystis, and Chlorella, and the enzyme activities of Saccharomyces and Chlorella were induced under vigorously aerated culture conditions and intensive light exposure conditions, respectively. Partial purification of Prx-linked peroxidase from the induced yeast cells indicated that the Prx-linked peroxidase system consists of two protein components, namely, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. This finding is consistent with the previous report on its purification based on its protein protection activity against oxidation [Chae et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 27670-27678 (1994)]. In this study we have confirmed that Prx-linked peroxidase activity are widely distributed, not only in bacteria species and Trypanosomatidae, but also in yeast and photosynthetic microorganisms, and showed reconstitution of the activity from partially purified interspecies components.

  14. Carbon-carbon double-bond reductases in nature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minmin; Hu, Haihong; Ma, Li; Zhou, Quan; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2014-08-01

    Reduction of C = C bonds by reductases, found in a variety of microorganisms (e.g. yeasts, bacteria, and lower fungi), animals, and plants has applications in the production of metabolites that include pharmacologically active drugs and other chemicals. Therefore, the reductase enzymes that mediate this transformation have become important therapeutic targets and biotechnological tools. These reductases are broad-spectrum, in that, they can act on isolation/conjugation C = C-bond compounds, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids, acid derivatives, and nitro compounds. In addition, several mutations in the reductase gene have been identified, some associated with diseases. Several of these reductases have been cloned and/or purified, and studies to further characterize them and determine their structure in order to identify potential industrial biocatalysts are still in progress. In this study, crucial reductases for bioreduction of C = C bonds have been reviewed with emphasis on their principal substrates and effective inhibitors, their distribution, genetic polymorphisms, and implications in human disease and treatment.

  15. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitor raloxifene: implications for identifying molybdopterin nitrite reductases.

    PubMed

    Weidert, E R; Schoenborn, S O; Cantu-Medellin, N; Choughule, K V; Jones, J P; Kelley, E E

    2014-02-15

    Sources of nitric oxide alternative to nitric oxide synthases are gaining significant traction as crucial mediators of vessel function under hypoxic inflammatory conditions. For example, capacity to catalyze the one electron reduction of nitrite (NO2-) to ·NO has been reported for hemoglobin, myoglobin and molybdopterin-containing enzymes including xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and aldehyde oxidase (AO). For XOR and AO, use of selective inhibition strategies is therefore crucial when attempting to assign relative contributions to nitrite-mediated ·NO formation in cells and tissue. To this end, XOR inhibition has been accomplished with application of classic pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors allo/oxypurinol or the newly FDA-approved XOR-specific inhibitor, Uloric® (febuxostat). Likewise, raloxifene, an estrogen receptor antagonist, has been identified as a potent (Ki=1.0 nM) inhibitor of AO. Herein, we characterize the inhibition kinetics of raloxifene for XOR and describe the resultant effects on inhibiting XO-catalyzed ·NO formation. Exposure of purified XO to raloxifene (PBS, pH 7.4) resulted in a dose-dependent (12.5-100 μM) inhibition of xanthine oxidation to uric acid. Dixon plot analysis revealed a competitive inhibition process with a Ki=13 μM. This inhibitory process was more effective under acidic pH; similar to values encountered under hypoxic/inflammatory conditions. In addition, raloxifene also inhibited anoxic XO-catalyzed reduction of NO2- to NO (EC50=64 μM). In contrast to having no effect on XO-catalyzed uric acid production, the AO inhibitor menadione demonstrated potent inhibition of XO-catalyzed NO2- reduction (EC50=60 nM); somewhat similar to the XO-specific inhibitor, febuxostat (EC50=4 nM). Importantly, febuxostat was found to be a very poor inhibitor of human AO (EC50=613 μM) suggesting its usefulness for validating XO-dependent contributions to NO2- reduction in biological systems. Combined, these data indicate care should be taken

  16. Malaria antifolate resistance with contrasting Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) polymorphisms in humans and Anopheles mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Mharakurwa, Sungano; Kumwenda, Taida; Mkulama, Mtawa A. P.; Musapa, Mulenga; Chishimba, Sandra; Shiff, Clive J.; Sullivan, David J.; Thuma, Philip E.; Liu, Kun; Agre, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance for drug-resistant parasites in human blood is a major effort in malaria control. Here we report contrasting antifolate resistance polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum when parasites in human blood were compared with parasites in Anopheles vector mosquitoes from sleeping huts in rural Zambia. DNA encoding P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (EC 1.5.1.3) was amplified by PCR with allele-specific restriction enzyme digestions. Markedly prevalent pyrimethamine-resistant mutants were evident in human P. falciparum infections—S108N (>90%), with N51I, C59R, and 108N+51I+59R triple mutants (30–80%). This resistance level may be from selection pressure due to decades of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine use in the region. In contrast, cycloguanil-resistant mutants were detected in very low frequency in parasites from human blood samples—S108T (13%), with A16V and 108T+16V double mutants (∼4%). Surprisingly, pyrimethamine-resistant mutants were of very low prevalence (2–12%) in the midguts of Anopheles arabiensis vector mosquitoes, but cycloguanil-resistant mutants were highly prevalent—S108T (90%), with A16V and the 108T+16V double mutant (49–57%). Structural analysis of the dihydrofolate reductase by in silico modeling revealed a key difference in the enzyme within the NADPH binding pocket, predicting the S108N enzyme to have reduced stability but the S108T enzyme to have increased stability. We conclude that P. falciparum can bear highly host-specific drug-resistant polymorphisms, most likely reflecting different selective pressures found in humans and mosquitoes. Thus, it may be useful to sample both human and mosquito vector infections to accurately ascertain the epidemiological status of drug-resistant alleles. PMID:22065788

  17. Cloning and characterization of a novel β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase from Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ji, Ye; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiao; Yu, Yuanhua

    2015-06-05

    Comamonas testosteroni (C. testosteroni) is a gram negative bacterium which can use steroid as a carbon source and degrade steroid with about 20 special enzymes. Most of the enzymes are inducible enzymes. 3-Oxoacyl-ACP reductase (E.C. 1.1.1.100) alternatively known as β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (BKR) is involved in fatty acid syntheses. DNA sequence comparison showed that BKR belongs to the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase (SDR) family. Our results showed that BKR is necessary for the degradation of steroid hormones in C. testosteroni. The DNA fragment of the BKR gene was cloned into an expressional plasmid pET-15b. BKR protein was expressed with 6× His-tag on the N-terminus and the enzyme was purified with Ni-column. Antibodies against BKR were prepared and a new BKR quantitative ELISA was created in our laboratory. The purified BKR is a 30.6 kDa protein on SDS-PAGE. C. testosteroni was induced by testosterone, estradiol, estriol and cholesterol. The expression of BKR was detected with an ELISA. The result showed that the BKR expression could be induced by cholesterol and estriol but not by testosterone and estradiol. BKR gene knock-out mutant (M-C.T.) was prepared by homologous integration. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to detect steroid hormone degradation in C. testosteroni ATCC11996 and BKR gene knock-out mutant. We proved that the M-C.T. eliminated of testosterone degradation. Degradations of cholesterol and estradiol were also decreased. We conclude that the novel BKR in C. testosteroni plays an important role in steroid degradation. This work provides some new information of SDR and steroid degradation in C. testosteroni.

  18. Microsecond subdomain folding in dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Iwakura, Masahiro; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman

    2011-07-08

    The characterization of microsecond dynamics in the folding of multisubdomain proteins has been a major challenge in understanding their often complex folding mechanisms. Using a continuous-flow mixing device coupled with fluorescence lifetime detection, we report the microsecond folding dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), a two-subdomain α/β/α sandwich protein known to begin folding in this time range. The global dimensions of early intermediates were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer, and the dynamic properties of the local Trp environments were monitored by fluorescence lifetime detection. We found that substantial collapse occurs in both the locally connected adenosine binding subdomain and the discontinuous loop subdomain within 35 μs of initiation of folding from the urea unfolded state. During the fastest observable ∼550 μs phase, the discontinuous loop subdomain further contracts, concomitant with the burial of Trp residue(s), as both subdomains achieve a similar degree of compactness. Taken together with previous studies in the millisecond time range, a hierarchical assembly of DHFR--in which each subdomain independently folds, subsequently docks, and then anneals into the native conformation after an initial heterogeneous global collapse--emerges. The progressive acquisition of structure, beginning with a continuously connected subdomain and spreading to distal regions, shows that chain entropy is a significant organizing principle in the folding of multisubdomain proteins and single-domain proteins. Subdomain folding also provides a rationale for the complex kinetics often observed.

  19. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  20. EC power management and NTM control in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Francesca; Fredrickson, E.; Henderson, M.; Bertelli, N.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Nowak, S.; Poli, E.; Sauter, O.

    2016-10-01

    The suppression of Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs) is an essential requirement for the achievement of the demonstration baseline in ITER. The Electron Cyclotron upper launcher is specifically designed to provide highly localized heating and current drive for NTM stabilization. In order to assess the power management for shared applications, we have performed time-dependent simulations for ITER scenarios covering operation from half to full field. The free-boundary TRANSP simulations evolve the magnetic equilibrium and the pressure profiles in response to the heating and current drive sources and are interfaced with a GRE for the evolution of size and frequency of the magnetic islands. Combined with a feedback control of the EC power and the steering angle, these simulations are used to model the plasma response to NTM control, accounting for the misalignment of the EC deposition with the resonant surfaces, uncertainties in the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction and in the magnetic island detection threshold. Simulations indicate that the threshold for detection of the island should not exceed 2-3cm, that pre-emptive control is a preferable option, and that for safe operation the power needed for NTM control should be reserved, rather than shared with other applications. Work supported by ITER under IO/RFQ/13/9550/JTR and by DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Deposition of CdSe by EC-ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Mkhulu K.; Cox, Stephen M.; Flowers, Billy H.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Pham, Long; Srisook, Nattapong; Happek, Uwe; Stickney, John L.

    2004-10-01

    The optimization of a program for CdSe thin film deposition using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE uses surface limited reactions, underpotential deposition, to form compound thin film deposits one atomic layer at a time on Au substrates. Cyclic voltammograms showing deposition of Cd and Se on the Au substrate were first performed to identify cycle potentials. CdSe thin films were formed using an automated flow deposition system, by alternately depositing Se and Cd atomic layers, forming a compound monolayer each cycle. In total, 200 cycle deposits were formed using a series of different potentials, to better optimize the deposition conditions. Electron probe microanalysis of the deposits showed Cd/Se ratio between 1.01 and 1.13. X-ray diffraction indicated the deposits were zinc blende, with a (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The thickness of the deposits were determined using ellipsometry, and found to be around 70 nm. AFM studies of the morphology of substrates and deposits indicated that conformal films were formed. The band gaps of the deposits was determined using UV-VIS absorption measurements, photoconductivity and reflection adsorption FTIR, and all suggested a value of 1.74 eV, consistent with literature values.

  2. Research on Intellectual Property Conflicts Identification in Knowledge Transferring among EC Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shibin

    As the lacks of existing research about intellectual property conflicts management of EC enterprise, the paper analysis the intellectual property conflicts in knowledge transferring among EC enterprises by intellectual property types, then, the paper makes research on intellectual property conflicts identification in knowledge transferring among EC enterprises, and gives relative assumption, meanwhile, the paper makes quantities identification of intellectual property conflicts in knowledge transferring among EC enterprises by evidential theory, finally, the paper gives the further research orientations.

  3. Pyrithione-based ruthenium complexes as inhibitors of aldo-keto reductase 1C enzymes and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kljun, Jakob; Anko, Maja; Traven, Katja; Sinreih, Maša; Pavlič, Renata; Peršič, Špela; Ude, Žiga; Codina, Elisa Esteve; Stojan, Jure; Lanišnik Rižner, Tea; Turel, Iztok

    2016-08-07

    Four ruthenium complexes of clinically used zinc ionophore pyrithione and its oxygen analog 2-hydroxypyridine N-oxide were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of enzymes of the aldo-keto reductase subfamily 1C (AKR1C). A kinetic study assisted with docking simulations showed a mixed type of inhibition consisting of a fast reversible and a slow irreversible step in the case of both organometallic compounds 1A and 1B. Both compounds also showed a remarkable selectivity towards AKR1C1 and AKR1C3 which are targets for breast cancer drug design. The organoruthenium complex of ligand pyrithione as well as pyrithione itself also displayed toxicity on the hormone-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell line with EC50 values in the low micromolar range.

  4. Evidence that the amino acid residue Cys117 of chloroplastic monodehydroascorbate reductase is involved in its activity and structural stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Qing-Yun; Sun, Yan-Li; Ma, Na-Na; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2010-04-01

    Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR; EC 1.6.5.4) is crucial for AsA regeneration and essential for maintaining the reduced pool of AsA. And the amino acid residue C117 of chloroplastic MDAR is the conserved cysteine residue in MDAR isoforms. A series mutation of conserved amino acid residue cysteine117 (C117) was constructed to investigate its role in MDAR structural stability and activity. Our study revealed that mutation in this conserved residue could cause pronounced loss of activity and conformational changes. Spectroscopic experiments indicated that these mutations influenced transition from the molten globule intermediate to the native state in folding process. These results suggested that amino acid residue C117 played a relatively important role in keeping MDAR structural stability and activity.

  5. 76 FR 27956 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland Model EC135 Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... past, the FADEC FAIL caution light illuminated on a few EC135 T1 helicopters. They state that this was... illuminated on a few EC135 T1 helicopters. They state that this was caused by a discrepancy in the parameters... information (MCAI) AD states that in the past, the FADEC FAIL caution light illuminated on a few EC135...

  6. Sulfite reductase protects plants against sulfite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rheinlands Ruhm') and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation.

  7. Evaluation of the size segregation of elemental carbon (EC) emission in Europe: influence on the simulation of EC long-range transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Cheng, Ya-Fang; Nordmann, Stephan; Birmili, Wolfram; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Ma, Nan; Wolke, Ralf; Wehner, Birgit; Sun, Jia; Spindler, Gerald; Mu, Qing; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    Elemental Carbon (EC) has a significant impact on human health and climate change. In order to evaluate the size segregation of EC emission in the EUCAARI inventory and investigate its influence on the simulation of EC long-range transportation in Europe, we used the fully coupled online Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry model (WRF-Chem) at a resolution of 2 km focusing on a region in Germany, in conjunction with a high-resolution EC emission inventory. The ground meteorology conditions, vertical structure and wind pattern were well reproduced by the model. The simulations of particle number and/or mass size distributions were evaluated with observations at the central European background site Melpitz. The fine mode particle concentration was reasonably well simulated, but the coarse mode was substantially overestimated by the model mainly due to the plume with high EC concentration in coarse mode emitted by a nearby point source. The comparisons between simulated EC and Multi-angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) measurements at Melpitz, Leipzig-TROPOS and Bösel indicated that the coarse mode EC (ECc) emitted from the nearby point sources might be overestimated by a factor of 2-10. The fraction of ECc was overestimated in the emission inventory by about 10-30 % for Russia and 5-10 % for Eastern Europe (e.g., Poland and Belarus). This incorrect size-dependent EC emission results in a shorter atmospheric life time of EC particles and inhibits the long-range transport of EC. A case study showed that this effect caused an underestimation of 20-40 % in the EC mass concentration in Germany under eastern wind pattern.

  8. A Novel Metagenomic Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Attenuates Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation and Virulence on Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bijtenhoorn, Patrick; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Müller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Utpatel, Christian; Schipper, Christina; Hornung, Claudia; Szesny, Matthias; Grond, Stephanie; Thürmer, Andrea; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Daniel, Rolf; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2011-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of a number of virulence factors, as well as biofilm formation, are controlled by quorum sensing (QS). N-Acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are an important class of signaling molecules involved in bacterial QS and in many pathogenic bacteria infection and host colonization are AHL-dependent. The AHL signaling molecules are subject to inactivation mainly by hydrolases (Enzyme Commission class number EC 3) (i.e. N-acyl-homoserine lactonases and N-acyl-homoserine-lactone acylases). Only little is known on quorum quenching mechanisms of oxidoreductases (EC 1). Here we report on the identification and structural characterization of the first NADP-dependent short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) involved in inactivation of N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and derived from a metagenome library. The corresponding gene was isolated from a soil metagenome and designated bpiB09. Heterologous expression and crystallographic studies established BpiB09 as an NADP-dependent reductase. Although AHLs are probably not the native substrate of this metagenome-derived enzyme, its expression in P. aeruginosa PAO1 resulted in significantly reduced pyocyanin production, decreased motility, poor biofilm formation and absent paralysis of Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, a genome-wide transcriptome study suggested that the level of lasI and rhlI transcription together with 36 well known QS regulated genes was significantly (≥10-fold) affected in P. aeruginosa strains expressing the bpiB09 gene in pBBR1MCS-5. Thus AHL oxidoreductases could be considered as potent tools for the development of quorum quenching strategies. PMID:22046268

  9. Essential role of the flexible linker on the conformational equilibrium of bacterial peroxiredoxin reductase for effective regeneration of peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank; Gruber, Gerhard

    2017-03-07

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can damage DNA, proteins, and lipids, so cells have antioxidant systems that regulate ROS. In many bacteria, a dedicated peroxiredoxin reductase, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit F (AhpF), catalyzes the rapid reduction of the redox-active disulfide center of the antioxidant protein peroxiredoxin (AhpC) to detoxify ROS such as hydrogen peroxide, organic hydroperoxide, and peroxynitrite. AhpF is a flexible multi-domain protein that enables a series of electron transfers among the redox centers by accepting reducing equivalents from NADH. A flexible linker connecting the N-terminal domain (NTD) and C-terminal domain (CTD) of AhpF suggests that the enzyme adopts a large-scale domain motion that alternates between the closed and open states to shuttle electrons from the CTD via the NTD to AhpC. Here, we conducted comprehensive mutational, biochemical, and biophysical analyses to gain insights into the role of the flexible linker and the residues critical for the domain motions of Escherichia coli AhpF (EcAhpF) during electron transfer. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies of linker mutants revealed that a group of charged residues, 200EKR202, is crucial for the swiveling motion of the NTD. Moreover, NADH binding significantly affected EcAhpF flexibility and the movement of the NTD relative to the CTD. The mutants also exhibited a decrease in H2O2 reduction by the AhpF-AhpC ensemble. We propose that a concerted movement involving the NTD, C-terminal NADH and FAD domains, and the flexible linker between them is essential for optimal intra-domain crosstalk and for efficient electron transfer to the redox partner AhpC required for peroxidation.

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, M.J.

    2000-12-01

    Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  11. Uterine glutathione reductase activity: modulation by estrogens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, M; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Pedrón, N N; Hicks, J J

    1999-10-29

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glutathione reductase activity in uterine tissue is regulated by sex hormones. In spayed rats uterine glutathione reductase was significantly increased by exogenous estrogen (P< 0.01), progesterone (P< 0.01) or estrogen plus progesterone (P<0.01). When enzyme activity is expressed per mg protein, daily administration of estrogen or progesterone induces a progressive increase of this enzyme between 24 to 48 h or 24 to 72 h of treatment, respectively. Whereas the combination of both steroids causes an earlier and higher increase in glutathione reductase activity at 24 h of treatment. Estradiol singly or in combination with progesterone induced the highest protein concentration in the uterus. Whereas uterine DNA concentration is only significantly affected by estradiol. Our results suggest that uterine glutathione reductase is regulated by estradiol and progesterone and may be involved in maintaining levels of reduced glutathione in the uterus. This compound may be required for control of the redox state of thiol groups and in detoxification reactions involving H2O2 and electrophylic substances. The antioxidant action of estrogens is partially due to the stimulation of glutathione reductase.

  12. HMG-CoA reductase guides migrating primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, M; Broihier, H T; Moore, L A; Lehmann, R

    1998-12-03

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is best known for catalysing a rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis, but it also participates in the production of a wide variety of other compounds. Some clinical benefits attributed to inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase are now thought to be independent of any serum cholesterol-lowering effect. Here we describe a new cholesterol-independent role for HMG-CoA reductase, in regulating a developmental process: primordial germ cell migration. We show that in Drosophila this enzyme is highly expressed in the somatic gonad and that it is necessary for primordial germ cells to migrate to this tissue. Misexpression of HMG-CoA reductase is sufficient to attract primordial germ cells to tissues other than the gonadal mesoderm. We conclude that the regulated expression of HMG-CoA reductase has a critical developmental function in providing spatial information to guide migrating primordial germ cells.

  13. Bacterial morphinone reductase is related to Old Yellow Enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    French, C E; Bruce, N C

    1995-01-01

    Morphinone reductase, produced by Pseudomonas putida M10, catalyses the NADH-dependent saturation of the carbon-carbon double bond of morphinone and codeinone, and is believed to be involved in the metabolism of morphine and codeine. The structural gene encoding morphinone reductase, designated morB, was cloned from Ps. putida M10 genomic DNA by the use of degenerate oligonucleotide probes based on elements of the amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme. Sequence analysis and structural characteristics indicated that morphinone reductase is related to the flavoprotein alpha/beta-barrel oxidoreductases, and is particularly similar to Old Yellow Enzyme of Saccharomyces spp. and the related oestrogen-binding protein of Candida albicans. Expressed sequence tags from several plant species show high homology to these enzymes, suggesting the presence of a family of enzymes conserved in plants and fungi. Although related bacterial proteins are known, morphinone reductase appears to be more similar to the eukaryotic proteins. Morphinone reductase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and has potential applications for the industrial preparation of semisynthetic opiates. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:8554504

  14. Purification and properties of proline reductase from Clostridium sticklandii.

    PubMed

    Seto, B; Stadtman, T C

    1976-04-25

    Proline reductase of Clostridium sticklandii is a membrane-bound protein and is released by treatment with detergents. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity and is estimated by gel filtration and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation to have a molecular weight of 298,000 to 327,000. A minimum molecular weight of 30,000 to 31,000 was calculated on the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and amino acid composition. Amino acid analysis showed a preponderance of acidic amino acids. No tryptophan was detected in the protein either spectrophotometrically or by amino acid analysis. A total of 20 sulfhydryl groups measured by titration of the reduced protein with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) is in agreement with 20 cystic acid residues determined in hydrolysates of performic acid-oxidized protein. No molybdenum, iron, or selenium was found in the pure protein. Although NADH is the physiological electron donor for the proline reductase complex, the purified 300,000 molecular weight reductase component is inactive in the presence of NADH in vitro. Dithiothreitol, in contrast, can serve as electron donor both for unpurified (putative proline reductase complex) and purified proline reductase in vitro.

  15. Developmental regulation of ecdysone receptor (EcR) and EcR-controlled gene expression during pharate-adult development of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Mello, Tathyana R P; Aleixo, Aline C; Pinheiro, Daniel G; Nunes, Francis M F; Bitondi, Márcia M G; Hartfelder, Klaus; Barchuk, Angel R; Simões, Zilá L P

    2014-01-01

    Major developmental transitions in multicellular organisms are driven by steroid hormones. In insects, these, together with juvenile hormone (JH), control development, metamorphosis, reproduction and aging, and are also suggested to play an important role in caste differentiation of social insects. Here, we aimed to determine how EcR transcription and ecdysteroid titers are related during honeybee postembryonic development and what may actually be the role of EcR in caste development of this social insect. In addition, we expected that knocking-down EcR gene expression would give us information on the participation of the respective protein in regulating downstream targets of EcR. We found that in Apis mellifera females, EcR-A is the predominantly expressed variant in postembryonic development, while EcR-B transcript levels are higher in embryos, indicating an early developmental switch in EcR function. During larval and pupal stages, EcR-B expression levels are very low, while EcR-A transcripts are more variable and abundant in workers compared to queens. Strikingly, these transcript levels are opposite to the ecdysteroid titer profile. 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) application experiments revealed that low 20E levels induce EcR expression during development, whereas high ecdysteroid titers seem to be repressive. By means of RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of both EcR transcript variants we detected the differential expression of 234 poly-A(+) transcripts encoding genes such as CYPs, MRJPs and certain hormone response genes (Kr-h1 and ftz-f1). EcR-KD also promoted the differential expression of 70 miRNAs, including highly conserved ones (e.g., miR-133 and miR-375), as well honeybee-specific ones (e.g., miR-3745 and miR-3761). Our results put in evidence a broad spectrum of EcR-controlled gene expression during postembryonic development of honeybees, revealing new facets of EcR biology in this social insect.

  16. Developmental regulation of ecdysone receptor (EcR) and EcR-controlled gene expression during pharate-adult development of honeybees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Tathyana R. P.; Aleixo, Aline C.; Pinheiro, Daniel G.; Nunes, Francis M. F.; Bitondi, Márcia M. G.; Hartfelder, Klaus; Barchuk, Angel R.; Simões, Zilá L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Major developmental transitions in multicellular organisms are driven by steroid hormones. In insects, these, together with juvenile hormone (JH), control development, metamorphosis, reproduction and aging, and are also suggested to play an important role in caste differentiation of social insects. Here, we aimed to determine how EcR transcription and ecdysteroid titers are related during honeybee postembryonic development and what may actually be the role of EcR in caste development of this social insect. In addition, we expected that knocking-down EcR gene expression would give us information on the participation of the respective protein in regulating downstream targets of EcR. We found that in Apis mellifera females, EcR-A is the predominantly expressed variant in postembryonic development, while EcR-B transcript levels are higher in embryos, indicating an early developmental switch in EcR function. During larval and pupal stages, EcR-B expression levels are very low, while EcR-A transcripts are more variable and abundant in workers compared to queens. Strikingly, these transcript levels are opposite to the ecdysteroid titer profile. 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) application experiments revealed that low 20E levels induce EcR expression during development, whereas high ecdysteroid titers seem to be repressive. By means of RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of both EcR transcript variants we detected the differential expression of 234 poly-A+ transcripts encoding genes such as CYPs, MRJPs and certain hormone response genes (Kr-h1 and ftz-f1). EcR-KD also promoted the differential expression of 70 miRNAs, including highly conserved ones (e.g., miR-133 and miR-375), as well honeybee-specific ones (e.g., miR-3745 and miR-3761). Our results put in evidence a broad spectrum of EcR-controlled gene expression during postembryonic development of honeybees, revealing new facets of EcR biology in this social insect. PMID:25566327

  17. Expressions of the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes are stimulated by recombinant platelet-derived growth factor isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, M.; Emmons, L.R.; Perruchoud, A. ); Block, L.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The plausible role that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has in the localized pathophysiological changes that occur in the arterial wall during development of atherosclerotic lesions led the authors to investigate the influence of recombinant (r)PDGF isomers -AA, -AB, and -BB on the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG0CoA) reductase ((S)-mevalonate:NAD{sup +} oxidoreductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.88) genes. In addition, they clarified the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in expression of the two genes in human skin fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells. The various rPDGF isoforms are distinct in their ability to activate transcription of both genes: (i) both rPDGF-AA and -BB stimulate transcription of the LDL-R gene; in contrast, rPDGF-BB but not -AA, activates transcription of the HMG-CoA reductase gene; (ii) all recombinant isoforms of PDGF activate transcription of the c-fos gene; (iii) while rPDGF-dependent transcription of the lDL-R gene occurs independently of PKC, transcription of the HMG-CoA reductase gene appears to involve the action of that enzyme.

  18. In Vitro Screening for β-Hydroxy-β-methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activity of Sequentially Extracted Fractions of Ficus palmata Forsk

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Danish; Khan, M. Salman; Khan, Amir; Khan, Mohd. Sajid; Srivastava, Ashwani K.; Bagga, Paramdeep

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia-induced oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which is one of the major causes of mortality worldwide. The current work, for the first time, accounts the antioxidant, genoprotective, antilipoperoxidative, and HMG-CoA reductase (EC 1.1.1.34) inhibitory properties of traditional medicinal plant, Ficus palmata Forsk. Our result showed that among sequentially extracted fractions of Ficus palmata Forsk, FPBA (F. palmata bark aqueous extract) and FPLM (F. palmata leaves methanolic extract) extracts have higher phenolic content and also exhibited significantly more radical scavenging (DPPH and Superoxide) and antioxidant (FRAP) capacity. Moreover, FPBA extract also exhibited significantly higher inhibition of lipid peroxidation assay. Additionally, results showed almost complete and partial protection of oxidatively damaged DNA by these plant extracts when compared to mannitol. Furthermore, our results showed that FPBA extract (IC50 = 9.1 ± 0.61 µg/mL) exhibited noteworthy inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase activity as compared to other extracts, which might suggest its role as cardioprotective agent. In conclusion, results showed that FPBA extract not only possess significant antioxidant and genoprotective property but also is able to attenuate the enzymatic activity of HMG-CoA reductase, which might suggest its role in combating various oxidative stress-related diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:24883325

  19. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  20. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  1. Selenium in thioredoxin reductase: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Brian M; Eckenroth, Brian E; Flemer, Stevenson; Hondal, Robert J

    2008-12-02

    Most high M(r) thioredoxin reductases (TRs) have the unusual feature of utilizing a vicinal disulfide bond (Cys(1)-Cys(2)) which forms an eight-membered ring during the catalytic cycle. Many eukaryotic TRs have replaced the Cys(2) position of the dyad with the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). Here we demonstrate that Cys- and Sec-containing TRs are distinguished by the importance each class of enzymes places on the eight-membered ring structure in the catalytic cycle. This hypothesis was explored by studying the truncated enzyme missing the C-terminal ring structure in conjunction with oxidized peptide substrates to investigate the reduction and opening of this dyad. The peptide substrates were identical in sequence to the missing part of the enzyme, containing either a disulfide or selenylsulfide linkage, but were differentiated by the presence (cyclic) and absence (acyclic) of the ring structure. The ratio of these turnover rates informs that the ring is only of modest importance for the truncated mouse mitochondrial Sec-TR (ring/no ring = 32), while the ring structure is highly important for the truncated Cys-TRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans (ring/no ring > 1000). All three enzymes exhibit a similar dependence upon leaving group pK(a) as shown by the use of the acyclic peptides as substrates. These two factors can be reconciled for Cys-TRs if the ring functions to simultaneously allow for attack by a nearby thiolate while correctly positioning the leaving group sulfur atom to accept a proton from the enzymic general acid. For Sec-TRs the ring is unimportant because the lower pK(a) of the selenol relative to a thiol obviates its need to be protonated upon S-Se bond scission and permits physical separation of the selenol and the general acid. Further study of the biochemical properties of the truncated Cys and Sec TR enzymes demonstrates that the chemical advantage conferred on the eukaryotic enzyme by a selenol is the ability to

  2. Molecular cloning, computational and expression analysis of anthocyanidin reductase in tea (Camellia sinensis).

    PubMed

    Thirugnanasambantham, Krishnaraj; Muralidaran, Senguttuvan; Mandal, Abul Kalam Azad

    2014-09-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages rich in phenolic compounds, which includes epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), epicatechin (EC) and catechin (C). Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) is responsible for catechin biosynthesis in plants, and analysis of its protein sequences and structures will be valuable for further research in the field. We have screened our dormant bud-specific complementary DNA (cDNA) library and reported 1,322-bp cDNA encoding CsANR. Analysis of the sequence revealed the presence of 1,011-bp open reading frame with coding capacity for a polypeptide of 337 amino acids, flanked by 1,123- and 196-bp 5' and 3' untranslated regions, respectively. Theoretical molecular weight (MW) and isoelectric point (pI) of the deduced ANR protein were predicted (using ProtParam) to be 36.4 kDa and 6.54. For the first time, we have reported 3D model of ANR from C. sinensis. Quality of the predicted model was analysed with PROCHECK analysis. Molecular docking of modelled ANR revealed similar binding pockets for both substrates and products. Expression analyses of CsANR and accumulation pattern of catechins were observed to be varied with developmental age of tissue and seasonal condition. Variation in accumulation pattern of catechins and its fractions was found to be correlated with expression pattern of ANR.

