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Sample records for aldosterone receptor blocker

  1. Angiotensin receptor blocker drugs and inhibition of adrenal beta-arrestin-1-dependent aldosterone production: Implications for heart failure therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Aukszi, Beatrix

    2017-01-01

    Aldosterone mediates many of the physiological and pathophysiological/cardio-toxic effects of angiotensin II (AngII). Its synthesis and secretion from the zona glomerulosa cells of the adrenal cortex, elevated in chronic heart failure (HF), is induced by AngII type 1 receptors (AT1Rs). The AT1R is a G protein-coupled receptor, mainly coupling to Gq/11 proteins. However, it can also signal through β-arrestin-1 (βarr1) or -2 (βarr2), both of which mediate G protein-independent signaling. Over the past decade, a second, Gq/11 protein-independent but βarr1-dependent signaling pathway emanating from the adrenocortical AT1R and leading to aldosterone production has become appreciated. Thus, it became apparent that AT1R antagonists that block both pathways equally well are warranted for fully effective aldosterone suppression in HF. This spurred the comparison of all of the currently marketed angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, AT1R antagonists or sartans) at blocking activation of the two signaling modes (G protein-, and βarr1-dependent) at the AngII-activated AT1R and hence, at suppression of aldosterone in vitro and in vivo. Although all agents are very potent inhibitors of G protein activation at the AT1R, candesartan and valsartan were uncovered to be the most potent ARBs at blocking βarr activation by AngII and at suppressing aldosterone in vitro and in vivo in post-myocardial infarction HF animals. In contrast, irbesartan and losartan are virtually G protein-“biased” blockers at the human AT1R, with very low efficacy for βarr inhibition and aldosterone suppression. Therefore, candesartan and valsartan (and other, structurally similar compounds) may be the most preferred ARB agents for HF pharmacotherapy, as well as for treatment of other conditions characterized by elevated aldosterone.

  2. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition: overview of the therapeutic use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and direct renin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Kelly; Smith, Holly; Biederman, Jason

    2014-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy in hypertensive diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, or normoalbuminuria has been repeatedly shown to improve cardiovascular mortality and reduce the decline in glomerular filtration rate. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade in normotensive diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria or microalbuminuria cannot be advocated at present. Dual RAAS inhibition with ACE inhibitors plus ARBs or ACE inhibitors plus direct renin inhibitors has failed to improve cardiovascular or renal outcomes but has predisposed patients to serious adverse events.

  3. Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and aldosterone antagonists in the prevention of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Kathy M; Sanoski, Cynthia A; Spinler, Sarah A

    2009-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are significant health problems and an economic burden to society. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a key role in the occurrence of structural and electrical remodeling, potentially explaining the development of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Angiotensin II has been shown to regulate cardiac cell proliferation and to modulate cardiac myocyte ion channels. Results of post hoc analyses from prospective clinical trials appear to show that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are most effective in the prevention of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure. It is difficult to determine if these agents are useful in the prevention of new-onset atrial fibrillation after myocardial infarction, and available evidence suggests that the benefit of ACE inhibitors and ARBs for prevention of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension appears limited to those with left ventricular hypertrophy. Patients with structural changes in cardiac muscle, such as those with heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy, appear to benefit the most from RAAS blockade, possibly due to the theory of reversal of cardiac remodeling. There is no evidence, to our knowledge, that either ACE inhibitors or ARBs facilitate direct electrical current cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation; however, it appears that RAAS blockade may be useful in the prevention of recurrent atrial fibrillation after direct electrical current cardioversion. Whether ACE inhibitors may prevent life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias or SCD is unclear. Aldosterone antagonists appear to be useful for the prevention of SCD in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Results from ongoing clinical trials are anticipated to provide further insight on the potential roles of RAAS inhibitors for the prevention of

  4. Effect of Eplerenone, a Selective Aldosterone Blocker, on the Development of Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae Hee; Hong, Ho Cheol; Cho, Myong Jin; Kim, Yoon Jung; Choi, Hae Yoon; Eun, Chai Ryoung; Yang, Sae Jeong; Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Hee Young; Seo, Ji A; Kim, Sin Gon; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop

    2012-01-01

    Background Aldosterone antagonists are reported to have beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy by effective blocking of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We investigated the renoprotective effect of the selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone, the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril, and combined eplerenone and lisinopril treatment in type 2 diabetic rats. Methods Animals were divided into six groups as follows: Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat control, OLETF rats treated with a low dose of eplerenone (50 mg/kg/day), OLETF rats treated with a high dose of eplerenone (200 mg/kg/day), OLETF rats treated with lisinopril (10 mg/kg/day), OLETF rats treated with a combination of both drugs (eplerenone 200 mg/kg/day and lisinopril 10 mg/kg/day), and obese non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats for 26 weeks. Results Urinary albumin excretion was significantly lower in the lisinopril group, but not in the eplerenone group. Urinary albumin excretion was decreased in the combination group than in the lisinopril group. Glomerulosclerosis and renal expression of type I and type IV collagen, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and fibronectin mRNA were markedly decreased in the lisinopril, eplerenone, and combination groups. Conclusion Eplerenone and lisinopril combination showed additional benefits on type 2 diabetic nephropathy compared to monotherapy of each drug. PMID:22540049

  5. Aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Funder, John W

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone is currently thought to exert its physiologic effects by activating epithelial mineralocorticoid receptors, and its pathologic effects on the cardiovascular system via mineralocorticoid receptors in the heart and blood vessels. Recent studies have extended this understanding to include a reevaluation of the roles of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor activation in blood pressure control; the rapid, nongenomic effects of aldosterone; the role of cortisol as a mineralocorticoid receptor agonist under conditions of redox change/tissue damage/reactive oxygen species generation; the growing consensus that primary aldosteronism accounts for approximately 10% of all essential hypertension; recent new insights into the cardioprotective role of spironolactone; and the development of third- and fourth-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for use in cardiovascular and other inflammatory disease. These findings on aldosterone action and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade are analyzed in the context of the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  6. The L-, N-, and T-type triple calcium channel blocker benidipine acts as an antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of nuclear receptor family.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Hiromichi; Hirayama, Kazunori; Yoda, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Katsutoshi; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Kusaka, Hideaki; Matsubara, Masahiro

    2010-06-10

    Aldosterone-induced activation of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor family, results in increased tissue damage such as vascular inflammation and cardiac and perivascular fibrosis. Benidipine, a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, is used for hypertension and angina. Benidipine exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological features such as renoprotective and cardioprotective effects through triple blockade of L-, N-, and T-type calcium channels. However, the mechanism of additional beneficial effects on end-organ damage is poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of benidipine and other calcium channel blockers on aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation using luciferase reporter assay system. Benidipine showed more potent activity than efonidipine, amlodipine, or azelnidipine. Benidipine depressed the response to higher concentrations of aldosterone, whereas pretreatment of eplerenone, a steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, did not. Binding studies using [(3)H] aldosterone indicated that benidipine and other calcium channel blockers competed for binding to mineralocorticoid receptor. Benidipine and other calcium channel blockers showed antagonistic activity on Ser810 to Leu mutant mineralocorticoid receptor, which is identified in patients with early-onset hypertension. On the other hand, eplerenone partially activated the mutant. Results of analysis using optical isomers of benidipine indicated that inhibitory effect of aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation was independent of its primary blockade of calcium channels. These results suggested that benidipine directly inhibits aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation, and the antagonistic activity might contribute to the drug's pleiotropic pharmacological features.

  7. Determinants and Changes Associated with Aldosterone Breakthrough after Angiotensin II Receptor Blockade in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Overt Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Moranne, Olivier; Bakris, George; Fafin, Coraline; Favre, Guillaume; Pradier, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system decreases proteinuria and slows estimated GFR decline in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with overt nephropathy. Serum aldosterone levels may increase during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade. The determinants and consequences of this aldosterone breakthrough remain unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study examined the incidence, determinants, and changes associated with aldosterone breakthrough in a posthoc analysis of a randomized study that compared the effect of two angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with overt nephropathy. Results Of 567 of 860 participants included in this posthoc analysis, 28% of participants developed aldosterone breakthrough, which was defined by an increase greater than 10% over baseline values of serum aldosterone levels after 1 year of angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment. Factors independently associated with aldosterone breakthrough at 1 year were lower serum aldosterone and potassium levels at baseline, higher decreases in sodium intake, systolic BP, and estimated GFR from baseline to 1 year, and use of losartan versus telmisartan. Aldosterone breakthrough at 6 months was not sustained at 1 year in 69% of cases, and it did not predict estimated GFR decrease and proteinuria increase between 6 months and 1 year. Conclusions Aldosterone breakthrough is a frequent event 1 year after initiating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, particularly in participants exposed to intensive lowering of BP with sodium depletion and short-acting angiotensin II receptor blockers. Short-term serum aldosterone level increases at 6 months are not associated with negative kidney outcomes between 6 months and 1 year. PMID:23929924

  8. Blockade of T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels by benidipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, inhibits aldosterone production in human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R.

    PubMed

    Akizuki, Osamu; Inayoshi, Atsushi; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Yao, Kozo; Shirakura, Shiro; Sasaki, Katsutoshi; Kusaka, Hideaki; Matsubara, Masahiro

    2008-04-28

    Benidipine, a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, is used for treatment of hypertension and angina. Benidipine exerts pleiotropic pharmacological features, such as renoprotective and cardioprotective effects. In pathophysiological conditions, the antidiuretic hormone aldosterone causes development of renal and cardiovascular diseases. In adrenal glomerulosa cells, aldosterone is produced in response to extracellular potassium, which is mainly mediated by T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. More recently, it has been demonstrated that benidipine inhibits T-type Ca2+ channels in addition to L-type Ca2+ channels. Therefore, effect of calcium channel blockers, including benidipine, on aldosterone production and T-type Ca2+ channels using human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R was investigated. Benidipine efficiently inhibited KCl-induced aldosterone production at low concentration (3 and 10 nM), with inhibitory activity more potent than other calcium channel blockers. Patch clamp analysis indicated that benidipine concentration-dependently inhibited T-type Ca2+ currents at 10, 100 and 1000 nM. As for examined calcium channel blockers, inhibitory activity for T-type Ca2+ currents was well correlated with aldosterone production. L-type specific calcium channel blockers calciseptine and nifedipine showed no effect in both assays. These results indicate that inhibition of T-type Ca2+ channels is responsible for inhibition of aldosterone production in NCI-H295R cells. Benidipine efficiently inhibited KCl-induced upregulation of 11-beta-hydroxylase mRNA and aldosterone synthase mRNA as well as KCl-induced Ca2+ influx, indicating it as the most likely inhibition mechanism. Benidipine partially inhibited angiotensin II-induced aldosterone production, plus showed additive effects when used in combination with the angiotensin II type I receptor blocker valsartan. Benidipine also partially inhibited angiotensin II-induced upregulation of the above m

  9. New Evidence Supporting the Use of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Blockers in Drug-Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Hafid; Webb, David J

    2016-04-01

    Treatment resistant hypertension (TRH), defined as a blood pressure above goal despite treatment with optimally tolerated doses of 3 antihypertensive agents of different classes, ideally including a diuretic, remains a significant problem and its management an area of uncertainty for physicians. One hypothesis is that resistant hypertension is due to abnormal sodium retention, mediated by aldosterone breakthrough occurring despite blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). Thus, there has been renewed interest in the use of mineralocorticoid receptor blockers (MRB) to treat this condition. This article critically evaluates new evidence supporting the use of MRB in TRH published in the last 3 years. We conclude that there is now sufficient evidence to recommend MRB, in particular spironolactone, as the first choice medication to treat this condition, and for its inclusion in future guidelines.

  10. On the top of ARB N/L type Ca channel blocker leads to less elevation of aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Konoshita, Tadashi; Kaeriyama, Saori; Urabe, Machi; Nakaya, Takahiro; Yamada, Mika; Ichikawa, Mai; Yamamoto, Katsushi; Sato, Satsuki; Imagawa, Michiko; Fujii, Miki; Makino, Yasukazu; Zenimaru, Yasuo; Wakahara, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Jinya; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The activation of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is one of the unfavourable characteristics of calcium channel blocker (CCB). N type calcium channel is thought to be involved in renin gene transcription and adrenal aldosterone release. Accordingly, N/L type CCB has a possibility of less elevation of plasma aldosterone concentrations (PAC) among CCBs. In a monotherapy study, we had already demonstrated that N/L type CCB leads to less activation of the RAS compared with L type CCB. The objective of this study is to substantiate the hypothesis that at the condition of additive administration on the top of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), still N/L type CCB leads to less elevation of PAC compared with L type one. Subjects were 60 hypertensives administered with valsartan. As an open label study, amlodipine (L type) or cilnidipine (N/L type) were administered on the top of valsartan (ARB) in a cross-over manner. Results were as follows (valsartan+amlodipine compared with valsartan+cilnidipine): systolic blood pressure (SBP)/diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (mmHg): 132±10/76±10 compared with 131±10/77±9, P=0.95/0.48, plasma renin activity (PRA) (ng/ml·h): 2.41±2.67 compared with 2.00±1.50 P=0.20, PAC (pg/ml): 77.3±31.0 compared with 67.4±24.8, P<0.05, urinary albumin excretion (UAE) (mg/gCr): 105.9±216.1 compared with 73.9±122.2, P<0.05. Thus, PAC at cilnidipine was significantly lower than those at amlodipine in spite of the comparable BP reductions. Besides, UAE was significantly lower at cilnidipine. In conclusion, on the top of the ARB, it is suggested that cilnidipine administration might lead to less elevation of PAC and reduction in UAE compared with amlodipine. PMID:27515419

  11. L/N-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine reduces plasma aldosterone, albuminuria, and urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masanori; Maruyama, Noriaki; Suzuki, Hiroko; Inoshita, Atsushi; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2013-07-01

    Cilnidipine inhibits both L- and N-type calcium channels and has been shown to dilate efferent arterioles as effectively as afferent arterioles. We conducted an open-label, randomized trial to compare the effects of cilnidipine against those of amlodipine on blood pressure (BP), albuminuria, and plasma aldosterone concentration in hypertensive patients with mild- to moderate-stage chronic kidney disease. Patients with BP ≥130/80 mmHg, an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 90-30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and albuminuria ≥30 mg/g, despite treatment with the maximum recommended dose of angiotensin II receptor blockers, were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients received either 10 mg/day cilnidipine (increased to 20 mg/day; n = 35) or 2.5 mg/day amlodipine (increased to 5 mg/day; n = 35). After 48 weeks of treatment, a significant and comparable reduction in systolic and diastolic BP was observed in both groups. The percent reduction in the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio and liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) in the cilnidipine group was significantly greater than in the amlodipine group. Although plasma renin activity did not differ between the two groups, the plasma aldosterone level was significantly decreased in the cilnidipine group. Cilnidipine therefore appears to reduce albuminuria, urinary L-FABP, and plasma aldosterone levels more than amlodipine, and these effects are independent of BP reduction.

  12. Pharmacological treatment of aldosterone excess.

    PubMed

    Deinum, Jaap; Riksen, Niels P; Lenders, Jacques W M

    2015-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism, caused by autonomous secretion of aldosterone by the adrenals, is estimated to account for at least 5% of hypertension cases. Hypertension explains the considerable cardiovascular morbidity caused by aldosteronism only partly, calling for specific anti-aldosterone drugs. The pharmacology of aldosterone is complex due to high homology with other steroids, the resemblance of steroid receptors, and the common pathways of steroid synthesis. Classically, pharmacological treatment of aldosteronism relied on the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone, which is highly effective, but causes considerable, mainly sexual side-effects due to limited selectivity for the MR. New agents have been developed or are being developed that aim at higher selectivity for MR antagonists (eplerenone, dihydropyridine-derived calcium channel blockers (CCB)), or inhibition of aldosterone synthesis. Eplerenone is less potent than spironolactone, but causes fewer adverse effects due to its selectivity for the MR. Non-steroidal MR antagonists have been developed from dihydropyridine CCBs, having lost their CCB activity and being highly selective for the MR. The first clinical studies with these drugs are underway. Aldosterone synthase inhibitors are an attractive alternative, but are prone to interference with cortisol synthesis due to the inhibition of 11-β-hydroxylation, an essential step in both cortisol and aldosterone synthesis, and accumulation of mineralocorticoid precursors. In coming years clinical research will provide the answers as to which drugs and strategies to treat high-aldosterone states are the most effective.

  13. Renal Aldosterone Receptors: Studies with [3H]Aldosterone and the Anti-Mineralocorticoid [3H]Spirolactone (SC-26304)

    PubMed Central

    Marver, Diana; Stewart, John; Funder, John W.; Feldman, David; Edelman, Isidore S.

    1974-01-01

    In vivo, a spirolactone (SC-26304) inhibited the effects of aldosterone on urinary K+:Na+ ratios and the binding of [3H]aldosterone to renal cytoplasmic and nuclear receptors. Cytoplasmic binding of [3H]aldosterone and [3H]spirolactone (SC-26304) was similar in magnitude and involved the same set of sites. Under three sets of conditions—(i) in the intact rat, (ii) in kidney slices, and (iii) in reconstitution studies (mixing prelabeled cytoplasm with either purified renal nuclei or chromatin), [3H]spirolactone (SC-26304) did not yield specific nuclear complexes in contrast to the reproducible generation of these complexes with [3H]aldosterone. In glycerol density gradients, cytoplasmic [3H]aldosterone receptor complexes sedimented at 8.5 S and 4 S in low concentrations of salt and at 4.5 S in high concentrations of salt. Cytoplasmic [3H]spirolactone (SC-26304) receptor complexes sedimented at 3 S in low concentrations of salt and 4 S in high concentrations of salt. These results are discussed in terms of an allosteric model of the receptor system. Images PMID:4364539

  14. Type I receptors in parotid, colon, and pituitary are aldosterone selective in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, K.; Funder, J.W. )

    1987-10-01

    Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated that type I receptors in the rat kidney are aldosterone selective, whereas those in the hippocampus do not appear to discriminate between aldosterone and corticosterone. The authors have injected mature rats with ({sup 3}H)aldosterone or ({sup 3}H)corticosterone plus 100-fold excess of RU 28362, with or without unlabeled aldosterone or corticosterone, and compared type I receptor occupancy in two classic mineralocorticoid target tissues (parotid and colon) and in the pituitary. Mature rats were killed 10-180 min after tracer administration; ({sup 3}H)aldosterone was well taken up and retained in all tissues, whereas ({sup 3}H)corticosterone was significantly retained only in the pituitary 10 min after tracer administration. To assess a possible role for corticosterone-binding globulin (CBG) in conferring aldosterone specificity on type I receptors, 10-day-old rats (with very low levels of CBG) were similarly injected. In the colon and parotid, ({sup 3}H)aldosterone binding was at least an order of magnitude higher than that of corticosterone; in the pituitary aldosterone binding was approximately three times that of corticosterone. They interpret these data as evidence that in the parotid and colon type I receptors are aldosterone selective by a non-CBG-requiring mechanism, whereas in the pituitary there appear to be both aldosterone-selective and nonselective type I sites.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  16. Oxidative DNA Damage in Kidneys and Heart of Hypertensive Mice Is Prevented by Blocking Angiotensin II and Aldosterone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Susanne; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Zimnol, Anna; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recently, we could show that angiotensin II, the reactive peptide of the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, causes the formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in kidneys and hearts of hypertensive mice. To further investigate on the one hand the mechanism of DNA damage caused by angiotensin II, and on the other hand possible intervention strategies against end-organ damage, the effects of substances interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system on angiotensin II-induced genomic damage were studied. Methods In C57BL/6-mice, hypertension was induced by infusion of 600 ng/kg • min angiotensin II. The animals were additionally treated with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker eplerenone and the antioxidant tempol. DNA damage and the activation of transcription factors were studied by immunohistochemistry and protein expression analysis. Results Administration of angiotensin II led to a significant increase of blood pressure, decreased only by candesartan. In kidneys and hearts of angiotensin II-treated animals, significant oxidative stress could be detected (1.5-fold over control). The redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB were activated in the kidney by angiotensin II-treatment (4- and 3-fold over control, respectively) and reduced by all interventions. In kidneys and hearts an increase of DNA damage (3- and 2-fold over control, respectively) and of DNA repair (3-fold over control) was found. These effects were ameliorated by all interventions in both organs. Consistently, candesartan and tempol were more effective than eplerenone. Conclusion Angiotensin II-induced DNA damage is caused by angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated formation of oxidative stress in vivo. The angiotensin II-mediated physiological increase of aldosterone adds to the DNA-damaging effects. Blocking angiotensin II and mineralocorticoid receptors therefore

  17. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Blockers in Hypertension: Alive and Well.

    PubMed

    Frishman, William H

    2016-10-27

    βeta-Adrenergic receptor blockers (β-blockers) are an appropriate treatment for patients having systemic hypertension (HTN) who have concomitant ischemic heart disease (IHD), heart failure, obstructive cardiomyopathy, aortic dissection or certain cardiac arrhythmias. β-blockers can be used in combination with other antiHTN drugs to achieve maximal blood pressure control. Labetalol can be used in HTN emergencies and urgencies. β-blockers may be useful in HTN patients having a hyperkinetic circulation (palpitations, tachycardia, HTN, and anxiety), migraine headache, and essential tremor. β-blockers are highly heterogeneous with respect to various pharmacologic properties: degree of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity , membrane stabilizing activity , β1 selectivity, α1-adrenergic blocking effects, tissue solubility, routes of systemic elimination, potencies and duration of action, and specific properties may be important in the selection of a drug for clinical use. β-blocker usage to reduce perioperative myocardial ischemia and cardiovascular (CV) complications may not benefit as many patients as was once hoped, and may actually cause harm in some individuals. Currently the best evidence supports perioperative β-blocker use in two patient groups: patients undergoing vascular surgery with known IHD or multiple risk factors for it, and for those patients already receiving β-blockers for known CV conditions.

  18. Plasma soluble (pro)renin receptor is independent of plasma renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations but is affected by ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Geneviève; Blanchard, Anne; Curis, Emmanuel; Bergerot, Damien; Chambon, Yann; Hirose, Takuo; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Tabard, Sylvie Brailly; Baron, Stéphanie; Frank, Michael; Totsune, Kazuhito; Azizi, Michel

    2014-02-01

    A soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) circulates in plasma and is able to bind renin and prorenin. It is not known whether plasma sPRR concentrations vary with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. We measured plasma sPRR, renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in 121 white and 9 black healthy subjects, 40 patients with diabetes mellitus, 41 hypertensive patients with or without renin-angiotensin system blockers, 9 patients with primary aldosteronism, and 10 patients with Gitelman syndrome. Median physiological plasma sPRR concentration was 23.5 ng/mL (interquartile range, 20.9-26.5) under usual uncontrolled sodium diet. sPRR concentration in healthy subjects, unlike renin and prorenin, did not display circadian variation or dependence on age, sex, posture, or hormonal status. sPRR concentrations were ≈25% lower in black than in white subjects, whereas renin concentrations were ≈40% lower. Patients with diabetes mellitus (average renin-high prorenin levels) and with hypertension only (average renin-average prorenin levels) had sPRR concentrations similar to healthy subjects. Renin-angiotensin system blockade was associated with increase of sPRR concentration by ≈12%. sPRR in patients with primary aldosteronism (low renin-low prorenin) and Gitelman syndrome (high renin-high prorenin) were similar and ≈10% higher than in healthy subjects. There was no correlation between sPRR and renin or prorenin. In conclusion, our results show that plasma sPRR concentrations are dependent on ethnicity and independent of renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in healthy subjects and in patients with contrasted degrees of renin-angiotensin system activity.

  19. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  20. Aldosterone Induces Renal Fibrosis and Inflammatory M1-Macrophage Subtype via Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Cortegano, Isabel; Ballesteros, Sandra; Alía, Mario; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Olivares-Álvaro, Elena; Egido, Jesús; de Andrés, Belén; Gaspar, María Luisa; de las Heras, Natalia; Lahera, Vicente; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate macrophages heterogeneity and structural, functional and inflammatory alterations in rat kidney by aldosterone + salt administration. The effects of treatment with spironolactone on above parameters were also analyzed. Male Wistar rats received aldosterone (1 mgkg-1d-1) + 1% NaCl for 3 weeks. Half of the animals were treated with spironolactone (200 mg kg-1d-1). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were elevated (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats. Relative kidney weight, collagen content, fibronectin, macrophage infiltrate, CTGF, Col I, MMP2, TNF-α, CD68, Arg2, and SGK-1 were increased (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats, being reduced by spironolactone (p<0.05). Increased iNOS and IFN-γ mRNA gene expression (M1 macrophage markers) was observed in aldosterone + salt rats, whereas no significant differences were observed in IL-10 and gene ArgI mRNA expression or ED2 protein content (M2 macrophage markers). All the observed changes were blocked with spironolactone treatment. Macrophage depletion with liposomal clodronate reduced macrophage influx and inflammatory M1 markers (INF-γ or iNOS), whereas interstitial fibrosis was only partially reduced after this intervention, in aldosterone plus salt-treated rats. In conclusion, aldosterone + salt administration mediates inflammatory M1 macrophage phenotype and increased fibrosis throughout mineralocorticoid receptors activation. PMID:26730742

  1. [Primary aldosteronism].

    PubMed

    Amar, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Primary aldosteronism affects 6% of hypertensive patients. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient with severe or resistant hypertension or hypertension associated with hypokalemia. The screening test consists on the assessment of the aldosterone to renin ratio. In case of an elevated ratio, the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism is confirmed by either elevated concentrations of basal plasma and/or urinary aldosterone or absence of suppression of aldosterone during dynamic test (including the saline infusion test). CT aims to ensure the absence of adrenal carcinoma and to study the morphology of the adrenals. The unilateral or bilateral type of aldosterone secretion is based on the realization of an adrenal venous sampling. When the hypersecretion is unilateral, the treatment consists of adrenalectomy leading to cure of hypertension in 42% of cases, improvement in 40% of cases. For patient with bilateral disease or who don't want to undergo surgery, treatment is based on spironolactone usually at doses of 25 or 50 mg in combination with other antihypertensives drugs such as diuretics or calcium channel blockers.

  2. The aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway exerts anti-inflammatory effects in endotoxin-induced uveitis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Elodie; Zhao, Min; Ly, André; Leroux Les Jardins, Guillaume; Goldenberg, Brigitte; Naud, Marie-Christine; Jonet, Laurent; Besson-Lescure, Bernadette; Jaisser, Frederic; Farman, Nicolette; De Kozak, Yvonne; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the eye is a mineralocorticoid-sensitive organ and we now question the role of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in ocular inflammation. The endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU), a rat model of human intraocular inflammation, was induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Evaluations were made 6 and 24 hours after intraocular injection of aldosterone (simultaneous to LPS injection). Three hours after onset of EIU, the MR and the glucocorticoid metabolizing enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) expression were down-regulated in iris/ciliary body and the corticosterone concentration was increased in aqueous humor, altering the normal MR/glucocorticoid receptor (GR) balance. At 24 hours, the GR expression was also decreased. In EIU, aldosterone reduced the intensity of clinical inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. The clinical benefit of aldosterone was abrogated in the presence of the MR antagonist (RU26752) and only partially with the GR antagonist (RU38486). Aldosterone reduced the release of inflammatory mediators (6 and 24 hours: TNF-α, IFN-γ, MIP-1α) in aqueous humor and the number of activated microglia/macrophages. Aldosterone partly prevented the uveitis-induced MR down-regulation. These results suggest that MR expression and activation in iris/ciliary body could protect the ocular structures against damages induced by EIU.

  3. Rapid effects of aldosterone in primary cultures of cardiomyocytes - do they suggest the existence of a membrane-bound receptor?

    PubMed

    Araujo, Carolina Morais; Hermidorff, Milla Marques; Amancio, Gabriela de Cassia Sousa; Lemos, Denise da Silveira; Silva, Marcelo Estáquio; de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Isoldi, Mauro César

    2016-10-01

    Aldosterone acts on its target tissue through a classical mechanism or through the rapid pathway through a putative membrane-bound receptor. Our goal here was to better understand the molecular and biochemical rapid mechanisms responsible for aldosterone-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We have evaluated the hypertrophic process through the levels of ANP, which was confirmed by the analysis of the superficial area of cardiomyocytes. Aldosterone increased the levels of ANP and the cellular area of the cardiomyocytes; spironolactone reduced the aldosterone-increased ANP level and cellular area of cardiomyocytes. Aldosterone or spironolactone alone did not increase the level of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), but aldosterone plus spironolactone led to increased cAMP level; the treatment with aldosterone + spironolactone + BAPTA-AM reduced the levels of cAMP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced cAMP increase is independent of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and dependent on Ca(2+). Next, we have evaluated the role of A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAP) in the aldosterone-induced hypertrophic response. We have found that St-Ht31 (AKAP inhibitor) reduced the increased level of ANP which was induced by aldosterone; in addition, we have found an increase on protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) activity when cells were treated with aldosterone alone, spironolactone alone and with a combination of both. Our data suggest that PKC could be responsible for ERK5 aldosterone-induced phosphorylation. Our study suggests that the aldosterone through its rapid effects promotes a hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes that is controlled by an AKAP, being dependent on ERK5 and PKC, but not on cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase signaling pathways. Lastly, we provide evidence that the targeting of AKAPs could be relevant in patients with aldosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  4. Effects and Safety of Linagliptin as an Add-on Therapy in Advanced-Stage Diabetic Nephropathy Patients Taking Renin–Angiotensin–Aldosterone System Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuichiro; Ishii, Hiroki; Kitano, Taisuke; Shindo, Mitsutoshi; Miyazawa, Haruhisa; Ito, Kiyonori; Hirai, Keiji; Kaku, Yoshio; Mori, Honami; Hoshino, Taro; Ookawara, Susumu; Kakei, Masafumi; Tabei, Kaoru; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated the effects and safety of linagliptin as an add-on therapy in patients with advanced-stage diabetic nephropathy (DMN) taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers. METHOD Twenty advanced-stage DMN patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): 24.5 ± 13.4 mL/min/1.73 m2) taking RAAS blockers were administered 5 mg/day linagliptin for 52 weeks. Changes in glucose and lipid metabolism and renal function were evaluated. RESULTS Linagliptin decreased glycosylated hemoglobin levels (from 7.32 ± 0.77% to 6.85 ± 0.87%, P < 0.05) without changing fasting blood glucose levels, and significantly decreased total cholesterol levels (from 189.6 ± 49.0 to 170.2 ± 39.2 mg/dL, P < 0.05) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (from 107.1 ± 32.4 to 90.2 ± 31.0 mg/dL, P < 0.05) without changing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Urine protein/creatinine ratio and annual change in eGFR remained unchanged. No adverse effects were observed. CONCLUSION Linagliptin as an add-on therapy had beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism without impairment of renal function, and did not have any adverse effects in this population of patients with advanced-stage DMN taking RAAS blockers. PMID:27660406

  5. Aberrant gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) expression and its regulation of CYP11B2 expression and aldosterone production in adrenal aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hattangady, Namita G; Ye, Ping; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Morimoto, Ryo; Ito-Saito, Takako; Sugawara, Akira; Ohba, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Rainey, William E; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-03-25

    Aberrant expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) has been reported in human adrenal tissues including aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, the details of its expression and functional role in adrenals are still not clear. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the mean level of GnRHR mRNA was significantly higher in APAs than in human normal adrenal (NA) (P=0.004). GnRHR protein expression was detected in human NA and neoplastic adrenal tissues. In H295R cells transfected with GnRHR, treatment with GnRH resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in CYP11B2 reporter activity. Chronic activation of GnRHR with GnRH (100nM), in a cell line with doxycycline-inducible GnRHR (H295R-TR/GnRHR), increased CYP11B2 expression and aldosterone production. These agonistic effects were inhibited by blockers for the calcium signaling pathway, KN93 and calmidazolium. These results suggest GnRH, through heterotopic expression of its receptor, may be a potential regulator of CYP11B2 expression levels in some cases of APA.

  6. The Diuretic Torasemide Does Not Prevent Aldosterone-Mediated Mineralocorticoid Receptor Activation in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gravez, Basile; Tarjus, Antoine; Jimenez-Canino, Ruben; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Messaoudi, Smail; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez; Jaisser, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Aldosterone binds to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and exerts pleiotropic effects beyond enhancing renal sodium reabsorption. Excessive mineralocorticoid signaling is deleterious during the evolution of cardiac failure, as evidenced by the benefits provided by adding MR antagonists (MRA) to standard care in humans. In animal models of cardiovascular diseases, MRA reduce cardiac fibrosis. Interestingly diuretics such as torasemide also appear efficient to improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, through several mechanisms. Among them, it has been suggested that torasemide could block aldosterone binding to the MR. To evaluate whether torasemide acts as a MRA in cardiomyocytes, we compared its effects with a classic MRA such as spironolactone. We monitored ligand-induced nuclear translocation of MR-GFP and MR transactivation activity in the cardiac-like cell line H9C2 using a reporter gene assay and known endogenous aldosterone-regulated cardiac genes. Torasemide did not modify MR nuclear translocation. Aldosterone-induced MR transactivation activity was reduced by the MRA spironolactone, not by torasemide. Spironolactone blocked the induction by aldosterone of endogenous MR-responsive genes (Sgk-1, PAI-1, Orosomucoid-1, Rgs-2, Serpina-3, Tenascin-X), while torasemide was ineffective. These results show that torasemide is not an MR antagonist; its association with MRA in heart failure may however be beneficial, through actions on complementary pathways. PMID:24040049

  7. Moderation of dietary sodium potentiates the renal and cardiovascular protective effects of angiotensin receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Holtkamp, Frank A; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Navis, Gerjan J; Lewis, Julia B; Ritz, Eberhard; de Graeff, Pieter A; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2012-08-01

    Dietary sodium restriction has been shown to enhance the short-term response of blood pressure and albuminuria to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Whether this also enhances the long-term renal and cardiovascular protective effects of ARBs is unknown. Here we conducted a post-hoc analysis of the RENAAL and IDNT trials to test this in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy randomized to ARB or non-renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (non-RAASi)-based antihypertensive therapy. Treatment effects on renal and cardiovascular outcomes were compared in subgroups based on dietary sodium intake during treatment, measured as the 24-h urinary sodium/creatinine ratio of 1177 patients with available 24-h urinary sodium measurements. ARB compared to non-RAASi-based therapy produced the greatest long-term effects on renal and cardiovascular events in the lowest tertile of sodium intake. Compared to non-RAASi, the trend in risk for renal events was significantly reduced by 43%, not changed, or increased by 37% for each tertile of increased sodium intake, respectively. The trend for cardiovascular events was significantly reduced by 37%, increased by 2% and 25%, respectively. Thus, treatment effects of ARB compared with non-RAASi-based therapy on renal and cardiovascular outcomes were greater in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy with lower than higher dietary sodium intake. This underscores the avoidance of excessive sodium intake, particularly in type 2 diabetic patients receiving ARB therapy.

  8. Angiotensin receptor blockers & endothelial dysfunction: Possible correlation & therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Radenković, Miroslav; Stojanović, Marko; Nešić, Ivana Milićević; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium is one of the most important constituents of vascular homeostasis, which is achieved through continual and balanced production of different relaxing and contractile factors. When there is a pathological disturbance in release of these products, endothelial dysfunction (ED) will probably occur. ED is considered to be the initial step in the development of atherosclerosis. This pathological activation and inadequate functioning of endothelial cells was shown to be to some extent a reversible process, which all together resulted in increased interest in investigation of different beneficial treatment options. To this point, the pharmacological approach, including for example, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or statins, was clearly shown to be effective in the improvement of ED. One of many critical issues underlying ED represents instability in the balance between nitric oxide and angiotensin II (Ang II) production. Considering that Ang II was confirmed to be important for the development of ED, the aim of this review article was to summarize the findings of up to date clinical studies associated with therapeutic application of angiotensin receptor blockers and improvement in ED. In addition, it was of interest to review the pleiotropic actions of angiotensin receptor blockers linked to the improvement of ED. The prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo or active-controlled clinical trials were identified and selected for the final evaluation. PMID:27934794

  9. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Durango, N.; Vecchiola, A.; Gonzalez-Gomez, L. M.; Simon, F.; Riedel, C. A.; Fardella, C. E.; Kalergis, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models. PMID:26448944

  10. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Durango, N; Vecchiola, A; Gonzalez-Gomez, L M; Simon, F; Riedel, C A; Fardella, C E; Kalergis, A M

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models.

  11. G-protein-coupled receptors in aldosterone-producing adenomas: a potential cause of hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ping; Mariniello, Barbara; Mantero, Franco; Shibata, Hirotaka; Rainey, William E

    2007-10-01

    The source of aldosterone in 30-40% of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) is unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). The mechanisms causing elevated aldosterone production in APA are unknown. Herein, we examined the expression of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in APA and demonstrated that when compared with normal adrenals, there is a general elevation of certain GPCR in many APA and/or ectopic expression of GPCR in others. RNA samples from normal adrenals (n = 5), APAs (n = 10), and cortisol-producing adenomas (CPAs; n = 13) were used on 15 genomic expression arrays, each of which included 223 GPCR transcripts presented in at least 1 out of 15 of the independent microarrays. The array results were confirmed using real-time RT-PCR (qPCR). Four GPCR transcripts exhibited a statistically significant increase that was greater than threefold when compared with normal adrenals, suggesting a general increase in expression when compared with normal adrenal glands. Four GPCR transcripts exhibited a > 15-fold increase of expression in one or more of the APA samples when compared with normal adrenals. qPCR analysis confirmed array data and found the receptors with the highest fold increase in APA expression to be LH receptor, serotonin receptor 4, GnRH receptor, glutamate receptor metabotropic 3, endothelin receptor type B-like protein, and ACTH receptor. There are also sporadic increased expressions of these genes in the CPAs. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of altered GPCR expression in many cases of PA and provide candidate GPCR for further study.

  12. Interrupting autocrine ligand-receptor binding: comparison between receptor blockers and ligand decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of cell behavioral functions by ligand/receptor binding can be accomplished in autocrine fashion, where cells secrete ligand capable of binding to receptors on their own surfaces. This proximal secretion of autocrine ligands near the surface receptors on the secreting cell suggests that control of these systems by inhibitors of receptor/ligand binding may be more difficult than for systems involving exogenous ligands. Hence, it is of interest to predict the conditions under which successful inhibition of cell receptor binding by the autocrine ligand can be expected. Previous theoretical work using a compartmentalized model for autocrine cells has elucidated the conditions under which addition of solution decoys for the autocrine ligand can interrupt cell receptor/ligand binding via competitive binding of the secreted molecules (Forsten, K. E., and D. A. Lauffenburger. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1-12.) We now apply a similar modeling approach to examine the addition of solution blockers targeted against the cell receptor. Comparison of the two alternative inhibition strategies reveals that a significantly lower concentration of receptor blockers, compared to ligand decoys, will obtain a high degree of inhibition. The more direct interruption scheme characteristic of the receptor blockers may make them a preferred strategy when feasible. PMID:1330038

  13. Clinical Profile of Eprosartan: A Different Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Blankestijn, P. J; Rupp, H

    2008-01-01

    Rationale. The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important. Angiotensin II receptor blocker drugs (ARBs) have provided a useful class of anti-hypertensive drugs. Eprosartan is a relatively new ARB which is chemically distinct (non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole) from all other ARBs (biphenyl tetrazoles). An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system. Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs. The distinct properties of this non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole ARB might be relevant in the effort to reduce cardiovascular risk, also beyond its blood pressure lowering capacity. PMID:18855637

  14. Combination ACE inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy - future considerations.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are regularly prescribed for the management of hypertension. Each of these drug classes has also been shown to provide survival benefits for patients with heart failure, proteinuric chronic kidney disease, and/or a high cardiac risk profile. The individual gains seen with each of these drug classes have led to speculation that their combination might offer additive if not synergistic outcome benefits. The foundation of this hypothesis, although biologically possible, has thus far not been sufficiently well proven to support the everyday use of these 2 drug classes in combination. Additional outcomes trials, which are currently proceeding to their conclusion, may provide the necessary proof to support an expanded use of these 2 drug classes in combination.

  15. Aldosterone: effects on the kidney and cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Briet, Marie; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2010-05-01

    Aldosterone, a steroid hormone with mineralocorticoid activity, is mainly recognized for its action on sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron of the kidney, which is mediated by the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Beyond this well-known action, however, aldosterone exerts other effects on the kidney, blood vessels and the heart, which can have pathophysiological consequences, particularly in the presence of a high salt intake. Aldosterone is implicated in renal inflammatory and fibrotic processes, as well as in podocyte injury and mesangial cell proliferation. In the cardiovascular system, aldosterone has specific hypertrophic and fibrotic effects and can alter endothelial function. Several lines of evidence support the existence of crosstalk between aldosterone and angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cells. The deleterious effects of aldosterone on the cardiovascular system require concomitant pathophysiological conditions such as a high salt diet, increased oxidative stress, or inflammation. Large interventional trials have confirmed the benefits of adding mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists to standard therapy, in particular to angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy, in patients with heart failure. Small interventional studies in patients with chronic kidney disease have shown promising results, with a significant reduction of proteinuria associated with aldosterone antagonism, but large interventional trials that test the efficacy and safety of mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists in chronic kidney disease are needed.

  16. Effects of T-Type Calcium Channel Blockers on Renal Function and Aldosterone in Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Yang, Mao Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure can cause kidney damage, which can increase blood pressure, leading to a vicious cycle. It is not clear whether the protective effects of T-type calcium channel blockers (T-type CCBs) on renal function are better than those of L-type CCBs or renin-angiotensin system (RAS) antagonists in patients with hypertension. Methods and Findings PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID, Web of Science, Cochrane, CNKI, MEDCH, VIP, and WANFANG databases were searched for clinical trials published in English or Chinese from January 1, 1990, to December 31, 2013. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated and reported. A total of 1494 reports were collected, of which 24 studies with 1,696 participants (including 809 reports comparing T-type CCBs versus L-type CCBs and 887 reports comparing T-type CCB versus RAS antagonists) met the inclusion criteria. Compared with L-type CCBs, T-type CCBs resulted in a significant decline in aldosterone (mean difference = −15.19, 95% CI −19.65–−10.72, p<1×10−5), proteinuria (mean difference = −0.73, 95% CI −0.88–−0.57, p<1×10−5), protein to creatinine ratio (mean difference = −0.22, 95% CI −0.41–−0.03, p = 0.02), and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (mean difference = −55.38, 95% CI −86.67–−24.09, p = 0.0005); no significant difference was noted for systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p = 0.76) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (p = 0.16). The effects of T-type CCBs did not significantly differ from those of RAS antagonists for SBP (p = 0.98), DBP (p = 0.86), glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.93), albuminuria (p = 0.97), creatinine clearance rate (p = 0.24), and serum creatinine (p = 0.27) in patients with hypertension. Conclusion In a pooled analysis of data from 24 studies measuring the effects of T-type CCBs on renal function and aldosterone, the protective effects of T-type CCBs on renal

  17. Therapeutic perspectives in hypertension: novel means for renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system modulation and emerging device-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Unger, Thomas; Paulis, Ludovit; Sica, Domenic A

    2011-11-01

    The conventional antihypertensive therapies including renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists (converting enzyme inhibitors, receptor blockers, renin inhibitors, and mineralocorticoid receptor blockers), diuretics, β-blockers, and calcium channel blockers are variably successful in achieving the challenging target blood pressure values in hypertensive patients. Difficult to treat hypertension is still a commonly observed problem world-wide. A number of drugs are considered to be used as novel therapies for hypertension. Renalase supplementation, vasopeptidase inhibitors, endothelin antagonists, and especially aldosterone antagonists (aldosterone synthase inhibitors and novel selective mineralocorticoid receptor blockers) are considered an option in resistant hypertension. In addition, the aldosterone antagonists as well as (pro)renin receptor blockers or AT(2) receptor agonists might attenuate end-organ damage. This array of medications has now been complemented by a number of new approaches of non-pharmacological strategies including vaccination, genomic interference, controlled breathing, baroreflex activation, and probably most successfully renal denervation techniques. However, the progress on innovative therapies seems to be slow and the problem of resistant hypertension and proper blood pressure control appears to be still persisting. Therefore the regimens of currently available drugs are being fine-tuned, resulting in the establishment of several novel fixed-dose combinations including triple combinations with the aim to facilitate proper blood pressure control. It remains an exciting question which approach will confer the best blood pressure control and risk reduction in this tricky disease.

  18. Reappraisal of role of angiotensin receptor blockers in cardiovascular protection.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have shown cardioprotective and renoprotective properties. These agents are recommended as first-line therapy for the treatment of hypertension and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. Early studies pointed to the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of ARBs in high-risk patients. The ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) established the clinical equivalence of the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of telmisartan and ramipril, but did not find an added benefit of the combination over ramipril alone. Similar findings were observed in the Telmisartan Randomized AssessmeNt Study in aCE INtolerant subjects with cardiovascular Disease (TRANSCEND) trial conducted in ACEI-intolerant patients. In ONTARGET, telmisartan had a better tolerability profile with similar renoprotective properties compared with ramipril, suggesting a potential clinical benefit over ramipril. The recently completed Olmesartan Reducing Incidence of Endstage Renal Disease in Diabetic Nephropathy Trial (ORIENT) and Olmesartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) studies will further define the role of ARBs in cardioprotection and renoprotection for high-risk patients.

  19. Anxiolytics not acting at the benzodiazepine receptor: beta blockers.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, P

    1992-01-01

    1. Although there is clear evidence for many controlled trials in the past 25 years that beta blockers are effective in anxiety disorders clear indications for their use are lacking. 2. The balance of evidence suggests that the mechanism of action of beta-blocking drugs is through peripheral blockade of beta-mediated symptoms. 3. Most evidence to the efficacy of beta-blockers comes from study of their use in generalized anxiety and in acute stress. 4. Because beta-blockers carry no risks of pharmacological dependence they may be preferred to many other anti-anxiety drugs.

  20. Finerenone Impedes Aldosterone-dependent Nuclear Import of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Prevents Genomic Recruitment of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1*

    PubMed Central

    Amazit, Larbi; Le Billan, Florian; Kolkhof, Peter; Lamribet, Khadija; Viengchareun, Say; Fay, Michel R.; Khan, Junaid A.; Hillisch, Alexander; Lombès, Marc; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Fagart, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone regulates sodium homeostasis by activating the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Hyperaldosteronism leads todeleterious effects on the kidney, blood vessels, and heart. Although steroidal antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are clinically useful for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, they are associated with several side effects. Finerenone, a novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, is presently being evaluated in two clinical phase IIb trials. Here, we characterized the molecular mechanisms of action of finerenone and spironolactone at several key steps of the MR signaling pathway. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis approaches allowed identification of Ser-810 and Ala-773 as key residues for the high MR selectivity of finerenone. Moreover, we showed that, in contrast to spironolactone, which activates the S810L mutant MR responsible for a severe form of early onset hypertension, finerenone displays strict antagonistic properties. Aldosterone-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MR are inhibited by both finerenone and spironolactone. However, automated quantification of MR subcellular distribution demonstrated that finerenone delays aldosterone-induced nuclear accumulation of MR more efficiently than spironolactone. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that, as opposed to spironolactone, finerenone inhibits MR, steroid receptor coactivator-1, and RNA polymerase II binding at the regulatory sequence of the SCNN1A gene and also remarkably reduces basal MR and steroid receptor coactivator-1 recruitment, unraveling a specific and unrecognized inactivating mechanism on MR signaling. Overall, our data demonstrate that the highly potent and selective MR antagonist finerenone specifically impairs several critical steps of the MR signaling pathway and therefore represents a promising new generation MR antagonist. PMID:26203193

  1. Effects of the T/L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine on albuminuria and plasma aldosterone concentration. A pilot study involving switching from L-type calcium channel blockers to benidipine.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria and a high plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) are prognosis factors predicting a poor outcome for cardiovascular disease. We examined here the effects of benidipine, a T/L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), on albuminuria and PAC.Thirty-one patients with essential hypertension who received an L-type CCB and achieved the target blood pressure (BP) indicated by the Treatment Guidelines of the Japan Society of Hypertension (JSH2009) were investigated. The Ltype CCB under treatment was switched to benidipine at a dose in which equivalent BP reduction was expected. BP and estimated glomerular filtration rate at 6 months after switching to benidipine were not significantly different from those at baseline. The urinary-albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) decreased significantly by 36.9% (P = 0.001). No significant change was observed in plasma renin activity (P = 0.063). The PAC of all patients decreased significantly by 11.8% (P = 0.002). When analyzed by daily doses of benidipine, the PAC appeared to have decreased in patients who received 4 mg per day of benidipine (n = 14), although statistical significance was not reached (P = 0.096). The PAC in patients who received 8 mg per day of benidipine (n =17) was significantly reduced by 13.2% (P = 0.017).In hypertensive patients whose BP is controlled by L-type CCB, switching to the T/L-type CCB benidipine maintained BP control and reduced UACR. In addition, the high dose of benidipine reduced the PAC independent of BP control. These results suggest the T/L-type CCB benidipine may contribute to cardio-renal protection in addition to lowering BP.

  2. Differences in the clinical effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and Angiotensin receptor blockers: a critical review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Dézsi, Csaba András

    2014-06-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a major role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and closely related cardio- and cerebrovascular events. Although both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers; ARBs) are equally important in the treatment of hypertension, according to the results of recent years, there might be substantial differences in their cardiovascular protective effects, and these differences might be explained by our increasing knowledge of their non-overlapping mechanisms of action. The number of studies investigating how ACE inhibitors and ARB agents differ will certainly be increasing in the future. ACE inhibitors are the safe therapeutic opportunity for hypertensive patients at high risk, with a cardiological comorbidity.

  3. Mineralocorticoid receptor is involved in the aldosterone pathway in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Bordin, Luciana; Saccardi, Carlo; Donà, Gabriella; Sabbadin, Chiara; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Plebani, Mario; Brunati, Anna Maria; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Gizzo, Salvatore; Armanini, Decio

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that excessive aldosterone (Aldo) secretion in primary aldosteronism (PA) is associated with red blood cells (RBC) senescence. These alterations were prevented/inhibited by cortisol (Cort) or canrenone (Can) raising the hypothesis that Aldo effects in RBC may be mediated by mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), though to date MR has never been demonstrated in human RBC. The aim of this multicenter comparative study was to investigate whether Aldo effects were mediated by MR in these a-nucleated cells. We included 12 healthy controls (HC) and 22 patients with PA. MR presence and activation were evaluated in RBC cytosol by glycerol gradient sedimentation, Western blotting, immuno-precipitation and radioimmunoassay. We demonstrated that RBC contained cytosolic MR, aggregated with HSP90 and other proteins to form multiprotein complex. Aldo induced MR to release from the complex and to form MR dimers which were quickly proteolyzed. Cort induced MR release but not dimers formation while Can was not able to induce MR release. In addition, RBC cytosol from PA patients contained significantly higher amounts of both MR fragments (p<0.0001) and Aldo (p<0.0001) concentrations. In conclusion, in RBC a genomic-like Aldo pathway is proposed involving MR activation, dimerization and proteolysis, but lacking nuclear transcription. In addition, dimers proteolysis may ensure a sort of Aldo scavenging from circulation by entrapping Aldo in MR fragments. PMID:27158328

  4. Effect of aldosterone breakthrough on albuminuria during treatment with a direct renin inhibitor and combined effect with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa; Fukuda, Seiichi

    2013-10-01

    We have reported observing aldosterone breakthrough in the course of relatively long-term treatment with renin-angiotensin (RA) system inhibitors, where the plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) increased following an initial decrease. Aldosterone breakthrough has the potential to eliminate the organ-protective effects of RA system inhibitors. We therefore conducted a study in essential hypertensive patients to determine whether aldosterone breakthrough occurred during treatment with the direct renin inhibitor (DRI) aliskiren and to ascertain its clinical significance. The study included 40 essential hypertensive patients (18 men and 22 women) who had been treated for 12 months with aliskiren. Aliskiren significantly decreased blood pressure and plasma renin activity (PRA). The PAC was also decreased significantly at 3 and 6 months; however, the significant difference disappeared after 12 months. Aldosterone breakthrough was observed in 22 of the subjects (55%). Urinary albumin excretion differed depending on whether breakthrough occurred. For the subjects in whom aldosterone breakthrough was observed, eplerenone was added. A significant decrease in urinary albumin excretion was observed after 1 month, independent of changes in blood pressure. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that aldosterone breakthrough occurs in some patients undergoing DRI therapy. Aldosterone breakthrough affects the drug's ability to improve urinary albumin excretion, and combining a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with the DRI may be useful for decreasing urinary albumin excretion. When the objective is organ protection in hypertensive patients, a two-pronged approach using combination therapy to inhibit both the RA system and aldosterone may be highly effective.

  5. Increased infections with β-blocker use in ischemic stroke, a β2-receptor mediated process?

    PubMed

    Starr, Jordan B; Tirschwell, David L; Becker, Kyra J

    2017-03-03

    Strokes promote immunosuppression, partially from increased sympathetic activity. Altering sympathetic drive with β-blockers has variably been shown to improve stroke outcomes. This study adds to this literature using propensity score matching to limit confounding and by examining the effects of selective and non-selective β-blockers. Prospective data from acute ischemic stroke admissions at a single center from July 2010-June 2015 were analyzed. Outcomes included infection (urinary tract infection [UTI], pneumonia, or bacteremia), discharge modified Rankin Score (mRS), and in-hospital death. Any selective and non-selective β-blocker use during the first 3 days of admission were investigated with propensity score matching. A sensitivity analysis was also performed. This study included 1431 admissions. Any β-blocker use was associated with increased infections (16.4 vs. 10.7%, p = 0.030). Non-selective β-blocker use was associated with increased infections (18.9 vs. 9.7%, p = 0.005) and UTIs (13.0 vs. 5.5%, p = 0.009). Selective β-blocker use was not associated with infection. There were no associations between β-blocker use and in-hospital death or discharge mRS. In the sensitivity analysis, the association between non-selective β-blocker use and urinary tract infections persisted (12.5 vs. 4.2%, p = 0.044). No associations with death or mRS were found. Early β-blocker use after ischemic stroke may increase the risk of infection but did not change disability or mortality risk. The mechanism may be mediated by β2-adrenergic receptor antagonism given the different effects seen with selective versus non-selective β-blocker use.

  6. Effects of an angiotensin 2 receptor blocker plus diuretic combination drug in chronic heart failure complicated by hypertension.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, O; Ishii, H; Kobayashi, S

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 24 weeks' treatment with an angiotensin 2 receptor blocker (ARB)/diuretic combination drug were investigated in an open-label study of 61 patients with stabilized chronic heart failure. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors were replaced with a tablet containing hydrochlorothiazide 6.25 mg plus candesartan 8 mg, administered orally, once daily, in patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg while under optimal treatment. Both SBP and DBP declined significantly during the ARB/diuretic combination treatment. Diuretics administered previously were discontinued during the study period in 15 patients, decreasing the number of drugs being taken. During ARB/diuretic combination treatment, the blood urea nitrogen level worsened but no significant changes were noted in potassium or estimated glomerular filtration rate, which had been a matter of concern. Additionally, the level of brain natriuretic peptide, an indicator of the severity of heart failure, was improved, indicating effectiveness and safety of the ARB/diuretic combination drug.