  3. Ascorbic acid contents in transgenic potato plants overexpressing two dehydroascorbate reductase genes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Aiguo; Shi, Qinghua; Yu, Xianchang

    2011-03-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA, vitamin C) is one of the most important nutritional quality factors in many horticultural crops and has many biological activities in the human body. Dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1; DHAR) plays an important role in maintaining the normal level of ascorbic acid (AsA) by recycling oxidized ascorbic acid. To increase AsA content of potato, we isolated and characterized the cDNAs encoding two isoform DHARs localized in cytosol and chloroplast from potato, and developed two types of transgenic potato plants overexpressing cytosolic DHAR gene and chloroplastic DHAR, respectively. Incorporation of the transgene in the genome of potato was confirmed by PCR and real time RT-PCR. The overexpression of cytosolic DHAR significantly increased DHAR activities and AsA contents in potato leaves and tubers, whereas chloroplastic DHAR overexpression only increased DHAR activities and AsA contents in leaves, and did not change them in tubers. These results indicated that AsA content of potato can be elevated by enhancing recycling ascorbate via DHAR overexpression, moreover, cytosolic DHAR might play main important roles in improving the AsA contents of potato tubers.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of glutathione reductase (GR) genes from rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Yadav, Sandep; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-02-01

    Plant cells and tissues remain always on risk under abiotic and biotic stresses due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants protect themselves against ROS induced oxidative damage by the upregulation of antioxidant machinery. Out of many components of antioxidant machinery, glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and glutathione (GSH, γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) play important role in the protection of cell against oxidative damage. In stress condition, the GR helps in maintaining the reduced glutathione pool for strengthening the antioxidative processes in plants. Present study investigates genome wide analysis of GR from rice and Arabidopsis. We were able to identify 3 rice GR genes (LOC_Os02 g56850, LOC_Os03 g06740, LOC_Os10 g28000) and 2 Arabidopsis GR genes (AT3G54660, AT3G24170) from their respective genomes on the basis of their annotation as well as the presence of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site. The evolutionary relationship of the GR genes from rice and Arabidopsis genomes was analyzed using the multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. This revealed evolutionary conserved pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site among the GR protein in rice and Arabidopsis. This study should make an important contribution to our better understanding of the GR under normal and stress condition in plants.

  5. A Continuous Spectrophotometric Assay for APS Reductase Activity with Sulfite-Selective Probes

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (EC number 1.8.4.10), (APR) catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction for the biosynthesis of essential reduced sulfur-containing biomolecules, such as cysteine, and is essential for survival in the latent phase of TB infection. Despite the importance of APR to Mtb, and other bacterial pathogens, current assay methods depend on use of [35S]-labeled APS or shunt AMP to a coupled-enzyme system. Both methods are cumbersome and require the use of expensive reagents. Here we report the development of a continuous spectrophotometric method for measuring APR activity by using novel sulfite-selective colorimetric or “off-on” fluorescent levulinate-based probes. The APR activity can thus be followed by monitoring the increase in absorbance or fluorescence of the resulting phenolate product. Using this assay, we determined Michelis-Menten kinetic constants (Km, kcat, kcat/Km) and apparent inhibition constant (Ki) for adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), which compared favorably to values obtained in the gold-standard radioactive assay. The newly developed assay is robust and easy to perform with a simple spectrophotometer. PMID:23711725

  6. Purification and properties of glutathione reductase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, A; Rivas, J; Losada, M

    1984-01-01

    An NADPH-glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 6,000-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119. The purified enzyme exhibits a specific activity of 249 U/mg and is characterized by being a dimeric flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing protein with a ratio of absorbance at 280 nm to absorbance at 462 nm of 5.8, a native molecular weight of 104,000, a Stokes radius of 4.13 nm, and a pI of 4.02. The enzyme activity is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents and heavy-metal ions, especially in the presence of NADPH, with oxidized glutathione behaving as a protective agent. As is the case with the same enzyme from other sources, the kinetic data are consistent with a branched mechanism. Nevertheless, the cyanobacterial enzyme presents three distinctive features with respect to that isolated from non-photosynthetic organisms: (i) absolute specificity for NADPH, (ii) an alkaline optimum pH value of ca. 9.0, and (iii) strong acidic character of the protein, as estimated by column chromatofocusing. The kinetic parameters are very similar to those found for the chloroplast enzyme, but the molecular weight is lower, being comparable to that of non-photosynthetic microorganisms. A protective function, analogous to that assigned to the chloroplast enzyme, is suggested. Images PMID:6425264

  7. Photometric study of 1999 TD10 and 2000 EC98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselot, P.; Petit, J.-M.; Poulet, F.

    2003-05-01

    We present photometric data obtained on the Kuiper Belt Object 1999 TD10 and the Centaur 2000 EC98. The goal of these observations is to derive their phase function, as well as their rotational lightcurve. We managed to observe 1999 TD10 in the R, V and B bands during six different nights in October-November-December 2001 period at the Danish 1.54-m telescope of ESO in Chile. The Sierra Nevada Observatory 1.50-m telescope was also used in order to add relative magnitudes to improve the determination of the rotational lightcurve. The observations are compatible with a single-peaked rotational lightcurve with a 7h41.5mn+/-0.1mn period or a double-peaked lightcurve with a 15h22.9mn+/-0.1mn. We present the phase curve obtained when assuming that the lightcurve is single-peaked. This phase curve reveals clearly an increase of about 0.3 magnitude and of similar importance for the three bands when phase angle decreases from 3.7 deg to 0.3 deg. The brightness increases linearly with decreasing phase angle and thus prevents modelling of the opposition surge. Neverthless the poor sample of the observational data does not permit a firm conclusion concerning the presence or absence of an opposition surge on the phase angle range covered by our data. Complementary observations are needed. We managed to observe 2000 EC98 during four half nights in March 2002 with the Danish telescope and three consecutive nights with the ESO 3.6-m telescope in April 2003. So far we have only preliminary results concerning the rotational period of this object. If a single-peaked lightcurve is assumed we find a period of 12h56mn+/-6mn and a peak to peak amplitude (in the R band) of 0.28+/-0.03 magnitude. We compare also these results to the other one already published. They are in good agreement, expecially for the slope of the phase function curve, which is equal to 0.121+/-0.003 mag.deg-1 for 1999 TD10 and for the phase angle range covered by our observations.

  8. Cloning and characterization of two EcR isoforms from Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternates.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hongbiao; Shen, Weifeng; Liu, Yan; He, Lihua; Niu, Baolong; Meng, Zhiqi; Mu, Jianjun

    2013-09-01

    The ecdysone receptor (EcR) is the hormonal receptor of ecdysteroids, which regulates insect growth and development. In this study, we cloned and characterized two isoforms of EcR in Monochamus alternates named MaEcR A and MaEcR B. The cDNAs of MaEcR A and MaEcR B have open repeating frames of 1,695 and 1,392 bp, respectively. The deduced proteins have the same C-terminal sequence and varied in N-terminal, and are consistent with reports on other insect species, particularly with the receptor of another coleopteran, Tribolium castaneum. The isoform-specific developmental expression profile of EcR in the epidermis and the midgut were analyzed with quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the pupal stage. RNA interference (RNAi) with common or isoform-specific regions induced developmental stagnation. When treated in the later larval stage, RNAi with either the common sequence or an EcR A specific sequence caused more severe effects and most larvae died prior to adulthood. The EcR B specific sequence caused less severe effects and about half of the treated larvae became adults, but some showed developmental defects. RNAi with both isoforms at early pupal stage attenuated the expression of 20E-regulated genes E74, E75, and HR3. The study demonstrates the role of EcR in the transduction of ecdysteroid response in Monochamus alternatus.

  9. Comparative study on dihydrofolate reductases from Shewanella species living in deep-sea and ambient atmospheric-pressure environments.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Chiho; Ohmae, Eiji; Tate, Shin-ichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Nakasone, Kaoru; Kato, Chiaki

    2011-03-01

    To examine whether dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from deep-sea bacteria has undergone molecular evolution to adapt to high-pressure environments, we cloned eight DHFRs from Shewanella species living in deep-sea and ambient atmospheric-pressure environments, and subsequently purified six proteins to compare their structures, stabilities, and functions. The DHFRs showed 74-90% identity in primary structure to DHFR from S. violacea, but only 55% identity to DHFR from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR). Far-ultraviolet circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra suggested that the secondary and tertiary structures of these DHFRs were similar. In addition, no significant differences were found in structural stability as monitored by urea-induced unfolding and the kinetic parameters, K(m) and k(cat); although the DHFRs from Shewanella species were less stable and more active (2- to 4-fold increases in k(cat)/K(m)) than ecDHFR. Interestingly, the pressure effects on enzyme activity revealed that DHFRs from ambient-atmospheric species are not necessarily incompatible with high pressure, and DHFRs from deep-sea species are not necessarily tolerant of high pressure. These results suggest that the DHFR molecule itself has not evolved to adapt to high-pressure environments, but rather, those Shewanella species with enzymes capable of retaining functional activity under high pressure migrated into the deep-sea.

  10. Effect of acetic acid present in bagasse hydrolysate on the activities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase in Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luanne Helena Augusto; das Graças de Almeida Felipe, Maria; Vitolo, Michele; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2004-11-01

    The first two steps in xylose metabolism are catalyzed by NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR) (EC 1.1.1.21) and NAD(P)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) (EC 1.1.1.9), which lead to xylose-->xylitol-->xylulose conversion. Xylitol has high commercial value, due to its sweetening and anticariogenic properties, as well as several clinical applications. The acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse allows the separation of a xylose-rich hemicellulosic fraction that can be used as a substrate for Candida guilliermondii to produce xylitol. However, the hydrolysate contains acetic acid, an inhibitor of microbial metabolism. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on the activities of XR and XDH and on xylitol formation by C. guilliermondii were studied. For this purpose, fermentations were carried out in bagasse hydrolysate and in synthetic medium. The activities of XR and XDH were higher in the medium containing acetic acid than in control medium. Moreover, none of the fermentative parameters were significantly altered during cell culture. It was concluded that acetic acid does not interfere with xylitol formation since the increase in XR activity is proportional to XDH activity, leading to a greater production of xylitol and its subsequent conversion to xylulose.

  11. Kinetic measurements of phosphoglucose isomerase and phosphomannose isomerase by direct analysis of phosphorylated aldose-ketose isomers using tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong; Chen, Ye; Leary, Julie A.

    2005-02-01

    A mass spectrometry based method for the direct determination of kinetic constants for phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) and phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) is described. PGI catalyzes the interconversion between glucose-6-phosphate (Glc6P) and fructose-6-phosphate (Fru6P) and PMI performs the same function between mannose-6-phosphate (Man6P) and Fru6P. These two enzymes are essential in the pathways of glycolytic or oxidative metabolism of carbohydrates and have been considered as potential therapeutic targets. Traditionally, they are assayed either by spectrophotometric detection of Glc6P with one or more coupling enzymes or by a colorimetric detection of Fru6P. However, no suitable assay for Man6P has been developed yet to study the reaction of PMI in the direction from Fru6P to Man6P. In the work presented herein, a general assay for the isomeric substrate-product pair between Glc6P and Fru6P or between Man6P and Fru6P was developed, with the aim of directly studying the kinetics of PGI and PMI in both directions. The 6-phosphorylated aldose and ketose isomers were distinguished based on their corresponding tandem mass spectra (MS2) obtained on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, and a multicomponent quantification method was utilized to determine the composition of binary mixtures. Using this method, the conversion between Fru6P and Glc6P and that between Fru6P and Man6P are directly monitored. The equilibrium constants for the reversible reactions catalyzed by PGI and PMI are measured to be 0.3 and 1.1, respectively, and the kinetic parameters for both substrates of PGI and PMI are also determined. The values of KM and Vmax for Fru6P as substrate of PMI are reported to be 0.15 mM and 7.78 [mu]mol/(min mg), respectively. All other kinetic parameters measured correlate well with those obtained using traditional methods, demonstrating the accuracy and reliability of this assay.

  12. High-Statistics β+ / EC -Decay Study of 122Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jigmeddorj, Badamsambuu; S1292 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Xe isotopes are centrally located in the Z > 50 , N < 82 region that displays an extraordinarily smooth evolution of simple collective signatures. However, the collectivity of excited states in this region is very poorly characterized. There are spectroscopic hints to unusual structures in this region. The 03+ states in 124-132Xe are very strongly populated in (3He , n) reactions, suggesting a pairing vibrational structure influenced by proton subshell gaps, perhaps leading to shape-coexistence that could give rise to strong E 0 transitions. Recent work on 124Xe has established nearly identical quadrupole collectivity for the pairing vibrational 03+ band and the ground state band. However, in 122Xe, the 03+ state has not been firmly identified. A high-statistics 122Cs β+ / EC decay experiment to obtain detailed spectroscopic data for low-spin states was performed at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility using the 8 π γ-ray spectrometer and its auxiliary detectors including PACES, an array of five Si(Li) detectors, for conversion electron spectroscopy. The decay scheme has been considerably extended through a γ- γ coincidence analysis, and 0+ states have been identified via γ- γ angular correlations. This work supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  13. A detoxifying oxygen reductase in the anaerobic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Vicente, João B; Tran, Vy; Pinto, Liliana; Teixeira, Miguel; Singh, Upinder

    2012-09-01

    We report the characterization of a bacterial-type oxygen reductase abundant in the cytoplasm of the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Upon host infection, E. histolytica is confronted with various oxygen tensions in the host intestine, as well as increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species at the site of local tissue inflammation. Resistance to oxygen-derived stress thus plays an important role in the pathogenic potential of E. histolytica. The genome of E. histolytica has four genes that encode flavodiiron proteins, which are bacterial-type oxygen or nitric oxide reductases and were likely acquired by lateral gene transfer from prokaryotes. The EhFdp1 gene has higher expression in virulent than in nonvirulent Entamoeba strains and species, hinting that the response to oxidative stress may be one correlate of virulence potential. We demonstrate that EhFdp1 is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica and that the protein levels are markedly increased (up to ~5-fold) upon oxygen exposure. Additionally, we produced fully functional recombinant EhFdp1 and demonstrated that this enzyme is a specific and robust oxygen reductase but has poor nitric oxide reductase activity. This observation represents a new mechanism of oxygen resistance in the anaerobic protozoan pathogen E. histolytica.

  14. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  15. Obtaining partial purified xylose reductase from Candida guilliermondii

    PubMed Central

    Tomotani, Ester Junko; de Arruda, Priscila Vaz; Vitolo, Michele; de Almeida Felipe, Maria das Graças

    2009-01-01

    The enzymatic bioconversion of xylose into xylitol by xylose reductase (XR) is an alternative for chemical and microbiological processes. The partial purified XR was obtained by using the following three procedures: an agarose column, a membrane reactor or an Amicon Ultra-15 50K Centrifugal Filter device at yields of 40%, 7% and 67%, respectively. PMID:24031408

  16. Dissimilatory Nitrite Reductase Genes from Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Casciotti, Karen L.; Ward, Bess B.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase gene (nirK) was discovered in several isolates of β-subdivision ammonia-oxidizing bacteria using PCR and DNA sequencing. PCR primers Cunir3 and Cunir4 were designed based on published nirK sequences from denitrifying bacteria and used to amplify a 540-bp fragment of the nirK gene from Nitrosomonas marina and five additional isolates of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Amplification products of the expected size were cloned and sequenced. Alignment of the nucleic acid and deduced amino acid (AA) sequences shows significant similarity (62 to 75% DNA, 58 to 76% AA) between nitrite reductases present in these nitrifiers and the copper-containing nitrite reductase found in classic heterotrophic denitrifiers. While the presence of a nitrite reductase in Nitrosomonas europaea is known from early biochemical work, preliminary sequence data from its genome indicate a rather low similarity to the denitrifier nirKs. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial nitrifier nirK sequences indicates that the topology of the nirK tree corresponds to the 16S rRNA and amoA trees. While the role of nitrite reduction in the metabolism of nitrifying bacteria is still uncertain, these data show that the nirK gene is present in closely related nitrifying isolates from many oceanographic regions and suggest that nirK sequences retrieved from the environment may include sequences from ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:11319103

  17. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  20. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  1. The Kinetics and Inhibition of the Enzyme Methemoglobin Reductase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, A. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry experiment which involves the preparation and kinetics of an oxidation-reduction enzyme system, methemoglobin reductase. A crude enzyme extract is prepared and assayed spectrophotometrically. The enzyme system obeys Michaelis-Menton kinetics with respect to both substrate and the NADH cofactor. (MLH)

  2. [Malate oxidation by mitochondrial succinate:ubiquinone-reductase].

    PubMed

    Belikova, Iu O; Kotliar, A B

    1988-04-01

    Succinate:ubiquinone reductase was shown to catalyze the oxidation of L- and D-stereoisomers of malate by artificial electron acceptors and ubiquinone. The rate of malate oxidation by succinate:ubiquinone reductase is by two orders of magnitude lower than that for the natural substrate--succinate. The values of kinetic constants for the oxidation of D- and L-stereoisomers of malate are equal to: V infinity = 0.1 mumol/min/mg protein, Km = 2 mM and V infinity = 0.05 mumol/min/mg protein, Km = 2 mM, respectively. The malate dehydrogenase activity is fully inhibited by the inhibitors of the dicarboxylate-binding site of the enzyme, i.e., N-ethylmaleimide and malonate and is practically insensitive to carboxin, a specific inhibitor of the ubiquinone-binding center. The enol form of oxaloacetate was shown to be the product of malate oxidation by succinate:ubiquinone reductase. The kinetics of inhibition of the enzyme activity by the ketone and enol forms of oxaloacetate was studied. Both forms of oxaloacetate effectively inhibit the succinate:ubiquinone reductase reaction.

  3. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  4. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-28

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  5. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  6. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  7. The polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, methionine synthase, methionine synthase reductase, and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results.

  8. The Polymorphisms in Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase, Methionine Synthase, Methionine Synthase Reductase, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results. PMID:22719222

  9. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-2A

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Townsend

    2002-03-01

    Well ER-EC-2A was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in January and February of 2000 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in the Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 412.9 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,516.1 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 228.0 meters, approximately two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 81 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 212 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 30 samples. The well was collared in rhyolite lava and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of borehole data indicates that this well was drilled within the margins of the buried Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks calderas, and that caldera collapse in this area was deeper than expected, resulting in a section of Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon (caldera-filling deposit) that is much thicker than expected.

  10. Completion report for Well ER-EC-6

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-05-01

    Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  11. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-8

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    Well ER-EC-8 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 129.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 609.6 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 98.4 meters, 24 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on evaluation of composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 20 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 157.9 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Drilling began in Tertiary-age tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, and penetrated tuffs of the Beatty Wash Formation, tuff of Buttonhook Wash, and the upper portion of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from this well helps define the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. Geologic and hydrologic data from the well will aid in development of models to predict groundwater flow and contaminant migration within and near the Nevada Test Site.

  12. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-7

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    Well ER-EC-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 265.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 422.5 meters. The planned depth of 762 meters was not reached due to borehole stability problems. One completion string with two isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 227.8 meters, 20 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings, supplemented by geophysical log data, and incorporating data from detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Beneath a thin alluvial deposit, the well penetrated 410 meters of lava and bedded tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon Group, deposited in the Timber Mountain caldera moat after caldera collapse. The geologic interpretation of data from this well provides information on the thickness, lithologic composition, and hydrogeologic character of moat-filling rocks in the southern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field.

  13. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-09-01

    Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

  14. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-5

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    Well ER-EC-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 342.6 meters below ground surface. The borehole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 309.9 meters, 40 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 18 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 349.6 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results from detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock samples. The well penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Thirsty Canyon Group, caldera moat-filling sedimentary deposits, lava of the Beatty Wash Formation, and landslide breccia and tuffs of the Timber Mountain Group. The well reached total depth in welded ashflow tuff of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff after penetrating 440.1 meters of this unit, which is also the main water-producing unit in the well. The geologic interpretation of data from this well constrains the western margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera to the west of the well location.

  15. Effect of Elastic Compression Stocking (ECS) on Leg Veins During 2G Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeille, Ph.; Kaspransky, R.

    2008-06-01

    Objective: evaluate the calf vein response to hypergravity, and check the efficiency of elastic compression stocking (ECS) in preventing their distension. Method: Tibial (Tib csa) and Gastrocnemius (Gast csa) vein cross section area were investigated by echography. The subject was submitted to (a) 10 min stand test (ST), (b) 2G centrifugation for 2 min, (c) 10 min ST, with and without ECS. Results: Centrifugation at 2G induced a higher vein distension for both Gast and Tib vein compare to ST. At 2G centrifugation, ECS reduced the amplitude of the csa increase and limited the max vein csa to the ST value without ECS.

  16. SUPPRESSOR OF FRIGIDA (SUF4) Supports Gamete Fusion via Regulating Arabidopsis EC1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Resentini, Francesca; Cyprys, Philipp; Steffen, Joshua G; Alter, Svenja; Morandini, Piero; Mizzotti, Chiara; Lloyd, Alan; Drews, Gary N; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Colombo, Lucia; Sprunck, Stefanie; Masiero, Simona

    2017-01-01

    The EGG CELL1 (EC1) gene family of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprises five members that are specifically expressed in the egg cell and redundantly control gamete fusion during double fertilization. We investigated the activity of all five EC1 promoters in promoter-deletion studies and identified SUF4 (SUPPRESSOR OF FRIGIDA4), a C2H2 transcription factor, as a direct regulator of the EC1 gene expression. In particular, we demonstrated that SUF4 binds to all five Arabidopsis EC1 promoters, thus regulating their expression. The down-regulation of SUF4 in homozygous suf4-1 ovules results in reduced EC1 expression and delayed sperm fusion, which can be rescued by expressing SUF4-β-glucuronidase under the control of the SUF4 promoter. To identify more gene products able to regulate EC1 expression together with SUF4, we performed coexpression studies that led to the identification of MOM1 (MORPHEUS' MOLECULE1), a component of a silencing mechanism that is independent of DNA methylation marks. In mom1-3 ovules, both SUF4 and EC1 genes are down-regulated, and EC1 genes show higher levels of histone 3 lysine-9 acetylation, suggesting that MOM1 contributes to the regulation of SUF4 and EC1 gene expression.

  17. Treatment of hirsutism with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J R

    1986-05-01

    Much os the evidence gathered from studies of 5 alpha-reductase activity levels and androgen metabolism in the skin of hirsute women and the excretion of androgen metabolites by hirsute women indicates that 5 alpha-reduced androgens are probably of primary importance in hirsutism. Unfortunately, until very recently, the lack of a suitable 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor made it very difficult to adequately test the hypothesis that such an inhibitor might be useful in the treatment of hirsutism and certain other androgen-related diseases. No substance was available which had good, unambiguous activity in vivo as a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor. A number of 4-azasteroids have now been found to possess excellent 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory activity both in vitro and in vivo. Among other properties, several of these compounds show little or no affinity for the androgen receptor of rat prostate cytosol, they attenuate the growth promoting effect of T, but not DHT, on the ventral prostate of castrated male rats, they cause a marked reduction in prostatic DHT concentration in acutely treated rats and dogs and they bring about a significant decline in prostate size in chronically treated rats and dogs. It is expected that, in the near future, one or more of these highly active 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors will be tested in the clinic as a treatment for hirsutism. The results of those studies will be awaited with a great deal of interest since they should considerably advance our understanding of this disease and possibly contribute to its control.

  18. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N/sub 2/O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N/sub 2/O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N/sub 2/O reductase activity was inhibited by 0/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 ..mu..M) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 ..mu..M) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N/sub 2/O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater, estuarine, and alkaline-saline environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N/sub 2/O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N/sub 2/O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  19. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N2O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N2O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N2O reductase activity was inhibited by O2, C2H2, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 μM) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 μM) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N2O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater (Km = 2.17 μM), estuarine (Km = 14.5 μM), and alkaline-saline (Km = 501 μM) environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N2O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N2O per m2 per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N2O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N2O per m2 per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  20. Identification and characterization of 2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A reductase, the prototype of a novel class of dearomatizing reductases.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Christian; Estelmann, Sebastian; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Müller, Michael; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Boll, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The enzymatic dearomatization of aromatic ring systems by reduction represents a highly challenging redox reaction in biology and plays a key role in the degradation of aromatic compounds under anoxic conditions. In anaerobic bacteria, most monocyclic aromatic growth substrates are converted to benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), which is then dearomatized to a conjugated dienoyl-CoA by ATP-dependent or -independent benzoyl-CoA reductases. It was unresolved whether or not related enzymes are involved in the anaerobic degradation of environmentally relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this work, a previously unknown dearomatizing 2-naphthoyl-CoA reductase was purified from extracts of the naphthalene-degrading, sulphidogenic enrichment culture N47. The oxygen-tolerant enzyme dearomatized the non-activated ring of 2-naphthoyl-CoA by a four-electron reduction to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthoyl-CoA. The dimeric 150 kDa enzyme complex was composed of a 72 kDa subunit showing sequence similarity to members of the flavin-containing 'old yellow enzyme' family. NCR contained FAD, FMN, and an iron-sulphur cluster as cofactors. Extracts of Escherichia coli expressing the encoding gene catalysed 2-naphthoyl-CoA reduction. The identified NCR is a prototypical enzyme of a previously unknown class of dearomatizing arylcarboxyl-CoA reductases that are involved in anaerobic PAH degradation; it fundamentally differs from known benzoyl-CoA reductases.

  1. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  2. Improving the Stability of the EC1 Domain of E-cadherin by Thiol Alkylation of the Cysteine Residue

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Maulik; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Williams, Todd D.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to improve chemical and physical stability of the EC1 protein derived from the extracellular domain of E-cadherin. In solution, the EC1 protein has been shown to form a covalent dimer via a disulfide bond formation followed by physical aggregation and precipitation. To improve solution stability of the EC1 protein, the thiol group of the Cys13 residue in EC1 was alkylated with iodoacetate, iodoacetamide, and maleimide-PEG-5000 to produce thioether derivatives called EC1-IA, EC1-IN, and EC1-PEG. The physical and chemical stabilities of the EC1 derivatives and the parent EC1 were evaluated at various pHs (3.0, 7.0, and 9.0) and temperatures (0, 3, 70 °C). The structural characteristics of each molecule were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy and the derivatives have similar secondary structure as the parent EC1 protein at pH 7.0. Both EC1-IN and EC1-PEG derivatives showed better chemical and physical stability profiles than did the parent EC1 at pH 7.0. EC1-PEG had the best stability profile compared to EC1-IN and EC1 in solution under various conditions. PMID:22531851

  3. Immunological approach to the regulation of nitrate reductase in Monoraphidium braunii.

    PubMed

    Díez, J; López-Ruiz, A

    1989-02-01

    The effects of different culture conditions on nitrate reductase activity and nitrate reductase protein from Monoraphidium braunii have been studied, using two different immunological techniques, rocket immunoelectrophoresis and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, to determine nitrate reductase protein. The nitrogen sources ammonium and glutamine repressed nitrate reductase synthesis, while nitrite, alanine, and glutamate acted as derepressors. There was a four- to eightfold increase of nitrate reductase activity and a twofold increase of nitrate reductase protein under conditions of nitrogen starvation versus growth on nitrate. Nitrate reductase synthesis was repressed in darkness. However, when Monoraphidium was grown under heterotrophic conditions with glucose as the carbon and energy source, the synthesis of nitrate reductase was maintained. With ammonium or darkness, changes in nitrate reductase activity correlated fairly well with changes in nitrate reductase protein, indicating that in both cases loss of activity was due to repression and not to inactivation of the enzyme. Experiments using methionine sulfoximine, to inhibit ammonium assimilation, showed that ammonium per se and not a product of its metabolism was the corepressor of the enzyme. The appearance of nitrate reductase activity after transferring the cells to induction media was prevented by cycloheximide and by 6-methylpurine, although in this latter case the effect was observed only in cells preincubated with the inhibitor for 1 h before the induction period.

  4. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, ML; Fitzgerald, MP; Zhong, W; Askeland, RW; Domann, FE

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  5. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, M L; Fitzgerald, M P; Zhong, W; Askeland, R W; Domann, F E

    2014-01-16

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  6. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki , Gang; David R. , Sarkanen; Simo , Ford; Joshua D.

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  7. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  8. Purification and biochemical characterization of simplified eukaryotic nitrate reductase expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Guillaume G; Joshi, Rama C; Campbell, Ellen R; Campbell, Wilbur H

    2004-09-01

    NAD(P)H:nitrate reductase (NaR, EC 1.7.1.1-3) is a useful enzyme in biotechnological applications, but it is very complex in structure and contains three cofactors-flavin adenine dinucleotide, heme-Fe, and molybdenum-molybdopterin (Mo-MPT). A simplified nitrate reductase (S-NaR1) consisting of Mo-MPT-binding site and nitrate-reducing active site was engineered from yeast Pichia angusta NaR cDNA (YNaR1). S-NaR1 was cytosolically expressed in high-density fermenter culture of methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Total amount of S-NaR1 protein produced was approximately 0.5 g per 10 L fermenter run, and methanol phase productivity was 5 microg protein/g wet cell weight/h. Gene copy number in genomic DNA of different clones showed direct correlation with the expression level. S-NaR1 was purified to homogeneity in one step by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and total amount of purified protein per run of fermentation was approximately 180 mg. Polypeptide size was approximately 55 kDa from electrophoretic analysis, and S-NaR1 was mainly homo-tetrameric in its active form, as shown by gel filtration. S-NaR1 accepted electrons efficiently from reduced bromphenol blue (kcat = 2081 s(-1)) and less so from reduced methyl viologen (kcat = 159 s(-1)). The nitrate KM for S-NaR1 was 30 +/- 3 microM, which is very similar to YNaR1. S-NaR1 is capable of specific nitrate reduction, and direct electric current, as shown by catalytic nitrate reduction using protein film cyclic voltammetry, can drive this reaction. Thus, S-NaR1 is an ideal form of this enzyme for commercial applications, such as an enzymatic nitrate biosensor formulated with S-NaR1 interfaced to an electrode system.

  9. Program Unit Funding: A Handbook for ECS Operators in the 2002/2003 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This handbook is written specifically for Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta, Canada, applying for Program Unit Funding for students with severe disabilities. It is also designed to enhance the understanding of how assistance is provided to ECS children with severe disabilities by teachers, special needs assistants, parents, and…

  10. Governors' Top Education Issues: 2015 State of the State Addresses. ECS Education Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Stephanie; Rowland, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Education Commission of the States (ECS) strives to keep its constituency apprised of education policy trends across the states. To provide a comprehensive overview of educational priorities outlined by governors, ECS summarized the education proposals and accomplishments detailed in every 2015 State of the State address delivered to date. Each…

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Ec of... - Toxic Equivalency Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Toxic Equivalency Factors 2 Table 2 of... Sources: Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Pt. 60, Subpt. Ec, Table 2 Table 2 of Subpart Ec of Part 60—Toxic Equivalency Factors Dioxin/furan...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Ec to... - Toxic Equivalency Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxic Equivalency Factors 2 Table 2 of Subpart Ec to Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Ec to Part 60—Toxic Equivalency Factors Dioxin/furan congener Toxic equivalency factor...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 of Subpart Ec to... - Toxic Equivalency Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Toxic Equivalency Factors 2 Table 2 of Subpart Ec to Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Ec to Part 60—Toxic Equivalency Factors Dioxin/furan congener Toxic equivalency factor...

  14. The X-ray crystal structure of APR-B, an atypical adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase from Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Clare E M; Hughes, Richard K; McManus, Michael T; Lawson, David M; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2013-11-15

    Sulfonucleotide reductases catalyse the first reductive step of sulfate assimilation. Their substrate specificities generally correlate with the requirement for a [Fe4S4] cluster, where adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductases possess a cluster and 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductases do not. The exception is the APR-B isoform of APS reductase from the moss Physcomitrella patens, which lacks a cluster. The crystal structure of APR-B, the first for a plant sulfonucleotide reductase, is consistent with a preference for APS. Structural conservation with bacterial APS reductase rules out a structural role for the cluster, but supports the contention that it enhances the activity of conventional APS reductases.

  15. The respiratory arsenate reductase from Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afkar, E.; Lisak, J.; Saltikov, C.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.; Stolz, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The respiratory arsenate reductase from the Gram-positive, haloalkaliphile, Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10 was purified and characterized. It is a membrane bound heterodimer (150 kDa) composed of two subunits ArrA (110 kDa) and ArrB (34 kDa), with an apparent Km for arsenate of 34 ??M and Vmax of 2.5 ??mol min-1 mg-1. Optimal activity occurred at pH 9.5 and 150 g l-1 of NaCl. Metal analysis (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) of the holoenzyme and sequence analysis of the catalytic subunit (ArrA; the gene for which was cloned and sequenced) indicate it is a member of the DMSO reductase family of molybdoproteins. ?? 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Chilson, Oscar P.; Kelly-Chilson, Anne E.; Schneider, Julie D.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and cultured rhizobia were compared with those of the enzyme in soybean nodule host cytosol. Reductase from host cytosol differed from that in bacteroids in: (a) the effect of pH on enzymic activity, (b) the capacity to catalyze both reduction of pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid and NAD+-dependent proline oxidation, (c) apparent affinities for pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid, and (d) sensitivities to inhibition by NADP+ and proline. The K1 for proline inhibition of P5CR in bacteroid cytosol was 1.8 millimolar. The properties of P5CR in B. japonicum and bacteroid cytosol were similar. The specific activities of P5CR in the cytosolic fractions of the nodule host and the bacteroid compartment were also comparable. PMID:16668837

  17. Characterization of 12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid Reductase in Corn

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Brady A.; Zimmerman, Don C.

    1986-01-01

    12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase, an enzyme of the biosynthetic pathway that converts linolenic acid to jasmonic acid, has been characterized from the kernel and seedlings of corn (Zea mays L.). The molecular weight of the enzyme, estimated by gel filtration, was 54,000. Optimum enzyme activity was observed over a broad pH range, from pH 6.8 to 9.0. The enzyme had a Km of 190 micromolar for its substrate, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. The preferred reductant was NADPH, for which the enzyme exhibited a Km of 13 micromolar, compared with 4.2 millimolar for NADH. Reductase activity was low in the corn kernel but increased five-fold by the fifth day after germination and then gradually declined. PMID:16664582

  18. [Properties of a nitrite reductase inhibitor protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Karapetian, A V; Nalbandian, R M

    1993-08-01

    The amino acid composition and major physico-chemical properties of the "nonblue" copper protein isolated earlier from Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined. It has been found that the azurin oxidase, cytochrome c551 oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities of the enzyme are inhibited by this protein. The inhibition seems to be due to the protein interaction with the electron-accepting center of nitrite reductase.

  19. Early diagnosis and management of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Odame, I; Donaldson, M D; Wallace, A M; Cochran, W; Smith, P J

    1992-01-01

    Two siblings of Pakistani origin, karyotype 46 XY, were born with predominantly female external genitalia with minute phallus, bifid scrotum, urogenital sinus, and palpable gonads. The older sibling at the age of 8 days showed an adequate testosterone response to human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) stimulation. The diagnosis of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency was made at age 6 years when no 5 alpha-reduced glucocorticoid metabolites were detectable in urine even after tetracosactrin (Synacthen) stimulation. In the younger sibling the diagnosis of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency was provisionally made at the early age of 3 days on the basis of high urinary tetrahydrocortisol (THF)/allotetrahydrocortisol (5 alpha-THF) ratio and this ratio increased with age confirming the diagnosis. Plasma testosterone: dihydrotestosterone (DHT) ratio before and after hCG stimulation was within normal limits at age 3 days but was raised at age 9 months. Topical DHT cream application to the external genitalia promoted significant phallic growth in both siblings and in the older sibling corrective surgery was facilitated. In prepubertal male pseudohermaphrodites with normal or raised testosterone concentrations, phallic growth in response to DHT cream treatment could be an indirect confirmation of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. Images Figure 1 PMID:1626992

  20. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Two Pseudomonas Flavoprotein Xenobiotic Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Blehert, David S.; Fox, Brian G.; Chambliss, Glenn H.

    1999-01-01

    The genes encoding flavin mononucleotide-containing oxidoreductases, designated xenobiotic reductases, from Pseudomonas putida II-B and P. fluorescens I-C that removed nitrite from nitroglycerin (NG) by cleavage of the nitroester bond were cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The P. putida gene, xenA, encodes a 39,702-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that removes either the terminal or central nitro groups from NG and that reduces 2-cyclohexen-1-one but did not readily reduce 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The P. fluorescens gene, xenB, encodes a 37,441-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that exhibits fivefold regioselectivity for removal of the central nitro group from NG and that transforms TNT but did not readily react with 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Heterologous expression of xenA and xenB was demonstrated in Escherichia coli DH5α. The transcription initiation sites of both xenA and xenB were identified by primer extension analysis. BLAST analyses conducted with the P. putida xenA and the P. fluorescens xenB sequences demonstrated that these genes are similar to several other bacterial genes that encode broad-specificity flavoprotein reductases. The prokaryotic flavoprotein reductases described herein likely shared a common ancestor with old yellow enzyme of yeast, a broad-specificity enzyme which may serve a detoxification role in antioxidant defense systems. PMID:10515912

  1. The existence and significance of a mitochondrial nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Nohl, Hans; Staniek, Katrin; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2005-01-01

    The physiological functions of nitric oxide (NO) are well established. The finding that the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) is NO was totally unexpected. It was shown that NO is a reaction product of an enzymatically catalyzed, overall, 5-electron oxidation of guanidinium nitrogen from L-arginine followed by the release of the free radical species NO. NO is synthesized by a single protein complex supported by cofactors, coenzymes (such as tetrahydrobiopterin) and cytochrome P450. The latter can uncouple from substrate oxidation producing O2*- radicals. The research groups of Richter [Ghafourifar P, Richter C. Nitric oxide synthase activity in mitochondria. FEBS Lett 1997; 418: 291-296.] and Boveris [Giulivi C, Poderoso JJ, Boveris A. Production of nitric oxide by mitochondria. J Biol Chem 1998; 273: 11038-11043.] identified a mitochondrial NO synthase (NOS). There are, however, increasing reports demonstrating that mitochondrial NO is derived from cytosolic NOS belonging to the Ca2+-dependent enzymes. NO was thought to control cytochrome oxidase. This assumption is controversial due to the life-time of NO in biological systems (millisecond range). We found a nitrite reductase in mitochondria which is of major interest. Any increase of nitrite in the tissue which is the first oxidation product of NO, for instance following NO donors, will stimulate NO-recycling via mitochondrial nitrite reductase. In this paper, we describe the identity and the function of mitochondrial nitrite reductase and the consequences of NO-recycling in the metabolic compartment of mitochondria.

  2. Phosphoglycerate kinase acts in tumour angiogenesis as a disulphide reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Angelina J.; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Kisker, Oliver; Flynn, Evelyn; Underwood, Anne; Condron, Rosemary; Hogg, Philip J.

    2000-12-01

    Disulphide bonds in secreted proteins are considered to be inert because of the oxidizing nature of the extracellular milieu. An exception to this rule is a reductase secreted by tumour cells that reduces disulphide bonds in the serine proteinase plasmin. Reduction of plasmin initiates proteolytic cleavage in the kringle 5 domain and release of the tumour blood vessel inhibitor angiostatin. New blood vessel formation or angiogenesis is critical for tumour expansion and metastasis. Here we show that the plasmin reductase isolated from conditioned medium of fibrosarcoma cells is the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase. Recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase had the same specific activity as the fibrosarcoma-derived protein. Plasma of mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumours contained several-fold more phosphoglycerate kinase, as compared with mice without tumours. Administration of phosphoglycerate kinase to tumour-bearing mice caused an increase in plasma levels of angiostatin, and a decrease in tumour vascularity and rate of tumour growth. Our findings indicate that phosphoglycerate kinase not only functions in glycolysis but is secreted by tumour cells and participates in the angiogenic process as a disulphide reductase.

  3. The effect of quercetin and galangin on glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, Helena; Berczeliová, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Quercetin and galangin can change the activity of glutathione reductase. Quercetin (a catechol structure in the B-ring) and galangin (any hydroxyl group in the B-ring) have different biological activities but, both possess high antioxidant abilities. Quercetin during the antioxidative action, is converted into an oxidized products (o-semiquinone and o-quinone), and subsequently glutathionyl adducts may be formed or SH-enzyme can be inhibited. We have tried to see whether inhibition of glutathione reductase (GR) can be influenced by preincubation of enzyme with NADPH (a creation of reduced form of enzyme, GRH(2)) and whether diaphorase activity of the enzyme is decreased by these flavonoids. The results confirmed that quercetin inhibits GRH(2) and inhibition is reduced by addition of EDTA or N-acetylcysteine. Both of flavonoids have no effect on diaphorase activity of glutathione reductase and this enzyme could increase the production of free radicals by catalysis of reduction of o-quinone during action of quercetin in vivo.

  4. Catalytic mechanism and substrate selectivity of aldo-keto reductases: insights from structure-function studies of Candida tenuis xylose reductase.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Regina; Wilson, David K; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2006-09-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) constitute a large protein superfamily of mainly NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductases involved in carbonyl metabolism. Catalysis is promoted by a conserved tetrad of active site residues (Tyr, Lys, Asp and His). Recent results of structure-function relationship studies for xylose reductase (AKR2B5) require an update of the proposed catalytic mechanism. Electrostatic stabilization by the epsilon-NH3+ group of Lys is a key source of catalytic power of xylose reductase. A molecular-level analysis of the substrate binding pocket of xylose reductase provides a case of how a very broadly specific AKR achieves the requisite selectivity for its physiological substrate and could serve as the basis for the design of novel reductases with improved specificities for biocatalytic applications.

  5. Phylogenetic diversity of dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes from deep-sea cold seep sediment.

    PubMed

    Fukuba, Tatsuhiro; Ogawa, Mari; Fujii, Teruo; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR, EC 1.8.99.3) alpha-subunit genes from a deep-sea cold seep was analyzed. Bulk genomic DNA was extracted from the cold seep sediment and used for amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of DSR alpha-subunit gene. Two sizes of PCR products, 1.4 kb (expected) and 1.3 kb (unexpected), were amplified. Sixteen clones of the 1.4-kb amplicons and 16 clones of 1.3-kb amplicons, a total of 32 clones, were obtained and grouped into operational DSR units (ODUs) based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) by digestion with HaeIII and MboI. A total of 14 ODUs, i.e., 5 ODUs from 1.4-kb amplicon clones and 9 ODUs from 1.3-kb amplicon clones, were recovered. About 400 bp of the 5' ends of all the clones was sequenced and validated the RFLP-based ODU grouping. All the 5'-end 400-bp sequences of ODUs, even from the 1.3-kb amplicons, showed the characteristic DSR amino acid sequence motifs. The ODUs from 1.4-kb amplicons were closely related to the delta-Proteobacterial lineage with the DSR genes from epsilon-Proteobacterial epibionts of the hot vent worm Alvinella pompejana. The ODUs from 1.3-kb amplicons were mostly related to the unknown but possibly archaeal lineage. The diversity of the DSR genes may indicate the diversity of sulfate reducers in the seep sediment as well as the complexity of electron donors including methane.

  6. Anti-proliferative effect of Jesridonin on paclitaxel-resistant EC109 human esophageal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong; Guo, Liubin; Wang, Saiqi; Wang, Junwei; Li, Yongmei; Dou, Yinhui; Wang, Ran; Shi, Hongge; Ke, Yu; Liu, Hongmin

    2017-01-01

    Chemoresistance to anticancer drugs is a major obstacle in the efforts to develop a successful treatment strategy for esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC). Thus, the exploration of new drugs and treatment strategies for combating resistance are of utmost importance. In this study, we investigated the antitumor drug resistance activity of Jesridonin, a new ent-kaurene diterpenoid, and its possible mechanisms of action using the resistant cancer cell line, EC109/Taxol. MTT assay revealed that Jesridonin had similar IC50 values against EC109 paclitaxel-sensitive cells and drug-resistant EC109/Taxol cells in vitro. In mice, Jesridonin effectively prevented the growth of EC109/Taxol tumor xenografts without exerting any significant toxicity. In addition, Jesridonin significantly inhibited the proliferation of EC109/Taxol cells, induced apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed that Jesridonin upregulated the expression of p53, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), cleaved-caspase-9 and cleaved-caspase-3 in EC109/Taxol cells, and downregulated the expression of procaspase-3, procaspase-9 and Bcl-2 in the EC109/Taxol cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, our results demonstrate that Jesridonin may have potential for use in the treatment of paclitaxel-resistant ESCC. The data of the present study may lead to the development of novel treatment strategies for paclitaxel-resistant tumors. PMID:28204832

  7. The intracellular distribution and secretion of endopeptidases 24.15 (EC 3.4.24.15) and 24.16 (EC 3.4.24.16).

    PubMed

    Ferro, Emer S; Carreno, Flávia R; Goni, Camila; Garrido, Paula A G; Guimaraes, Alessander O; Castro, Leandro M; Oliveira, Vitor; Araujo, Maurício C; Rioli, Vanessa; Gomes, Marcelo D; Fontenele-Neto, José Domingues; Hyslop, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    Endopeptidase 24.15 (EC 3.4.24.15; EP24.15) and endopeptidase 24.16 (EC 3.4.24.16; EP24.16) are enzymes involved in general peptide metabolism in mammalian cells and tissues. This review will focus on morphological and biochemical aspects related to the subcellular distribution and secretion of these homologous enzymes in the central nervous system. These are important issues for a better understanding of the functions of EP24.15 and EP24.16 within neuroendocrine systems.

  8. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Are Essential for Virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Rouf, Syed Fazle; Kitowski, Vera; Böhm, Oliver M.; Rhen, Mikael; Jäger, Timo; Bange, Franz-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species represents a fundamental innate defense against microbes in a diversity of host organisms. Oxidative stress, amongst others, converts peptidyl and free methionine to a mixture of methionine-S- (Met-S-SO) and methionine-R-sulfoxides (Met-R-SO). To cope with such oxidative damage, methionine sulfoxide reductases MsrA and MsrB are known to reduce MetSOs, the former being specific for the S-form and the latter being specific for the R-form. However, at present the role of methionine sulfoxide reductases in the pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial pathogens has not been fully detailed. Here we show that deletion of msrA in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella (S.) enterica serovar Typhimurium increased susceptibility to exogenous H2O2, and reduced bacterial replication inside activated macrophages, and in mice. In contrast, a ΔmsrB mutant showed the wild type phenotype. Recombinant MsrA was active against free and peptidyl Met-S-SO, whereas recombinant MsrB was only weakly active and specific for peptidyl Met-R-SO. This raised the question of whether an additional Met-R-SO reductase could play a role in the oxidative stress response of S. Typhimurium. MsrC is a methionine sulfoxide reductase previously shown to be specific for free Met-R-SO in Escherichia (E.) coli. We tested a ΔmsrC single mutant and a ΔmsrBΔmsrC double mutant under various stress conditions, and found that MsrC is essential for survival of S. Typhimurium following exposure to H2O2, as well as for growth in macrophages, and in mice. Hence, this study demonstrates that all three methionine sulfoxide reductases, MsrA, MsrB and MsrC, facilitate growth of a canonical intracellular pathogen during infection. Interestingly MsrC is specific for the repair of free methionine sulfoxide, pointing to an important role of this pathway in the oxidative stress response of Salmonella Typhimurium. PMID:22073230

  9. [Size distributions of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in Shanghai atmospheric particles].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Hua; Wei, Nan-Nan; Liu, Wei; Lin, Jun; Fan, Xue-Bo; Yao, Jian; Geng, Yan-Hong; Li, Yu-Lan; Li, Yan

    2010-09-01

    Size distributions of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) in atmospheric particles with size range from < 0.49, 0.49-0.95, 0.95-1.50, 1.50-3.00, 3.00-7.20, > 7.20 microm, collected in Jiading District, Shanghai were determined. For estimating size distribution of SOC in these atmospheric particles, a method of determining (OC/EC)(pri) in atmospheric particles with different sizes was discussed and developed, with which SOC was estimated. According to the correlation between OC and EC, main sources of the particles were also estimated roughly. The size distributions of OC and SOC showed a bi-modal with peaks in the particles with size of < 0.49 microm and > 3.0 microm, respectively. EC showed both of a bi-modal and tri-modal. Compared with OC, EC was preferably enriched in particles with size of < 0.49 microm. Mass concentrations of OC and EC in fine particles (< 3.00 microm) accounted for 59.8%-80.0% and 58.1%-82.4% of those in total suspended particles. OC and EC were preferably enriched in fine particles (< 3.00 microm). The concentrations of SOC in the particles with different sizes accounted for 15.7%-79.1% of OC in the particles with corresponding size. Concentrations of SOC in fine aerosols (< 3.00 microm) and coarse aerosols (> 3.00 microm) accounted for 41.4% and 43.5% of corresponding OC. Size distributions of OC, EC and SOC showed time-dependence. The correlation between OC and EC showed that the main contribution to atmospheric particles in Jiading District derived from light petrol vehicles exhaust.

  10. MSFC Sortie Laboratory Environmental Control System (ECS) phase B design study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatonis, A. J.; Mitchell, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    Phase B effort of the Sortie Lab program has concluded. Results of that effort are presented which pertain to the definitions of the environmental control system (ECS). Numerous design studies were performed in Phase B to investigate system feasibility, complexity, weight, and cost. The results and methods employed for these design studies are included. An autonomous Sortie Lab ECS was developed which utilizes a deployed space radiator. Total system weight was projected to be 1814.4 kg including the radiator and fluids. ECS power requirements were estimated at 950 watts.

  11. Cloning of a nitrate reductase inactivator (NRI) cDNA from Spinacia oleracea L. and expression of mRNA and protein of NRI in cultured spinach cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Masatoshi; Ide, Hiroaki; Nakayama, Shinya; Sasaki, Asako; Kitazaki, Shinei; Sato, Takahide; Nakagawa, Hiroki

    2003-04-01

    The spinach ( Spinacia oleracea L. (cv. Hoyo) nitrate reductase inactivator (NRI) is a novel protein that irreversibly inactivates NR. Using degenerate primers based on an N-terminal amino acid sequence of NRI purified from spinach leaves and a cDNA library, we isolated a full-length NRI cDNA from spinach that contains an open reading frame encoding 479 amino acid residues. This protein shares 67.4% and 51.1-68.3% amino acid sequence similarities with a nucleotide pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.9) from rice and three types of the nucleotide pyrophosphatase-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. Immunoblot analysis revealed that NRI was constitutively expressed in suspension-cultured spinach cells; however, its expression level is quite low in 1-day-subcultured cells. Moreover, northern blot analysis indicated that this expression was regulated at the mRNA level. These results suggest that NRI functions in mature cells.

  12. Ammonification in Bacillus subtilis Utilizing Dissimilatory Nitrite Reductase Is Dependent on resDE

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Tamara; Frankenberg, Nicole; Marino, Marco; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    During anaerobic nitrate respiration Bacillus subtilis reduces nitrate via nitrite to ammonia. No denitrification products were observed. B. subtilis wild-type cells and a nitrate reductase mutant grew anaerobically with nitrite as an electron acceptor. Oxygen-sensitive dissimilatory nitrite reductase activity was demonstrated in cell extracts prepared from both strains with benzyl viologen as an electron donor and nitrite as an electron acceptor. The anaerobic expression of the discovered nitrite reductase activity was dependent on the regulatory system encoded by resDE. Mutation of the gene encoding the regulatory Fnr had no negative effect on dissimilatory nitrite reductase formation. PMID:9422613

  13. Structure of the Molybdenum Site of EEcherichia Coli Trimethylamine N-Oxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Nelson, K.Johnson; Rajagopalan, K.V.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    We report a structural characterization of the molybdenum site of recombinant Escherichia coli trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reductase using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme active site shows considerable similarity to that of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, in that, like DMSO reductase, the TMAO reductase active site can exist in multiple forms. Examination of the published crystal structure of TMAO oxidase from Shewanella massilia indicates that the postulated Mo coordination structure is chemically impossible. The presence of multiple active site structures provides a potential explanation for the anomalous features reported from the crystal structure.

  14. 1. General view of Boeing EC135 looking aircraft. View to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of Boeing EC-135 looking aircraft. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. 53. Photographer unknown, date unknown. E.C. COLLIER under sail, dredging ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photographer unknown, date unknown. E.C. COLLIER under sail, dredging oysters. Please credit Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, Maryland. - Two-Sail Bateau E. C. COLLIER, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, Mills Street, Saint Michaels, Talbot County, MD

  16. Components of glycine reductase from Eubacterium acidaminophilum. Cloning, sequencing and identification of the genes for thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin and selenoprotein PA.

    PubMed

    Lübbers, M; Andreesen, J R

    1993-10-15

    The genes encoding thioredoxin reductase (trxB), thioredoxin (trxA), protein PA of glycine reductase (grdA) and the first 23 amino acids of the large subunit of protein PC of glycine reductase (grdC) belonging to the reductive deamination systems present in Eubacterium acidaminophilum were cloned and sequenced. The proteins were products of closely linked genes with 314 codons (thioredoxin reductase), 110 codons (thioredoxin), and 158 codons (protein PA). The protein previously called 'atypically small lipoamide dehydrogenase' or 'electron transferring flavoprotein' could now conclusively be identified as a thioredoxin reductase (subunit mass of 34781 Da) by the alignment with the enzyme of Escherichia coli showing the same typical order of the corresponding domains. The thioredoxin (molecular mass of 11742 Da) deviated considerably from the known consensus sequence, even in the most strongly conserved redox-active segment WCGPC that was now GCVPC. The selenocysteine of protein PA (molecular mass of 16609 Da) was encoded by TGA. The protein was highly similar to those of Clostridium purinolyticum and Clostridium sticklandii involved in glycine reductase. Thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin of E. acidaminophilum could be successfully expressed in E. coli.

  17. Sequence of a cDNA encoding the bi-specific NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase from the tree Betula pendula and identification of conserved protein regions.

    PubMed

    Friemann, A; Brinkmann, K; Hachtel, W

    1991-05-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) assays revealed a bispecific NAD(P)H-NR (EC 1.6.6.2.) to be the only nitrate-reducing enzyme in leaves of hydroponically grown birches. To obtain the primary structure of the NAD(P)H-NR, leaf poly(A)+ mRNA was used to construct a cDNA library in the lambda gt11 phage. Recombinant clones were screened with heterologous gene probes encoding NADH-NR from tobacco and squash. A 3.0 kb cDNA was isolated which hybridized to a 3.2 kb mRNA whose level was significantly higher in plants grown on nitrate than in those grown on ammonia. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA comprises a reading frame encoding a protein of 898 amino acids which reveals 67%-77% identity with NADH-nitrate reductase sequences from higher plants. To identify conserved and variable regions of the multicentre electron-transfer protein a graphical evaluation of identities found in NR sequence alignments was carried out. Thirteen well-conserved sections exceeding a size of 10 amino acids were found in higher plant nitrate reductases. Sequence comparisons with related redox proteins indicate that about half of the conserved NR regions are involved in cofactor binding. The most striking difference in the birch NAD(P)H-NR sequence in comparison to NADH-NR sequences was found at the putative pyridine nucleotide binding site. Southern analysis indicates that the bi-specific NR is encoded by a single copy gene in birch.

  18. The Three-Dimensional Structure of NAD(P)H:Quinone Reductase, a Flavoprotein Involved in Cancer Chemoprotection and Chemotherapy: Mechanism of the Two-Electron Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rongbao; Bianchet, Mario A.; Talalay, Paul; Amzel, L. Mario

    1995-09-01

    Quinone reductase [NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.99.2], also called DT diaphorase, is a homodimeric FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes obligatory NAD(P)H-dependent two-electron reductions of quinones and protects cells against the toxic and neoplastic effects of free radicals and reactive oxygen species arising from one-electron reductions. These two-electron reductions participate in the reductive bioactivation of cancer chemotherapeutic agents such as mitomycin C in tumor cells. Thus, surprisingly, the same enzymatic reaction that protects normal cells activates cytotoxic drugs used in cancer chemotherapy. The 2.1-Å crystal structure of rat liver quinone reductase reveals that the folding of a portion of each monomer is similar to that of flavodoxin, a bacterial FMN-containing protein. Two additional portions of the polypeptide chains are involved in dimerization and in formation of the two identical catalytic sites to which both monomers contribute. The crystallographic structures of two FAD-containing enzyme complexes (one containing NADP^+, the other containing duroquinone) suggest that direct hydride transfers from NAD(P)H to FAD and from FADH_2 to the quinone [which occupies the site vacated by NAD(P)H] provide a simple rationale for the obligatory two-electron reductions involving a ping-pong mechanism.

  19. Lunar Module ECS (Environmental Control System) - Design Considerations and Failure Modes. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Design considerations and failure modes for the Lunar Module (LM) Environmental Control System (ECS) are described. An overview of the the oxygen supply and cabin pressurization, atmosphere revitalization, water management and heat transport systems are provided. Design considerations including reliability, flight instrumentation, modularization and the change to the use of batteries instead of fuel cells are discussed. A summary is provided for the LM ECS general testing regime.

  20. Simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols with the climate model EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noije, T. P. C.; Le Sager, P.; Segers, A. J.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Krol, M. C.; Hazeleger, W.; Williams, A. G.; Chambers, S. D.

    2014-10-01

    We have integrated the atmospheric chemistry and transport model TM5 into the global climate model EC-Earth version 2.4. We present an overview of the TM5 model and the two-way data exchange between TM5 and the IFS model from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the atmospheric general circulation model of EC-Earth. In this paper we evaluate the simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols in a one-way coupled configuration. We have carried out a decadal simulation for present-day conditions and calculated chemical budgets and climatologies of tracer concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For comparison we have also performed offline simulations driven by meteorological fields from ECMWF's ERA-Interim reanalysis and output from the EC-Earth model itself. Compared to the offline simulations, the online-coupled system produces more efficient vertical mixing in the troposphere, which reflects an improvement of the treatment of cumulus convection. The chemistry in the EC-Earth simulations is affected by the fact that the current version of EC-Earth produces a cold bias with too dry air in large parts of the troposphere. Compared to the ERA-Interim driven simulation, the oxidizing capacity in EC-Earth is lower in the tropics and higher in the extratropics. The atmospheric lifetime of methane in EC-Earth is 9.4 years, which is 7% longer than the lifetime obtained with ERA-Interim but remains well within the range reported in the literature. We further evaluate the model by comparing the simulated climatologies of surface radon-222 and carbon monoxide, tropospheric and surface ozone, and aerosol optical depth against observational data. The work presented in this study is the first step in the development of EC-Earth into an Earth system model with fully interactive atmospheric chemistry and aerosols.

  1. Simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols with the climate model EC-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noije, T. P. C.; Le Sager, P.; Segers, A. J.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Krol, M. C.; Hazeleger, W.

    2014-03-01

    We have integrated the atmospheric chemistry and transport model TM5 into the global climate model EC-Earth version 2.4. We present an overview of the TM5 model and the two-way data exchange between TM5 and the integrated forecasting system (IFS) model from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the atmospheric general circulation model of EC-Earth. In this paper we evaluate the simulation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols in a one-way coupled configuration. We have carried out a decadal simulation for present-day conditions and calculated chemical budgets and climatologies of tracer concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For comparison we have also performed offline simulations driven by meteorological fields from ECMWF's ERA-Interim reanalysis and output from the EC-Earth model itself. Compared to the offline simulations, the online-coupled system produces more efficient vertical mixing in the troposphere, which likely reflects an improvement of the treatment of cumulus convection. The chemistry in the EC-Earth simulations is affected by the fact that the current version of EC-Earth produces a cold bias with too dry air in large parts of the troposphere. Compared to the ERA-Interim driven simulation, the oxidizing capacity in EC-Earth is lower in the tropics and higher in the extratropics. The methane lifetime is 7% higher in EC-Earth, but remains well within the range reported in the literature. We evaluate the model by comparing the simulated climatologies of surface carbon monoxide, tropospheric and surface ozone, and aerosol optical depth against observational data. The work presented in this study is the first step in the development of EC-Earth into an Earth system model with fully interactive atmospheric chemistry and aerosols.

  2. A Search for Companions to the Pulsating sdB Star EC 20117–4014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, T.; Oswalt, T.; Amaral, M.; Jordan, R.

    2017-03-01

    EC 20117–4014 is known to be a spectroscopic binary system consisting of an sdB star and F5V star. It was monitored using the SARA-CT telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile over several observing seasons. Periodic O-C variations were detected in the two highest amplitude pulsations in EC 20117–4014, permitting detection of the F5V companion, whose period and semimajor axis were previously unknown.