  7. Is there any difference between angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers for heart failure?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-07-06

    Angiotensin receptor blockers are usually considered as equivalent to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors for patients with heart failure and low-ejection fraction. Some guidelines even recommend the former as first line treatment given their better adverse effects profile. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including eight pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors probably have a similar effect on mortality, and they might be equivalent in reducing hospitalization risk too. Treatment withdrawal due to adverse effects is probably lower with angiotensin receptor blockers than with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

  8. Aldosterone induces fibrosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage in livers of male rats independent of blood pressure changes

    SciTech Connect

    Queisser, Nina; Happ, Kathrin; Link, Samuel; Jahn, Daniel; Zimnol, Anna; Geier, Andreas; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor blockers show antifibrotic potential in hepatic fibrosis. The mechanism of this protective effect is not known yet, although reactive oxygen species seem to play an important role. Here, we investigated the effects of elevated levels of aldosterone (Ald), the primary ligand of the mineralocorticoid receptor, on livers of rats in a hyperaldosteronism model: aldosterone-induced hypertension. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were treated for 4 weeks with aldosterone. To distinguish if damage caused in the liver depended on increased blood pressure or on increased Ald levels, the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone was given in a subtherapeutic dose, not normalizing blood pressure. To investigate the impact of oxidative stress, the antioxidant tempol was administered. Aldosterone induced fibrosis, detected histopathologically, and by expression analysis of the fibrosis marker, α-smooth muscle actin. Further, the mRNA amount of the profibrotic cytokine TGF-β was increased significantly. Fibrosis could be reduced by scavenging reactive oxygen species, and also by blocking the mineralocorticoid receptor. Furthermore, aldosterone treatment caused oxidative stress and DNA double strand breaks in livers, as well as the elevation of DNA repair activity. An increase of the transcription factor Nrf2, the main regulator of the antioxidative response could be observed, and of its target genes heme oxygenase-1 and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. All these effects of aldosterone were prevented by spironolactone and tempol. Already after 4 weeks of treatment, aldosteroneinfusion induced fibrosis in the liver. This effect was independent of elevated blood pressure. DNA damage caused by aldosterone might contribute to fibrosis progression when aldosterone is chronically increased. - Highlights: • Aldosterone has direct profibrotic effects on the liver independent of blood pressure. • Fibrosis is mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor and

  9. An N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blocker with neuroprotective activity

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Kwok-Keung; Blondelle, Sylvie E.; Ostresh, John M.; Houghten, Richard A.; Montal, Mauricio

    2001-01-01

    Excitotoxicity, resulting from sustained activation of glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype, is considered to play a causative role in the etiology of ischemic stroke and several neurodegenerative diseases. The NMDA receptor is therefore a target for the development of neuroprotective agents. Here, we identify an N-benzylated triamine (denoted as NBTA) as a highly selective and potent NMDA-receptor channel blocker selected by screening a reduced dipeptidomimetic synthetic combinatorial library. NBTA blocks recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with a mean IC50 of 80 nM; in contrast, it does not block GluR1, a glutamate receptor of the non-NMDA subtype. The blocking activity of NBTA on NMDA receptors exhibits the characteristics of an open-channel blocker: (i) no competition with agonists, (ii) voltage dependence, and (iii) use dependence. Significantly, NBTA protects rodent hippocampal neurons from NMDA receptor, but not kainate receptor-mediated excitotoxic cell death, in agreement with its selective action on the corresponding recombinant receptors. Mutagenesis data indicate that the N site, a key asparagine on the M2 transmembrane segment of the NR1 subunit, is the main determinant of the blocker action. The results highlight the potential of this compound as a neuroprotectant. PMID:11248110

  10. Aldosterone-reversible decrease in the density of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in the rat after adrenalectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Skolnick, P.

    1987-03-01

    A statistically significant decrease in the density of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed in renal membranes of rats beginning 2 weeks after adrenalectomy when compared with sham-operated controls. This decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was manifest as a decrease in the maximum binding of two ligands, (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PK 11195, without accompanying changes in their Kd for this site. Similar changes were not seen in another aldosterone-sensitive organ, the submandibular salivary gland. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density observed in adrenalectomized rat renal membranes was restored to control levels after 1 week of aldosterone administration using a dose (12.5 micrograms/kg/day) that had no effect on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in sham-operated animals. In contrast, dexamethasone administration (50 micrograms/kg/day, 1 week) had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density when administered to either adrenalectomized or sham-operated rats. Further, adrenal demedullation had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density or affinity. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was localized to the renal cortex and the outer stripe of the medulla by gross dissection of renal slices and renal tissue section autoradiography. The specific effect of adrenalectomy on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density, the lack of direct effect of aldosterone on (/sup 3/H) Ro 5-4864 binding and the localization of the change in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density to the renal cortex and outer stripe suggest that these changes may reflect an adaptation of the renal nephron (possibly the distal convoluted tubule, intermediate tubule and/or the collecting duct) to the loss of mineralocorticoid hormones.

  11. Remission of post-transplant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with angiotensin receptor blockers

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, S. B.; Sethi, S. K.; Jha, P.; Duggal, R.; Kher, V.

    2017-01-01

    Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is common after kidney transplantation. Plasmapheresis (PP) is considered to be the most effective treatment; however, results are variable and relapse is common after stopping plasmapheresis. Here, we report an unusual case of recurrent FSGS, who achieved complete remission with angiotensin receptor blocker therapy.

  12. Moderate inappropriately high aldosterone/NaCl constellation in mice: cardiovascular effects and the role of cardiovascular epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Barbara; Rabe, Sindy; Winter, Sabrina; Ruhs, Stefanie; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Schneider, Bettina; Sibilia, Maria; Gotthardt, Michael; Kempe, Sabine; Mäder, Karsten; Grossmann, Claudia; Gekle, Michael

    2014-12-11

    Non-physiological activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), e.g. by aldosterone under conditions of high salt intake, contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, although beneficial effects of aldosterone also have been described. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) contributes to cardiovascular alterations and mediates part of the MR effects. Recently, we showed that EGFR is required for physiological homeostasis and function of heart and arteries in adult animals. We hypothesize that moderate high aldosterone/NaCl, at normal blood pressure, affects the cardiovascular system depending on cardiovascular EGFR. Therefore we performed an experimental series in male and female animals each, using a recently established mouse model with EGFR knockout in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes and determined the effects of a mild-high aldosterone-to-NaCl constellation on a.o. marker gene expression, heart size, systolic blood pressure, impulse conduction and heart rate. Our data show that (i) cardiac tissue of male but not of female mice is sensitive to mild aldosterone/NaCl treatment, (ii) EGFR knockout induces stronger cardiac disturbances in male as compared to female animals and (iii) mild aldosterone/NaCl treatment requires the EGFR in order to disturb cardiac tissue homeostasis whereas beneficial effects of aldosterone seem to be independent of EGFR.

  13. Primary Aldosteronism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrinology Find an Endocrinologist Value of an Endocrinologist Learn About Clinical Trials Keep Your Body in Balance › Primary Aldosteronism Fact Sheet Primary Aldosteronism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Paul Stewart, MD, FRCP William Young, ...

  14. Factors affecting the aldosterone/renin ratio.

    PubMed

    Stowasser, M; Ahmed, A H; Pimenta, E; Taylor, P J; Gordon, R D

    2012-03-01

    Although the aldosterone/renin ratio (ARR) is the most reliable screening test for primary aldo-steronism, false positives and negatives occur. Dietary salt restriction, concomitant malignant or renovascular hypertension, pregnancy and treatment with diuretics (including spironolactone), dihydropyridine calcium blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor antagonists can produce false negatives by stimulating renin. We recently reported selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors lower the ratio. Because potassium regulates aldosterone, uncorrected hypokalemia can lead to false negatives. Beta-blockers, alpha-methyldopa, clonidine, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress renin, raising the ARR with potential for false positives. False positives may occur in patients with renal dysfunction or advancing age. We recently showed that (1) females have higher ratios than males, and (2) false positive ratios can occur during the luteal menstrual phase and while taking an oral ethynylestradiol/drospirenone (but not implanted subdermal etonogestrel) contraceptive, but only if calculated using direct renin concentration and not plasma renin activity. Where feasible, diuretics should be ceased at least 6 weeks and other interfering medications at least 2 before ARR measurement, substituting noninterfering agents (e. g., verapamil slow-release±hydralazine and prazosin or doxazosin) were required. Hypokalemia should be corrected and a liberal salt diet encouraged. Collecting blood midmorning from seated patients following 2-4 h upright posture improves sensitivity. The ARR is a screening test only and should be repeated once or more before deciding whether to proceed to confirmatory suppression testing. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry aldosterone assays represent a major advance towards addressing inaccuracies inherent in other available methods.

  15. Clinic and Home Blood Pressure Lowering Effect of an Angiotensin Receptor Blocker, Fimasartan, in Postmenopausal Women with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Joo, Seung-Jae; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Changsoo; Cho, Eun Joo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin receptor blockers may be an appropriate first-line agent for postmenopausal women with hypertension because the activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system is suggested as one possible mechanism of postmenopausal hypertension. However, there are few studies substantiating this effect. This study aimed to investigate clinic and home blood pressure (BP) lowering effect of fimasartan, a new angiotensin receptor blocker, in postmenopausal women with hypertension. Among patients with hypertension enrolled in K-Mets Study, 1373 women with fimasartan as a first antihypertensive drug and 3-months follow-up data were selected. They were divided into 2 groups; premenopausal women (pre-MPW; n = 382, 45.3 ± 4.6 years) and postmenopausal women (post-MPW; n = 991, 60.9 ± 8.2 years). Baseline clinic systolic BP was not different (pre-MPW; 152.9 ± 15.2 vs. post-MPW; 152.8 ± 13.5 mm Hg), but diastolic BP was lower in post-MPW (pre-MPW; 95.7 ± 9.4 vs. post-MPW; 91.9 ± 9.4 mm Hg, P <0.001). After 3-month treatment, clinic BP declined effectively without significant differences between 2 groups (Δsystolic/diastolic BP: pre-MPW; −25.7 ± 17.7/−14.2 ± 11.3 vs. post-MPW; −25.7 ± 16.3/−13.1 ± 10.9 mm Hg). Home morning and evening systolic BP decreased similarly in both groups (Δmorning/evening systolic BP: pre-MPW; −21.3 ± 17.9/−23.1 ± 15.8 vs. post-MPW; −20.4 ± 17.3/−20.2 ± 19.2 mm Hg). Fimasartan also significantly decreased the standard deviations of home morning and evening systolic BP of pre-MPW and post-MPW. Fimasartan was a similarly effective BP lowering agent in both post-MPW and pre-MPW with hypertension, and it also decreased day-to-day BP variability. PMID:27258507

  16. Prevention of experimental autoimmune cardiomyopathy in rabbits by receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Matsui, S; Fu, M L

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effects of beta1-adrenoceptor blockade and M2-muscarinic receptor antagonist in rabbits which have developed dilated cardiomyopathy-like changes after immunization with the peptides from the second extracellular loop of human beta1-adrenoceptor (beta1-peptide) and M2-muscarinic receptor (M2-peptide). Ten rabbits, which were immunized with beta1-peptide once a month for one year, were treated with bisoprolol and 10 rabbits, which were immunized with M2-peptide, were treated with otenzepad. Although both groups treated with receptor blockade or antagonist showed an increased titer of anti-beta1-adrenoceptor or anti-M2-muscarinic receptor antibodies, myocardial damages were markedly less than those in beta1-peptide- or M2-peptide-immunized rabbits. This study indicates that anti-beta1-adrenoceptor and anti-M2-muscarinic receptor antibodies are of pathogenic importance in the development of human dilated cardiomyopathy, and that beta-adrenoceptor blockade, bisoprolol, and M2-muscarinic receptor antagonist, otenzepad, might be clinically useful for treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  17. Progress towards clinically useful aldosterone synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the high degree of similarity between aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) and cortisol synthase (CYP11B1), the design of selective inhibitors of one or the other of these two enzymes was, at one time, thought to be impossible. Through development of novel enzyme screening assays and significant medicinal chemistry efforts, highly potent inhibitors of CYP11B2 have been identified with selectivities approaching 1000-fold between the two enzymes. Many of these molecules also possess selectivity against other steroidogenic cytochromes P450 (e.g. CYP17A1 and CYP19A1) as well as hepatic drug metabolizing P450s. Though not as well developed or explored, inhibitors of CYP11B1, with selectivities approaching 50-fold, have also been identified. The therapeutic benefits of affecting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been well established with the therapeutically useful angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Data regarding the additional benefits of an aldosterone synthase inhibitor (ASi) are beginning to emerge from animal models and human clinical trials. Despite great promise and much progress, additional challenges still exist in the path towards development of a therapeutically useful ASi.

  18. The use of plasma aldosterone and urinary sodium to potassium ratio as translatable quantitative biomarkers of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence supports the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. These findings have generated renewed interest in novel MR antagonists with improved selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors and a potentially reduced risk of hyperkalemia. Characterization of novel MR antagonists warrants establishing translatable biomarkers of activity at the MR receptor. We assessed the translatability of urinary sodium to potassium ratio (Na+/K+) and plasma aldosterone as biomarkers of MR antagonism using eplerenone (Inspra®), a commercially available MR antagonist. Further we utilized these biomarkers to demonstrate antagonism of MR by PF-03882845, a novel compound. Methods The effect of eplerenone and PF-03882845 on urinary Na+/K+ and plasma aldosterone were characterized in Sprague-Dawley rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Additionally, the effect of eplerenone on these biomarkers was determined in healthy volunteers. Drug exposure-response data were modeled to evaluate the translatability of these biomarkers from rats to humans. Results In Sprague-Dawley rats, eplerenone elicited a rapid effect on urinary Na+/K+ yielding an EC50 that was within 5-fold of the functional in vitro IC50. More importantly, the effect of eplerenone on urinary Na+/K+ in healthy volunteers yielded an EC50 that was within 2-fold of the EC50 generated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Similarly, the potency of PF-03882845 in elevating urinary Na+/K+ in Sprague-Dawley rats was within 3-fold of its in vitro functional potency. The effect of MR antagonism on urinary Na+/K+ was not sustained chronically; thus we studied the effect of the compounds on plasma aldosterone following chronic dosing in SHR. Modeling of drug exposure-response data for both eplerenone and PF-03882845 yielded EC50 values that were within 2-fold of that estimated from modeling of drug exposure with changes in urinary sodium and potassium excretion

  19. Aldosterone Inactivates the Endothelin-B Receptor via a Cysteinyl Thiol Redox Switch to Decrease Pulmonary Endothelial Nitric Oxide Levels and Modulate Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; White, Kevin; Chan, Stephen Y.; Handy, Diane E.; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized, in part, by decreased endothelial nitric oxide (NO•) production and elevated levels of endothelin-1. Endothelin-1 is known to stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the endothelin-B receptor (ETB), suggesting that this signaling pathway is perturbed in PAH. Endothelin-1 also stimulates adrenal aldosterone synthesis; in systemic blood vessels, hyperaldosteronism induces vascular dysfunction by increasing endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decreasing NO• levels. We hypothesized that aldosterone modulates PAH by disrupting ETB-eNOS signaling through a mechanism involving increased pulmonary endothelial oxidant stress. Methods and Results In rats with PAH, elevated endothelin-1 levels were associated with elevated aldosterone levels in plasma and lung tissue and decreased lung NO• metabolites in the absence of left heart failure. In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), endothelin-1 increased aldosterone levels via PGC-1α/steroidogenesis factor-1-dependent upregulation of aldosterone synthase. Aldosterone also increased ROS production, which oxidatively modified cysteinyl thiols in the eNOS-activating region of ETB to decrease endothelin-1-stimulated eNOS activity. Substitution of ETB-Cys405 with alanine improved ETB-dependent NO• synthesis under conditions of oxidant stress, confirming that Cys405 is a redox sensitive thiol that is necessary for ETB-eNOS signaling. In HPAECs, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism with spironolactone decreased aldosterone-mediated ROS generation and restored ETB-dependent NO• production. Spironolactone or eplerenone prevented or reversed pulmonary vascular remodeling and improved cardiopulmonary hemodynamics in two animal models of PAH in vivo. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that aldosterone modulates an ETB cysteinyl thiol redox switch to decrease pulmonary endothelium-derived NO• and promote PAH

  20. Postnatal acute renal failure after fetal exposure to angiotensin receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Luca; Sordino, Desiree; De Bernardo, Giuseppe; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2015-07-02

    Maternal hypertensive treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) during the second and third trimester of pregnancy is associated with several fetal and neonatal complications, and potential adverse outcomes. We report a neonate presenting with transient renal acute failure during the first days of life after maternal treatment with ARBs. Women who became pregnant while taking one of these drugs must modify antihypertensive therapy with a different class drug as soon as pregnancy is recognised.

  1. [Assessment of the utilization of angiotensin receptor blockers in hypertension].

    PubMed

    Peña Cabia, S; Ricote Lobera, I; Santos Mena, B; Hidalgo Correas, F J; Climent Florez, B; García Díaz, B

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar en nuestra área de Salud el grado en que la utilización de antagonistas de los receptores de la angiotensina II (ARA-II) se ajusta a los criterios propuestos por la Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (CAM) antes de la instauración del «Plan de Actuación de ARA-II». Estudiar las indicaciones para las que se prescriben e identificar aquellos factores que han podido influir en su prescripción. Métodos: Estudio de utilización de medicamentos del tipo indicación- prescripción, descriptivo y transversal, en el que se seleccionaron pacientes con hipertensión arterial y en tratamiento con ARA-II ingresados en un Hospital General Universitario durante un periodo de estudio de 3 meses. De acuerdo con las situaciones clínicas recogidas en el Documento de la CAM «Criterios para establecer el lugar en la terapéutica de los antagonistas de los receptores de la angiotensina II», se calculó el porcentaje de pacientes con «prescripción adecuada» y «prescripción no adecuada» de ARA-II y se analizó si la edad y el sexo tenían influencia en el tipo de prescripción o en las principales indicaciones para las que se prescribieron. Resultados: De los 153 pacientes que se incluyeron en el estudio, el 67,3% tuvieron una «prescripción no adecuada», el 47,6% de ellos por prescripción de ARA-II como primer fármaco antagonista del sistema renina angiotensina aldosterona y el 34,0% por mal control de la tensión arterial con inhibidores de la enzima convertidora de angiotensina (IECA). No se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas por edad o sexo en cuanto al tipo de prescripción o en las principales indicaciones para las que se prescribieron. Conclusiones: La adecuación a los criterios de uso del Documento de ARA-II se produjo en el 32,7% de los casos. Además, no se observó que factores como la edad y el sexo influyeran en el tipo de prescripción. Asimismo, se evidenciaron percep-

  2. The angiotensin receptor blocker losartan reduces coronary arteriole remodeling in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Husarek, Kathryn E; Katz, Paige S; Trask, Aaron J; Galantowicz, Maarten L; Cismowski, Mary J; Lucchesi, Pamela A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and are associated with alterations of blood vessel structure and function. Although endothelial dysfunction and aortic stiffness have been documented, little is known about the effects of T2DM on coronary microvascular structural remodeling. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays an important role in large artery stiffness and mesenteric vessel remodeling in hypertension and T2DM. The goal of this study was to determine whether the blockade of AT1R signaling dictates vascular smooth muscle growth that partially underlies coronary arteriole remodeling in T2DM. Control and db/db mice were given AT1R blocker losartan via drinking water for 4 weeks. Using pressure myography, we found that coronary arterioles from 16-week db/db mice undergo inward hypertrophic remodeling due to increased wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio with a decreased lumen diameter. This remodeling was accompanied by decreased elastic modulus (decreased stiffness). Losartan treatment decreased wall thickness, wall-to-lumen ratio, and coronary arteriole cell number in db/db mice. Losartan treatment did not affect incremental elastic modulus. However, losartan improved coronary flow reserve. Our data suggest that Ang II-AT1R signaling mediates, at least in part, coronary arteriole inward hypertrophic remodeling in T2DM without affecting vascular mechanics, further suggesting that targeting the coronary microvasculature in T2DM may help reduce cardiac ischemic events.

  3. High potassium promotes mutual interaction between (pro)renin receptor and the local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in rat inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuanming; Fang, Hui; Zhou, Li; Lu, Aihua; Yang, Tianxin

    2016-10-01

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) is predominantly expressed in the collecting duct (CD) with unclear functional implication. It is not known whether CD PRR is regulated by high potassium (HK). Here, we aimed to investigate the effect of HK on PRR expression and its role in regulation of aldosterone synthesis and release in the CD. In primary rat inner medullary CD cells, HK augmented PRR expression and soluble PPR (sPRR) release in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by PRR small interfering RNA (siRNA), eplerenone, and losartan. HK upregulated aldosterone release in parallel with an increase of CYP11B2 (cytochrome P-450, family 11, subfamily B, polypeptide 2) protein expression and upregulation of medium renin activity, both of which were attenuated by a PRR antagonist PRO20, PRR siRNA, eplerenone, and losartan. Similarly, prorenin upregulated aldosterone release and CYP11B2 expression, both of which were attenuated by PRR siRNA. Interestingly, a recombinant sPRR (sPRR-His) also stimulated aldosterone release and CYP11B2 expression. Taken together, we conclude that HK enhances a local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), leading to increased PRR expression, which in turn amplifies the response of the RAAS, ultimately contributing to heightened aldosterone release.

  4. In silico screening for agonists and blockers of the β2 adrenergic receptor: implications of inactive and activated state structures

    PubMed Central

    Costanzi, Stefano; Vilar, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Ten crystal structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) have been published, reflecting different signaling states. Here, through controlled docking experiments, we examined the implications of using inactive or activated structures on the in silico screening for agonists and blockers of the receptor. Specifically, we targeted the crystal structures solved in complex with carazolol (2RH1), the neutral antagonist alprenalol (3NYA), the irreversible agonist FAUC50 (3PDS) and the full agonist BI-167017 (3P0G). Our results indicate that activated structures favor agonists over blockers while inactive structures favor blockers over agonists. This tendency is more marked for activated than for inactive structures. Additionally, agonists tend to receive more favorable docking scores when docked at activated rather than inactive structures, while blockers do the opposite. Hence, the difference between the docking scores attained with an activated and an inactive structure is an excellent means for the classification of ligands into agonists and blockers, as we determined through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). With respect to virtual screening, all structures prioritized well agonists and blockers over non-binders. However, inactive structures worked better for blockers and activated structures worked better for agonists. Notably, the combination of individual docking experiments through receptor ensemble docking (RED) resulted in an excellent performance in the retrieval of both agonists and blockers. Finally, we demonstrated that the induced fit docking of agonists is a viable way of modifying an inactive crystal structure and bias it towards the in silico recognition of agonists rather than blockers. PMID:22170280

  5. Ca sup 2+ channel blockers interact with. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptors in rabbit ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Homaidan, F.R.; Donowitz, M.; Wicks, J.; Cusolito, S.; El Sabban, M.E.; Weiland, G.A.; Sharp, G.W.G. Tufts Univ. School of Medicine and New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1988-04-01

    An interaction between Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors has been demonstrated in rabbit ileum by studying the effect of clonidine on active electrolyte transport, under short-circuited conditions, in the presence and absence of several Ca{sup 2+} channel blocking agents. Clonidine, verapamil, diltiazem, cadmium, and nitrendipine all decrease short-circuit current and stimulate NaCl absorption to different extents with clonidine having the largest effect. Exposure to verapamil, diltiazem, and cadmium inhibited the effects of clonidine on transport, whereas nitrendipine had no such effect. Verapamil, diltiazem, and cadmium, but not nitrendipine, also decreased the specific binding of ({sup 3}H){alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic agents to a preparation of ileal basolateral membranes explaining the observed decrease in the transport effects of clonidine. The effective concentrations of the Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers that inhibited the effects of clonidine on transport were fairly similar to the concentrations needed to inhibit its specific binding. The displacement of clonidine by calcium channel blockers is ascribed to a nonspecific effect of these agents, although the possibility that their effects are exerted via their binding to the calcium channels is not excluded.

  6. beta-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms and beta-blocker treatment outcomes in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pacanowski, M A; Gong, Y; Cooper-Dehoff, R M; Schork, N J; Shriver, M D; Langaee, T Y; Pepine, C J; Johnson, J A

    2008-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB1 and ADRB2) variants influence cardiovascular risk and beta-blocker responses in hypertension and heart failure. We evaluated the relationship between ADRB1 and ADRB2 haplotypes, cardiovascular risk (death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and nonfatal stroke), and atenolol-based vs. verapamil sustained-release (SR)-based antihypertensive therapy in 5,895 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. After an average of 2.8 years, death rates were higher in patients carrying the ADRB1 Ser49-Arg389 haplotype (hazard ratio (HR) 3.66, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.68-7.99). This mortality risk was significant in patients randomly assigned to verapamil SR (HR 8.58, 95% CI 2.06-35.8) but not atenolol (HR 2.31, 95% CI 0.82-6.55), suggesting a protective role for the beta-blocker. ADRB2 haplotype associations were divergent within the treatment groups but did not remain significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. ADRB1 haplotype variation is associated with mortality risk, and beta-blockers may be preferred in subgroups of patients defined by ADRB1 or ADRB2 polymorphisms.

  7. The functional c.-2G>C variant of the mineralocorticoid receptor modulates blood pressure, renin, and aldosterone levels.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Nienke; Caprio, Massimiliano; Blaya, Carolina; Fumeron, Frédéric; Sartorato, Paola; Ronconi, Vanessa; Giacchetti, Gilberta; Mantero, Franco; Fernandes-Rosa, Fabio L; Simian, Christophe; Peyrard, Sévrine; Zitman, Frans G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Kloet, E Ron; Azizi, Michel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Derijk, Roel H; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2010-11-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is essential in the regulation of volemia and blood pressure. Rare mutations in the MR gene cause type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism and hypertension. In this study we characterized the common MR polymorphism c.-2G>C (rs2070951) in vitro and tested its influence on parameters related to blood pressure regulation and the renin-angiotensin system. In vitro studies showed that the G allele was associated with decreased MR protein levels and reduced transcriptional activation compared with the C allele. Association studies were performed with several outcome variables in 3 independent cohorts: a mild hypertensive group subjected to a salt-sensitivity test, a healthy normotensive group included in a crossover study to receive both a high and low Na/K diet, and a large cohort (The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety), in which blood pressure was measured. Subjects with the GG genotype had significantly higher plasma renin levels both in the mild hypertensive group and in normal volunteers compared with homozygous C carriers. The GG genotype was also correlated with higher plasma aldosterone levels in healthy subjects. In both the mild hypertensive group and The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety cohort the genotype GG was associated with higher systolic blood pressure in males. In conclusion, the G allele of the common functional genetic polymorphism c.-2G>C in the MR gene associates with increased activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis and with increased blood pressure, probably related to decreased MR expression.

  8. Treating the Host Response to Ebola Virus Disease with Generic Statins and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Rordam, Ole Martin; Opal, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Treatments targeting the Ebola virus may eventually be shown to work, but they will not have an impact on overall Ebola mortality in West Africa. Endothelial dysfunction is responsible for the fluid and electrolyte imbalances seen in Ebola patients. Because inexpensive generic statins and angiotensin receptor blockers restore endothelial barrier integrity, they can be used to treat the host response in these patients. In Sierra Leone, approximately 100 Ebola patients were treated with this combination, and reports indicate that survival was greatly improved. PMID:26106080

  9. Indistinguishable Synaptic Pharmacodynamics of the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Channel Blockers Memantine and Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Emnett, Christine M.; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Taylor, Amanda M.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Memantine and ketamine, voltage- and activation-dependent channel blockers of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs), have enjoyed a recent resurgence in clinical interest. Steady-state pharmacodynamic differences between these blockers have been reported, but it is unclear whether the compounds differentially affect dynamic physiologic signaling. In this study, we explored nonequilibrium conditions relevant to synaptic transmission in hippocampal networks in dissociated culture and hippocampal slices. Equimolar memantine and ketamine had indistinguishable effects on the following measures: steady-state NMDA currents, NMDAR excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) decay kinetics, progressive EPSC inhibition during repetitive stimulation, and extrasynaptic NMDAR inhibition. Therapeutic drug efficacy and tolerability of memantine have been attributed to fast kinetics and strong voltage dependence. However, pulse depolarization in drug presence revealed a surprisingly slow and similar time course of equilibration for the two compounds, although memantine produced a more prominent fast component (62% versus 48%) of re-equilibration. Simulations predicted that low gating efficacy underlies the slow voltage–dependent relief from block. This prediction was empirically supported by faster voltage-dependent blocker re-equilibration with several experimental manipulations of gating efficacy. Excitatory postsynaptic potential–like voltage commands produced drug differences only with large, prolonged depolarizations unlikely to be attained physiologically. In fact, we found no difference between drugs on measures of spontaneous network activity or acute effects on plasticity in hippocampal slices. Despite indistinguishable synaptic pharmacodynamics, ketamine provided significantly greater neuroprotection from damage induced by oxygen glucose deprivation, consistent with the idea that under extreme depolarizing conditions, the biophysical difference between drugs

  10. Microalbuminuria and hypertension in pregnancy: role of aldosterone and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Ambrosini, Guido; Sabbadin, Chiara; Donà, Gabriella; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-09-01

    Women with a history of hypertension in pregnancy are at increased risk of microalbuminuria later in life. Microalbuminuria is a marker of kidney dysfunction frequently related to an inflammatory event. Pregnancy is a dynamic process characterized by immune tolerance, angiogenesis, and hormonal regulation. Menstruation and pregnancy are associated with a physiological inflammation, which is altered in preeclampsia and probably in other hypertensive situations of pregnancy. An imbalance between pro-oxidant factors and the ability to scavenge these factors produces oxidative stress, which has been evaluated in many cells, but leukocytes are the main source of inflammatory cytokines and experimental and clinical evidence support a possible role of aldosterone as a mediator of placental and renal damage mediated by growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and cytokines. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and aldosterone receptor blockers are frequently effective in reducing the risk of progression of cardiovascular and renal disease.

  11. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction and protects podocytes from aldosterone-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanggang; Huang, Songming; Wang, Wenyan; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Chunhua; Ding, Guixia; Liu, Bicheng; Yang, Tianxin; Zhang, Aihua

    2012-10-01

    Glomerular podocytes are highly specialized epithelial cells whose injury in glomerular diseases causes proteinuria. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is an early event in podocyte injury, we tested whether a major regulator of oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial function, the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), affects podocyte damage. Aldosterone-induced injury decreased PGC-1α expression, and induced mitochondrial and podocyte damage in dose- and time-dependent manners. The suppression of endogenous PGC-1α by RNAi caused podocyte mitochondrial damage and apoptosis while its increase by infection with an adenoviral vector prevented aldosterone-induced mitochondrial malfunction and inhibited injury. Overexpression of the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1, a gene upstream of PGC-1α, prevented aldosterone-induced mitochondrial damage and podocyte injury by upregulating PGC-1α at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator, attenuated aldosterone-induced mitochondrial malfunction and podocyte injury in vitro and in aldosterone-infused mice in vivo. Hence, endogenous PGC-1α may be important for maintenance of mitochondrial function in podocytes under normal conditions. Activators of SIRT1, such as resveratol, may be therapeutically useful in glomerular diseases to promote and maintain PGC-1α expression and, consequently, podocyte integrity.

  12. Aldosterone breakthrough during aliskiren, valsartan, and combination (aliskiren + valsartan) therapy.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S; Rekhtman, Yelena; Klemmer, Philip J; Canetta, Pietro A; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-01-01

    Aldosterone levels increase in 30%-40% of patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers over the long term. This "aldosterone breakthrough" may carry important clinical consequences given aldosterone's nonepithelial, pro-fibrotic actions. The renin inhibitor, aliskiren, by suppressing the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) proximally, may limit breakthrough compared to conventional RAAS blockade. This open-label study (NCT01129557) randomized subjects to aliskiren 300 mg daily (A), valsartan 320 mg daily (V), or aliskiren 150 mg + valsartan 160 mg daily (A+V) for 9 months. Eligible subjects had proteinuria >300 mg/day, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and systolic blood pressure (BP) >130 or diastolic BP >80 mm Hg. Serum and 24-hour urine aldosterone (indexed to 24-hour urine Na) were checked before initiation of therapy and at 3, 6, and 9 months. Aldosterone breakthrough was defined as a sustained increase from baseline aldosterone by study end. The study was intended to enroll 120 subjects but was terminated early by the sponsor. We present here the results of 33 subjects who completed the protocol, of which 12 were randomized to A, 11 were randomized to V, and 10 were randomized to A+V. Mean baseline eGFR was 75.5 (±23.3) mL/min/1.73 m(2); baseline proteinuria was 3104 (±2943) mg/day; and baseline BP was 134.7 (±10.5)/84.8 (±8.4) mm Hg. Three (27%) subjects on V, three (25%) subjects on A, and three (30%) subjects on A+V had aldosterone breakthrough. Mean proteinuria reduction was 31% from baseline in all subjects: 30% in subjects with breakthrough vs. 32% in subjects without breakthrough. Mean BP reduction was 11.0/8.8 mm Hg in all subjects: 8.4/6.1 mm Hg in subjects with breakthrough vs. 12.0/9.8 mm Hg in subjects without breakthrough. Aliskiren, alone or in combination with valsartan, did not reduce the incidence of aldosterone breakthrough in subjects with hypertension

  13. A pentasymmetric open channel blocker for Cys-loop receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Carta, Valentina; Pangerl, Michael; Baur, Roland; Puthenkalam, Roshan; Ernst, Margot; Trauner, Dirk; Sigel, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAA receptors) are chloride ion channels composed of five subunits, mediating fast synaptic and tonic inhibition in the mammalian brain. These receptors show near five-fold symmetry that is most pronounced in the second trans-membrane domain M2 lining the Cl- ion channel. To take advantage of this inherent symmetry, we screened a variety of aromatic anions with matched symmetry and found an inhibitor, pentacyanocyclopentdienyl anion (PCCP-) that exhibited all characteristics of an open channel blocker. Inhibition was strongly dependent on the membrane potential. Through mutagenesis and covalent modification, we identified the region α1V256-α1T261 in the rat recombinant GABAA receptor to be important for PCCP- action. Introduction of positive charges into M2 increased the affinity for PCCP- while PCCP- prevented the access of a positively charged molecule into M2. Interestingly, other anion selective cys-loop receptors were also inhibited by PCCP-, among them the Drosophila RDL GABAA receptor carrying an insecticide resistance mutation, suggesting that PCCP- could serve as an insecticide.

  14. Correlations of plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration with ambulatory blood pressure responses to nebivolol and valsartan, alone and in combination, in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Giles, Thomas D; Bakris, George; Oparil, Suzanne; Weber, Michael A; Li, Huiling; Mallick, Madhuja; Bharucha, David B; Chen, ChunLin; Ferguson, William G

    2015-11-01

    After demonstration of the antihypertensive efficacy of the combination of the beta-blocker nebivolol and the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan in an 8-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (N = 4161), we now report the effects of this treatment on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in a substudy (n = 805). Plasma renin activity increased with valsartan (54%-73%) and decreased with nebivolol (51%-65%) and the combination treatment (17%-39%). Plasma aldosterone decreased with individual treatments (valsartan, 11%-22%; nebivolol, 20%-26%), with the largest reduction (35%) observed with maximum combination dose (20 mg nebivolol/320 mg valsartan). Baseline ln(plasma renin activity) correlated with the 8-week reductions in 24-hour systolic and diastolic BP following treatments with the combination (all doses combined, P = .003 and P < .001) and nebivolol (both, P < .001), but not with valsartan. Baseline ln(aldosterone) correlated with 24-hour systolic and diastolic BP reductions following combination treatment only (P < .001 and P = .005). The implications of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system effects of this beta blocker-angiotensin receptor blocker combination should be explored further.

  15. Aldosterone induces fibrosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage in livers of male rats independent of blood pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Nina; Happ, Kathrin; Link, Samuel; Jahn, Daniel; Zimnol, Anna; Geier, Andreas; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor blockers show antifibrotic potential in hepatic fibrosis. The mechanism of this protective effect is not known yet, although reactive oxygen species seem to play an important role. Here, we investigated the effects of elevated levels of aldosterone (Ald), the primary ligand of the mineralocorticoid receptor, on livers of rats in a hyperaldosteronism model: aldosterone-induced hypertension. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 4 weeks with aldosterone. To distinguish if damage caused in the liver depended on increased blood pressure or on increased Ald levels, the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone was given in a subtherapeutic dose, not normalizing blood pressure. To investigate the impact of oxidative stress, the antioxidant tempol was administered. Aldosterone induced fibrosis, detected histopathologically, and by expression analysis of the fibrosis marker, α-smooth muscle actin. Further, the mRNA amount of the profibrotic cytokine TGF-β was increased significantly. Fibrosis could be reduced by scavenging reactive oxygen species, and also by blocking the mineralocorticoid receptor. Furthermore, aldosterone treatment caused oxidative stress and DNA double strand breaks in livers, as well as the elevation of DNA repair activity. An increase of the transcription factor Nrf2, the main regulator of the antioxidative response could be observed, and of its target genes heme oxygenase-1 and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. All these effects of aldosterone were prevented by spironolactone and tempol. Already after 4 weeks of treatment, aldosteroneinfusion induced fibrosis in the liver. This effect was independent of elevated blood pressure. DNA damage caused by aldosterone might contribute to fibrosis progression when aldosterone is chronically increased.

  16. Osmotic stress regulates mineralocorticoid receptor expression in a novel aldosterone-sensitive cortical collecting duct cell line.

    PubMed

    Viengchareun, Say; Kamenicky, Peter; Teixeira, Marie; Butlen, Daniel; Meduri, Geri; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Kurschat, Christine; Lanel, Aurélie; Martinerie, Laetitia; Sztal-Mazer, Shoshana; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel; Ferrary, Evelyne; Cherradi, Nadia; Lombès, Marc

    2009-12-01

    Aldosterone effects are mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a transcription factor highly expressed in the distal nephron. Given that MR expression level constitutes a key element controlling hormone responsiveness, there is much interest in elucidating the molecular mechanisms governing MR expression. To investigate whether hyper- or hypotonicity could affect MR abundance, we established by targeted oncogenesis a novel immortalized cortical collecting duct (CCD) cell line and examined the impact of osmotic stress on MR expression. KC3AC1 cells form domes, exhibit a high transepithelial resistance, express 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 and functional endogenous MR, which mediates aldosterone-stimulated Na(+) reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel activation. MR expression is tightly regulated by osmotic stress. Hypertonic conditions induce expression of tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein, an osmoregulatory transcription factor capable of binding tonicity-responsive enhancer response elements located in MR regulatory sequences. Surprisingly, hypertonicity leads to a severe reduction in MR transcript and protein levels. This is accompanied by a concomitant tonicity-induced expression of Tis11b, a mRNA-destabilizing protein that, by binding to the AU-rich sequences of the 3'-untranslated region of MR mRNA, may favor hypertonicity-dependent degradation of labile MR transcripts. In sharp contrast, hypotonicity causes a strong increase in MR transcript and protein levels. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that optimal adaptation of CCD cells to changes in extracellular fluid composition is accompanied by drastic modification in MR abundance via transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Osmotic stress-regulated MR expression may represent an important molecular determinant for cell-specific MR action, most notably in renal failure, hypertension, or mineralocorticoid resistance.

  17. Aldosterone Receptor Antagonism Reduces Urinary C-Reactive Protein Excretion in Angiotensin II-Infused, Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Mamalis, Andrew; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Background Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) may contribute to elevated arterial pressure in Ang II-dependent hypertension. However, the in vivo effects of Ang II and of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism on CRP during Ang II-dependent hypertension have not been examined. In addition, urinary CRP excretion as a method to monitor the progression of Ang II-induced inflammation has not been evaluated. Methods Urine samples were collected from three groups (n = 10/group) of rats: 1) normotensive control, 2) angiotensin II infused (Ang II; 60 ng/min), and 3) Ang II + eplerenone (epl; 25 mg/d). A diet containing epl (0.1 %) was provided after 1 week of Ang II infusion. Results After 28 d, Ang II increased SBP from 136 ± 5 to 207 ± 8 mmHg; this response in SBP was not altered following MR antagonism (215 ± 6 mmHg). Ang II-infusion increased plasma CRP from 14 ± 2 to 26 ± 3 μg/mL and increased urinary CRP excretion nearly 8-fold (143 ± 26 vs 1102 ± 115 ng/d). Treatment with eplerenone reduced plasma CRP by 25 % and urinary immunoreactive CRP (irCRP) by 34 % in Ang II-infused rats suggesting that aldosterone contributes to the CRP-associated inflammatory response in Ang II-dependent hypertension. Conclusions The increase in SBP preceded the increase in irCRP excretion by at least 4 days suggesting that CRP does not significantly contribute to increased arterial blood pressure in Ang II-dependent hypertension. The blockade of MR reduced plasma CRP and urinary irCRP excretion demonstrating the contribution of aldosterone to the Ang II-induced generation of CRP. Furthermore, urinary CRP may serve as a non-invasive index for monitoring cardiovascular inflammation during hypertension. PMID:20161115

  18. Effects of nicotinic and NMDA receptor channel blockers on intravenous cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Blokhina, Elena A; Kashkin, Vladimir A; Zvartau, Edwin E; Danysz, Wojciech; Bespalov, Anton Y

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors prevents acquisition of instrumental behaviors reinforced by food and drugs such as morphine and cocaine. The present study aimed to extend this evidence by testing whether NMDA receptor channel blocker, memantine, would exert similar effects on acquisition of cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice. Inasmuch as memantine also acts as nicotinic receptor channel blocker, this study assessed the effects of mecamylamine and MRZ 2/621 that are more selective nicotinic blockers. Adult male Swiss mice were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.8-2.4 microg/infusion) or nicotine (0.08-0.32 microg/infusion) during the 30-min test. Pretreatment with memantine (0.1-10 mg/kg) prevented acquisition of nicotine but not cocaine self-administration. Pretreatment with mecamylamine (0.3-3 mg/kg) and MRZ 2/621 (0.3-10 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent suppression of both cocaine and nicotine self-administration. Taken together with the previous reports, these results indicate that nicotinic receptor blockers antagonize acute reinforcing effects of cocaine while NMDA receptor blockade may have limited effectiveness.

  19. Effect of dietary fiber on the level of free angiotensin II receptor blocker in vitro.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tamezane, Yui; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakagawa, Minami; Imai, Kimie; Nakanishi, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan potassium (LO), candesartan (CA), and telmisartan (TE), and dietary fiber was studied as to the level of free ARB in vitro. When ARB was incubated with soluble (sodium alginate, pectin, and glucomannan) or insoluble (cellulose and chitosan) dietary fiber, the levels of free LO, TE, and CA decreased. This resulted only from mixing the dietary fiber with the ARBs and differed among the types of dietary fiber, and the pH and electrolytes in the mixture. The levels of free LO and TE tended to decrease with a higher concentration of sodium chloride in pH 1.2 fluid. These results suggest that it is important to pay attention to the possible interactions between ARBs and dietary fiber.

  20. Rimonabant: a cannabinoid receptor type 1 blocker for management of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Eli V; Cannon, Christopher P

    2006-05-16

    Rimonabant is a first selective blocker of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) being developed for the treatment of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors, including abdominal obesity and smoking. In four large trials, after one year of treatment, rimonabant 20 mg led to greater weight loss and reduction in waist circumference compared with placebo. Therapy with rimonabant is also associated with favorable changes in serum lipid levels and an improvement in glycemic control in prediabetes patients and in type 2 diabetic patients. At the same dose, rimonabant significantly increased cigarette smoking quit rates as compared with placebo. Rimonabant seems to be well tolerated, with a primary side effect of mild nausea. As an agent with a novel mechanism of action, rimonabant has a potential to be a useful adjunct to lifestyle and behavior modification in treatment of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors, including abdominal obesity and smoking.

  1. Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Juan M

    2012-11-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT(1) receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT(1) receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood-brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurodegerative, mood and traumatic brain disorders, and cognitive decline. In rodents, ARBs (AT(1) receptor blockers) ameliorate stress-induced disorders, anxiety and depression, protect cerebral blood flow during stroke, decrease brain inflammation and amyloid-β neurotoxicity and reduce traumatic brain injury. Direct anti-inflammatory protective effects, demonstrated in cultured microglia, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, neurons and human circulating monocytes, may result not only in AT(1) receptor blockade, but also from PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) stimulation. Controlled clinical studies indicate that ARBs protect cognition after stroke and during aging, and cohort analyses reveal that these compounds significantly reduce the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease. ARBs are commonly used for the therapy of hypertension, diabetes and stroke, but have not been studied in the context of neurodegenerative, mood or traumatic brain disorders, conditions lacking effective therapy. These compounds are well-tolerated pleiotropic neuroprotective agents with additional beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic profiles, and their use in central nervous system disorders offers a novel therapeutic approach of immediate translational value. ARBs should be tested for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease, affective disorders, such as co-morbid cardiovascular disease and depression, and traumatic

  2. Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI): New Avenues in Cardiovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Tocci, G; Battistoni, A; Rubattu, S

    2015-09-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is continuously and progressively raising worldwide. Essential hypertension is a major driver of cardiovascular events, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and congestive heart failure. This latter may represent the final common pathway of different cardiovascular diseases, and it is often mediated by progressive uncontrolled hypertension. Despite solid advantages derived from effective and sustained blood pressure control, and the widespread availability of effective antihypertensive medications, the vast majority of the more than 1 billion hypertensive patients worldwide continue to have uncontrolled hypertension. Among various factors that may be involved, the abnormal activation of neurohormonal systems is one consistent feature throughout the continuum of cardiovascular diseases. These systems may initiate biologically meaningful "injury responses". However, their sustained chronic overactivity often may induce and maintain the progression from hypertension towards congestive heart failure. The renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system, the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelin system are major neurohormonal stressor systems that are not only able to elevate blood pressure levels by retaining water and sodium, but also to play a role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. More recently, the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) represents a favourable approach to inhibit neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and suppress the RAAS via blockade of the AT1 receptors, without the increased risk of angioedema. LCZ696, the first-in-class ARNI, has already demonstrated BP lowering efficacy in patients with hypertension, in particular with respect to systolic blood pressure levels, improved cardiac biomarkers, cardiac remodelling and prognosis in patients with heart failure. This manuscript will briefly overview the main pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of ARNI in

  3. The risks and benefits of therapy with aldosterone receptor antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2007-01-01

    Spironolacotone and eplerenone are mineralocorticoid-blocking agents. These compounds block both the epithelial and non-epithelial actions of aldosterone with the latter assuming increasing clinical importance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both effectively reduce blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each offer survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the potential for renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as the use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has increased the hazards inherent to use of such drugs has become more apparent. Whereas; the endocrine side-effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove fatal if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia develop. However, for most patients the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered as a possibility in any patient receiving one or the other of these medications. As such, steps should be taken to lessen the likelihood of its occurring if therapy is being contemplated with agents in this class.

  4. Combination therapy of angiotensin II receptor blocker and calcium channel blocker exerts pleiotropic therapeutic effects in addition to blood pressure lowering: amlodipine and candesartan trial in Yokohama (ACTY).

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akinobu; Tamura, Kouichi; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Ohsawa, Masato; Haku, Sona; Azushima, Kengo; Dejima, Toru; Wakui, Hiromichi; Yanagi, Mai; Okano, Yasuko; Fujikawa, Tetsuya; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Mizushima, Shunsaku; Tochikubo, Osamu; Umemura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent guidelines recommend combination antihypertensive therapy to achieve the target blood pressure (BP) and to suppress target organ damage. This study aimed to examine the beneficial effects of combination therapy with candesartan and amlodipine on BP control and markers of target organ function in Japanese essential hypertensive patients (N = 20) who did not achieve the target BP level during the monotherapy period with either candesartan or amlodipine. After the monotherapy period, for patients already being treated with amlodipine, a once-daily 8 mg dose of candesartan was added on during the combination therapy period (angiotensin II receptor blocker [ARB] add-on group, N = 10), and a once-daily 5 mg dose of amlodipine was added on for those already being treated with candesartan (calcium channel blocker [CCB] add-on group, N = 10). Combination therapy with candesartan and amlodipine for 12 weeks significantly decreased clinic and home systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). In addition, the combination therapy was able to significantly reduce urine albumin excretion without decrease in estimated glomerular filtration ratio and resulted in significant improvements in brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, central SBP, and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the CCB add-on group showed a significantly greater decrease in clinic and home DBP than the ARB add-on group. The calcium channel blocker add-on group also exhibited better improvements in vascular functional parameters than the ARB add-on group. These results suggest that combination therapy with candesartan and amlodipine is an efficient therapeutic strategy for hypertension with pleiotropic benefits.

  5. Otilonium: a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, L.; Villarroya, M.; Lara, B.; Olmos, V.; Gilabert, J. A.; López, M. G.; Martínez-Sierra, R.; Borges, R.; García, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Otilonium, a clinically useful spasmolytic, behaves as a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) as well as a mild wide-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 2. 45Ca2+ uptake into chromaffin cells stimulated with high K+ (70 mM, 1 min) was blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 7.6 microM. The drug inhibited the 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by the nicotinic AChR agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) with a 79 fold higher potency (IC50 = 0.096 microM). 3. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents (IBa) through Ca2+ channels of voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 6.4 microM, very close to that of K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake. Blockade developed in 10-20 s, almost as a single step and was rapidly and almost fully reversible. 4. Whole-cell nicotinic AChR-mediated currents (250 ms pulses of 100 microM DMPP) applied at 30 s intervals were blocked by otilonium in a concentration-dependent manner, showing an IC50 of 0.36 microM. Blockade was induced in a step-wise manner. Wash out of otilonium allowed a slow recovery of the current, also in discrete steps. 5. In experiments with recordings in the same cells of whole-cell IDMPP, Na+ currents (INa) and Ca2+ currents (ICa), 1 microM otilonium blocked 87% IDMPP, 7% INa and 13% ICa. 6. Otilonium inhibited the K(+)-evoked catecholamine secretory response of superfused bovine chromaffin cells with an IC50 of 10 microM, very close to the IC50 for blockade of K(+)-induced 45Ca2+ uptake and IBa. 7. Otilonium inhibited the secretory responses induced by 10 s pulses of 50 microM DMPP with an IC50 of 7.4 nM. Hexamethonium blocked the DMPP-evoked responses with an IC50 of 29.8 microM, 4,000 fold higher than that of otilonium. 8. In conclusion, otilonium is a potent blocker of nicotinic AChR-mediated responses. The drugs also blocked various subtypes of neuronal voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels at a considerably lower potency. Na+ channels were unaffected by

  6. Renoprotective effect of calcium channel blockers in combination with an angiotensin receptor blocker in elderly patients with hypertension. A randomized crossover trial between benidipine and amlodipine.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Koichi; Dohi, Yasuaki; Nakazawa, Ai; Sugiura, Tomonori; Yamashita, Sumiyo; Sato, Koichi; Kimura, Genjiro

    2010-01-01

    Anti-hypertensive medication with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) is effective in slowing the progression of chronic kidney disease. The present study was designed to investigate whether calcium channel blockers (CCBs) in combination with an ARB differentially affect kidney function. Elderly hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (n = 17, 72 +/- 6 years old) were instructed to self-measure blood pressure. They were randomly assigned to receive either benidipine (4-8 mg/day) or amlodipine (5-10 mg/day) combined with olmesartan (10 mg/day). After 3 months, CCBs were switched in each patient and the same protocol was applied for another 3 months. At baseline, significant correlation was obtained between urine albumin (22.8 +/- 16.7 (median +/- median absolute deviation) mg/g creatinine) and self-measured blood pressure (170 +/- 23/87 +/- 10 (mean +/- SD) mmHg, r = 0.65, p < 0.01). Both regimens reduced blood pressure to a similar extent (139 +/- 22/75 +/- 11 mmHg and 133 +/- 17/72 +/- 10 mmHg, respectively; both p < 0.001), while urine albumin decreased only after combination therapy including benidipine (11.7 +/- 6.1 mg/g creatinine, p < 0.05). Benidipine, but not amlodipine, in combination with olmesartan, reduced urinary albumin excretion in elderly hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease. The results suggest the importance of selecting medications used in combination with ARB in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Combination Therapy Consisting of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blocker, Calcium Channel Blocker and Hydrochlorothiazide in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Yuhei; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Motozato, Kota; Yoshimine, Yuka; Norimatsu, Kenji; Arimura, Tadaaki; Koyoshi, Rie; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Inoue, Ken; Shirotani, Tetsuro; Fujisawa, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Eiyu; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Many patients continue to have high blood pressure (BP) even after treatment with high-dose (H)-angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker (CCB) or middle-dose (M)-ARB/CCB/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ). Methods Thirty-two hypertensive patients who had the use of H-ARB/CCB or M-ARB/CCB/HCTZ were enrolled in this study. We applied a changeover with a switch to H-ARB (telmisartan 80 mg/day)/CCB (amlodipine 5 mg/day or nifedipine CR 40 mg/day)/HCTZ (12.5 mg/day). Results Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were significantly decreased in all patients and in the H-ARB/CCB and M-ARB/CCB/HCTZ groups after 3 months. Percentage (%) of patients who reached the target BP after 3 months (72%) in all patients was significantly higher than that at 0 months (19%). There were no serious adverse effects in any of the patients. Conclusions Combination therapy with H-ARB/CCB/HCTZ was associated with a significant reduction of BP. PMID:28090225

  8. The M-channel blocker linopirdine is an agonist of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Cristian; Babes, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    Linopirdine is a well known blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels from the Kv7 (or KCNQ) family that generate the so called M current in mammalian neurons. Kv7 subunits are also expressed in pain-sensing neurons in dorsal root ganglia, in which they modulate neuronal excitability. In this study we demonstrate that linopirdine acts as an agonist of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1), another ion channel expressed in nociceptors and involved in pain signaling. Linopirdine induces increases in intracellular calcium concentration in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing TRPV1, but not TRPA1 and TRPM8 or in wild-type HEK293 cells. Linopirdine also activates an inward current in TRPV1-expressing HEK293 cells that is almost completely blocked by the selective TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. At low concentrations linopirdine sensitizes both recombinant and native TRPV1 channels to heat, in a manner that is not prevented by the Kv7-channel opener flupirtine. Taken together, these results indicate that linopirdine exerts an excitatory action on mammalian nociceptors not only through inhibition of the M current but also through activation of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1.

  9. Aldosterone blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... hypotension) Aldosterone is a hormone released by the adrenal glands . It helps the body regulate blood pressure. Aldosterone ... may be due to Bartter syndrome (extremely rare) Adrenal glands release too much aldosterone hormone ( primary hyperaldosteronism - usually ...

  10. Role of RAAS and adipokines in cardiovascular protection: effect of different doses of angiotensin II receptor blocker on adipokines level in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Hass, Anat; Oz, Hadar; Mashavi, Margarita; Shargorodsky, Marina

    2014-10-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of different doses of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), candesartan, on circulating adiponectin and leptin levels as well as leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR) in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.Sixty-nine hypertensive patients were randomized to three groups: group 1 included patients treated with high doses of Candesartan (32 mg); group 2 included patients treated with conventional doses of Candesartan (16 mg); and group 3 included patients that received antihypertensive treatment other than ARBs or angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors. Patients were evaluated for lipid profile, HbA1C, insulin, C-peptide, c-reactive protein, aldosterone, renin, Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin and LAR. Baseline adiponectin, leptin, and LAR levels did not differ significantly between the three groups. After 6 months of treatment, LAR was significantly higher in group 3 than group 1 (P = .007) or group 2 (P = .023). Differences between effects of high (32 mg) and conventional doses (16 mg) of Candesartan on LAR were not observed (P = .678). Marginal across-group differences were detected for posttreatment circulating adiponectin level (P = .064). Univariate general linear model (GLM) analysis of posttreatment LAR detected significant by-group differences even after adjustment for age, gender, baseline values of LAR, and blood pressure. In this model, group was the only significant predictor of LAR after controlling for these variables. Treatment with high doses of the ARB, candesartan, is associated with significantly reduced LAR and marginally increased circulating adiponectin levels in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.

  11. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers increase tolerance of cells to copper and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Spincemaille, Pieter; Chandhok, Gursimran; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut; Verbeek, Jef; Chaltin, Patrick; Cammue, Bruno P.; Cassiman, David; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The human pathology Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by toxic copper (Cu) accumulation in brain and liver, resulting in, among other indications, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis of hepatocytes. In an effort to identify novel compounds that can alleviate Cu-induced toxicity, we screened the Pharmakon 1600 repositioning library using a Cu-toxicity yeast screen. We identified 2 members of the drug class of Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) that could increase yeast tolerance to Cu, namely Candesartan and Losartan. Subsequently, we show that specific ARBs can increase yeast tolerance to Cu and/or the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (Cp). The latter also induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that specific ARBs can prevent the prevalence of Cu-induced apoptotic markers in yeast, with Candesartan Cilexetil being the ARB which demonstrated most pronounced reduction of apoptosis-related markers. Next, we tested the sensitivity of a selection of yeast knockout mutants affected in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Cu for Candesartan Cilexetil rescue in presence of Cu. These data indicate that Candesartan Cilexetil increases yeast tolerance to Cu irrespectively of major ROS-detoxifying proteins. Finally, we show that specific ARBs can increase mammalian cell tolerance to Cu, as well as decrease the prevalence of Cu-induced apoptotic markers. All the above point to the potential of ARBs in preventing Cu-induced toxicity in yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:28357214

  12. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan attenuates aortic stiffening and remodelling in STZ-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention or attenuation of diabetic vascular complications includes anti-hypertensive treatment with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors on account of their protective effects beyond blood pressure reduction. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), on blood pressure, aortic stiffening, and aortic remodelling in experimental type 1 diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) (65 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. One diabetic group was treated for 10 weeks with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day p/o). Pressure-independent aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured under anaesthesia after intravenous infusion of phenylephrine and nitroglycerine. Aortic wall samples were collected for histomorphometrical analysis. Results Untreated diabetes imposed differential effects on aortic stiffening, as demonstrated by increased isobaric PWV over a range of high blood pressures, but not at lower blood pressures. This was associated with loss and disruption of elastin fibres and an increase in collagen fibres in the aortic media. Treatment with telmisartan decreased resting blood pressure, reduced aortic stiffness, and partially prevented the degradation of elastin network within the aortic wall. Conclusions Telmisartan improved the structural and functional indices of aortic stiffening induced by untreated STZ-diabetes, demonstrating the importance of ARBs in the therapeutic approach to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:24920962

  13. Renoprotective effect and cost-effectiveness of using benidipine, a calcium channel blocker, to lower the dose of angiotensin receptor blocker in hypertensive patients with albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Saito, Fumio; Fujita, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Ichiyama, Izumi; Harasawa, Shinsuke; Oiwa, Kouji; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Otsuka, Yuji; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kanmatsuse, Katsuo; Kushiro, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    In hypertensive patients with chronic renal disease, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are among the first-line drugs, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are recommended as a second line. We examined the effects of two therapeutic strategies using ARBs and benidipine, a CCB, on blood pressure (BP), urinary albumin excretion (UAE), and cost-effectiveness in hypertensive patients with albuminuria. Patients whose BP was 140/90 mmHg or higher despite treatment with low- or medium-dose ARBs were assigned randomly to two groups. In Group A (n=14), the ARB dose was maximized and then benidipine was added until BP targets were reached (<130/85 mmHg). In Group B (n=18), benidipine was administered first and then the ARB dose was increased until BP targets were reached. The BP targets were achieved by ARB alone in 36% of Group A patients and by the addition of benidipine in 83% of Group B patients. Finally, BP decreased in each group, reaching the targets in 93% of Group A patients and 94% of Group B patients after a 4-month therapeutic period. UAE was decreased in both groups after a 4-month therapeutic period compared to the allocation period (-33+/-6% in Group A, -31+/-6% in Group B; p<0.001, respectively). The monthly drug cost was higher (11,426+/-880 vs. 8,955+/-410 yen, p=0.012) and the cost-effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment was lower (p=0.003) in Group A than in Group B. We conclude that the addition of benidipine to low- or medium-dose ARB is, in light of the renal protection and the cost-effectiveness of this approach, a useful therapeutic strategy for controlling BP in hypertensive patients with albuminuria.