  3. Selective neurotensin-derived internally quenched fluorogenic substrates for neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16): comparison with thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15) and neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, V; Campos, M; Hemerly, J P; Ferro, E S; Camargo, A C; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L

    2001-05-15

    Internally quenched fluorescent peptides derived from neurotensin (pELYENKPRRPYIL) sequence were synthesized and assayed as substrates for neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16), thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15 or TOP), and neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11 or NEP). Abz-LYENKPRRPYILQ-EDDnp (where EDDnp is N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine and Abz is ortho-aminobenzoic acid) was derived from neurotensin by the introduction of Q-EDDnp at the C-terminal end of peptide and by the substitution of the pyroglutamic (pE) residue at N-terminus for Abz and a series of shorter peptides was obtained by deletion of amino acids residues from C-terminal, N-terminal, or both sides. Neurolysin and TOP hydrolyzed the substrates at P--Y or Y--I or R--R bonds depending on the sequence and size of the peptides, while NEP cleaved P-Y or Y-I bonds according to its S'(1) specificity. One of these substrates, Abz-NKPRRPQ-EDDnp was a specific and sensitive substrate for neurolysin (k(cat) = 7.0 s(-1), K(m) = 1.19 microM and k(cat)/K(m) = 5882 mM(-1). s(-1)), while it was completely resistant to NEP and poorly hydrolyzed by TOP and also by prolyl oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.21.26). Neurolysin concentrations as low as 1 pM were detected using this substrate under our conditions and its analogue Abz-NKPRAPQ-EDDnp was hydrolyzed by neurolysin with k(cat) = 14.03 s(-1), K(m) = 0.82 microM, and k(cat)/K(m) = 17,110 mM(-1). s(-1), being the best substrate so far described for this peptidase.

  4. The structural protein ODV-EC27 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a multifunctional viral cyclin.

    PubMed

    Belyavskyi, M; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-09-15

    Two major characteristics of baculovirus infection are arrest of the host cell at G2/M phase of the cell cycle with continuing viral DNA replication. We show that Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes for a multifunctional cyclin that may partially explain the molecular basis of these important characteristics of AcMNPV (baculovirus) infection. Amino acids 80-110 of the viral structural protein ODV-EC27 (-EC27) demonstrate 25-30% similarity with cellular cyclins within the cyclin box. Immunoprecipitation results using antibodies to -EC27 show that -EC27 can associate with either cdc2 or cdk6 resulting in active kinase complexes that can phosphorylate histone H1 and retinoblastoma protein in vitro. The cdk6-EC27 complex also associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and we demonstrate that PCNA is a structural protein of both the budded virus and the occlusion-derived virus. These results suggest that -EC27 can function as a multifunctional cyclin: when associated with cdc2, it exhibits cyclin B-like activity; when associated with cdk6, the complex possesses cyclin D-like activity and binds PCNA. The possible roles of such a multifunctional cyclin during the life cycle of baculovirus are discussed, along with potential implications relative to the expression of functionally authentic recombinant proteins by using baculovirus-infected cells.

  5. A Study on Partnering Mechanism in B to B EC Server for Global Supply Chain Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaihara, Toshiya

    B to B Electronic Commerce (EC) technology is now in progress and regarded as an information infrastructure for global business. As the number and diversity of EC participants grows at the agile environment, the complexity of purchasing from a vast and dynamic array of goods and services needs to be hidden from the end user. Putting the complexity into the EC system instead means providing flexible auction server for enabling commerce within different business units. Market mechanism could solve the product distribution problem in the auction server by allocating the scheduled resources according to market prices. In this paper, we propose a partnering mechanism for B to B EC with market-oriented programming that mediates amongst unspecified various companies in the trade, and demonstrate the applicability of the economic analysis to this framework after constructing a primitive EC server. The proposed mechanism facilitates sophisticated B to B EC, which conducts a Pareto optimal solution for all the participating business units in the coming agile era.

  6. Expression of Finger Millet EcDehydrin7 in Transgenic Tobacco Confers Tolerance to Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv Kumar; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Raghavendrarao, Sanagala; Phanindra, Mullapudi Lakshmi Venkata; Venkat Raman, K; Solanke, Amolkumar U; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2015-09-01

    One of the critical alarming constraints for agriculture is water scarcity. In the current scenario, global warming due to climate change and unpredictable rainfall, drought is going to be a master player and possess a big threat to stagnating gene pool of staple food crops. So it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that enable the plants to cope with drought stress. In this study, effort was made to prospect the role of EcDehydrin7 protein from normalized cDNA library of drought tolerance finger millet in transgenic tobacco. Biochemical and molecular analyses of T0 transgenic plants were done for stress tolerance. Leaf disc assay, seed germination test, dehydration assay, and chlorophyll estimation showed EcDehydrin7 protein directly link to drought tolerance. Northern and qRT PCR analyses shows relatively high expression of EcDehydrin7 protein compare to wild type. T0 transgenic lines EcDehydrin7(11) and EcDehydrin7(15) shows superior expression among all lines under study. In summary, all results suggest that EcDehydrin7 protein has a remarkable role in drought tolerance and may be used for sustainable crop breeding program in other food crops.

  7. Cooperative fuzzy games approach to setting target levels of ECs in quality function deployment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihui; Chen, Yizeng; Yin, Yunqiang

    2014-01-01

    Quality function deployment (QFD) can provide a means of translating customer requirements (CRs) into engineering characteristics (ECs) for each stage of product development and production. The main objective of QFD-based product planning is to determine the target levels of ECs for a new product or service. QFD is a breakthrough tool which can effectively reduce the gap between CRs and a new product/service. Even though there are conflicts among some ECs, the objective of developing new product is to maximize the overall customer satisfaction. Therefore, there may be room for cooperation among ECs. A cooperative game framework combined with fuzzy set theory is developed to determine the target levels of the ECs in QFD. The key to develop the model is the formulation of the bargaining function. In the proposed methodology, the players are viewed as the membership functions of ECs to formulate the bargaining function. The solution for the proposed model is Pareto-optimal. An illustrated example is cited to demonstrate the application and performance of the proposed approach.

  8. Statistical strategies for averaging EC50 from multiple dose-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most dose-response studies, repeated experiments are conducted to determine the EC50 value for a chemical, requiring averaging EC50 estimates from a series of experiments. Two statistical strategies, the mixed-effect modeling and the meta-analysis approach, can be applied to estimate average behavior of EC50 values over all experiments by considering the variabilities within and among experiments. We investigated these two strategies in two common cases of multiple dose-response experiments in (a) complete and explicit dose-response relationships are observed in all experiments and in (b) only in a subset of experiments. In case (a), the meta-analysis strategy is a simple and robust method to average EC50 estimates. In case (b), all experimental data sets can be first screened using the dose-response screening plot, which allows visualization and comparison of multiple dose-response experimental results. As long as more than three experiments provide information about complete dose-response relationships, the experiments that cover incomplete relationships can be excluded from the meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates. If there are only two experiments containing complete dose-response information, the mixed-effects model approach is suggested. We subsequently provided a web application for non-statisticians to implement the proposed meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates from multiple dose-response experiments.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductases.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Steven A; Walker, Alexander M; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E; Kang, ChulHee

    2017-02-01

    Cinnamoyl-coenzyme A reductase (CCR) catalyzes the reduction of hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters using NADPH to produce hydroxycinnamyl aldehyde precursors in lignin synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of cinnamoyl-CoA reductases from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a strategic plant for bioenergy production, were deduced from crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic and thermodynamic analyses. Although SbCCR1 displayed higher affinity for caffeoyl-CoA or p-coumaroyl-CoA than for feruloyl-CoA, the enzyme showed significantly higher activity for the latter substrate. Through molecular docking and comparisons between the crystal structures of the Vitis vinifera dihydroflavonol reductase and SbCCR1, residues threonine-154 and tyrosine-310 were pinpointed as being involved in binding CoA-conjugated phenylpropanoids. Threonine-154 of SbCCR1 and other CCRs likely confers strong substrate specificity for feruloyl-CoA over other cinnamoyl-CoA thioesters, and the T154Y mutation in SbCCR1 led to broader substrate specificity and faster turnover. Through data mining using our structural and biochemical information, four additional putative CCR genes were discovered from sorghum genomic data. One of these, SbCCR2, displayed greater activity toward p-coumaroyl-CoA than did SbCCR1, which could imply a role in the synthesis of defense-related lignin. Taken together, these findings provide knowledge about critical residues and substrate preference among CCRs and provide, to our knowledge, the first three-dimensional structure information for a CCR from a monocot species.

  10. Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase-Dependent Redox Networks in Platyhelminth Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Mariana; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Platyhelminth parasites cause chronic infections that are a major cause of disability, mortality, and economic losses in developing countries. Maintaining redox homeostasis is a major adaptive problem faced by parasites and its disruption can shift the biochemical balance toward the host. Platyhelminth parasites possess a streamlined thiol-based redox system in which a single enzyme, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), a fusion of a glutaredoxin (Grx) domain to canonical thioredoxin reductase (TR) domains, supplies electrons to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thioredoxin (Trx). TGR has been validated as a drug target for schistosomiasis. Recent Advances: In addition to glutathione (GSH) and Trx reduction, TGR supports GSH-independent deglutathionylation conferring an additional advantage to the TGR redox array. Biochemical and structural studies have shown that the TR activity does not require the Grx domain, while the glutathione reductase and deglutathionylase activities depend on the Grx domain, which receives electrons from the TR domains. The search for TGR inhibitors has identified promising drug leads, notably oxadiazole N-oxides. Critical Issues: A conspicuous feature of platyhelminth TGRs is that their Grx-dependent activities are temporarily inhibited at high GSSG concentrations. The mechanism underlying the phenomenon and its biological relevance are not completely understood. Future Directions: The functional diversity of Trxs and Grxs encoded in platyhelminth genomes remains to be further assessed to thoroughly understand the TGR-dependent redox network. Optimization of TGR inhibitors and identification of compounds targeting other parasite redox enzymes are good options to clinically develop relevant drugs for these neglected, but important diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 735–745. PMID:22909029

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T: Hypoplastic Left Heart and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Kimberly J; Olivero, Anthony D; Haw, Marcus P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of congenital heart defects is higher in infants with mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. The MTHFR C677T gene decreases the bioavailability of folate and increases plasma homocysteine, a risk factor for thrombosis. There have been no reported cases in the literature on the clinical implications of this procoagulable state in the setting of cyanotic heart disease, which itself has prothrombotic predisposition. Two patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome developed postoperative thrombotic complications, both were homozygous for MTHFR C677T. We present these cases and highlight the implications of MTHFR mutation in the management of complex congenital heart disease.

  12. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated.

  13. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-04-24

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Variations of EC and OC Aerosol Combustion Sources in a Polluted Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Fahrni, S.; Santos, G.; Bush, S. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbonaceous aerosols are a major component of fine air particulate matter (PM2.5) in polluted metropolitan areas and in the global atmosphere. Elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosols influence Earth's energy balance by means of direct and indirect pathways and EC has been suggested as a better indicator of public health impacts from combustion-related sources than PM mass. Quantifying the contribution of fossil fuel and biomass combustion to the EC and OC emissions and their temporal and spatial variations is critical for developing efficient legislative air pollution control measures and successful climate mitigation strategies. In this study, we used radiocarbon (14C) to separate and quantify fossil and biomass contributions to a time series of EC and OC collected at 3 locations in Salt Lake City (SLC). Aerosol samples were collected on quartz fiber filters and a modified OC/EC analyzer was used with the Swiss_4S protocol to isolate and trap the EC fraction. Together with the total carbon (TC) content of the samples, the EC was analyzed for its 14C content with accelerator mass spectrometry. The 14C of OC was derived as a mass balance difference between TC and EC. EC had an annual average fraction modern of 0.13±0.06 and did not vary significantly across seasons. OC had an annual average FM of 0.49±0.13, with the winter mean (0.43±0.11) lower than the summer mean (0.64±0.13) at the 5% significance level. While the 3 stations were chosen to represent a variety of environmental conditions within SLC, no major differences in this source partitioning were observed between stations. During winter, the major sources of air pollutants in SLC are motor vehicles and wood stove combustion and determining their relative contributions has been the subject of debate. Our results indicated that fossil fuels were the dominant source of carbonaceous aerosols during winter, contributing 87% or more of the total EC mass and 40-75% of the OC

  15. Effect of Dursban 480 EC (chlorpyrifos) and Talstar 10 EC (bifenthrin) on the physiological and genetic diversity of microorganisms in soil.

    PubMed

    Medo, Juraj; Maková, Jana; Kovácsová, Silvia; Majerčíková, Kamila; Javoreková, Soňa

    2015-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the impact of the insecticides Dursban 480 EC (with organophosphate compound chlorpyrifos as the active ingredient) and Talstar 10 EC (with pyrethroid bifenthrin as the active ingredient) on the respiration activity and microbial diversity in a sandy loam luvisol soil. The insecticides were applied in two doses: the maximum recommended dose for field application (15 mg kg(-1) for Dursban 480 EC and 6 mg kg(-1) for Talstar 10 EC) and a 100-fold higher dose for extrapolation of their effect. Bacterial and fungal genetic diversity was analysed in soil samples using PCR DGGE and the functional diversity (catabolic potential) was studied using BIOLOG EcoPlates at 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 112 days after insecticide application. Five bacterial groups (α, β, γ proteobacteria, firmibacteria and actinomycetes) and five groups of fungi or fungus-like microorganisms (Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, Oomycota and Zygomycota) were analysed using specific primer sets. This approach provides high resolution of the analysis covering majority of microorganisms in the soil. Only the high-dose Dursban 480 EC significantly changed the community of microorganisms. We observed its negative effect on α- and γ-proteobacteria, as the number of OTUs (operational taxonomic units) decreased until the end of incubation. In the β-proteobacteria group, initial increase of OTUs was followed by strong decrease. Diversity in the firmibacteria, actinomycetes and Zygomycota groups was minimally disturbed by the insecticide application. Dursban 480 EC, however, both positively and negatively affected certain species. Among negatively affected species Sphingomonas, Flavobacterium or Penicillium were detected, but Achromobacter, Luteibacter or Aspergillus were supported by applied insecticide. The analysis of BIOLOG plates using AWCD values indicated a significant increase in metabolic potential of microorganisms in the soil after the high

  16. A Novel NADPH-dependent flavoprotein reductase from Bacillus megaterium acts as an efficient cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Milhim, Mohammed; Gerber, Adrian; Neunzig, Jens; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-08-10

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) require electron transfer partners to catalyze substrate conversions. With regard to biotechnological approaches, the elucidation of novel electron transfer proteins is of special interest, as they can influence the enzymatic activity and specificity of the P450s. In the current work we present the identification and characterization of a novel soluble NADPH-dependent diflavin reductase from Bacillus megaterium with activity towards a bacterial (CYP106A1) and a microsomal (CYP21A2) P450 and, therefore, we referred to it as B. megaterium cytochrome P450 reductase (BmCPR). Sequence analysis of the protein revealed besides the conserved FMN-, FAD- and NADPH-binding motifs, the presence of negatively charged cluster, which is thought to represent the interaction domain with P450s and/or cytochrome c. BmCPR was expressed and purified to homogeneity in Escherichia coli. The purified BmCPR exhibited a characteristic diflavin reductase spectrum, and showed a cytochrome c reducing activity. Furthermore, in an in vitro reconstituted system, the BmCPR was able to support the hydroxylation of testosterone and progesterone with CYP106A1 and CYP21A2, respectively. Moreover, in view of the biotechnological application, the BmCPR is very promising, as it could be successfully utilized to establish CYP106A1- and CYP21A2-based whole-cell biotransformation systems, which yielded 0.3g/L hydroxy-testosterone products within 8h and 0.16g/L 21-hydroxyprogesterone within 6h, respectively. In conclusion, the BmCPR reported herein owns a great potential for further applications and studies and should be taken into consideration for bacterial and/or microsomal CYP-dependent bioconversions.

  17. Cloning and characterization of subunit genes of ribonucleotide reductase, a cell-cycle-regulated enzyme, from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, D; Schuster, S M; Chakrabarti, R

    1993-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (EC 1.17.4.1; RNR), a cell-cycle-regulated enzyme, catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides by the reduction of the corresponding ribonucleotides. The important role of the RNR in DNA synthesis and cell division makes this enzyme an excellent target for chemotherapy. However, nothing is known about this enzyme from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have isolated cDNA clones encoding both the large and small RNR subunits. The sequences of full-length clones of the large and small RNR subunits revealed an open reading frame encoding 806 and 349 amino acids, respectively, and showed significant identity with other RNR sequences in the data base. RNA blot analysis showed that the size of the large and small RNR subunit transcripts are 5.4 kb and 2.2 kb, respectively. Both the RNR subunit transcripts fluctuate in level during the cell cycle, reaching a peak preceding maximal DNA synthesis activity. An oligodeoxynucleotide phosphorothioate that is complementary to sequences around the translational initiation codon of the small RNR subunit showed significant inhibition of growth, as measured by the inhibition in DNA synthesis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8265664

  18. Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase catalyzed proton and hydride transfers: Temporal order and the roles of Asp27 and Tyr100

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C. Tony; Francis, Kevin; Layfield, Joshua P.; Huang, Xinyi; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Kohen, Amnon; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) has become a model for understanding enzyme catalysis, and yet several details of its mechanism are still unresolved. Specifically, the mechanism of the chemical step, the hydride transfer reaction, is not fully resolved. We found, unexpectedly, the presence of two reactive ternary complexes [enzyme:NADPH:7,8-dihydrofolate (E:NADPH:DHF)] separated by one ionization event. Furthermore, multiple kinetic isotope effect (KIE) studies revealed a stepwise mechanism in which protonation of the DHF precedes the hydride transfer from the nicotinamide cofactor (NADPH) for both reactive ternary complexes of the WT enzyme. This mechanism was supported by the pH- and temperature-independent intrinsic KIEs for the C-H→C hydride transfer between NADPH and the preprotonated DHF. Moreover, we showed that active site residues D27 and Y100 play a synergistic role in facilitating both the proton transfer and subsequent hydride transfer steps. Although D27 appears to have a greater effect on the overall rate of conversion of DHF to tetrahydrofolate, Y100 plays an important electrostatic role in modulating the pKa of the N5 of DHF to enable the preprotonation of DHF by an active site water molecule. PMID:25453098

  19. Induction mechanism of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Katsuyoshi; Uritani, Ikuzo; Oba, Kazuko

    2003-05-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, EC1.1.1.34), the key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, was purified from microsomes of potato tuber tissue, and a polyclonal antibody and two monoclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme were prepared. HMGR protein content was measured by immunotitration and radioimmunoassay using these antibodies. HMGR activity was very low in the fresh tissues of both potato tuber and sweet potato root. The activity in potato tuber was increased by cutting and further by additional fungal infection of the cut tissues. In sweet potato root tissue, the activity was scarcely increased after cutting alone, but was markedly increased by additional fungal infection or chemical treatment. The HMGR protein contents in both fresh potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues were also very low, and increased markedly in response to cutting and fungal infection. From these results, we proposed a hypothesis on the induction mechanism of HMGR after cutting and fungal infection in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

  20. Sequence of a cDNA encoding nitrite reductase from the tree Betula pendula and identification of conserved protein regions.

    PubMed

    Friemann, A; Brinkmann, K; Hachtel, W

    1992-02-01

    The sequence of an mRNA encoding nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.7.1.) from the tree Betula pendula was determined. A cDNA library constructed from leaf poly(A)+ mRNA was screened with an oligonucleotide probe deduced from NiR sequences from spinach and maize. A 2.5 kb cDNA was isolated that hybridized to an mRNA, the steady-state level of which increased markedly upon induction with nitrate. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA contains a reading frame encoding a protein of 583 amino acids that reveals 79% identity with NiR from spinach. The transit peptide of the NiR precursor from birch was determined to be 22 amino acids in size by sequence comparison with NiR from spinach and maize and is the shortest transit peptide reported so far. A graphical evaluation of identities found in the NiR sequence alignment revealed nine well conserved sections each exceeding ten amino acids in size. Sequence comparisons with related redox proteins identified essential residues involved in cofactor binding. A putative binding site for ferredoxin was found in the N-terminal half of the protein.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel inhibitors against 1,3,8-trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haifeng; Han, Xinya; Qin, Nian; Wei, Lin; Yang, Yue; Rao, Li; Chi, Bo; Feng, Lingling; Ren, Yanliang; Wan, Jian

    2016-03-15

    1,3,8-Trihydroxynaphthalene reductase (3HNR) is an essential enzymes that is involved in fungal melanin biosynthesis. Based on the structural informations of active site of 3HNR, a series of β-nitrostyrene compounds were rationally designed and synthesized. The enzymatic activities of these compounds showed that most of them exhibited high inhibitory activities (<5.0 μM) against 3HNR; compound 3-2 exhibit the highest inhibitory activity (IC50=0.29 μM). In particular, some of these compounds had moderate fungicidal activity against Magnaporthe grisea. Compound 3-4 showed high in vivo activities against M. grisea (EC50=9.5 ppm). Furthermore, compound 3-2 was selected as a representative molecule, and the probable binding mode of this compound and the surrounding residues in the active site of 3HNR was elucidated by using molecular dock. The positive results suggest that β-nitrostyrene derivatives are most likely to be promising leads toward the discovery of novel agent of rice blast.

  2. Characterization of integrons among Escherichia coli in a region at high incidence of ESBL-EC.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Ming; Wang, Ming-Yi; Yuan, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Hong-Jun; Li, Qin; Zhu, Ya-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Objective : The aim of study was to investigate the distribution of the integrons in Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolates, and analyze the possible relationship between the antimicrobial resistance profiles and the integrons. Methods : The antimicrobial profiles of 376 E. coli strains were analysed by disk diffusion test. The integron genes and variable regions were detected by PCR. Some amplicons were sequenced to determine the gene cassettes style. Results : Of 376 isolates, 223 isolates (59.3%) were confirmed as ESBL-EC. Comparison to ESBL-negative E. coli, the high rates of resistance to the third and fourth generation of cephalosporins, penicillins and amikacin were found in ESBL-EC. Only class 1 was integron detected in the isolates, and the prevalence of it was 66.5%. It was commonly found in ESBL-EC (77.6%, 173/223), which was higher than that of ESBL-negative E. coli (50.3%, 77/153) (p<0.001). Six different genes cassettes were detected in this study and were classified into three groups: dfr17-aadA5, dfrA12-aadA2 and aacA4-CmlA1. Additionally, more than one gene array harboured in 13.9% isolates of ESBL-EC, while in 9.1% isolates of ESBL-negative E.coli. Conclusion : The high incidence of ESBL-EC with resistance to multiple antibiotics were detected in the isolates from Blood stream infection (BSI). More resistant gene cassettes in ESBL-EC may partially underlie the high resistance to amikacin, while no relation exists between the high incidence of ESBL-EC and classes 1~ 3 integrons in this region.

  3. Lung physiology during ECS resuscitation of DCD donors followed by in situ assessment of lung function.

    PubMed

    Reoma, Junewai L; Rojas, Alvaro; Krause, Eric M; Obeid, Nabeel R; Lafayette, Nathan G; Pohlmann, Joshua R; Padiyar, Niru P; Punch, Jeffery D; Cook, Keith E; Bartlett, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support (ECS) of donors after cardiac death (DCD) has been shown to improve abdominal organs for transplantation. This study assesses whether pulmonary congestion occurs during ECS with the heart arrested and describes an in vivo method to assess if lungs are suitable for transplantation from DCD donors after ECS resuscitation. Cardiac arrest was induced in 30 kg pigs, followed by 10 min of warm ischemia. Cannulae were placed into the right atrium (RA) and iliac artery, and veno-arterial ECS was initiated for 90 min with lungs inflated, group 1 (n = 5) or deflated, group 2 (n = 3). Left atrial pressures were measured as a marker for pulmonary congestion. After 90 min of ECS, lung function was evaluated. Cannulae were placed into the pulmonary artery (PA) and left ventricle (LV). A second pump was included, and ECS was converted to a bi-ventricular (bi-VAD) system. The RVAD drained from the RA and pumped into the PA, and the LVAD drained the LV and pumped into the iliac. This brought the lungs back into circulation for a 1-hr assessment period. The oxygenator was turned off, and ventilation was restarted. Flows, blood gases, PA and left atrial pressures, and compliance were recorded. In both the groups, LA pressure was <15 mm Hg during ECS. During the lung assessment period, PA flows were 1.4-2.2 L/min. PO2 was >300 mm Hg, with normal PCO2. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support resuscitation of DCD donors is feasible and allows for assessment of function before procurement. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support does not cause pulmonary congestion, and the lungs retain adequate function for transplantation. Compliance correlated with lung function.

  4. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  5. Human Neuroglobin Functions as a Redox-regulated Nitrite Reductase*

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Tejero, Jesús; Basu, Swati; Azarov, Ivan; Wang, Xunde; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Frizzell, Sheila; Jayaraman, Thottala; Geary, Lisa; Shapiro, Calli; Ho, Chien; Shiva, Sruti; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroglobin is a highly conserved hemoprotein of uncertain physiological function that evolved from a common ancestor to hemoglobin and myoglobin. It possesses a six-coordinate heme geometry with proximal and distal histidines directly bound to the heme iron, although coordination of the sixth ligand is reversible. We show that deoxygenated human neuroglobin reacts with nitrite to form nitric oxide (NO). This reaction is regulated by redox-sensitive surface thiols, cysteine 55 and 46, which regulate the fraction of the five-coordinated heme, nitrite binding, and NO formation. Replacement of the distal histidine by leucine or glutamine leads to a stable five-coordinated geometry; these neuroglobin mutants reduce nitrite to NO ∼2000 times faster than the wild type, whereas mutation of either Cys-55 or Cys-46 to alanine stabilizes the six-coordinate structure and slows the reaction. Using lentivirus expression systems, we show that the nitrite reductase activity of neuroglobin inhibits cellular respiration via NO binding to cytochrome c oxidase and confirm that the six-to-five-coordinate status of neuroglobin regulates intracellular hypoxic NO-signaling pathways. These studies suggest that neuroglobin may function as a physiological oxidative stress sensor and a post-translationally redox-regulated nitrite reductase that generates NO under six-to-five-coordinate heme pocket control. We hypothesize that the six-coordinate heme globin superfamily may subserve a function as primordial hypoxic and redox-regulated NO-signaling proteins. PMID:21296891

  6. A mutant of barley lacking NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lea, P. )

    1989-04-01

    A mutant of barley, LaPr 88/29, deficient in peroxisomal NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been identified. Compared to the wild type the activities of NADH-HPR and NADPH-HPR were severely reduced but the mutant was still capable of fixing CO{sub 2} at rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type in air. Although lacking an enzyme in the main photorespiratory pathway, there appeared to be little disruption to photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C) serine were similar in both mutant and wild type. LaPr 88/29 has been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase (GR) and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-HPR activity is due to the NADH-HPR enzyme. Immunological studies, using antibodies raised against spinach HPR, have shown that the NADH-dependent enzyme protein is absent in LaPr 88/29 but there appears to be enhanced synthesis of the NADPH-dependent enzyme protein.

  7. Fluorescent analogues of methotrexate: characterization and interaction with dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A A; Kempton, R J; Anstead, G M; Freisheim, J H

    1983-01-18

    The dansylated derivatives of lysine and ornithine analogues of methotrexate exhibit fluorescence properties characteristic of the dansyl moiety with an excitation at 328 nm and an emission maximum at 580 nm in aqueous media. As in the case of dansyl amino acids, the fluorescence emission is dependent upon the polarity of the medium. In solvents of low dielectric constant there is an enhancement of the dansyl fluorescence intensity as well as a shift to shorter wavelengths. The dansylated analogues show a reduction in the quantum yields as compared to N epsilon-dansyl-L-lysine and 5-(N,N-dimethylamino)-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid. The absorption spectra of the two dansyl analogues are similar to the spectra of the parent basic amino acid precursors but with reduced molar extinction values. The two fluorescent analogues of methotrexate were found to be potent inhibitors of purified dihydrofolate reductases from Lactobacillus casei and from chicken liver. The binding of these fluorescent analogues to either dihydrofolate reductase resulted in 10-15-nm blue shift of the ligand emission maxima and a 2-5-fold enhancement of the emission. These fluorescent properties of the bound ligands indicate a possible interaction of the dansyl moiety with a region on the enzyme molecule which is more hydrophobic relative to the surrounding solvent.

  8. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau, Y.; Roby, C.; Meyer, C.M.; Vignais, P.M. )

    1989-07-25

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, nitrogenase is regulated by a reversible covalent modification of Fe protein or dinitrogenase reductase (Rc2). The linkage of the modifying group to inactive Rc2 was found to be sensitive to alkali and to neutral hydroxylamine. Complete release of the modifying group was achieved by incubation of inactive Rc2 in 0.4 or 1 M hydroxylamine. After hydroxylamine treatment of the Rc2 preparation, the modifying group could be isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The modifying group comigrated with ADP-ribose on both ion-exchange HPLC and thin-layer chromatography. Analyses by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided further evidence that the modifying group was ADP-ribose. The NMR spectrum of inactive Rc2 exhibited signals characteristic of ADP-ribose; integration of these signals allowed calculation of a molar ration ADP-ribose/Rc2 of 0.63. A hexapeptide carrying the ADP-ribose moiety was purified from a subtilisin digest of inactive Rc2. The structure of this peptide, determined by amino acid analysis and sequencing, is Gly-Arg(ADP-ribose)-Gly-Val-Ile-Thr. This structure allows identification of the binding site for ADP-ribose as Arg 101 of the polypeptide chain of Rc2. It is concluded that nitrogenase activity in R. capsulatus is regulated by reversible ADP-ribosylation of a specific arginyl residue of dinitrogenase reductase.

  9. Hydroxyurea-resistant vaccinia virus: overproduction of ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Slabaugh, M.B.; Mathews, C.K.

    1986-11-01

    Repeated passage of vaccinia virus in increasing concentrations of hydroxyurea followed by plaque purification resulted in the isolation of variants capable of growth in 5 mM hydroxyurea, a drug concentration which inhibited the reproduction of wild-type vaccinia virus 1000-fold. Analyses of viral protein synthesis by using (/sup 35/S)methionine pulse-labeling at intervals throughout the infection cycle revealed that all isolates overproduced a 34,000-molecular-weight (MW) early polypeptide. Measurement of ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase activity after infection indicated that 4- to 10-fold more activity was induced by hydroxyurea-resistant viruses than by the wild-type virus. A two-step partial purification resulted in a substantial enrichment for the 34,000-MW protein from extracts of wild-type and hydroxyurea-resistant-virus-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. In the presence of the drug, the isolates incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA earlier and a rate substantially greater than that of the wild type, although the onset of DNA synthesis was delayed in both cases. The drug resistance trait was markedly unstable in all isolates. In the absence of selective pressure, plaque-purified isolated readily segregated progeny that displayed a wide range of resistance phenotypes. The results of this study indicate that vaccinia virus encodes a subunit of ribonucleotide reductase which is 34,000-MW early protein whose overproduction confers hydroxyurea resistance on reproducing viruses.

  10. Increased nitrite reductase activity of fetal versus adult ovine hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Arlin B.; Tiso, Mauro; Verma, Shilpa T.; Lo, Jennifer; Joshi, Mahesh S.; Azarov, Ivan; Longo, Lawrence D.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Power, Gordon G.

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nitrite, NO2−, serves as a circulating reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is activated during physiological and pathological hypoxia. One of the intravascular mechanisms for nitrite conversion to NO is a chemical nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin. The rate of NO production from this reaction is increased when hemoglobin is in the R conformation. Because the mammalian fetus exists in a low-oxygen environment compared with the adult and is exposed to episodes of severe ischemia during the normal birthing process, and because fetal hemoglobin assumes the R conformation more readily than adult hemoglobin, we hypothesized that nitrite reduction to NO may be enhanced in the fetal circulation. We found that the reaction was faster for fetal than maternal hemoglobin or blood and that the reactions were fastest at 50–80% oxygen saturation, consistent with an R-state catalysis that is predominant for fetal hemoglobin. Nitrite concentrations were similar in blood taken from chronically instrumented normoxic ewes and their fetuses but were elevated in response to chronic hypoxia. The findings suggest an augmented nitrite reductase activity of fetal hemoglobin and that the production of nitrite may participate in the regulation of vascular NO homeostasis in the fetus. PMID:19028797

  11. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  12. Properties of the arsenate reductase of plasmid R773.

    PubMed

    Gladysheva, T B; Oden, K L; Rosen, B P

    1994-06-14

    Resistance to toxic oxyanions in Escherichia coli is conferred by the ars operon carried on plasmid R773. The gene products of this operon catalyze extrusion of antimonials and arsenicals from cells of E. coli, thus providing resistance to those toxic oxyanions. In addition, resistance to arsenate is conferred by the product of the arsC gene. In this report, purified ArsC protein was shown to catalyze reduction of arsenate to arsenite. The enzymatic activity of the ArsC protein required glutaredoxin as a source of reducing equivalents. Other reductants, including glutathione and thioredoxin, were not effective electron donors. A spectrophotometric assay was devised in which arsenate reduction was coupled to NADPH oxidation. The results obtained with the coupled assay corresponded to those found by direct reduction of radioactive arsenate to arsenite. The only substrate of the reaction was arsenate (Km = 8 mM); other oxyanions including phosphate, sulfate, and antimonate were not reduced. Phosphate and sulfate were weak inhibitors, while the product, arsenite, was a stronger inhibitor (Ki = 0.1 mM). Arsenate reductase activity exhibited a pH optimum of 6.3-6.8. These results indicate that the ArsC protein is a novel reductase, and elucidation of its enzymatic mechanism should be of interest.

  13. Sequence and properties of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase from Enterobacter cloacae PB2.

    PubMed

    French, C E; Nicklin, S; Bruce, N C

    1996-11-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase, which reductively liberates nitrite from nitrate esters, is related to old yellow enzyme. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase follows a ping-pong mechanism with competitive substrate inhibition by NADPH, is strongly inhibited by steroids, and is capable of reducing the unsaturated bond of 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  14. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  15. QTL analysis of ferric reductase activity in the model legume lotus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological and molecular studies have demonstrated that iron accumulation from the soil into Strategy I plants can be limited by ferric reductase activity. An initial study of Lotus japonicus ecotypes Miyakojima MG-20 and Gifu B-129 identified significant leaf chlorosis and ferric reductase activ...

  16. Biliverdin Reductase Mediates Hypoxia-Induced EMT via PI3-Kinase and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rui; Yao, Ying; Han, Min; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Wei, Juncheng; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding; Xu, Gang

    2008-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia in the renal parenchyma is thought to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), leading to fibrogenesis and ultimately end-stage renal failure. Biliverdin reductase, recently identified as a serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase that may activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, is upregulated in response to reactive oxygen species that may accompany hypoxia. We investigated this potential role of biliverdin reductase in hypoxia-induced renal tubular EMT. Expression of biliverdin reductase was upregulated in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK-2) cultured in hypoxic conditions (1% O2), and this was accompanied by reduced expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin. Inhibiting PI3K reversed these changes, consistent with EMT. In normoxic conditions, overexpression of biliverdin reductase promoted similar characteristics of EMT, which were also reversed by inhibiting PI3K. Furthermore, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knockdown biliverdin reductase, we demonstrated that the enzyme associates with phosphorylated Akt and mediates the hypoxia-induced EMT phenotype. In vivo, expression of biliverdin reductase increased in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and immunohistochemistry of serial sections demonstrated similar localization of phosphorylated Akt and biliverdin reductase. In conclusion, biliverdin reductase mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through a PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway. PMID:18184861

  17. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  18. Comparison of finasteride (Proscar), a 5 alpha reductase inhibitor, and various commercial plant extracts in in vitro and in vivo 5 alpha reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L; Primka, R L; Berman, C; Vergult, G; Gabriel, M; Pierre-Malice, M; Gibelin, B

    1993-01-01

    Human prostate was used as a source of 5 alpha reductase. Compounds were incubated with an enzyme preparation and [3H]testosterone. [3H]-dihydrotestosterone production was measured to calculate 5 alpha reductase activity. IC50 values (ng/ml) were finasteride = 1; Permixon = 5,600; Talso = 7,000; Strogen Forte = 31,000; Prostagutt = 40,000; and Tadenan = 63,000. Bazoton and Harzol had no activity at concentrations up to 500,000 ng/ml. In castrate rats stimulated with testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT), finasteride, but not Permixon or Bazoton, inhibited T stimulated prostate growth, while none of the three compounds inhibited DHT stimulated growth. These results demonstrate that finasteride inhibits 5 alpha reductase, while Permixon and Bazoton have neither anti-androgen nor 5 alpha reductase inhibitory activity. In addition, in a 7 day human clinical trial, finasteride, but not Permixon or placebo, decreased serum DHT in men, further confirming the lack of 5 alpha reductase inhibition by Permixon. Finasteride and the plant extracts listed above do not inhibit the binding of DHT to the rat prostatic androgen receptor (concentrations to 100 micrograms/ml). Based on these results, it is unlikely that these plant extracts would shrink the prostate by inhibiting androgen action or 5 alpha reductase.

  19. Isolation of ascorbate free radical reductase from rabbit lens soluble fraction.

    PubMed

    Bando, Masayasu; Inoue, Takashi; Oka, Mikako; Nakamura, Kayako; Kawai, Kenji; Obazawa, Hajime; Kobayashi, Shizuko; Takehana, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase with diaphorase activity was isolated from the rabbit lens soluble fraction to characterise some molecular properties of the enzyme. The isolation was accomplished using gel filtration (Sephadex G-75 superfine or Sephacryl S-200 HR), affinity chromatography (Affi-Gel Blue), native isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A major soluble AFR reductase was found at an isoelectric point of 8.4 and a molecular weight of 31 kDa, and a few minor enzymes were also detected in the range of pI 7.0-8.6. An unknown N-terminal partial amino acid sequence was determined in one peptide fragment prepared from the major enzyme fraction. From the sequence analysis, it is discussed that the lens soluble AFR reductase may differ from NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase reported to be involved in the membrane-bound AFR reductase activity of mitochondria, microsomes and plasma membrane.

  20. Trypanothione Reductase: A Viable Chemotherapeutic Target for Antitrypanosomal and Antileishmanial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Omar F.

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two debilitating disease groups caused by parasites of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. and affecting millions of people worldwide. A brief outline of the potential targets for rational drug design against these diseases are presented, with an emphasis placed on the enzyme trypanothione reductase. Trypanothione reductase was identified as unique to parasites and proposed to be an effective target against trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The biochemical basis of selecting this enzyme as a target, with reference to the simile and contrast to human analogous enzyme glutathione reductase, and the structural aspects of its active site are presented. The process of designing selective inhibitors for the enzyme trypanothione reductase has been discussed. An overview of the different chemical classes of inhibitors of trypanothione reductase with their inhibitory activities against the parasites and their prospects as future chemotherapeutic agents are briefly revealed. PMID:21901070

  1. Low-EC-Content Electrolytes for Low-Temperature Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Surampudi, Subbarao

    2003-01-01

    Electrolytes comprising LiPF6 dissolved at a concentration of 1.0 M in three different mixtures of alkyl carbonates have been found well suited for use in rechargeable lithium-ion electrochemical cells at low temperatures. These and other electrolytes have been investigated in continuing research directed toward extending the lower limit of practical operating temperatures of Li-ion cells down to -60 C. This research at earlier stages was reported in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, the three most recent being "Ethyl Methyl Carbonate as a Cosolvent for Lithium-Ion Cells" (NPO-20605), Vol. 25, Low-EC-Content Electrolytes for Low-Temperature Li-Ion Cells No. 6 (June 2001), page 53; "Alkyl Pyrocarbonate Electrolyte Additives for Li-Ion Cells" (NPO-20775), Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 37; and "Fluorinated Alkyl Carbonates as Cosolvents in Li-Ion Cells (NPO-21076), Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 38. The present solvent mixtures, in terms of volume proportions of their ingredients, are 1 ethylene carbonate (EC) + 1 diethyl carbonate (DEC) + 1 dimethyl carbonate (DMC) + 3 ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC); 3EC + 3DMC + 14EMC; and 1EC + 1DEC + 1DMC + 4EMC. Relative to similar mixtures reported previously, the present mixtures, which contain smaller proportions of EC, have been found to afford better performance in experimental Li-ion cells at temperatures < -20 C.

  2. EC50 estimation of antioxidant activity in DPPH· assay using several statistical programs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Bertin, Riccardo; Froldi, Guglielmina

    2013-05-01

    DPPH(·) assay is a reliable method to determine the antioxidant capacity of biological substrates. The DPPH(·) radical scavenging activity is generally quantified in terms of inhibition percentage of the pre-formed free radical by antioxidants, and the EC(50) (concentration required to obtain a 50% antioxidant effect) is a typically employed parameter to express the antioxidant capacity and to compare the activity of different compounds. In this study, the EC(50) estimation was performed using a comparative approach based on various regression models implemented in six specialized computer programs: GraphPad Prism® version 5.01, BLeSq, OriginPro® 8.5.1, SigmaPlot® 12, BioDataFit® 1.02, and IBM SPSS Statistics® Desktop 19.0. For this project, quercetin, catechin, ascorbic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and acetylcysteine were screened as antioxidant standards with DPPH(·) assay to define the EC(50) parameters. All the statistical programs gave similar EC(50) values, but GraphPad Prism® five-parameter analysis pointed out a best performance, also showing a minor variance in relation to the actual EC(50).

  3. Single-Particle Composition Measured in an Alpine Valley: Wood Smoke, EC and BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepmann, C.; Gross, D. S.; Benzaid, S.; Christensen, J.; Turetsky, E.; Musicant, D.; Sandradewi, J.; Prevot, A.; Baltensperger, U.

    2007-12-01

    Particulate pollution is an issue of concern in today's society. Current regulations focus on the mass of particulate matter (PM) per volume of air, and not the source or chemical composition of the PM. Here we will present results from the AEROWOOD campaign in Roveredo, Switzerland where we investigated the PM composition measured using a single-particle mass spectrometer (TSI 3800 ATOFMS) to identify the sources of ambient particles. The goal was to differentiate wood smoke particles from diesel emissions. Roveredo is located in a deep alpine valley with strong wintertime thermal inversions, trapping the emissions. Local homes are predominantly heated by wood fires, and the village is located along a motorway that crosses the Swiss alps, providing two distinct particle sources. The particles sampled with the ATOFMS have been analyzed in a variety of ways with a focus on the temporal trends of the different particle types identified. Of particular interest is the distinction made between elemental carbon (EC) and black carbon (BC). During AEROWOOD, EC was measured chemically using real- time thermo/optical methods. BC was recorded directly by absorption, using an aethalometer. Regression models have been constructed to predict the EC and BC values using the single-particle mass spectra, providing chemical insight into the differences in these quantities. Additionally, comparing the timeline plots of EC, BC and the particle types found from the ATOFMS data should provide an idea as to the sources of EC and BC in this location.

  4. Assignment of EC numbers to enzymatic reactions with reaction difference fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qian-Nan; Zhu, Hui; Li, Xiaobing; Zhang, Manman; Deng, Zhe; Yang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Zixin

    2012-01-01

    The EC numbers represent enzymes and enzyme genes (genomic information), but they are also utilized as identifiers of enzymatic reactions (chemical information). In the present work (ECAssigner), our newly proposed reaction difference fingerprints (RDF) are applied to assign EC numbers to enzymatic reactions. The fingerprints of reactant molecules minus the fingerprints of product molecules will generate reaction difference fingerprints, which are then used to calculate reaction Euclidean distance, a reaction similarity measurement, of two reactions. The EC number of the most similar training reaction will be assigned to an input reaction. For 5120 balanced enzymatic reactions, the RDF with a fingerprint length at 3 obtained at the sub-subclass, subclass, and main class level with cross-validation accuracies of 83.1%, 86.7%, and 92.6% respectively. Compared with three published methods, ECAssigner is the first fully automatic server for EC number assignment. The EC assignment system (ECAssigner) is freely available via: http://cadd.whu.edu.cn/ecassigner/.

  5. Real-time multi-EC-actuator MHD control on TCV

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, T. P.; Canal, G.; Duval, B. P.; Graves, J. P.; Kim, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Testa, D.; Felici, F.; Collaboration: TCV Team

    2014-02-12

    Real-time control of multiple plasma actuators is a requirement in advanced tokamaks; for example for burn control, plasma current profile control and MHD stabilization - EC wave absorption is ideally suited especially for the latter. For example, on ITER 24 EC sources can be switched between 54 inputs at the torus. In the torus, 5 launchers direct the power to various locations across the plasma profile via 11 steerable mirrors. For optimal usage of the available power, the aiming and polarization of the beams must be adapted to the plasma configuration and the needs of the scenario. Since the EC system performs many competing tasks, present day systems should demonstrate the ability of an EC plant to deal with several targets in parallel and/or to switch smoothly between goals to attain overall satisfaction. Recently TCV has taken a first step towards such a demonstration. Several EC launchers are used simultaneously to regulate the sawtooth period and to preempt m/n = 3/2 NTMs, by controlling the power levels. In parallel, a second algorithm stabilizes any NTM that saturates [1]. These and real-time MHD control experiments on ELMs [2] are presented.

  6. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate potently inhibits the in vitro activity of hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase[S

    PubMed Central

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Spina, Michele; Tran, Chi Nhan; Falconi, Maurizio; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is the rate-controlling enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, and owing to its biological and pharmacological relevance, researchers have investigated several compounds capable of modulating its activity with the hope of developing new hypocholesterolemic drugs. In particular, polyphenol-rich extracts were extensively tested for their cholesterol-lowering effect as alternatives, or adjuvants, to the conventional statin therapies, but a full understanding of the mechanism of their action has yet to be reached. Our work reports on a detailed kinetic and equilibrium study on the modulation of HMGR by the most-abundant catechin in green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Using a concerted approach involving spectrophotometric, optical biosensor, and chromatographic analyses, molecular docking, and site-directed mutagenesis on the cofactor site of HMGR, we have demonstrated that EGCG potently inhibits the in vitro activity of HMGR (Ki in the nanomolar range) by competitively binding to the cofactor site of the reductase. Finally, we evaluated the effect of combined EGCG-statin administration. PMID:21357570

  7. A new cotton SDR family gene encodes a polypeptide possessing aldehyde reductase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase activities.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Song, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Qin, Yong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    To understand regulatory mechanisms of cotton fiber development, microarray analysis has been performed for upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Based on this, a cDNA (GhKCR3) encoding a polypeptide belonging to short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase family was isolated and cloned. It contains an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding a polypeptide of 328 amino acid residues. Following its overexpression in bacterial cells, the purified recombinant protein specifically uses NADPH to reduce a variety of short-chain aldehydes. A fragment between Gly180 and Gly191 was found to be essential for its catalytic activity. Though the GhKCR3 gene shares low sequence similarities to the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YBR159w that encodes 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR) catalyzing the second step of fatty acid elongation, it was surprisingly able to complement the yeast ybr159wDelta mutant. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that very long-chain fatty acids, especially C26:0, were produced in the ybr159wDelta mutant cells expressing GhKCR3. Applying palmitoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA as substrates, GhKCR3 showed KCR activity in vitro. Quantitative real time-PCR analysis indicated GhKCR3 transcripts accumulated in rapidly elongating fibers, roots, and stems. Our results suggest that GhKCR3 is probably a novel KCR contributing to very long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in plants.

  8. Polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and thymidylate synthase (TYMS) in multiple myeloma risk.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carmen S P; Ortega, Manoela M; Ozelo, Margareth C; Araujo, Renato C; De Souza, Cármino A; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M; Costa, Fernando F

    2008-03-01

    We tested whether the polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene, MTHFR C677T and A1298C, the methionine synthase gene, MTR A2756G, the methionine synthase reductase gene, MTRR A66G, and the thymidylate synthase gene, TYMS 2R-->3R, involved in folate and methionine metabolism, altered the risk for multiple myeloma (MM). Genomic DNA from 123MM patients and 188 controls was analysed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion for the polymorphism analyses. The frequency of the MTR 2756 AG plus GG genotype was higher in patients than in controls (39.8% versus 23.4%, P=0.001). Individual carriers of the variant allele G had a 2.31 (95% CI: 1.38-3.87)-fold increased risk for MM compared with others. In contrast, similar frequencies of the MTHFR, the MTRR and the TYMS genotypes were seen in patients and controls. These results suggest, for the first time, a role for the MTR A2756G polymorphism in MM risk in our country, but should be confirmed by large-scale epidemiological studies with patients and controls age matched.

  9. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) gene polymorphisms and adult meningioma risk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Yan-Wen; Shi, Hua-Ping; Wang, Yan-Zhong; Li, Gui-Ling; Yu, Hai-Tao; Xie, Xin-You

    2013-11-01

    The causes of meningiomas are not well understood. Folate metabolism gene polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with various human cancers. It is still controversial and ambiguous between the functional polymorphisms of folate metabolism genes 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) and risk of adult meningioma. A population-based case–control study involving 600 meningioma patients (World Health Organization [WHO] Grade I, 391 cases; WHO Grade II, 167 cases; WHO Grade III, 42 cases) and 600 controls was done for the MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTRR A66G, and MTR A2756G variants in Chinese Han population. The folate metabolism gene polymorphisms were determined by using a polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Meningioma cases had a significantly lower frequency of MTHFR 677 TT genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 0.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.74; P = 0.001] and T allele (OR = 0.80, 95 % CI 0.67–0.95; P = 0.01) than controls. A significant association between risk of meningioma and MTRR 66 GG (OR = 1.41, 95 % CI 1.02–1.96; P = 0.04) was also observed. When stratifying by the WHO grade of meningioma, no association was found. Our study suggested that MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G variants may affect the risk of adult meningioma in Chinese Han population.

  10. Curcumin is a tight-binding inhibitor of the most efficient human daunorubicin reductase--Carbonyl reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Hornung, Jan; Ebert, Bettina; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund

    2015-06-05

    Curcumin is a major component of the plant Curcuma longa L. It is traditionally used as a spice and coloring in foods and is an important ingredient in curry. Curcuminoids have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and gained increasing attention as potential neuroprotective and cancer preventive compounds. In the present study, we report that curcumin is a potent tight-binding inhibitor of human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1, Ki=223 nM). Curcumin acts as a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate 2,3-hexandione as revealed by plotting IC50-values against various substrate concentrations and most likely as a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH. Molecular modeling supports the finding that curcumin occupies the cofactor binding site of CBR1. Interestingly, CBR1 is one of the most effective human reductases in converting the anthracycline anti-tumor drug daunorubicin to daunorubicinol. The secondary alcohol metabolite daunorubicinol has significantly reduced anti-tumor activity and shows increased cardiotoxicity, thereby limiting the clinical use of daunorubicin. Thus, inhibition of CBR1 may increase the efficacy of daunorubicin in cancer tissue and simultaneously decrease its cardiotoxicity. Western-blots demonstrated basal expression of CBR1 in several cell lines. Significantly less daunorubicin reduction was detected after incubating A549 cell lysates with increasing concentrations of curcumin (up to 60% less with 50 μM curcumin), suggesting a beneficial effect in the co-treatment of anthracycline anti-tumor drugs together with curcumin.

  11. Naegleria fowleri: a free-living highly pathogenic amoeba contains trypanothione/trypanothione reductase and glutathione/glutathione reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Ondarza, Raúl N; Hurtado, Gerardo; Tamayo, Elsa; Iturbe, Angélica; Hernández, Eva

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents definitive data showing that the thiol-bimane compound isolated and purified by HPLC from Naegleria fowleri trophozoites unequivocally corresponds by matrix assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS, to the characteristic monoprotonated ion of trypanothione-(bimane)(2) [M(+)H(+)] of m/z 1104.57 and to the trypanothione-(bimane) of m/z 914.46. The trypanothione disulfide T(S)(2) was also found to have a molecular ion of m/z 723.37. Additionally HPLC demonstrated that thiol-bimane compounds corresponding to cysteine and glutathione were present in Naegleria. The ion patterns of the thiol-bimane compounds prepared from commercial trypanothione standard, Entamoeba histolytica and Crithidia luciliae are identical to the Naegleria thiol-bimane compound. Partially purified extracts from N. fowleri showed the coexistence of glutathione and trypanothione reductases activities. There is not doubt that the thiol compound trypanothione, which was previously thought to occur only in Kinetoplastida, is also present in the human pathogens E. histolytica and N. fowleri, as well as in the non-pathogenic euglenozoan E. gracilis. The presence of the trypanothione/trypanothione reductase system in N. fowleri creates the possibility of using this enzyme as a new "drug target" for rationally designed drugs to eliminate the parasite, without affecting the human host.

  12. Thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system of Streptomyces clavuligerus: sequences, expression, and organization of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Yanko, M; Mislovati, M; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Av-Gay, Y; Aharonowitz, Y

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase of Streptomyces clavuligerus were cloned, and their DNA sequences were determined. Previously, we showed that S. clavuligerus possesses a disulfide reductase with broad substrate specificity that biochemically resembles the thioredoxin oxidoreductase system and may play a role in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It consists consists of two components, a 70-kDa NADPH-dependent flavoprotein disulfide reductase with two identical subunits and a 12-kDa heat-stable protein general disulfide reductant. In this study, we found, by comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences, that the 35-kDa protein is in fact thioredoxin reductase; it shares 48.7% amino acid sequence identity with Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase, the 12-kDa protein is thioredoxin, and it shares 28 to 56% amino acid sequence identity with other thioredoxins. The streptomycete thioredoxin reductase has the identical cysteine redox-active region--Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys--and essentially the same flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADPH dinucleotide-binding sites as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and is partially able to accept E. coli thioredoxin as a substrate. The streptomycete thioredoxin has the same cysteine redox-active segment--Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys--that is present in virtually all eucaryotic and procaryotic thioredoxins. However, in vivo it is unable to donate electrons to E. coli methionine sulfoxide reductase and does not serve as a substrate in vitro for E. coli thioredoxin reductase. The S. clavuligerus thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) genes are organized in a cluster. They are transcribed in the same direction and separated by 33 nucleotides. In contrast, the trxA and trxB genes of E. coli, the only other organism in which both genes have been characterized, are physically widely separated. Images PMID:8349555

  13. Flavin reductase: sequence of cDNA from bovine liver and tissue distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, K S; Hultquist, D E

    1994-01-01

    Flavin reductase catalyzes electron transfer from reduced pyridine nucleotides to methylene blue or riboflavin, and this catalysis is the basis of the therapeutic use of methylene blue or riboflavin in the treatment of methemoglobinemia. A cDNA for a mammalian flavin reductase has been isolated and sequenced. Degenerate oligonucleotides, with sequences based on amino acid sequences of peptides derived from bovine erythrocyte flavin reductase, were used as primers in PCR to selectively amplify a partial cDNA that encodes the bovine reductase. The template used in the PCR was first strand cDNA synthesized from bovine liver total RNA using oligo(dT) primers. A PCR product was used as a specific probe to screen a bovine liver cDNA library. The sequence determined from two overlapping clones contains an open reading frame of 621 nucleotides and encodes 206 amino acids. The amino acid sequence deduced from the bovine liver flavin reductase cDNA matches the amino acid sequences determined for erythrocyte reductase-derived peptides, and the predicted molecular mass of 22,001 Da for the liver reductase agrees well with the molecular mass of 21,994 Da determined for the erythrocyte reductase by electrospray mass spectrometry. The amino acid sequence at the N terminus of the reductase has homology to sequences of pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes, and the predicted secondary structure, beta alpha beta, resembles the common nucleotide-binding structural motif. RNA blot analysis indicates a single 1-kilobase reductase transcript in human heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, placenta, and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:7937764

  14. NASA FACTS: E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite (EcAMSat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Tomko, David

    2013-01-01

    The E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite(EcAMSat) mission will investigate space microgravity affects on the antibiotic resistance of E. coli, a bacterial pathogen responsible for urinary tract infection in humans and animals. EcAMSat is being developed through a partnership between NASAs Ames Research Center and the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. A.C. Matin is the Stanford University Principal Investigator. EcAMSat will investigate spaceflight effects on bacterial antibiotic resistance and its genetic basis. Bacterial antibiotic resistance may pose a danger to astronauts in microgravity, where the immune response is weakened. Scientists believe that the results of this experiment could help design effective countermeasures to protect astronauts health during long duration human space missions.

  15. Ethanol production, corn gluten feed, and EC trade. Agriculture information bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.

    1993-07-01

    The profitability of ethanol depends not only on sales of ethanol, but on sales of several coproducts of corn wet-milling such as corn gluten feed (CGF). CGF demand and supply are affected by several European Community (EC) and US policies, such as EC grain price supports and US energy policies. Changes in existing policies and programs could have a significant effect on the CGF market and, consequently, on the profitability of ethanol production. The report examines the implications of several policy options on demand, supply, and price of CGF and on the profitability of ethanol production. The policy changes examined include: (1) the effect of proposed changes in EC farm and trade policies, and (2) the effect of increased ethanol production due to proposed US environmental policies, such as the reauthorization of the Clean Air Act.

  16. HIV-1 Dual Infected LTNP-EC Patients Developed an Unexpected Antibody Cross-Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pernas, Maria; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Casado, Concepcion; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Olivares, Isabel; Yuste, Eloisa; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the neutralization breadth in dually infected (DI) HIV-1 long-term non-progressor elite controller patients (LTNP-EC) using a representative minipanel of 6 viruses from 5 different subtypes. Our results showed an improved neutralization breadth in DI LTNP-EC patients when compared with matched LTNP single-infected patients. The role of viral diversity in neutralization was estimated with the Shannon Entropy and the p-distance in viral quasispecies. We found a positive correlation between neutralization breadth and diversity within the viral quasispecies. This correlation could explain why a group of LTNP-EC patients developed a broad neutralizing response despite having undetectable levels of viremia. PMID:26258485

  17. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination.

  18. Description of the docking module ECS for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. W.; Jaax, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The role of the Docking Module ECS (Environmental Control System) to be used on the Apollo-Soyuz Test mission is to provide a means for crewmen to transfer safely between the Apollo and Soyuz vehicles in a shirtsleeve environment. This paper describes the Docking Module ECS and includes the philosophy and rationale used in evaluating and selecting the capabilities that are required to satisfy the Docking Module's airlock function: (1) adjusting the pressure and composition of the atmosphere to effect crew transfer and (2) providing a shirtsleeve environment during transfer operations. An analytical evaluation is given of the environmental parameters (including CO2 level, humidity, and temperature) during a normal transfer timeline.

  19. Clinical pharmacokinetics and exposure-toxicity relationship of a folate-Vinca alkaloid conjugate EC145 in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sausville, Edward A; Klein, Patrick J; Morgenstern, David; Leamon, Christopher P; Messmann, Richard A; LoRusso, Patricia

    2009-12-01

    The clinical pharmacokinetics and exposure-toxicity relationship were determined for EC145, a conjugate of folic acid and the Vinca alkaloid desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH), in cancer patients. EC145 plasma concentration and toxicity data were obtained from a first-in-man phase I study and analyzed by nonlinear mixed effect modeling with NONMEM. EC145 concentration-time profile after intravenous administration was well described by a 2-compartment model with a first-order elimination process from the central compartment. BSA was identified as a significant covariate on EC145 clearance, accounting for 14.6% of interindividual variation on EC145 clearance. Population estimates for the clearance, steady-state volume of distribution, distribution, and elimination half-lives were 56.1 L/h, 26.1 L, 6 minutes, and 26 minutes, respectively. Constipation and peripheral neuropathy were the most common and clinically relevant toxicities. The clearance and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) were significant predictors for the incidence of EC145-induced constipation but not peripheral neuropathy. In conclusion, EC145 is rapidly distributed and eliminated in cancer patients. BSA is a statistically significant covariate on EC145 clearance, but its clinical relevance remains to be defined. EC145-induced constipation occurs at a higher frequency in the patients with lower EC145 clearance, where the drug exposure tends to be higher.

  20. B-vitamins, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ward, Mary; Wilson, Carol P; Strain, J J; Horigan, Geraldine; Scott, John M; McNulty, Helene

    2011-07-01

    Hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke. A common polymorphism in the gene encoding the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), previously identified as the main genetic determinant of elevated homocysteine concentration and also recognized as a risk factor for CVD, appears to be independently associated with hypertension. The B-vitamin riboflavin is required as a cofactor by MTHFR and recent evidence suggests it may have a role in modulating blood pressure, specifically in those with the homozygous mutant MTHFR 677 TT genotype. If studies confirm that this genetic predisposition to hypertension is correctable by low-dose riboflavin, the findings could have important implications for the management of hypertension given that the frequency of this polymorphism ranges from 3 to 32 % worldwide.

  1. A ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor with deoxyribonucleoside-reversible cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Crona, Mikael; Codó, Paula; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Hofer, Anders; Fernandes, Aristi P; Tholander, Fredrik

    2016-11-01

    Ribonucleotide Reductase (RNR) is the sole enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides into deoxyribonucleotides. Even though RNR is a recognized target for antiproliferative molecules, and the main target of the approved drug hydroxyurea, few new leads targeted to this enzyme have been developed. We have evaluated a recently identified set of RNR inhibitors with respect to inhibition of the human enzyme and cellular toxicity. One compound, NSC73735, is particularly interesting; it is specific for leukemia cells and is the first identified compound that hinders oligomerization of the mammalian large RNR subunit. Similar to hydroxyurea, it caused a disruption of the cell cycle distribution of cultured HL-60 cells. In contrast to hydroxyurea, the disruption was reversible, indicating higher specificity. NSC73735 thus defines a potential lead candidate for RNR-targeted anticancer drugs, as well as a chemical probe with better selectivity for RNR inhibition than hydroxyurea.