  14. Angiotensin Converting-Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensin Receptor Blockers, and Calcium Channel Blockers Are Associated with Prolonged Vascular Access Patency in Uremic Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Wu, Yu-Te; Lin, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular access failure is a huge burden for patients undergoing hemodialysis. Many efforts have been made to maintain vascular access patency, including pharmacotherapy. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I), angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), and calcium channel blocker (CCB) are known for their antihypertensive and cardio-protective effects, however, their effects on long-term vascular access patency are still inconclusive. Design, setting, participants and measurements We retrospectively enrolled patients commencing maintenance hemodialysis between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2006 by using National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Primary patency was defined as the date of first arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or arteriovenous graft (AVG) creation to the time of access thrombosis or any intervention aimed to maintain or re-establish vascular access patency. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust the influences of patient characteristics, co-morbidities and medications. Results Total 42244 patients were enrolled in this study, 37771 (89.4%) used AVF, 4473 (10.6%) used AVG as their first long term dialysis access. ACE-I, ARB, and CCB use were all associated with prolonged primary patency of AVF [hazard ratio (HR) 0.586, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.557–0.616 for ACE-I use; HR 0.532, CI 0.508–0.556 for ARB use; HR 0.485, CI 0.470–0.501 for CCB use] and AVG (HR 0.557, CI 0.482–0.643 for ACE-I use, HR 0.536, CI 0.467–0.614 for ARB use, HR 0.482, CI 0.442–0.526 for CCB use). Conclusions In our analysis, ACE-I, ARB, and CCB were strongly associated with prolonged primary patency of both AVF and AVG. Further prospective randomized studies are still warranted to prove the causality. PMID:27832203

  15. Comparative effect of angiotensin II type I receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers on laboratory parameters in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Both angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARBs) and calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used antihypertensive drugs. Many clinical studies have demonstrated and compared the organ-protection effects and adverse events of these drugs. However, few large-scale studies have focused on the effect of these drugs as monotherapy on laboratory parameters. We evaluated and compared the effects of ARB and CCB monotherapy on clinical laboratory parameters in patients with concomitant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and July 31, 2011, to identify cohorts of new ARB users (n = 601) and propensity-score matched new CCB users (n = 601), with concomitant mild to moderate hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We used a multivariate-adjusted regression model to adjust for differences between ARB and CCB users, and compared laboratory parameters including serum levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), non-fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), sodium, potassium, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), hemoglobin and hematocrit, and white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) counts up to 12 months after the start of ARB or CCB monotherapy. Results We found a significant reduction of serum TC, HbA1c, hemoglobin and hematocrit and RBC count and a significant increase of serum potassium in ARB users, and a reduction of serum TC and hemoglobin in CCB users, from the baseline period to the exposure period. The reductions of RBC count, hemoglobin and hematocrit in ARB users were significantly greater than those in CCB users. The increase of serum potassium in ARB users was significantly greater than that in CCB users. Conclusions Our study suggested that hematological adverse effects and electrolyte imbalance are

  16. Aldosterone and the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Cachofeiro, Victoria; Miana, Maria; de Las Heras, Natalia; Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Sandra; Fernández-Tresguerres, Jesús; Lahera, Vicente

    2008-04-01

    Aldosterone can act in different tissues exerting physiological and pathological effects. At the vascular level, aldosterone affects endothelial function since administration of aldosterone impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. In addition, the administration of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists ameliorate relaxation to acetylcholine in models of both hypertension and atherosclerosis and in patients with heart failure. A reduction in nitric oxide levels seems to be the main mechanism underlying this effect due to a reduction in its production as well as an increase in its degradation by reactive oxygen species. Aldosterone is a pro-inflammatory factor that can participate in the vascular inflammatory process associated with different pathologies including hypertension through activation of the NFkappaB system, which mediates the vascular production of different cytokines. This mineralocorticoid also participates in the vascular remodeling observed in hypertensive rats since the administration of eplerenone improved the media-to-lumen ratio in these animals. This effect seems to be due to an increase in extracellular matrix. In summary, aldosterone through mineralocorticoid receptors can participate in the vascular damage associated with different pathologies including hypertension through its prooxidant, pro-inflammatory and profibrotic effects that triggered endothelial dysfunction, an inflammatory process and vascular remodeling.

  17. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Angiotensin Converging Enzyme Inhibitors Versus Angiotensin Receptor Blockers for Primary Hypertension. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,8: CD009096].

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Silva, Luís; Fonseca, João A

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are first line drugs in the treatment of hypertension. The aim of this review was to assess if there are differences between these drug classes regarding the prevention of total mortality, occurrence of cardiovascular events and of adverse effects. A systematic review and metanalysis was performed, searching for studies that compare angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers face-to-face, in several databases until July 2014. The study selection and data extraction were performed by 2 independent researchers. Nine studies were included, with a total of 10 963 participants, 9 398 of which participated in the same study and had high cardiovascular risk. No differences were observed regarding total mortality, cardiovascular mortality or total cardiovascular events. A slightly smaller risk was observed with angiotensin receptor blockers regarding withdrawal due to adverse effects (55 people were needed to be treated with angiotensin receptor blockers for 4.1 years to avoid one withdrawal due to adverse effect), mainly due to the occurrence of dry cough with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Thus, no differences were observed between angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in the prevention of total mortality and cardiovascular events, and angiotensin receptor blockers were better tolerated. Given the large proportion of participants with a high cardiovascular risk, the generalization of these results to other populations is limited.

  18. Angiotensin-Receptor Blocker, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, and Risks of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have protective effects against atrial fibrillation (AF). The differences between ARB and ACEI in their effects on the primary prevention of AF remain unclear. This study compared ARB and ACEI in combined antihypertensive medications for reducing the risk of AF in patients with hypertension, and determined which was better for AF prevention in a nationwide cohort study. Patients aged ≥55 years and with a history of hypertension were identified from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical records of 25,075 patients were obtained, and included 6205 who used ARB, 8034 who used ACEI, and 10,836 nonusers (no ARB or ACEI) in their antihypertensive regimen. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF. During an average of 7.7 years’ follow-up, 1619 patients developed new-onset AF. Both ARB (adjusted HR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.44–0.58, P < 0.001) and ACEI (adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.47–0.59, P < 0.001) reduced the risk of AF compared to nonusers. Subgroup analysis showed that ARB and ACEI were equally effective in preventing new-onset AF regardless of age, gender, the presence of heart failure, diabetes, and vascular disease, except for those with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). ARB prevents new-onset AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of stroke or TIA (log-rank P = 0.012). Both ARB and ACEI reduce new-onset AF in patients with hypertension. ARB prevents AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of prior stroke or TIA. PMID:27196491

  19. Evidence to Consider Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers for the Treatment of Early Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent type of dementia and diagnosed late in the progression of the illness when irreversible brain tissue loss has already occurred. For this reason, treatments have been ineffective. It is imperative to find novel therapies ameliorating modifiable risk factors (hypertension, stroke, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and traumatic brain injury) and effective against early pathogenic mechanisms including alterations in cerebral blood flow leading to poor oxygenation and decreased access to nutrients, impaired glucose metabolism, chronic inflammation, and glutamate excitotoxicity. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) fulfill these requirements. ARBs are directly neuroprotective against early injury factors in neuronal, astrocyte, microglia, and cerebrovascular endothelial cell cultures. ARBs protect cerebral blood flow and reduce injury to the blood brain barrier and neurological and cognitive loss in animal models of brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer's disease. These compounds are clinically effective against major risk factors for Alzheimer's disease: hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, and ameliorate age-dependent cognitive loss. Controlled studies on hypertensive patients, open trials, case reports, and database meta-analysis indicate significant therapeutic effects of ARBs in Alzheimer's disease. ARBs are safe compounds, widely used to treat cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in humans, and although they reduce hypertension, they do not affect blood pressure in normotensive individuals. Overall, there is sufficient evidence to consider long-term controlled clinical studies with ARBs in patients suffering from established risk factors, in patients with early cognitive loss, or in normal individuals when reliable biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease risk are identified.

  20. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers as a first choice in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Bae, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Lee, Won Kee; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Chae, Shung Chull

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have not been adequately evaluated in patients without left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or heart failure after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: Between November 2005 and January 2008, 6,781 patients who were not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or ARBs were selected from the Korean AMI Registry. The primary endpoints were 12-month major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death and recurrent AMI. Results: Seventy percent of the patients were Killip class 1 and had a LV ejection fraction ≥ 40%. The prescription rate of ARBs was 12.2%. For each patient, a propensity score, indicating the likelihood of using ARBs during hospitalization or at discharge, was calculated using a non-parsimonious multivariable logistic regression model, and was used to match the patients 1:4, yielding 715 ARB users versus 2,860 ACEI users. The effect of ARBs on in-hospital mortality and 12-month MACE occurrence was assessed using matched logistic and Cox regression models. Compared with ACEIs, ARBs significantly reduced in-hospital mortality(1.3% vs. 3.3%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.379; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.190 to0.756; p = 0.006) and 12-month MACE occurrence (4.6% vs. 6.9%; HR, 0.661; 95% CI, 0.457 to 0.956; p = 0.028). However, the benefit of ARBs on 12-month mortality compared with ACEIs was marginal (4.3% vs. 6.2%; HR, 0.684; 95% CI, 0.467 to 1.002; p = 0.051). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ARBs are not inferior to, and may actually be better than ACEIs in Korean patients with AMI. PMID:26701233

  1. Determinants for the adoption of angiotensin II receptor blockers by general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Greving, Jacoba P; Denig, Petra; van der Veen, Willem Jan; Beltman, Frank W; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M

    2006-12-01

    Results of studies conducted 10-20 years ago show the prominence of commercial information sources in the adoption process of new drugs. Over the past decade, there has been a growing emphasis on practicing evidence-based medicine in drug prescribing. This raises the question whether professional information sources currently counterbalance the influence of commercial information sources in the adoption process. The aim of this study was to identify determinants influencing the adoption of a new drug class, the angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), by general practitioners (GPs) in The Netherlands. A retrospective study was conducted to assess prevalent ARB prescribing for hypertensive patients using the Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI) database. We conducted a survey among all GPs who participated in the IPCI project in 2003 to assess their exposure to commercial and professional information sources, perceived benefits and risks of ARBs, perceived influences of the professional network, and general characteristics. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to identify determinants of ARB adoption while adjusting for patient characteristics. Data were obtained from 70 GPs and 9470 treated hypertensive patients. A total of 1093 patients received ARBs (12%). GPs who reported frequent use of commercial information sources were more likely to prescribe ARBs routinely in preference to other antihypertensives, whereas GPs who used a prescribing decision support system and those who were involved in pharmacotherapy education were less likely to prescribe ARBs. Other factors that were associated with higher levels of ARB adoption included a more positive perception of ARBs regarding their effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, and working in single-handed practices or in rural areas. Aside from determinants related to the patient population, adoption of a new drug class among Dutch GPs is still determined more by their reliance on promotional information

  2. Concentration-dependent mode of interaction of angiotensin II receptor blockers with uric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Takashi; Sato, Masanobu; Maeda, Tomoji; Ogihara, Toshio; Tamai, Ikumi

    2007-01-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) is currently recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It has been reported that an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), losartan, decreases SUA level, whereas other ARBs, such as candesartan, have no lowering effect. Because the renal uric acid transporter (URAT1) is an important factor controlling the SUA level, we examined the involvement of URAT1 in those differential effects of various ARBs on SUA level at clinically relevant concentrations. This study was done by using URAT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Losartan, pratosartan, and telmisartan exhibited cis-inhibitory effects on the uptake of uric acid by URAT1, whereas at higher concentrations, only telmisartan did, and these ARBs reduced the uptake in competitive inhibition kinetics. On the other hand, candesartan, EXP3174 [2-n-butyl-4-chloro-1-[(2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yI)methyl]imidazole-5-carboxylic acid] (a major metabolite of losartan), olmesartan, and valsartan were not inhibitory. Preloading of those ARBs in the oocytes enhanced the URAT1-mediated uric acid uptake, showing a trans-stimulatory effect. The present study is a first demonstration of the differential effects of ARBs on URAT1 that some ARBs are both cis-inhibitory and trans-stimulatory, depending on concentration, whereas others exhibit either a trans-stimulatory or cis-inhibitory effect alone, which could explain the clinically observed differential effects of ARBs on SUA level. Furthermore, it was found that such differential effects of ARBs on URAT1 could be predicted from the partial chemical structures of ARBs, which will be useful information for the appropriate use and development of ARBs without an increase of SUA.

  3. Toxicity of select beta adrenergic receptor-blocking pharmaceuticals (B-blockers) on aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Huggett, D B; Brooks, B W; Peterson, B; Foran, C M; Schlenk, D

    2002-08-01

    One class of pharmaceutical compounds identified in U.S. and European waters are the B-adrenergic receptor blocking compounds (B-blockers). However, little information is available on the potential aquatic toxicity of these compounds. Therefore, Hyalella azteca, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Oryias latipes (Japanese medaka) were exposed to metoprolol, nadolol, and propranolol to determine potential toxicity. Average 48-h LC(50) for propranolol to H. azteca was 29.8 mg/L. The no-observed-effects concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observed-effects concentration (LOEC) for propranolol affecting reproduction of H. azteca were 0.001 and 0.1 mg/L, respectively. The average propranolol and metoprolol 48-h LC(50)s for D. magna were 1.6 and 63.9 mg/L, respectively. C. dubia 48-h LC(50)s were 0.85 and 8.8 mg/L for propranolol and metoprolol, respectively. The NOEC and LOEC of propranolol affecting reproduction in C. dubia were 0.125 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. In O. latipes, the propranolol 48-h LC(50) was 24.3 mg/L. Medaka growth was decreased at 0.5 mg/L propranolol. A 2-week medaka reproductive study indicated significant changes in plasma steroid levels; however, no changes in the average number of eggs produced or number of viable eggs which hatched was observed. In a 4-week follow-up propranolol exposure, the total number of eggs produced by medaka and the number of viable eggs that hatched were decreased at concentrations as low as 0.5 microg/L. Based on this study and the expected aqueous environmental exposure levels, adverse effects of propranolol to invertebrate populations is unlikely; however, further reproductive studies are need to elucidate the risk to teleosts.

  4. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Use and Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Malakauskas, Sandra M; Ma, Jennie Z; Quarles, Darryl L; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between ACEI/ARB use and mortality in CKD patients. Background There is insufficient evidence about the association of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) with mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods A logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the propensity of ACEI/ARB initiation in 141,413 US veterans with non-dialysis CKD previously unexposed to ACEI/ARB treatment. We examined the association of ACEI/ARB administration with all-cause mortality in patients matched by propensity scores, using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox models in “intention-to-treat” analyses, and in generalized linear models with binary outcomes and inverse probability treatment weighing (IPTW) in “as-treated” analyses. Results The mean±SD age of the patients at baseline was 75±10 years, 8% of patients were black, and 22% were diabetic. ACEI/ARB administration was associated with significantly lower risk of mortality both in the intention-to-treat analysis (HR=0.81; 95%CI: 0.78-0.84, p<0.001) and in the as-treated analysis with IPTW (OR=0.37; 95%CI: 0.34-0.41, p<0.001). The association of ACEI/ARB treatment with lower risk of mortality was present in all examined subgroups. Conclusions In this large contemporary cohort of non-dialysis dependent CKD patients, ACEI/ARB administration was associated with greater survival. PMID:24269363

  5. Renoprotective effects of benidipine in combination with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker in hypertensive Dahl rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kozo; Sato, Hitoshi; Ina, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohno, Tetsuji; Shirakura, Shiro

    2003-08-01

    We examined the effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the calcium channel blockers benidipine and amlodipine, hydralazine, and the combination of candesartan and benidipine or amlodipine on blood pressure and renal function in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) hypertensive rats. Male DS rats (5 weeks of age) were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet, resulting in hypertension accompanied by glomerular sclerosis and an increased urinary albumin excretion. Drugs were orally administered from 2 to 6 weeks after the start of the feeding. Although candesartan (1 or 10 mg/kg) had little effect on the blood pressure, benidipine (4 mg/kg), amlodipine (4 mg/kg) and hydralazine (5 mg/kg) had similar hypotensive effects. Benidipine, but not amlodipine, hydralazine, or candesartan, significantly inhibited the increase in the albuminuria and glomerular sclerosis. The combination of candesartan (1 mg/kg) and benidipine (4 mg/kg) lowered the levels of blood pressure and albuminuria more effectively than the combination of candesartan (1 mg/kg) and amlodipine (4 mg/kg). These results indicate that benidipine is effective in preventing the impairment of renal function in DS hypertensive rats, and suggest that additional benefits can be expected by combination therapy with benidipine and an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker.

  6. Meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of adding an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) to a calcium channel blocker (CCB) following ineffective CCB monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jin; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Zhi-De; Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Schoenhagen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted this meta-analysis to systematically review and analyze the clinical benefits of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) combined with calcium channel blocker (CCB) following ineffective CCB monotherapy. Methods PubMed was searched for articles published until August 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical benefits of ARB combined with CCB following ineffective CCB monotherapy were included. The primary efficacy endpoint of the studies was normal rate of blood pressure, the secondary efficacy endpoints were the response rate and change in blood pressure from baseline. The safety endpoint of the studies was incidence of adverse events. Differences are expressed as relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous outcomes and weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% CIs for continuous outcomes. Heterogeneity across studies was tested by using the I2 statistic. Results Seven RCTs were included and had sample sizes ranging from 185 to 1,183 subjects (total: 3,909 subjects). The pooled analysis showed that the on-target rate of hypertension treatment was significantly higher in the amlodipine + ARB group than in the amlodipine monotherapy group (RR =1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.91; P<0.01). The response rate of systolic blood pressure (SBP) (RR =1.28; 95% CI, 1.04–1.58; P<0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (RR =1.27; 95% CI, 1.12–1.44; P=0.04) were significantly higher in the amlodipine + ARB group than in the amlodipine monotherapy group. The change in SBP (RR =−3.56; 95% CI, −7.76–0.63; P=0.10) and DBP (RR =−3.03; 95% CI, −6.51–0.45; P=0.09) were higher in hypertensive patients receiving amlodipine + ARB but the difference did not reach statistical significance. ARB + amlodipine treatment carried a lower risk of adverse events relative to amlodipine monotherapy (RR =0.88; 95% CI, 0.80-0.96; P<0.01). Conclusions The results of our meta-analysis demonstrate that adding an ARB to CCB

  7. Unambiguous observation of blocked states reveals altered, blocker-induced, cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N. Lowri; Williams, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of ions through membrane channels is precisely regulated by gates. The architecture and function of these elements have been studied extensively, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying gating. Recent investigations have focused on ion occupancy of the channel’s selectivity filter and its ability to alter gating, with most studies involving prokaryotic K+ channels. Some studies used large quaternary ammonium blocker molecules to examine the effects of altered ionic flux on gating. However, the absence of blocking events that are visibly distinct from closing events in K+ channels makes unambiguous interpretation of data from single channel recordings difficult. In this study, the large K+ conductance of the RyR2 channel permits direct observation of blocking events as distinct subconductance states and for the first time demonstrates the differential effects of blocker molecules on channel gating. This experimental platform provides valuable insights into mechanisms of blocker-induced modulation of ion channel gating. PMID:27703263

  8. General pharmacological profile and effects of E-4716, a novel histamine receptor blocker, on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fisas, M A; Gutiérrez, B; Fort, M; Dordal, A; García, C; Farré, A J

    1998-04-01

    The general pharmacological profile and effects of E-4716 on the CNS have been investigated in comparison with other histamine receptor blockers. In in vitro studies with isolated organs and in binding studies on numerous receptors, E-4716 had no activity even at high concentrations, except for the selective blockade of H1 receptors. No activity was observed in pharmacological trials in vivo, such as the Irwin test or analgesia induced by phenylbenzoquinone or electroshock, suggesting a depressant activity on the CNS. In tests potentiating hypnosis induced by barbiturates, benzodiazepines and ethanol in mice, E-4716 always showed milder potentiating effects than the other reference drugs. In monkeys, no sedating effects were observed at 200 mg/kg, p.o. These results suggest that E-4716 exhibits good clinical efficacy without any secondary effects.

  9. The Beta-1-Receptor Blocker Nebivolol Elicits Dilation of Cerebral Arteries by Reducing Smooth Muscle [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Cseplo, Peter; Vamos, Zoltan; Ivic, Ivan; Torok, Orsolya; Toth, Attila; Koller, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Nebivolol is known to have beta-1 blocker activity, but it was also suggested that it elicits relaxation of the peripheral arteries in part via release of nitric oxide (NO). However, the effect of nebivolol on the vasomotor tone of cerebral arteries is still unclear. Objective To assess the effects of nebivolol on the diameter of isolated rat basilar arteries (BA) in control, in the presence of inhibitors of vasomotor signaling pathways of know action and hemolysed blood. Methods and Results Vasomotor responses were measured by videomicroscopy and the intracellular Ca2+ by the Fura-2 AM ratiometric method. Under control conditions, nebivolol elicited a substantial dilation of the BA (from 216±22 to 394±20 μm; p<0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner (10−7 to 10−4 M). The dilatation was significantly reduced by endothelium denudation or by L-NAME (inhibitor of NO synthase) or by SQ22536 (adenylyl cyclase blocker). Dilatation of BA was also affected by beta-2 receptor blockade with butoxamine, but not by the guanylate cyclase blocker ODQ. Interestingly, beta-1 blockade by atenolol inhibited nebivolol-induced dilation. Also, the BKCa channel blocker iberiotoxin and KCa channel inhibitor TEA significantly reduced nebivolol-induced dilation. Nebivolol significantly reduced smooth muscle Ca2+ level, which correlated with the increases in diameters and moreover it reversed the hemolysed blood-induced constriction of BA. Conclusions Nebivolol seems to have an important dilator effect in cerebral arteries, which is mediated via several vasomotor mechanisms, converging on the reduction of smooth muscle Ca2+ levels. As such, nebivolol may be effective to improve cerebral circulation in various diseased conditions, such as hemorrhage. PMID:27716772

  10. The PGE(2)-EP4 receptor is necessary for stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in response to low dietary salt intake in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pöschke, Antje; Kern, Niklas; Maruyama, Takayuki; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Narumiya, Shuh; Jensen, Boye L; Nüsing, Rolf M

    2012-11-15

    Increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and PGE(2) synthesis have been shown to be prerequisites for renal renin release after Na(+) deprivation. To answer the question of whether EP4 receptor type of PGE(2) mediates renin regulation under a low-salt diet, we examined renin regulation in EP4(+/+), EP4(-/-), and in wild-type mice treated with EP4 receptor antagonist. After 2 wk of a low-salt diet (0.02% wt/wt NaCl), EP4(+/+) mice showed diminished Na(+) excretion, unchanged K(+) excretion, and reduced Ca(2+) excretion. Diuresis and plasma electrolytes remained unchanged. EP4(-/-) exhibited a similar attenuation of Na(+) excretion; however, diuresis and K(+) excretion were enhanced, and plasma Na(+) concentration was higher, whereas plasma K(+) concentration was lower compared with control diet. There were no significant differences between EP4(+/+) and EP4(-/-) mice in blood pressure, creatinine clearance, and plasma antidiuretic hormone (ADH) concentration. Following salt restriction, plasma renin and aldosterone concentrations and kidney renin mRNA level rose significantly in EP4(+/+) but not in EP4(-/-) and in wild-type mice treated with EP4 antagonist ONO-AE3-208. In the latter two groups, the low-salt diet caused a significantly greater rise in PGE(2) excretion. Furthermore, mRNA expression for COX-2 and PGE(2) synthetic activity was significantly greater in EP4(-/-) than in EP4(+/+) mice. We conclude that low dietary salt intake induces expression of COX-2 followed by enhanced renal PGE(2) synthesis, which stimulates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by activation of EP4 receptor. Most likely, defects at the step of EP4 receptor block negative feedback mechanisms on the renal COX system, leading to persistently high PGE(2) levels, diuresis, and K(+) loss.

  11. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers prevent pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions and morphological changes in rat brain neurons.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Aleksey V; Kim, Kira Kh; Vasilev, Dmitry S; Lukomskaya, Nera Ya; Lavrentyeva, Valeria V; Tumanova, Natalia L; Zhuravin, Igor A; Magazanik, Lev G

    2015-03-01

    Alterations in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission play a central role in the etiology of epilepsy, with overstimulation of glutamate receptors influencing epileptic activity and corresponding neuronal damage. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which belong to a class of ionotropic glutamate receptors, play a primary role in this process. This study compared the anticonvulsant properties of two NMDA receptor channel blockers, memantine and 1-phenylcyclohexylamine (IEM-1921), in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model of seizures in rats and investigated their potencies in preventing PTZ-induced morphological changes in the brain. The anticonvulsant properties of IEM-1921 (5 mg/kg) were more pronounced than those of memantine at the same dose. IEM-1921 and memantine decreased the duration of convulsions by 82% and 37%, respectively. Both compounds were relatively effective at preventing the tonic component of seizures but not myoclonic seizures. Memantine significantly reduced the lethality caused by PTZ-induced seizures from 42% to 11%, and all animals pretreated with IEM-1921 survived. Morphological examination of the rat brain 24 hr after administration of PTZ revealed alterations in the morphology of 20-25% of neurons in the neocortex and the hippocampus, potentially induced by excessive glutamate. The expression of the excitatory amino acid transporter 1 protein was increased in the hippocampus of the PTZ-treated rats. However, dark neurons did not express caspase-3 and were immunopositive for the neuronal nuclear antigen protein, indicating that these neurons were alive. Both NMDA antagonists prevented neuronal abnormalities in the brain. These results suggest that NMDA receptor channel blockers might be considered possible neuroprotective agents for prolonged seizures or status epilepticus leading to neuronal damage.

  12. The Decrement of Hemoglobin Concentration with Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Treatment Is Correlated with the Reduction of Albuminuria in Non-Diabetic Hypertensive Patients: Post-Hoc Analysis of ESPECIAL Trial.

    PubMed

    An, Jung Nam; Hwang, Jin Ho; Lee, Jung Pyo; Chin, Ho Jun; Kim, Sejoong; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Suhnggwon; Park, Jung Hwan; Shin, Sung Joon; Lee, Sang Ho; Choi, Bum Soon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system exhibits a renoprotective effect; however, blockade of this system may also decrease hemoglobin (Hb) and erythropoietin (EPO) levels. We evaluated the correlation between reduced albuminuria and decreased hemoglobin concentrations after treatment with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). Two hundred forty-five non-diabetic hypertensive participants with established albuminuria and relatively preserved renal function were treated with an ARB (40 mg/day olmesartan) for eight weeks. Subsequent changes in various clinical parameters, including Hb, EPO, and albuminuria, were analyzed following treatment. After the 8-week treatment with an ARB, Hb and EPO levels significantly decreased. Patients with a greater decrease in Hb exhibited a greater reduction in 24-hour urinary albumin excretion compared with patients with less of a decrease or no decrease in Hb, whereas no associations with a decline in renal function and EPO levels were noted. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a correlation between the reduction of urine albumin excretion and the decrease in Hb levels (after natural logarithm transformation, adjusted odds ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.21-2.56, P = 0.003). Linear regression analysis also supported this positive correlation (Pearson correlation analysis; R = 0.24, P < 0.001). Decreased Hb concentrations following ARB treatment were positively correlated with reduced albuminuria in non-diabetic hypertensive patients, regardless of decreased blood pressure and EPO levels or renal function decline.

  13. Telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevents the development of diabetes in male Spontaneously Diabetic Torii rats.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Fukui, Michiaki; Hosoda, Hiroko; Asano, Mai; Harusato, Ichiko; Tanaka, Muhei; Shiraishi, Emi; Senmaru, Takashi; Sakabe, Kazumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kitawaki, Jo; Fujinami, Aya; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto

    2009-03-01

    To assess the beneficial effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan on a non-obese animal model of reduced function and mass of islet beta-cells prior to the development of diabetes, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were treated with telmisartan at 8 weeks of age. At 24 weeks of age, the treatment with telmisartan dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, and high-dose (5 mg/kg/day) treated SDT rats did not developed diabetes. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that treatment with high-dose telmisartan reduced mRNA expression of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, components of NAD(P)H oxidase, transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the pancreas of male SDT rats. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses revealed that treatment with telmisartan also reduced expression of p47(phox). These results suggest that treatment with telmisartan reduces oxidative stress by local RAS activation and protects against islet beta-cell damage and dysfunction. These findings provide at least a partial explanation for the reduced incidence of new-onset diabetes that has been observed in several clinical trials involving angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors.

  14. Induction of human adiponectin gene transcription by telmisartan, angiotensin receptor blocker, independently on PPAR-{gamma} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriuchi, Akie ||. E-mail: f1195@cc.nagasaki-u-ac.jp; Shimamura, Mika; Kita, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Fujishima, Keiichiro; Fukushima, Keiko |; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Yuji; Kawasaki, Eiji

    2007-05-18

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, has been shown to ameliorate insulin resistance and inhibit the process of atherosclerosis. Recently, several reports have stated that angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), increase adiponectin plasma level, and ameliorate insulin resistance. Telmisartan, a subclass of ARBs, has been shown to be a partial agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma}, and to increase the plasma adiponectin level. However, the transcriptional regulation of the human adiponectin gene by telmisartan has not been determined yet. To elucidate the effect of telmisartan on adiponectin, the stimulatory regulation of human adiponectin gene by telmisartan was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, utilizing adenovirus-mediated luciferase reporter gene-transferring technique. This study indicates that telmisartan may stimulate adiponectin transcription independent of PPAR-{gamma}.

  15. An angiotensin II receptor blocker-calcium channel blocker combination prevents cardiovascular events in elderly high-risk hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease better than high-dose angiotensin II receptor blockade alone.

    PubMed

    Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2013-01-01

    The OSCAR study was a multicenter, prospective randomized open-label blinded end-point study of 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients comparing the efficacy of angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) uptitration to an ARB plus calcium channel blocker (CCB) combination. In this prospective study, we performed prespecified subgroup analysis according to baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) defined as an eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Blood pressure was lower in the combined therapy than in the high-dose ARB cohort in both groups with and without CKD. In patients with CKD, significantly more primary events (a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death) occurred in the high-dose ARB group than in the combination group (30 vs. 16, respectively, hazard ratio 2.25). Significantly more cerebrovascular and more heart failure events occurred in the high-dose ARB group than in the combination group. In patients without CKD, however, the incidence of primary events was similar between the two treatments. The treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant. Allocation to the high-dose ARB was a significant independent prognostic factor for primary events in patients with CKD. Thus, the ARB plus CCB combination conferred greater benefit in prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with CKD compared with high-dose ARB alone. Our findings provide new insight into the antihypertensive strategy for elderly hypertensive patients with CKD.

  16. Color development upon reaction of ferric ion with the toxin JSTX, a glutamate receptor blocker present in the venom gland of the spider Nephila clavata (Joro spider).

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, M; Narai, N; Pan-Hou, H; Shimazaki, K; Miwa, A; Kawai, N

    1988-01-01

    A spider toxin, JSTX, derived from Nephila clavata, which blocks glutamate receptor was found to react with Fe3+. Mechanism of the coloration may be chelate formation since the green color completely faded upon the addition of EDTA. The colored JSTX significantly lost its neurophysiological activity. This unique coloration may be useful for not only detecting specific blockers of the glutamate receptor in spider venom but also for characterizing the glutamate receptor.

  17. Toll-like receptor 4 blocker as potential therapy for acetaminophen-induced organ failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    SALAMA, MOHAMED; ELGAMAL, MOHAMED; ABDELAZIZ, AZZA; ELLITHY, MOATAZ; MAGDY, DINA; ALI, LINA; FEKRY, EMAD; MOHSEN, ZINAB; MOSTAFA, MARIAM; ELGAMAL, HODA; SHEASHAA, HUSSEIN; SOBH, MOHAMED

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, 4-hydroxyacetanilide) is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the United States. In addition to exhibiting hepatotoxicity, APAP exerts a nephrotoxic effect may be independent of the induced liver damage. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been suggested as a potential class of novel therapeutic targets. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 in the prevention of APAP-induced hepato-renal failure. Four groups of C57BL mice were studied: Vehicle-treated/control (VEH), APAP-treated (APAP), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + NAC) and TAK-242-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + TAK) groups. Mice were clinically assessed then perfused 4 h later. Liver and kidney tissues were collected and examined histologically using basic hematoxylin and eosin staining to detect signs of necrosis and inflammation. Plasma samples were collected to measure the levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and serum creatinine. In addition, liver and kidney tissues were assayed to determine the levels of reduced glutathione. The results of the present study indicate the potential role of TLR-4 in APAP-induced organ toxicity. In the APAP + TAK and APAP + NAC groups, histopathological examination indicated that pretreatment with TAK-242 or NAC afforded protection against APAP-induced injury. However, this protective effect was more clinically evident in the APAP + TAK group compared with the APAP + NAC group. The various biochemical parameters (serum enzymes and reduced glutathione) revealed no significant protection in either of the pretreated groups. Therefore, the present study indicated that the TLR-4 blocker had protective effects against acute APAP toxicity in liver and kidney tissues. These effects were identified clinically, histologically and biochemically. Furthermore, the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 exhibited antioxidant properties in addition to anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26170942

  18. Toll-like receptor 4 blocker as potential therapy for acetaminophen-induced organ failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mohamed; Elgamal, Mohamed; Abdelaziz, Azza; Ellithy, Moataz; Magdy, Dina; Ali, Lina; Fekry, Emad; Mohsen, Zinab; Mostafa, Mariam; Elgamal, Hoda; Sheashaa, Hussein; Sobh, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, 4-hydroxyacetanilide) is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the United States. In addition to exhibiting hepatotoxicity, APAP exerts a nephrotoxic effect may be independent of the induced liver damage. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been suggested as a potential class of novel therapeutic targets. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 in the prevention of APAP-induced hepato-renal failure. Four groups of C57BL mice were studied: Vehicle-treated/control (VEH), APAP-treated (APAP), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + NAC) and TAK-242-pretreated plus APAP (APAP + TAK) groups. Mice were clinically assessed then perfused 4 h later. Liver and kidney tissues were collected and examined histologically using basic hematoxylin and eosin staining to detect signs of necrosis and inflammation. Plasma samples were collected to measure the levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and serum creatinine. In addition, liver and kidney tissues were assayed to determine the levels of reduced glutathione. The results of the present study indicate the potential role of TLR-4 in APAP-induced organ toxicity. In the APAP + TAK and APAP + NAC groups, histopathological examination indicated that pretreatment with TAK-242 or NAC afforded protection against APAP-induced injury. However, this protective effect was more clinically evident in the APAP + TAK group compared with the APAP + NAC group. The various biochemical parameters (serum enzymes and reduced glutathione) revealed no significant protection in either of the pretreated groups. Therefore, the present study indicated that the TLR-4 blocker had protective effects against acute APAP toxicity in liver and kidney tissues. These effects were identified clinically, histologically and biochemically. Furthermore, the TLR-4 blocker TAK-242 exhibited antioxidant properties in addition to anti-inflammatory effects.

  19. Role of ACTH and Other Hormones in the Regulation of Aldosterone Production in Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2016-01-01

    The major physiological regulators of aldosterone production from the adrenal zona glomerulosa are potassium and angiotensin II; other acute regulators include adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and serotonin. Their interactions with G-protein coupled hormone receptors activate cAMP/PKA pathway thereby regulating intracellular calcium flux and CYP11B2 transcription, which is the specific steroidogenic enzyme of aldosterone synthesis. In primary aldosteronism (PA), the increased production of aldosterone and resultant relative hypervolemia inhibits the renin and angiotensin system; aldosterone secretion is mostly independent from the suppressed renin–angiotensin system, but is not autonomous, as it is regulated by a diversity of other ligands of various eutopic or ectopic receptors, in addition to activation of calcium flux resulting from mutations of various ion channels. Among the abnormalities in various hormone receptors, an overexpression of the melanocortin type 2 receptor (MC2R) could be responsible for aldosterone hypersecretion in aldosteronomas. An exaggerated increase in plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) is found in patients with PA secondary either to unilateral aldosteronomas or bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH) following acute ACTH administration compared to normal individuals. A diurnal increase in PAC in early morning and its suppression by dexamethasone confirms the increased role of endogenous ACTH as an important aldosterone secretagogue in PA. Screening using a combination of dexamethasone and fludrocortisone test reveals a higher prevalence of PA in hypertensive populations compared to the aldosterone to renin ratio. The variable level of MC2R overexpression in each aldosteronomas or in the adjacent zona glomerulosa hyperplasia may explain the inconsistent results of adrenal vein sampling between basal levels and post ACTH administration in the determination of source of aldosterone excess. In the rare cases of glucocorticoid remediable

  20. The comparative efficacy and safety of the angiotensin receptor blockers in the management of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Hazel Mae A; White, C Michael; White, William B

    2015-01-01

    All national guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) as an initial or add-on antihypertensive therapy. The eight available ARBs have variable clinical efficacy when used for control of hypertension. Additive blood pressure-lowering effects have been demonstrated when ARBs are combined with thiazide diuretics or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, augmenting hypertension control. Furthermore, therapeutic use of ARBs goes beyond their antihypertensive effects, with evidence-based benefits in heart failure and diabetic renal disease particularly among angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-intolerant patients. On the other hand, combining renin-angiotensin system blocking agents, a formerly common practice among medical subspecialists focusing on the management of hypertension, has ceased, as there is not only no evidence of cardiovascular benefit but also modest evidence of harm, particularly with regard to renal dysfunction. ARBs are very well tolerated as monotherapy, as well as in combination with other antihypertensive medications, which improve adherence to therapy and have become a mainstay in the treatment of stage 1 and stage 2 hypertension.

  1. Transcranial random noise stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1) for 10 min induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 min. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1 mA for 10 min stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham) on eight healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency toward inhibiting MEPs 5–60 min poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0–20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS. Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms. PMID:25914617

  2. LH, progesterone, and TSH can stimulate aldosterone in vitro: a study on normal adrenal cortex and aldosterone producing adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, G; Balzan, S; Morelli, L; Iacconi, P; Sabatino, L; Ripoli, A; Fommei, E

    2014-05-01

    Endocrine factors different from ACTH or angiotensin II can stimulate aldosterone secretion and have a role in the pathophysiology of hyperaldosteronism. Aldosterone may increase in luteotropic/progestogenic and in hypothyroid states; LH and, occasionally, TSH receptors have been detected in normal adrenal cortex and aldosterone-producing adenoma. The aim of the study was to compare adrenal contents of LH and TSH receptors between normal cortex and aldosterone-producing adenoma and to evaluate the ability of LH, its product progesterone, and TSH to stimulate aldosterone secretion in vitro from primary adrenocortical cells. Surgical aldosterone-producing adenoma fragments from 19 patients and adrenal cortex fragments from 10 kidney donors were used for Western blotting and cell cultures. LH (n=26), TSH (n=19) and progesterone (n=8) receptor proteins were investigated; LH receptor-mRNA was also tested in 8 samples. Aldosterone responses in vitro to LH, progesterone, and TSH stimulation were assayed. LH and TSH receptors were more expressed in adenoma than normal cortex (p<0.01, p<0.05, respectively); progesterone receptor was observed in 6/8 samples. Aldosterone increased after in vitro stimulation with LH (5/12 adenoma, 1/7 normal cells), progesterone (4/5 adenoma, 5/6 normal cells), and TSH (3/5 adenoma and 3/5 normal cells). LH and TSH receptors were more expressed in aldosterone producing adenoma than normal adrenal cortex. LH, progesterone, and TSH can stimulate aldosterone in vitro. Similar mechanisms could participate in vivo in the aldosterone increase in lutheotropic, progestogenic, or hypothyroid states and may exist in both normal adrenal cortex and adenoma in responsive individuals.

  3. Nocturnal oscillations of plasma aldosterone in relation to sleep stages.

    PubMed

    Krauth, M O; Saini, J; Follenius, M; Brandenberger, G

    1990-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between aldosterone secretion and sleep stages in conjunction with two aldosterone regulating hormone systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), and also K+. Nocturnal plasma patterns of aldosterone, plasma renin activity (PRA), ACTH and K+ were established in blood collected at 10-min intervals in two groups of 6 subjects. Both groups underwent two 9 hour overnight-studies, consisting of one control night and one experimental night. The first group was maintained on a low Na diet and the other was given a beta-blocker, atenolol. Polygraphic recordings of sleep were scored according to established criteria. For the control night, REM sleep usually began at peak level or in the descending phase of aldosterone oscillations. As previously described, PRA reflected REM-NREM sleep alteration, levels increased in NREM and decreased during REM sleep. ACTH fluctuations did not oscillate with sleep stages, but levels were very seldom in the ascending phase at REM sleep onset. Plasma K+ remained almost constant throughout the night. The relative importance of the ACTH and the RAS on nocturnal aldosterone secretion and the relationship between aldosterone oscillations and sleep stages remained unclear. Modulating renin levels by either consuming a low Na diet or administration of a beta-blocker enabled this relationship to be clarified. The RAS dominated aldosterone secretion when stimulated by a low sodium diet. Aldosterone oscillations then reflected PRA oscillations with a delay of about 20 min and the relationship of aldosterone to sleep stages was dependent on the relationship of PRA with sleep stages.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Influence of initial angiotensin receptor blockers on treatment persistence in uncomplicated hypertension: A nation-wide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ah, Young-Mi; Lee, Ju-Yeun; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kong, Jisun; Kim, Baegeum; Choi, Kyung Hee; Han, Nayoung; Yu, Yun Mi; Oh, Jung Mi; Shin, Wan Gyoon; Lee, Hae-Young

    2016-01-01

    We identified 55 504 uncomplicated, treatment-naïve hypertensive patients who started angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in 2012 from national claims data. The proportion of patients remaining on any hypertension treatment at 12 months and the adherence rate were similar between the losartan cohort (66.82% and 68.25%) and the nonlosartan ARB cohort (67.48% and 69.01%). After adjusting for confounding factors, there was no difference in persistence (aHR 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-1.01) on hypertension treatment between losartan and nonlosartan ARB cohort. Post hoc analysis showed that patients initially prescribed eprosartan, irbesartan (both, aHR 1.33), and telmisartan (aHR 1.11) were more likely to discontinue the initial drug, whereas valsartan initiators (aHR 0.96) were less likely compared with losartan initiators.

  5. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question.

  6. A retrospective study of the effects of angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Jahnavi V.; Dass, Ervilla E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Till date, several studies have compared angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in terms of delaying the progression of diabetic nephropathy. But the superiority of one drug class over the other remains unsettled. This study has retrospectively compared the effects of ACE inhibitors and ARBs in diabetic nephropathy. The study aims to compare ACE inhibitors and ARBs in terms of delaying or preventing the progression of diabetic nephropathy, association between blood pressure (B.P) and urinary albumin and also B.P and serum creatinine with ACE inhibitor and ARB, know the percentage of hyperkalemia in patients of diabetic nephropathy receiving ACE inhibitor or ARB. Settings and Design: A total of 134 patients diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy during the years 2001–2010 and having a complete follow-up were studied, out of which 99 were on ARB (63 patients of Losartan and 36 of Telmisartan) and 35 on ACE inhibitor (Ramipril). Subjects and Methods: There was at least 1-month of interval between each observation made and also between the date of treatment started and the first reading that is, the observation of the 1st month. In total, three readings were taken that is, of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd month after the treatment started. Comparison of the 1st and 3rd month after the treatment started was done. Mean ± standard deviation, Paired t-test, and Chi-square were used for the analysis of the data. Results: The results reflect that ARBs (Losartan and Telmisartan) when compared to ACE inhibitor (Ramipril) are more effective in terms of delaying the progression of diabetic nephropathy and also in providing renoprotection. Also, ARBs have the property of simultaneously decreasing the systolic B.P and albuminuria when compared to ACE inhibitor (Ramipril). Conclusions: Angiotensin receptor blockers are more renoprotective than ACE inhibitors and also provide better cardioprotection. PMID:25878372

  7. Age-related difference in the sleep pressure-lowering effect between an angiotensin II receptor blocker and a calcium channel blocker in Asian hypertensives: the ACS1 Study.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Hoshide, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Sleep blood pressure (BP), which is partly determined by salt sensitivity and intake, is an important cardiovascular risk in hypertensives. However, there have been no studies on age-related differences in the sleep BP-lowering effect between angiotensin II receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers in Asians. Azilsartan Circadian and Sleep Pressure-the 1st Study was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, 2-parallel-group study conducted to compare the efficacy of 8-week oral treatment with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (azilsartan 20 mg) or a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine 5 mg) on sleep BP as evaluated by ambulatory BP monitoring. Among the overall population, amlodipine treatment achieved significantly greater reduction in sleep BP, awake BP, and 24-hour BP than azilsartan treatment. BP reduction by amlodipine was particularly pronounced in elderly hypertensive patients aged ≥60 years old. Among patients ≥60 years old, the amlodipine group had numerically, but not significantly, higher control rate of sleep BP compared with the azilsartan group. Similar results were found for awake BP and 24-hour BP. These results suggest a greater BP reduction/control by amlodipine compared with azilsartan and that reduction/control of BP by amlodipine was also more effective in the elderly population. As recommended in the American Society of Hypertension/The international Society of Hypertension and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for differentiating treatment according to age, amlodipine should be one of the options for starting treatment in the elderly population. CLINICAL TRIAL URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01762501 CLINICAL TRIAL ID: NCT01762501.

  8. Renin-Angiotensin-aldosterone system in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Oleksandra; Helal, Imed; Shchekochikhin, Dmitry; Schrier, Robert W

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most frequent life-threatening hereditary disease. Prognostic factors for progressive renal impairment have been identified such as gender, race, age, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension. Hypertension is the only risk factor for renal dysfunction in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, which is presently treatable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension will help in defining appropriate interventions. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system is the pivotal factor in the pathogenesis of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Basic research and clinical studies in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease implicated activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system. Therapy of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocker has the potential to prevent cardiovascular complications and slow the progression of renal disease. The results of two large multicenter double-blind placebo controlled randomized clinical trials (the HALT-PKD trials) possibly will elucidate the beneficial effects of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system inhibition in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  9. Azilsartan, aliskiren, and combination antihypertensives utilizing renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Gregg; Sankholkar, Kedar; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2014-01-01

    Health care providers managing hypertension (HTN) have a large selection of pharmacologic agents to choose from, including several different classes of drugs and many similar drugs within each class. Antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system has been shown to be very effective for HTN, especially in patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and heart failure. Within this group, there have been 2 new agents recently introduced to the US market and approved by the Food and Drug Administration. It is important for the HTN specialist to be familiar with the merits of these 2 drugs: the angiotensin receptor blocker Edarbi (azilsartan) and the renin inhibitor Tekturna (aliskiren). Additionally, there have been several new, fixed-dose combination antihypertensives introduced to the market since 2006 that use a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone antagonist. Seven of these combine 2 drugs together in a single pill: Edarbyclor (azilsartan/chlorthalidone), Exforge (amlodipine/valsartan), Azor (olmesartan/amlodipine), Twynsta (amlodipine/telmisartan), Tekturna HCT [aliskiren/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ)], Valturna (aliskiren/valsartan), Tekamlo (aliskiren/amlodipine). Three triple-drug combination medications have also been introduced recently: Exforge HCT (amlodipine/valsartan/HCTZ), Tribenzor (olmesartan/amlodipine/HCTZ), and Amturnide (aliskiren/amlodipine/hydrocholorothiazide). This review will summarize the trial data and important pharmacologic merits of these 2 new renin-angiotensin-aldosterone antagonists and the advantages of initiating treatment with one of the new fixed-dose, combination drugs approved over the last 5 years.

  10. [Prothrombotic aldosterone action--a new side of the hormone].

    PubMed

    Gromotowicz, Anna; Osmólska, Urszula; Mantur, Maria; Szoka, Piotr; Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Szemraj, Janusz; Chabielska, Ewa

    2010-10-18

    Recent studies have focused on a new wave of interest in aldosterone due mainly to its growing profile as a local messenger in pathology of the cardiovascular system, rather than its hormonal action. In the last few years strong evidence for a correlation between raised aldosterone level and haemostasis disturbances leading to increased risk of cardiovascular events has been provided. It has been demonstrated that aldosterone contributes to endothelial dysfunction, fibrinolytic disorders and oxidative stress augmentation. It was also shown that chronic aldosterone treatment results in enhanced experimental arterial thrombosis. Our study in a venous model of thrombosis in normotensive rats confirmed that even a short-lasting increase in aldosterone level intensified thrombus formation. One-hour aldosterone infusion shortened bleeding time; increased platelet adhesion to collagen; reduced tissue factor, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor; and increased plasminogen activator plasma level. A fall in plasma nitric oxide metabolite concentration with a decrease in aortic nitric oxide synthase mRNA level was also observed. Moreover, aldosterone increased hydrogen peroxide and malonyl dialdehyde plasma concentration and augmented NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutase aortic expression. Therefore, the mechanism of aldosterone prothrombotic action is multiple and involves primary haemostasis activation, procoagulative and antifibrinolytic action, NO bioavailability impairment and oxidative stress augmentation. The effects of aldosterone were not fully abolished by mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, suggesting the involvement of alternative mechanisms in the prothrombotic aldosterone action.

  11. Chloride channels of glycine and GABA receptors with blockers: Monte Carlo minimization and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Zhorov, B S; Bregestovski, P D

    2000-01-01

    GABA and glycine receptors (GlyRs) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that respond to the inhibitory neurotransmitters by opening a chloride-selective central pore lined with five M2 segments homologous to those of alpha(1) GlyR/ ARVG(2')LGIT(6')TVLTMTTQSSGSR. The activity of cyanotriphenylborate (CTB) and picrotoxinin (PTX), the best-studied blockers of the Cl(-) pores, depends essentially on the subunit composition of the receptors, in particular, on residues in positions 2' and 6' that form the pore-facing rings R(2') and R(6'). Thus, CTB blocks alpha(1) and alpha(1)/beta, but not alpha(2) GlyRs (Rundström, N., V. Schmieden, H. Betz, J. Bormann, and D. Langosch. 1994. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91:8950-8954). PTX blocks homomeric receptors (alpha(1) GlyR and rat rho(1) GABAR), but weakly antagonizes heteromeric receptors (alpha(1)/beta GlyR and rho(1)/rho(2) GABAR) (Pribilla, I., T. Takagi, D. Langosch, J. Bormann, and H. Betz. 1992. EMBO J. 11:4305-4311; Zhang D., Z. H. Pan, X. Zhang, A. D. Brideau, and S. A. Lipton. 1995. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92:11756-11760). Using as a template the kinked-helices model of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the open state (Tikhonov, D. B., and B. S. Zhorov. 1998. Biophys. J. 74:242-255), we have built homology models of GlyRs and GABARs and calculated Monte Carlo-minimized energy profiles for the blockers pulled through the pore. The profiles have shallow minima at the wide extracellular half of the pore, a barrier at ring R(6'), and a deep minimum between rings R(6') and R(2') where the blockers interact with five M2s simultaneously. The star-like CTB swings necessarily on its way through ring R(6') and its activity inversely correlates with the barrier at R(6'): Thr(6')s and Ala(2')s in alpha(2) GlyR confine the swinging by increasing the barrier, while Gly(2')s in alpha(1) GlyR and Phe(6')s in beta GlyR shrink the barrier. PTX has an egg-like shape with an isopropenyl group at the elongated end and

  12. Intracellular mediators of potassium-induced aldosterone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, A.; Chiou, S.; Davis, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular messengers of potassium in eliciting aldosterone secretion in calf adrenal glomerulosa cells since there were unresolved issues relating to the role of phosphoinositides, cAMP and protein kinases. We observed no evidence of hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) in {sup 3}H-inositol labeled alf adrenal cells or increase of cAMP in response to potassium. Addition of calcium channel blocker, nitrendipine after stimulating adrenal glomerulosa cells with potassium, markedly inhibited aldosterone secretion. A calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) produced greater reduction of aldosterone secretion than an inhibitor of protein kinase C (H-7). These results suggest that a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration through voltage-dependent calcium channel and calmodulin are the critical determinants of aldosterone secretion stimulated by potassium.

  13. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morton, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. Less than 50 cases of pregnancy in women with primary aldosteronism have been reported, suggesting the disorder is significantly underdiagnosed in confinement. Accurate diagnosis is complicated by physiological changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in pregnancy, leading to a risk of false negative results on screening tests. The course of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is highly variable, although overall it is associated with a very high risk of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The optimal management of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is unclear, with uncertainty regarding the safety of mineralocorticoid antagonists and amiloride, their relative efficacy compared with the antihypertensive medications commonly used during pregnancy, and as to whether prognosis is improved by laparoscopic adrenalectomy where an adrenal adenoma can be demonstrated.

  14. Aldosterone does not modify gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Verhovez, A; Williams, T A; Morello, F; Monticone, S; Brizzi, M F; Dentelli, P; Fallo, F; Fabris, B; Amenta, F; Gomez-Sanchez, C; Veglio, F; Mulatero, P

    2012-03-01

    The toxic effects of aldosterone on the vasculature, and in particular on the endothelial layer, have been proposed as having an important role in the cardiovascular pathology observed in mineralocorticoid-excess states. In order to characterize the genomic molecular mechanisms driving the aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, we performed an expression microarray on transcripts obtained from both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human coronary artery endothelial cells stimulated with 10 - 7 M aldosterone for 18 h. The results were then subjected to qRT-PCR confirmation, also including a group of genes known to be involved in the control of the endothelial function or previously described as regulated by aldosterone. The state of activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor was investigated by means of a luciferase-reporter assay using a plasmid encoding a mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-sensitive promoter. Aldosterone did not determine any significant change in gene expression in either cell type both in the microarray and in the qRT-PCR analysis. The luciferase-reporter assay showed no activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor following aldosterone stimulation. The status of nonfunctionality of the mineralocorticoid receptor expressed in cultured human umbilical and coronary artery endothelial cells does not allow aldosterone to modify gene expression and provides evidence against either a beneficial or harmful genomic effect of aldosterone on healthy endothelial cells.

  15. Are we missing a mineralocorticoid in teleost fish? Effects of cortisol, deoxycorticosterone and aldosterone on osmoregulation, gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity and isoform mRNA levels in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.; Regish, A.; O'Dea, M. F.; Shrimpton, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    It has long been held that cortisol, acting through a single receptor, carries out both glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid actions in teleost fish. The recent finding that fish express a gene with high sequence similarity to the mammalian mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) suggests the possibility that a hormone other than cortisol carries out some mineralocorticoid functions in fish. To test for this possibility, we examined the effect of in vivo cortisol, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and aldosterone on salinity tolerance, gill Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) activity and mRNA levels of NKA α1a and α1b in Atlantic salmon. Cortisol treatment for 6–14 days resulted in increased, physiological levels of cortisol, increased gill NKA activity and improved salinity tolerance (lower plasma chloride after a 24 h seawater challenge), whereas DOC and aldosterone had no effect on either NKA activity or salinity tolerance. NKA α1a and α1b mRNA levels, which increase in response to fresh water and seawater acclimation, respectively, were both upregulated by cortisol, whereas DOC and aldosterone were without effect. Cortisol, DOC and aldosterone had no effect on gill glucocorticoid receptor GR1, GR2 and MR mRNA levels, although there was some indication of possible upregulation of GR1 by cortisol (p = 0.07). The putative GR blocker RU486 inhibited cortisol-induced increases in salinity tolerance, NKA activity and NKA α1a and α1b transcription, whereas the putative MR blocker spironolactone had no effect. The results provide support that cortisol, and not DOC or aldosterone, is involved in regulating the mineralocorticoid functions of ion uptake and salt secretion in teleost fish.

  16. Effects of isoflurane on the actions of neuromuscular blockers on the muscle nicotine acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanxiang; Yao, Shanglong; Nie, Hui; Lü, Bin

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that volatile anesthetic enhancement of muscle relaxation is the result of combined drug effects on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The poly A m RNA from muscle by isolation were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes for receptor expression. Concentration-effect curves for the inhibition of Ach-induced currents were established for vecuronium, rocuranium, and isoflurane. Subsequently, inhibitory effects of NDMRs were studied in the presence of the isoflurane at a concentration equivalent to half the concentration producing a 50% inhibition alone. All tested drugs produced rapid and readily reversible concentration-dependent inhibition. The 50% inhibitory concentration values were 889 micromol/L (95% CI: 711-1214 micromol). 33.4 micromol (95% CI: 27.1-41.7 nmol) and 9.2 nmol (95% CI: 7.9-12.3 nmol) for isoflurane. rocuranium and vecuronium, respectively. Coapplication of isoflurane significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of rocuranium and vecuronium, and it was especially so at low concentration of NMDRs. Isoflurane increases the potency of NDMRs, possibly by enhancing antagonist affinity at the receptor site.

  17. Alpha Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions such as high blood pressure and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Find out more about this class of medication. ... these conditions: High blood pressure Enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia) Though alpha blockers are commonly used to treat ...

  18. Beta Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Beta blockers, also called beta-adrenergic blocking agents, treat a variety of conditions, such as high blood pressure and migraines. Find out more about this ...

  19. The anthelmintic pyrantel acts as a low efficacious agonist and an open-channel blocker of mammalian acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, D; De Rosa, M J; Spitzmaul, G; Bouzat, C

    2001-08-01

    Pyrantel is an anthelmintic which acts as an agonist of nicotinic receptors (AChRs) of nematodes and exerts its therapeutic effects by depolarizing their muscle membranes. Here we explore at the single-channel level the action of pyrantel at mammalian muscle AChR. AChR currents are elicited by pyrantel. However, openings do not appear in clearly identifiable clusters over a range of pyrantel concentrations (1-300 microM). The mean open time decreases as a function of concentration, indicating an additional open-channel block. Single-channel recordings in the presence of high ACh concentrations and pyrantel demonstrate that the anthelmintic acts as a high-affinity open-channel blocker. When analyzed in terms of a sequential blocking scheme, the calculated forward rate constant for the blocking process is 8x10(7) M(-1) x s(-1), the apparent dissociation constant is 8 microM at a membrane potential of -70 mV and the process is voltage dependent. Pyrantel displaces alpha-bungarotoxin binding but the concentration dependence of equilibrium binding is shifted towards higher concentrations with respect to that of ACh binding. Thus, by acting at the binding site pyrantel activates mammalian AChRs with low efficacy, and by sterical blockade of the pore, the activated channels are then rapidly inhibited.

  20. Cardiovascular risk reduction in hypertension: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers. Where are we up to?

    PubMed

    Sindone, A; Erlich, J; Lee, C; Newman, H; Suranyi, M; Roger, S D

    2016-03-01

    Previously, management of hypertension has concentrated on lowering elevated blood pressure. However, the target has shifted to reducing absolute cardiovascular (CV) risk. It is estimated that two in three Australian adults have three or more CV risk factors at the same time. Moderate reductions in several risk factors can, therefore, be more effective than major reductions in one. When managing hypertension, therapy should be focused on medications with the strongest evidence for CV event reduction, substituting alternatives only when a primary choice is not appropriate. Hypertension management guidelines categorise angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) interchangeably as first-line treatments in uncomplicated hypertension. These medications have different mechanisms of action and quite different evidence bases. They are not interchangeable and their prescription should be based on clinical evidence. Despite this, currently ARB prescriptions are increasing at a higher rate than those for ACEI and other antihypertensive classes. Evidence that ACEI therapy prevents CV events and death, in patients with coronary artery disease or multiple CV risk factors, emerged from the European trial on reduction of cardiac events with perindopril in stable coronary artery disease (EUROPA) and Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) trials respectively. The consistent benefit has been demonstrated in meta-analyses. The clinical trial data for ARB are less consistent, particularly regarding CV outcomes and mortality benefit. The evidence supports the use of ACEI (Class 1a) compared with ARB despite current prescribing trends.

  1. The putative (pro)renin receptor blocker HRP fails to prevent (pro)renin signaling.

    PubMed

    Feldt, Sandra; Maschke, Ulrike; Dechend, Ralf; Luft, Friedrich C; Muller, Dominik N

    2008-04-01

    The prorenin/renin receptor is a recently discovered component of the renin-angiotensin system. The effects of aliskiren, a direct inhibitor of human renin, were compared with the handle region decoy peptide (HRP), which blocks the prorenin/renin receptor, in double-transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes. After 7 wk, all aliskiren-treated rats were alive, whereas mortality was 40% in vehicle-treated and 58% in HRP-treated rats. Aliskiren but not the HRP reduced BP and normalized albuminuria, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, a marker of renal tubular damage, to the levels of nontransgenic controls. In vitro, human renin and prorenin induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, independent of angiotensin II (AngII), in vascular smooth muscle cells. Preincubation with the HRP or aliskiren did not prevent renin- and prorenin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, whereas the MAP kinase kinase (MEK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 prevented both. In conclusion, renin inhibition but not treatment with the HRP protects against AngII-induced renal damage in double-transgenic rats. In addition, the in vitro data do not support the use of the HRP to block AngII-independent prorenin- or renin-mediated effects.

  2. Aldosterone and the conquest of land.

    PubMed

    Colombo, L; Dalla Valle, L; Fiore, C; Armanini, D; Belvedere, P

    2006-04-01

    The sequence of the phylogenetic events that preceded the appearance of aldosterone in vertebrates is described, starting from the ancestral conversion of cytochrome P450s from oxygen detoxification to xenobiotic detoxification and synthesis of oxygenated endobiotics with useful functions in intercellular signalling, such as steroid hormones. At the end of the Silurian period [438-408 million yr ago, (Mya)], a complete set of cytochrome P450s for corticoid synthesis was presumably already available, except for mitochondrial cytochrome P450c18 or aldosterone synthase encoded by CYP11B2. This gene arose by duplication of the CYP11B gene in the sarcopterygian or lobe-finned fish/tetrapod line after its divergence from the actinopterygian or ray-finned fish line 420 Mya, but before the beginning of the colonization of land by tetrapods in the late Devonian period, around 370 Mya. The fact that aldosterone is already present in Dipnoi, which occupy an evolutionary transition between water- and air-breathing but are fully aquatic, suggests that the role of this steroid was to potentiate the corticoid response to hypoxia, rather than to prevent dehydration out of the water. In terrestrial amphibians, there is no differentiation between the secretion rates and gluco- and mineralocorticoid effects of aldosterone and corticosterone. In sauropsids, plasma aldosterone concentrations are much lower than in amphibians, but regulation of salt/water balance is dependent upon both aldosterone and corticosterone, though sometimes with opposed actions. In terrestrial mammals, aldosterone acquires a specific mineralocorticoid function, because its interaction with the mineralocorticoid receptor is protected by the coexpression of the enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, which inactivates both cortisol and corticosterone. There is evidence that aldosterone can be also synthesized extra-adrenally in brain neurons and cardiac myocytes, which lack this protection and where

  3. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalov, Emil; Jones, Susan M.; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Snell, Lawrence D.; Elliott, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2) and tolvaptan (V2) are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke. Methods Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan) or orally (tolvaptan) for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS), plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC) and Evans Blue (EB) extravasation index were evaluated at the end point. Results Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle) to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle). Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle) to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05). Conclusion Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke. PMID:26275173

  4. Unmasking the functions of the chromaffin cell α7 nicotinic receptor by using short pulses of acetylcholine and selective blockers

    PubMed Central

    López, Manuela G.; Montiel, Carmen; Herrero, Carlos J.; García-Palomero, Esther; Mayorgas, Inés; Hernández-Guijo, Jesús M.; Villarroya, M.; Olivares, Román; Gandía, Luis; McIntosh, J. Michael; Olivera, Baldomero M.; García, Antonio G.

    1998-01-01

    Methyllycaconitine (MLA), α-conotoxin ImI, and α-bungarotoxin inhibited the release of catecholamines triggered by brief pulses of acetylcholine (ACh) (100 μM, 5 s) applied to fast-superfused bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, with IC50s of 100 nM for MLA and 300 nM for α-conotoxin ImI and α-bungarotoxin. MLA (100 nM), α-conotoxin ImI (1 μM), and α-bungarotoxin (1 μM) halved the entry of 45Ca2+ stimulated by 5-s pulses of 300 μM ACh applied to incubated cells. These supramaximal concentrations of α7 nicotinic receptor blockers depressed by 30% (MLA), 25% (α-bungarotoxin), and 50% (α-conotoxin ImI) the inward current generated by 1-s pulses of 100 μM ACh, applied to voltage-clamped chromaffin cells. In Xenopus oocytes expressing rat brain α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor for acetylcholine nAChR, the current generated by 1-s pulses of ACh was blocked by MLA, α-conotoxin ImI, and α-bungarotoxin with IC50s of 0.1 nM, 100 nM, and 1.6 nM, respectively; the current through α3β4 nAChR was unaffected by α-conotoxin ImI and α-bungarotoxin, and weakly blocked by MLA (IC50 = 1 μM). The functions of controlling the electrical activity, the entry of Ca2+, and the ensuing exocytotic response of chromaffin cells were until now exclusively attributed to α3β4 nAChR; the present results constitute the first evidence to support a prominent role of α7 nAChR in controlling such functions, specially under the more physiological conditions used here to stimulate chromaffin cells with brief pulses of ACh. PMID:9826675

  5. Aldosterone and Renin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidney (renal vein renin levels). If the value is significantly higher in one side, this indicates where the narrowing of the artery is present. Low aldosterone (hypoaldosteronism) usually occurs as part of ...

  6. Snooker Structure-Based Pharmacophore Model Explains Differences in Agonist and Blocker Binding to Bitter Receptor hTAS2R39

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Wibke S. U.; Sanders, Marijn P. A.; van Buren, Leo; Gouka, Robin J.; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Ritschel, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The human bitter taste receptor hTAS2R39 can be activated by many dietary (iso)flavonoids. Furthermore, hTAS2R39 activity can be blocked by 6-methoxyflavanones, 4’-fluoro-6-methoxyflavanone in particular. A structure-based pharmacophore model of the hTAS2R39 binding pocket was built using Snooker software, which has been used successfully before for drug design of GPCRs of the rhodopsin subfamily. For the validation of the model, two sets of compounds, both of which contained actives and inactives, were used: (i) an (iso)flavonoid-dedicated set, and (ii) a more generic, structurally diverse set. Agonists were characterized by their linear binding geometry and the fact that they bound deeply in the hTAS2R39 pocket, mapping the hydrogen donor feature based on T5.45 and N3.36, analogues of which have been proposed to play a key role in activation of GPCRs. Blockers lack hydrogen-bond donors enabling contact to the receptor. Furthermore, they had a crooked geometry, which could sterically hinder movement of the TM domains upon receptor activation. Our results reveal characteristics of hTAS2R39 agonist and bitter blocker binding, which might facilitate the development of blockers suitable to counter the bitterness of dietary hTAS2R39 agonists in food applications. PMID:25729848

  7. Debate: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers--a gap in evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen G; White, William B

    2003-05-22

    In this article, 2 leading physicians debate the strength of outcome data on the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renovascular events. Dr. Stephen G. Ball notes that the efficacy of ACE inhibitors for reducing the risk for myocardial infarction independent of their effects on blood pressure is controversial. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, ramipril treatment in high-risk patients was associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for myocardial infarction; mean reduction in blood pressure was 3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and 1 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The HOPE investigators propose that the 20% reduction was much greater than would be expected based on the observed blood pressure reduction. However, a meta-regression analysis of blood pressure reduction in >20 antihypertensive therapy outcome trials found that the reduction in myocardial infarction risk with ramipril observed in HOPE was consistent with the modest blood pressure reduction seen with that agent. Nevertheless, there are convincing data for prevention of myocardial infarction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, including those with heart failure after myocardial infarction, as well as supportive evidence from studies in patients with diabetes mellitus and concomitant hypertension. On the other hand, Dr. William B. White takes the position that ARBs are well-tolerated antihypertensive agents that specifically antagonize the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and provide a more complete block of the pathologic effects of angiotensin II-which are mediated via the AT(1) receptor-than ACE inhibitors. The Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE) II study and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (ValHeFT) suggest that ARBs reduce the risk for mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. The Losartan

  8. Evaluation of the serotonin receptor blocker methiothepin in broilers injected intravenously with lipopolysaccharide and microparticles.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M E; Wideman, R F

    2006-12-01

    There has been considerable interest in the role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension due to episodes of primary pulmonary hypertension in humans linked to serotoninergic appetite-suppressant drugs. In this study, we investigated the effect of 5-HT on the development of pulmonary hypertension induced by injecting bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) and cellulose microparticles intravenously, using the nonselective 5-HT(1/2)receptor, antagonist methiothepin. In Experiment 1, broilers selected for ascites susceptibility or resistance under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia were treated with methiothepin or saline, followed by injection of LPS, while recording pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). In Experiment 2 ascites-susceptible broilers were treated with methiothepin or saline, followed by injection of cellulose microparticles, while recording PAP. In Experiment 3, an i.v. microparticle injection dose shown to cause 50% mortality was injected into ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant broilers after methiothepin or saline treatment. Injecting methiothepin reduced PAP below baseline values in ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant broilers, suggesting a role for 5-HT in maintaining the basal tone of the pulmonary vasculature in broilers. Injecting microparticles into the wing vein had no affect on the PAP in the broilers treated with methiothepin, suggesting that 5-HT is an important mediator in the pulmonary hypertensive response of broilers to microparticles. Furthermore, injecting an 50% lethal dose of microparticles into ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant broilers pretreated with methiothepin resulted in reduced mortality. Serotonin appears to play a less prominent role in the pulmonary hypertensive response of broilers to intravenously injected LPS, indicating that other mediators within the innate response to inflammatory stimuli may also be involved. These results are consistent with our

  9. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109(TM3), Phe182(ECL2), Gln257(TM6), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108(TM3), Ser109(TM3), Ala163(TM4), Phe182(ECL2), Lys199(TM5), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R.

  10. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Node, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109TM3, Phe182ECL2, Gln257TM6, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108TM3, Ser109TM3, Ala163TM4, Phe182ECL2, Lys199TM5, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. PMID:26121982

  11. Identification of ghrelin receptor blocker, D-[Lys3] GHRP-6 as a CXCR4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kalpesh; Dixit, Vishwa Deep; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jie Wan; Schaffer, Eric M; Nguyen, Dzung; Taub, Dennis D

    2012-01-01

    [D-Lys3]-Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6 (DLS) is widely utilized in vivo and in vitro as a selective ghrelin receptor (GHS-R) antagonist. Unexpectedly, we identified that DLS also has the ability to block CXCL12 binding and activity through CXCR4 on T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Moreover, as CXCR4 has been shown to act as a major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into CD4 positive host cells, we have also found that DLS partially blocks CXCR4-mediated HIV-1 entry and propagation in activated human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that DLS is not the specific and selective antagonist as thought for GHS-R1a and appears to have additional effects on the CXCR4 chemokine receptor. Our findings also suggest that structural analogues that mimic DLS binding properties may also have properties of blocking HIV infectivity, CXCR4 dependent cancer cell migration and attenuating chemokine-mediated immune cell trafficking in inflammatory disorders.

  12. A Pilot Study on the Effect of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers on Platelet Aggregation in Hypertensive Patients- A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sanji, Narendranath; Kamath, Pallavi Mahadeva; Devendrappa, Srinivas Lokikere; Hanumanthareddy, Shashikala Gowdara; Maniyar, Imran; Rudrappa, Suresh Surappla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Thrombosis is an invariable component contributing to cardiovascular events in patients with hypertension. One of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease is increased platelet activity. One among the widely used antihypertensive agents are Angiotensin II type 1 Receptor Blockers (ARBs). Even though there are many studies involving antihypertensive agents, their antithrombotic properties remain elusive and not fully characterized. Aim To evaluate the anti-aggregatory effect of ARBs on platelets in-vivo. Materials and Methods A total of 60 subjects were included in this observational pilot study conducted in the medicine out patient department of JJM Hospital, Davanagere, Karnataka, India. Among them, 30 patients with essential hypertension attending Medicine OPD of a tertiary care hospital, who were on ARB for at least one month, were enrolled into study group. The control group consisted of 30 normotensive subjects who were not on any drug affecting platelet function. The Bleeding Time (BT) was evaluated for both the groups using Duke method of BT estimation. Data was analysed using SPSS software version 20. The test group was compared with control group using student’s unpaired t-test. Results The mean BT of study group was 2.488 minutes ± 0.0361 Standard Error of Mean (SEM) and that of control group was 1.998 minutes ± 0.0362 SEM. The result was statistically significant (p<0.001). The average duration of treatment was 2.933 years. Conclusion ARB have antiplatelet activity. Increase in BT in ARB group when compared with that of control group is a reflection of antiplatelet activity. PMID:28050394

  13. Aliskiren in Patients Failing to Achieve Blood Pressure Targets With Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Elizabeth B.; Ling, Hua; Burns, Tammy L.; Mooss, Aryan N.; Hilleman, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess the efficacy of aliskiren in patients failing to reach blood pressure (BP) goals with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). Methods A total of 107 patients who failed to reach BP goals on ACEI or ARB were switched to aliskiren. Changes in BP were determined during maximal ACEI, ARB, or aliskiren therapy. Results Mean reduction in sBP and dBP with ACEI was 8.5 ± 6.3 mmHg and 6.0 ± 4.7 mmHg, respectively. Mean reduction in sBP and dBP with ARB was 8.3 ± 6.7 mmHg and 5.0 ± 5.2 mmHg, respectively. Mean reduction in sBP and dBP with aliskiren 150 mg/d was 6.7 ± 5.4 mmHg and 5.4 ± 4.8 mmHg, respectively. Mean reduction in sBP and dBP with aliskiren 300 mg/d was 8.6 ± 6.3 mmHg and 6.0 ± 4.9 mmHg, respectively. BP reductions between ACEI, ARB, and aliskiren were not significantly different. Conclusions Aliskiren is ineffective in patients failing ACEI or ARB therapy. Given the label changes restricting the use of aliskiren in combination with ACEI and ARB, excess cost compared to ACEI and ARB, and a paucity of outcome data, there is a limited role for aliskiren in practice.

  14. ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in IgA nephropathy with mild proteinuria: the ACEARB study.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Claudio; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Casartelli, Donatella; Pozzoni, Pietro; Andrulli, Simeone; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Locatelli, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have investigated IgA nephropathy patients presenting with 'favorable' clinical features at onset, such as normal renal function, proteinuria<1 g/24 hours and the absence of hypertension, and no controlled clinical trials have tested the effects of treatment in such patients who may nevertheless develop end-stage renal disease. It is therefore important to find a well-tolerated and economic therapy capable of decreasing their risk of high proteinuria and blood pressure levels. The aim of this multicenter open-label randomized clinical trial is to test whether blocking the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) decreases the risk of progression in patients aged 3-60 years with biopsy-proven benign IgA glomerulonephritis, proteinuria levels of 0.3-0.9 g/24 hours, and normal renal function and blood pressure. The RAS is blocked by first using a single drug class (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker), and then combining the 2 classes as soon as the 1-drug blockade has become ineffective. We plan to enroll 378 patients over the next 3 years and randomize them to receive ramipril 5 mg/day (3 mg/m2 in children) (group A), irbesartan 300 mg/day (175 mg/m 2 in children) (group B) or supportive therapy (group C); if an increase in proteinuria of at least 50% from baseline is detected after 6 months of treatment, the other RAS inhibitor will be added. The observation period will be at least 5 years (except in the case of the development of the primary end point).

  15. Antihypertensive efficacy of the angiotensin receptor blocker azilsartan medoxomil compared with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril

    PubMed Central

    Bönner, G; Bakris, G L; Sica, D; Weber, M A; White, W B; Perez, A; Cao, C; Handley, A; Kupfer, S

    2013-01-01

    Drug therapy often fails to control hypertension. Azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) is a newly developed angiotensin II receptor blocker with high efficacy and good tolerability. This double-blind, controlled, randomised trial compared its antihypertensive efficacy and safety vs the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril (RAM) in patients with clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) 150–180 mm Hg. Patients were randomised (n=884) to 20 mg AZL-M or 2.5 mg RAM once daily for 2 weeks, then force-titrated to 40 or 80 mg AZL-M or 10 mg RAM for 22 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in trough, seated, clinic SBP. Mean patient age was 57±11 years, 52.4% were male, 99.5% were Caucasian. Mean baseline BP was 161.1±7.9/94.9±9.0 mm Hg. Clinic SBP decreased by 20.6±0.95 and 21.2±0.95 mm Hg with AZL-M 40 and 80 mg vs12.2±0.95 mm Hg with RAM (P<0.001 for both AZL-M doses). Adverse events leading to discontinuation were less frequent with AZL-M 40 and 80 mg (2.4% and 3.1%, respectively) than with RAM (4.8%). These data demonstrated that treatment of stage 1–2 hypertension with AZL-M was more effective than RAM and better tolerated. PMID:23514842

  16. Initial reduction of oxidative stress by angiotensin receptor blocker contributes long term outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Tadanori; Takehara, Naofumi; Sumitomo, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Toshiharu; Ishii, Yoshinao; Kato, Jun-ichi; Kawabe, Jun-ichi; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: It remains unclear whether administration of ARB with reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging effects improves the prognosis of patients undergoing PCI. Objectives: This study investigated whether the pre-intervention antioxidant effect of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) affects long-term outcomes in patients after successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) without early adverse events. Methods: Fifty-two patients who underwent elective PCI were randomly assigned for treatment with or without ARB, which was administered within 48 hours before PCI. ROS levels in mononuclear cells (MNCs) and serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured pre-PCI and 6 months post-PCI. After exclusion of unexpected early adverse events during angiographic follow-up period, the long-term outcome (major adverse cerebro-cardiovascular event; MACCE) was assessed in eligible patients. Results: Forty-three patients (non-ARB n = 22, ARB n = 21) were followed up in this study. During angiographic follow-up period, ROS formation in MNCs was significantly increased in the non-ARB group (from 29.4 [21.6-35.2] to 37.2 [30.7-45.1] arbitrary units; p = 0.031) compared to that in the ARB group. Meanwhile, SOD activity was significantly impaired in the non-ARB group alone (from 24.0 ± 17.0 to 16.3 ± 13.8%, p = 0.004). During the follow-up period (median, 63.3 months), MACCEs were observed in 6 patients. The cumulative event ratio of MACCE was significantly higher in the non-ARB group than in the ARB group (p = 0.018). Conclusions: Concomitant administration of ARB effectively reduced ROS production of PCI patients during angiographic follow-up period. Initial ROS inhibition following ARB administration may contribute to improvement of worse outcomes in patients who have undergone successful PCI. PMID:25628957

  17. The renal protective effect of angiotensin receptor blockers depends on intra-individual response variation in multiple risk markers

    PubMed Central

    Schievink, Bauke; de Zeeuw, Dick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are renoprotective and targeted to blood pressure. However, ARBs have multiple other (off-target) effects which may affect renal outcome. It is unknown whether on-target and off-target effects are congruent within individuals. If not, this variation in short term effects may have important implications for the prediction of individual long term renal outcomes. Our aim was to assess intra-individual variability in multiple parameters in response to ARBs in type 2 diabetes. Methods Changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), albuminuria, potassium, haemoglobin, cholesterol and uric acid after 6 months of losartan treatment were assessed in the RENAAL database. Improvement in predictive performance of renal outcomes (ESRD or doubling serum creatinine) for each individual using ARB-induced changes in all risk markers was assessed by the relative integrative discrimination index (RIDI). Results SBP response showed high variability (mean –5.7 mmHg, 5th to 95th percentile –36.5 to +24.0 mmHg) between individuals. Changes in off-target parameters also showed high variability between individuals. No congruency was observed between responses to losartan in multiple parameters within individuals. Using individual responses in all risk markers significantly improved renal risk prediction (RIDI 30.4%, P < 0.01) compared with using only SBP changes. Results were successfully replicated in two independent trials with irbesartan, IDNT and IRMA-2. Conclusions In this post hoc analysis we showed that ARBs have multiple off-target effects which vary between and within individuals. Combining all ARB-induced responses beyond SBP provides a more accurate prediction of who will benefit from ARB therapy. Prospective trials are required to validate these findings. PMID:25872610

  18. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in the treatment of hypertension: should they be used together?

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Paolo; Angeli, Fabio; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Reboldi, Gianpaolo

    2010-11-01

    The combined use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) poses a dilemma to clinicians. On the one hand, indirect evidence from compelling, but still surrogate outcome measures such as blood pressure and proteinuria suggest some merits of this combination. On the other hand, the outcome benefits of the ACEIs+ARBs combination in morbidity/mortality trials remain confined to patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and reduced ejection fraction. Incidentally, most of the benefit offered by the ACEIs+ARBs combination in these patients was not driven by mortality, but by fewer rehospitalizations for CHF. Even in patients with renal disease and proteinuria, the combined use of ACEIs and ARBs, although highly effective in reducing urinary protein excretion, has not yet been proven to significantly delay end-stage renal disease and the need for dialysis. In the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and In Combination With Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET), the dual blockade of the renin angiotensin system did not produce additional outcome benefit over that afforded by ACE inhibition alone. Notably, however, patients with BP >160/100 mmHg at entry were excluded from ONTARGET, thus limiting the applicability of these results to the treatment of hypertension. The European Society of Hypertension guidelines do not suggest large-scale use of the ACEIs+ARBs combination in patients with hypertension. However, patients with resistant hypertension, particularly if proteinuria coexists, could benefit from this combination, which however requires close monitoring for adverse events, including hyperkalemia and worsening renal function.

  19. Impact of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockers on fractional flow reserve and index of microvascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Emanuele; Sarno, Giovanna; Berza, Catalina Trana; Di Gioia, Giuseppe; Bartunek, Jozef; Vanderheyden, Marc; Di Serafino, Luigi; Wijns, William; Trimarco, Bruno; De Bruyne, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the effect of β- and α-adrenergic blockers on fractional flow reserve (FFR) and index of microvascular resistance (IMR). In 43 patients (pts) with intermediate stenoses, we measured FFR and IMR before and after nonselective β-blocker propranolol (30 μg/kg, n = 20) and selective β1-blocker metoprolol (40 μg/kg, n = 23) IC; (b) In additional 21 pts after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), FFR and IMR were measured before and after α-blocker phentolamine (3 mg) IC. Neither propranolol nor metoprolol changed values of FFR and IMR. Phentolamine slightly decreased FFR (from 0.88 ± 0.05 to 0.87 ± 0.06, p = 0.025) but did not change IMR. FFR decreased from >0.80 to ≤0.80 in 3 pts (14%), but in none, the value decreased to <0.75. β-blockers do not affect FFR and IMR in intermediate stenoses. After PCI, a mild decrease in FFR occurs after α-blockers, though of limited clinical impact.

  20. Estrogen receptor-β in the paraventricular nucleus and rostroventrolateral medulla plays an essential protective role in aldosterone/salt-induced hypertension in female rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Zhang, Zhongming; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Ralph F; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2013-06-01

    The identification of the specific estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes that are involved in estrogen protection from hypertension and their specific locations in the central nervous system is critical to our understanding and design of effective estrogen replacement therapies in women. Using selective ER agonists and recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying small interference (si) RNA to silence either ERα (AAV-siRNA-ERα) or ERβ (AAV-siRNA-ERβ), the present study investigated regional specificity of different ER subtypes in the protective actions of estrogen in aldosterone (Aldo)-induced hypertension. Intracerebroventricular infusions of either diarylpropionitrile, a selective ERβ agonist, or propyl-pyrazole-triol, a selective ERα agonist, attenuated Aldo/NaCl-induced hypertension in ovariectomized rats. In contrast, intracerebroventricular injections of siRNA-ERα or siRNA-ERβ augmented Aldo-induced hypertension in intact females. Site-specific paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or rostroventrolateral medulla (RVLM) injections of siRNA-ERβ augmented Aldo-induced hypertension. However, rats with PVN or RVLM injections of siRNA-ERα did not significantly increase blood pressure induced by Aldo. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of the PVN and RVLM of siRNA-injected rat confirmed a marked reduction in the expression of ERα and ERβ. In cultured PVN neurons, silencing either ERα or ERβ by culturing PVN neurons with siRNA-ERα or siRNA-ERβ enhanced Aldo-induced reactive oxygen species production. Ganglionic blockade after Aldo infusion showed an increase in sympathetic activity in ERβ knockdown rats. These results indicate that both PVN and RVLM ERβ, but not ERα in these nuclei, contribute to the protective effects of estrogen against Aldo-induced hypertension. The brain regions responsible for the protective effects of estrogen interaction with ERα in Aldo-induced hypertension still need to be determined.

  1. Renoprotective effects of the L-/T-type calcium channel blocker benidipine in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2013-05-01

    The renoprotective effects of benidipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB) developed in Japan, are reviewed herein. Benidipine has a sustained antihypertensive effect independent of its blood concentration since it binds to dihydropyridine (DHP) receptors via a "membrane approach" (approach to the cell membrane followed by long retention at the DHP binding site). Benidipine dilates glomerular afferent and efferent arterioles equally through inhibition of Ttype Ca channels. Thus, it may cause a decrease of intraglomerular pressure and is superior to CCBs (capable of inhibiting only L-type Ca channels) in terms of suppression of proteinuria. Additionally, benidipine suppresses worsening of renal function more powerfully than CCBs (suppressing only L-type Ca channels), allowing better prognosis as to renal function. The inhibitory effect of benidipine on T-type calcium channels results in the suppression of aldosterone formation in the adrenal glands and of oxidative stress induced by aldosterone. Thus, the aldosterone-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of benidipine mediated by inhibition of T-type calcium channels would result in renoprotection and suppression of disease progression in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). If such patients have proteinuria, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors are used as first-line drugs, but benidipine, as an L-/T-type CCB, is recommended when they require some concomitant drugs. Moreover, the superiority of RAS inhibitors has not been demonstrated in hypertensive patients with CKD and without proteinuria. Thus, in such patients, benidipine should be considered as a first-line antihypertensive drug.

  2. New drug therapies interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Monge, Matthieu; Lorthioir, Aurélien; Bobrie, Guillaume; Azizi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    There is a persistent need for the development of new antihypertensive drugs, because the control of blood pressure is still not achievable in a significant proportion of hypertensive patients. Since the approval in 2007 of aliskiren, no other new antihypertensive based on new mechanism(s) of action have been approved. In fact, the development of promising novel drugs has been stopped for safety, efficacy or marketing reasons. Despite these difficulties, the pipeline is not dry and different new antihypertensive strategies targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway, are in clinical development stage. The dual angiotensin II receptor-neprilysin inhibitor LCZ696, a single molecule synthetized by cocrystallisation of valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug AHU377 is in development for resistant hypertension and for heart failure. Daglutril is a dual neprylisin-endothelin converting enzyme inhibitor which was shown to decrease BP in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Aldosterone synthase inhibitors and the third and fourth generation non-steroidal dihydropyridine based mineralocorticoid receptors blockers are new ways to target the multiple noxious effects of aldosterone in the kidney, vessels and heart. Centrally acting aminopeptidase A inhibitors block brain angiotensin III formation, one of the main effector peptides of the brain renin angiotensin system. However, a long time will be still necessary to evaluate extensively the efficacy and safety of these new approaches. In the mean time, using appropriate and personalized daily doses of available drugs, decreasing physician inertia, improving treatment adherence, improving access to healthcare and reducing treatment costs remain major objectives to reduce the incidence of resistant hypertension.

  3. Effects of the AT(1) receptor blocker losartan and the calcium channel blocker benidipine on the accumulation of lipids in the kidney of a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Nobukazu; Hongo, Makiko; Matsuzaki, Gen; Furuta, Kyoko; Saito, Kan; Sakurai, Ryota; Sakamoto, Aiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Nagai, Ryozo

    2010-03-01

    Unfavorable lipid accumulation may occur in the kidneys in the presence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether excess lipids would accumulate in the kidneys of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, an animal model of metabolic syndrome. From 34 weeks of age, OLETF rats were treated orally with a calcium channel blocker, benidipine (3 mg kg(-1) per day), or an AT1 receptor blocker, losartan (25 mg kg(-1) per day), for 8 weeks. Blood pressure was slightly but significantly higher in the untreated OLETF rats (149+/-4 mm Hg) than in Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (136+/-2 mm Hg), and both losartan (135+/-3 mm Hg) and benidipine (138+/-3 mm Hg) reduced blood pressure in OLETF rats to a level comparable to that in LETO rats. Tissue content of triglycerides (TG) was greater in OLETF rats than in LETO rats (6.24+/-3.77 and 2.85+/-1.32 microg mg(-1) x tissue, respectively), and both losartan and benidipine reduced these values. Histological analysis showed lipid droplets in tubular cells in which increased dihydroethidium fluorescence was present. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, PGC-1alpha and uncoupling protein-2 was found to be higher in OLETF rats than in LETO rats; however, the expression of these genes was not altered by treatment with either antihypertensive drug. In contrast, both losartan and benidipine increased the amount of total and phosphorylated forms of AMP kinase and the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1). In conclusion, treatment of OLETF rats with losartan and benidipine reduced the tissue content of TG, decreased the production of superoxide and regulated the expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation such as AMP-activated protein kinase and CPT-1 in the kidneys.

  4. JD-5006 and JD-5037: peripherally restricted (PR) cannabinoid-1 receptor blockers related to SLV-319 (Ibipinabant) as metabolic disorder therapeutics devoid of CNS liabilities.

    PubMed

    Chorvat, Robert J; Berbaum, Jennifer; Seriacki, Kristine; McElroy, John F

    2012-10-01

    Analogs of SLV-319 (Ibipinibant), a CB1 receptor inverse agonist, were synthesized with functionality intended to limit brain exposure while maintaining the receptor affinity and selectivity of the parent compound. Structure activity relationships of this series, and pharmacology of two lead compounds, 16 (JD-5006) and 23 (JD-5037) showing little brain presence as indicated by tissue distribution and receptor occupancy studies, are described. Effects with one of these compounds on plasma triglyceride levels, liver weight and enzymes, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity support the approach that blockade of peripheral CB(1) receptors is sufficient to produce many of the beneficial metabolic effects of globally active CB(1) blockers. Thus, PR CB(1) inverse agonists may indeed represent a safer alternative to highly brain-penetrant agents for the treatment of metabolic disorders, including diabetes, liver diseases, dyslipidemias, and obesity.

  5. Aldosterone Activates NF-κB in the Collecting Duct

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Valérie; De Seigneux, Sophie; Agassiz, Victor; Hasler, Udo; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Féraille, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Besides its classical effects on salt homeostasis in renal epithelial cells, aldosterone promotes inflammation and fibrosis and modulates cell proliferation. The proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB has been implicated in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and regulation of transepithelial sodium transport. The effect of aldosterone on the NF-κB pathway in principal cells of the cortical collecting duct, a major physiologic target of aldosterone, is unknown. Here, in both cultured cells and freshly isolated rat cortical collecting duct, aldosterone activated the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway, leading to increased expression of several NF-κB–targeted genes (IκBα, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, IL-1β, and IL-6). Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, a gene induced early in the response to aldosterone, but not pharmacologic inhibition of extracellular signal–regulated kinase and p38 kinase, attenuated aldosterone-induced NF-κB activation. Pharmacologic antagonism or knockdown of the mineralocorticoid receptor prevented aldosterone-induced NF-κB activity. In addition, activation of the glucocorticoid receptor inhibited the transactivation of NF-κB by aldosterone. In agreement with these in vitro findings, spironolactone prevented NF-κB–induced transcriptional activation observed in cortical collecting ducts of salt-restricted rats. In summary, aldosterone activates the canonical NF-κB pathway in principal cells of the cortical collecting duct by activating the mineralocorticoid receptor and by inducing SGK1. PMID:18987305

  6. Aldosterone and the cardiovascular system: a dangerous association.

    PubMed

    Cachofeiro, Victoria; López-Andrés, Natalia; Miana, Maria; Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; de Las Heras, Natalia; Martínez, Ernesto; Lahera, Vicente; Fortuño, María Antonia

    2010-12-01

    Initial studies have focussed on the actions of aldosterone in renal electrolyte handling and, as a consequence, blood pressure control. More recently, attention has primarily been focussed on its actions on the heart and vascular system, where it is locally produced. Aldosterone by binding mineralocorticoid receptors causes oxidative stress, fibrosis and triggers an inflammatory response in the cardiovascular system. All these effects could be underlying the role of aldo-sterone on cardiac and vascular remodelling associated with different pathological situations. At the vascular level, aldo-sterone affects endothelial function because administration of aldosterone to rats impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. In addition, the administration of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists ameliorates endothelium-dependent relaxation in models of both hypertension and atherosclerosis, and in patients with heart failure. Several mechanisms can participate in this effect, including production of vasoconstrictor factors and a reduction in nitric oxide levels. This reduction can involve both a decrease in its production as well as an increase in its degradation by reactive oxygen species. Aldosterone can produce oxidative stress by the activation of transcription factors such as the NF-κB system, which can also trigger an inflammatory process through the production of different cytokines. At cardiac level, high levels of aldosterone can also adversely impact heart function by producing cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction and electrical remodelling through changes in ionic channels. All these effects can explain the beneficial effect of mineralocorticoid blockade in the cardiovascular system.

  7. Genomic and rapid effects of aldosterone: what we know and do not know thus far.

    PubMed

    Hermidorff, Milla Marques; de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Isoldi, Mauro César

    2017-01-01

    Aldosterone is the most known mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal cortex. The genomic pathway displayed by aldosterone is attributed to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling. Even though the rapid effects displayed by aldosterone are long known, our knowledge regarding the receptor responsible for such event is still poor. It is intense that the debate whether the MR or another receptor-the "unknown receptor"-is the receptor responsible for the rapid effects of aldosterone. Recently, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1) was elegantly shown to mediate some aldosterone-induced rapid effects in several tissues, a fact that strongly places GPER-1 as the unknown receptor. It has also been suggested that angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) also participates in the aldosterone-induced rapid effects. Despite this open question, the relevance of the beneficial effects of aldosterone is clear in the kidneys, colon, and CNS as aldosterone controls the important water reabsorption process; on the other hand, detrimental effects displayed by aldosterone have been reported in the cardiovascular system and in the kidneys. In this line, the MR antagonists are well-known drugs that display beneficial effects in patients with heart failure and hypertension; it has been proposed that MR antagonists could also play an important role in vascular disease, obesity, obesity-related hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. Taken altogether, our goal here was to (1) bring a historical perspective of both genomic and rapid effects of aldosterone in several tissues, and the receptors and signaling pathways involved in such processes; and (2) critically address the controversial points within the literature as regarding which receptor participates in the rapid pathway display by aldosterone.

  8. H2 blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcer disease - H2 blockers; PUD - H2 blockers; Gastroesophageal reflux - H2 blockers ... blockers are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  9. Renal sodium transporter/channel expression and sodium excretion in P2Y2 receptor knockout mice fed a high-NaCl diet with/without aldosterone infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Listhrop, Raelene; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2011-03-01

    The P2Y(2) receptor (P2Y2-R) antagonizes sodium reabsorption in the kidney. Apart from its effect in distal nephron, hypothetically, P2Y(2)-R may modulate activity/abundances of sodium transporters/channel subunits along the nephron via antagonism of aldosterone or vasopressin or interaction with mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) or oxidative stress (OS). To determine the extent of the regulatory role of P2Y(2)-R in renal sodium reabsorption, in study 1, we fed P2Y(2)-R knockout (KO; n = 5) and wild-type (WT; n = 5) mice a high (3.15%)-sodium diet (HSD) for 14 days. Western blotting revealed significantly higher protein abundances for cortical and medullary bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), medullary α-1-subunit of Na-K-ATPase, and medullary α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in KO vs. WT mice. Molecular analysis of urine showed increased excretion of nitrates plus nitrites (NOx), PGE(2), and 8-isoprostane in the KO, relative to WT mice, supporting a putative role for these molecules in determining alterations of proteins involved in sodium transport along the nephron. To determine whether genotype differences in response to aldosterone might have played a role in these differences due to HSD, in study 2 aldosterone levels were clamped (by osmotic minipump infusion). Clamping aldosterone (with HSD) led to significantly impaired natriuresis with elevated Na/H exchanger isoform 3 in the cortex, and NKCC2 in the medulla, and modest but significantly lower levels of NKCC2, and α- and β-ENaC in the cortex of KO vs. WT mice. This was associated with significantly reduced urinary NOx in the KO, although PGE(2) and 8-isoprostane remained significantly elevated vs. WT mice. Taken together, our results suggest that P2Y(2)-R is an important regulator of sodium transporters along the nephron. Pre- or postreceptor differences in the response to aldosterone, perhaps mediated via prostaglandins or changes in

  10. Distinct properties of telmisartan on agonistic activities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ among clinically used angiotensin II receptor blockers: drug-target interaction analyses.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Hirotoshi; Kurosaki, Eiji; Niimi, Tatsuya; Gato, Katsuhiko; Kawasaki, Yuko; Suwa, Akira; Honbou, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Okumura, Hiroyuki; Sanagi, Masanao; Tomura, Yuichi; Orita, Masaya; Yonemoto, Takako; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    A proportion of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) improves glucose dyshomeostasis and insulin resistance in a clinical setting. Of these ARBs, telmisartan has the unique property of being a partial agonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). However, the detailed mechanism of how telmisartan acts on PPARγ and exerts its insulin-sensitizing effect is poorly understood. In this context, we investigated the agonistic activity of a variety of clinically available ARBs on PPARγ using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system. Based on physicochemical data, we then reevaluated the metabolically beneficial effects of telmisartan in cultured murine adipocytes. ITC and SPR assays demonstrated that telmisartan exhibited the highest affinity of the ARBs tested. Distribution coefficient and parallel artificial membrane permeability assays were used to assess lipophilicity and cell permeability, for which telmisartan exhibited the highest levels of both. We next examined the effect of each ARB on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. To investigate the impact on adipogenesis, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiated with each ARB in addition to standard inducers of differentiation for adipogenesis. Telmisartan dose-dependently facilitated adipogenesis and markedly augmented the mRNA expression of adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), accompanied by an increase in the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and protein expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). In contrast, other ARBs showed only marginal effects in these experiments. In accordance with its highest affinity of binding for PPARγ as well as the highest cell permeability, telmisartan superbly activates PPARγ among the ARBs tested, thereby providing a fresh avenue for treating hypertensive patients with metabolic derangement.

  11. Comparison of the antiproteinuric effects of the calcium channel blockers benidipine and amlodipine administered in combination with angiotensin receptor blockers to hypertensive patients with stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masanori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Maruyama, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2009-04-01

    Benidipine, an L- and T-type calcium channel blocker, dilates both efferent and afferent arterioles and reduces glomerular pressure. Thus, it may exert renoprotective effects. We conducted an open-labeled, randomized trial to compare the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect and antiproteinuric effect of benidipine with those of amlodipine in hypertensive patients with moderate-to-advanced-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) (stages 3-5). These patients were already being administered the current maximum recommended doses of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Patients with BP >or=140/90 mm Hg, despite treatment with the maximum recommended dose of ARBs, were randomly assigned to two groups. The patients received either of the following treatment regimens: 4 mg day(-1) of benidipine, which was increased up to a dose of 16 mg day(-1) (B group; n=24), and 2.5 mg day(-1) of amlodipine, which was increased up to a dose of 10 mg day(-1) amlodipine (A group; n=23). After 6 months of treatment, a significant and comparable reduction in the systolic and diastolic BP was seen in both groups. The decrease in the urinary protein to creatinine ratio in the B group was significantly lower than that in the A group. Benidipine exerted antiproteinuric effect to a greater extent than did amlodipine, even in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We conclude that the addition of benidipine, rather than amlodipine, ameliorates urinary protein excretion in hypertensive patients with CKD who are already being administered ARBs. Therefore, we propose a combination therapy with benidipine and ARBs, even for patients with moderate-to-advanced-stage CKD.

  12. Fixed-Dose Combinations of Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibitors and Calcium Channel Blockers in the Treatment of Hypertension: A Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fu-Chih; Tung, Ying-Chang; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of different regimens are recommended in guidelines for the treatment of hypertension. However, clinical studies comparing FDCs of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker (CCB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitor)/CCB in hypertensive patients are lacking.Using a propensity score matching of 4:1 ratio, this retrospective claims database study compared 2 FDC regimens, ARB/CCB and ACE inhibitor/CCB, in treating hypertensive patients with no known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. All patients were followed for at least 3 years or until the development of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) during the study period. In addition, the effect of medication adherence on clinical outcomes was evaluated in subgroup analysis based on different portions of days covered.There was no significant difference in MACE-free survival (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.50; P = 0.08) and survival free from hospitalization for heart failure (HR: 1.15; 95% CI: 082-1.61; P = 0.431), new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 071-1.36; P = 0.906), and initiation of dialysis (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 050-1.92; P = 0.965) between the 2 study groups. The results remained the same within each subgroup of patients with different adherence statuses.ARBs in FDC regimens with CCBs in the present study were shown to be as effective as ACE inhibitors at reducing the risks of MACEs, hospitalization for heart failure, new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease, and new initiation of dialysis in hypertensive patients, regardless of the medication adherence status.

  13. Effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers on the relationships between ambulatory blood pressure and anti-hypertensive effects, autonomic function, and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yasuko; Tamura, Kouichi; Masuda, Shinitirou; Ozawa, Motoko; Tochikubo, Osamu; Umemura, Satoshi

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationships between the anti-hypertensive effects, autonomic function, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) following treatment of hypertensive subjects with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in hypertensives. Nineteen patients with hypertension were assigned randomly to daily treatment with ARBs. After 16 weeks of treatment, blood pressure (BP) and 24 h the ratio of low frequency to high frequency component (LF/HF), an index of sympathovagal balance were decreased by ARBs. The HRQOL scores improved during the study. In this study, ARB therapy was associated with an improvement in BP, autonomic function, and HRQOL.

  14. The Impact Exerted on Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Chronic Heart Failure by Aldosterone Receptor Antagonists: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Cantatrione, Claudio; Mazzei, Damiana; Barone, Augusto; Maurea, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Background Aldosterone receptor antagonists (ARAs) have been associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFREF), but not in those with heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). With the aim to study this topic more deeply, we carried out a meta-analysis of selective and non-selective ARAs in HFREF and HFpEF. Methods We searched PubMed and Scopus databases. We decided to incorporate in the meta-analysis only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of ARAs in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) if they met the following criteria: experimental groups included patients with CHF treated with ARAs in addition to the conventional therapy; control groups included patients with CHF receiving conventional therapy without ARAs. Outcomes of interest were all-cause death, hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause, hyperkalemia, or gynecomastia. Results We detected 15 studies representing 15,671 patients. ARAs were associated with a reduced odds of all-cause death (odds ratio (OR): 0.79; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73 - 0.87) and hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause (OR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.61 - 0.89). However, subgroup analysis showed that these advantages were limited to HFREF (all-cause death: OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.69 - 0.84; hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause: OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.51 - 0.85), but they did not affect the HFpEF group (all-cause death: OR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.76 - 1.1; hospitalizations from cardiovascular cause: OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.7 - 1.09). ARAs increased the risk of hyperkalemia (OR: 2.17; 95% CI: 1.88 - 2.5). Non-selective ARAs, but not selective ARAs, increased the risk of gynecomastia (OR: 8.22, 95% CI: 4.9 - 13.81 vs. OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.43 - 1.27). Conclusions ARAs reduced the risk of adverse cardiac events in HFREF but not HFpEF. In particular, ARA use in HFpEF patients is questionable, since in this CHF type, no significant

  15. Placental growth factor mediates aldosterone-dependent vascular injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Iris Z; Newfell, Brenna G; Aronovitz, Mark; Mohammad, Najwa N; McGraw, Adam P; Perreault, Roger E; Carmeliet, Peter; Ehsan, Afshin; Mendelsohn, Michael E

    2010-11-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists reduce cardiovascular ischemia and mortality by unknown mechanisms. Aldosterone is a steroid hormone that signals through renal mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) to regulate blood pressure. MRs are expressed and regulate gene transcription in human vascular cells, suggesting that aldosterone might have direct vascular effects. Using gene expression profiling, we identify the pro-proliferative VEGF family member placental growth factor (PGF) as an aldosterone-regulated vascular MR target gene in mice and humans. Aldosterone-activated vascular MR stimulated Pgf gene transcription and increased PGF protein expression and secretion in the mouse vasculature. In mouse vessels with endothelial damage and human vessels from patients with atherosclerosis, aldosterone enhanced expression of PGF and its receptor, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1). In atherosclerotic human vessels, MR antagonists inhibited PGF expression. In vivo, aldosterone infusion augmented vascular remodeling in mouse carotids following wire injury, an effect that was lost in Pgf-/- mice. In summary, we have identified PGF as what we believe to be a novel downstream target of vascular MR that mediates aldosterone augmentation of vascular injury. These findings suggest a non-renal mechanism for the vascular protective effects of aldosterone antagonists in humans and support targeting the vascular aldosterone/MR/PGF/Flt1 pathway as a therapeutic strategy for ischemic cardiovascular disease.

  16. Effects of aldosterone on insulin sensitivity and secretion.

    PubMed

    Luther, James M

    2014-12-01

    Dr. Conn originally reported an increased risk of diabetes in patients with hyperaldosteronism in the 1950s, although the mechanism remains unclear. Aldosterone-induced hypokalemia was initially described to impair glucose tolerance by impairing insulin secretion. Correction of hypokalemia by potassium supplementation only partially restored insulin secretion and glucose tolerance, however. Aldosterone also impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated pancreatic islets via reactive oxygen species in a mineralocorticoid receptor-independent manner. Aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation also impairs insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and skeletal muscle. Aldosterone may produce insulin resistance secondarily by altering potassium, increasing inflammatory cytokines, and reducing beneficial adipokines such as adiponectin. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists reduce circulating aldosterone concentrations and also the risk of type 2 diabetes in clinical trials. These data suggest that primary and secondary hyperaldosteronism may contribute to worsening glucose tolerance by impairing insulin sensitivity or insulin secretion in humans. Future studies should define the effects of MR antagonists and aldosterone on insulin secretion and sensitivity in humans.

  17. Role of calcium in effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aldosterone production in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, L.; Schiffrin, E.L.

    1987-04-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits the stimulation of aldosterone secretion by isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells produced by angiotensin II (ANG II), ACTH, and potassium. The effect of ANP on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium on isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. In the presence of ANP the maximal response of aldosterone output stimulated by ANG II or potassium decreased and the half-maximum (EC/sub 50/) of the response to ACTH was displaced to the right. Because these effects resemble those of calcium-channel blockers, the authors investigated the effect of different concentrations of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium. Nifedipine produced effects similar to ANP. The maximal response of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II and potassium was decreased and the dose-response curve to ACTH was displaced to the right. ANP decreased the maximal response of aldosterone to the dihydropyridine derivative BAY K8644, a calcium-channel activator, without change in its EC/sub 50/. In contrast, nifedipine displaced the dose-response curve to BAY K8644 to the right as expected of a competitive inhibitor. The effect of ANP and nifedipine on basal and stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. ANP may act on the rat adrenal glomerulosa cells at least in part by interference with calcium entry.

  18. Outcomes of drug-based and surgical treatments for primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Olivier; Lorthioir, Aurelien; Zinzindohoue, Franck; Plouin, Pierre-François; Amar, Laurence

    2015-05-01

    Treatments for primary aldosteronism (PA) aim to correct or prevent the deleterious consequences of hyperaldosteronism: hypertension, hypokalemia, and direct target organ damage. Patients with unilateral PA considered fit for surgery can undergo laparoscopic adrenalectomy, which significantly decreases blood pressure (BP) and medications in most cases and cures hypertension in about 40%. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA) are used to treat patients with bilateral PA and those with unilateral PA if surgery is not possible or not desired. Spironolactone is more potent than eplerenone, but high doses are poorly tolerated in men. MRA can be replaced or complemented with epithelial sodium channel blockers, such as amiloride. Thiazide diuretics and calcium channel blockers are used when the first-line drugs are insufficient to control BP. Dietary sodium restriction should be implemented in all cases because the deleterious consequences of hyperaldosteronism are dependent on salt loading. Several studies comparing the results of surgery and MRA have reported no differences in terms of BP, serum potassium concentration, or cardiovascular and kidney outcomes, although the benefits of treatment tend to be observed sooner with surgery. Patients with PA display relative glomerular hyperfiltration, which is reversed by specific treatment, revealing CKD in 30% of patients. However, further kidney damage is lessened by the treatment of PA.

  19. Analysis of second- and third-line antihypertensive treatments after initial therapy with an angiotensin II receptor blocker using real-world Japanese data.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, Shinzo; Shimasaki, Yukio; Kikuchi, Takashi; Otsuka, Yujiro; Iwasaki, Kosuke; Ohishi, Mitsuru

    2016-12-01

    Combination therapy using two or three classes of drugs is often required to treat hypertension to prevent cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined combination therapies administered following initial therapy with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) in hypertensive Japanese patients. To determine which classes of antihypertensives are being prescribed as second- or third-line treatments for patients who were initially treated with a single ARB, we analyzed prescription claims data from two Japanese health-care databases for 2008 to 2015. Among the 26 998 patients who were initially treated with a single ARB (from one database), calcium channel blockers (CCBs) were the most frequently prescribed second-line antihypertensive, as these medicines were added for >20% of patients within 1 year of ARB prescription initiation. The addition rates of CCBs as a second-line therapy differed depending on the initial ARB type. In contrast, <10% of patients received a diuretic as a second-line antihypertensive. Among the 48 813 patients who were prescribed an ARB in combination with a CCB (as shown in the other database), diuretics were prescribed as third-line antihypertensives more frequently than increased doses of CCBs or ARBs. Diuretics were added for 8% of patients within 2 years of CCB addition, and the addition rates differed based on the CCB dose used for combination therapy. We also found that the addition rates of diuretics differed depending on patient clinical histories among ARB and CCB recipients.

  20. Translational Success Stories: Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Carlos M; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone exerts its best known sodium homeostasis actions by controlling sodium excretion at the level of the distal tubules via activation of the apical epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolateral Na+/K+ ATPase pump. Recently, this mineralocorticoid hormone has been demonstrated to act on the heart and blood vessels. Excess release of aldosterone in relation to the salt status induces both genomic and non-genomic effects that by promoting endothelial dysfunction, and vascular and cardio-renal adverse remodeling, contribute to the target organ damage found in hypertension, heart failure, myocardial infarction and chronic renal failure. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockers have been shown to be highly effective in resistant hypertension and to slow down heart failure progression, and in experimental animals, the development of atherosclerosis. Blockade of the action of aldosterone and potentially other mineralocorticoid steroids has been increasingly demonstrated to be an extremely beneficial therapy in different forms of cardiovascular disease. This review provides a summary of the knowledge that exists regarding aldosterone actions in the cardiovascular system and, in providing the translational impact of this knowledge to the clinical arena, illustrates how much more needs to be achieved in exploring the use of mineralocorticoid receptor blockers in less advanced stages of heart, renal, and vascular disease. PMID:25552697

  1. Identification and characterization of the protein components of the skeletal muscle receptor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca sup 2+ channel blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    In these studies, photoaffinity labeling and immunolabeling approaches were used to identify and characterize components of the skeletal muscle receptor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers. The 1,4-dihydropyridine receptor purified from rabbit skeletal muscle consists of proteins of 175,000, 170,000, 52,000, and 32,000 Da when analyzed by SDS-PAGE under nonreducing conditions and stained with Coomassie Blue dye. After reduction of disulfide bonds, the 175,000 Da protein shifts in apparent molecular mass to 150,000 Da. Photoaffinity labeling using the dihydropyridine ligands ({sup 3}H)azidopine and ({sup 3}H)PN200-110 identified a protein of 170,000 Da as the dihydropyridine binding component of the receptor. Specific polyclonal antibodies were developed against both the nonreduced and reduced forms of the 175/150,000 and 32,000 Da proteins and were used to show that the 150,000 and 32,000 Da proteins are distinct from each other and from other components of the receptor and that they copurify with the 170,000 Da protein at each step of purification. In addition, monoclonal antibodies against the 170,000 and 52,000 Da polypeptides were shown to coimmunoprecipitate the 150,000 and 32,000 Da polypeptides from solubilized skeletal muscle triads.