  2. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  3. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  4. Thioredoxin reductase 1 suppresses adipocyte differentiation and insulin responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaoxiao; Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Petrus, Paul; Conrad, Marcus; Rydén, Mikael; Arnér, Elias S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), encoded by Txnrd1, was suggested to modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in mice. Here we discovered that TrxR1 suppresses insulin responsiveness, anabolic metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. Immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Txnrd1 (Txnrd1−/−) displayed increased metabolic flux, glycogen storage, lipogenesis and adipogenesis. This phenotype coincided with upregulated PPARγ expression, promotion of mitotic clonal expansion and downregulation of p27 and p53. Enhanced Akt activation also contributed to augmented adipogenesis and insulin sensitivity. Knockdown of TXNRD1 transcripts accelerated adipocyte differentiation also in human primary preadipocytes. Furthermore, TXNRD1 transcript levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue from 56 women were inversely associated with insulin sensitivity in vivo and lipogenesis in their isolated adipocytes. These results suggest that TrxR1 suppresses anabolic metabolism and adipogenesis by inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways downstream of insulin stimulation. PMID:27346647

  5. Purification and characterization of 5-ketofructose reductase from Erwinia citreus.

    PubMed Central

    Schrimsher, J L; Wingfield, P T; Bernard, A; Mattaliano, R; Payton, M A

    1988-01-01

    5-Ketofructose reductase [D(-)fructose:(NADP+) 5-oxidoreductase] was purified to homogeneity from Erwinia citreus and demonstrated to catalyse the reversible NADPH-dependent reduction of 5-ketofructose (D-threo-2,5-hexodiulose) to D-fructose. The enzyme appeared as a single species upon analyses by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing with an apparent relative molecular mass of 40,000 and an isoelectric point of 4.4. The amino acid composition of the enzyme and the N-terminal sequence of the first 39 residues are described. The steady-state kinetic mechanism was an ordered one with NADPH binding first to the enzyme and then to 5-ketofructose, and the order of product release was D-fructose followed by NADP+. The reversible nature of the reaction offers the possibility of using this enzyme for the determination of D-fructose. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3178725

  6. Mechanism of inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase with motexafin gadolinium (MGd)

    SciTech Connect

    Zahedi Avval, Farnaz; Berndt, Carsten; Pramanik, Aladdin; Holmgren, Arne

    2009-02-13

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is an expanded porphyrin anticancer agent which selectively targets tumor cells and works as a radiation enhancer, with promising results in clinical trials. Its mechanism of action is oxidation of intracellular reducing molecules and acting as a direct inhibitor of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). This paper focuses on the mechanism of inhibition of RNR by MGd. Our experimental data present at least two pathways for inhibition of RNR; one precluding subunits oligomerization and the other direct inhibition of the large catalytic subunit of the enzyme. Co-localization of MGd and RNR in the cytoplasm particularly in the S-phase may account for its inhibitory properties. These data can elucidate an important effect of MGd on the cancer cells with overproduction of RNR and its efficacy as an anticancer agent and not only as a general radiosensitizer.

  7. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  8. Go green: the anti-inflammatory effects of biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wegiel, Barbara; Otterbein, Leo E

    2012-01-01

    Biliverdin (BV) has emerged as a cytoprotective and important anti-inflammatory molecule. Conversion of BV to bilirubin (BR) is catalyzed by biliverdin reductase (BVR) and is required for the downstream signaling and nuclear localization of BVR. Recent data by others and us make clear that BVR is a critical regulator of innate immune responses resulting from acute insult and injury and moreover, that a lack of BVR results in an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype. In macrophages, BVR is regulated by its substrate BV which leads to activation of the PI3K-Akt-IL-10 axis and inhibition of TLR4 expression via direct binding of BVR to the TLR4 promoter. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of BVR and the bile pigments in inflammation in context with its activity as an enzyme, receptor, and transcriptional regulator.

  9. DNA versus protein immunisation for production of monoclonal antibodies against Choristoneura fumiferana ecdysone receptor (CfEcR).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan-Hui; Makhmoudova, Amina; Arif, Basil M; Feng, Qili; Retnakaran, Arthur; Palli, Subba Reddy; Krell, Peter J

    2006-04-12

    The full-length ecdysone receptor cDNA of Choristoneura fumiferana (CfEcR-B) was cloned into bacterial expression systems and the recombinant protein was expressed either with a His-tag (His-EcR-B) or glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion (GST-EcR-B). The His-EcR-B was expressed mostly as insoluble aggregates, while the GST-EcR-B was partially soluble and could be purified using affinity chromatography. Mice were then immunised with the purified GST-EcR-B protein. Due to the time-consuming protein expression and purification procedures and the solubility problem of the recombinant protein, we also inserted the full-length CfEcR-B cDNA into the mammalian DNA vaccine expression vector, pVAC1-mcs for DNA immunisation. In vitro expression of CfEcR-B in mammalian cells transfected with the pVAC-EcR-B plasmid was confirmed prior to the delivery of the DNA vaccine into mice. The anti-CfEcR-B MAbs generated from both DNA and protein vaccines were characterised and shown to recognise native CfEcR-B protein induced by 20E in CF-203 insect cells. DNA immunisation was shown to overcome the solubility problem of the bacterial expressed EcR and created a more direct route for monoclonal antibody production for this receptor protein obviating the need for EcR expression and purification to generate the antigen.

  10. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx(5 )[ATS]x(4) Gx(4) [VIL]WNR[TS]x(2) [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x(3){K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes.

  11. Evidence for a Hexaheteromeric Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase in Moorella thermoacetica

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Johanna; Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Moorella thermoacetica can grow with H2 and CO2, forming acetic acid from 2 CO2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been characterized to date, except for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF). We report here that the M. thermoacetica gene that putatively encodes this enzyme, metF, is part of a transcription unit also containing the genes hdrCBA, mvhD, and metV. MetF copurified with the other five proteins encoded in the unit in a hexaheteromeric complex with an apparent molecular mass in the 320-kDa range. The 40-fold-enriched preparation contained per mg protein 3.1 nmol flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 3.4 nmol flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and 110 nmol iron, almost as predicted from the primary structure of the six subunits. It catalyzed the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with reduced benzyl viologen but not with NAD(P)H in either the absence or presence of oxidized ferredoxin. It also catalyzed the reversible reduction of benzyl viologen with NADH (diaphorase activity). Heterologous expression of the metF gene in Escherichia coli revealed that the subunit MetF contains one FMN rather than FAD. MetF exhibited 70-fold-higher methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity with benzyl viologen when produced together with MetV, which in part shows sequence similarity to MetF. Heterologously produced HdrA contained 2 FADs and had NAD-specific diaphorase activity. Our results suggested that the physiological electron donor for methylenetetrahydrofolate reduction in M. thermoacetica is NADH and that the exergonic reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADH is coupled via flavin-based electron bifurcation with the endergonic reduction of an electron acceptor, whose identity remains unknown. PMID:25002540

  12. The modulation of carbonyl reductase 1 by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Boušová, Iva; Skálová, Lenka; Souček, Pavel; Matoušková, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), an enzyme belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, has been detected in all human tissues. CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of many xenobiotics, including important drugs (e.g. anthracyclines, nabumetone, bupropion, dolasetron) and harmful carbonyls and quinones. Moreover, it participates in the metabolism of a number of endogenous compounds and it may play a role in certain pathologies. Plant polyphenols are not only present in many human food sources, but are also a component of many popular dietary supplements and herbal medicines. Many studies reviewed herein have demonstrated the potency of certain flavonoids, stilbenes and curcuminoids in the inhibition of the activity of CBR1. Interactions of these polyphenols with transcriptional factors, which regulate CBR1 expression, have also been reported in several studies. As CBR1 plays an important role in drug metabolism as well as in the protection of the organism against potentially harmful carbonyls, the modulation of its expression/activity may have significant pharmacological and/or toxicological consequences. Some polyphenols (e.g. luteolin, apigenin and curcumin) have been shown to be very potent CBR1 inhibitors. The inhibition of CBR1 seems useful regarding the increased efficacy of anthracycline therapy, but it may cause the worse detoxification of reactive carbonyls. Nevertheless, all known information about the interactions of polyphenols with CBR1 have only been based on the results of in vitro studies. With respect to the high importance of CBR1 and the frequent consumption of polyphenols, in vivo studies would be very helpful for the evaluation of risks/benefits of polyphenol interactions with CBR1.

  13. d-Apiose Reductase from Aerobacter aerogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Donna L.; Kindel, Paul K.

    1970-01-01

    A strain of Aerobacter aerogenes PRL-R3 has been isolated which utilizes d-apiose as its sole source of carbon. A new enzyme, d-apiose reductase, was discovered in this strain. The enzyme was not present when the strain was grown on d-glucose. d-Apiose reductase catalyzes the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent interconversion of d-apiose and d-apiitol. The enzyme is specific for d-apiose and d-apiitol, with a few possible exceptions. The Km for d-apiose is 0.02 m. The Km for d-apiitol is 0.01 m. The enzyme is almost completely specific for the reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. When cell-free extracts were centrifuged at 100,000 × g for 1 hr, the enzyme remained in solution. Optimal activity for the reduction of d-apiose was obtained at pH 7.5 in glycylglycine buffer, whereas for the oxidation of d-apiitol it was obtained at pH 10.5 in glycine buffer. Enzymatic reduction of d-apiose was not appreciably affected by the presence of 0.02 m ethylenediaminetetraacetate. Paper chromatography and specific spray reagents were used to identify d-apiitol and d-apiose as the products of this reversible reaction. d-Apiose and d-apiitol did not serve as substrates for ribitol dehydrogenase and d-arabitol dehydrogenase from A. aerogenes PRL-R3. PMID:4314545

  14. Steroid 5β-Reductase from Leaves of Vitis vinifera: Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Mona; Munkert, Jennifer; Campa, Manuela; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan; Müller-Uri, Frieder

    2015-11-25

    A steroid 5β-reductase gene corresponding to the hypothetical protein LOC100247199 from leaves of Vitis vinifera (var. 'Chardonnay') was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed 5β-reductase activity when progesterone was used as a substrate. The reaction was stereoselective, producing only 5β-products such as 5β-pregnane-3,20-dione. Other small substrates (terpenoids and enones) were also accepted as substrates, indicating the highly promiscuous character of the enzyme class. Our results show that the steroid 5β-reductase gene, encoding an orthologous enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in leaves of the cardenolide-free plant V. vinifera. We emphasize the fact that, on some occasions, different reductases (e.g., progesterone 5β-reductase and monoterpenoid reductase) can also use molecules that are similar to the final products as a substrate. Therefore, in planta, the different reductases may contribute to the immense number of diverse small natural products finally leading to the flavor of wine.

  15. Purification, properties, and sequence of glycerol trinitrate reductase from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Snape, J R; Walkley, N A; Morby, A P; Nicklin, S; White, G F

    1997-01-01

    Glycerol trinitrate (GTN) reductase, which enables Agrobacterium radiobacter to utilize GTN and related explosives as sources of nitrogen for growth, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme was a 39-kDa monomeric protein which catalyzed the NADH-dependent reductive scission of GTN (Km = 23 microM) to glycerol dinitrates (mainly the 1,3-isomer) with a pH optimum of 6.5, a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, and no dependence on metal ions for activity. It was also active on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), on isosorbide dinitrate, and, very weakly, on ethyleneglycol dinitrate, but it was inactive on isopropyl nitrate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, ammonium ions, nitrate, or nitrite. The amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence was homologous (42 to 51% identity and 61 to 69% similarity) to those of PETN reductase from Enterobacter cloacae, N-ethylmaleimide reductase from Escherichia coli, morphinone reductase from Pseudomonas putida, and old yellow enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, placing the GTN reductase in the alpha/beta barrel flavoprotein group of proteins. GTN reductase and PETN reductase were very similar in many respects except in their distinct preferences for NADH and NADPH cofactors, respectively. PMID:9401040

  16. Reduction of mitochondrial protein mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters by human glutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Aaron P.; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial outer membrane protein mitoNEET is a newly discovered target of type II diabetes drug pioglitazone. Structurally, mitoNEET is a homodimer with each monomer containing an N-terminal transmembrane alpha helix tethered to mitochondrial outer membrane and a C-terminal cytosolic domain hosting a redox active [2Fe-2S] cluster. Genetic studies have shown that mitoNEET has a central role in regulating energy metabolism in mitochondria. However, specific function of mitoNEET remains largely elusive. Here we find that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters can be efficiently reduced by Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Purified human glutathione reductase has the same activity as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. However, rat thioredoxin reductase, a human thioredoxin reductase homolog that contains selenocysteine in the catalytic center, has very little or no activity to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. N-ethylmaleimide, a potent thiol modifier, completely inhibits human glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters, indicating that the redox active disulfide in the catalytic center of human glutathione reductase may be directly involved in reducing the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. Additional studies reveal that the reduced mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters in mouse heart cell extracts can be reversibly oxidized by hydrogen peroxide without disruption of the clusters, suggesting that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters may undergo redox transition to regulate energy metabolism in mitochondria in response to oxidative signals. PMID:25645953

  17. Proteomics-based metabolic modeling reveals that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) controls endothelial cell (EC) permeability.

    PubMed

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability.

  18. Localization and Spectroscopic Analysis of the Cu(I) Binding Site in Wheat Metallothionein Ec-1

    PubMed Central

    Tarasava, Katsiaryna; Loebus, Jens; Freisinger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The early cysteine-labeled metallothionein (MT) from Triticum aestivum (common wheat), denoted Ec-1, features two structurally well-defined domains, γ and βE, coordinating two and four Zn(II) ions, respectively. While the protein is currently assumed to function mainly in zinc homeostasis, a low amount of copper ions was also recently detected in a native Ec-1 sample. To evaluate the observed copper binding in more detail, the recombinant Zn6Ec-1 form was exposed to different amounts of Cu(I) ions and the resulting species characterized with spectroscopic methods. Data reveal that the first Cu(I) equivalent coordinates exclusively to the N-terminal γ-domain of the protein and replaces one Zn(II) ion. To analyze the ability of the γ-domain for coordination of monovalent metal ions in more detail, the γ-Ec-1 peptide fragment was incubated with increasing amounts of Cu(I) and the process monitored with UV–VIS, circular dichroism, and luminescence spectroscopy. Closely similar spectra are observed regardless if the apo- or the metal ion-loaded and, hence, pre-folded forms, were used for the titration experiments with Cu(I). The results indicate that low amounts of Cu(I) ions displace the two metal ions subsequently and stoichiometrically, despite the different coordination geometry requirements of Cu(I) and Zn(II). PMID:26978358

  19. EC Toolbox Project: General Findings and Some Particular Proposals--The Next Generation of Performance Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumsion, John; Ward, Suzanne

    This study shows how performance measurement can be developed to take advantage of the most advanced computer software and hardware now available. The "Toolbox" study was commissioned by the European Commission (EC) and undertaken by De Montfort University in partnership with Essex County Libraries and the Library and Information…

  20. Early Childhood Technology Integrated Instructional System (EC-TIIS): Phase 3. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Linda; Schneider, Carol; Daytner, Gary; Johanson, Joyce; Hutinger, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The Early Childhood Technology Integrated Instructional System 3 (EC-TIIS 3), housed in the Center for Best Practices in Early Childhood (the Center) within the College of Education and Human Services at Western Illinois University (WIU), was funded in 2004 by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) as a…

  1. 24 CFR 599.503 - Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC. 599.503 Section 599.503 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES RENEWAL COMMUNITIES...

  2. 24 CFR 599.503 - Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC. 599.503 Section 599.503 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES RENEWAL COMMUNITIES...

  3. 24 CFR 599.503 - Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC. 599.503 Section 599.503 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES RENEWAL COMMUNITIES...

  4. 24 CFR 599.503 - Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC. 599.503 Section 599.503 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES RENEWAL COMMUNITIES...

  5. Artificial intelligence in process control: Knowledge base for the shuttle ECS model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, A. Kent

    1989-01-01

    The general operation of KATE, an artificial intelligence controller, is outlined. A shuttle environmental control system (ECS) demonstration system for KATE is explained. The knowledge base model for this system is derived. An experimental test procedure is given to verify parameters in the model.

  6. 76 FR 66618 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Model EC225LP Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Model EC225LP helicopters. This AD requires inspecting the dome fairing support for a crack at the dome fairing attachment point. If a crack is found, this AD requires replacing the dome fairing support and the associated coning stop support assembly before further flight. If no crack is found, this AD...

  7. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  8. DOD Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) in contracting report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    Use of Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) to support Department of Defense (DoD) procurement processes has been under consideration for some time. A 1988 Deputy Secretary of Defense memo calls for maximum use of EDI, based on 10 years of DoD EDI investigation and experiments. In 1990, Defense Management Review Decision 941 stated, 'The strategic goal of DoD's current efforts is to provide the department with the capability to initiate, conduct, and maintain its external business related transactions and internal logistics, contracting, and financial activities without requiring the use of hard copy media.' The EC in Contracting PAT membership reflected a broad cross section of Military Services and Defense Agencies working on a full-time basis for 60 days. The diversity of the EC in Contracting PAT ensured that the needs and concerns of all DoD components were addressed during the creation of the report. The resultant plan, therefore, represents a comprehensive approach for implementing EC throughout the DoD.

  9. EC 03089-6421: a new, very rapidly pulsating sdO star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Worters, H. L.; Østensen, R. H.

    2017-01-01

    EC 03089-6421, classified sdO in the Edinburgh-Cape (EC) blue object survey, is shown to have unusually rapid pulsations with a dominant frequency near 32 mHz (amplitude ˜0.02 mag; period 31.1s) - which appears to be strongly variable in amplitude on timescales of hours and days - and a generally weaker frequency near 29 mHz (amplitude ˜0.004 mag; period 34.2s) which is also variable in amplitude. This star varies at twice the frequency of any known hot subdwarf pulsator. Although the low resolution EC spectrogram appears very similar to those of DAO stars, our analysis derives Teff = 40200 ± 1600 K; log g = 6.25 ± 0.23 and log N(He)/N(H) = -1.63 ± 0.55; more recent spectrograms give Teff = 37400 ± 1000 K; log g = 5.70 ± 0.13 and log N(He)/N(H) = -2.02 ± 0.17, both of which indicate that the gravity is too low for a white dwarf star, although the low temperature derived from the Balmer lines is at odds with the absence of neutral Helium and the strength of He II 4686. It is possible that EC 03089-6421 is a field analogue of the ω Cen sdO variables.

  10. Revisiting the EC/CMB model for extragalactic large scale jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchini, M.; Tavecchio, F.; Ghisellini, G.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most outstanding results of the Chandra X-ray Observatory was the discovery that AGN jets are bright X-ray emitters on very large scales, up to hundreds of kpc. Of these, the powerful and beamed jets of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars are particularly interesting, as the X-ray emission cannot be explained by an extrapolation of the lower frequency synchrotron spectrum. Instead, the most common model invokes inverse Compton scattering of photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background (EC/CMB) as the mechanism responsible for the high energy emission. The EC/CMB model has recently come under criticism, particularly because it should predict a significant steady flux in the MeV-GeV band which has not been detected by the Fermi/LAT telescope for two of the best studied jets (PKS 0637-752 and 3C273). In this work we revisit some aspects of the EC/CMB model and show that electron cooling plays an important part in shaping the spectrum. This can solve the overproduction of γ-rays by suppressing the high energy end of the emitting particle population. Furthermore, we show that cooling in the EC/CMB model predicts a new class of extended jets that are bright in X-rays but silent in the radio and optical bands. These jets are more likely to lie at intermediate redshifts, and would have been missed in all previous X-ray surveys due to selection effects.

  11. 24 CFR 599.503 - Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of Renewal Community designation on an EZ/EC. 599.503 Section 599.503 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES RENEWAL COMMUNITIES...

  12. Commissioning of 170 GHz, 1 MW EC H&CD in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J. H.; Sakamoto, K.; Joung, M.; Park, S. I.; Kim, H. J.; Han, W. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bae, Y. S.; Yang, H. L.; Kwak, J. G.; Kwon, M.; Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.

    2012-09-01

    The newly installed electron cyclotron heating and current drive (EC H&CD) system with a frequency of 170 GHz was successfully commissioned and used for the second-harmonic ECH-assisted startup in 2011 operational campaign of the KSTAR. As a RF power source, ITER pre-prototype of 170 GHz, 1 MW continuous-wave gyrotron, is loaned from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). During the KSTAR 2011 plamma campaign, maxumum pulse length of 10 sec at 0.6 MW EC beam was reliably injected into the plasma and the 170 GHz second harmonic ECH-assisted start-up was successful leading to reduce the flux consumption at toroidal magnetic field of 3 T. As a result, the flux consumption until the plasma current flat-top was reduced from 4.13 Wb for pure Ohmic to 3.62 Wb (12 % reduction) for the perpendicular injection. When the EC beam is launched with toroidal angle of 20 deg in co-CD direction, more reduced magnetic flux consumption was obtained with 3.14 Wb (24 % reduction) compared with pure OH plasmas. In recent, the gyrotron has been successfully commissioned with the output power of 1 MW and the pulse duration of 20 sec in KSTAR. This paper presents successful commissioning of 170 GHz EC H&CD system in KSTAR as well as the heating and startup experimental results.

  13. Inactivation of nocardiophages phi C and phi EC by extracts of bacteriophage-attachable cells.

    PubMed

    Brownell, G H; Crockett, J K

    1971-12-01

    Cultures of several species of Nocardia, including N. erythropolis Mat-Ce and Mat-cE mating strains, were extracted with solvents in an attempt to isolate an inactivating complex for nocardiophages phiC and phiEC. Ethanol was the only solvent found effective in solubilizing an inhibitory substance. Inactivating extracts were obtained from the cells of all species to which the phage were able to attach. After extraction of whole cells or cell wall preparations, the phage could not effectively attach to them. Both phages phiC and phiEC were inactivated by the same complex. However, phage phiEC inactivation was 10-fold greater than phiC inactivation. The velocity of inactivation was about 4.1 x 10(2) plaque-forming units per microgram per minute for phiC and 1.1 x 10(3) plaque-forming units per microgram per minute for phage phiEC. The cell extracts required divalent cations for phage inactivation. The inhibitory capacity of the cell extracts was reduced or lost by the activity of proteolytic enzymes, Tween 80, 2-mercaptoethanol, thymol, and sodium lauryl sulfate. Boiling the extract for 10 min did not alter its activity. The inactivating substance was postulated to be a lipoprotein of considerable complexity, unique in the ease with which it is solubilized from host cells by ethanol.

  14. ETV VR/VS SUNSET LABORATORY MODEL 4 OC-EC FIELD ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a verification report statement that describes the verification test which was conducted over a period of approximately 30 days (April 5 to May 7, 2013) and involved the continuous operation of duplicate Model 4 OC-EC analyzers at the Battelle Columbus Operations Special ...

  15. Living and Learning in EcCoWell Cities: Discussion Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2012-01-01

    These notes and questions have been prepared to promote discussion of the ideas set out in the Clarifying paper, "Living and learning in EcCoWell cities" to be found on the PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) website. This Discussion Paper sets ten questions for discussion. We are hoping to encourage discussions of these issues around the world.

  16. A miniature integrated multimodal sensor for measuring pH, EC and temperature for precision agriculture.

    PubMed

    Futagawa, Masato; Iwasaki, Taichi; Murata, Hiroaki; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    Making several simultaneous measurements with different kinds of sensors at the same location in a solution is difficult because of crosstalk between the sensors. In addition, because the conditions at different locations in plant beds differ, in situ measurements in agriculture need to be done in small localized areas. We have fabricated a multimodal sensor on a small Si chip in which a pH sensor was integrated with electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature sensors. An ISFET with a Si(3)N(4) membrane was used for the pH sensor. For the EC sensor, the electrical conductivity between platinum electrodes was measured, and the temperature sensor was a p-n junction diode. These are some of the most important measurements required for controlling the conditions in plant beds. The multimodal sensor can be inserted into a plant bed for in situ monitoring. To confirm the absence of crosstalk between the sensors, we made simultaneous measurements of pH, EC, and temperature of a pH buffer solution in a plant bed. When the solution was diluted with hot or cold water, the real time measurements showed changes to the EC and temperature, but no change in pH. We also demonstrated that our sensor was capable of simultaneous in situ measurements in rock wool without being affected by crosstalk.

  17. Steroidal pyrazolines evaluated as aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Bhat, Mashooq A; Amr, Abdel-Galil E; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M

    2012-05-01

    The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibition of synthesized heterocyclic pyrazole derivatives fused with steroidal structure for chemoprevention of cancer is reported herein. All compounds were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Cyproterone(®)). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds were much more potent than the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC(50) of 80 μM. In addition, all the compounds displayed potent quinone reductase-2 inhibition. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors resulting from this study have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  18. Comparison of the Stereospecificity and Immunoreactivity of NADH-Ferricyanide Reductases in Plant Membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Fredlund, K. M.; Struglics, A.; Widell, S.; Askerlund, P.; Kader, J. C.; Moller, I. M.

    1994-01-01

    The substrate stereospecificity of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activities in the inner mitochondrial membrane and peroxisomal membrane of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf plasma membrane, and red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) tonoplast were all specific for the [beta]-hydrogen of NADH, whereas the reductases in wheat root (Triticum aestivum L.) endoplasmic reticulum and potato tuber outer mitochondrial membrane were both [alpha]-hydrogen specific. In all isolated membrane fractions one or several polypeptides with an apparent size of 45 to 55 kD cross-reacted with antibodies raised against a microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase on western blots. PMID:12232391

  19. Cloning and characterization of the methyl coenzyme M reductase genes from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Bokranz, M; Bäumner, G; Allmansberger, R; Ankel-Fuchs, D; Klein, A

    1988-01-01

    The genes coding for methyl coenzyme M reductase were cloned from a genomic library of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg into Escherichia coli by using plasmid expression vectors. When introduced into E. coli, the reductase genes were expressed, yielding polypeptides identical in size to the three known subunits of the isolated enzyme, alpha, beta, and gamma. The polypeptides also reacted with the antibodies raised against the respective enzyme subunits. In M. thermoautotrophicum, the subunits are encoded by a gene cluster whose transcript boundaries were mapped. Sequence analysis revealed two more open reading frames of unknown function located between two of the methyl coenzyme M reductase genes. Images PMID:2448287

  20. Comparative hydrogen-deuterium exchange for a mesophilic vs thermophilic dihydrofolate reductase at 25 °C: identification of a single active site region with enhanced flexibility in the mesophilic protein.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Olayinka A; Sours, Kevin M; Lee, Thomas; Kohen, Amnon; Resing, Katheryn A; Ahn, Natalie G; Klinman, Judith P

    2011-09-27

    The technique of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been applied to a mesophilic (E. coli) dihydrofolate reductase under conditions that allow direct comparison to a thermophilic (B. stearothermophilus) ortholog, Ec-DHFR and Bs-DHFR, respectively. The analysis of hydrogen-deuterium exchange patterns within proteolytically derived peptides allows spatial resolution, while requiring a series of controls to compare orthologous proteins with only ca. 40% sequence identity. These controls include the determination of primary structure effects on intrinsic rate constants for HDX as well as the use of existing 3-dimensional structures to evaluate the distance of each backbone amide hydrogen to the protein surface. Only a single peptide from the Ec-DHFR is found to be substantially more flexible than the Bs-DHFR at 25 °C in a region located within the protein interior at the intersection of the cofactor and substrate-binding sites. The surrounding regions of the enzyme are either unchanged or more flexible in the thermophilic DHFR from B. stearothermophilus. The region with increased flexibility in Ec-DHFR corresponds to one of two regions previously proposed to control the enthalpic barrier for hydride transfer in Bs-DHFR [Oyeyemi et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 10074].

  1. Proanthocyanidin synthesis and expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase in developing grape berries and grapevine leaves.

    PubMed

    Bogs, Jochen; Downey, Mark O; Harvey, John S; Ashton, Anthony R; Tanner, Gregory J; Robinson, Simon P

    2005-10-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs), also called condensed tannins, can protect plants against herbivores and are important quality components of many fruits. Two enzymes, leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR), can produce the flavan-3-ol monomers required for formation of PA polymers. We isolated and functionally characterized genes encoding both enzymes from grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv Shiraz). ANR was encoded by a single gene, but we found two highly related genes encoding LAR. We measured PA content and expression of genes encoding ANR, LAR, and leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase in grape berries during development and in grapevine leaves, which accumulated PA throughout leaf expansion. Grape flowers had high levels of PA, and accumulation continued in skin and seeds from fruit set until the onset of ripening. VvANR was expressed throughout early flower and berry development, with expression increasing after fertilization. It was expressed in berry skin and seeds until the onset of ripening, and in expanding leaves. The genes encoding LAR were expressed in developing fruit, particularly in seeds, but had low expression in leaves. The two LAR genes had different patterns of expression in skin and seeds. During grape ripening, PA levels decreased in both skin and seeds, and expression of genes encoding ANR and LAR were no longer detected. The results indicate that PA accumulation occurs early in grape development and is completed when ripening starts. Both ANR and LAR contribute to PA synthesis in fruit, and the tissue and temporal-specific regulation of the genes encoding ANR and LAR determines PA accumulation and composition during grape berry development.

  2. Variation of OC, EC, WSIC and trace metals of PM10 in Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Mandal, T. K.; Saxena, Mohit; Rashmi; Sharma, A.; Datta, A.; Saud, T.

    2014-06-01

    Variation of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water soluble inorganic ionic components (WSIC) and major and trace elements of particulate matter (PM10) were studied over Delhi, an urban site of the Indo Gangatic Plain (IGP), India in 2010. Strong seasonal variation was noticed in the mass concentration of PM10 and its chemical composition with maxima during winter (PM10: 213.1±14.9 μg m-3; OC: 36.05±11.60 μg m-3; EC: 9.64±2.56 μg m-3) and minima during monsoon (PM10: 134.7±39.9 μg m-3; OC: 14.72±6.95 μg m-3; EC: 3.35±1.45 μg m-3). The average concentration of major and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, K, CA, Cr, Ti, Fe, Zn and Mn) was accounted for ~17% of the PM10 mass. Average values of K+/EC (0.28) and Cl-/EC (0.59) suggest the influences of biomass burning in PM10, whereas, higher concentration of Ca2+ suggests the soil erosion as possible source from the nearby agricultural field. Fe/Al ratio (0.34) indicates mineral dust as a source at the sampling site, similarly, Ca/Al ratio (2.45) indicates that aerosol over this region is rich in Ca mineral compared to average upper continental crust. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis quantifies the contribution of soil dust (20.7%), vehicle emissions (17.0%), secondary aerosols (21.7%), fossil fuel combustion (17.4%) and biomass burning (14.3%) to PM10 mass concentration at the observational site of Delhi.