  2. In vivo imaging of oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice and its normalization by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker

    SciTech Connect

    Sonta, Toshiyo; Inoguchi, Toyoshi . E-mail: toyoshi@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yasukawa, Keiji; Inuo, Mieko; Tsubouchi, Hirotaka; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Utsumi, Hideo; Nawata, Hajime

    2005-05-06

    This study was undertaken to evaluate oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice by electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging technique. Oxidative stress in the kidney was evaluated as organ-specific reducing activity with the signal decay rates of carbamoyl-PROXYL probe using ESR imaging. The signal decay rates were significantly faster in corresponding image pixels of the kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice than in those of controls. This technique further demonstrated that administration of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/kg), completely restored the signal decay rates in the diabetic kidneys to control values. In conclusion, this study provided for the first time the in vivo evidence for increased oxidative stress in the kidneys of diabetic mice and its normalization by ARB as evaluated by ESR imaging. This technique would be useful as a means of further elucidating the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Aldosterone and volume management in hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2014-05-01

    Aldosterone-receptor antagonists dose-dependently reduce both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone. These compounds are used commonly in the treatment of hypertension, with or without aldosteronism, and in the volume-overload periods of various forms of heart failure, cirrhosis, and renal failure. In this regard, the relevant site of action for these compounds is compartmentalized to the distal nephron. The cardiac benefits of aldosterone-receptor blockade now are sufficiently well established to warrant routine use of these compounds for their survival benefits in moderate to advanced stages of heart failure. Aldosterone-receptor antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone commonly are used in the treatment of resistant forms of hypertension. Spironolactone, but not eplerenone, is a commonly used add-on diuretic that provides incremental benefit for salt-and-water excretion in excess of what may be seen with a loop diuretic given together with a thiazide-type diuretic. The dose-response relationship for natriuresis with spironolactone has not been explored completely as to its combination therapy responses. The quite high doses of spironolactone used in patients with cirrhosis and ascites would infer that the overall treatment effect with this compound exceeds simple receptor blockade and may include a nervous system effect that operationally reduces renal sympathetic nerve traffic. The adverse electrolyte and renal function side effects with aldosterone-receptor antagonists are not uncommon in at-risk patients, such as those with chronic kidney disease, and require that dosing be mindful of the tendency of these drugs to importantly increase serum potassium levels.

  4. [Efficacy and Safety of a Fixed Combination of Perindopril Arginine and Amlodipine in Patients With Hypertension Uncontrolled by Treatment With Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Real Clinical Practice. Results of the PREVOSHODSTVO (SUPERIORITY) Program].

    PubMed

    Ostroumova, O D

    2017-01-01

    The article presents preliminary results of a subanalysis of PREVOSHODSTVO (SUPERIORITY) phase IV study. Aim of this subanalysis was to assess efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose perindopril/amlodipine combination (FDPAC) in patients with arterial hypertension (AP) uncontrolled on previous treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs).

  5. [Gender-related differences in the efficacy of treatment of hypertensive and coronary heart diseases in aged and elderly patients by angiotensin II receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Zaslavskaia, R M; Krivchikova, L V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study hemodynamics and clinical symptoms before and after treatment of arterial hypertension (AH) and coronary heart disease (CHD) using angiotensin II receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors depending on the patients' sex. A total of 150 patients with AH and CHD were examined (80 women and 70 men, mean age 70 a 66 yr respectively). Eighty two of them (group 1) were given receptor blockers (losap, losartan, lorista, bloctran) and 63 (group 2) inhibitors (prestarium, noliprel). Effectiveness of treatment was evaluated from the results of 24-hr AP monitoring, daily self-control of AP (as described by Korotkov) and responds to questionnaires. The effectiveness of receptor blockers showed marked gender-specific differences. Specifically, they reduced systolic and diastolic pressure and improved well-being in women. In men, this treatment decreased the frequency of angina attacks, headache, and heart throbs. Enzyme inhibitors caused a greater reduction of diastolic AP in women but less pronounced gender-related changes in dynamics of main AP and ECG parameters than receptor blockers.

  6. Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio Is Associated With Reduced 24-Hour Heart Rate Variability and QTc Prolongation in Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Grübler, Martin R; Kienreich, Katharina; Gaksch, Martin; Verheyen, Nicolas; Hartaigh, Bríain Ó; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; März, Winfried; Schmid, Johannes; Oberreither, Eva-Maria; Wetzel, Julia; Catena, Cristiana; Sechi, Leonardo A; Pieske, Burkert; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Aldosterone is considered to exert direct effects on the myocardium and the sympathetic nervous system. Both QT time and heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) are considered to be markers of arrhythmic risk and autonomous dysregulation. In this study, we investigated the associations between aldosterone, QT time, and HRV in patients with arterial hypertension.We recruited 477 hypertensive patients (age: 60.2 ± 10.2 years; 52.3% females) with a mean systolic/diastolic 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) value of 128 ± 12.8/77.1 ± 9.2 mmHg and with a median of 2 (IQR: 1-3) antihypertensive agents. Patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Internal Medicine of the Medical University of Graz, Austria. Blood samples, 24-hour HRV derived from 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and ECG's were obtained. Plasma aldosterone and plasma renin concentrations were measured by means of a radioimmunoassay. Twenty-four-hour urine specimens were collected in parallel with ABPM.Mean QTc was 423.3 ± 42.0 milliseconds for males and 434.7 ± 38.3 milliseconds for females. Mean 24H-HR and 24H-HRV was 71.9 ± 9.8 and 10.0 ± 3.6 bpm, respectively. In linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, ABPM, and current medication, aldosterone to active renin ratio (AARR) was significantly associated with the QTc interval, a marker for cardiac repolarization abnormalities (mean = 426 ± 42.4 milliseconds; β-coefficient = 0.121; P = 0.03) as well as with the 24-hour heart rate variability a surrogate for autonomic dysfunction (median = 9.67 [IQR = 7.38-12.22 bpm]; β-coefficient = -0.133; P = 0.01).In hypertensive patients, AARR is significantly related to QTc prolongation as well as HRV. Further studies investigating the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blocker and aldosterone synthase inhibitors on QTc and HRV are warranted.

  7. Purinergic inhibition of ENaC produces aldosterone escape.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Mironova, Elena; Bugaj, Vladislav; Rieg, Timo; Insel, Paul A; Vallon, Volker; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2010-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying "aldosterone escape," which refers to the excretion of sodium (Na(+)) during high Na(+) intake despite inappropriately increased levels of mineralocorticoids, are incompletely understood. Because local purinergic tone in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron downregulates epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) activity, we tested whether this mechanism mediates aldosterone escape. Here, urinary ATP concentration increased with dietary Na(+) intake in mice. Physiologic concentrations of ATP decreased ENaC activity in a dosage-dependent manner. P2Y(2)(-/-) mice, which lack the purinergic receptor, had significantly less increased Na(+) excretion than wild-type mice in response to high-Na(+) intake. Exogenous deoxycorticosterone acetate and deletion of the P2Y(2) receptor each modestly increased the resistance of ENaC to changes in Na(+) intake; together, they markedly increased resistance. Under the latter condition, ENaC could not respond to changes in Na(+) intake. In contrast, as a result of aldosterone escape, wild-type mice had increased Na(+) excretion in response to high-Na(+) intake regardless of the presence of high deoxycorticosterone acetate. These data suggest that control of ENaC by purinergic signaling is necessary for aldosterone escape.

  8. Purinergic Inhibition of ENaC Produces Aldosterone Escape

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Elena; Bugaj, Vladislav; Rieg, Timo; Insel, Paul A.; Vallon, Volker; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying “aldosterone escape,” which refers to the excretion of sodium (Na+) during high Na+ intake despite inappropriately increased levels of mineralocorticoids, are incompletely understood. Because local purinergic tone in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron downregulates epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) activity, we tested whether this mechanism mediates aldosterone escape. Here, urinary ATP concentration increased with dietary Na+ intake in mice. Physiologic concentrations of ATP decreased ENaC activity in a dosage-dependent manner. P2Y2−/− mice, which lack the purinergic receptor, had significantly less increased Na+ excretion than wild-type mice in response to high-Na+ intake. Exogenous deoxycorticosterone acetate and deletion of the P2Y2 receptor each modestly increased the resistance of ENaC to changes in Na+ intake; together, they markedly increased resistance. Under the latter condition, ENaC could not respond to changes in Na+ intake. In contrast, as a result of aldosterone escape, wild-type mice had increased Na+ excretion in response to high-Na+ intake regardless of the presence of high deoxycorticosterone acetate. These data suggest that control of ENaC by purinergic signaling is necessary for aldosterone escape. PMID:20813869

  9. Transcriptome Pathway Analysis of Pathological and Physiological Aldosterone-Producing Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junhua; Lam, Brian; Neogi, Sudeshna G.; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Brown, Morris J.

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism is present in ≈10% of hypertensives. We previously performed a microarray assay on aldosterone-producing adenomas and their paired zona glomerulosa and fasciculata. Confirmation of top genes validated the study design and functional experiments of zona glomerulosa selective genes established the role of the encoded proteins in aldosterone regulation. In this study, we further analyzed our microarray data using AmiGO 2 for gene ontology enrichment and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to identify potential biological processes and canonical pathways involved in pathological and physiological aldosterone regulation. Genes differentially regulated in aldosterone-producing adenoma and zona glomerulosa were associated with steroid metabolic processes gene ontology terms. Terms related to the Wnt signaling pathway were enriched in zona glomerulosa only. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed "NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway" and "LPS (lipopolysaccharide)/IL-1 (interleukin-1)–mediated inhibition of RXR (retinoid X receptor) function" were affected in both aldosterone-producing adenoma and zona glomerulosa with associated genes having up to 21- and 8-fold differences, respectively. Comparing KCNJ5-mutant aldosterone-producing adenoma, zona glomerulosa, and zona fasciculata samples with wild-type samples, 138, 56, and 59 genes were differentially expressed, respectively (fold-change >2; P<0.05). ACSS3, encoding the enzyme that synthesizes acetyl-CoA, was the top gene upregulated in KCNJ5-mutant aldosterone-producing adenoma compared with wild-type. NEFM, a gene highly upregulated in zona glomerulosa, was upregulated in KCNJ5 wild-type aldosterone-producing adenomas. NR4A2, the transcription factor for aldosterone synthase, was highly expressed in zona fasciculata adjacent to a KCNJ5-mutant aldosterone-producing adenoma. Further interrogation of these genes and pathways could potentially provide further insights into the pathology of primary

  10. Benidipine reduces albuminuria and plasma aldosterone in mild-to-moderate stage chronic kidney disease with albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masanori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Shiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Fujita, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Koichi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2011-02-01

    Benidipine inhibits both L- and T-type Ca channels, and has been shown to dilate the efferent arterioles as effectively as the afferent arterioles. In this study, we conducted an open-label and randomized trial to compare the effects of benidipine with those of amlodipine on blood pressure (BP), albuminuria and aldosterone concentration in hypertensive patients with mild-to-moderate stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients with BP ≥ 130/80 mm Hg, with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-90 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m(2), and with albuminuria>30 mg per g creatinine (Cr), despite treatment with the maximum recommended dose of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients received either of the following two treatment regimens: 2 mg per day benidipine, which was increased up to a dose of 8 mg per day (n=52), or 2.5 mg per day amlodipine, which was increased up to a dose of 10  mg per day (n=52). After 6 months of treatment, a significant and comparable reduction in the systolic and diastolic BP was observed in both groups. The decrease in the urinary albumin to Cr ratio in the benidipine group was significantly lower than that in the amlodipine group. Although plasma renin activity was not different in the two groups, plasma aldosterone levels were significantly decreased in the benidipine group. Moreover, urinary Na/K ratio was significantly decreased in the benidipine group but remained unchanged in the serum. It may be concluded that benidipine results in a greater reduction of plasma aldosterone and albuminuria than amlodipine, and that these effects are independent of BP reduction.

  11. What is a preferred angiotensin II receptor blocker-based combination therapy for blood pressure control in hypertensive patients with diabetic and non-diabetic renal impairment?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension has a major associated risk for organ damage and mortality, which is further heightened in patients with prior cardiovascular (CV) events, comorbid diabetes mellitus, microalbuminuria and renal impairment. Given that most patients with hypertension require at least two antihypertensives to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals, identifying the most appropriate combination regimen based on individual risk factors and comorbidities is important for risk management. Single-pill combinations (SPCs) containing two or more antihypertensive agents with complementary mechanisms of action offer potential advantages over free-drug combinations, including simplification of treatment regimens, convenience and reduced costs. The improved adherence and convenience resulting from SPC use is recognised in updated hypertension guidelines. Despite a wide choice of SPCs for hypertension treatment, clinical evidence from direct head-to-head comparisons to guide selection for individual patients is lacking. However, in patients with evidence of renal disease or at greater risk of developing renal disease, such as those with diabetes mellitus, microalbuminura and high-normal BP or overt hypertension, guidelines recommend renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blocker-based combination therapy due to superior renoprotective effects compared with other antihypertensive classes. Furthermore, RAS inhibitors attenuate the oedema and renal hyperfiltration associated with calcium channel blocker (CCB) monotherapy, making them a good choice for combination therapy. The occurrence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-induced cough supports the use of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for RAS blockade rather than ACE inhibitors. In this regard, ARB-based SPCs are available in combination with the diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) or the calcium CCB, amlodipine. Telmisartan, a long-acting ARB with preferential pharmacodynamic profile compared with several other ARBs, and the

  12. Interaction of SR 33557 with skeletal muscle calcium channel blocker receptors in the baboon: characterization of its binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sol-Rolland, J.; Joseph, M.; Rinaldi-Carmona, M. )

    1991-05-01

    A procedure for the isolation of primate skeletal microsomal membranes was initiated. Membranes exhibited specific enzymatic markers such as 5'-nucleotidase, Ca{sup 2}{sup +},Mg({sup 2}{sup +})-adenosine triphosphatase and an ATP-dependent calcium uptake. Baboon skeletal microsomes bound specifically with high-affinity potent Ca{sup 2}{sup +} channel blockers such as dihydropyridine, phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine derivatives. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding assays with ({sup 3}H)(+)-PN 200-110, ({sup 3}H)(-)-desmethoxyverapamil (( {sup 3}H)(-)-D888) and ({sup 3}H)-d-cis-dilitiazem were consistent with a single class of binding sites for the three radioligands. The pharmacological profile of SR 33557, an original compound with calcium antagonist properties, was investigated using radioligand binding studies. SR 33557 totally inhibited the specific binding of the three main classes of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} channel effectors and interacted allosterically with them. In addition, SR 33557 bound with high affinity to a homogeneous population of binding sites in baboon skeletal muscle.

  13. Potential of the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) telmisartan, irbesartan, and candesartan for inhibiting the HMGB1/RAGE axis in prevention and acute treatment of stroke.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Tancharoen, Salunya; Ito, Takashi; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Miura, Naoki; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2013-09-13

    Stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. The main cause of stroke is atherosclerosis, and the most common risk factor for atherosclerosis is hypertension. Therefore, antihypertensive treatments are recommended for the prevention of stroke. Three angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), telmisartan, irbesartan and candesartan, inhibit the expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), which is one of the pleiotropic effects of these drugs. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is the ligand of RAGE, and has been recently identified as a lethal mediator of severe sepsis. HMGB1 is an intracellular protein, which acts as an inflammatory cytokine when released into the extracellular milieu. Extracellular HMGB1 causes multiple organ failure and contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. This is the first review of the literature evaluating the potential of three ARBs for the HMGB1-RAGE axis on stroke therapy, including prevention and acute treatment. This review covers clinical and experimental studies conducted between 1976 and 2013. We propose that ARBs, which inhibit the HMGB1/RAGE axis, may offer a novel option for prevention and acute treatment of stroke. However, additional clinical studies are necessary to verify the efficacy of ARBs.

  14. Impact of Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor Blockers on Survival of Patients with NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lili; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Ling; Wan, Huanying; Gao, Beili; Feng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) can decrease tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis and inhibit metastasis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are found in approximately 30% of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in East Asia and in 10–15% of such patients in Western countries. We retrospectively identified 228 patients with histologically confirmed advanced NSCLC and 73 patients with early stage disease; 103 of these patients took antihypertensive drugs, and 112 received treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There was a significant difference in progression-free survival after first-line therapy (PFS1) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients treated with TKIs, there was a significant difference in PFS but not in overall survival (OS) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients with advanced NSCLC, there was a significant difference in PFS1 between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. ACEI/ARB in combination with standard chemotherapy or TKIs had a positive effect on PFS1 or OS, regardless of whether the lung cancer was in the early or advanced stage. PMID:26883083

  15. Secreted phospholipase A2 inhibitors are also potent blockers of binding to the M-type receptor.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Rouault, Morgane; Surrel, Fanny; Le Calvez, Catherine; Bezzine, Sofiane; Singer, Alan; Gelb, Michael H; Lambeau, Gérard

    2006-11-07

    Mammalian secreted phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)s) constitute a family of structurally related enzymes that are likely to play numerous biological roles because of their phospholipid hydrolyzing activity and binding to soluble and membrane-bound proteins, including the M-type receptor. Over the past decade, a number of competitive inhibitors have been developed against the inflammatory-type human group IIA (hGIIA) sPLA(2) with the aim of specifically blocking its catalytic activity and pathophysiological functions. The fact that many of these inhibitors, including the indole analogue Me-Indoxam, inhibit several other sPLA(2)s that bind to the M-type receptor prompted us to investigate the impact of Me-Indoxam and other inhibitors on the sPLA(2)-receptor interaction. By using a Ca(2+) loop mutant derived from a venom sPLA(2) which is insensitive to hGIIA inhibitors but still binds to the M-type receptor, we demonstrate that Me-Indoxam dramatically decreases the affinity of various sPLA(2)s for the receptor, yet an sPLA(2)-Me-Indoxam-receptor complex can form at very high sPLA(2) concentrations. Me-Indoxam inhibits the binding of iodinated mouse sPLA(2)s to the mouse M-type receptor expressed on live cells but also enhances binding of sPLA(2) to phospholipids. Because Me-Indoxam and other competitive inhibitors protrude out of the sPLA(2) catalytic groove, it is likely that the inhibitors interfere with the sPLA(2)-receptor interaction by steric hindrance and to different extents that depend on the type of sPLA(2) and inhibitor. Our finding suggests that the various anti-inflammatory therapeutic effects of sPLA(2) inhibitors may be due not only to inhibition of enzymatic activity but also to modulation of binding of sPLA(2) to the M-type receptor or other as yet unknown protein targets.

  16. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a small-molecule multi-FGF receptor blocker with allosteric properties.

    PubMed

    Bono, Françoise; De Smet, Frederik; Herbert, Corentin; De Bock, Katrien; Georgiadou, Maria; Fons, Pierre; Tjwa, Marc; Alcouffe, Chantal; Ny, Annelii; Bianciotto, Marc; Jonckx, Bart; Murakami, Masahiro; Lanahan, Anthony A; Michielsen, Christof; Sibrac, David; Dol-Gleizes, Frédérique; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Zacchigna, Serena; Herault, Jean-Pascal; Fischer, Christian; Rigon, Patrice; Ruiz de Almodovar, Carmen; Claes, Filip; Blanc, Isabelle; Poesen, Koen; Zhang, Jie; Segura, Inmaculada; Gueguen, Geneviève; Bordes, Marie-Françoise; Lambrechts, Diether; Broussy, Roselyne; van de Wouwer, Marlies; Michaux, Corinne; Shimada, Toru; Jean, Isabelle; Blacher, Silvia; Noel, Agnès; Motte, Patrick; Rom, Eran; Rakic, Jean-Marie; Katsuma, Susumu; Schaeffer, Paul; Yayon, Avner; Van Schepdael, Ann; Schwalbe, Harald; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Carmeliet, Geert; Rozensky, Jef; Dewerchin, Mieke; Simons, Michael; Christopoulos, Arthur; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Carmeliet, Peter

    2013-04-15

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) are targets for anticancer drug development. To date, only RTK inhibitors that block orthosteric binding of ligands and substrates have been developed. Here, we report the pharmacologic characterization of the chemical SSR128129E (SSR), which inhibits fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling by binding to the extracellular FGFR domain without affecting orthosteric FGF binding. SSR exhibits allosteric properties, including probe dependence, signaling bias, and ceiling effects. Inhibition by SSR is highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Oral delivery of SSR inhibits arthritis and tumors that are relatively refractory to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antibodies. Thus, orally-active extracellularly acting small-molecule modulators of RTKs with allosteric properties can be developed and may offer opportunities to improve anticancer treatment.

  17. The GHS-R blocker D-[Lys3] GHRP-6 serves as CCR5 chemokine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kalpesh; Dixit, Vishwa Deep; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jie Wan; Schaffer, Eric M; Nguyen, Dzung; Taub, Dennis D

    2012-01-01

    [D-Lys3]-Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6 (DLS) is widely utilized in vivo and in vitro as a selective ghrelin receptor (GHS-R) antagonist. This antagonist is one of the most common antagonists utilized in vivo to block GHS-R function and activity. Here, we found that DLS also has the ability to modestly block chemokine function and ligand binding to the chemokine receptor CCR5. The DLS effects on RANTES binding and Erk signaling as well as calcium mobilization appears to be much stronger than its effects on MIP-1α and MIP-1β. CCR5 have been shown to act as major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the CD4 positive host cells. To this end, we also found that DLS blocks M-tropic HIV-1 propagation in activated human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that DLS may not be a highly selective GHS-R1a inhibitor and may also effects on other G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family members. Moreover, DLS may have some potential clinical applications in blocking HIV infectivity and CCR5-mediated migration and function in various inflammatory disease states.

  18. The Role of Aldosterone in Obesity-Related Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kawarazaki, Wakako; Fujita, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Obese subjects often have hypertension and related cardiovascular and renal diseases, and this has become a serious worldwide health problem. In obese subjects, impaired renal-pressure natriuresis causes sodium retention, leading to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Physical compression of the kidneys by visceral fat and activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), and aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) system are involved in this mechanism. Obese subjects often exhibit hyperaldosteronism, with increased salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP). Adipose tissue excretes aldosterone-releasing factors, thereby stimulating aldosterone secretion independently of the systemic RAS, and aldosterone/MR activation plays a key role in the development of hypertension and organ damage in obesity. In obese subjects, both salt sensitivity of BP, enhanced by obesity-related metabolic disorders including aldosterone excess, and increased dietary sodium intake are closely related to the incidence of hypertension. Some salt sensitivity-related gene variants affect the risk of obesity, and together with salt intake, its combination is possibly associated with the development of hypertension in obese subjects. With high salt levels common in modern diets, salt restriction and weight control are undoubtedly important. However, not only MR blockade but also new diagnostic modalities and therapies targeting and modifying genes that are related to salt sensitivity, obesity, or RAS regulation are expected to prevent obesity and obesity-related hypertension.

  19. The Role of Aldosterone in Obesity-Related Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kawarazaki, Wakako

    2016-01-01

    Obese subjects often have hypertension and related cardiovascular and renal diseases, and this has become a serious worldwide health problem. In obese subjects, impaired renal-pressure natriuresis causes sodium retention, leading to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Physical compression of the kidneys by visceral fat and activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), and aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) system are involved in this mechanism. Obese subjects often exhibit hyperaldosteronism, with increased salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP). Adipose tissue excretes aldosterone-releasing factors, thereby stimulating aldosterone secretion independently of the systemic RAS, and aldosterone/MR activation plays a key role in the development of hypertension and organ damage in obesity. In obese subjects, both salt sensitivity of BP, enhanced by obesity-related metabolic disorders including aldosterone excess, and increased dietary sodium intake are closely related to the incidence of hypertension. Some salt sensitivity-related gene variants affect the risk of obesity, and together with salt intake, its combination is possibly associated with the development of hypertension in obese subjects. With high salt levels common in modern diets, salt restriction and weight control are undoubtedly important. However, not only MR blockade but also new diagnostic modalities and therapies targeting and modifying genes that are related to salt sensitivity, obesity, or RAS regulation are expected to prevent obesity and obesity-related hypertension. PMID:26927805

  20. Additive Effect of Qidan Dihuang Grain, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers on Albuminuria Levels in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: A Randomized, Parallel-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lei; Jiang, Pingping; Zhou, Lin; Sun, Xiaomin; Bi, Jianlu; Cui, Lijuan; Nie, Xiaoli; Luo, Ren; Liu, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria is characteristic of early-stage diabetic nephropathy (DN). The conventional treatments with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) are unable to prevent the development of albuminuria in normotensive individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Purpose. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of ARB combined with a Chinese formula Qidan Dihuang grain (QDDHG) in improving albuminuria and Traditional Chinese Medicine Symptom (TCMS) scores in normotensive individuals with T2DM. Methods. Eligible patients were randomized to the treatment group and the control group. Results. Compared with baseline (week 0), both treatment and control groups markedly improved the 24-hour albuminuria, total proteinuria (TPU), and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (A/C) at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Between treatment and the control group, the levels of albuminuria in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the control group at 8 and 12 weeks (p < 0.05). In addition, treatment group markedly decreased the scores of TCMS after treatment. Conclusion. This trial suggests that QDDHG combined with ARB administration decreases the levels of albuminuria and the scores for TCMS in normotensive individuals with T2DM. PMID:27375762

  1. Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hypertension Treated With the Renin Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil vs Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: The Prospective EARLY Registry.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Bramlage, Peter; Baumgart, Peter; Mahfoud, Felix; Buhck, Hartmut; Ouarrak, Taoufik; Ehmen, Martina; Senges, Jochen; Gitt, Anselm K

    2015-12-01

    For patients with newly diagnosed hypertension, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are usually the first-line therapies. There is, however, no real-life data regarding the relative clinical effectiveness and tolerability of either drug class. The prospective registry, Treatment With Azilsartan Compared to ACE Inhibitors in Antihypertensive Therapy (EARLY), was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the ARB azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) vs ACE inhibitors in real-world patients. Of the 1153 patients with newly diagnosed hypertension who were included in the registry, 789 were prescribed AZL-M and 364 were prescribed an ACE inhibitor. After multivariate adjustment, AZL-M was found to provide superior blood pressure reduction and better target blood pressure (<140/90 mm Hg) achievement. The proportion of patients with adverse events was not statistically different between groups. The authors conclude that in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients, AZL-M provides superior blood pressure control with a similar safety profile compared with ACE inhibitors.

  2. TRC120038, a Novel Dual AT1/ETA Receptor Blocker for Control of Hypertension, Diabetic Nephropathy, and Cardiomyopathy in ob-ZSF1 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohanan, Anookh; Gupta, Ram; Dubey, Amita; Jagtap, Vikrant; Mandhare, Appaji; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Chauthaiwale, Vijay; Dutt, Chaitanya

    2011-01-01

    In hypertensive subjects, angiotensin II and endothelin participate in a manner involving closely interwoven pathways in increasing blood pressure (BP) and inducing end organ damage. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of TRC120038, a novel dual AT1/ETA receptor blocker on BP, in obese Zucker spontaneously hypertensive fatty rats (ob-ZSF1), an animal model of moderate hypertension, diabetes with progressive renal and cardiac dysfunction. Ob-ZSF1 rats loaded with 0.5% salt were treated with TRC120038 (11.8 mg/kg bid.) or candesartan cilexetil (0.3 mg/kg od.) or vehicle control. Blood pressure (by radio-telemetry) and renal functional markers were monitored throughout the study. Cardiac function was assessed terminally by pressure volume catheter. Markers for renal dysfunction were measured and changes were evaluated histopathologically. TRC120038 showed greater fall in both systolic and diastolic BP in comparison to candesartan at its maximum antihypertensive dose. TRC120038 also reduced the severity of renal dysfunction and preserved cardiac function in ob-ZSF1 rat. PMID:22235363

  3. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landau, Ester; Amar, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension (HT) is a complication of 8% of all pregnancies and 10% of HT cases are due to primary aldosteronism (PA). There is very little data on PA and pregnancy. Given the changes in the renin angiotensin system during pregnancy, the diagnosis of PA is difficult to establish during gestation. It may be suspected in hypertensive patients with hypokalemia. A comprehensive literature review identified reports covering 40 pregnancies in patients suffering from PA. Analysis of these cases shows them to be high-risk pregnancies leading to maternal and fetal complications. Pregnancy must be programmed, and if the patient has a unilateral form of PA, adrenalectomy should be performed prior to conception. It is customary to stop spironolactone prior to conception and introduce antihypertensive drugs that present no risk of teratogenicity. When conventional antihypertensive drugs used during pregnancy fail to control high blood pressure, diuretics, including potassium-sparing diuretics may be prescribed. Adrenalectomy can be considered during the second trimester of pregnancy exclusively in cases of refractory hypertension. A European retrospective study is currently underway to collect a larger number of cases.

  4. The H1 histamine receptor blocker, chlorpheniramine, completely prevents the increase in REM sleep induced by immobilization stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Zamorano, J A; Esqueda-Leon, E; Jimenez-Anguiano, A; Cintra-McGlone, L; Mendoza Melendez, M A; Velazquez Moctezuma, J

    2009-01-01

    Chlorpheniramine is a selective antagonist of the H1 histaminergic receptor subtype and its effects in humans include somnolence. Chlorpheniramine affects sleep in rats, mainly by decreasing REM sleep. On the other hand, stress by immobilization induces an important increase in the percentage of REM sleep. In this study we analyzed the effects of blocking histaminergic receptors on REM sleep induced by immobilization stress. Adult male Wistar rats were chronically implanted for sleep recording. Immobilization stress was induced by placing the rat in a small cylinder for 2 h. Experimental conditions were: A. Control; B. Stress; C. Stress plus vehicle and D. Stress plus chlorpheniramine. Independent experiments were done both in the dark, as well as the light period. Results showed that the increase in REM sleep observed after immobilization stress was completely abolished by chlorpheniramine, both in the dark and in the light phase. Furthermore, the decrease in REM sleep was significant even when compared to the non-stressed control rats. REM sleep latency was also significantly longer during both light phases. The present results suggest that REM sleep is quite sensitive to histaminergic blockage. It is possible that chlorpheniramine is also blocking the cholinergic mechanisms generating REM sleep.

  5. Induction of transient hyperprolactinaemia in neonatal rats by direct or maternal treatment with the dopamine receptor blocker, sulpiride.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M; Howie, P W

    1987-07-01

    Prolactin was measured in the plasma of neonatal rats after iv and ip injection of the dopamine receptor blocking drug sulpiride, and after its ip injection to neonatal rats' nursing mothers. The sulpiride dose PRL response relationship in 10-25 day old neonatal rats was similar to that found in lactating rats, with a threshold sensitivity around 29 nmol sulpiride/kg body weight and a maximal response at about 2.9 mumol/kg. Absolute levels of PRL in the neonate (both peak and increment-over-basal) were, however, 90% lower than in adults. Treatment of lactating mothers with a maximally stimulatory dose of sulpiride (2.9 mumol/kg) twice daily for 4 days resulted in small but highly significant increases in neonatal PRL on days 1 and 2 but complete loss of response by day 4. These data demonstrate that there is a close similarity between the responses of maternal and neonatal rats to sulpiride and that transfer of the drug to the neonate via milk can induce neonatal hyperprolactinaemia. The subsequent loss of the neonatal PRL response on chronic exposure to sulpiride may indicate a degree of disturbance of hypothalamic dopaminergic mechanisms. In the clinical situation this would suggest that doses of dopamine receptor-blocking drugs used to enhance maternal milk production should be carefully chosen.

  6. A novel design of combining the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril with the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) losartan using homo coupling via PEG diacid linker.

    PubMed

    Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Park, Shery; Ju, Hee; Movahed, Mohammad R

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in American adults. Furthermore, the incidence of congestive heart failure is on the rise as a major cause of hospitalization and mortality in this population. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors prevent the production of angiotensin II, which has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) were developed as a direct inhibitor of angiotensin II. ARBs have been shown to be effective in the treatment of patients with systolic heart failure but do not cause chronic coughing which is a common side effect of ACE inhibitors. In theory, a compound that has the combined effect of an ACE inhibitor and an ARB should be more effective in treating heart failure patients than either agents alone. Therefore, the purpose of this manuscript is to design and discuss the benefits of a new molecule, which combines captopril, an ACE inhibitor, with losartan, an ARB. In this experiment Captopril and Losartan were modified and synthesized separately and combined by homo or mono coupling. This was achieved by taking advantage of PEG (Polyethylene glycol) as a linker. It is expected that this molecule will have the combined modes of action of both ACEs and ARBs. Benefits from combination therapy include; increased efficacy, reduced adverse effects, convenience, compliance, and prolonged duration. Consequently, this combined molecule is expected to block the production of angiotensin II more efficiently and effectively. Although captopril and losartan work in the same system by blocking the effect of angiotensin II they have different action sites and mechanisms some patents are also discussed. Losartan blocks the AT1 receptor which is expressed on the cell surface, while captopril inhibits ACE, preventing production of angiotensin II, which is present in both the plasma and on the cell surface, especially on endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

  7. Antihypertensive treatment using an angiotensin receptor blocker and a thiazide diuretic improves patients' quality of life: the Saga Challenge Antihypertensive Study (S-CATS).

    PubMed

    Kamura, Aoi; Inoue, Teruo; Kuroki, Shigetaka; Ishida, Shiro; Iimori, Kenichirou; Kato, Toru; Naitoh, Hirofumi; Tamesue, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hideo; Node, Koichi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the Saga Challenge Antihypertensive Study (S-CATS), a single-arm, prospective and multi-center trial, was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined antihypertensive treatment with losartan and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ). Enrolled in the study were a total of 161 patients with hypertension, who in spite of treatment with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) alone or an ARB and calcium channel blocker (CCB), had not been able to reach blood pressure control goals set by the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines (JSH 2004). The ARBs were replaced with a combination pill containing losartan (50 mg) and HCTZ (12.5 mg), and this treatment was continued for 3 months. This change in therapy resulted in significant decreases in systolic (158±14 to 137±15 mm Hg, P<0.001) and diastolic (85±11 to 76±10 mm Hg, P<0.001) blood pressure and heart rate (73±3 to 72±3) during the study. The patients' quality of life (QOL) score, the EuroQol 5 dimensions (EQ-5D) and the visual analog scale (VAS) (n=96; 70.0 (68.8-80.0) to 80.0 (70.0-90.0), P<0.01) all improved significantly. Another QOL score, the hypertension symptom score (HSS), which we originally developed for the S-CATS trial, decreased significantly (n=93; 4.0 (1.0-9.0) to 2.0 (1.0-8.0), P<0.05). The Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), which is a psychometric assessment of subjective sleep quality, also decreased significantly (n=45; 4.0 (2.0-7.0) to 3.0 (2.0-5.0), P<0.05). There was a significant correlation between a change in HSS (baseline value -3-months value) and a decrease in systolic blood pressure (n=93; R=0.241, P<0.05). These results suggest that an anti-hypertensive treatment combined with an ARB and a thiazide diuretic may improve patients' QOL, including sleep quality.

  8. Structure of the high-affinity binding site for noncompetitive blockers of the acetylcholine receptor: (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine labels homologous residues in the. beta. and delta chains

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudat, J.; Dennis, M.; Heidmann, T.; Haumont, P.Y.; Lederer, F.; Changeux, J.P.

    1987-05-05

    The membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata was photolabeled by the noncompetitive channel blocker (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine under equilibrium conditions in the presence of the agonist carbamoylcholine. The amount of radioactivity incorporated into all subunits was reduced by addition of phencyclidine, a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers. The labeled ..beta.. chain was purified and digested with trypsin or CNBr, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Sequence analysis resulted in the identification of Ser-254 and Leu-257 as residues labeled by (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine in a phencyclidine-sensitive manner. These residues are located in the hydrophobic and potentially transmembrane segment M II of the ..beta.. chain, a region homologous to that containing the chlorpromazine-labeled Ser-262 in the delta chain. These results show that homologous regions of different receptor subunits contribute to the unique high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers, a finding consistent with the location of this site on the axis of symmetry of the receptor molecule.

  9. Role of cytokines in anti-implantation activity of H2 receptor blockers in albino Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shyam S; Ittiyavirah, Sibi P

    2010-03-01

    In this study, the negative effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin(TCDD) on the immune system and body weight gain of rats and the preventive effects of curcumin were examined. For this purpose, 3-4 months old 128 Wistar albino rats with 280-310g body weights were used. The 2microg/kg dose of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 100mg/kg dose of curcumin were dissolved in corn oil and orally given to the rats found in the experimental and control groups. Then, the serum samples were taken from all rats at 15, 30, 45 and 60th days to analyzed for the determination of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and IL-13 levels by ELISA method. The data of body weight gain was measured at 15, 30, 45 and 60th days. The results indicated that 2,3,7,8,3,7,8-TCDD caused to increase significantly (p<0.05) in serum TNF-alpha levels. However, it caused significantly (p<0.05) decreases in the levels of IFN-gamma, IL-12 and IL-13 in rats. On contrary, curcumin increased IFN-gamma, IL-12 and IL-13 levels, but decreased TNF-alpha level in rats. Additionally, TCDD caused significantly (P<0.01) reductions in the body weight gain. However curcumin reversed this effect of TCDD.In conclusion, 2,3,7,8-TCDD significantly suppressed the humoral immunity and body weight gain in rats at doses of 2microg/kg. However curcumin, which was found in some plants, eliminated the effect of TCDD on immune system and body weight when it was given together with 2,3,7,8-TCDD. It is thought that this effect may have occurred via curcumin and TCDD were binding aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) competitively.

  10. NGS-based transcriptome profiling reveals biomarkers for companion diagnostics of the TGF-β receptor blocker galunisertib in HCC.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Agarwal, Rahul; Dituri, Francesco; Lupo, Luigi; Trerotoli, Paolo; Mancarella, Serena; Winter, Peter; Giannelli, Gianluigi

    2017-02-23

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling has gained extensive interest in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The small molecule kinase inhibitor galunisertib, targeting the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI), blocks HCC progression in preclinical models and shows promising effects in ongoing clinical trials. As the drug is not similarly effective in all patients, this study was aimed at identifying new companion diagnostics biomarkers for patient stratification. Next-generation sequencing-based massive analysis of cDNA ends was used to investigate the transcriptome of an invasive HCC cell line responses to TGF-β1 and galunisertib. These identified mRNA were validated in 78 frozen HCC samples and in 26 ex-vivo HCC tissues treated in culture with galunisertib. Respective protein levels in patients blood were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. SKIL, PMEPA1 ANGPTL4, SNAI1, Il11 and c4orf26 were strongly upregulated by TGF-β1 and downregulated by galunisertib in different HCC cell lines. In the 78 HCC samples, only SKIL and PMEPA1 (P<0.001) were correlated with endogenous TGF-β1. In ex-vivo samples, SKIL and PMEPA1 were strongly downregulated (P<0.001), and correlated (P<0.001) with endogenous TGF-β1. SKIL and PMEPA1 mRNA expression in tumor tissues was significantly increased compared with controls and not correlated with protein levels in the blood of paired HCC patients. SKIL and PMEPA1 mRNA levels were positively correlated with TGF-β1 mRNA concentrations in HCC tissues and strongly downregulated by galunisertib. The target genes identified here may serve as biomarkers for the stratification of HCC patients undergoing treatment with galunisertib.

  11. SFE/SFHTA/AFCE primary aldosteronism consensus: Introduction and handbook.

    PubMed

    Amar, Laurence; Baguet, Jean Philippe; Bardet, Stéphane; Chaffanjon, Philippe; Chamontin, Bernard; Douillard, Claire; Durieux, Pierre; Girerd, Xaxier; Gosse, Philippe; Hernigou, Anne; Herpin, Daniel; Houillier, Pascal; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Joffre, Francis; Kraimps, Jean-Louis; Lefebvre, Hervé; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Mounier-Véhier, Claire; Nussberger, Juerg; Pagny, Jean-Yves; Pechère, Antoinette; Plouin, Pierre-François; Reznik, Yves; Steichen, Olivier; Tabarin, Antoine; Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Zinzindohoue, Franck; Chabre, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The French Endocrinology Society (SFE) French Hypertension Society (SFHTA) and Francophone Endocrine Surgery Association (AFCE) have drawn up recommendations for the management of primary aldosteronism (PA), based on an analysis of the literature by 27 experts in 7 work-groups. PA is suspected in case of hypertension associated with one of the following characteristics: severity, resistance, associated hypokalemia, disproportionate target organ lesions, or adrenal incidentaloma with hypertension or hypokalemia. Diagnosis is founded on aldosterone/renin ratio (ARR) measured under standardized conditions. Diagnostic thresholds are expressed according to the measurement units employed. Diagnosis is established for suprathreshold ARR associated with aldosterone concentrations >550pmol/L (200pg/mL) on 2 measurements, and rejected for aldosterone concentration<240pmol/L (90pg/mL) and/or subthreshold ARR. The diagnostic threshold applied is different if certain medication cannot be interrupted. In intermediate situations, dynamic testing is performed. Genetic forms of PA are screened for in young subjects and/or in case of familial history. The patient should be informed of the results expected from medical and surgical treatment of PA before exploration for lateralization is proposed. Lateralization is explored by adrenal vein sampling (AVS), except in patients under 35 years of age with unilateral adenoma on imaging. If PA proves to be lateralized, unilateral adrenalectomy may be performed, with adaptation of medical treatment pre- and postoperatively. If PA is non-lateralized or the patient refuses surgery, spironolactone is administered as first-line treatment, replaced by amiloride, eplerenone or calcium-channel blockers if insufficiently effective or poorly tolerated.

  12. Alterations in expression of Cat-315 epitope of perineuronal nets during normal ageing, and its modulation by an open-channel NMDA receptor blocker, memantine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jun; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Jinno, Shozo

    2017-03-08

    The perineuronal net (PNN), a specialized aggregate of the extracellular matrix, is involved in neuroprotection against oxidative stress, which is now recognized as a major contributor to age-related decline in brain functions. In this study, we investigated the age-related molecular changes of PNNs using monoclonal antibody Cat-315, which recognizes human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) glycan on aggrecan-based PNNs. Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope in the hippocampus were higher in middle-aged (MA, 12-month-old) mice than in young adult (YA, 2-month-old) mice. Although there were no differences in the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope between old age (OA, 20-month-old) and MA mice, Cat-315 immunoreactivity was also detected in astrocytes of OA mice. To focus on Cat-315 epitope in PNNs, we used YA and MA mice in the following experiments. Optical disector analysis showed that there were no differences in the numbers of Cat-315-positive (Cat-315(+) ) PNNs between YA and MA mice. Fluorescence intensity analysis indicated that Cat-315 immunoreactivity in PNNs increased with age in the dorsal hippocampus, which is mainly involved in cognitive functions. Administration of an open-channel blocker of NMDA receptor, memantine, reduced the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the numbers of glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals colocalized with Cat-315 epitope around parvalbumin-positive neurons were decreased by memantine. These findings provide novel insight into the involvement of PNNs in normal brain ageing, and suggest that memantine may counteract the age-related alterations in expression levels of Cat-315 epitope via regulation of its subcellular localization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers suppress the cell proliferation effects of angiotensin II in breast cancer cells by inhibiting AT1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Du, Ning; Feng, Jiang; Hu, Li-Juan; Sun, Xin; Sun, Hai-Bing; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Ren, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Chronic stress and a high-fat diet are well-documented risk factors associated with the renin-angiotensin system in the development of breast cancer. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a novel component of the renin-angiotensin system. Several recent studies have focused on the function of AT1R in cell proliferation during cancer development. Thus, we hypothesized that angiotensin II (Ang Ⅱ) can promote proliferation of breast cancer via activated AT1R; the activation of AT1R may play an important role in promoting breast cancer growth, and AT1R blocker (ARB) may suppress the promotional effect on proliferation by antagonizing AT1R. The expression level of AT1R was found to be significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells by immunohistochemistry, but no correlation between AT1R expression and ER/PR/Her-2 expression was observed. The AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cell line exhibited high expression of AT1R protein, and we generated the AT1R(-)-MCF-7 cell line using RNA interference. ARBs, and in particular irbesartan, effectively inhibited the effects of Ang II on cell proliferation, cell cycle development and downstream AT1R signaling events, including the activation of the Ras-Raf-MAPK pathway and the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB. Irbesartan also significantly altered p53, PCNA and cyclin D1 expression, which was also influenced by activated AT1R in AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that ARBs may be useful as a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  14. Diuretics enhance effects of increased dose of candesartan on ambulatory blood pressure reduction in Japanese patients with uncontrolled hypertension treated with medium-dose angiotensin II receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Sakima, Atsushi; Kita, Toshihiro; Nakada, Seigo; Yokota, Naoto; Tamaki, Noboru; Etoh, Takuma; Shimokubo, Toru; Kitamura, Kazuo; Takishita, Shuichi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although blockade of the renin-angiotensin system by increasing the dose of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is recommended to achieve clinical benefits in terms of blood pressure (BP) control and cardiovascular and renal outcomes, the effect of this increased dose on ambulatory BP monitoring has not been evaluated completely in Japanese patients with uncontrolled hypertension undergoing medium-dose ARB therapy. The primary objective of this study was to examine the effect of the relatively high dose of the ARB candesartan (12 mg/day) on 24-h systolic BP and the attainment of target BP levels in uncontrolled hypertension treated with a medium dose of ARBs. A total of 146 hypertensive patients (age: 69.9 ± 9.3 years; females: 65.8%) completed the study. After switching to candesartan at 12 mg/day, all these BP measurements decreased significantly (p<0.001). Attainment of the target office BP (p=0.0014) and 24-h BP levels (p=0.0296) also improved significantly. Subgroup analysis indicated that the reduction of 24-h systolic BP was larger in patients treated with diuretics than those without (p=0.0206). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between the combined ARB and diuretic therapy, and the change in 24-h systolic BP irrespective of preceding ARBs. In conclusion, the switching therapy to increased dose of candesartan caused significant reductions in office and ambulatory BP levels, and improved the attainment of target BP levels in patients with uncontrolled hypertension treated with a medium dose of ARBs. Combination with diuretics enhanced this effect.

  15. Comparative Effects of Direct Renin Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker on Albuminuria in Hypertensive Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Uzu, Takashi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Haneda, Masakazu; Koya, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Kida, Yasuo; Ikebuchi, Motoyoshi; Nakamura, Takaaki; Nishimura, Masataka; Takahara, Noriko; Obata, Toshiyuki; Omichi, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Shingu, Ryosuke; Taki, Hideki; Nagai, Yoshio; Tokuda, Hiroaki; Kitada, Munehiro; Misawa, Miwa; Nishiyama, Akira; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients with diabetes, albuminuria is a risk marker of end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. An increased renin-angiotensin system activity has been reported to play an important role in the pathological processes in these conditions. We compared the effect of aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor (DRI), with that of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) on albuminuria and urinary excretion of angiotensinogen, a marker of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system activity. Methods We randomly assigned 237 type 2 diabetic patients with high-normal albuminuria (10 to <30 mg/g of albumin-to-creatinine ratio) or microalbuminuria (30 to <300 mg/g) to the DRI group or ARB group (any ARB) with a target blood pressure of <130/80 mmHg. The primary endpoint was a reduction in albuminuria. Results Twelve patients dropped out during the observation period, and a total of 225 patients were analyzed. During the study period, the systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not different between the groups. The changes in the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio from baseline to the end of the treatment period in the DRI and ARB groups were similar (-5.5% and -6.7%, respectively). In contrast, a significant reduction in the urinary excretion of angiotensinogen was observed in the ARB group but not in the DRI group. In the subgroup analysis, a significant reduction in the albuminuria was observed in the ARB group but not in the DRI group among high-normal albuminuria patients. Conclusion DRI and ARB reduced albuminuria in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition, ARB, but not DRI, reduced albuminuria even in patients with normal albuminuria. DRI is not superior to ARB in the reduction of urinary excretion of albumin and angiotensinogen. PMID:28033332

  16. The beta2 adrenergic receptor Gln27Glu polymorphism affects insulin resistance in patients with heart failure: possible modulation by choice of beta blocker.

    PubMed

    Vardeny, Orly; Detry, Michelle A; Moran, John J M; Johnson, Maryl R; Sweitzer, Nancy K

    2008-12-01

    Insulin resistance is prevalent in heart failure (HF) patients, and beta2 adrenergic receptors (beta2-AR) are involved in glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that beta2-AR Gln27Glu and Arg16Gly polymorphisms affect insulin resistance in HF patients, and we explored if effects of beta2-AR polymorphisms on glucose handling are modified by choice of beta blocker. We studied 30 nondiabetic adults with HF and a history of systolic dysfunction; 15 were receiving metoprolol succinate, and 15 were receiving carvedilol. We measured fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance, and we determined beta2-AR genotypes at codons 27 and 16. The cohort was insulin resistant with a mean HOMA-IR score of 3.4 (95% CI, 2.3 to 4.5; normal value, 1.0). Patients with the Glu27Glu genotype exhibited higher insulin and HOMA-IR compared to individuals carrying a Gln allele (P = 0.019). Patients taking carvedilol demonstrated lower insulin resistance if also carrying a wild-type allele at codon 27 (fasting insulin, 9.8 +/- 10.5 versus 20.5 +/- 2.1 for variant, P = 0.072; HOMA-IR, 2.4 +/- 2.7 versus 5.1 +/- 0.6, P = 0.074); those on metoprolol succinate had high insulin resistance irrespective of genotype. The beta2-AR Glu27Glu genotype may be associated with higher insulin concentrations and insulin resistance in patients with HF. Future studies are needed to confirm whether treatment with carvedilol may be associated with decreased insulin and insulin resistance in beta2-AR codon 27 Gln carriers.

  17. Addition of hydrochlorothiazide to angiotensin receptor blocker therapy can achieve a lower sodium balance with no acceleration of intrarenal renin angiotensin system in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuwa, Daisuke; Fukuda, Michio; Ogiyama, Yoshiaki; Sato, Ryo; Mizuno, Masashi; Miura, Toshiyuki; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Michikawa, Makoto; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce a lower sodium (Na) balance, and the natriuretic effect is enhanced under Na deprivation, despite falls in blood pressure (BP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods The effect of additional hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ; 12.5 mg/day) to ARB treatment (valsartan; 80 mg/day) on glomerulotubular Na balance was evaluated in 23 patients with chronic kidney disease. Results Add-on HCTZ decreased GFR, tubular Na load, and tubular Na reabsorption (tNa), although 24-hour urinary Na excretion (UNaV) remained constant. Daily urinary angiotensinogen excretion (UAGTV, 152±10→82±17 μg/g Cre) reduced (p=0.02). Changes in tubular Na load (r2=0.26) and tNa (r2=0.25) correlated with baseline 24-hour UAGTV. Changes in filtered Na load correlated with changes in nighttime systolic BP (r2=0.17), but not with changes in daytime systolic BP. The change in the tNa to filtered Na load ratio was influenced by the change in daytime UNaV (β=−0.67, F=16.8), rather than the change in nighttime UNaV. Conclusions Lower Na balance was produced by add-on HCTZ to ARB treatment without an increase of intra-renal renin-angiotensin system activity, leading to restoration of nocturnal hypertension. A further study is needed to demonstrate that the reduction of UAGTV by additional diuretics to ARBs prevents the progression of nephropathy or cardiovascular events. PMID:27283968

  18. Comparable effect of aliskiren or a diuretic added on an angiotensin II receptor blocker on augmentation index in hypertension: a multicentre, prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Murakami, Takashi; Sakuragi, Satoru; Doi, Masayuki; Nanba, Seiji; Mima, Atsushi; Tominaga, Youkou; Oka, Takafumi; Kajikawa, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Background The effects of antihypertensive drug combination therapy on central blood pressure (BP) and augmentation index (AI) have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, or a diuretic added to an angiotensin II receptor blocker on AI in patients with essential hypertension. Methods A 24-week, prospective, multicentre, randomised, open-label study enrolled 103 patients already treated with valsartan. Participants were randomly allocated to receive either valsartan with aliskiren (V+A), or valsartan with trichlormethiazide (V+T). The primary outcome was the change in AI derived from radial artery tonometry. Secondary outcome measures included systolic and diastolic BP, cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI, which reflects arterial stiffness) and urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine concentration. Results After 24 weeks, systolic and diastolic BP were significantly reduced in both groups to a broadly comparable extent. There was no significant difference in AI at the end of the study between the V+A group and the V+T group (between-group difference: −2.3%, 95% CI −6.9% to 2.2%, p=0.31). Central BP at the end of the study also did not differ between the two groups (p=0.62). There was no significant difference in the CAVI between the groups at the end of the study. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine concentration was significantly lower in the V+A group than in the V+T group (p<0.01), suggesting that V+A attenuated oxidative stress more than V+T. Conclusion The combination of valsartan and aliskiren had an effect on AI comparable with that of the combination of valsartan and trichlormethiazide. UMIN Clinical Trial Registration number UMIN000005726.

  19. Dopaminergic Inhibition of Metoclopramide-induced Aldosterone Secretion in Man

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Robert M.; Thorner, Michael O.; Ortt, Elizabeth M.

    1980-01-01

    prolactin levels and completely inhibited the prolactin responses to metoclopramide. In contrast, bromocriptine did not alter basal plasma aldosterone concentrations or the aldosterone responses to metoclopramide. Plasma renin activity, plasma cortisol, and serum potassium concentrations were unchanged by metoclopramide, dopamine, or bromocriptine. The results of this study suggest that the aldosterone response to metoclopramide is mediated by metoclopramide's antagonist activity at the dopamine receptor level. The results further suggest dissociation of the responses to the dopamine agonists, dopamine and bromocriptine, and indicate that a new type of dopamine receptor may inhibit aldosterone secretion. PMID:7400305

  20. Angiotensin II-Activated Protein Kinase D Mediates Acute Aldosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Brian A.; Olala, Lawrence; Arun, Senthil Nathan; Parker, Peter M.; George, Mariya V.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin II (AngII)-aldosterone system can contribute to cardiovascular disease, such that an understanding of this system is critical. Diacylglycerol-sensitive serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) is activated by AngII in several systems, including the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line NCI H295R, where this enzyme enhances chronic (24 hours) AngII-evoked aldosterone secretion. However, the role of PKD in acute AngII-elicited aldosterone secretion has not been previously examined. In primary cultures of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, which secrete detectable quantities of aldosterone in response to secretagogues within minutes, PKD was activated in response to AngII, but not an elevated potassium concentration or adrenocorticotrophic hormone. This activation was time- and dose-dependent and occurred through the AT1, but not the AT2, receptor. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of constitutively-active PKD resulted in enhanced AngII-induced aldosterone secretion; whereas overexpression of a dominant-negative PKD construct decreased AngII-stimulated aldosterone secretion. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKD mediates acute AngII-induced aldosterone secretion. PMID:19961896

  1. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, inhibits advanced glycation end product (AGE)-elicited mesangial cell damage by suppressing AGE receptor (RAGE) expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Seiji; Fukami, Kei; Okuda, Seiya

    2009-07-24

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor RAGE mediates the progressive alteration in renal architecture and loss of renal function in diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress generation and inflammation also play a central role in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigated whether and how nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), blocked the AGE-elicited mesangial cell damage in vitro. Nifedipine, but not amlodipine, a control CCB, down-regulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGE-exposed mesangial cells. AGE increased mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in mesangial cells, both of which were prevented by the treatment with nifedipine, but not amlodipine. The beneficial effects of nifedipine on AGE-exposed mesangial cells were blocked by the simultaneous treatment of GW9662, an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}). Although nifedipine did not affect expression levels of PPAR-{gamma}, it increased the PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in mesangial cells. Our present study provides a unique beneficial aspect of nifedipine on diabetic nephropathy; it could work as an anti-inflammatory agent against AGE by suppressing RAGE expression in cultured mesangial cells via PPAR-{gamma} activation.

  2. Involvement of the bone morphogenetic protein system in endothelin- and aldosterone-induced cell proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells isolated from human patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryutaro; Otsuka, Fumio; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Yamashita, Misuzu; Otani, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Masaya; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Kusano, Kengo F; Ito, Hiroshi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2010-05-01

    Recent genetic studies have uncovered a link between familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and germline mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein type-II receptor (BMPRII). The pathology of PAH is characterized by remodeling of the pulmonary arteries due to pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) hyperproliferation. Although increased endothelial injury and impaired suppression of PASMC proliferation are both critical for the cellular pathogenesis of PAH, a detailed molecular mechanism underlying PAH has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the roles of the BMP system and other vasoactive factors associated with PAH (including endothelin (ET), angiotensin II (Ang II) and aldosterone) in the mitotic actions of PASMCs isolated from idiopathic and secondary PAH lungs. ET1 and aldosterone stimulated PASMC proliferation of idiopathic PAH more effectively than secondary PAH, whereas Ang II and ET3 failed to activate mitosis in either of the PASMC cell type. The effects of ET1 and aldosterone were blocked by bosentan, an ET type-A/B receptor (ETA/BR) antagonist, and eplerenone, a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blocker, respectively. Among the BMP ligands examined, BMP-2 and BMP-7, but not BMP-4 or BMP-6, significantly increased cell mitosis in both PASMC cell types. Notably, ET1- and aldosterone-induced mitosis and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation were significantly increased in the presence of BMP-2 and BMP-7 in PASMCs isolated from idiopathic PAH, although additive effects were not observed in PASMCs isolated from secondary PAH. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1)/ERK2 signaling suppressed basal-, ET1- and aldosterone-induced PASMC mitosis more potently than that of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibition. Given the fact that BMP-2 and BMP-7 upregulated ETA/BR and MR expression and that BMP-2 decreased 11betaHSD2 (11beta

  3. Interleukin-18 deficiency protects against renal interstitial fibrosis in aldosterone/salt-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Tanino, Akiko; Okura, Takafumi; Nagao, Tomoaki; Kukida, Masayoshi; Pei, Zuowei; Enomoto, Daijiro; Miyoshi, Ken-Ichi; Okamura, Haruki; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and was described originally as an interferon γ-inducing factor. Aldosterone plays a central role in the regulation of sodium and potassium homoeostasis by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor and contributes to kidney and cardiovascular damage. Aldosterone has been reported to induce IL-18, resulting in cardiac fibrosis with induced IL-18-mediated osteopontin (OPN). We therefore hypothesized that aldosterone-induced renal fibrosis via OPN may be mediated by IL-18. To verify this hypothesis, we compared mice deficient in IL-18 and wild-type (WT) mice in a model of aldosterone/salt-induced hypertension. IL-18(-/-) and C57BL/6 WT mice were used for the uninephrectomized aldosterone/salt hypertensive model, whereas NRK-52E cells (rat kidney epithelial cells) were used in an in vitro model. In the present in vivo study, IL-18 protein expression was localized in medullary tubules in the WT mice, whereas in aldosterone-infused WT mice this expression was up-regulated markedly in the proximal tubules, especially in injured and dilated tubules. This renal damage caused by aldosterone was attenuated significantly by IL-18 knockout with down-regulation of OPN expression. In the present in vitro study, aldosterone directly induced IL-18 gene expression in renal tubular epithelial cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These effects were inhibited completely by spironolactone. IL-18 may be a key mediator of aldosterone-induced renal fibrosis by inducing OPN, thereby exacerbating renal interstitial fibrosis. Inhibition of IL-18 may therefore provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention aimed at preventing the progression of renal injury.

  4. Aldosterone Activates Transcription Factor Nrf2 in Kidney Cells Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.; Link, Samuel; Hey, Valentin; Stopper, Helga; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: An increased kidney cancer risk was found in hypertensive patients, who frequently exhibit hyperaldosteronism, known to contribute to kidney injury, with oxidative stress playing an important role. The capacity of kidney cells to up-regulate transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key regulator of the cellular antioxidative defense, as a prevention of aldosterone-induced oxidative damage was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results: Aldosterone activated Nrf2 and increased the expression of enzymes involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis and detoxification. This activation depended on the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and oxidative stress. In vitro, Nrf2 activation, GSH amounts, and target gene levels decreased after 24 h, while oxidant levels remained high. Nrf2 activation could not protect cells against oxidative DNA damage, as aldosterone-induced double-strand breaks and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-guanine (8-oxodG) lesions steadily rose. The Nrf2 activator sulforaphane enhanced the Nrf2 response both in vitro and in vivo, thereby preventing aldosterone-induced DNA damage. In vivo, Nrf2 activation further had beneficial effects on the aldosterone-caused blood pressure increase and loss of kidney function. Innovation: This is the first study showing the activation of Nrf2 by aldosterone. Moreover, the results identify sulforaphane as a substance that is capable of preventing aldosterone-induced damage both in vivo and in vitro. Conclusion: Aldosterone-induced Nrf2 adaptive response cannot neutralize oxidative actions of chronically increased aldosterone, which, therefore could be causally involved in the increased cancer incidence of hypertensive individuals. Enhancing the cellular antioxidative defense with sulforaphane might exhibit beneficial effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2126–2142. PMID:24512358

  5. Secretin is involved in sodium conservation through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

    PubMed

    Bai, Juan; Chow, Billy K C

    2017-04-01

    Secretin (SCT) and its receptor (SCTR) are important in fluid regulation at multiple levels via the modulation of expression and translocation of renal aquaporin 2 and functions of central angiotensin II (ANGII). The functional interaction of SCT with peripheral ANGII, however, remains unknown. As the ANGII-aldosterone axis dominates the regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function, we therefore tested whether SCT/SCTR can regulate sodium homeostasis via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. SCTR-knockout (SCTR(-/-)) mice showed impaired aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) expression and, consequently, aldosterone release upon intraperitoneal injection of ANGII. Endogenous ANGII production induced by dietary sodium restriction was higher in SCTR(-/-) than in C57BL/6N [wild-type (WT)] mice, but CYP11B2 and aldosterone synthesis were not elevated. Reduced accumulation of cholesteryl ester-the precursor of aldosterone-was observed in adrenal glands of SCTR(-/-) mice that were fed a low-sodium diet. Absence of SCTR resulted in elevated basal transcript levels of adrenal CYP11B2 and renal ENaCs. Although transcript and protein levels of ENaCs were similar in WT and SCTR(-/-) mice under sodium restriction, ENaCs in SCTR(-/-) mice were less sensitive to amiloride hydrochloride. In summary, the SCT/SCTR axis is involved in aldosterone precursor uptake, and the knockout of SCTR results in defective aldosterone biosynthesis/release and altered sensitivity of ENaCs to amiloride.-Bai, J., Chow, B. K. C. Secretin is involved in sodium conservation through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

  6. HUMAN INTERVENTIONS TO CHARACTERIZE NOVEL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN-ALDOSTERONE SYSTEM AND PARATHYROID HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer M.; Williams, Jonathan S.; Luther, James M.; Garg, Rajesh; Garza, Amanda E.; Pojoga, Luminita H.; Ruan, Daniel T.; Williams, Gordon H.; Adler, Gail K.; Vaidya, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Observational studies in primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) suggest a positive relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone (PTH); however, interventions to better characterize the physiologic relationship between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and PTH are needed. We evaluated the effect of individual RAAS components on PTH using 4 interventions in humans without PA. PTH was measured before and after: Study 1) low-dose angiotensin II [AngII] infusion (1 ng/kg/min) and captopril administration (25 mg × 1); Study 2) high-dose AngII infusion (3 ng/kg/min); Study 3) blinded crossover randomization to aldosterone infusion (0.7 µg/kg/hr) and vehicle; and Study 4) blinded randomization to spironolactone (50mg/daily) or placebo for 6 weeks. Infusion of AngII at 1 ng/kg/min acutely increased aldosterone (+148%) and PTH (+10.3%), while AngII at 3 ng/kg/min induced larger incremental changes in aldosterone (+241%) and PTH (+36%) (P<0.01). Captopril acutely decreased aldosterone (−12%) and PTH (−9.7%) (P<0.01). In contrast, aldosterone infusion robustly raised serum aldosterone (+892%) without modifying PTH. However, spironolactone therapy over 6 weeks modestly lowered PTH when compared to placebo (P<0.05). In vitro studies revealed the presence of AngII type I and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in normal and adenomatous human parathyroid tissues. We observed novel pleiotropic relationships between RAAS components and the regulation of PTH in individuals without PA: the acute modulation of PTH by the RAAS appears to be mediated by AngII, whereas the long-term influence of the RAAS on PTH may involve aldosterone. Future studies to evaluate the impact of RAAS inhibitors in treating PTH-mediated disorders are warranted. PMID:24191286

  7. Is it safe to use TNF-α blockers for systemic inflammatory disease in patients with heart failure? Importance of dosage and receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Larsen, Alf I; Omdal, Roald

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blockers are widely used in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, especially chronic arthritis. Current guidelines advise against the use of such agents in patients who have a concomitant heart failure. Consequently, a group of patients with a devastating inflammatory disease cannot benefit from an excellent treatment option. After a critical review of the current literature, we conclude that there is not sufficient evidence to warn against such a regimen if recommended standard doses are used. A negative effect on the heart function seems to occur if unconventional high doses of TNF-α blockers are given. The theoretical background for this is discussed.

  8. Impact of drug price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A previous study has suggested that drug price adjustments allow physicians in Taiwan to gain greater profit by prescribing generic drugs. To better understand the effect of price adjustments on physician choice, this study used renin-angiotensin drugs (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] and angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) to examine the impact of price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on patented and off-patent drugs with the same therapeutic indication. Methods Using the Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (2005), we identified 147,157 patients received ACEIs and/or ARBs between 1997 and 2008. The annual incident and prevalent users of ACEIs, ARBs and overall renin-angiotensin drugs were examined. Box-Tiao intervention analysis was applied to assess the impact of price adjustments on monthly utilization of and expenditures on these drugs. ACEIs were divided into patented and off-patent drugs, off-patent ACEIs were further divided into original brands and generics, and subgroup analyses were performed. Results The number of incident renin-angiotensin drug users decreased over the study period. The number of prevalent ARB users increased and exceeded the cumulative number of first-time renin-angiotensin drug users starting on ARBs, implying that some patients switched from ACEIs to ARBs. After price adjustments, long term trend increases in utilization were observed for patented ACEIs and ARBs; a long-term trend decrease was observed for off-patent ACEIs; long-term trend change was not significant for overall renin-angiotensin drugs. Significant long-term trend increases in expenditures were observed for patented ACEIs after price adjustment in 2007 (200.9%, p = 0.0088) and in ARBs after price adjustments in 2001 (173.4%, p < 0.0001) and 2007 (146.3%, p < 0.0001). A significant long-term trend decrease in expenditures was observed for off-patent ACEIs after 2004 price adjustment (

  9. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and receptor blockers on appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock in patients with severe systolic heart failure (from the GRADE Multicenter Study).

    PubMed

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Refaat, Marwan M; Habib, Robert H; Al-Shaar, Laila; Singh, Madhurmeet; Gutmann, Rebecca; Bloom, Heather L; Dudley, Samuel C; Ellinor, Patrick T; Saba, Samir F; Shalaby, Alaa A; Weiss, Raul; McNamara, Dennis M; Halder, Indrani; London, Barry

    2015-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with cardiomyopathy. Although angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) decrease cardiac mortality in these cohorts, their role in preventing SCD has not been well established. We sought to determine whether the use of ACEi or ARB in patients with cardiomyopathy is associated with a lower incidence of appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) shocks in the Genetic Risk Assessment of Defibrillator Events study that included subjects with an ejection fraction of ≤30% and ICDs. Treatment with ACEi/ARB versus no-ACEi/ARB was physician dependent. There were 1,509 patients (mean age [SD] 63 [12] years, 80% men, mean [SD] EF 21% [6%]) with 1,213 (80%) on ACEi/ARB and 296 (20%) not on ACEi/ARB. We identified 574 propensity-matched patients (287 in each group). After a mean (SD) of 2.5 (1.9) years, there were 334 (22%) appropriate shocks in the entire cohort. The use of ACEi/ARB was associated with lower incidence of shocks at 1, 3, and 5 years in the matched cohort (7.7%, 16.7%, and 18.5% vs 13.2%, 27.5%, and 32.0%; RR = 0.61 [0.43 to 0.86]; p = 0.005). Among patients with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) >60 and 30 to 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), those on no-ACEi/ARB were at 45% and 77% increased risk of ICD shock compared with those on ACEi/ARB, respectively. ACEi/ARB were associated with significant lower incidence of appropriate ICD shock in patients with cardiomyopathy and GFR ≥30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and with neutral effect in those with GFR <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2).

  10. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hubers, Scott A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the FDA approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure; valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses two of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of heart failure - activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared to enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacologic properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. PMID:26976916

  11. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hubers, Scott A; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-03-15

    Heart failure affects ≈5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, β-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure: Valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses 2 of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure: activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared with enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacological properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension.

  12. Aldosterone induces rapid sodium intake by a nongenomic mechanism in the nucleus tractus solitarius

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hu; Hu, Bo; Zhou, Hong; Yan, Jianqun; Jia, Ru; Lu, Bo; Sun, Bo; Luo, Xiao; Fan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether aldosterone has a rapid action in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) that increases sodium intake, and to examine whether this effect of aldosterone, if present, is mediated by G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with a stainless-steel cannula in the NTS were used. Aldosterone was injected into the NTS at the doses of 1, 5, 10 and 20 ng 0.1 μl−1. A rapid dose-related increase of 0.3 M NaCl intake was induced within 30 min and this increase was not suppressed by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone (10 ng 0.1 μl−1). Water intake was not affected by aldosterone. The GPER agonist G-1 produced a parallel and significant increase in sodium intake, while pre-treatment with GPER antagonist G15 (10 ng 0.1 μl−1) blocked the G-1 or aldosterone-induced rapid sodium intake. In addition, sodium intake induced by sodium depletion or low-sodium diet fell within 30 min after injection into the NTS of the MR antagonist spironolactone, while G15 had no effect. Our results confirm previous reports, and support the hypothesis that aldosterone evokes rapid sodium intake through a non-genomic mechanism involving GPER in NTS. PMID:27934887

  13. β-Adrenergic blockers.

    PubMed

    Frishman, William H; Saunders, Elijah

    2011-09-01

    KEY POINTS AND PRACTICAL RECOMMENDATIONS: •  β-Blockers are appropriate treatment for patients with hypertension and those who have concomitant ischemic heart disease, heart failure, obstructive cardiomyopathy, or certain arrhythmias. •  β-Blockers can be used in combination with other antihypertensive drugs to achieve maximal blood pressure control. Labetalol can be used in hypertensive emergencies and urgencies. •  β-Blockers may be useful in patients having hyperkinetic circulation (palpitations, tachycardia, hypertension, and anxiety), migraine headache, and essential tremor. •  β-Blockers are highly heterogeneous with respect to various pharmacologic effects: degree of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity, membrane-stabilizing activity, β(1) selectivity, α(1) -adrenergic-blocking effect, tissue solubility, routes of systemic elimination, potencies and duration of action, and specific effects may be important in the selection of a drug for clinical use. •  β-Blocker usage to reduce perioperative ischemia and cardiovascular complications may not benefit as many patients as was once hoped and may actually cause harm in some individuals. Currently the best evidence supports β-blocker use in two patient groups: patients undergoing vascular surgery with known ischemic heart disease or multiple risk factors for it and for patients already receiving β-blockers for known cardiovascular conditions.

  14. Beta blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thadani, U

    1983-11-10

    Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are effective in the management of patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension. Noncardioselective agents, cardioselective agents and beta blockers with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) are equally effective, provided they are used in equipotent doses. Beta blockers can be used as first-line therapy in the management of hypertension and can be safely combined with diuretics, vasodilators, or both, for a better control of blood pressure. The exact mechanism by which beta blockers decrease blood pressure remains speculative, but they all reduce cardiac output during long-term therapy; drugs with ISA lower cardiac output and heart rate less than do drugs without ISA. Pharmacokinetic properties of beta blockers differ widely; drugs metabolized by the liver have shorter plasma half-lives than drugs primarily excreted by the kidneys. Although many of the side effects of various beta blockers are similar, differences in water and lipid solubility account for a higher incidence of central nervous system side effects with lipid-soluble drugs (such as propranolol and metoprolol) than with hydrophilic drugs (such as atenolol and timolol). The incidence of cold extremities has been reported to be less with drugs with ISA, and the incidence of bronchospasm less with cardioselective drugs. In the management of uncomplicated mild-to-moderate hypertension, all beta blockers are equally effective and produce less troublesome side effects than alternative antihypertensive agents. For effective therapy beta blockers can be used in 2 divided daily doses or even once daily.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Time to virological failure with atazanavir/ritonavir and lopinavir/ritonavir, with or without an H2-receptor blocker, not significantly different in HIV observational database study.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Philip H; Nassar, Naiel

    2008-08-01

    A retrospective electronic database study was conducted to determine any differences in time to virological failure and percent of virological failure among HIV-infected patients concurrently receiving H2-blockers versus patients not receiving these agents while receiving atazanavir (ATV)/ritonavir (r) or lopinavir (LPV)/r-containing antiretroviral treatment regimens. Data were culled from October 2003 (when ATV became commercially available) through February 2006. Virological failure was defined as (1) two plasma HIV-1 RNA levels >400 copies/mL after at least one HIV-1 RNA level below the level of detection or (2) failure to achieve an HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL within 24 weeks. Data from 267 ATV/r-treated patients who met the case definition were compared with data from 670 LPV/r-treated patients. Approximately 10% of the ATV/r group received concurrent H2-blockers when compared with 20% of the LPV/r group. Multivariate analysis showed no statistically significant differences regarding time to virological failure between or among the four subgroups, adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics (P = 0.79, log-rank test). At 750 days following treatment initiation, the proportion of patients not experiencing virological failure was 56% in the ATV/r-blocker subgroup, 48% in the ATV/r-alone subgroup, 45% in the LPV/r-alone subgroup and 42% in the LPV/r-blocker subgroup.

  16. Redefining beta-blocker use in hypertension: selecting the right beta-blocker and the right patient.

    PubMed

    Mann, Samuel J

    2017-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials have concluded that the cardiovascular outcome of first-step treatment of hypertension with traditional vasoconstricting beta-blockers is inferior to treatment with other antihypertensive drug classes. Beta-blocker use is also associated with undesirable side effects. Consequently, some recent guidelines consider beta-blockers an inferior option for first-step treatment of hypertension. Despite this, beta-blockers are still widely prescribed, and likely overused, in the management of hypertension. It is the contention of this perspective that beta-blockers do have an important role in treating hypertension, but their use needs to be much better targeted, by better identification of both the right patient and the right beta-blocker. Identifying the right patient involves consideration of underlying mechanisms of hypertension. In the absence of comorbidities for which a beta-blocker is indicated, beta-blockers would not seem to be the preferred treatment for patients with either sodium/volume-mediated hypertension, for which they are usually ineffective, or for those with renin-angiotensin system-mediated hypertension, for which angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers provide equal antihypertensive efficacy with evidence of better outcome and fewer adverse effects. Beta-blockers would instead appear to be best suited for patients with sympathetically driven, that is, neurogenic, hypertension, whether as a first-step drug, such as in patients with hypertension in the acute post-stroke period, in so-called "hyperkinetic" patients, and in patients with labile hypertension, or as an add-on drug in patients with resistant hypertension. In choosing among the beta-blockers, combined alpha/beta-blockade offers advantages over beta-blocker monotherapy and merits greater clinical and research attention. Finally, unreliable bioavailability greatly interferes with the effectiveness of lipophilic, but not

  17. Management of hyperkalaemia consequent to mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Roscioni, Sara S; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bakker, Stephan J L; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J

    2012-12-01

    Mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists (MRAs) reduce blood pressure and albuminuria in patients treated with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II-receptor blockers. The use of MRAs, however, is limited by the occurrence of hyperkalaemia, which frequently occurs in patients older than 65 years with impaired kidney function, and/or diabetes. Patients with these characteristics might still benefit from MRA therapy, however, and should not be excluded from this treatment option. This limitation raises the question of how to optimize the therapeutic use of MRAs in this population of patients. Understanding the individual variability in patients' responses to MRAs, in terms of albuminuria, blood pressure and serum potassium levels, might lead to targeted intervention. MRA use might be restricted to patients with high levels of mineralocorticoid activity, evaluated by circulating renin and aldosterone levels or renal excretion of potassium. In addition, reviewing the patient's diet and concomitant medications might prove useful in reducing the risk of developing subsequent hyperkalaemia. If hyperkalaemia does develop, treatment options exist to decrease potassium levels, including administration of calcium gluconate, insulin, β(2)-agonists, diuretics and cation-exchange resins. In combination with novel aldosterone blockers, these strategies might offer a rationale with which to optimize therapeutic intervention and extend the population of patients who can benefit from use of MRAs.

  18. Aldosterone decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo in mice and in murine islets

    PubMed Central

    Luo, P.; Kreger, M. T.; Brissova, M.; Dai, C.; Whitfield, T. T.; Kim, H. S.; Wasserman, D. H.; Powers, A. C.; Brown, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Aldosterone concentrations increase in obesity and predict the onset of diabetes. We investigated the effects of aldosterone on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in vivo and in vitro. Methods We assessed insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in aldosterone synthase-deficient (As [also known as Cyp11b2]−/−)and wild-type mice using euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic clamps, respectively. We also conducted studies during high sodium intake to normalise renin activity and potassium concentration in As−/− mice. We subsequently assessed the effect of aldosterone on insulin secretion in vitro in the presence or absence of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in isolated C57BL/6J islets and in the MIN6 beta cell line. Results Fasting glucose concentrations were reduced in As−/−mice compared with wild-type. During hyperglycaemic clamps, insulin and C-peptide concentrations increased to a greater extent in As−/− than in wild-type mice. This was not attributable to differences in potassium or angiotensin II, as glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was enhanced in As−/− mice even during high sodium intake. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity between As−/− and wild-type mice in euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp studies. In islet and MIN6 beta cell studies, aldosterone inhibited glucose and isobutylmethylxanthine-stimulated insulin secretion, an effect that was not blocked by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism, but was prevented by the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol. Conclusions/interpretation We demonstrated that aldosterone deficiency or excess modulates insulin secretion in vivo and in vitro via reactive oxygen species and in a manner that is independent of mineralocorticoid receptors. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of glucose intolerance in conditions of relative aldosterone excess. PMID:21519965

  19. The noncompetitive blocker ( sup 3 H)chlorpromazine labels three amino acids of the acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit: Implications for the alpha-helical organization of regions MII and for the structure of the ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Revah, F.; Galzi, J.L.; Giraudat, J.; Haumont, P.Y.; Lederer, F.; Changeux, J.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Labeling studies of Torpedo marmorata nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the noncompetitive channel blocker ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine have led to the initial identification of amino acids plausibly participating to the walls of the ion channel on the alpha, beta, and delta subunits. We report here results obtained with the gamma subunit, which bring additional information on the structure of the channel. After photolabeling of the membrane-bound receptor under equilibrium conditions in the presence of agonist and with or without phencyclidine (a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers), the purified labeled gamma subunit was digested with trypsin, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by HPLC. Sequence analysis of peptide mixtures containing various amounts of highly hydrophobic fragments showed that three amino acids are labeled by ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine in a phencyclidine-sensitive manner: Thr-253, Ser-257, and Leu-260. These residues all belong to the hydrophobic and putative transmembrane region MII of the gamma subunit. Their distribution along the sequence is consistent with an alpha-helical organization of this segment. The ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine-labeled amino acids are conserved at homologous positions in the known sequences of other ligand-gated ion channels and may, thus, play a critical role in ion-transport mechanisms.

  20. In silico optimization of pharmacokinetic properties and receptor binding affinity simultaneously: a 'parallel progression approach to drug design' applied to β-blockers.

    PubMed

    Advani, Poonam; Joseph, Blessy; Ambre, Premlata; Pissurlenkar, Raghuvir; Khedkar, Vijay; Iyer, Krishna; Gabhe, Satish; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Coutinho, Evans

    2016-01-01

    The present work exploits the potential of in silico approaches for minimizing attrition of leads in the later stages of drug development. We propose a theoretical approach, wherein 'parallel' information is generated to simultaneously optimize the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of lead candidates. β-blockers, though in use for many years, have suboptimal PKs; hence are an ideal test series for the 'parallel progression approach'. This approach utilizes molecular modeling tools viz. hologram quantitative structure activity relationships, homology modeling, docking, predictive metabolism, and toxicity models. Validated models have been developed for PK parameters such as volume of distribution (log Vd) and clearance (log Cl), which together influence the half-life (t1/2) of a drug. Simultaneously, models for PD in terms of inhibition constant pKi have been developed. Thus, PK and PD properties of β-blockers were concurrently analyzed and after iterative cycling, modifications were proposed that lead to compounds with optimized PK and PD. We report some of the resultant re-engineered β-blockers with improved half-lives and pKi values comparable with marketed β-blockers. These were further analyzed by the docking studies to evaluate their binding poses. Finally, metabolic and toxicological assessment of these molecules was done through in silico methods. The strategy proposed herein has potential universal applicability, and can be used in any drug discovery scenario; provided that the data used is consistent in terms of experimental conditions, endpoints, and methods employed. Thus the 'parallel progression approach' helps to simultaneously fine-tune various properties of the drug and would be an invaluable tool during the drug development process.

  1. Marine Bivalve Cellular Responses to Beta Blocker Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    β blockers are prescription drugs used for medical treatment of hypertension and arrhythmias. They prevent binding of agonists such as catecholamines to β adrenoceptors. In the absence of agonist induced activation of the receptor, adenylate cyclase is not activated whi...

  2. Suppression of Aldosterone Secretion After Recumbent Saline Infusion Does Not Exclude Lateralized Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Erika; Steichen, Olivier; Nogueira-Silva, Luis; Küpers, Elselien; Pagny, Jean-Yves; Grataloup, Christine; Baron, Stéphanie; Zinzindohoue, Franck; Plouin, Pierre-François; Amar, Laurence

    2016-10-01

    Guidelines recommend suppression tests such as the saline infusion test (SIT) to ascertain the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism (PA) in patients with a high aldosterone:renin ratio. However, suppression tests have only been evaluated in small retrospective series, and some experts consider that they are not helpful for the diagnosis of PA. In this study, we evaluated whether low post-SIT aldosterone concentrations do exclude lateralized PA. Between February 2009 and December 2013, 199 patients diagnosed with PA on the basis of 2 elevated aldosterone:renin ratio results and a high basal plasma or urinary aldosterone level or high post-SIT aldosterone level had a selective adrenal venous sampling. We used a selectivity index of 2 and a lateralization index of 4 to interpret the adrenal venous sampling results. Baseline characteristics of the patients were the following (percent or median): men 63%, 48 years old, office blood pressure 142/88 mm Hg, serum potassium 3.4 mmol/L, aldosterone:renin ratio 113 pmol/mU, plasma aldosterone concentration 588 pmol/L. The proportion of patients with lateralized adrenal venous sampling was 12 of 41 (29%) among those with post-SIT aldosterone <139 pmol/L (5 ng/dL) and 38 of 104 (37%) among those with post-SIT aldosterone <277 pmol/L (10 ng/dL). Post-SIT aldosterone levels were not associated with the blood pressure outcome of adrenalectomy. A low post-SIT aldosterone level cannot rule out lateralized PA, even with a low threshold (139 pmol/L). Adrenal venous sampling should be considered for patients who are eligible for surgery with elevated basal aldosterone levels even if they have low aldosterone concentrations after recumbent saline suppression testing.

  3. Rationale and study design of the Prospective comparison of Angiotensin Receptor neprilysin inhibitor with Angiotensin receptor blocker MEasuring arterial sTiffness in the eldERly (PARAMETER) study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bryan; Cockcroft, John R; Kario, Kazuomi; Zappe, Dion H; Cardenas, Pamela; Hester, Allen; Brunel, Patrick; Zhang, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension in elderly people is characterised by elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increased pulse pressure (PP), which indicate large artery ageing and stiffness. LCZ696, a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI), is being developed to treat hypertension and heart failure. The Prospective comparison of Angiotensin Receptor neprilysin inhibitor with Angiotensin receptor blocker MEasuring arterial sTiffness in the eldERly (PARAMETER) study will assess the efficacy of LCZ696 versus olmesartan on aortic stiffness and central aortic haemodynamics. Methods and analysis In this 52-week multicentre study, patients with hypertension aged ≥60 years with a mean sitting (ms) SBP ≥150 to <180 and a PP>60 mm Hg will be randomised to once daily LCZ696 200 mg or olmesartan 20 mg for 4 weeks, followed by a forced-titration to double the initial doses for the next 8 weeks. At 12–24 weeks, if the BP target has not been attained (msSBP <140  and ms diastolic BP <90 mm Hg), amlodipine (2.5–5 mg) and subsequently hydrochlorothiazide (6.25–25 mg) can be added. The primary and secondary endpoints are changes from baseline in central aortic systolic pressure (CASP) and central aortic PP (CAPP) at week 12, respectively. Other secondary endpoints are the changes in CASP and CAPP at week 52. A sample size of 432 randomised patients is estimated to ensure a power of 90% to assess the superiority of LCZ696 over olmesartan at week 12 in the change from baseline of mean CASP, assuming an SD of 19 mm Hg, the difference of 6.5 mm Hg and a 15% dropout rate. The primary variable will be analysed using a two-way analysis of covariance. Ethics and dissemination The study was initiated in December 2012 and final results are expected in 2015. The results of this study will impact the design of future phase III studies assessing cardiovascular protection. Clinical trials identifier EUDract number 2012

  4. The path to an angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-03-17

    The PARADIGM-HF (Prospective comparison of ARNi with ACEi to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure) trial demonstrated that a new angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor was superior to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in reducing mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. This paper traces the research path that culminated in the development of this drug. The first phase, elucidation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, began with Tigerstedt's discovery of renin, followed by isolation of angiotensin, isolation of angiotensin-converting enzyme, and synthesis of its inhibitors and of angiotensin receptor blockers. Phase 2 began with de Bold's discovery of atrial natriuretic peptide, followed by isolation of the enzyme that degrades it (neprilysin) and its inhibitors. Phase 3 consists of blocking both the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide-degrading systems simultaneously. A molecular complex, LCZ696, developed by scientists at Novartis, combines an angiotensin receptor blocker with a neprilysin inhibitor, is well tolerated, and represents an important step in the management of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction.

  5. [Aldosterone and kidney diseases: an emergent paradigm with important clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2011-06-01

    Slowing the progression of chronic kidney diseases needs new efficient treatments. Aldosterone classically acts on the distal nephron: it allows sodium reabsorption, potassium secretion and participates to blood volume control. Recently, new targets of aldosterone have been described including the heart and the vasculature but also non-epithelial kidney cells such as mesangial cells, podocytes and renal fibroblasts. The pathophysiological implication of aldosterone and its receptor, the mineralocorticoid receptor has been demonstrated ex vivo in cell culture and in vivo in experimental animal models with kidney damages such as diabetic and hypertensive kidney nephropathies, chronic kidney disease and glomerulopathies. The beneficial effects of the pharmacological antagonists of the mineralocorticoid receptor are independent of the hypertensive effect of aldosterone, indicating that blocking the activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor in these non-classical renal targets may be of clinical importance. Several clinical studies now report benefit and safety when using spironolactone or eplerenone, the currently available mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, in patients with kidney diseases. In this review, we discuss the recent results reported in experimental and clinical research in this domain.

  6. The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (2013 Grover Conference series).

    PubMed

    Maron, Bradley A; Leopold, Jane A

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with aberrant pulmonary vascular remodeling that leads to increased pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and right ventricular dysfunction. There is now accumulating evidence that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is activated and contributes to cardiopulmonary remodeling that occurs in PAH. Increased plasma and lung tissue levels of angiotensin and aldosterone have been detected in experimental models of PAH and shown to correlate with cardiopulmonary hemodynamics and pulmonary vascular remodeling. These processes are abrogated by treatment with angiotensin receptor or mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. At a cellular level, angiotensin and aldosterone activate oxidant stress signaling pathways that decrease levels of bioavailable nitric oxide, increase inflammation, and promote cell proliferation, migration, extracellular matrix remodeling, and fibrosis. Clinically, enhanced renin-angiotensin activity and elevated levels of aldosterone have been detected in patients with PAH, which suggests a role for angiotensin and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in the treatment of PAH. This review will examine the current evidence linking renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation to PAH with an emphasis on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are modulated by aldosterone and may be of importance for the pathobiology of PAH.

  7. Clinical impacts of additive use of olmesartan in hypertensive patients with chronic heart failure: the supplemental benefit of an angiotensin receptor blocker in hypertensive patients with stable heart failure using olmesartan (SUPPORT) trial.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yasuhiko; Shiba, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Jun; Miyata, Satoshi; Nochioka, Kotaro; Miura, Masanobu; Takada, Tsuyoshi; Saga, Chiharu; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Masafumi; Nakagawa, Makoto; Sekiguchi, Nobuyo; Komaru, Tatsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Fukuchi, Mitsumasa; Nozaki, Eiji; Hiramoto, Tetsuya; Inoue, Kanichi; Goto, Toshikazu; Ohe, Masatoshi; Tamaki, Kenji; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Ishide, Nobumasa; Maruyama, Yukio; Tsuji, Ichiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2015-04-14

    We examined whether an additive treatment with an angiotensin receptor blocker, olmesartan, reduces the mortality and morbidity in hypertensive patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, β-blockers, or both. In this prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded endpoint study, a total of 1147 hypertensive patients with symptomatic CHF (mean age 66 years, 75% male) were randomized to the addition of olmesartan (n = 578) to baseline therapy vs. control (n = 569). The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause death, non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, and hospitalization for worsening heart failure. During a median follow-up of 4.4 years, the primary endpoint occurred in 192 patients (33.2%) in the olmesartan group and in 166 patients (29.2%) in the control group [hazard ratio (HR) 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.46, P = 0.112], while renal dysfunction developed more frequently in the olmesartan group (16.8 vs. 10.7%, HR 1.64; 95% CI 1.19-2.26, P = 0.003). Subgroup analysis revealed that addition of olmesartan to combination of ACE inhibitors and β-blockers was associated with increased incidence of the primary endpoint (38.1 vs. 28.2%, HR 1.47; 95% CI 1.11-1.95, P = 0.006), all-cause death (19.4 vs. 13.5%, HR 1.50; 95% CI 1.01-2.23, P = 0.046), and renal dysfunction (21.1 vs. 12.5%, HR 1.85; 95% CI 1.24-2.76, P = 0.003). Additive use of olmesartan did not improve clinical outcomes but worsened renal function in hypertensive CHF patients treated with evidence-based medications. Particularly, the triple combination therapy with olmesartan, ACE inhibitors and β-blockers was associated with increased adverse cardiac events. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov-NCT00417222.

  8. Serum aldosterone and death, end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular events in blacks and whites: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Deo, Rajat; Yang, Wei; Khan, Abigail M; Bansal, Nisha; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leonard, Mary B; Keane, Martin G; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Steigerwalt, Susan; Townsend, Raymond R; Shlipak, Michael G; Feldman, Harold I

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that elevated aldosterone concentrations are an independent risk factor for death in patients with cardiovascular disease. Limited studies, however, have evaluated systematically the association between serum aldosterone and adverse events in the setting of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the association between serum aldosterone and death and end-stage renal disease in 3866 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort. We also evaluated the association between aldosterone and incident congestive heart failure and atherosclerotic events in participants without baseline cardiovascular disease. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate independent associations between elevated aldosterone concentrations and each outcome. Interactions were hypothesized and explored between aldosterone and sex, race, and the use of loop diuretics and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors. During a median follow-up period of 5.4 years, 587 participants died, 743 developed end-stage renal disease, 187 developed congestive heart failure, and 177 experienced an atherosclerotic event. Aldosterone concentrations (per SD of the log-transformed aldosterone) were not an independent risk factor for death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.12), end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.17), or atherosclerotic events (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.18). Aldosterone was associated with congestive heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.35). Among participants with chronic kidney disease, higher aldosterone concentrations were independently associated with the development of congestive heart failure but not for death, end-stage renal disease, or atherosclerotic events. Further studies should evaluate whether mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may reduce adverse events in individuals with

  9. SFE/SFHTA/AFCE consensus on primary aldosteronism, part 7: Medical treatment of primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Herpin, Daniel; Lefebvre, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Spironolactone, which is a potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, represents the first line medical treatment of primary aldosteronism (PA). As spironolactone is also an antagonist of the androgen and progesterone receptor, it may present side effects, especially in male patients. In case of intolerance to spironolactone, amiloride may be used to control hypokaliemia and we suggest that eplerenone, which is a more selective but less powerful antagonist of the mineralocorticoid receptor, be used in case of intolerance to spironolactone and insufficient control of hypertension by amiloride. Specific calcic inhibitors and thiazide diuretics may be used as second or third line therapy. Medical treatment of bilateral forms of PA seem to be as efficient as surgical treatment of lateralized PA for the control of hypertension and the prevention of cardiovascular and renal morbidities. This allows to propose medical treatment of PA to patients with lateralized forms of PA who refuse surgery or to patients with PA who do not want to be explored by adrenal venous sampling to determine whether they have a bilateral or lateralized form.

  10. Pharmacogenetics of beta-blockers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaekyu; Johnson, Julie A

    2007-06-01

    Beta-blockers are an important cardiovascular drug class, recommended as first-line treatment of numerous diseases such as heart failure, hypertension, and angina, as well as treatment after myocardial infarction. However, responses to a beta-blocker are variable among patients. Results of numerous studies now suggest that genetic polymorphisms may contribute to variability in responses to beta-blockers. This review summarizes the pharmacogenetic data for beta-blockers in patients with various diseases and discusses the potential implications of beta-blocker pharmacogenetics in clinical practice.

  11. Drug therapy of apparent treatment-resistant hypertension: focus on mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Glicklich, Daniel; Frishman, William H

    2015-04-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mmHg despite three different antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. aTRH is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke, chronic renal failure, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, aortic aneurysm, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Preliminary studies of renal nerve ablation as a therapy to control aTRH were encouraging. However, these results were not confirmed by the Symplicity 3 trial. Therefore, attention has refocused on drug therapy. Secondary forms of hypertension and associated conditions such as obesity, sleep apnea, and primary aldosteronism are common in patients with aTRH. The pivotal role of aldosterone in the pathogenesis of aTRH in many cases is well recognized. For patients with aTRH, the Joint National Committee-8, the European Society of Hypertension, and a recent consensus conference recommend that a diuretic, ACE inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and calcium channel blocker combination be used to maximally tolerated doses before starting a 'fourth-line' drug such as a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Although the best fourth-line drug for aTRH has not been extensively investigated, a number of studies summarized here show that an MR antagonist is effective in reducing BP when added to the standard multi-drug regimen.

  12. Transforming growth factor beta1 and aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kota; Hathaway, Catherine K.; Chang, Albert S.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review It is well established that blocking renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system (RAAS) is effective for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal complications in hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Although the induction of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) by components of RAAS mediates the hypertrophic and fibrogenic changes in cardiovascular-renal complications, it is still controversial as to whether TGFbeta1 can be a target to prevent such complications. Here we review recent findings on the role of TGFbeta1 in fluid homeostasis, focusing on the relationship with aldosterone. Recent findings TGFbeta1 suppresses adrenal production of aldosterone and renal tubular sodium reabsorption. We have generated mice with TGFbeta1 mRNA expression graded in five steps from 10% to 300% normal, and found that blood pressure and plasma volume are negatively regulated by TGFbeta1. Notably, the 10 % hypomorph exhibits primary aldosteronism and sodium and water retention due to markedly impaired urinary excretion of water and electrolytes. Summary These results identify TGFbeta signaling as an important counterregulatory system against aldosterone. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for the suppressive effects of TGFbeta1 on adrenocortical and renal function may further our understanding of primary aldosteronism as well as assist in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for hypertension. PMID:25587902

  13. Primary Aldosteronism and ARMC5 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Zilbermint, Mihail; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Faucz, Fabio R.; Berthon, Annabel; Gkourogianni, Alexandra; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Batsis, Maria; Sinaii, Ninet; Quezado, Martha M.; Merino, Maria; Hodes, Aaron; Abraham, Smita B.; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Davis, Adam; Gebreab, Samson Y.; Neff, Ryan; Kebebew, Electron; Bertherat, Jérôme; Lodish, Maya B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Primary aldosteronism is one of the leading causes of secondary hypertension, causing significant morbidity and mortality. A number of genetic defects have recently been identified in primary aldosteronism, whereas we identified mutations in ARMC5, a tumor-suppressor gene, in cortisol-producing primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Objective: We investigated a cohort of 56 patients who were referred to the National Institutes of Health for evaluation of primary aldosteronism for ARMC5 defects. Methods: Patients underwent step-wise diagnosis, with measurement of serum aldosterone and plasma renin activity followed by imaging, saline suppression and/or oral salt loading tests, plus adrenal venous sampling. Cortisol secretion was also evaluated; unilateral or bilateral adrenalectomy was performed, if indicated. DNA, protein, and transfection studies in H295R cells were conducted by standard methods. Results: We identified 12 germline ARMC5 genetic alterations in 20 unrelated and two related individuals in our cohort (39.3%). ARMC5 sequence changes in 6 patients (10.7%) were predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis. All affected patients carrying a variant predicted to be damaging were African Americans (P = .0023). Conclusions: Germline ARMC5 variants may be associated with primary aldosteronism. Additional cohorts of patients with primary aldosteronism and metabolic syndrome, particularly African Americans, should be screened for ARMC5 sequence variants because these may underlie part of the known increased predisposition of African Americans to low renin hypertension. PMID:25822102

  14. Circadian Rhythm of Plasma Aldosterone Concentration in Patients with Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Kem, David C.; Weinberger, Myron H.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Kramer, Norman J.; Lerman, Robert; Furuyama, Shunsuke; Nugent, Charles A.

    1973-01-01

    Plasma aldosterone, cortisol, and renin activity were measured in nine recumbent patients with hyperaldosteronism, including seven with adenomas, one with idiopathic hyperplasia, and one with glucocorticoid suppressible hyperplasia. All had peak values of plasma aldosterone concentration from 3 a.m. to noon and lowest values at 6 p.m. or midnight. This rhythm was similar to the circadian pattern of plasma cortisol in the same patients. When these data were normalized to eliminate the wide variation in ranges of plasma aldosterone and cortisol between individuals, there was an excellent correlation (r = + 0.87, P < 0.005) between the two hormones. In contrast, plasma aldosterone concentrations did not correlate with plasma renin activity before or after normalization of data. Short term suppression of ACTH by administration of dexamethasone eliminated the circadian variation of plasma aldosterone in both patients with hyperplasia and in four of five patients with adenomas, while it markedly altered the rhythm in the fifth. Similar doses of dexamethasone were administered to four normal subjects and did not flatten the circadian rhythm of plasma aldosterone. These data suggest that patients with primary aldosteronism have a circadian rhythm of plasma aldosterone mediated by changes in ACTH. PMID:4353776

  15. Occurrence and fate of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist transformation product valsartan acid in the water cycle--a comparative study with selected β-blockers and the persistent anthropogenic wastewater indicators carbamazepine and acesulfame.

    PubMed

    Nödler, Karsten; Hillebrand, Olav; Idzik, Krzysztof; Strathmann, Martin; Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Licha, Tobias

    2013-11-01

    The substantial transformation of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist valsartan to the transformation product 2'-(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid (referred to as valsartan acid) during the activated sludge process was demonstrated in the literature and confirmed in the here presented study. However, there was a severe lack of knowledge regarding the occurrence and fate of this compound in surface water and its behavior during drinking water treatment. In this work a comparative study on the occurrence and persistency of valsartan acid, three frequently used β-blockers (metoprolol, atenolol, and sotalol), atenolol acid (one significant transformation product of atenolol and metoprolol), and the two widely distributed persistent anthropogenic wastewater indicators carbamazepine and acesulfame in raw sewage, treated wastewater, surface water, groundwater, and tap water is presented. Median concentrations of valsartan acid in the analyzed matrices were 101, 1,310, 69, <1.0, and 65 ng L(-1), respectively. Treated effluents from wastewater treatment plants were confirmed as significant source. Regarding concentration levels of pharmaceutical residues in surface waters valsartan acid was found just as relevant as the analyzed β-blockers and the anticonvulsant carbamazepine. Regarding its persistency in surface waters it was comparable to carbamazepine and acesulfame. Furthermore, removal of valsartan acid during bank filtration was poor, which demonstrated the relevance of this compound for drinking water suppliers. Regarding drinking water treatment (Muelheim Process) the compound was resistant to ozonation but effectively eliminated (≥90%) by subsequent activated carbon filtration. However, without applying activated carbon filtration the compound may enter the drinking water distribution system as it was demonstrated for Berlin tap water.

  16. Beta-Blockers and Calcium Channel Blockers: First Line Agents.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Isaac; Moris, Cesar; Avanzas, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    Beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers (CCB) are milestones in the treatment of stable coronary ischaemic disease. Their main effects are particularly suited for the management of effort-induced angina because of the reduction of oxygen demand they achieve. The clinical benefits of these drugs are highly reproducible and have been shown to improve overall clinical outcomes. Despite the availability of other, and newer antianginal drugs, treatment guidelines continue to recommend the use of beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers as first line therapies.

  17. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used.

  18. Case Report: A case report of acromegaly associated with primary aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Matrozova, Joanna; Vandeva, Silvia; Zacharieva, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient with a rare combination of acromegaly and primary aldosteronism. A 37 year-old female patient was diagnosed with acromegaly on the basis of typical clinical, hormonal and image characteristics. She presented also with one of the most common co-morbidities – arterial hypertension. The patient has been regularly followed-up and after three surgical interventions, irradiation and adjuvant treatment with a dopamine agonist, acromegaly was finally controlled in 2008 (20 years after diagnosis). Arterial hypertension however, remained a therapeutic problem even after prescription of four antihypertensive drugs. She had normal biochemical parameters, except for low potassium levels 3.2 (3.5-5.6) mmol/l. This raised the suspicion of primary hyperaldosteronism, confirmed by a high aldosterone to plasma rennin activity ratio, high aldosterone level after a Captopril challenge test and visualization of a 35 mm left adrenal nodule on a CT scan. After an operation, the patient recovered from hypokalemia and antihypertensive therapy was reduced to a small dose of a Ca blocker. Co-morbid arterial hypertension is common in acromegaly, though it is rare for this to be caused by Conn’s adenoma. The association of Conn’s adenoma with acromegaly has been interpreted in two lines: as a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type (MEN1) syndrome or as a direct mitogenic effect of hyperactivated GH-IGF1 axis. PMID:25210615

  19. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism and excretion of [(14)C]-lanicemine (AZD6765), a novel low-trapping N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor channel blocker, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Zhou, Diansong; Grimm, Scott W; Bui, Khanh H

    2015-03-01

    1.(1S)-1-phenyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethanamine (lanicemine; AZD6765) is a low-trapping N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) channel blocker that has been studied as an adjunctive treatment in major depressive disorder. The metabolism and disposition of lanicemine was determined in six healthy male subjects after a single intravenous infusion dose of 150 mg [(14)C]-lanicemine. 2.Blood, urine and feces were collected from all subjects. The ratios of Cmax and AUC(0-∞) of lanicemine to plasma total radioactivity were 84 and 66%, respectively, indicating that lanicemine was the major circulating component with T1/2 at 16 h. The plasma clearance of lanicemine was 8.3 L/h, revealing that lanicemine is a low-clearance compound. The mean recovery of radioactivity from urine was 93.8% of radioactive dose. 3.In urine samples, 10 metabolites of lanicemine were identified. Among which, an O-glucuronide conjugate (M1) was the most abundant metabolite (∼11% of the dose in excreta). In plasma, the circulatory metabolites were identified as a para-hydroxylated metabolite (M1), an O-glucuronide (M2), an N-carbamoyl glucuronide (M3) and an N-acetylated metabolite (M6). The average amount of each of metabolite was less than 4% of total radioactivity detected in plasma or urine. 4.In conclusion, lanicemine is a low-clearance compound. The unchanged drug and metabolites are predominantly eliminated via urinary excretion.

  20. Aldosterone alters the participation of endothelial factors in noradrenaline vasoconstriction differently in resistance arteries from normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Fabiano E; Blanco-Rivero, Javier; Avendaño, María Soledad; Sastre, Esther; Yela, Rubén; Velázquez, Kyra; Salaíces, Mercedes; Balfagón, Gloria

    2011-03-11

    This study analyzed the effect of aldosterone (0.05mg/kg per day, 3 weeks) on vasoconstriction induced by noradrenaline in mesenteric resistance arteries from WKY rats and SHR. Contraction to noradrenaline was measured in mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated and aldosterone-treatedrats from both strains. Participation of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions, thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) and prostacyclin in this response was determined. 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1alpha and thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) releases were determined by enzyme immunoassay. NO and superoxide anion release were also determined by fluorescence and chemiluminiscence, respectively. Aldosterone did not modify noradrenaline-induced contraction in either strain. In mesenteric resistance arteries from both aldosterone-treated groups, endothelium removal or preincubation with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME increased the noradrenaline-induced contraction, while incubation with the superoxide anion scavenger tempol decreased it. Preincubation with either the COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitor (indomethacin and NS-398, respectively) decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals, while this response was not modified by COX-1 inhibitor SC-560. TxA(2) synthesis inhibitor (furegrelate), or TxA2 receptor antagonist (SQ 29 548) also decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals. In untreated SHR, but not WKY rats, this response was increased by L-NAME, and reduced by tempol, indomethacin, NS-398 or SQ 29 548. Aldosterone treatment did not modify NO or TxB(2) release, but it did increase superoxide anion and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) release in mesenteric resistance arteries from both strains. In conclusion, chronic aldosterone treatment reduces smooth muscle contraction to alpha-adrenergic stimuli, producing a new balance in the release of endothelium-derived prostanoids and NO.

  1. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cécile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115 ± 2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113 ± 1; Ay, 128 ± 7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  2. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115±2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124±2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113±1; Ay, 128±7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  3. Beta-Adrenergic blockers as antiarrhythmic and antifibrillatory compounds: an overview.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bramah N

    2005-06-01

    Beta-Adrenergic blockers have a wide spectrum of action for controlling cardiac arrhythmias that is larger than initially thought. Data from the past several decades indicate that, as an antiarrhythmic class, beta-blockers remain among the very few pharmacologic agents that reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death, prolong survival, and ameliorate symptoms caused by arrhythmias in patients with cardiac disease. As a class of compounds, beta-blockers have a fundamental pharmacologic property that attenuates the effects of competitive adrenergic receptors. However, the net clinical effects of the different beta-receptor blockers may vary quantitatively because of variations in associated intrinsic sympathomimetic agonism and in their intrinsic potency for binding to beta-receptors. These individual compounds also differ in their selectivity for beta(1)- and beta(2)-receptors. Metoprolol is a beta(1)-selective blocker, whereas carvedilol is a nonselective beta(1)- and beta(2)-blocker, an antioxidant, and has a propensity to inhibit alpha(1)-receptors and endothelin. Evolving data from controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials suggest that there are clinically significant differences among this class of drugs. Recent evidence also suggests that the antiarrhythmic actions of certain beta-receptor blockers such as carvedilol and metoprolol extend beyond the ventricular tissue to encompass atrial cells and help maintain sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation, especially in combination with potent antifibrillatory agents such as amiodarone. This introduction provides a current perspective on these newer developments in the understanding of the antiarrhythmic and antifibrillatory actions of beta-blockers.

  4. Benidipine reduces ischemia reperfusion-induced systemic oxidative stress through suppression of aldosterone production in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Keisuke; Usui, Soichiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takashima, Shin-ichiro; Kitano, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Kanako; Okajima, Masaki; Furusho, Hiroshi; Takamura, Masayuki

    2012-03-01

    Aldosterone is implicated in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases, including ischemia reperfusion (I/R) and myocardial infarction, and also causes oxidative stress and inflammation in cardiovascular systems. Benidipine, a long-acting T- and L-type calcium channel blocker, reduces infarct size following myocardial I/R in rabbits. Benidipine also inhibits the production of aldosterone in vitro. However, the precise mechanism of this phenomenon in vivo remains unknown. We therefore evaluated whether benedipine has a beneficial role through the regulation of oxidative stress in myocardial I/R. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 30 min of left ascending coronary I/R. Benidipine was administered orally at 3 mg kg(-1) daily for 3 weeks without any changes in hemodynamic variables. Benidipine significantly reduced infarction size (13.4±2.5%) compared with controls (25.5±3.6%). Urinary 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, increased significantly after I/R. I/R induced increases in 8-OHdG were significantly lower with benidipine. Local myocardial 8-OHdG was also elevated in I/R, but this augmentation was significantly suppressed with benidipine. The plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) significantly increased 2 days after I/R and remained elevated at least 7 days after I/R. Treatment with benidipine significantly decreased I/R-induced elevation of the PAC. I/R-induced markers of fibrosis in hearts also reduced in benidipine. These results suggest that the administration of benidipine reduces myocardial infarct size as well as systemic oxidative stress after I/R. These phenomena are partially linked to reduced plasma aldosterone levels.

  5. Molecular Heterogeneity in Aldosterone-Producing Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Kazutaka; Chen, Andrew X.; Omata, Kei; Vinco, Michelle; Giordano, Thomas J.; Else, Tobias; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of next-generation sequencing has resulted in the identification of recurrent somatic mutations underlying primary aldosteronism (PA). However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the relationship between tumor aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) expression and somatic mutation status. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate tumor CYP11B2 expression and somatic aldosterone-driver gene mutation heterogeneity. Methods: Fifty-one adrenals from 51 PA patients were studied. Immunohistochemistry for CYP11B2 was performed. Aldosterone-producing adenomas with intratumor CYP11B2 heterogeneity were analyzed for mutation status using targeted next-generation sequencing. DNA was isolated from CYP11B2-positive, CYP11B2-negative, and adjacent normal areas from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Results: Of 51 adrenals, seven (14 %) showed distinct heterogeneity in CYP11B2 by immunohistochemistry, including six adenomas with intratumor heterogeneity and one multinodular hyperplastic adrenal with both CYP11B2-positive and -negative nodules. Of the six adrenocortical adenomas with CYP11B2 heterogeneity, three had aldosterone-regulating mutations (CACNA1D p.F747C, KCNJ5 p.L168R, ATP1A1 p.L104R) only in CYP11B2-positive regions, and one had two different mutations localized to two histologically distinct CYP11B2-positive regions (ATP2B3 p.L424_V425del, KCNJ5 p.G151R). Lastly, one adrenal with multiple CYP11B2-expressing nodules showed different mutations in each (CACNA1D p.F747V and ATP1A1 p.L104R), and no mutations were identified in CYP11B2-negative nodule or adjacent normal adrenal. Conclusions: Adrenal tumors in patients with PA can demonstrate clear heterogeneity in CYP11B2 expression and somatic mutations in driver genes for aldosterone production. These findings suggest that aldosterone-producing adenoma tumorigenesis can occur within preexisting nodules through the acquisition of somatic mutations that drive aldosterone

  6. Long term outcome of Aldosteronism after target treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vin-Cent; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Chang, Chia-Hui; Hu, Ya-Hui; Lin, Lian-Yu; Lin, Yen-Hung; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Chen, Likwang; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2016-01-01

    There exists a great knowledge gap in terms of long-term effects of various surgical and pharmacological treatments on outcomes among primary aldosteronism (PA) patients. Using a validated algorithm, we extracted longitudinal data for all PA patients diagnosed in 1997–2010 and treated in the Taiwan National Health Insurance. We identified 3362 PA patients for whom the mean length of follow-up was 5.75 years. PA has higher major cardiovascular events (MACE) than essential hypertension (23.3% vs 19.3%, p = 0.015). Results from the Cox model suggest a strong effect of adrenalectomy on lowering mortality (HR = 0.23 with residual hypertension and 0.21 with resolved hypertension). While need for receptor antagonist (MRA) MRA after diagnosis suggests that a defined daily dose (DDD) of MRA between 12.5 and 50 mg may alleviate risk of death in a U-shape pattern. A specificity test identified patients who has aldosterone producing adenoma (HR = 0.50, p = 0.005) also confirmed adrenalectomy attenuated all-cause mortality. Adrenalectomy decreases long-term all-cause mortality independently from PA cure from hypertension. Prescription corresponding to a DDD between 12.5 and 50 mg may decrease mortality for patients needing MRA. It calls for more attention on early diagnosis, early treatment and prescription of appropriate dosage of MRA for PA patients. PMID:27586402

  7. [Farmacological effect of retabolil on aldosterone level and arterial pressure in rats under the action of vibrations].

    PubMed

    Obut, T A; Ovsiukova, M V; Egorova, S A; Érdynieva, T A; Dement'eva, T Iu; Obut, E T

    2014-01-01

    The experiments were performed on male rats, which were subjected to single and multiply repeated vibrations (low-frequency, horizontal, high-amplitude) analogous to the action of motor transport vibrations. It is established that the administration of retabolil produces a hypotensive effect and blocks the vibration-induced increase in the level of hypertensive hormone aldosterone. Under conditions of the multiply repeated action of vibrations, both effects were realized via micro-opioid receptors. In the case of a single action, these receptors were only involved in a hypotensive effect but not mediated in aldosterone suppression. Both these effects were absent in the control group of animals (not subjected to vibrations). Therefore, retabolil can be used as a hypotensive and aldosterone-blocking drug for vibration-induced hypertension in animals and, probably, in humans.