  3. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; ...

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different depositionmore » position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (βN~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.« less

  4. Falcon 460 EC in the control of foliage diseases of some ornamentals.

    PubMed

    Wojdyła, A T

    2006-01-01

    Falcon 460 EC (167 g tebuconazole + 250 g spiroxamine + 43 g triadimenol per 1 dm3) at concentration 0.1%, applied as spray 4-times at 7-day intervals, was used in the control of Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae on rose. After 4 weeks of plants protection effectiveness of the tested product was more than 92%. In the control of Diplocarpon rosae, Falcon 460 EC was applied when the first disease symptoms appeared on rose shrubs. The product application was repeated 9 times at 7-day intervals. Effectiveness of the product was more than 70%. In the control of Sphaerotheca humuli and Colletotrichum spp. on pansy Falcon 460 EC at concentration 0.1% was used as spray 4-times at 7-day intervals. After that time effectiveness of the fungicide was at least 83%. Four applications of Falcon 460 EC at concentration 0.1% in the control of Microsphaeria alphitoides on oak controlled at last 95% of the disease development. In observation done 3 months later its activity was still very high. Falcon 460 EC was very effective in the control of rust fungi. Two applications at 7-day-intervals of the product in the control of Melampsora epitea on willow suppressed formation of new uredia by about 70-90% and almost all of them were dried. When applied 4 times at week intervals as spray on chrysanthemum it suppressed formation of new telia of Puccinia horiana by about 80%. Also, it was found that 14 days after rose spray, spores of D. rosae collected from leaf blades germinated in about 5%. In the case of control leaves more than 83% of germinating spores were found.

  5. Rigorous comparison of the spectral SNR of FTIR and EC-QCL spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, David T. D.; Hogg, Richard A.; Groom, Kristian M.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Cockburn, John W.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    FTIR spectroscopy using a thermal light source has been the dominant method for obtaining infrared spectra since the 1950's. Unfortunately the limited surface brightness and low spatial coherence of black-body radiators limits the spectral SNR in microspectroscopy and stand-off detection. Two recent innovations are addressing this problem a) FTIR instruments illuminated by high-spatial coherence broad-band supercontinuum sources and b) high spatial coherence narrow-band EC-QCL's. Here we ask whether these two approaches offer equivalent sensitivity. By noting an analogy with near-infrared optical coherence tomography we rigorously show that the high temporal coherence of the EC-QCL brings an additional, very large SNR advantage over an FTIR instrument illuminated by a supercontinuum source under otherwise matched conditions. Specifically if a spectrum containing N points is recorded by both instruments using the same illumination intensity and the same detector noise level, then the EC-QCL can deliver a given spectral SNR in a time xN shorter than the FTIR instrument. This factor can reach x100, potentially even x1000, in realistic applications. We exploit the analogy with OCT further by developing a mid-infrared "swept laser", using commercially available components, in which the tuning rate is much higher than in commercial EC-QCL devices. We use this swept laser to demonstrate the SNR advantage experimentally, using a custom-made EC-QCL spectrometer and PDMS polymer samples. We explore the potential upper limits on spectral acquisition rates, both from the fundamental kinetics of gain build-up in the external cavity and from likely mechanical limits on cavity tuning rates.

  6. SN 2012ec: mass of the progenitor from PESSTO follow-up of the photospheric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, C.; Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M.; Zampieri, L.; Maund, J. R.; Pumo, M. L.; Jerkstrand, A.; Benetti, S.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Hamuy, M.; Inserra, C.; Knapic, C.; LaCluyze, A. P.; Molinaro, M.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Pignata, G.; Reichart, D. E.; Ries, C.; Riffeser, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, M.; Smareglia, R.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Yaron, O.; Young, D.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of a photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of SN 2012ec, which exploded in the spiral galaxy NGC 1084, during the photospheric phase. The photometric light curve exhibits a plateau with luminosity L = 0.9 × 1042 erg s-1 and duration ˜90 d, which is somewhat shorter than standard Type II-P supernovae (SNe). We estimate the nickel mass M(56Ni) = 0.040 ± 0.015 M⊙ from the luminosity at the beginning of the radioactive tail of the light curve. The explosion parameters of SN 2012ec were estimated from the comparison of the bolometric light curve and the observed temperature and velocity evolution of the ejecta with predictions from hydrodynamical models. We derived an envelope mass of 12.6 M⊙, an initial progenitor radius of 1.6 × 1013 cm and an explosion energy of 1.2 foe. These estimates agree with an independent study of the progenitor star identified in pre-explosion images, for which an initial mass of M = 14-22 M⊙ was determined. We have applied the same analysis to two other Type II-P SNe (SNe 2012aw and 2012A), and carried out a comparison with the properties of SN 2012ec derived in this paper. We find a reasonable agreement between the masses of the progenitors obtained from pre-explosion images and masses derived from hydrodynamical models. We estimate the distance to SN 2012ec with the standardized candle method (SCM) and compare it with other estimates based on other primary and secondary indicators. SNe 2012A, 2012aw and 2012ec all follow the standard relations for the SCM for the use of Type II-P SNe as distance indicators.

  7. Comparison of modified chin lift technique with EC technique for mask ventilation in adult apneic patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa, Geetha C.; Parate, Leena Harshad; Tejesh, C. A.; Prathima, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mask ventilation (MV) is an essential basic life support skill. We used chin lift maneuver for MV and named as modified chin lift technique (MCL). EC technique is most common technique used for MV. Aims: The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of both techniques for MV in term of expired tidal volume (TV). Secondarily, we also assessed the effect of experience on the performance of these both techniques. Settings and Design: The study area was operation theater of our hospital. This was a prospective, randomized, crossover study. Methods: A total 108 adults undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were recruited. In all patients, operators (novice/anesthesiologist) randomly performed both techniques either to start with EC or MCL technique. Expired TV was measured for one minute for each technique. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test was used to compare TV. Results and Conclusion: The mean TV was significantly higher in MCL group than EC group (528.08 [104.96] ml vs. 483.39 [103] ml; P < 0.001). The novice (521.89 [117.9] ml vs. 478.70 [130.29] ml; P < 0.001) as well as anesthesiologists (534.27 [110.85] ml vs. 488.08 [111.6] ml; P < 0.001) was able to generate significantly more TV with MCL technique than EC technique. The TV did not differ significantly between novice and anesthesiologist for EC technique (P = 0.474) or MCL technique (P = 0.187). Novices as well as anesthesiologist felt MCL technique more satisfactory (70%). Clinical Trial Registration: CTRI/2016/04/006874. PMID:27746566

  8. Plasma rotation and NTM onset driven by central EC deposition in TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E.; Sauter, O.; Canal, G.; Duval, B.; Federspiel, L.; Karpushov, A. N.; Kim, D.; Reimerders, H.; Rossel, J.; Testa, D.; Wagner, D.; Raju, D.; Collaboration: TCV Team

    2014-02-12

    The effects of the central electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) on the spontaneous plasma rotation and on the presence of Tearing Modes (TM), observed in the TCV tokamak[1], were recently investigated as an interplay between the toroidal velocity and NTM onset in absence of sawteeth, ELMs and error fields [2–3]. In a set of reproducible TCV discharges (I{sub p}∼ −150 kA, B{sub t}∼ −1.4 T, ne,{sub av∼} 1.5 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, T{sub e}∼ 3 keV and T{sub i}∼0.25 keV, q{sub 95}∼5.8) with both pure EC heating and current drive the cnt-Ip toroidal velocity was observed to be reduced with subsequent co-Ip appearance of 3/2 and 2/1 modes during the ramp up EC phases. The understanding of the capability of the on-axis EC power to modify the rotation profiles before and after the TM onset and of the sudden disappearance of 3/2 mode when 2/1 starts is the main purpose of this work. The velocity profile modifications are due to a direct effect of the EC absorbed power and also related to some variation of the perpendicular diffusion of the toroidal momentum and to magnetic braking effects of the kind of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) due to the NTM resonant field perturbations associated to the presence of TM. Numerical investigations are performed using a 1D toroidal momentum balance equation including contributions by external sources, as EC power, and NTV torques. Furthermore, the combined evolution of the 3/2 and 2/1 modes requires considering also coupling effects included in a generalized Rutherford equation for the modelling of the TM time growth.

  9. Normal human serum (HS) prevents oxidant-induced lysis of cultured endothelial cells (ECs)

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, K.S.; Harlan, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    Most studies demonstrating oxidant lysis of cultured ECs are performed in serum-free media or media containing low concentrations of bovine serum. The authors found that HS protects human and bovine ECs from lysis caused by reagent H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or glucose/glucose oxidase (GO)-generated H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. EC injury was assessed by /sup 51/Cr release, cell detachment, or trypan blue dye exclusion. Protective HS activity was dose-dependent with concentrations greater than or equal to 25% preventing lethal injury. Cytotoxicity at 24 hrs, induced by 20 mU/ml GO, was 90.1 +/- 5.2% without HS vs 1.7 +/- 4.6% with 25% HS present (20 exp). Similar protection was observed with heparinized plasma. Of note, comparable concentrations of bovine serum were devoid of protective activity. Addition of fatty acid-free albumin to the media was also without protective effect. Preliminary characterization showed HS activity was stable to 60/sup 0/C for 30 min, non-dialyzable at 25,000 MW cutoff, and retained in delipidated serum. The HS protection was not merely due to scavenging of exogenous H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as A23187-induced EC lysis was also prevented by HS. Protective activity was not reproduced by purified cerruloplasmin or transferrin. In conclusion, unidentified factor(s) present in HS protect cultured ECs from oxidant-induced lysis. Since endothelium is normally exposed to 100% plasma, the authors suggest that in vitro studies of oxidant-mediated injury be performed in the presence of HS. Factor(s) in HS may play an important role in modulating oxidant-induced vascular injury in vivo.

  10. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, H.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different deposition position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (βN~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.

  11. Hyperglycemia and redox status regulate RUNX2 DNA-binding and an angiogenic phenotype in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mochin, Maria T; Underwood, Karen F; Cooper, Brandon; McLenithan, John C; Pierce, Adam D; Nalvarte, Cesar; Arbiser, Jack; Karlsson, Anna I; Moise, Alexander R; Moskovitz, Jackob; Passaniti, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by hyperglycemic conditions, which can induce cellular stress responses, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and anti-oxidant defenses that modulate intracellular signaling to prevent oxidative damage. The RUNX2 DNA-binding transcription factor is activated by a glucose-mediated intracellular pathway, plays an important role in endothelial cell (EC) function and angiogenesis, and is a target of oxidative stress. RUNX2 DNA-binding and EC differentiation in response to glucose were conserved in ECs from different tissues and inhibited by hyperglycemia, which stimulated ROS production through the aldose reductase glucose-utilization pathway. Furthermore, the redox status of cysteine and methionine residues regulated RUNX2 DNA-binding and reversal of oxidative inhibition was consistent with an endogenous Methionine sulfoxide reductase-A (MsrA) activity. Low molecular weight MsrA substrates and sulfoxide scavengers were potent inhibitors of RUNX2 DNA binding in the absence of oxidative stress, but acted as antioxidants to increase DNA binding in the presence of oxidants. MsrA was associated with RUNX2:DNA complexes, as measured by a sensitive, quantitative DNA-binding ELISA. The related RUNX2 protein family member, RUNX1, which contains an identical DNA-binding domain, was a catalytic substrate of recombinant MsrA. These findings define novel redox pathways involving aldose reductase and MsrA that regulate RUNX2 transcription factor activity and biological function in ECs. Targeting of these pathways could result in more effective strategies to alleviate the vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes or cancer.

  12. Confocal microscopy reveals thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15) and neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16) in the classical secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Garrido, P A; Vandenbulcke, F; Ramjaun, A R; Vincent, B; Checler, F; Ferro, E; Beaudet, A

    1999-04-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15; EP24.15) and neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16; EP24.16) are closely related enzymes involved in the metabolic inactivation of bioactive peptides. Both of these enzymes were previously shown to be secreted from a variety of cell types, although their primary sequence lacks a signal peptide. To investigate the mechanisms responsible for this secretion, we examined by confocal microscopy the subcellular localization of these two enzymes in the neuroendocrine cell line AtT20. Both EP24.15 and EP24.16 were found by immunohistochemistry to be abundantly expressed in AtT20 cells. Western blotting experiments confirmed that the immunoreactivity detected in the soma of these cells corresponded to previously cloned isoforms of the enzymes. At the subcellular level, both enzymes colocalized extensively with the integral trans-Golgi network protein, syntaxin-6, in the juxtanuclear region. In addition, both EP24.15 and EP24.16 were found within small vesicular organelles distributed throughout the cell body. Some, but not all, of these organelles also stained positively for ACTH. These results demonstrate that both EP24.15 and EP24.16 are present within the classical secretory pathway. Their colocalization with ACTH further suggests that they may be targeted to the regulated secretory pathway, even in the absence of a signal peptide.

  13. Quantitative electrochemical and electrochromic behavior of terthiophene and carbazole containing conjugated polymer network film precursors: EC-QCM and EC-SPR.

    PubMed

    Taranekar, Prasad; Fulghum, Timothy; Baba, Akira; Patton, Derek; Advincula, Rigoberto

    2007-01-16

    A comparative analysis of the copolymerization behavior between an electro-active terthiophene and a carbazole moiety of a conjugated polymer precursor was investigated using electrochemical and hyphenated electrochemical methods. Five different precursor polymers were first synthesized and characterized using NMR, IR, and GPC. The polymers include homopolymers of individual electro-active groups (P3T, P-CBZ) and different compositions of 25, 50, and 75% (P3TC-25, P3TC50, and P3TC-75) with respect to the two electro-active groups. Since the oxidation potentials of terthiophene and carbazole lie very close to each other, highly cross-linked copolymer films of varying extent were produced depending on the composition. The copolymerization extent was found to be dependent primarily on the amount of the terthiophene, which in this case provided for a more efficient carbazole polymerization and copolymerization than with just carbazole alone (homopolymer). The extent of copolymerization, electrochromic properties, and viscoelastic changes was quantitatively investigated using a number of hyphenated electrochemistry techniques: spectro-electrochemistry, electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance studies (EC-QCM), and electrochemical surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (EC-SPR). Each technique revealed a unique aspect of the electrocopolymerization behavior that was used to define structure-property relationships and the deposition/copolymerization mechanism.

  14. Determination of the priority substances regulated by 2000/60/EC and 2008/105/EC Directives in the surface waters supplying water treatment plants of Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Golfinopoulos, Spyros K; Nikolaou, Anastasia D; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Kotrikla, Anna Maria; Vagi, Maria C; Petsas, Andreas S; Lekkas, Demetris F; Lekkas, Themistokles D

    2017-03-21

    An investigation into the occurrence of priority substances regulated by 2000/60/EC Water Framework Directive and 2008/105/EC Directive was conducted for a period of one year in the surface water sources supplying the water treatment plants (WTPs) of Athens and in the raw water of WTPs. Samples from four reservoirs and four water treatment plants of Athens were taken seasonally. The substances are divided into seven specific groups, including eight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), diethylhexylphthalate, four organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), three organophosphorus/organonitrogen pesticides (OPPs/ONPs), four triazines and phenylurea herbicides, pentachlorophenol, and four metals. The aforementioned substances belong to different chemical categories, and different analytical methods were performed for their determination. The results showed that the surface waters that feed the WTPs of Athens are not burdened with significant levels of toxic substances identified as European Union (EU) priority substances. Atrazine, hexachlorocyclohexane, endosulfan, trifluralin, anthracene and 4-nonylphenol were occasionally observed at very low concentrations. Their presence in a limited number of cases could be attributed to waste disposal, agricultural activities, and to a limited industrial activity in the area nearby the water bodies.

  15. A cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase mediates the first step of denitrification in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Sann, R; Kostka, S; Friedrich, B

    1994-01-01

    Respiratory nitrite reductase (NIR) has been purified from the soluble extract of denitrifying cells of Alcaligenes eutrophus strain H16 to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme was induced under anoxic conditions in the presence of nitrite. Purified NIR showed typical features of a cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase. It appeared to be a dimer of kDa subunits, its activity was only weakly inhibited by the copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate, and spectral analysis revealed absorption maxima which were characteristic for the presence of heme c and heme d1. The isoelectric point of 8.6 was considerably higher than the pI determined for cd1 nitrite reductases from pseudomonads. Eighteen amino acids at the N-terminus of the A. eutrophus NIR, obtained by protein sequencing, showed no significant homology to the N-terminal region of nitrite reductases from Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  16. Inhibition of carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart by alkyl phenyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yorishige; Narumi, Rika; Shimada, Hideaki

    2007-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of alkyl phenyl ketones on carbonyl reductase activity were examined in pig heart. In this study, carbonyl reductase activity was estimated as the ability to reduce 4-benzoylpyridine to S(-)-alpha-phenyl-4-pyridylmethanol in the cytosolic fraction from pig heart (pig heart cytosol). The order of their inhibitory potencies was hexanophenone > valerophenone > heptanophenone > butyrophenone > propiophenone. The inhibitory potencies of acetophenone and nonanophenone were much lower. A significant relationship was observed between Vmax/Km values for the reduction of alkyl phenyl ketones and their inhibitory potencies for carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart cytosol. Furthermore, hexanophenone was a competitive inhibitor for the enzyme activity. These results indicate that several alkyl phenyl ketones including hexanophenone inhibit carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart cytosol, by acting as substrate inhibitors.

  17. Amplification and loss of dihydrofolate reductase genes in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, R.J.; Schimke, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    During stepwise increases in the methotrexate concentration in culture medium, the authors selected Chinese hamster ovary cells that contained elevated dihydrofolate reductase levels which were proportional to the number of dihydrofolate reductase gene copies (i.e., gene amplification). The authors studied the dihydrofolate reductase levels in individual cells that underwent the initial steps of methotrexate resistance by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter technique. Such cells constituted a heterogeneous population with differing dihydrofolate reductase levels, and they characteristically lost the elevated enzyme levels when they were grown in the absence of methotrexate. The progeny of individual cells with high enzyme levels behaved differently and could lose all or variable numbers of the amplified genes.

  18. In vitro inhibition of human erythrocyte glutathione reductase by some new organic nitrates.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, Murat; Talaz, Oktay; Ekinci, Deniz; Cavdar, Hüseyin; Küfrevioğlu, Omer Irfan

    2009-07-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR), is responsible for the existence of GSH molecule, a crucial antioxidant against oxidative stress reagents. The antimalarial activities of some redox active compounds are attributed to their inhibition of antioxidant flavoenzyme glutathione reductase, and inhibitors are therefore expected to be useful for the treatment of malaria. Twelve organic nitrate derivatives were synthesized and treated with human erythrocyte GR. The molecules were identified as strong GR inhibitors and novel antimalaria candidates.

  19. Damage Detection Response Characteristics of Open Circuit Resonant (SansEC) Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.; Smith, Laura J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Wang, Chuantong; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The capability to assess the current or future state of the health of an aircraft to improve safety, availability, and reliability while reducing maintenance costs has been a continuous goal for decades. Many companies, commercial entities, and academic institutions have become interested in Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) and a growing effort of research into "smart" vehicle sensing systems has emerged. Methods to detect damage to aircraft materials and structures have historically relied on visual inspection during pre-flight or post-flight operations by flight and ground crews. More quantitative non-destructive investigations with various instruments and sensors have traditionally been performed when the aircraft is out of operational service during major scheduled maintenance. Through the use of reliable sensors coupled with data monitoring, data mining, and data analysis techniques, the health state of a vehicle can be detected in-situ. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is developing a composite aircraft skin damage detection method and system based on open circuit SansEC (Sans Electric Connection) sensor technology. Composite materials are increasingly used in modern aircraft for reducing weight, improving fuel efficiency, and enhancing the overall design, performance, and manufacturability of airborne vehicles. Materials such as fiberglass reinforced composites (FRC) and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) are being used to great advantage in airframes, wings, engine nacelles, turbine blades, fairings, fuselage structures, empennage structures, control surfaces and aircraft skins. SansEC sensor technology is a new technical framework for designing, powering, and interrogating sensors to detect various types of damage in composite materials. The source cause of the in-service damage (lightning strike, impact damage, material fatigue, etc.) to the aircraft composite is not relevant. The sensor will detect damage independent of the cause

  20. Loss of SOD3 (EcSOD) expression promotes an aggressive phenotype in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Brianne R.; Fath, Melissa A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Hrabe, Jennifer E.; Button, Anna M.; Allen, Bryan G.; Case, Adam J.; Altekruse, Sean; Wagner, Brett A.; Buettner, Garry R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Cozen, Wendy; Beardsley, Robert A.; Keene, Jeffery; Henry, Michael D.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Mezhir, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells are known to produce excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, which may contribute to the aggressive and refractory nature of this disease. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) is an antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide in the extracellular environment. The current work tests the hypothesis that EcSOD modulates PDA growth and invasion by modifying the redox balance in PDA. Experimental Design We evaluated the prognostic significance of EcSOD in a human tissue microarray of patients with PDA. EcSOD overexpression was performed in PDA cell lines and animal models of disease. The impact of EcSOD on PDA cell lines was evaluated with Matrigel invasion in combination with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor to determine the mechanism of action of EcSOD in PDA. Results Loss of EcSOD expression is a common event in PDA, which correlated with worse disease biology. Overexpression of EcSOD in PDA cell lines resulted in decreased invasiveness that appeared to be related to reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide. Pancreatic cancer xenografts overexpressing EcSOD also demonstrated slower growth and peritoneal metastasis. Over-expression of EcSOD or treatment with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic caused significant decreases in PDA cell invasive capacity. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that loss of EcSOD leads to increased reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide which contributes to the invasive phenotype. These results allow for the speculation that superoxide dismutase mimetics might inhibit PDA progression in human clinical disease. PMID:25634994

  1. Fine carbonaceous aerosol characteristics at a megacity during the Chinese Spring Festival as given by OC/EC online measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baoshuang; Bi, Xiaohui; Feng, Yinchang; Dai, Qili; Xiao, Zhimei; Li, Liwei; Wu, Jianhui; Yuan, Jie; Zhang, YuFen

    2016-11-01

    The OC/EC online monitoring campaign was carried out in Tianjin of China from 8th February to 15th March 2015 during the Chinese Spring Festival period (CSFP). The concentrations of OC, EC, BC and other ambient pollutants (e.g. SO2, NO2 and PM2.5, etc.) in high time resolution were measured with related online-monitoring instruments. During the CSFP, according to the peaks of PM2.5 concentrations and number concentrations (NC) of aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between 0.3 and 2.5 μm, five pollution-events were generally identified and displayed. These pollution-events were closely associated with large-scale fireworks displaying, combustion activities such as heating for winter, and the stable meteorological conditions, etc. During the CSFP, EC and OC concentrations showed variations up to one order of magnitude. The uncertainty of instrument itself and the difference for measured methods, further caused the differences between thermal OC (measured OC by thermal method) and optical OC (measured OC by optical method) concentrations, as well as between thermal EC (measured EC by thermal method) and optical EC (measured EC by optical method) concentrations. The high-concentration carbonaceous aerosols could enlarge the uncertainty of measuring instrument, reducing the correlations between OC and EC, and enhance the differences among thermal EC, optical BC and optical EC. The OC/EC ratios and the percentages of SOC/OC would be declined, when the pollution-events formed during the CSFP. Due to the different sources for thermal POC and thermal SOC, the correlation of the two was relatively lower (R2 = 0.39). Thermal POC dominated over thermal OC during the CSFP.

  2. X-ray structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata at 2. 4- angstrom resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyan, J.; Xiangpeng Kong; Krishna, T.S.R.; Murgolo, N.J.; Field, H.; Cerami, A.; Henderson, G.B. ); Sweet, R.M. )

    1991-10-01

    Trypanosomes and related protozoan parasites lack glutathione reductase and possess instead a closely related enzyme that serves as the reductant of a bis(glutathione)-spermidien conjugate, trypanothione. The human and parasite enzymes have mutually exclusive substrate specificities, providing a route for the design of therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of the parasite enzyme. The authors report here the three-dimensional structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata and show that it closely resembles the structure of human glutathione reductase. In particular, the core structure surrounding the catalytic machinery is almost identical in the two enzymes. However, significant differences are found at the substrate binding sites. A cluster of basic residues in glutathione reductase is replaced by neutral, hydrophobic, or acidic residues in trypanothione reductase, consistent with the nature of the spermidine linkage and the change in overall charge of the substrate from {minus}2 to +1, respectively. The binding site is more open in trypanothione reductase due to rotations of about 4{degree} in the domains that form in site, with relative shifts of as much as 2-3 {angstrom} in residues that can interact with potential inhibitors and complement previous modeling and mutagenesis studies on the two enzymes.

  3. Genetic and Physiologic Characterization of Ferric/Cupric Reductase Constitutive Mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Nyhus, Karin J.; Jacobson, Eric S.

    1999-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast that causes meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Because iron acquisition is critical for growth of a pathogen in a host, we studied the regulation of the ferric reductase and ferrous uptake system of this organism. We isolated 18 mutants, representing four independent loci, with dysregulated ferric reductase. The mutant strains had >10-fold higher than wild-type WT reductase activity in the presence of iron. Two of the strains also had >7-fold higher than WT iron uptake in the presence of iron but were not markedly iron sensitive. Both were sensitive to the oxidative stresses associated with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. One strain exhibited only 23% of the WT level of iron uptake in the absence of iron and grew poorly without iron supplementation of the medium, phenotypes consistent with an iron transport deficiency; it was sensitive to superoxide but not to hydrogen peroxide. The fourth strain had high reductase activity but normal iron uptake; it was not very sensitive to oxidative stress. We also demonstrated that the ferric reductase was regulated by copper and could act as a cupric reductase. Sensitivity to oxidants may be related to iron acquisition by a variety of mechanisms and may model the interaction of the yeast with the immune system. PMID:10225895

  4. Ascorbate free radical reductases and diaphorases in soluble fractions of the human lens.

    PubMed

    Bando, M; Obazawa, H

    1995-12-01

    Major and minor ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductases, with diaphorase activity, and three other diaphorases were separated from the human lens soluble fraction by DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange column chromatography. They were characterized for adsorptivity to ion-exchange and 5'AMP-Sepharose 4B affinity columns, kinetic properties, and substrate specificity. The latter diaphorases were closely correlated with NADH-cytochrome beta 5 reductase. The major and minor AFR reductases were regarded as a major diaphorase group different from two ubiquitous diaphorases, i.e., NADH-cytochrome beta 5 reductase and DT-diaphorase. A major AFR reductase was partially purified approximately 50 fold over the lens soluble fraction by ion-exchange, affinity, and gel filtration (Sephacryl S-200 HR) column chromatography. From the partially purified enzyme, 2 bands, one sharp and one diffuse, were obtained by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two proteins, of 20 and 24 kDa, were identified in the active enzyme bands by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This suggests that the 20 and/or 24 kDa proteins may be components of the major AFR reductase.

  5. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils. PMID:24435070

  6. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders.

  7. Androgen Regulation of 5α-Reductase Isoenzymes in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Prostate Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Ding, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhengxin; Lu, Jing-Fang; Maity, Sankar N.; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kim, Jeri

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme 5α-reductase, which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), performs key functions in the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway. The three isoenzymes of 5α-reductase identified to date are encoded by different genes: SRD5A1, SRD5A2, and SRD5A3. In this study, we investigated mechanisms underlying androgen regulation of 5α-reductase isoenzyme expression in human prostate cells. We found that androgen regulates the mRNA level of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in a cell type–specific manner, that such regulation occurs at the transcriptional level, and that AR is necessary for this regulation. In addition, our results suggest that AR is recruited to a negative androgen response element (nARE) on the promoter of SRD5A3 in vivo and directly binds to the nARE in vitro. The different expression levels of 5α-reductase isoenzymes may confer response or resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitors and thus may have importance in prostate cancer prevention. PMID:22194926

  8. Cyclohexanol and methylcyclohexanols. A family of inhibitors of hepatic HMGCoA reductase in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miciak, A; White, D A; Middleton, B

    1986-10-15

    Oral dosing of rats with cyclohexanol and methylcyclohexanols resulted in the inhibition of hepatic HMGCoA reductase. Neither cyclohexane or cyclohexane diols exerted any effects. Inhibition was not due to alcohol dehydrogenase mediated changes in redox state since 3,3',5-trimethylcyclohexanol (TMC), a non substrate for alcohol dehydrogenase, was a potent inhibitor of HMGCoA reductase. Following a single dose of TMC there was no alteration in total hepatic HMGCoA reductase activity for more than 6 hr after which the enzyme activity was depressed in a dose-dependent manner. The normal diurnal rhythm of HMGCoA reductase was reduced in amplitude following TMC administration but the phase was unaltered and the t 1/2 for activity decay following the peak of activity was unaffected. Prior to the inhibitory effect of a TMC dose becoming apparent in total HMGCoA reductase activity we found that the expressed activity of the enzyme (after isolation in F- medium to suppress endogenous protein phosphatase) was depressed by 43%. The inhibitory effect of TMC on total HMGCoA reductase activity seen 8 hr or more after dosing was reflected by inhibition of sterol synthesis in liver measured in vivo after [3H]-H2O administration.

  9. A novel L-xylulose reductase essential for L-arabinose catabolism in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Metz, Benjamin; Mojzita, Dominik; Herold, Silvia; Kubicek, Christian P; Richard, Peter; Seiboth, Bernhard

    2013-04-09

    L-Xylulose reductases belong to the superfamily of short chain dehydrogenases and reductases (SDRs) and catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of L-xylulose to xylitol in L-arabinose and glucuronic acid catabolism. Here we report the identification of a novel L-xylulose reductase LXR3 in the fungus Trichoderma reesei by a bioinformatic approach in combination with a functional analysis. LXR3, a 31 kDa protein, catalyzes the reduction of L-xylulose to xylitol via NADPH and is also able to convert D-xylulose, D-ribulose, L-sorbose, and D-fructose to their corresponding polyols. Transcription of lxr3 is specifically induced by L-arabinose and L-arabitol. Deletion of lxr3 affects growth on L-arabinose and L-arabitol and reduces total NADPH-dependent LXR activity in cell free extracts. A phylogenetic analysis of known L-xylulose reductases shows that LXR3 is phylogenetically different from the Aspergillus niger L-xylulose reductase LxrA and, moreover, that all identified true L-xylulose reductases belong to different clades within the superfamily of SDRs. This indicates that the enzymes responsible for the reduction of L-xylulose in L-arabinose and glucuronic acid catabolic pathways have evolved independently and that even the fungal LXRs of the L-arabinose catabolic pathway have evolved in different clades of the superfamily of SDRs.