  8. Characteristics of aldosterone binding in rat and human serum.

    PubMed

    Coirini, H; White, A; Marusic, E T; De Nicola, A F

    1982-01-01

    Binding of cortisol and corticosterone by serum proteins is well established, but discrepancies exist regarding aldosterone. We have observed that approximately 1% of 3H-aldosterone incubated with rat serum was bound in a time-dependent process, although it was not competed by a large excess of non-radioactive aldosterone, assessed by Florisil separation or gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 columns. After electrophoresis on cellulose acetate of rat serum incubated with 3H-aldosterone, specific or non-specific binding to protein fractions was not obtained. Further, a 10 000-fold molar excess of aldosterone (10 microM) displaced only 34% of the bound 3H-aldosterone to rat serum, preventing the calculation of the IC50 value. Increasing concentrations of aldosterone (3-83 nM) did not displace 3H-corticosterone bound in rat serum to presumably corticosterone binding globulin (CBG). In contrast, inhibition of this binding by 3-83 nM corticosterone was concentration dependent, showing an IC50 value of 10(-8) M. In normal human serum, binding of 3H-aldosterone demonstrated competition by a 100 and 1 000-fold excess of aldosterone. Displacement curves of 3H corticosterone bound to human serum by 1.7-75 nM corticosterone or 0.05-8.8 microM aldosterone yielded IC50 values in the range of 10(-8) M for corticosterone and 10(-6) M for aldosterone. With horse serum, aldosterone's binding affinity was three orders of magnitude lower than that of corticosterone. These studies suggest that in the rat aldosterone was loosely and weakly bound to a high capacity binder, possibly albumin. In agreement with the work of others, in humans aldosterone may be bound to both CBG and albumin. The current data do not substantiate for the presence of specific aldosterone binding proteins in serum.

  9. Centruroides toxin, a selective blocker of surface Na+ channels in skeletal muscle: voltage-clamp analysis and biochemical characterization of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Jaimovich, E; Ildefonse, M; Barhanin, J; Rougier, O; Lazdunski, M

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes the effects of a toxin from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus on frog skeletal muscle. The main findings are the following, (i) Centruroides toxin (CssII) blocks the early phase of the inward sodium current in the muscle that arises from influx via Na+ channels in the surface membrane, but it does not affect the late phase of the inward current that represents flux through Na+ channels in the T-tubule membranes, (ii) CssII, in marked contrast to tetrodotoxin, does not affect contraction of the muscle, (iii) Measurements of the binding of 125I-labeled CssII to a partially purified membrane preparation from the muscle indicate that the Kd of the CssII--receptor complex is approximately 0.4 nM. The half-life for the dissociation of this complex is 3 min at 22 degrees C and 16 min at 2 degrees C. Binding of the radiolabeled toxin varies markedly with pH and becomes insignificant at pH greater than 8.5. Proteolytic digestion of the membrane preparation decreases its ability to bind CssII, suggesting that the receptor is a protein. (iv) The number of binding sites for a radiolabeled derivative of tetrodotoxin on the membrane preparation was similar to that for CssII. However, neither tetrodotoxin nor any of seven other neurotoxins and some local anesthetics that alter the functioning of the Na+ channel have any effect on the binding of CssII to the muscle membrane. These results therefore indicate that CssII belongs to a different class of neurotoxins that has a different receptor on the Na+ channel.

  10. Centruroides toxin, a selective blocker of surface Na+ channels in skeletal muscle: voltage-clamp analysis and biochemical characterization of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jaimovich, E; Ildefonse, M; Barhanin, J; Rougier, O; Lazdunski, M

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of a toxin from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus on frog skeletal muscle. The main findings are the following, (i) Centruroides toxin (CssII) blocks the early phase of the inward sodium current in the muscle that arises from influx via Na+ channels in the surface membrane, but it does not affect the late phase of the inward current that represents flux through Na+ channels in the T-tubule membranes, (ii) CssII, in marked contrast to tetrodotoxin, does not affect contraction of the muscle, (iii) Measurements of the binding of 125I-labeled CssII to a partially purified membrane preparation from the muscle indicate that the Kd of the CssII--receptor complex is approximately 0.4 nM. The half-life for the dissociation of this complex is 3 min at 22 degrees C and 16 min at 2 degrees C. Binding of the radiolabeled toxin varies markedly with pH and becomes insignificant at pH greater than 8.5. Proteolytic digestion of the membrane preparation decreases its ability to bind CssII, suggesting that the receptor is a protein. (iv) The number of binding sites for a radiolabeled derivative of tetrodotoxin on the membrane preparation was similar to that for CssII. However, neither tetrodotoxin nor any of seven other neurotoxins and some local anesthetics that alter the functioning of the Na+ channel have any effect on the binding of CssII to the muscle membrane. These results therefore indicate that CssII belongs to a different class of neurotoxins that has a different receptor on the Na+ channel. PMID:6285366

  11. Beta-blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2010-12-15

    Beta blockers have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular conditions for decades. Despite a long history and status as a guideline-recommended treatment option for hypertension, recent meta-analyses have brought into question whether β blockers are still an appropriate therapy given outcomes data from other antihypertensive drug classes. However, β blockers are a heterogenous class of agents with diverse pharmacologic and physiologic properties. Much of the unfavorable data revealed in the recent meta-analyses were gleaned from studies involving nonvasodilating, traditional β blockers, such as atenolol. However, findings with traditional β blockers may not be extrapolated to other members of the class, particularly those agents with vasodilatory activity. Vasodilatory β blockers (i.e., carvedilol and nebivolol) reduce blood pressure in large part through reducing systemic vascular resistance rather than by decreasing cardiac output, as is observed with traditional β blockers. Vasodilating ability may also ameliorate some of the concerns associated with traditional β blockade, such as the adverse effects on metabolic and lipid parameters, including an increased risk for new-onset diabetes. Furthermore, vasodilating ability is physiologically relevant and important in treating a condition with common co-morbidities involving metabolic and lipid abnormalities such as hypertension. In patients with hypertension and diabetes or coronary artery disease, vasodilating β blockers provide effective blood pressure control with neutral or beneficial effects on important parameters for the co-morbid disease. In conclusion, it is time for a reexamination of the clinical evidence for the use of β blockers in hypertension, recognizing that there are patients for whom β blockers, particularly those with vasodilatory actions, are an appropriate treatment option.

  12. Anti-Fibrotic Effect of Losartan, an Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker, Is Mediated through Inhibition of ER Stress via Up-Regulation of SIRT1, Followed by Induction of HO-1 and Thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyosang; Baek, Chung Hee; Lee, Raymond Bok; Chang, Jai Won; Yang, Won Seok; Lee, Sang Koo

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increasingly identified as modulator of fibrosis. Losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, has been widely used as the first choice of treatment in chronic renal diseases. We postulated that anti-fibrotic effect of losartan is mediated through inhibition of ER stress via SIRT1 (silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1) hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1)/thioredoxin pathway. Renal tubular cells, tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress, and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) mouse model were used. Expression of ER stress was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical stain. ER stress was induced by chemical ER stress inducer, tunicamycin, and non-chemical inducers such as TGF-β, angiotensin II, high glucose, and albumin. Losartan suppressed the TM-induced ER stress, as shown by inhibition of TM-induced expression of GRP78 (glucose related protein 78) and p-eIF2α (phosphospecific-eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α), through up-regulation of SIRT1 via HO-1 and thioredoxin. Losartan also suppressed the ER stress by non-chemical inducers. In both animal models, losartan reduced the tubular expression of GRP78, which were abolished by pretreatment with sirtinol (SIRT1 inhibitor). Sirtinol also blocked the inhibitory effect of losartan on the UUO-induced renal fibrosis. These findings provide new insights into renoprotective effects of losartan and suggest that SIRT1, HO-1, and thioredoxin may be potential pharmacological targets in kidney diseases under excessive ER stress condition. PMID:28146117

  13. Interleukin-17 retinotoxicity is prevented by gene transfer of a soluble interleukin-17 receptor acting as a cytokine blocker: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Wang, Yujuan; Park, Stanley; Shen, Defen; Chu, Xi Kathy; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tuo, Jingsheng; Eberhart, Charles G; Olsen, Timothy W; Mullins, Robert F; White, Gary; Wadsworth, Sam; Scaria, Abraham; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common yet complex retinal degeneration that causes irreversible central blindness in the elderly. Pathology is widely believed to follow loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor degeneration. Here we report aberrant expression of interleukin-17A (IL17A) and the receptor IL17RC in the macula of AMD patients. In vitro, IL17A induces RPE cell death characterized by the accumulation of cytoplasmic lipids and autophagosomes with subsequent activation of pro-apoptotic Caspase-3 and Caspase-9. This pathology is reduced by siRNA knockdown of IL17RC. IL17-dependent retinal degeneration in a mouse model of focal retinal degeneration can be prevented by gene therapy with adeno-associated virus vector encoding soluble IL17 receptor. This intervention rescues RPE and photoreceptors in a MAPK-dependent process. The IL17 pathway plays a key role in RPE and photoreceptor degeneration and could hold therapeutic potential in AMD.

  14. Antibody to dihydropyridine calcium entry blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, S.; Minaskanian, G.; Fairhurst, A.

    1986-03-05

    Antibodies that recognize dihydropyridine calcium entry blockers were elicited from rabbits. A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for dihydropyridines was developed and its specificity compared to the DHP binding site in skeletal muscle membranes. The antibody bound (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine with a higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 0.155 nM) than did the DHP receptor of skeletal muscle (K/sub D/ = 1-3 nM). However, in contrast to the DHP receptor, the antibody recognized only those DHP drugs with meta-nitrophenyl substituents at the 4-position on the DHP ring, and thus reflected the meta position of the nitro group on the DHP hapten used as an antigen. Both the antibody and the receptor exhibited stereospecificity, with each site recognizing the (+) isomer of nicardipine as the more potent. This antibody should prove useful in the studies of some potentially irreversible DHP molecules and for use in the production of anti-idotype antibodies.

  15. The ratios of aldosterone / plasma renin activity (ARR) versus aldosterone / direct renin concentration (ADRR).

    PubMed

    Glinicki, Piotr; Jeske, Wojciech; Bednarek-Papierska, Lucyna; Kruszyńska, Aleksandra; Gietka-Czernel, Małgorzata; Rosłonowska, Elżbieta; Słowińska-Srzednicka, Jadwiga; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is estimated to occur in 5-12% of patients with hypertension. Assessment of aldosterone / plasma renin activity (PRA) ratio (ARR) has been used as a screening test in patients suspected of PA. Direct determination of renin (DRC) and calculation of aldosterone / direct renin concentration ratio (ADRR) could be similarly useful for screening patients suspected of PA. The study included 62 patients with indication for evaluation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and 35 healthy volunteers. In all participants we measured concentrations of serum aldosterone, plasma direct renin, and PRA after a night's rest and again after walking for two hours. The concentrations of aldosterone, direct renin, and PRA were measured by isotopic methods (radioimmunoassay (RIA) / immunoradiometric assay (IRMA)). Correlations of ARR with ADRR in the supine position were r = 0.9162, r(2) = 0.8165 (p < 0.01); and in the up-right position were r = 0.7765, r(2) = 0.9153 (p < 0.01). The cut-off values of ARR and ADRR ≥ 100 presented highest specificity (99%) for the diagnosis of PA; however, quite acceptable specificity and sensitivity (> 80% and 100%, respectively) appeared for the ratios ≥ 30. We suggest that for practical and economic reasons ARR can be replaced by ADRR.

  16. Aldosterone increases the apical Na sup + permeability of toad bladder by two different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Garty, H. )

    1988-10-01

    The aldosterone-induced augmentation of Na{sup +} transport in toad bladder was analyzed by comparing the hormonal actions on the transepithelial short-circuit current and on the amiloride-sensitive {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake in isolated membrane vesicles. Incubating bladders with 0.5 {mu}M aldosterone for 3 hr evoked more than a 2-fold increase of the short-circuit current but had no effect on the amiloride-sensitive Na{sup +} transport in apical vesicles derived from the treated tissue. A longer incubation produced an additional augmentation of the short-circuit current, which was accompanied by about a 3-fold increase of the channel activity in isolated membranes. The stimulatory effect of aldosterone sustained in vesicles was inhibited by the antagonist spironolactone and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. It is suggested that aldosterone elevates the apical Na{sup +} permeability of target epithelia by two different mechanisms: a relatively fast effect which is insensitive to triiodothyronine or butyrate and is not sustained by the isolated membrane, and a slower or later response blocked by these reagents, which is preserved by the isolated membrane. The data also indicate that these processes are mediated by different nuclear receptors.

  17. Conjugates of γ-Carbolines and Phenothiazine as new selective inhibitors of butyrylcholinesterase and blockers of NMDA receptors for Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Makhaeva, Galina F; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Boltneva, Natalia P; Sokolov, Vladimir B; Grigoriev, Vladimir V; Serebryakova, Olga G; Vikhareva, Ekaterina A; Aksinenko, Alexey Yu; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Bachurin, Sergey O

    2015-08-18

    Alzheimer disease is a multifactorial pathology and the development of new multitarget neuroprotective drugs is promising and attractive. We synthesized a group of original compounds, which combine in one molecule γ-carboline fragment of dimebon and phenothiazine core of methylene blue (MB) linked by 1-oxo- and 2-hydroxypropylene spacers. Inhibitory activity of the conjugates toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and structurally close to them carboxylesterase (CaE), as well their binding to NMDA-receptors were evaluated in vitro and in silico. These newly synthesized compounds showed significantly higher inhibitory activity toward BChE with IC50 values in submicromolar and micromolar range and exhibited selective inhibitory action against BChE over AChE and CaE. Kinetic studies for the 9 most active compounds indicated that majority of them were mixed-type BChE inhibitors. The main specific protein-ligand interaction is π-π stacking of phenothiazine ring with indole group of Trp82. These compounds emerge as promising safe multitarget ligands for the further development of a therapeutic approach against aging-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and/or other pathological conditions.

  18. Effect of RAAS blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high CVD risk subjects with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chaugai, Sandip; Sherpa, Lhamo Yanchang; Sepehry, Amir A.; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that atrial fibrillation significantly increases the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects. Application of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers for prevention of recurrence of atrial fibrillation and adverse clinical outcomes in subjects with atrial fibrillation is a theoretically appealing concept. However, results of clinical trials evaluating the effect of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation remain inconclusive. A pooled study of 6 randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on subjects with atrial fibrillation was performed. A total of 6 randomized controlled trials enrolled a total of 53,510 patients followed for 1 to 5 years. RAAS blockade therapy was associated with 14% reduction in the incidence of heart failure (OR: 0.86, [95%CI: 0.76– 0.97], P=0.018) and 17% reduction in the incidence of CVE (OR: 0.83, [95%CI: 0.70–0.99], P = 0.038). The corresponding decline in absolute risk against heart failure (ARR: 1.4%, [95%CI: 0.2–2.6%], P = 0.018) and CVE (ARR: 3.5%, [95%CI: 0.0–6.9%], P = 0.045) in the AF group was much higher than the non-AF group for heart failure (ARR: 0.4%, [95%CI: 0.0–0.7%], P = 0.057) and CVE (ARR: 1.6%, [95%CI: –0.1% to 3.3%], P = 0.071). No significant effect was noted on all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, stroke, or myocardial infarction. This study suggests that RAAS blockade offers protection against heart failure and cardiovascular events in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation. PMID:27368043

  19. Hypersensitivity of acetylcholine receptor in diabetic skeletal muscle to neuromuscular blockers: the effect of myotubes cultured with spinal cord or its extract.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Fujihara, M; Nojima, H; Kimura, I

    1986-01-01

    The hypersensitivity of the neuromuscular junctions of diabetic mice to succinylcholine (SuCh), but not to d-tubocurarine (d-TC), was investigated using a cross culture preparation of diabetic skeletal muscle or spinal cord extract with normal tissues. Whether the hypersensitivity is due to the muscle cells themselves was examined using adult muscle of diabetic KK-CAy, prediabetic KK-CAy and normal ddY mice cocultured with embryonic spinal cord of normal ddY mice. The cultured neuromuscular junctions between diabetic KK-CAy muscle and normal ddY spinal cord was hypersensitive to SuCh, but not to d-TC. In contrast, such junctions between prediabetic KK-CAy muscle and normal ddY spinal cord were not hypersensitive to either drug. The involvement of neuronal factors in hypersensitivity to SuCh in diabetic KK-CAy neuromuscular junctions was examined using adult spinal cord extract (SCE) from diabetic KK-CAy and from normal ddY mice. We followed the time course of change in sensitivity of the acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in normal ddY embryonic myotubes to SuCh and d-TC. Both diabetic SCE and normal SCE reduced the sensitivity of myotubes to ACh; the reduction of ACh potential amplitudes by the former was less than that by the latter. Myotubes cultured with diabetic SCE was hypersensitive to both 1.51 microM SuCh and 0.134 microM d-TC. These results suggest that the hypersensitivity of the neuromuscular junctions in diabetic KK-CAy mice to SuCh but not to d-TC is mainly attributable to the diabetic muscle cells themselves.

  20. Upregulation of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein by Hypoxia Stimulates Aldosterone Synthesis in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells to Promote Pulmonary Vascular Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Oldham, William M.; Chan, Stephen Y.; Vargas, Sara O.; Arons, Elena; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism(s) regulating hypoxia-induced vascular fibrosis are unresolved. Hyperaldosteronism correlates positively with vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), suggesting that aldosterone may contribute to the pulmonary vasculopathy of hypoxia. The hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors c-Fos/c-Jun regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which facilitates the rate-limiting step of aldosterone steroidogenesis. We hypothesized that c-Fos/c-Jun upregulation by hypoxia activates StAR-dependent aldosterone synthesis in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to promote vascular fibrosis in PAH. Methods and Results Patients with PAH, rats with Sugen/hypoxia-PAH, and mice exposed to chronic hypoxia expressed increased StAR in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, providing a basis for investigating hypoxia-StAR signaling in HPAECs. Hypoxia (2.0% FiO2) increased aldosterone levels selectively in HPAECs, which was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Increased aldosterone by hypoxia resulted from enhanced c-Fos/c-Jun binding to the proximal activator protein (AP-1) site of the StAR promoter in HPAECs, which increased StAR expression and activity. In HPAECs transfected with StAR-siRNA or treated with the AP-1 inhibitor, SR-11302, hypoxia failed to increase aldosterone, confirming that aldosterone biosynthesis required StAR activation by c-Fos/c-Jun. The functional consequences of aldosterone were confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of the mineralocorticoid receptor with spironolactone or eplerenone, which attenuated hypoxia-induced upregulation of the fibrogenic protein connective tissue growth factor and collagen III in vitro, and decreased pulmonary vascular fibrosis to improve pulmonary hypertension in Conclusions Our findings identify autonomous aldosterone synthesis in HPAECs due to hypoxia-mediated upregulation of StAR as a novel molecular mechanism that promotes pulmonary vascular

  1. Mechanisms of renal control of potassium homeostasis in complete aldosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Todkar, Abhijeet; Picard, Nicolas; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Sorensen, Mads V; Mihailova, Marija; Nesterov, Viatcheslav; Makhanova, Natalia; Korbmacher, Christoph; Wagner, Carsten A; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-02-01

    Aldosterone-independent mechanisms may contribute to K(+) homeostasis. We studied aldosterone synthase knockout (AS(-/-)) mice to define renal control mechanisms of K(+) homeostasis in complete aldosterone deficiency. AS(-/-) mice were normokalemic and tolerated a physiologic dietary K(+) load (2% K(+), 2 days) without signs of illness, except some degree of polyuria. With supraphysiologic K(+) intake (5% K(+)), AS(-/-) mice decompensated and became hyperkalemic. High-K(+) diets induced upregulation of the renal outer medullary K(+) channel in AS(-/-) mice, whereas upregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) sufficient to increase the electrochemical driving force for K(+) excretion was detected only with a 2% K(+) diet. Phosphorylation of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter was consistently lower in AS(-/-) mice than in AS(+/+) mice and was downregulated in mice of both genotypes in response to increased K(+) intake. Inhibition of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor reduced renal creatinine clearance and apical ENaC localization, and caused severe hyperkalemia in AS(-/-) mice. In contrast with the kidney, the distal colon of AS(-/-) mice did not respond to dietary K(+) loading, as indicated by Ussing-type chamber experiments. Thus, renal adaptation to a physiologic, but not supraphysiologic, K(+) load can be achieved in aldosterone deficiency by aldosterone-independent activation of the renal outer medullary K(+) channel and ENaC, to which angiotensin II may contribute. Enhanced urinary flow and reduced activity of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter may support renal adaptation by activation of flow-dependent K(+) secretion and increased intratubular availability of Na(+) that can be reabsorbed in exchange for K(+) secreted.

  2. Mechanisms of Renal Control of Potassium Homeostasis in Complete Aldosterone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Todkar, Abhijeet; Picard, Nicolas; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Sorensen, Mads V.; Mihailova, Marija; Nesterov, Viatcheslav; Makhanova, Natalia; Korbmacher, Christoph; Wagner, Carsten A.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone-independent mechanisms may contribute to K+ homeostasis. We studied aldosterone synthase knockout (AS−/−) mice to define renal control mechanisms of K+ homeostasis in complete aldosterone deficiency. AS−/− mice were normokalemic and tolerated a physiologic dietary K+ load (2% K+, 2 days) without signs of illness, except some degree of polyuria. With supraphysiologic K+ intake (5% K+), AS−/− mice decompensated and became hyperkalemic. High-K+ diets induced upregulation of the renal outer medullary K+ channel in AS−/− mice, whereas upregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) sufficient to increase the electrochemical driving force for K+ excretion was detected only with a 2% K+ diet. Phosphorylation of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter was consistently lower in AS−/− mice than in AS+/+ mice and was downregulated in mice of both genotypes in response to increased K+ intake. Inhibition of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor reduced renal creatinine clearance and apical ENaC localization, and caused severe hyperkalemia in AS−/− mice. In contrast with the kidney, the distal colon of AS−/− mice did not respond to dietary K+ loading, as indicated by Ussing-type chamber experiments. Thus, renal adaptation to a physiologic, but not supraphysiologic, K+ load can be achieved in aldosterone deficiency by aldosterone-independent activation of the renal outer medullary K+ channel and ENaC, to which angiotensin II may contribute. Enhanced urinary flow and reduced activity of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter may support renal adaptation by activation of flow-dependent K+ secretion and increased intratubular availability of Na+ that can be reabsorbed in exchange for K+ secreted. PMID:25071088

  3. PD-1 Blockers.

    PubMed

    Wolchok, Jedd D

    2015-08-27

    Nivolumab and pembrolizumab are monoclonal antibodies that block the programmed death-1 receptor (PD-1, CD279), resulting in dis-inhibition of tumor-specific immune responses. Both are recently approved for use in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, and nivolumab as well for non-small cell lung cancer.

  4. A novel aldosterone synthase inhibitor ameliorates mortality in pressure-overload mice with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Furuzono, Shinji; Meguro, Masaki; Miyauchi, Satoru; Inoue, Shinichi; Homma, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Keisuke; Tagawa, Yoh-Ichi; Nara, Futoshi; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2017-01-15

    It has been elucidated that mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists reduce mortality in patients with congestive heart failure and post-acute myocardial infarction. A direct inhibition of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) is also expected to have therapeutic benefits equal in quality to mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in terms of reducing mineralocorticoid receptor signaling. Therefore, we have screened our chemical libraries and identified a novel and potent aldosterone synthase inhibitor, 2,2,2-trifluoro-1-{4-[(4-fluorophenyl)amino]pyrimidin-5-y}-1-[1-(methylsulfonyl)piperidin-4-yl]ethanol (compound 1), by lead optimization. Pharmacological properties of compound 1 were examined in in vitro cell-based assays and an in vivo mouse model of pressure-overload hypertrophy by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Compound 1 showed potent CYP11B2 inhibition against human and mouse enzymes (IC50; 0.003μM and 0.096μM, respectively) in a cell-based assay. The oral administration of 0.06% compound 1 in the food mixture of a mouse TAC model significantly reduced the plasma aldosterone level and ameliorated mortality rate. This study is the first to demonstrate that a CYP11B2 inhibitor improved survival rates of heart failure induced by pressure-overload in mice. The treatment of 0.06% compound 1 did not elevate plasma potassium level in this model, although further evaluation of hyperkalemia is needed. These results suggest that compound 1 can be developed as a promising oral CYP11B2 inhibitor for pharmaceutical applications. Compound 1 could also be a useful compound for clarifying the role of aldosterone in cardiac hypertrophy.

  5. Chronic vasodilation increases renal medullary PDE5A and α-ENaC through independent renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system pathways.

    PubMed

    West, Crystal A; Shaw, Stefan; Sasser, Jennifer M; Fekete, Andrea; Alexander, Tyler; Cunningham, Mark W; Masilamani, Shyama M E; Baylis, Chris

    2013-11-15

    We have previously observed that many of the renal and hemodynamic adaptations seen in normal pregnancy can be induced in virgin female rats by chronic systemic vasodilation. Fourteen-day vasodilation with sodium nitrite or nifedipine (NIF) produced plasma volume expansion (PVE), hemodilution, and increased renal medullary phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) protein. The present study examined the role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in this mechanism. Virgin females were treated for 14 days with NIF (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) via diet), NIF with spironolactone [SPR; mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blocker, 200-300 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) via diet], NIF with losartan [LOS; angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker, 20 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) via diet], enalapril (ENAL; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, 62.5 mg/l via water), or vehicle (CON). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was reduced 7.4 ± 0.5% with NIF, 6.33 ± 0.5% with NIF + SPR, 13.3 ± 0.9% with NIF + LOS, and 12.0 ± 0.4% with ENAL vs. baseline MAP. Compared with CON (3.6 ± 0.3%), plasma volume factored for body weight was increased by NIF (5.2 ± 0.4%) treatment but not by NIF + SPR (4.3 ± 0.3%), NIF + LOS (3.6 ± 0.1%), or ENAL (4.0 ± 0.3%). NIF increased PDE5A protein abundance in the renal inner medulla, and SPR did not prevent this increase (188 ± 16 and 204 ± 22% of CON, respectively). NIF increased the α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC) protein in renal outer (365 ± 44%) and inner (526 ± 83%) medulla, and SPR prevented these changes. There was no change in either PDE5A or α-ENaC abundance vs. CON in rats treated with NIF + LOS or ENAL. These data indicate that the PVE and renal medullary adaptations in response to chronic vasodilation result from RAAS signaling, with increases in PDE5A mediated through AT1 receptor and α-ENaC through the MR.

  6. Hemodynamics, renal function, plasma renin, and aldosterone in man after 5 to 14 days of bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melada, G. A.; Goldman, R. H.; Luetscher, J. A.; Zager, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous bedrest for 5 to 14 days had no significant effect on resting heart rate, blood pressure, or cardiac output in six normal men. Head-up tilt induced greater tachycardia in 5 of 6 patients after bed rest than in the control period. Propranolol diminished both tachycardia and the incidence of hypotension and faintness in upright posture. Plasma volume fell, extracellular fluid volume increased, and plasma renin activity was significantly elevated following bedrest. Unusually large increases in plasma renin followed head-up tilt or administration of isoproterenol during bedrest and after resuming normal activity. During bedrest, plasma aldosterone was often increased in the early morning. It is concluded that after bedrest, upright posture evokes strong beta-adrenergic activity as well as exaggerated metabolic and circulatory responses which can be reduced or abolished by the beta-adrenergic blocker, propranolol.

  7. Central interactions of aldosterone and angiotensin II in aldosterone- and angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-02-01

    Many studies have implicated both angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (Aldo) in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the progression of renal injury, and cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. In several cases, ANG II and Aldo have been shown to have synergistic interactions in the periphery. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that ANG II and Aldo interact centrally in Aldo- and ANG II-induced hypertension in male rats. In rats with blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measured by DSI telemetry, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and RU28318 or the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist irbesartan significantly inhibited Aldo-induced hypertension. In ANG II-induced hypertension, icv infusion of RU28318 significantly reduced the increase in BP. Moreover, icv infusions of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin attenuated Aldo-induced hypertension. To confirm these effects of pharmacological antagonists, icv injections of either recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying siRNA silencers of AT1aR (AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (MR-siRNA) significantly attenuated the development of Aldo-induced hypertension. The immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of AT1aR-siRNA- or MR-siRNA-injected rats showed a marked reduction in the expression of AT1R or MR in the paraventricular nucleus compared with scrambled siRNA rats. When animals from all studies underwent ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium, there was a smaller reduction in the fall of BP in animals receiving icv AT1R or MR antagonists. These results suggest that ANG II and Aldo interact in the brain in a mutually cooperative manner such that the functional integrity of both brain AT1R and MR are necessary for hypertension to be induced by either systemic ANG II or Aldo. The pressor effects produced by systemic ANG II or Aldo involve increased central ROS and

  8. Tuning Photochromic Ion Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Photochromic channel blockers provide a conceptually simple and convenient way to modulate neuronal activity with light. We have recently described a family of azobenzenes that function as tonic blockers of Kv channels but require UV-A light to unblock and need to be actively switched by toggling between two different wavelengths. We now introduce red-shifted compounds that fully operate in the visible region of the spectrum and quickly turn themselves off in the dark. Furthermore, we have developed a version that does not block effectively in the dark-adapted state, can be switched to a blocking state with blue light, and reverts to the inactive state automatically. Photochromic blockers of this type could be useful for the photopharmacological control of neuronal activity under mild conditions. PMID:22860175

  9. The Regulation of Aldosterone Secretion in Anephric Man

    PubMed Central

    Bayard, Francis; Cooke, C. Robert; Tiller, David J.; Beitins, Inese Z.; Kowarski, Avinoam; Walker, W. Gordon; Migeon, Claude J.

    1971-01-01

    The regulation of aldosterone secretion in anephric man was investigated in studies on nephrectomized patients who were being intermittently hemodialyzed while awaiting renal transplantation. The effects of supine and upright posture on the concentration of plasma aldosterone on the 1st day postdialysis and on a 3rd or 4th day postdialysis were compared to the effects of postural variation in normal subjects who were on a low sodium intake and on a high sodium intake. In contrast with the normal subjects who exhibited higher concentrations of plasma aldosterone after 2 hr of upright posture than in the supine position and low concentrations of plasma aldosterone on a high sodium intake, the anephric patients showed less consistent variations in plasma aldosterone due to changes in posture and exhibited higher concentrations of plasma aldosterone on the 3rd or 4th day postdialysis, despite an increase in body weight, than on the 1st day postdialysis. The increase in the concentration of plasma aldosterone in the anephric patients between the 1st day postdialysis and the 3rd or 4th day postdialysis indicates that aldosterone secretion is not responding primarily, in this situation, to volume-related stimuli. There was a high degree of correlation between the concentration of plasma aldosterone and the corresponding levels of serum potassium concentration, which also rose significantly between the 1st day postdialysis and the 3rd or 4th day postdialysis. Furthermore, when potassium accumulation between dialyses was prevented in three of these patients, the concentration of plasma aldosterone fell to minimally detectable levels. The results of these studies suggest that the primary regulator of aldosterone secretion in the absence of the kidneys is potassium. PMID:4329001

  10. Non-genomic aldosterone action: from the cell membrane to human physiology.

    PubMed

    Lösel, Ralf; Feuring, Martin; Wehling, Martin

    2002-12-01

    According to the traditional model, steroid hormones bind to intracellular receptors and subsequently modulate transcription and protein synthesis, thus triggering genomic events finally responsible for delayed effects. In addition, very rapid effects of steroids mainly affecting intracellular signaling have been widely recognized which are clearly incompatible with the genomic model. These rapid, non-genomic steroid actions are likely to be transmitted via specific membrane receptors. Evidences for non-genomic steroid effects and distinct receptors involved are now presented for all steroid groups including vitamin D(3) and thyroid hormones. Mechanisms of action are being studied with regard to signal perception and transduction involved, and for various steroids including aldosterone a patchy sketch of a membrane receptor/second messenger cascade shows up being not essentially dissimilar to cascades involved in catecholamine or peptide hormone action. Aside non-classical membrane receptors with a high affinity for aldosterone, these effects involve phospholipase C, phosphoinositide turnover, intracellular pH and calcium, protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. Increasing evidence is being accumulated for rapid physiological responses in humans, e.g. at the level of circulatory or metabolic effects, rendering clinical significance to these rapid actions.

  11. Emergence and evolution of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

    PubMed

    Fournier, David; Luft, Friedrich C; Bader, Michael; Ganten, Detlev; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2012-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is not the sole, but perhaps the most important volume regulator in vertebrates. To gain insights into the function and evolution of its components, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of its main related genes. We found that important parts of the system began to appear with primitive chordates and tunicates and that all major components were present at the divergence of bony fish, with the exception of the Mas receptor. The Mas receptor first appears after the bony-fish/tetrapod divergence. This phase of evolutionary innovation happened about 400 million years ago. We found solid evidence that angiotensinogen made its appearance in cartilage fish. The presence of several RAAS genes in organisms that lack all the components shows that these genes have had other ancestral functions outside of their current role. Our analysis underscores the utility of sequence comparisons in the study of evolution. Such analyses may provide new hypotheses as to how and why in today's population an increased activity of the RAAS frequently leads to faulty salt and volume regulation, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases, opening up new and clinically important research areas for evolutionary medicine.

  12. Beta-Blockers and Nitrates: Pharmacotherapy and Indications.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Emanuela; Degiovanni, Anna; Cavallino, Chiara; Lupi, Alessandro; Rognoni, Andrea; Bongo, Angelo S

    2015-01-01

    Many clinically important differences exist between beta blockers. B1-selectivity is of clinical interest because at clinically used doses, b1- selective agents block cardiac b-receptors while having minor effects on bronchial and vascular b-receptors. Beta-adrenergic blocking agents significantly decrease the frequency and duration of angina pectoris, instead the prognostic benefit of beta-blockers in stable angina has been extrapolated from studies of post myocardial infarction but has not yet been documented without left ventricular disfunction or previous myocardial infarction. Organic nitrates are among the oldest drugs, but they still remain a widely used adjuvant in the treatment of symptomatic coronary artery disease. While their efficacy in relieving angina pectoris symptoms in acute settings and in preventing angina before physical or emotional stress is undisputed, the chronic use of nitrates has been associated with potentially important side effects such as tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. B-blockers are the firstline anti-anginal therapy in stable stable angina patients without contraindications, while nitrates are the secondline anti-anginal therapy. Despite 150 years of clinical practice, they remain fascinating drugs, which in a chronic setting still deserve investigation. This review evaluated pharmacotherapy and indications of Beta-blockers and nitrates in stable angina.

  13. Aldosterone Inhibits the Fetal Program and Increases Hypertrophy in the Heart of Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azibani, Feriel; Devaux, Yvan; Coutance, Guillaume; Schlossarek, Saskia; Polidano, Evelyne; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Regine; Carrier, Lucie; Solal, Alain Cohen; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Launay, Jean-Marie; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Delcayre, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial hypertension (AH) induces cardiac hypertrophy and reactivation of “fetal” gene expression. In rodent heart, alpha-Myosin Heavy Chain (MyHC) and its micro-RNA miR-208a regulate the expression of beta-MyHC and of its intronic miR-208b. However, the role of aldosterone in these processes remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings RT-PCR and western-blot were used to investigate the genes modulated by arterial hypertension and cardiac hyperaldosteronism. We developed a model of double-transgenic mice (AS-Ren) with cardiac hyperaldosteronism (AS mice) and systemic hypertension (Ren). AS-Ren mice had increased (x2) angiotensin II in plasma and increased (x2) aldosterone in heart. Ren and AS-Ren mice had a robust and similar hypertension (+70%) versus their controls. Anatomical data and echocardiography showed a worsening of cardiac hypertrophy (+41%) in AS-Ren mice (P<0.05 vs Ren). The increase of ANP (x 2.5; P<0.01) mRNA observed in Ren mice was blunted in AS-Ren mice. This non-induction of antitrophic natriuretic peptides may be involved in the higher trophic cardiac response in AS-Ren mice, as indicated by the markedly reduced cardiac hypertrophy in ANP-infused AS-Ren mice for one month. Besides, the AH-induced increase of ßMyHC and its intronic miRNA-208b was prevented in AS-Ren. The inhibition of miR 208a (−75%, p<0.001) in AS-Ren mice compared to AS was associated with increased Sox 6 mRNA (x 1.34; p<0.05), an inhibitor of ßMyHC transcription. Eplerenone prevented all aldosterone-dependent effects. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that increased aldosterone in heart inhibits the induction of atrial natriuretic peptide expression, via the mineralocorticoid receptor. This worsens cardiac hypertrophy without changing blood pressure. Moreover, this work reveals an original aldosterone-dependent inhibition of miR-208a in hypertension, resulting in the inhibition of β-myosin heavy chain expression through the induction of

  14. Hyperkalaemia in the age of aldosterone antagonism.

    PubMed

    Chapagain, A; Ashman, N

    2012-11-01

    Hyperkalaemia is well recognized as a medical emergency. However, with the publication of trials showing benefit with renin-aldosterone axis suppression in heart failure, the epidemiology of patients presenting with hyperkalaemia has changed. The reported incidence of rate of serious hyperkalaemia (>6.0 mEq/l of potassium) ranges from 6 to 12% in patients on spironolactone with congestive cardiac failure (CCF). A rational choice of therapy based on present evidence is different from the traditionally used algorithm, given our understanding of the physiology relevant to this patient group. This article discusses the changing face of hyperkalaemia and the present evidence and discusses options in treatment of hyperkalaemia.

  15. Effects of ACTH on the last step of aldosterone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cozza, E N; Ceballos, N R; Lantos, C P

    1989-12-01

    The production of tritiated aldosterone and tritiated SM (a saponifiable 18-hydroxycorticosterone derivative) by rat adrenals were studied at various incubation times in absence or presence of two concentrations of ACTH. Tritiated 18-hydroxycorticosterone or 18-deoxyaldosterone served as precursors. The lower ACTH concentration (150 pM) increased the production of tritiated aldosterone. Whereas, the higher ACTH concentration (1.5 microM) stimulated tritiated aldosterone production at shorter incubation time (30 min), while after 60 min it inhibited. This time dependency would reflect variations in the levels of endogenous steroids. On the other hand, the effects of ACTH on tritiated SM production were opposite to those on tritiated aldosterone. In effect, while 150 pM ACTH inhibited SM production, 1.5 microM ACTH stimulated it. These results suggest that ACTH promotes opposite effects on the productions of aldosterone and SM and therefore both productions would be coordinated under the regulation of ACTH.

  16. How Do Beta Blocker Drugs Affect Exercise?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More How do beta blocker drugs affect exercise? Updated:Aug 5,2015 Beta blockers are a ... about them: Do they affect your ability to exercise? The answer can vary a great deal, depending ...

  17. Can Beta Blockers Cause Weight Gain?

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can beta blockers cause weight gain? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, ... can occur as a side effect of some beta blockers, especially the older ones, such as atenolol (Tenormin) ...

  18. Formulary considerations in selection of beta-blockers.

    PubMed

    Yedinak, K C

    1993-08-01

    Selection of beta-adrenergic blockers for formulary addition can be a difficult task, especially with the increasing availability of new beta-blockers, as well as the numerous differences in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of currently available agents. Nevertheless, appropriate evaluation of the important characteristics of beta-blockers should allow selection of the most cost-effective agents for formulary addition. Most importantly, differences in efficacy, product formulation and cost should be carefully considered when making formulary decisions. Notably, evidence from clinical trials indicates differences in efficacy among beta-blockers for post-myocardial infarction prophylaxis, situational anxiety, essential tremor, thyrotoxicosis, migraine prophylaxis and prevention of bleeding associated with oesophageal varices. For many clinical situations, it is also important to select an effective agent that is available in both an oral and intravenous formulation, especially for cardioprotection after acute myocardial infarction and for use in supraventricular arrhythmias. In addition, availability of sustained release products and generic formulations should be considered for their potential to increase compliance and decrease cost, respectively. Comparative drug costs, as well as costs associated with decreased compliance, should also be carefully evaluated. Differences in beta-receptor selectivity, duration of action and presence of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) are also important considerations in the selection of beta-blockers for formulary consideration. Although degree of selectivity is relative, beta 1-selective agents may be less likely to induce bronchospasm in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may be less likely to affect glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes mellitus. Duration of action of a beta-blocker is an important consideration for evaluation of efficacy throughout the recommended

  19. Albuminuria is associated with an increased prostasin in urine while aldosterone has no direct effect on urine and kidney tissue abundance of prostasin.

    PubMed

    Oxlund, Christina; Kurt, Birgül; Schwarzensteiner, Ilona; Hansen, Mie R; Stæhr, Mette; Svenningsen, Per; Jacobsen, Ib A; Hansen, Pernille B; Thuesen, Anne D; Toft, Anja; Hinrichs, Gitte R; Bistrup, Claus; Jensen, Boye L

    2017-02-24

    The proteinase prostasin is a candidate mediator for aldosterone-driven proteolytic activation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). It was hypothesized that the aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway stimulates prostasin abundance in kidney and urine. Prostasin was measured in plasma and urine from type 2 diabetic patients with resistant hypertension (n = 112) randomized to spironolactone/placebo in a clinical trial. Prostasin protein level was assessed by immunoblotting in (1) human and rat urines with/without nephrotic syndrome, (2) human nephrectomy tissue, (3) urine and kidney from aldosterone synthase-deficient (AS(-/-)) mice and ANGII- and aldosterone-infused mice, and in (4) kidney from adrenalectomized rats. Serum aldosterone concentration related to prostasin concentration in urine but not in plasma. Plasma prostasin concentration increased significantly after spironolactone compared to control. Urinary prostasin and albumin related directly and were reduced by spironolactone. In patients with nephrotic syndrome, urinary prostasin protein was elevated compared to controls. In rat nephrosis, proteinuria coincided with increased urinary prostasin, unchanged kidney tissue prostasin, and decreased plasma prostasin while plasma aldosterone was suppressed. Prostasin protein abundance in human nephrectomy tissue was similar across gender and ANGII inhibition regimens. Prostasin urine abundance was not different in AS(-/-) and aldosterone-infused mice. Prostasin kidney level was not different from control in adrenalectomized rats and AS(-/-) mice. We found no evidence for a direct relationship between mineralocorticoid receptor signaling and kidney and urine prostasin abundance. The reduction of urinary prostasin in spironolactone-treated patients is most likely the result of an improved glomerular filtration barrier function and generally reduced proteinuria.

  20. Prediction and experimental validation of acute toxicity of beta-blockers in Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Fraysse, Benoit; Garric, Jeanne

    2005-10-01

    Acute toxicity of beta-adrenoceptor blockers (beta-blockers) was studied with beta-blockers as single compounds or in mixture using the standardized acute 2-d Ceriodaphnia dubia immobility test. The tested compounds were selected according to their selectivity for the beta1-adrenoceptor, with three beta1-selective blockers (acebutolol, atenolol, and metoprolol) and three non-beta1-selective blockers (nadolol, oxprenolol, and propranolol). The acute toxicity (median effective concentration) of the six single compounds ranged from 1.4 mg/L for propranolol to 163 mg/L for nadolol. According to European Union directive 93/67EEC, these values range from toxic for aquatic organisms to nonclassified. The more toxic compounds, propranolol and oxprenolol, are both characterized by a membrane-stabilizing activity, a strong affinity for the beta1-adrenoceptor, and a high octanol-water partition coefficient (log Kow). The property of beta-receptor selectivity seems not to be involved in the observed acute toxicity of the single compounds for C. dubia. Nevertheless, the toxicity of the selected compounds in mixture can be defined according to the beta1-selectivity. Two main joint effects have been detected: An independent action for the beta1-selective blockers, and an additive effect when either the nonselective beta1-selective blockers or the six compounds are tested together. The concentration addition model seems to be appropriate, providing a reasonable worst-case estimation of beta-blocker mixture toxicity for regulatory purposes.

  1. Aldosterone regulates cellular turnover and mitogen-activated protein kinase family expression in the neonatal rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Bae, In Sun; Jang, Gi Young; Hong, Young Sook; Lee, Joo Won

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that aldosterone is a potent mitogenic signal regulating genes involved in antiapoptosis, cell proliferation and growth. We investigated the role of endogenous aldosterone in renal development, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family expression. Newborn rats were treated with either spironolactone (200 mg/kg/d) in olive oil or only olive oil for 7 days. TUNEL assay and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) stain were performed on kidney sections. Immunoblots, immunohistochemical (IHC) stain, and reverse transcriptase-PCR for MAPKs were performed. PCNA-positive proliferating cells decreased and apoptotic cells increased significantly with spironolactone (P < 0.05). In the spironolactone-treated group, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-2 expression increased, whereas extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)-2 and p38 expressions decreased in immunoblots (P < 0.05) and IHC stain. ERK-2 and p38 mRNA expressions increased in the spironolactone-treated group (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that aldosterone blockade in the developing kidney decreases cellular proliferation, increases apoptosis, and modulates the expressions of JNK-2, ERK-2, and p38. Aldosterone possibly participates in renal development and MAPK family may serve as, in part, the signaling intermediate through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the developing kidney. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 724-733, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Regulation of intraocular pressure and pupil size by beta-blockers and epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Ohrström, A; Pandolfi, M

    1980-12-01

    The interaction of adrenergic beta-receptor blockers and epinephrine on intraocular pressure and pupil size was investigated in healthy volunteers. Oral (atenolol and propranolol) and local (timolol) beta-blockers were studied. The experiment was carried out under double-blind randomized crossover conditions. The results showed that the combination of oral beta-blockers with topical epinephrine had an additive hypotensive effect on IOP, while timolol and epinephrine eyedrops both reduced the IOP used alone, but combined had an antagonistic effect, resulting in the disappearance of the epinephrine-mediated IOP reduction.

  3. Salt, aldosterone, and insulin resistance: impact on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Lastra, Guido; Dhuper, Sonal; Johnson, Megan S; Sowers, James R

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are powerful risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), both of which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of CVD and CKD risk factors has identified salt sensitivity and insulin resistance as key elements underlying the relationship between hypertension and T2DM. Excess dietary salt and caloric intake, as commonly found in westernized diets, is linked not only to increased blood pressure, but also to defective insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose homeostasis. In this setting, activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), as well as increased signaling through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), result in increased production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, which in turn contribute to insulin resistance and impaired vascular function. In addition, insulin resistance is not limited to classic insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle, but it also affects the cardiovascular system, where it participates in the development of CVD and CKD. Current clinical knowledge points towards an impact of salt restriction, RAAS blockade, and MR antagonism on cardiovascular and renal protection, but also on improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  4. Pitting type of pretibial edema in a patient with silent thyroiditis successfully treated by angiotensin ii receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Itsuro; Mori, Yoko; Baba, Asuka; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 56 Final Diagnosis: Thyroiditis – silent Symptoms: Palpitations • pretibial pitting edema • short of breath • sweating Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unknown etiology Background: Hyper- or hypothyroidism sometimes causes pretibial myxedema characterized by non-pitting infiltration of a proteinaceous ground substance. However, in those patients, the “pitting” type of pretibial edema as a result of increased sodium and fluid retention or vascular hyper-permeability rarely occurs, except in cases complicated by heart failures due to severe cardiomyopathy or pulmonary hypertension. Case Report: A 56-year-old woman developed bilateral pretibial pitting edema, followed by occasional sweating, palpitations, and shortness of breath, which persisted for more than 2 months. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism due to silent thyroiditis was supported by elevated levels of free thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), with a marked decrease in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and the negative results for TSH receptor antibodies with typical findings of destructive thyrotoxicosis. Despite her “pitting” type of pretibial edema, a chest radio-graph demonstrated the absence of cardiomyopathy or congestive heart failure. Oral administration of angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) was initiated for her systolic hypertension, with a relatively higher elevation of plasma renin activity compared to that of the aldosterone level. Although the symptoms characteristic to hyperthyroidism, such as increased sweating, palpitations and shortness of breath, slowly improved with a spontaneous resolution of the disease, ARB quickly resolved the pretibial pitting edema shortly after the administration.. Conclusions: In this case, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system stimulated by thyroid hormone was likely responsible for the patient’s pitting type of edema. The pharmacological

  5. A Case of Primary Aldosteronism with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyun Hee; Park, Kyung Jun; Kim, Sun Young

    2006-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to chronic renal failure with a 10-year history of hypertension. We found polycystic kidney disease, pulmonary tuberculosis and an aldosterone-producing adrenocortical mass. At this time, her serum potassium level and blood pressure were within the normal range. She refused hemodialysis and then was hospitalized because of uremic encephalopathy. On admission, her serum potassium level was normal without treatment and plasma aldosterone concentration highly elevated. She received hemodialysis, and thereafter hypokalemia developed. We then administered spironolactone, whereupon serum potassium level returned to the normal range. In this case, we thought that normokalemia was balanced hypokalemia of primary aldosteronism with hyperkalemia of chronic renal failure, and that hypokalemia developed after hemodialysis was due to an imbalanced primary aldosteronism with end stage renal disease. PMID:24459492

  6. Global- and renal-specific sympathoinhibition in aldosterone hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Liu, Boshen; Hildebrandt, Drew A; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2015-06-01

    Recent technology for chronic electric activation of the carotid baroreflex and renal nerve ablation provide global and renal-specific suppression of sympathetic activity, respectively, but the conditions for favorable antihypertensive responses in resistant hypertension are unclear. Because inappropriately high plasma levels of aldosterone are prevalent in these patients, we investigated the effects of baroreflex activation and surgical renal denervation in dogs with hypertension induced by chronic infusion of aldosterone (12 μg/kg per day). Under control conditions, basal values for mean arterial pressure and plasma norepinephrine concentration were 100±3 mm Hg and 134±26 pg/mL, respectively. By day 7 of baroreflex activation, plasma norepinephrine was reduced by ≈40% and arterial pressure by 16±2 mm Hg. All values returned to control levels during the recovery period. Arterial pressure increased to 122±5 mm Hg concomitant with a rise in plasma aldosterone concentration from 4.3±0.4 to 70.0±6.4 ng/dL after 14 days of aldosterone infusion, with no significant effect on plasma norepinephrine. After 7 days of baroreflex activation at control stimulation parameters, the reduction in plasma norepinephrine was similar but the fall in arterial pressure (7±1 mm Hg) was diminished (≈55%) during aldosterone hypertension when compared with control conditions. Despite sustained suppression of sympathetic activity, baroreflex activation did not have central actions to inhibit either the stimulation of vasopressin secretion or drinking induced by increased plasma osmolality during chronic aldosterone infusion. Finally, renal denervation did not attenuate aldosterone hypertension. These findings suggest that aldosterone excess may portend diminished blood pressure lowering to global and especially renal-specific sympathoinhibition during device-based therapy.

  7. Adrenal Venous Sampling: Where Is the Aldosterone Disappearing to?

    SciTech Connect

    Solar, Miroslav; Ceral, Jiri; Krajina, Antonin; Ballon, Marek; Malirova, Eva; Brodak, Milos; Cap, Jan

    2010-08-15

    Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is generally considered to be the gold standard in distinguishing unilateral and bilateral aldosterone hypersecretion in primary hyperaldosteronism. However, during AVS, we noticed a considerable variability in aldosterone concentrations among samples thought to have come from the right adrenal glands. Some aldosterone concentrations in these samples were even lower than in samples from the inferior vena cava. We hypothesized that the samples with low aldosterone levels were unintentionally taken not from the right adrenal gland, but from hepatic veins. Therefore, we sought to analyze the impact of unintentional cannulation of hepatic veins on AVS. Thirty consecutive patients referred for AVS were enrolled. Hepatic vein sampling was implemented in our standardized AVS protocol. The data were collected and analyzed prospectively. AVS was successful in 27 patients (90%), and hepatic vein cannulation was successful in all procedures performed. Cortisol concentrations were not significantly different between the hepatic vein and inferior vena cava samples, but aldosterone concentrations from hepatic venous blood (median, 17 pmol/l; range, 40-860 pmol/l) were markedly lower than in samples from the inferior vena cava (median, 860 pmol/l; range, 460-4510 pmol/l). The observed difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Aldosterone concentrations in the hepatic veins are significantly lower than in venous blood taken from the inferior vena cava. This finding is important for AVS because hepatic veins can easily be mistaken for adrenal veins as a result of their close anatomic proximity.

  8. [Applications for bronchial blockers in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    García-Guasch, R; Campos, J H; Granell, M; Peña, J J

    2007-11-01

    One-lung ventilation is commonly used to facilitate visualization of the field during thoracic surgery. New devices for performing this technique that have become available over the past 2 decades include the Univent bronchial blocker incorporated in a single-lumen tube, the Arndt endobronchial blocker, and the Cohen endobronchial blocker. Although insertion of a double-lumen tube is still the method used most often to isolate the lung, bronchial blockade is an increasingly common technique and, in certain clinical settings, provides advantages over the double-lumen tube. This review provides an update on new concepts in the use of bronchial blockers as a technique for lung isolation and one-lung ventilation. The literature search was performed on MEDLINE through PubMed using the keywords bronchial blockers and thoracic surgery. The search span started with 1982-the year the first modern bronchial blocker was described - and ended with February 2006.

  9. Activation of the Endogenous Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System or Aldosterone Administration Increases Urinary Exosomal Sodium Channel Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying; Wang, Xiaojing; Rose, Kristie L.; MacDonald, W. Hayes; Zhang, Bing; Schey, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary exosomes secreted by multiple cell types in the kidney may participate in intercellular signaling and provide an enriched source of kidney-specific proteins for biomarker discovery. Factors that alter the exosomal protein content remain unknown. To determine whether endogenous and exogenous hormones modify urinary exosomal protein content, we analyzed samples from 14 mildly hypertensive patients in a crossover study during a high-sodium (HS, 160 mmol/d) diet and low-sodium (LS, 20 mmol/d) diet to activate the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We further analyzed selected exosomal protein content in a separate cohort of healthy persons receiving intravenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg per hour for 10 hours) versus vehicle infusion. The LS diet increased plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration, whereas aldosterone infusion increased only aldosterone concentration. Protein analysis of paired urine exosome samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry–based multidimensional protein identification technology detected 2775 unique proteins, of which 316 exhibited significantly altered abundance during LS diet. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and α- and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits from the discovery set were verified using targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantified with isotope-labeled peptide standards. Dietary sodium restriction or acute aldosterone infusion similarly increased urine exosomal γENaC[112–122] peptide concentrations nearly 20-fold, which correlated with plasma aldosterone concentration and urinary Na/K ratio. Urine exosomal NCC and αENaC concentrations were relatively unchanged during these interventions. We conclude that urinary exosome content is altered by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Urinary measurement of exosomal γENaC[112–122] concentration may provide a useful biomarker of ENaC activation in future clinical studies. PMID:26113616

  10. Activation of the Endogenous Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System or Aldosterone Administration Increases Urinary Exosomal Sodium Channel Excretion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying; Wang, Xiaojing; Rose, Kristie L; MacDonald, W Hayes; Zhang, Bing; Schey, Kevin L; Luther, James M

    2016-02-01

    Urinary exosomes secreted by multiple cell types in the kidney may participate in intercellular signaling and provide an enriched source of kidney-specific proteins for biomarker discovery. Factors that alter the exosomal protein content remain unknown. To determine whether endogenous and exogenous hormones modify urinary exosomal protein content, we analyzed samples from 14 mildly hypertensive patients in a crossover study during a high-sodium (HS, 160 mmol/d) diet and low-sodium (LS, 20 mmol/d) diet to activate the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We further analyzed selected exosomal protein content in a separate cohort of healthy persons receiving intravenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg per hour for 10 hours) versus vehicle infusion. The LS diet increased plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration, whereas aldosterone infusion increased only aldosterone concentration. Protein analysis of paired urine exosome samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multidimensional protein identification technology detected 2775 unique proteins, of which 316 exhibited significantly altered abundance during LS diet. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and α- and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits from the discovery set were verified using targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantified with isotope-labeled peptide standards. Dietary sodium restriction or acute aldosterone infusion similarly increased urine exosomal γENaC[112-122] peptide concentrations nearly 20-fold, which correlated with plasma aldosterone concentration and urinary Na/K ratio. Urine exosomal NCC and αENaC concentrations were relatively unchanged during these interventions. We conclude that urinary exosome content is altered by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Urinary measurement of exosomal γENaC[112-122] concentration may provide a useful biomarker of ENaC activation in future clinical studies.

  11. Association studies suggest a key role for endothelin-1 in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and the accompanying renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system suppression.