  10. A Novel l-Xylulose Reductase Essential for l-Arabinose Catabolism in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    l-Xylulose reductases belong to the superfamily of short chain dehydrogenases and reductases (SDRs) and catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of l-xylulose to xylitol in l-arabinose and glucuronic acid catabolism. Here we report the identification of a novel l-xylulose reductase LXR3 in the fungus Trichoderma reesei by a bioinformatic approach in combination with a functional analysis. LXR3, a 31 kDa protein, catalyzes the reduction of l-xylulose to xylitol via NADPH and is also able to convert d-xylulose, d-ribulose, l-sorbose, and d-fructose to their corresponding polyols. Transcription of lxr3 is specifically induced by l-arabinose and l-arabitol. Deletion of lxr3 affects growth on l-arabinose and l-arabitol and reduces total NADPH-dependent LXR activity in cell free extracts. A phylogenetic analysis of known l-xylulose reductases shows that LXR3 is phylogenetically different from the Aspergillus nigerl-xylulose reductase LxrA and, moreover, that all identified true l-xylulose reductases belong to different clades within the superfamily of SDRs. This indicates that the enzymes responsible for the reduction of l-xylulose in l-arabinose and glucuronic acid catabolic pathways have evolved independently and that even the fungal LXRs of the l-arabinose catabolic pathway have evolved in different clades of the superfamily of SDRs. PMID:23506391

  11. Characterization of anaerobic sulfite reduction by Salmonella typhimurium and purification of the anaerobically induced sulfite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenbeck, P.C. ); Clark, M.A.; Barrett, E.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium that lack the biosynthetic sulfite reductase (cysI and cysJ mutants) retain the ability to reduce sulfite for growth under anaerobic conditions. Here we report studies of sulfite reduction by a cysI mutant of S. typhimurium and purification of the associated anaerobic sulfite reductase. Sulfite reduction for anaerobic growth did not require a reducing atmosphere but was prevented by an argon atmosphere contaminated with air (<0.33%). It was also prevented by the presence of 0.1 mM nitrate. Anaerobic growth in liquid minimal medium, but not on agar, was found to require additions of trace amounts (10{sup {minus}7} M) of cysteine. Spontaneous mutants that grew under the argon contaminated with air also lost the requirement for 10{sup {minus}7}M cysteine for anaerobic growth in liquid. A role for sulfite reduction in anaerobic energy generation was contraindicated by the findings that sulfite reduction did not improve cell yields, and anaerobic sulfite reductase activity was greatest during the stationary phase of growth. Sulfite reductase was purified from the cytoplasmic fraction of the anaerobically grown cysI mutant and was purified 190-fold. The most effective donor in crude extracts was NADH. NADHP and methyl viologen were, respectively, 40 and 30% as effective as NADH. Oxygen reversibly inhibited the enzyme. The anaerobic sulfite reductase showed some resemblance to the biosynthetic sulfite reductase, but apparently it has a unique, as yet unidentified function.

  12. Corn leaf nitrate reductase - A nontoxic alternative to cadmium for photometric nitrate determinations in water samples by air-segmented continuous-flow analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, C.J.; Fischer, A.E.; Campbell, W.H.; Campbell, E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Development, characterization, and operational details of an enzymatic, air-segmented continuous-flow analytical method for colorimetric determination of nitrate + nitrite in natural-water samples is described. This method is similar to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 353.2 and U.S. Geological Survey method 1-2545-90 except that nitrate is reduced to nitrite by soluble nitrate reductase (NaR, EC 1.6.6.1) purified from corn leaves rather than a packed-bed cadmium reactor. A three-channel, air-segmented continuous-flow analyzer-configured for simultaneous determination of nitrite (0.020-1.000 mg-N/L) and nitrate + nitrite (0.05-5.00 mg-N/L) by the nitrate reductase and cadmium reduction methods-was used to characterize analytical performance of the enzymatic reduction method. At a sampling rate of 90 h-1, sample interaction was less than 1% for all three methods. Method detection limits were 0.001 mg of NO2- -N/L for nitrite, 0.003 mg of NO3-+ NO2- -N/L for nitrate + nitrite by the cadmium-reduction method, and 0.006 mg of NO3- + NO2- -N/L for nitrate + nitrite by the enzymatic-reduction method. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite by both methods was greater than 95% complete over the entire calibration range. The difference between the means of nitrate + nitrite concentrations in 124 natural-water samples determined simultaneously by the two methods was not significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level.

  13. Catalytic cycle of human glutathione reductase near 1 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Faber, H. Richard; Savvides, Savvas N.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Summary Efficient enzyme catalysis depends on exquisite details of structure beyond those resolvable in typical medium- and high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Here we report synchrotron-based cryocrystallographic studies of natural substrate complexes of the flavoenzyme human glutathione reductase (GR) at nominal resolutions between 1.1 and 0.95 Å that reveal new aspects of its mechanism. Compression in the active site causes overlapping van der Waals radii and distortion in the nicotinamide ring of the NADPH substrate, which enhances catalysis via stereoelectronic effects. The bound NADPH and redox-active disulfide are positioned optimally on opposite sides of the flavin for a 1,2-addition across a flavin double bond. The new structures extend earlier observations to reveal that the redox-active disulfide loop in GR is an extreme case of sequential peptide bonds systematically deviating from planarity, a net deviation of 53° across 5 residues. But this apparent strain is not a factor in catalysis as it is present in both oxidized and reduced structures. Intriguingly, the flavin bond lengths in oxidized GR are intermediate between those expected for oxidized and reduced flavin, but we present evidence that this may not be due to the protein environment but instead to partial synchrotron reduction of the flavin by the synchrotron beam. Finally, of more general relevance, we present evidence that the structures of synchrotron-reduced disulfide bonds cannot generally be used as reliable models for naturally reduced disulfide bonds. PMID:18638483

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency enhances resistance against cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fodil-Cornu, N; Kozij, N; Wu, Q; Rozen, R; Vidal, S M

    2009-10-01

    Folates provide one-carbon units for nucleotide synthesis and methylation reactions. A common polymorphism in the MTHFR gene (677C --> T) results in reduced enzymatic activity, and is associated with an increased risk for neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease. The high prevalence of this polymorphism suggests that it may have experienced a selective advantage under environmental pressure, possibly an infectious agent. To test the hypothesis that methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype influences the outcome of infectious disease, we examined the response of Mthfr-deficient mice against mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Acute MCMV infection of Mthfr(-/-) mice resulted in early control of cytokine secretion, decreased viral titer and preservation of spleen immune cells, in contrast to Mthfr wild-type littermates. The phenotype was abolished in MTHFR transgenic mice carrying an extra copy of the gene. Infection of primary fibroblasts with MCMV showed a decrease in viral replication and in the number of productively infected cells in Mthfr(+/-) fibroblasts compared with wild-type cells. These results indicate that Mthfr deficiency protects against MCMV infection in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that human genetic variants may provide an advantage in the host response against certain pathogens.

  15. [Molecular characterizations of two dehydroascorbate reductases from Selaginella moellendorffii].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zishuo; Lan, Ting; Li, Di; Yang, Hailing; Zeng, Qingyin

    2011-01-01

    Plant dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) is a physiologically important reducing enzyme in the ascorbate-glutathione recycling reaction. In this study, two DHARs genes (SmDHAR1 and SmDHAR2) were isolated from Selaginella moellendorffii. The SmDHAR1 and SmDHAR2 genes encode two proteins of 218 and 241 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular mass of 23.97 kDa and 27.33 kDa, respectively. The genomic sequence analysis showed SmDHAR1 and SmDHAR2 contained five and six introns, respectively. Reverse transcription PCR revealed that the SmDHAR1 and SmDHAR2 were constitutive expression genes in S. moellendorffii. The recombinant SmDHAR1 and SmDHAR2 proteins were overexpressed in E. coli, and were purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The recombinant SmDHAR1 showed 116-fold higher enzymatic activity towards the substrate dehydroascorbate than recombinant SmDHAR2. The recombinant SmDHAR1 showed higher thermal stability than recombinant SmDHAR2. These results indicated obvious functional divergence between the duplicate genes SmDHAR1 and SmDHAR2.

  16. The superoxide reductase from the early diverging eukaryote Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Testa, Fabrizio; Mastronicola, Daniela; Cabelli, Diane E; Bordi, Eugenio; Pucillo, Leopoldo P; Sarti, Paolo; Saraiva, Lígia M; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Teixeira, Miguel

    2011-10-15

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxide reductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR(Gi)) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T(final)) with Fe(3+) ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK(a)=8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR(Gi) reacts with O(2)(•-) with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k(1)=1.0×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T(1); this in turn rapidly decays to the T(final) state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR(Gi) is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  17. Correlated Protein Motion Measurements of Dihydrofolate Reductase Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengyang; Niessen, Katherine; Pace, James; Cody, Vivian; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first direct measurements of the long range structural vibrational modes in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). DHFR is a universal housekeeping enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of 7,8-dihydrofolate to 5,6,7,8-tetra-hydrofolate, with the aid of coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). This crucial enzymatic role as the target for anti-cancer [methotrexate (MTX)], and other clinically useful drugs, has made DHFR a long-standing target of enzymological studies. The terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1), corresponds to global correlated protein motions. In our lab we have developed Crystal Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), which directly measures these large scale intra-molecular protein vibrations, by removing the relaxational background of the solvent and residue side chain librational motions. We demonstrate narrowband features in the anisotropic absorbance for mouse DHFR with the ligand binding of NADPH and MTX single crystals as well as Escherichia coli DHFR with the ligand binding of NADPH and MTX single crystals. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI2 grant DBI2959989.

  18. A second target of benzamide riboside: dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Breton; Johnson-Farley, Nadine; Kerrigan, John E; Scotto, Kathleen W; Banerjee, Debabrata; Felczak, Krzysztof; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Gounder, Murugesan; Lin, HongXia; Abali, Emine Ercikan; Bertino, Joseph R

    2012-11-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is an essential enzyme involved in de novo purine and thymidine biosynthesis. For several decades, selective inhibition of DHFR has proven to be a potent therapeutic approach in the treatment of various cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, osteogenic sarcoma, carcinoma of the breast, and head and neck cancer. Therapeutic success with DHFR inhibitor methotrexate (MTX) has been compromised in the clinic, which limits the success of MTX treatment by both acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms. We report that benzamide riboside (BR), via anabolism to benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD) known to potently inhibit inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), also inhibits cell growth through a mechanism involving downregulation of DHFR protein. Evidence to support this second site of action of BR includes the finding that CCRF-CEM/R human T-cell lymphoblasic leukemia cells, resistant to MTX as a consequence of gene amplification and overexpression of DHFR, are more resistant to BR than are parental cells. Studies of the mechanism by which BR lowers DHFR showed that BR, through its metabolite BAD, reduced NADP and NADPH cellular levels by inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinase (NADK). As consequence of the lack of NADPH, DHFR was shown to be destabilized. We suggest that, inhibition of NADK is a new approach to downregulate DHFR and to inhibit cell growth.

  19. Chromate reductase activity in Streptomyces sp. MC1.

    PubMed

    Polti, Marta A; Amoroso, María J; Abate, Carlos M

    2010-02-01

    Biological transformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by enzymatic reduction may provide a less costly and more environmentally friendly approach to remediation. In a previous report a Cr(VI) resistant actinomycete strain, Streptomyces sp. MC1, was able to reduce Cr(VI) present in a synthetic medium, soil extract and soil samples. This is the first time optimal conditions such as pH, temperature, growth phase and electron donor have been elucidated in vitro for Cr(VI) reduction by a streptomycete. Chromate reductase of Streptomyces sp. MC1 is a constitutive enzyme which was mainly associated with biomass and required NAD(P)H as an electron donor. It was active over a broad temperature (19-39 degrees C) and pH (5-8) range, and optimum conditions were 30 degrees C and pH 7. The enzyme was present in supernatant, pellet and cell free extract. Bioremediation with the enzyme was observed in non-compatible cell reproduction systems, conditions frequently found in contaminated environments.

  20. Identification of activators of methionine sulfoxide reductases A and B

    PubMed Central

    Cudic, Predrag; Joshi, Neelambari; Sagher, Daphna; Williams, Brandon T.; Stawikowski, Maciej J.; Weissbach, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr) family of enzymes has been shown to protect cells against oxidative damage. The two major Msr enzymes, MsrA and MsrB, can repair oxidative damage to proteins due to reactive oxygen species, by reducing the methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. A role of MsrA in animal aging was first demonstrated in D. melanogaster where transgenic flies over-expressing recombinant bovine MsrA had a markedly extended life span. Subsequently, MsrA was also shown to be involved in the life span extension in C. elegans. These results supported other studies that indicated up-regulation, or activation, of the normal cellular protective mechanisms that cells use to defend against oxidative damage could be an approach to treat age related diseases and slow the aging process. In this study we have identified, for the first time, compounds structurally related to the natural products fusaricidins that markedly activate recombinant bovine and human MsrA and human MsrB. PMID:26718410

  1. Structural Basis for Activation of Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-12-03

    The class Ib ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli can initiate reduction of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides with either a Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-tyrosyl radical (Y{sm_bullet}) or a Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor in the NrdF subunit. Whereas Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} can self-assemble from Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and O{sub 2}, activation of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF requires a reduced flavoprotein, NrdI, proposed to form the oxidant for cofactor assembly by reduction of O{sub 2}. The crystal structures reported here of E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF reveal different coordination environments, suggesting distinct initial binding sites for the oxidants during cofactor activation. In the structures of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF in complex with reduced and oxidized NrdI, a continuous channel connects the NrdI flavin cofactor to the NrdF Mn{sub 2}{sup II} active site. Crystallographic detection of a putative peroxide in this channel supports the proposed mechanism of Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly.

  2. Structure and kinetics assays of recombinant Schistosoma mansoni dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Serrão, Vitor Hugo Balasco; Romanello, Larissa; Cassago, Alexandre; de Souza, Juliana Roberta Torini; Cheleski, Juliana; DeMarco, Ricardo; Brandão-Neto, José; Pereira, Humberto D'Muniz

    2017-03-11

    The parasite Schistosoma mansoni possesses all pathways for pyrimidine biosynthesis, in which dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), thymidylate cycle participants, is essential for nucleotide metabolism to obtain energy and structural nucleic acids. Thus, DHFRs have been widely suggested as therapeutic targets for the treatment of infectious diseases. In this study, we expressed recombinant SmDHFR in a heterologous manner to obtain structural, biochemical and kinetic information. X-ray diffraction of recombinant SmDHFR at 1.95Å resolution showed that the structure exhibited the canonical DHFR fold. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to determine the kinetic constants for NADP(+) and dihydrofolate. Moreover, inhibition assays were performed using the commercial folate analogs methotrexate and aminopterin; these analogs are recognized as folate competitors and are used as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer and autoimmune diseases. This study provides information that may prove useful for the future discovery of novel drugs and for understanding these metabolic steps from this pathway of S. mansoni, thus aiding in our understanding of the function of these essential pathways for parasite metabolism.

  3. Fasciola gigantica thioredoxin glutathione reductase: Biochemical properties and structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankita; Kesherwani, Manish; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Tripathi, Timir

    2016-08-01

    Platyhelminth thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) is a multifunctional enzyme that crosstalk between the conventional thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) system. It has been validated as a potential drug target in blood flukes. In the present study, we have performed a biochemical study on Fasciola gigantica TGR with substrates DTNB and GSSG. The Michaelis constant (Km) with DTNB was found to be 4.34±0.12μM while it was 61.15±1.50μM with GSSG. The kinetic results were compared with the TGR activities of other helminths. FgTGR showed typical hysteretic behavior with GSSG as other TGRs. We also described a homology-based structure of FgTGR. The cofactors (NADPH and FAD) and substrates (GSSG and DTNB) were docked, and two possible binding sites for substrates were identified in a single chain. The substrates were found to bind more favorably in the second site of TrxR domains. We also presented the first report on binding interaction of DTNB with a TGR. DTNB forms H-bond with His204 and Arg450 of chain A, Sec597, and Gly598 from chain B, salt-bridge with Lys124, and numerous other hydrophobic interactions. Helminth TGR represents an important enzyme in the redox and antioxidant system; hence, its inhibition can be used as an effective strategy against liver flukes.

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; de Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-02-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release.

  5. Hydrogenases in sulfate-reducing bacteria function as chromium reductase.

    PubMed

    Chardin, B; Giudici-Orticoni, M-T; De Luca, G; Guigliarelli, B; Bruschi, M

    2003-12-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to reduce chromate VI has been studied for possible application to the decontamination of polluted environments. Metal reduction can be achieved both chemically, by H(2)S produced by the bacteria, and enzymatically, by polyhemic cytochromes c(3). We demonstrate that, in addition to low potential polyheme c-type cytochromes, the ability to reduce chromate is widespread among [Fe], [NiFe], and [NiFeSe] hydrogenases isolated from SRB of the genera Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium. Among them, the [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough reduces Cr(VI) with the highest rate. Both [Fe] and [NiFeSe] enzymes exhibit the same K(m) towards Cr(VI), suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction rates are directly correlated with hydrogen consumption rates. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy enabled us to probe the oxidation by Cr(VI) of the various metal centers in both [NiFe] and [Fe] hydrogenases. These experiments showed that Cr(VI) is reduced to paramagnetic Cr(III), and revealed inhibition of the enzyme at high Cr(VI) concentrations. The significant decrease of both hydrogenase and Cr(VI)-reductase activities in a mutant lacking [Fe] hydrogenase demonstrated the involvement of this enzyme in Cr(VI) reduction in vivo. Experiments with [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin from Desulfovibrio gigas demonstrated that the low redox [Fe-S] (non-heme iron) clusters are involved in the mechanism of metal reduction by hydrogenases.

  6. Transgenic overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase improves cardiac performance

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Sarah G.; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Korte, Frederick Steven; Luo, Zhaoxiong; Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N.; Page, Jennifer L.; Brozovich, Frank; Weiss, Robert S.; Tian, Rong; Murry, Charles E.; Regnier, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cardiac myosin can use 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) as an energy substrate, that it enhances contraction and relaxation with minimal effect on calcium-handling properties in vitro, and that contractile enhancement occurs with only minor elevation of cellular [dATP]. Here, we report the effect of chronically enhanced dATP concentration on cardiac function using a transgenic mouse that overexpresses the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (TgRR), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in de novo deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Hearts from TgRR mice had elevated left ventricular systolic function compared with wild-type (WT) mice, both in vivo and in vitro, without signs of hypertrophy or altered diastolic function. Isolated cardiomyocytes from TgRR mice had enhanced contraction and relaxation, with no change in Ca2+ transients, suggesting targeted improvement of myofilament function. TgRR hearts had normal ATP and only slightly decreased phosphocreatine levels by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and they maintained rate responsiveness to dobutamine challenge. These data demonstrate long-term (at least 5-mo) elevation of cardiac [dATP] results in sustained elevation of basal left ventricular performance, with maintained β-adrenergic responsiveness and energetic reserves. Combined with results from previous studies, we conclude that this occurs primarily via enhanced myofilament activation and contraction, with similar or faster ability to relax. The data are sufficiently compelling to consider elevated cardiac [dATP] as a therapeutic option to treat systolic dysfunction. PMID:23530224

  7. Nitrate Reductase of Primary Roots of Red Spruce Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Yandow, Tim S.; Klein, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was found in primary roots, but not in foliage of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings. Nitrate induced NRA:NH4+ did not induce and slightly depressed NRA in older seedlings. Induction required 8 hours and, once induced, NRA decreased slowly in the absence of exogenous NO3−. Seedlings were grown in perlite with a complete nutrient solution containing NH4+ to limit NR induction. Established seedlings were stressed with nutrient solutions at pH 3, 4, or 5 supplemented with Cl− salts of Al, Cd, Pb, or Zn each at two concentrations. NRA in primary root tips was measured at 2, 14, 28, and 42 days. NRA induction was greatest at pH 3, and remained high during the period of study. NRA induction at pH 4 was lower. Metal ions suppressed NRA at pH 3 and 5, but enhanced NRA at pH 4. It is concluded that acidity and soluble metals in the root environment of red spruce are unlikely to be important factors in nitrogen transformations in red spruce roots. PMID:16664891

  8. Structure of Escherichia coli Flavodiiron Nitric Oxide Reductase.

    PubMed

    Romão, Célia V; Vicente, João B; Borges, Patrícia T; Victor, Bruno L; Lamosa, Pedro; Silva, Elísio; Pereira, Luís; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Soares, Cláudio M; Carrondo, Maria A; Turner, David; Teixeira, Miguel; Frazão, Carlos

    2016-11-20

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are present in organisms from all domains of life and have been described so far to be involved in the detoxification of oxygen or nitric oxide (NO), acting as O2 and/or NO reductases. The Escherichia coli FDP, named flavorubredoxin (FlRd), is the most extensively studied FDP. Biochemical and in vivo studies revealed that FlRd is involved in NO detoxification as part of the bacterial defense mechanisms against reactive nitrogen species. E. coli FlRd has a clear preference for NO as a substrate in vitro, exhibiting a very low reactivity toward O2. To contribute to the understanding of the structural features defining this substrate selectivity, we determined the crystallographic structure of E. coli FlRd, both in the isolated and reduced states. The overall tetrameric structure revealed a highly conserved flavodiiron core domain, with a metallo-β-lactamase-like domain containing a diiron center, and a flavodoxin domain with a flavin mononucleotide cofactor. The metal center in the oxidized state has a μ-hydroxo bridge coordinating the two irons, while in the reduced state, this moiety is not detected. Since only the flavodiiron domain was observed in these crystal structures, the structure of the rubredoxin domain was determined by NMR. Tunnels for the substrates were identified, and through molecular dynamics simulations, no differences for O2 or NO permeation were found. The present data represent the first structure for a NO-selective FDP.

  9. Prognostic Relevance of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Victor C.; Lu, Te-Ling; Yin, Hsin-Ling; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Lee, Yung-Chin; Liu, Chia-Chu; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Pin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Folate metabolism has been associated with cancers via alterations in nucleotide synthesis, DNA methylation, and DNA repair. We hypothesized that genetic variants in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a key enzyme of folate metabolism, would affect the prognosis of prostate cancer. Three haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the MTHFR gene region were genotyped in a cohort of 458 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy. One SNP, rs9651118, was associated with disease recurrence, and the association persisted after multivariate analyses adjusting for known risk factors. Public dataset analyses suggested that rs9651118 affects MTHFR expression. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that MTHFR expression is significantly upregulated in prostate tumor tissues when compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of MTHFR correlates with cancer recurrence and death in two independent publicly available prostate cancer datasets. In conclusion, our data provide rationale to further validate the clinical utility of MTHFR rs9651118 as a biomarker for prognosis in prostate cancer. PMID:27916838

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE METHIONINE SULFOXIDE REDUCTASES OF SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI

    PubMed Central

    Oke, Tolulope T.; Moskovitz, Jackob; Williams, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, also known as Bilharzia, is an infectious disease caused by several species of Schistosoma. Twenty million individuals suffer severe symptoms and 200,000 people die annually from the disease. The host responds to the presence of S. mansoni by producing reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress. We hypothesized that schistosomes produce antioxidants in response to oxidative stress. A known antioxidant protein is methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr). Methionine residues can be oxidized to methionine sulfoxide in the presence of oxidizing agents, which is readily reversed by the action of the Msr system. Two S. mansoni MsrB genes (MsrB1 and MsrB2) were cloned and the recombinant proteins expressed in bacteria and purified. The S. mansoni MsrB proteins contained the common conserved catalytic and zinc coordinating cysteines. Analysis of the proteins showed that both proteins promote the reduction of both free methionine sulfoxide (Met[O]) and dabsyl-Met(O) to free methionine (Met) and dabsyl-Met, respectively, while exhibiting differences in their specific activities towards these substrates. Using real-time PCR, both proteins were found to be expressed in all stages of the parasite’s life cycle with the highest level of expression of both proteins in the egg stage. This is the first description of MsrB proteins from a parasite. PMID:19604033

  11. Lausannevirus Encodes a Functional Dihydrofolate Reductase Susceptible to Proguanil

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, L.; Hauser, P. M.; Gauye, F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lausannevirus belongs to the family Marseilleviridae within the group of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs). These giant viruses exhibit unique features, including a large genome, ranging from 100 kb to 2.5 Mb and including from 150 to more than 2,500 genes, as well as the presence of genes coding for proteins involved in transcription and translation. The large majority of Lausannevirus open reading frames have unknown functions. Interestingly, a bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) is encoded in the Lausannevirus genome. The enzyme plays central roles in DNA precursor biosynthesis. DHFR is the pharmacological target of antifolates, such as trimethoprim, pyrimethamine, and proguanil. First, the functionality of Lausannevirus DHFR-TS was demonstrated by the successful complementation of a DHFR-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with a plasmid expressing the heterologous gene. Additionally, using this heterologous expression system, we demonstrated the in vitro susceptibility of Lausannevirus DHFR-TS to proguanil and its resistance to pyrimethamine and trimethoprim. Proguanil may provide a unique and useful treatment if Lausannevirus proves to be a human pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a DHFR-TS has been described and characterized in an NCLDV. PMID:28137801

  12. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR): the 2002 update.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Udo; Filling, Charlotta; Hult, Malin; Shafqat, Naeem; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lindh, Monica; Shafqat, Jawed; Nordling, Erik; Kallberg, Yvonne; Persson, Bengt; Jörnvall, Hans

    2003-02-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) form a large, functionally heterogeneous protein family presently with about 3000 primary and about 30 3D structures deposited in databases. Despite low sequence identities between different forms (about 15-30%), the 3D structures display highly similar alpha/beta folding patterns with a central beta-sheet, typical of the Rossmann-fold. Based on distinct sequence motifs functional assignments and classifications are possible, making it possible to build a general nomenclature system. Recent mutagenetic and structural studies considerably extend the knowledge on the general reaction mechanism, thereby establishing a catalytic tetrad of Asn-Ser-Tyr-Lys residues, which presumably form the framework for a proton relay system including the 2'-OH of the nicotinamide ribose, similar to the mechanism found in horse liver ADH. Based on their cellular functions, several SDR enzymes appear as possible and promising pharmacological targets with application areas spanning hormone-dependent cancer forms or metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, and infectious diseases.

  13. Solvent effects on catalysis by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Loveridge, E Joel; Tey, Lai-Hock; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2010-01-27

    Hydride transfer catalyzed by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has been described previously within an environmentally coupled model of hydrogen tunneling, where protein motions control binding of substrate and cofactor to generate a tunneling ready conformation and modulate the width of the activation barrier and hence the reaction rate. Changes to the composition of the reaction medium are known to perturb protein motions. We have measured kinetic parameters of the reaction catalyzed by DHFR from Escherichia coli in the presence of various cosolvents and cosolutes and show that the dielectric constant, but not the viscosity, of the reaction medium affects the rate of reaction. Neither the primary kinetic isotope effect on the reaction nor its temperature dependence were affected by changes to the bulk solvent properties. These results are in agreement with our previous report on the effect of solvent composition on catalysis by DHFR from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. However, the effect of solvent on the temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on hydride transfer catalyzed by E. coli DHFR is difficult to explain within a model, in which long-range motions couple to the chemical step of the reaction, but may indicate the existence of a short-range promoting vibration or the presence of multiple nearly isoenergetic conformational substates of enzymes with similar but distinct catalytic properties.

  14. Constitutive nitrate reductase expression and inhibition in winged bean

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenchuan; Harper, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    It was found that NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} had no effect on winged bean nitrate reductase activity (NRA). Similar NRA was expressed in plants grown on NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, urea, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and nil N. This indicated that the primary NR expressed in winged bean was constitutive, rather than substrate-inducible. Maximum NRA in winged bean was obtained in the light. KClO{sub 3} was capable of inhibiting NRA of leaves if added to the root growth medium or to the NR assay medium, indicating possible competition with NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} at the reduction site. While it has previously been shown that either cycloheximide alone, or both cycloheximide and chloramphenicol impair the synthesis of NR protein, our data unexpectedly demonstrated that cycloheximide had little effect on NRA, whereas chloramphenicol greatly inhibited the expression of NRA in winged bean. One interpretation is that chloroplasts may influence the activity and/or synthesis of constitutive NR proteins.

  15. Loss of quinone reductase 2 function selectively facilitates learning behaviors.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Charles-Etienne; Bastianetto, Stephane; Brouillette, Jonathan; Tse, YiuChung; Boutin, Jean A; Delagrange, Philippe; Wong, TakPan; Sarret, Philippe; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-09-22

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with deficits in learning and memory with age as well as in Alzheimer's disease. Using DNA microarray, we demonstrated the overexpression of quinone reductase 2 (QR2) in the hippocampus in two models of learning deficits, namely the aged memory impaired rats and the scopolamine-induced amnesia model. QR2 is a cytosolic flavoprotein that catalyzes the reduction of its substrate and enhances the production of damaging activated quinone and ROS. QR2-like immunostaining is enriched in cerebral structures associated with learning behaviors, such as the hippocampal formation and the temporofrontal cortex of rat, mouse, and human brains. In cultured rat embryonic hippocampal neurons, selective inhibitors of QR2, namely S26695 and S29434, protected against menadione-induced cell death by reversing its proapoptotic action. S26695 (8 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, adult QR2 knock-out mice demonstrated enhanced learning abilities in various tasks, including Morris water maze, object recognition, and rotarod performance test. Other behaviors related to anxiety (elevated plus maze), depression (forced swim), and schizophrenia (prepulse inhibition) were not affected in QR2-deficient mice. Together, these data suggest a role for QR2 in cognitive behaviors with QR2 inhibitors possibly representing a novel therapeutic strategy toward the treatment of learning deficits especially observed in the aged brain.

  16. Severe scoliosis in a patient with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Tatiana; Patel, Jinesh; Badilla-Porras, Ramses; Kronick, Jonathan; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2015-01-01

    Severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of folate metabolism. We report a new patient with severe MTHFR deficiency who presented at age 4 months with early onset severe scoliosis associated with severe hypotonia. Markedly decreased MTHFR enzyme activity (0.3 nmoles CHO/mg protein/h; reference range>9) and compound heterozygous mutations (c. 1304T>C; p.Phe435Ser and c.1539dup; p.Glu514Argfs∗24) in the MTHFR gene confirmed the diagnosis. She was treated with vitamin B12, folic acid and betaine supplementation and showed improvements in her developmental milestones and hypotonia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient with MTHFR deficiency reported with severe early onset scoliosis. Despite the late diagnosis and treatment initiation, she showed favorable short-term neurodevelopmental outcome. This case suggests that homocysteine measurement should be included in the investigations of patients with developmental delay, hypotonia and scoliosis within first