    PubMed

    Verdonk, Koen; Saleh, Langeza; Lankhorst, Stephanie; Smilde, J E Ilse; van Ingen, Manon M; Garrelds, Ingrid M; Friesema, Edith C H; Russcher, Henk; van den Meiracker, Anton H; Visser, Willy; Danser, A H Jan

    2015-06-01

    Women with preeclampsia display low renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity and a high antiangiogenic state, the latter characterized by high levels of soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase (sFlt)-1 and reduced placental growth factor levels. To investigate whether renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system suppression in preeclampsia is because of this disturbed angiogenic balance, we measured mean arterial pressure, creatinine, endothelin-1 (ET-1), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system components in pregnant women with a high (≥85; n=38) or low (<85; n=65) soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase-1/placental growth factor ratio. Plasma ET-1 levels were increased in women with a high ratio, whereas their plasma renin activity and plasma concentrations of renin, angiotensinogen, and aldosterone were decreased. Plasma renin activity-aldosterone relationships were identical in both the groups. Multiple regression analysis revealed that plasma renin concentration correlated independently with mean arterial pressure and plasma ET-1. Plasma ET-1 correlated positively with soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and negatively with plasma renin concentration, and urinary protein correlated with plasma ET-1 and mean arterial pressure. Despite the lower plasma levels of renin and angiotensinogen in the high-ratio group, their urinary levels of these components were elevated. Correction for albumin revealed that this was because of increased glomerular filtration. Subcutaneous arteries obtained from patients with preeclampsia displayed an enhanced, AT2 receptor-mediated response to angiotensin II. In conclusion, a high antiangiogenic state associates with ET-1 activation, which together with the increased mean arterial pressure may underlie the parallel reductions in renin and aldosterone in preeclampsia. Because ET-1 also was a major determinant of urinary protein, our data reveal a key role for ET-1 in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Finally, the enhanced angiotensin responsiveness

  12. [Beta-blockers in septic shock: a review].

    PubMed

    Vela-Vásquez, R S; Grigorov-Tzenkov, I; Aguilar, J L

    2015-02-01

    In septic shock, high adrenergic stress is associated with cardiovascular and systemic adverse effects, which can negatively affect the results. Beta-adrenergic receptor block has been shown to be effective in controlling the disproportionate increase in heart rate, maintaining a favorable hemodynamic profile and apparently improving the efficiency of the cardiovascular system in order to maintain tissue perfusion. They have also been shown to modulate favorably catecholamine-induced immunosuppression and to decrease insulin resistance, protein catabolism, and proinflammatory cytokine expression associated with cardiovascular dysfunction. Selective beta-1 blockers appear to provide better results than non-selective blockers, even suggesting a positive impact on mortality. Future clinical trials are still needed to confirm these findings and define the scope of their benefits.

  13. Cardiovascular effects of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Faria-Costa, Gabriel; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor, AT2R, has been described as having opposite effects to the angiotensin type 1 receptor, AT1R. Although the quantities of the AT2R found in the adult are low, its expression rises in pathological situations. The AT2R has three major signaling pathways: activation of serine/threonine phosphatases (promoting apoptosis and antioxidant effects), activation of the bradykinin/NO/cGMP pathway (promoting vasodilation), and activation of phospholipase A2 (associated with regulation of potassium currents). The AT2R appears to have effects in vascular remodeling, atherosclerosis prevention and blood pressure lowering (when associated with an AT1R inhibitor). After myocardial infarction, the AT2R appears to decrease infarct size, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and to improve cardiac function. However, its role in the heart is controversial. In the kidney, the AT2R promotes natriuresis. Until now, treatment directed at the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system has been based on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers. The study of the AT2R has been revolutionized by the discovery of a direct agonist, C21, which promises to become part of the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Effect of oral labetalol on plasma catecholamines, renin and aldosterone in patients with severe arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J; Pedersen, A; Pedersen, G

    1979-11-01

    Arterial blood pressure and plasma catecholamines, renin activity and aldosterone concentration in 12 patients with severe essential hypertension were studied before and after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockage induced by oral labetalol treatment for 2 months. Furosemide in a fixed dose was employed as a basic antihypertensive agent throughout the study. Blood pressure was adequately controlled in only 6 patients. Mean body weight increased by 1.8 kg and there was a rise in body weight which was inversely correlated with the fall in standing mean blood pressure. The mean plasma noradrenaline concentration decreased from 0.30 to 0.20 ng/ml, whereas plasma adrenaline did not change significantly. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration varied greatly, but the mean values did not change significantly. Change in body weight was correlated inversely with changes in plasma noradrenaline and renin. The results suggest that labetalol, through its combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blocking action, induces a rise in body weight, probably due to sodium and fluid retention, which partly counterbalances the antihypertensive effect of labetalol, and partly modifies both renin and sympathetic nervous activity.

  15. The prevalence of CTNNB1 mutations in primary aldosteronism and consequences for clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vin-Cent; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Yang, Shao-Yu; Huang, Kuo-How; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Jian-Jhong; Connolly, Rory; Hu, Ya-Hui; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Peng, Kang-Yung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway/β-catenin signaling may be important in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the prevalence and clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy in APA patients harboring CTNNB1 mutations. The molecular expression of CYP11B2 and gonadal receptors in adenomas were also explored. Adenomas from 219 APA patients (95 men; 44.2%; aged 50.5 ± 11.9 years) showed a high rate of somatic mutations (n = 128, 58.4%). The majority of them harbored KCNJ5 mutations (n = 116, 52.9%); 8 patients (3.7%, 6 women) had CTNNB1 mutations. Patients with APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations were older and had shorter duration of hypertension. After adrenalectomy, CTNNB1 mutation carriers had a higher possibility (87.5%) of residual hypertension than other APA patients. APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations have heterogeneous staining of β-catenin and variable expression of gonadal receptors and both CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. This suggests that CTNNB1 mutations may be more related to tumorigenesis rather than excessive aldosterone production. PMID:28102204

  16. The Multifaceted Mineralocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.

    2015-01-01

    The primary adrenal cortical steroid hormones, aldosterone, and the glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone, act through the structurally similar mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Aldosterone is crucial for fluid, electrolyte, and hemodynamic homeostasis and tissue repair; the significantly more abundant glucocorticoids are indispensable for energy homeostasis, appropriate responses to stress, and limiting inflammation. Steroid receptors initiate gene transcription for proteins that effect their actions as well as rapid non-genomic effects through classical cell signaling pathways. GR and MR are expressed in many tissues types, often in the same cells, where they interact at molecular and functional levels, at times in synergy, others in opposition. Thus the appropriate balance of MR and GR activation is crucial for homeostasis. MR has the same binding affinity for aldosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone. Glucocorticoids activate MR in most tissues at basal levels and GR at stress levels. Inactivation of cortisol and corticosterone by 11β-HSD2 allows aldosterone to activate MR within aldosterone target cells and limits activation of the GR. Under most conditions, 11β-HSD1 acts as a reductase and activates cortisol/corticosterone, amplifying circulating levels. 11β-HSD1 and MR antagonists mitigate inappropriate activation of MR under conditions of oxidative stress that contributes to the pathophysiology of the cardiometabolic syndrome; however, MR antagonists decrease normal MR/GR functional interactions, a particular concern for neurons mediating cognition, memory, and affect. PMID:24944027

  17. Prostaglandins, renin, aldosterone, and catecholamines in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J; Christensen, P; Johannesen, P; Kornerup, H J; Kristensen, S; Lauritsen, J G; Leyssac, P P; Rasmussen, A B; Wohlert, M

    1983-01-01

    Urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), plasma concentrations of renin (PRC), aldosterone (PAC), noradrenaline (PNA) and adrenaline (PA) were determined in the third trimester of pregnancy, 5 days and 3 months after delivery in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnant and non-pregnant control subjects. PGE2 was higher in pregnant control subjects than in non-pregnant subjects, but reduced to non-pregnant level in preeclampsia. PGF2 alpha was the same in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnancy but higher than in the non-pregnant group. PRC and PAC were increased during pregnancy, but considerably lesser in preeclampsia than during normotensive pregnancy. PNA and PA were the same in all three groups. All parameters were normal 3 months after delivery. There were no correlations between any of the hormones and blood pressure in any of the groups. PGE2 was positively correlated to PRC. The lack of renal PGE2 in preeclampsia might be responsible for the decrease in renal blood flow and sodium excretion, and the changes in PRC and PAC are supposed to be secondary to changes in PGE2. It is hypothesised that preeclampsia is a state of prostaglandin deficiency.

  18. Beta-blockers in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Yates, R A

    1981-09-01

    Beta-blockers, originally introduced into clinical practice for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders, are being increasingly advocated in the treatment of diverse neurological and psychiatric conditions. Thus, propranolol and certain other beta-blockers have been shown to be effective, and may be the drugs of choice, in the treatment of benign essential tremor and the prevention of recurrent migraine attacks. These drugs also have a useful role to play in the treatment of anxiety and alcohol withdrawal states, although beta-blockers have not come into general use in these conditions. The action of propranolol and related drugs in these neurological and psychiatric conditions is generally considered to be mediated by blockade of peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors, although other effects, either central or peripheral, may also be involved. The use of beta-blockers in the treatment of psychosis remains controversial. Current evidence does not support the use of propranolol in schizophrenia, but further studies in mania are warranted.

  19. Aldosterone induces myofibroblast EGF secretion to regulate epithelial colonic permeability.

    PubMed

    Miró, Lluïsa; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Maijó, Mònica; Amat, Concepció; Naftalin, Richard J; Moretó, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    In vivo studies show that raised aldosterone (Aldo) during low-Na adaptation regulates the growth of pericryptal myofibroblasts and reduces the permeability of the colonic epithelium. The aim of this study was to reproduce in vitro the in vivo condition of increased Aldo using human CCD-18Co myofibroblasts and T84 colonic epithelial cells to measure myofibroblast and epithelial proliferation and the expression of intercellular junction proteins. Proliferation was quantified by measuring 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. The myofibroblast expression of EGF, VEGFa, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was measured by real-time PCR and the expression of junctional complex proteins by Western blot. Aldo stimulated the proliferation of myofibroblasts by 70% (P < 0.05) and increased EGF mRNA expression by 30% (P < 0.05) without affecting VEGFa and TGF-β1. EGF concentration in the incubation medium increased by 30% (P < 0.05) 24 h after Aldo addition, and these effects were prevented by the addition of spironolactone. Myofibroblast proliferation in response to Aldo was mediated by EGF receptor (EGFR) and involved both MAPKK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways. When T84 cells were incubated with medium from myofibroblasts stimulated with Aldo (conditioned medium), the expression of β-catenin and claudin IV was increased by 30% (P < 0.05) and proliferation by 40% (P < 0.05). T84 proliferation decreased when α-EGF, or the EGFR antagonist AG1478, was present. Results in vivo indicate that rats fed a low-salt diet showed an increased expression of EGF and EGFR in the colonic mucosa. These results support the view that changes in colonic permeability during low-Na adaptation are mediated by the EGF secreted by myofibroblasts in response to raised Aldo.

  20. Bilateral Adrenocortical Masses Producing Aldosterone and Cortisol Independently

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Lee, You-Bin; Seok, Hyeri; Shin, In Seub; Eun, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jung-Han; Oh, Young Lyun

    2015-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with symptoms of hypertension and bilateral adrenocortical masses with no feature of Cushing syndrome. The serum aldosterone/renin ratio was elevated and the saline loading test showed no suppression of the plasma aldosterone level, consistent with a diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism. Overnight and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests showed no suppression of serum cortisol, indicating a secondary diagnosis of subclinical Cushing syndrome. Adrenal vein sampling during the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test demonstrated excess secretion of cortisol from the left adrenal mass. A partial right adrenalectomy was performed, resulting in normalization of blood pressure, hypokalemia, and high aldosterone level, implying that the right adrenal mass was the main cause of the hyperaldosteronism. A total adrenalectomy for the left adrenal mass was later performed, resulting in a normalization of cortisol level. The final diagnosis was bilateral adrenocortical adenomas, which were secreting aldosterone and cortisol independently. This case is the first report of a concurrent cortisol-producing left adrenal adenoma and an aldosterone-producing right adrenal adenoma in Korea, as demonstrated by adrenal vein sampling and sequential removal of adrenal masses. PMID:26248855

  1. Racial differences in sensitivity of blood pressure to aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wanzhu; Eckert, George J; Hannon, Tamara S; Liu, Hai; Pratt, Linda M; Wagner, Mary Anne; Dimeglio, Linda A; Jung, Jeesun; Pratt, J Howard

    2014-06-01

    Blacks in comparison with whites are at risk for a more serious form of hypertension with high rates of complications. Greater sodium retention is thought to underlie the blood pressure (BP)-determining physiology of blacks, but specific mechanisms have not been identified. In a prospective observational study of BP, 226 black children and 314 white children (mean age, 10.6 years) were enrolled initially. Assessments were repeated in 85 blacks and 136 whites after reaching adulthood (mean age, 31 years). The relationship of BP to plasma aldosterone concentration in the context of the prevailing level of plasma renin activity was studied in blacks and whites. In a secondary interventional study, 9-α fludrocortisone was administered for 2 weeks to healthy adult blacks and whites to simulate hyperaldosteronism. BP responses in the 2 race groups were then compared. Although black children had lower levels of plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone, their BP was positively associated with the plasma aldosterone concentration, an effect that increased as plasma renin activity decreased (P=0.004). Data from black adults yielded similar results. No similar relationship was observed in whites. In the interventional study, 9-α fludrocortisone increased BP in blacks but not in whites. In conclusion, aldosterone sensitivity is a significant determinant of BP in young blacks. Although its role in establishing the risk of hypertension is not known, it could be as relevant as the actual level of aldosterone.

  2. SY 03-3 OVERVIEW OF SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND EPIGENETIC REGULATION OF ALDOSTERONE PRODUCING ADENOMA (APA).

    PubMed

    Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and as a consequence, an upregulation of aldosterone biosynthesis.The Cav1.3 mutations (CACNA1D) have been reported to result in channel activation at less depolarized potentials and cause calcium influx and aldosterone production.Women in pregnancy and after menopause, the APA harbored activating mutations of CTNNB1 was reported, which encoded β-catenin in the Wnt cell-differentiation pathway, and expressed LHCGR and GNRHR, encoding gonadal receptors, at levels that were more than 100 times as high as the levels in other APA. The mutations stimulate Wnt activation and cause adrenocortical cells to de-differentiate toward their common adrenal- gonadal precursor cell type. (Science 2011; 331: 768. Nat Genet 2013; 45: 440, 1050, 1055 NEJM 2015; 373: 1429, Hypertens 2015;66:248 )The prevalence of somatic mutations in APA has been extensively investigated in many studies. KCNJ5 mutations are the most frequent genetic abnormalities reported in APA with a prevalence of ∼40% in Caucasian population, and as high as 70% in series from Japan. Mutations in the CACNA1D gene are the second most frequent genetic alterations observed in APA with a prevalence comprised about 5∼10 %. The mutations affecting ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 genes are less frequent with a reported prevalence of around 5 and 2%, respectively. (J Endo. 2015; 224: R63. Hypertens. 2015; 65: 507)(2) Clinical, radiological and pathological relationship of these mutationsGenotype-phenotype correlations have been reported that patients with KCNJ5 mutations are more frequently female, diagnosed younger and with higher minimal plasma potassium concentrations,and larger than those with non- KCNJ5 mutations or without mutations. KCNJ5-mutant APA are lower average Hounsfield units (H.U.) reading in CT scans. Most of KCNJ5 mutations are solitary uninodular APAs. Most tumors exhibiting KCNJ5 mutations demonstrated the classic histological pattern of APAs, comprising of large

  3. Marine Bivalve Cellular Responses to Beta Blocker Exposures ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    β blockers are prescription drugs used for medical treatment of hypertension and arrhythmias. They prevent binding of agonists such as catecholamines to β adrenoceptors. In the absence of agonist induced activation of the receptor, adenylate cyclase is not activated which in turn limits cAMP production and protein kinase A activation, preventing increases in blood pressure and arrhythmias. After being taken therapeutically, commonly prescribed β blockers may make their way to coastal habitats via discharge from waste water treatment plants (WWTP) posing a potential risk to aquatic organisms. The aim of our research is to evaluate cellular responses of three commercially important marine bivalves - Eastern oysters, blue mussels and hard clams - upon exposure to two β blocker drugs, propranolol and metoprolol, and to find molecular initiating events (MIEs) indicative of the exposure. Bivalves were obtained from Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA) and acclimated in the laboratory. Following acclimation, gills and hepatopancreas (HP) tissues were harvested and separately exposed to 0, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/l of each drug. Tissues were bathed in 30 parts per thousand (ppt) filtered seawater, antibiotic mix, Leibovitz nutrient media, and the test drug. Exposures were conducted for 24 hours and samples were saved for cellular biomarker assays. A lysosomal destabilization assay, which is a marker of membrane damage, was also performed at the end of each exposure.

  4. Structural, functional, and molecular alterations produced by aldosterone plus salt in rat heart: association with enhanced serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; de las Heras, Natalia; Miana, María; Ballesteros, Sandra; Delgado, Carmen; Song, Su; Hintze, Thomas; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the structural, functional, inflammatory, and oxidative alterations, as well as serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1 (SGK-1) expression, produced in rat heart by aldosterone + salt administration. Fibrosis mediators such as connective tissue growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 were also evaluated. Treatment with spironolactone was evaluated to prove mineralocorticoid mediation. Male Wistar rats received aldosterone (1 mg[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]d-1) + 1% NaCl for 3 weeks. Half of the animals were treated with spironolactone (200 mg[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]d-1). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, left ventricle (LV) systolic pressure, and LV end-diastolic pressure were elevated (P < 0.05) in aldosterone + salt-treated rats. In aldosterone + salt-treated rats, -dP/dt decreased (P < 0.05), but +dP/dt was similar in all groups. Spironolactone normalized (P < 0.05) systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, LV systolic pressure, LV end-diastolic pressure, and -dP/dt. Relative heart weight, collagen content, messenger RNA expression of transforming growth factor beta, connective tissue growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase 2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1[beta], p22phox, endothelial nitric oxide synhtase, and SGK-1 were increased (P < 0.05) in aldosterone + salt-treated rats, being reduced by spironolactone (P < 0.05). SGK-1 might be a key mediator in the structural, functional, and molecular cardiac alterations induced by aldosterone + salt in rats. All the observed changes and mediators are related with the activation of mineralocorticoid receptors.

  5. Interfering with mineralocorticoid receptor activation: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone is a potent mineralocorticoid produced by the adrenal gland. Aldosterone binds to and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in a plethora of tissues, but the cardiovascular actions of aldosterone are of primary interest clinically. Although MR antagonists were developed as antihypertensive agents, they are now considered to be important therapeutic options for patients with heart failure. Specifically, blocking only the MR has proven to be a difficult task because of its similarity to other steroid receptors, including the androgen and progesterone receptors. This lack of specificity caused the use of the first-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to be fraught with difficulty because of the side effects produced by drug administration. However, in recent years, several advances have been made that could potentially increase the clinical use of agents that inhibit the actions of aldosterone. These will be discussed here along with some examples of the beneficial effects of these new therapeutic agents. PMID:25165560

  6. Clinical review of beta-blockers in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D

    1980-09-01

    Anxiety has three essential elements: the subjective experience, autonomic symptoms and avoidance behaviour. Various theories are considered which highlight the psychic and somatic aspects of anxiety. Beta-adrenergic receptor blocking drugs have been used with advantage to treat everyday stresses. These include the anxiety produced by the civil disturbances in Northern Ireland, performing surgery, dentistry, musical instruments or speaking in public, as well as examination nerves. The profile of symptoms such as tachycardia, palpitations and tremor which are most likely to respond to beta-blockers are discussed as well as their side-effects. Their mode of action is different from other anxiolytics, with which they can be combined.

  7. [Effects of H2-blockers on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-12-01

    First-pass metabolism (FPM) of alcohol is demonstrated by lower blood alcohol concentrations after oral than intravenous administration of the same dose. FPM occurs predominantly in the stomach and has been attributed to class IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzyme localizated in the gastric mucosa. A number of factors that influence on gastric ADH activity and thereby modulate FPM have been identified. These include age, sex, ethnicity, concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed and drugs. Several H2-receptor antagonists, including cimetidine and ranitidine, inhibit gastric ADH activity and reduce FPM, resulting in higher blood alcohol concentrations after H2-blockers administration.

  8. Isolated production of aldosterone by a malignant adrenal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, D. S.; Fischer, D. G.; Forman, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    A 45-year-old female developed hypertension and hypokalemia. Elevated plasma aldosterone and suppressed plasma renin levels were measured with no evidence for glucocorticoid or androgen abnormalities. A left adrenal tumor was removed that showed histologic criteria for malignancy. It is commonly taught that malignant adrenal tumors are recognized by their multiple hormone production. However, isolated aldosterone production by a carcinoma can occur and requires close follow-up observation and therapy for this highly malignant tumor. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:6537692

  9. Aldosterone-induced osteopontin gene transcription in vascular smooth muscle cells involves glucocorticoid response element.

    PubMed

    Kiyosue, Arihiro; Nagata, Daisuke; Myojo, Masahiro; Sato, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Masao; Satonaka, Hiroshi; Nagai, Ryozo; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2011-12-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is known to be one of the cytokines that is involved in the vascular inflammation caused by aldosterone (Aldo). Previous reports have shown that Aldo increases OPN transcripts, and the mechanisms for this remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated how Aldo increases OPN transcripts in the vascular smooth muscle cells of rats. Aldosterone increased OPN transcripts time-dependently as well as dose-dependently. This increase was diminished by eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Luciferase promoter assays showed that the OPN promoter deleted to the -1599 site retained the same promoting ability as the full-length OPN promoter when stimulated by 10(-7) M Aldo, but the promoter deleted to the -1300 site lost the promoting ability. A glucocorticoid response element (GRE) is located in that deleted region. Luciferase assays of a mutated promoter without the GRE lost the luciferase upregulation, although mutated promoters with the deletion of other consensus sites maintained the promoter activity. The binding of the Aldo-MR complex to the GRE fragment was confirmed by an electrophoretic-mobility shift assay. This is the first report showing that Aldo regulates the transcriptional levels of OPN and inflammatory responses in the vasculature through a specific GRE site in the OPN promoter region.

  10. Hibernoma development in transgenic mice identifies brown adipose tissue as a novel target of aldosterone action.

    PubMed Central

    Zennaro, M C; Le Menuet, D; Viengchareun, S; Walker, F; Ricquier, D; Lombès, M

    1998-01-01

    Aldosterone is a major regulator of salt balance and blood pressure, exerting its effects via the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling tissue-specific expression of the human MR (hMR) in vivo, we have developed transgenic mouse models expressing the SV40 large T antigen (TAg) under the control of each of the two promoters of the hMR gene (P1 or P2). Unexpectedly, all five P1-TAg founder animals died prematurely from voluminous malignant liposarcomas originating from brown adipose tissue, as evidenced by the expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein ucp1, indicating that the proximal P1 promoter was transcriptionally active in brown adipocytes. No such hibernoma occurred in P2-TAg transgenic mice. Appropriate tissue-specific usage of P1 promoter sequences was confirmed by demonstrating the presence of endogenous MR in both neoplastic and normal brown adipose tissue. Several cell lines were derived from hibernomas; among them, the T37i cells can undergo terminal differentiation into brown adipocytes, which remain capable of expressing ucp1 upon adrenergic or retinoic acid stimulation. These cells possess endogenous functional MR, thus providing a new model to explore molecular mechanisms of mineralocorticoid action. Our data broaden the known functions of aldosterone and suggest a potential role for MR in adipocyte differentiation and regulation of thermogenesis. PMID:9502766

  11. Pertussis toxin treatment does not block inhibition by atrial natriuretic factor of aldosterone secretion in cultured bovine zona glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    De Lean, A.; Cantin, M.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) potently inhibits PGE or forskolin-stimulation aldosterone secretion in bovine zona glomerulosa (ZG) by acting through specific high affinity receptors. In order to evaluate the functional role of the regulatory protein N/sub i/ and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity (AC) in ZG, the authors have studied the effect of treatment with PT on inhibition by ANF of aldosterone production. Primary cultures of ZG were treated for 18 hours in serum-free F12 medium with (0-100 ng/ml PT). No effect of PT pretreatment was observed either on basal, PGE-stimulated or ANF-inhibited levels of steroidogenesis. When membranes prepared from control ZG were ADP-ribosylated with (/sup 32/P) NAD in the presence of PT, two toxin-specific bands with 39 Kd and 41 Kd were documented on SDS gel. Cell pretreatment with as low as 1 ng/ml drastically reduced further labelling of these two bands while higher doses completely abolished them. Since PT treatment covalently modifies completely the toxin substrate without altering ANF inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis, the authors conclude that N/sub i/ is not involved in the mode of action of ANF on aldosterone production.

  12. Effect of aldosterone-producing adenoma on endothelial function and Rho-associated kinase activity in patients with primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Oki, Kenji; Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Liao, James K; Higashi, Yukihito

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate vascular function and activity of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) in patients with primary aldosteronism. Vascular function, including flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, and ROCK activity in peripheral leukocytes were evaluated in 21 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA), 23 patients with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA), and 40 age-, sex-, and blood pressure-matched patients with essential hypertension (EHT). FMD was significantly lower in the APA group than in the IHA and EHT groups (3.2±2.0% versus 4.6±2.3% and 4.4±2.2%; P<0.05, respectively), whereas there was no significant difference in FMD between the IHA and EHT groups. There was no significant difference in nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the 3 groups. ROCK activity was higher in the APA group than in the IHA and EHT groups (1.29±0.57 versus 1.00±0.46 and 0.81±0.36l; P<0.05, respectively), whereas there was no significant difference in ROCK activity between the IHA and EHT groups. FMD correlated with age (r=-0.31; P<0.01), plasma aldosterone concentration (r=-0.35; P<0.01), and aldosterone:renin ratio (r=-0.34; P<0.01). ROCK activity correlated with age (r=-0.24; P=0.04), plasma aldosterone concentration (r=0.33; P<0.01), and aldosterone:renin ratio (r=0.46; P<0.01). After adrenalectomy, FMD and ROCK activity were restored in patients with APA. APA was associated with both endothelial dysfunction and increased ROCK activity compared with those in IHA and EHT. APA may have a higher risk of future cardiovascular events.

  13. A meta-analysis of the effects of β-adrenergic blockers in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Shen, Chengwu; Zhai, Shujun; Liu, Yukun; Yue, Wen-Wei; Han, Li

    2016-10-01

    Adrenergic β-blockers are drugs that bind to, but do not activate β-adrenergic receptors. Instead they block the actions of β-adrenergic agonists and are used for the treatment of various diseases such as cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, hypertension, headache, migraines, stress, anxiety, prostate cancer, and heart failure. Several meta-analysis studies have shown that β-blockers improve the heart function and reduce the risks of cardiovascular events, rate of mortality, and sudden death through chronic heart failure (CHF) of patients. The present study identified results from recent meta-analyses of β-adrenergic blockers and their usefulness in CHF. Databases including Medline/Embase/Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PubMed were searched for the periods May, 1985 to March, 2011 and June, 2013 to August, 2015, and a number of studies identified. Results of those studies showed that use of β-blockers was associated with decreased sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. However, contradictory results have also been reported. The present meta-analysis aimed to determine the efficacy of β-blockers on mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure. The results showed that mortality was significantly reduced by β-blocker treatment prior to the surgery of heart failure patients. The results from the meta-analysis studies showed that β-blocker treatment in heart failure patients correlated with a significant decrease in long-term mortality, even in patients that meet one or more exclusion criteria of the MERIT-HF study. In summary, the findings of the current meta-analysis revealed beneficial effects different β-blockers have on patients with heart failure or related heart disease.

  14. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1-5, area 6-15, and area 6-20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1-5, area 6-15, area 6-20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy.

  15. Activating mutations in CTNNB1 in aldosterone producing adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Åkerström, Tobias; Maharjan, Rajani; Sven Willenberg, Holger; Cupisti, Kenko; Ip, Julian; Moser, Ana; Stålberg, Peter; Robinson, Bruce; Alexander Iwen, K.; Dralle, Henning; Walz, Martin K.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Sidhu, Stan; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Hellman, Per; Björklund, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of secondary hypertension with a prevalence of 5–10% in unreferred hypertensive patients. Aldosterone producing adenomas (APAs) constitute a large proportion of PA cases and represent a surgically correctable form of the disease. The WNT signaling pathway is activated in APAs. In other tumors, a frequent cause of aberrant WNT signaling is mutation in the CTNNB1 gene coding for β-catenin. Our objective was to screen for CTNNB1 mutations in a well-characterized cohort of 198 APAs. Somatic CTNNB1 mutations were detected in 5.1% of the tumors, occurring mutually exclusive from mutations in KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CACNA1D. All of the observed mutations altered serine/threonine residues in the GSK3β binding domain in exon 3. The mutations were associated with stabilized β-catenin and increased AXIN2 expression, suggesting activation of WNT signaling. By CYP11B2 mRNA expression, CYP11B2 protein expression, and direct measurement of aldosterone in tumor tissue, we confirmed the ability for aldosterone production. This report provides compelling evidence that aberrant WNT signaling caused by mutations in CTNNB1 occur in APAs. This also suggests that other mechanisms that constitutively activate the WNT pathway may be important in APA formation. PMID:26815163

  16. Circadian rhythm of aldosterone in dairy cattle during the summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranas, T. J.; Roussel, J. D.; Seybt, S. H.

    1987-09-01

    Twelve Holstein heifers, pregnant from 120 150 days were used to study the circadian rhythm of aldosterone, cortisol, progesterone, sodium and potassium in dairy cattle during the summer in Louisiana. Cortisol was not significantly influenced by time (time 1 = 06.00 h). Aldosterone, sodium, potassium and progesterone changed significantly (P<.01) with time. Aldosterone peaked (116.5±17.2 pg/ml) at 08.00 h and then generally declined to 16.00 h (26.7±2.0 pg/ml). Sodium generally increased from 06.00 h (320.1±7.3 mg%) to 18.00 h (377.9±6.1 mg%), and then declined. Potassium generally increased from 06.00 h (20.9±0.5 mg%) to 22.00 h (23.0±0.3 mg%). Progesterone generally increased from 07.00 h (2.8±0.4 mg/ml) to 24.00 h (7.5±1.4 mg/ml). Aldosterone was significantly related to temperature associated with the time of the day samples were taken (r = 0.66, P<.02).

  17. 21 CFR 862.1045 - Aldosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aldosterone test system. 862.1045 Section 862.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1045 - Aldosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aldosterone test system. 862.1045 Section 862.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1045 - Aldosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aldosterone test system. 862.1045 Section 862.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1045 - Aldosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aldosterone test system. 862.1045 Section 862.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1045 - Aldosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aldosterone test system. 862.1045 Section 862.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. Dopamine Inhibits Angiotensin-Stimulated Aldosterone Biosynthesis in Bovine Adrenal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mc Kenna, Terence J.; Island, Donald P.; Nicholson, Wendell E.; Liddle, Grant W.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility that dopamine may play a role in the in vivo control of aldosterone production in man was suggested to us by reports from others; (a) that bromocriptine, a dopaminergic agonist, inhibits the aldosterone response to diuresis and to the infusion of angiotensin or ACTH; and (b) that metaclopramide, a dopamine blocking agent, causes elevations in plasma aldosterone levels. To determine whether such effects were direct or indirect, we examined the action of dopamine on aldosterone biosynthesis in isolated, bovine adrenal cells. Dopamine significantly inhibits the aldosterone response to angiotensin (P < 0.001), but does not influence basal aldosterone biosynthesis. It has previously been reported that angiotensin stimulates both the early and late phases of aldosterone biosynthesis. The present experiments demonstrated that the enhancing effect of angiotensin on the conversion of deoxycorticosterone to aldosterone (late phase of aldosterone biosynthesis) was almost completely inhibited by dopamine (P < 0.001). A significant inhibitory effect of dopamine (10 nM) was seen even when aldosterone biosynthesis was stimulated by a grossly supraphysiological concentration of angiotensin II (10 μM). However, these studies did not demonstrate any direct effect of dopamine on the early phase of aldosterone biosynthesis (cholesterol to pregnenolone) basally or when stimulated, or on the late phase of aldosterone biosynthesis under basal conditions. These in vitro studies suggest a direct inhibitory role for dopamine on the late phase of aldosterone biosynthesis, which may account for the in vivo inhibition of the aldosterone response to angiotensin in subjects treated with a dopaminergic agent. PMID:447857

  3. Fatty acids are potential endogenous regulators of aldosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Goodfriend, T L; Ball, D L; Elliott, M E; Morrison, A R; Evenson, M A

    1991-05-01

    Adrenal glomerulosa cells washed with delipidated albumin produced increased amounts of aldosterone in response to angiotensin-II (AII) or (Bu)2cAMP. Albumin treatment also increased binding of 125I-labeled AII to high affinity binding sites on adrenal cells. Lipid extracts of albumin solutions that were used to wash cells inhibited AII binding and aldosterone responses by washed glomerulosa cells. Chromatographic fractionation and mass spectroscopic analysis indicated that the inhibitors removed from cells by albumin were long chain fatty acids. Exogenous fatty acids not only inhibited AII binding, but they inhibited basal aldosterone production and increments in aldosterone caused by AII or dbcAMP, suggesting an effect on postreceptor steps in aldosteronogenesis. The most potent and most abundant fatty acids removed from adrenal cells were oleic, linoleic, and arachidonic. These fatty acids inhibited at micromolar concentrations in the absence of albumin and at somewhat higher concentrations in its presence. Cells that had been washed, then inhibited by exogenous oleic acid in vitro, were restored to their enhanced responsiveness by a second albumin wash, making it unlikely that cell damage is the mechanism of inhibition by fatty acids. Responses of fasciculata cells were not potentiated by albumin washes, and cortisol production was less sensitive than aldosterone production to exogenous fatty acids. Binding of ANP to glomerulosa cells was not affected by albumin or fatty acids. These results combined with clinical correlations make it plausible that unesterified fatty acids are naturally occurring regulators of the adrenal glomerulosa. Insulin's ability to lower plasma levels of fatty acids may be one way that it causes sodium retention.

  4. [Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Germain, Alfredo M; Kottman, Cristián; Valdés, Gloria

    2002-12-01

    Based on two patients, we discuss the difficulties in diagnosing and managing primary aldosteronism in pregnancy, which derive from changes of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis, from the uncertainty regarding blood pressure control along gestation and postpartum, and from the contraindication to the use of spironolactone. The first case is a 27 years old woman with a long standing refractory hypertension, a hemorrhagic stroke with left brachial hemiplegia and crural hemiparesia, two miscarriages, one stillbirth and one offspring with intrauterine growth retardation. Due to hypokalemia, a plasma aldosterone/renin activity ratio of 91, and a negative genetic screening for glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism (GRA), a primary hyperaldosteronism with normal adrenals in CT scan was diagnosed, and good blood pressure control was attained with spironolactone. After two and a half years of normotension, a fifth pregnancy, managed with methyldopa evolved with satisfactory blood pressures, plasma potassium, fetal growth, uterine and umbilical arterial resistance indexes, and maternal endothelial function. At 37 1/2 weeks of pregnancy the patient delivered a healthy newborn weighing 2,960 g. Blood pressure rose during the 48 hours of postpartum in the absence of proteinuria and required i.v. hydralazine. The second patient is a 37 years old woman, with known refractory hypertension for 7 years, hypokalemia, plasma aldosterone/renin activity ratio greater than 40, normal adrenals in the CAT scan, and a negative genetic screening for GRA. She had normotensive pregnancies 5 and 3 years prior to the detection of hypertension, with hypertensive crisis in both postpartum periods, retrospectively considered as expressions of primary hyperaldosteronism.

  5. SFE/SFHTA/AFCE consensus on primary aldosteronism, part 6: Adrenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Steichen, Olivier; Amar, Laurence; Chaffanjon, Philippe; Kraimps, Jean-Louis; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Zinzindohoue, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of primary aldosteronism (PA) aims at preventing or correcting hypertension, hypokalemia and target organ damage. Patients with lateralized PA and candidates for surgery may be managed by laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Partial adrenalectomy and non-surgical ablation have no proven advantage over total adrenalectomy. Intraoperative morbidity and mortality are low in reference centers, and day-surgery is warranted in selected cases. Spironolactone administered during the weeks preceding surgery controls hypertension and hypokalemia and may prevent postoperative hypoaldosteronism. In most cases, surgery corrects hypokalemia, improves control of hypertension and reduces the burden of pharmacologic treatment; in about 40% of cases, it resolves hypertension. However, success in controlling hypertension and reversing target organ damage is comparable with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Informed patient preference with regard to surgery is thus an important factor in therapeutic decision-making.

  6. Misperceptions About β-Blockers and Diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Ubel, Peter A; Jepson, Christopher; Asch, David A

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Based on a series of clinical trials showing no difference in the effectiveness or tolerability of most major classes of antihypertensive medications, the Joint National Commission on High Blood Pressure Treatment recommends that physicians prescribe β-blockers or diuretics as initial hypertensive therapy unless there are compelling indications for another type of medication. Nevertheless, many physicians continue to favor more expensive medications like angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and calcium channel blockers as first line agents. The persistent use of these agents raises questions as to whether physicians perceive ACE inhibitors and calcium channel blockers to be better than β-blockers and diuretics. METHODS We surveyed 1,200 primary care physicians in 1997, and another 500 primary care physicians in 2000, and asked them to estimate the relative effectiveness and side effects of 4 classes of medication in treating a hypothetical patient with uncomplicated hypertension: ACE inhibitors, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics. In addition, we asked them to indicate whether they ever provided free samples of hypertension medications to their patients. RESULTS Perceptions of the relative effectiveness and side effects of the 4 classes of hypertension medications did not significantly change over the 3 years, nor did prescription recommendations. Physicians perceive that diuretics are less effective at lowering blood pressure than the other 3 classes (P < .001). They also perceive that β-blockers are less tolerated than the other 3 classes (P < .001). In a multivariate model, perceptions of effectiveness and tolerability displayed significant associations with prescription preference independent of background variables. The only other variable to contribute significantly to the model was provision of free medication samples to patients. CONCLUSIONS Despite numerous clinical trials showing no difference in the effectiveness

  7. Benefits of Aldosterone Receptor Antagonism in Chronic Kidney Disease (BARACK D) trial–a multi-centre, prospective, randomised, open, blinded end-point, 36-month study of 2,616 patients within primary care with stage 3b chronic kidney disease to compare the efficacy of spironolactone 25 mg once daily in addition to routine care on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes versus routine care alone: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and increasing in prevalence. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and death in CKD, though of a different phenotype to the general CVD population. Few therapies have proved effective in modifying the increased CVD risk or rate of renal decline in CKD. There are accumulating data that aldosterone receptor antagonists (ARA) may offer cardio-protection and delay renal impairment in patients with the CV phenotype in CKD. The use of ARA in CKD has therefore been increasingly advocated. However, no large study of ARA with renal or CVD outcomes is underway. Methods The study is a prospective randomised open blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial set in primary care where patients will mainly be identified by their GPs or from existing CKD lists. They will be invited if they have been formally diagnosed with CKD stage 3b or there is evidence of stage 3b CKD from blood results (eGFR 30–44 mL/min/1.73 m2) and fulfil the other inclusion/exclusion criteria. Patients will be randomised to either spironolactone 25 mg once daily in addition to routine care or routine care alone and followed-up for 36 months. Discussion BARACK D is a PROBE trial to determine the effect of ARA on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes (onset or progression of CVD) in patients with stage 3b CKD. Trial registration EudraCT: 2012-002672-13 ISRTN: ISRCTN44522369 PMID:24886488

  8. Adsorption of beta blockers to environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kibbey, Tohren C G; Paruchuri, Rajiv; Sabatini, David A; Chen, Lixia

    2007-08-01

    Beta-adrenergic blocking agents (beta blockers) are widely used pharmaceuticals which have been detected in the environment. Predicting the transport and ultimate fate of beta blockers in the environment requires understanding their adsorption to soils and sediments, something for which little information is currently available. The objective of this work was to examine the adsorption of three beta blockers, propranolol, metoprolol and nadolol, to a natural alluvial material, as well as to six minerals present as components of the alluvial material. Batch adsorption experiments indicate that, for most of the minerals studied, compound hydrophobicity is an important predictor of adsorption, with propranolol,the most hydrophobic compound studied, adsorbing to the greatest extent. Results further suggest that, for the minerals studied, electrostatic effects are not a good predictor of adsorption; adsorption extent was not well-predicted by either surface zeta potential or by the difference between experiment pH and point of zero charge, despite the cationic nature af the three beta blockers at experiment pH values. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), on adsorption. Results indicate that SDBS significantly increases the adsorption of propranolol to two different sorbents. This result is potentially important because surfactants such as SDBS are likely to be present in wastewater effluents with beta blockers and could influence their mobility in the environment.

  9. Effect of beta-blockers on psychomotor performance in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Betts, T A; Knight, R; Crowe, A; Blake, A; Harvey, P; Mortiboy, D

    1985-01-01

    The effects of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists on psychometric tests including vehicle handling, choice reaction time, and kinetic visual acuity (KVA), are reviewed. The beta-blockers had little effect on the performance tests, with the unexplained but reproducible effect of enhanced KVA performance with atenolol. Although the beta-blockers had little effect on performance tests they were shown to have psychotropic effects in normal volunteers. The reasons for the conflicting evidence concerning the effect of these drugs on performance tests is discussed in relation to the present experiments and to variables that may influence response. It is concluded that one should use tests that are as independent as possible from potentially confounding variables. The use of evoked potentials in the electroencephalogram is one such test. A preliminary study is described in which the effects of beta-blockers were detected using visual evoked responses on the electroencephalogram.

  10. A beta-blocker, propranolol, decreases the efficacy from enzyme replacement therapy in Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-oh; Pope, Rand; Li, Songtao; Kishnani, Priya S.; Steet, Richard; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) fails to completely reverse muscle weakness in Pompe disease. β2-agonists enhanced ERT by increasing receptor-mediated uptake of rhGAA in skeletal muscles. Purpose To test the hypothesis that a β-blocker might reduce the efficacy of ERT, because the action of β-blockers opposes those of β2-agonists. Methods Mice with Pompe disease were treated with propranolol (a β-blocker) or clenbuterol in combination with ERT, or with ERT alone. Results Propranolol-treated mice had decreased weight gain (p<0.01), in comparison with clenbuterol-treated mice. Left ventricular mass was decreased (and comparable to wild-type) in ERT only and clenbuterol-treated groups of mice, and unchanged in propranolol-treated mice. GAA activity increased following either clenbuterol or propranolol in skeletal muscles. However, muscle glycogen was reduced only in clenbuterol-treated mice, not in propranolol-treated mice. Cell-based experiments confirmed that propranolol reduces uptake of rhGAA into Pompe fibroblasts and also demonstrated that the drug induces intracellular accumulation of glycoproteins at higher doses. Conclusion Propranolol, a commonly prescribed β-blocker, increased left ventricular mass and decreased glycogen clearance in skeletal muscle following ERT. β-blockers might therefore decrease the efficacy from ERT in patients with Pompe disease. PMID:26454691

  11. [Hypertension in the course of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Wyskida, Magdalena; Wyskida, Katarzyna; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena; Maruniak-Chudek, Iwona; Sikora, Jerzy; Chudek, Jerzy

    2015-02-15

    Hypertension is one of the most common cardiovascular diseases during pregnancy. Primary hyperaldosteronism (PHA) is the most frequent endocrinological, secondary cause of hypertension, rarely diagnosed in pregnant women. In the available literature about 50 cases of PHA in pregnant women have been described. PHA is often a cause of resistant hypertension. PHA can cause life-threatening complications both for the pregnant woman and the fetus. Diagnosis of PHA in pregnancy is difficult due to the antagonistic effect of progesterone on aldosterone, physiological increase of aldosterone release during gestation and frequent normokalaemic clinical course. Typical pharmacological treatment of PHA is limited due to the anti‑androgenic effect of spironolactone, lack of data concerning the safety of eplerenone and limited access to amiloride in Poland. Surgical treatment is a therapeutic option only in early pregnancy. This paper presents the current state of knowledge on diagnostic methods and treatment of PHA in pregnant women and a systematic review of cases described in the literature.

  12. High prevalence of thyroid ultrasonographic abnormalities in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Scaroni, Carla; Lumachi, Franco; Selice, Riccardo; Fiore, Cristina; Favia, Gennaro; Mantero, Franco

    2003-11-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid abnormalities detected by ultrasonography and, in particular, of multinodular nontoxic goiter in primary aldosteronism. We analyzed 80 consecutive of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (40 with unilateral adenoma and 40 with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism) and 80 normotensive healthy controls, comparable for age, sex, iodine intake, and geographical area. Blood pressure, thyroid palpation, thyroid function, and ultrasonography were evaluated. The prevalence of ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities was 60% in primary aldosteronism and 27% in controls (p < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant difference in prevalence of these abnormalities in unilateral adenoma and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism with respect to controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The prevalence of multinodular nontoxic goiter in idiopathic hyperaldosteronism was higher than in controls (p < 0.001) and, in particular, in female patients. From these data it seems to be worth considering the existence of primary hyperaldosteronism in patients with multinodular goiter and hypertension.

  13. Zero gravity and cardiovascular homeostasis. The relationship between endogenous hyperprolactinemia and plasma aldosterone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, E.; Re, R. N.; Kourides, I. A.; Weihl, A. C.; Maloof, F.

    1978-01-01

    Prolactin, thyrotropin and aldosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay and plasma renin activity by the radioimmunoassay of angiotensin I in normal women before and after the intravenous injection of 200 micrograms of thyrotropin releasing hormone. Prolactin increased at 15 minutes following thyrotropin releasing hormone. Plasma renin activity was not different from control levels during the first hour following the administration of thyrotropin releasing hormone, nor did the plasma aldosterone concentration differ significantly from the control levels during this period. However, with upright posture, an increase in aldosterone and in plasma renin activity was noted, demonstrating a normal capacity to secrete aldosterone. Similarly, no change in aldosterone was seen in 9 patients with primary hypothyroidism given thyrotropin releasing hormone, despite the fact that the increase in prolactin was greater than normal. These data demonstrate that acutely or chronically elevated serum prolactin levels do not result in increased plasma aldosterone levels in humans.

  14. Familial or genetic primary aldosteronism and Gordon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stowasser, Michael; Pimenta, Eduardo; Gordon, Richard D

    2011-06-01

    Salt-sensitive forms of hypertension have received considerable renewed attention in recent years. This article focuses on 2 main forms of salt-sensitive hypertension (familial or genetic primary aldosteronism [PA] and Gordon syndrome) and the current state of knowledge regarding their genetic bases. The glucocorticoid-remediable form of familial PA (familial hyperaldosteronism type I) is dealt with only briefly because it is covered in depth elsewhere.

  15. Plasma Renin Activity and Aldosterone: Correlations with Moderate Hypohydration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    circulating aldosterone, in conjunction Oith drinking systems were evaluated: the current gravity-fed sys- vasopressin ( antidiuretic hormone ), are the humoral...surprising that there is available an ex- and analyzed for fluid-electrolyte regulatory hormones . During all trials with chemical protective garments...hot ambient consumption, increased hypohydration, and elicited the great- conditions is accompanied by hormonal adaptations to est elevations in PRA and

  16. Time-dependent aldosterone metabolism in toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Brem, A.S.; Pacholski, M.; Morris, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) metabolism was examined in the toad bladder. Bladders were incubated with (/sup 3/H)aldosterone (10(-7) M) for 5 h, 1 h, or 10 min. Tissues were analyzed for metabolites using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). In separate experiments, Na+ transport was assessed by the short-circuit current (SCC) technique. Following a 5-h tissue incubation, about 25% of the (/sup 3/H)-aldosterone was converted into metabolites including a polar monosulfate metabolite, 20 beta-dihydroaldo (20 beta-DHAldo), small quantities of 5 beta-reduced products, and a variety of 5 alpha-reduced Aldo products including 5 alpha-DHAldo, 3 alpha,5 alpha-tetrahydroaldo (3 alpha,5 alpha-THAldo), and 3 beta,5 alpha-THAldo. Tissues metabolized approximately 10% of the labeled hormone into the same compounds by 1 h. Measurable quantities of these metabolites were also synthesized by bladders exposed to Aldo for only 10 min and then incubated in buffer for an additional 50 min without Aldo. Bladders pretreated with the spironolactone, K+-canrenoate (3.5 X 10(-4) M), and stimulated with Aldo (10(-7) M) generated a peak SCC 44 +/- 6% of that observed in matched pairs stimulated with Aldo (P less than 0.001; n = 6). K+-canrenoate also markedly diminished (/sup 3/H)aldosterone metabolism at both 5 and 1 h. Thus, metabolic transformation of Aldo begins prior to hormone-induced increases in Na+ transport. Both the generation of certain metabolites (e.g., 5 alpha-reductase pathway products) and the increase in Na+ transport can be selectively inhibited by K+-canrenoate.

  17. Mineralocorticoid specificity of renal type I receptors: in vivo binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, K.; Funder, J.W.

    1987-02-01

    The authors have injected rats with (TH)aldosterone or (TH) corticosterone, plus 100-fold excess of the highly specific glucocorticoid RU 28362, with or without excess unlabeled aldosterone or corticosterone and compared type I receptor occupancy in kidney and hippocampus. Thirty minutes after subcutaneous injection (TH)aldosterone was well retained in renal papilla-inner medulla, renal cortex-outer medulla, and hippocampus; in contrast, (TH)corticosterone was well retained only in hippocampus. Competition studies for (TH)aldosterone binding sites showed corticosterone to be a poor competitor in the kidney compared with hippocampus. Time-course studies, with rats killed 10-180 min after tracer administration, showed very low uptake/retention of (TH)corticosterone by kidney; in hippocampus (TH)corticosterone retention was similar to that of (TH)aldosterone in kidney, and retention of (TH)aldosterone by hippocampus was much more prolonged than of either tracer in any other tissue. Studies in 10-day-old rats, with very low levels of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), showed a high degree of aldosterone selectivity in both zones of the kidney, whereas 9TH)aldosterone and (TH)corticosterone were equivalently bound in hippocampus. They interpret these data as evidenced for a mechanism unrelated to extravascular CBG conferring mineralocorticoid specificity on renal type I receptors and propose two models derived from their findings consistent with such differential selectivity.

  18. Metaflumizone is a novel sodium channel blocker insecticide.

    PubMed

    Salgado, V L; Hayashi, J H

    2007-12-15

    Metaflumizone is a novel semicarbazone insecticide, derived chemically from the pyrazoline sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs) discovered at Philips-Duphar in the early 1970s, but with greatly improved mammalian safety. This paper describes studies confirming that the insecticidal action of metaflumizone is due to the state-dependent blockage of sodium channels. Larvae of the moth Spodoptera eridania injected with metaflumizone became paralyzed, concomitant with blockage of all nerve activity. Furthermore, tonic firing of abdominal stretch receptor organs from Spodoptera frugiperda was blocked by metaflumizone applied in the bath, consistent with the block of voltage-dependent sodium channels. Studies on native sodium channels, in primary-cultured neurons isolated from the CNS of the larvae of the moth Manduca sexta and on Para/TipE sodium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus (African clawed frog) oocytes, confirmed that metaflumizone blocks sodium channels by binding selectively to the slow-inactivated state, which is characteristic of the SCBIs. The results confirm that metaflumizone is a novel sodium channel blocker insecticide.

  19. Paradoxical glucose-induced hyperkalemia. Combined aldosterone-insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, S; Strunk, B; Singer, I; Goldberg, M

    1975-11-01

    Severe hyperkalemia associated with spontaneous hyperglycemia as well as with the intravenous infusions of glucose occurred in an insulin-requiring diabetic patient in the absence of potassium administration, the use of diuretics which inhibit urinary potassium excretion or acidemia. Metabolic balance studies revealed, in addition to diabets, the presence of isolated aldosterone deficiency of the hyporeninemic type. Intravenous glucose infusions (0.5 g/kg body weight) produced significant hyperkalemia but desoxycortisone acetate (DOCA) therapy (10 mg/day) prevented the glucose-induced hyperkalemia. In this patient, the serum potassium concentration increases after the intravenous infusions of glucose because there is insufficient aldosterone and insulin to reverse the transfer of potassium to the extracellular fluid which normally occurs after hypertonic infusions of glucose. Although DOCA replacement modifies the distribution of potassium in the extracellular fluid and blunts the hyperkalemic effect of intravenous infusions of glucose, a rise in the insulin level is required for the usual hypokalemic response to intravenously administered glucose. These studies illustrate the risk of raising blood glucose levels in patients with combined aldosterone and insulin deficiency and the tendency towards hyperkalemia in diabetic patients under certain clinical conditions.

  20. Reverse remodeling and recovery from cachexia in rats with aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Yaser; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Khan, M Usman; Green, Kelly D; Ahokas, Robert A; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2012-08-15

    The congestive heart failure (CHF) syndrome with soft tissue wasting, or cachexia, has its pathophysiologic origins rooted in neurohormonal activation. Mechanical cardiocirculatory assistance reveals the potential for reverse remodeling and recovery from CHF, which has been attributed to device-based hemodynamic unloading whereas the influence of hormonal withdrawal remains uncertain. This study addresses the signaling pathways induced by chronic aldosteronism in normal heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels, together with their potential for recovery (Recov) after its withdrawal. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were examined at 4 wk of aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) and following 4-wk Recov. Compared with untreated, age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by 1) a failure to gain weight, reduced muscle mass with atrophy, and a heterogeneity in cardiomyocyte size across the ventricles, including hypertrophy and atrophy at sites of microscopic scarring; 2) increased cardiomyocyte and mitochondrial free Ca(2+), coupled to oxidative stress with increased H(2)O(2) production and 8-isoprostane content, and increased opening potential of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore; 3) differentially expressed genes reflecting proinflammatory myocardial and catabolic muscle phenotypes; and 4) reversal to or toward recovery of these responses with 4-wk Recov. Aldosteronism in rats is accompanied by cachexia and leads to an adverse remodeling of the heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels. However, evidence presented herein implicates that these tissues retain their inherent potential for recovery after complete hormone withdrawal.

  1. Regulation of aldosterone secretion by Cav1.3

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Catherine B.; Haris Shaikh, Lalarukh; Garg, Sumedha; Tanriver, Gizem; Teo, Ada E. D.; Zhou, Junhua; Maniero, Carmela; Zhao, Wanfeng; Kang, Soosung; Silverman, Richard B.; Azizan, Elena A. B.; Brown, Morris J.

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) vary in phenotype and genotype. Zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs frequently have mutations of an L-type calcium channel (LTCC) CaV1.3. Using a novel antagonist of CaV1.3, compound 8, we investigated the role of CaV1.3 on steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R, and in primary human adrenal cells. This investigational drug was compared with the common antihypertensive drug nifedipine, which has 4.5-fold selectivity for the vascular LTCC, CaV1.2, over CaV1.3. In H295R cells transfected with wild-type or mutant CaV1.3 channels, the latter produced more aldosterone than wild-type, which was ameliorated by 100 μM of compound 8. In primary adrenal and non-transfected H295R cells, compound 8 decreased aldosterone production similar to high concentration of nifedipine (100 μM). Selective CaV1.3 blockade may offer a novel way of treating primary hyperaldosteronism, which avoids the vascular side effects of CaV1.2-blockade, and provides targeted treatment for ZG-like APAs with mutations of CaV1.3. PMID:27098837

  2. Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, C. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between plasma aldosterone levels and sweat sodium excretion after chronic exercise and heat acclimation was investigated, using subjects exercised, at 40 C and 45 percent humidity, for 2 h/day on ten consecutive days at 45 percent of their maximal oxygen uptake. The data indicate that, following heat acclimation, plasma aldosterone concentrations decrease, and that the eccrine gland responsiveness to aldosterone, as represented by sweat sodium reabsorption, may be augmented through exercise and heat acclimation.

  3. The Influence of a Heparin-Like Compound on Hypertension, Electrolytes and Aldosterone in Man

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, E. C.; Gornall, A. G.; Sutherland, D. J. A.; Stiefel, M.; Laidlaw, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    The mechanisms of the aldosterone-inhibiting and antihypertensive actions of heparin and certain other sulfated mucopolysaccharides were investigated in 13 hypertensive patients. N-formyl chitosan polysulfuric acid (RO 1-8307) was used rather than heparin because of its low anticoagulant activity. RO 1-8307 lowered aldosterone secretion in one patient with proved and one with probable primary aldosteronism; this indicates that the mucopolysaccharide does not inhibit aldosterone secretion via the renin-angiotensin mechanism. In six hypertensive patients RO 1-8307 caused a fall in the secretion of aldosterone and its probable immediate precursor, 18-hydroxycorticosterone; therefore it does not act at the last step in the synthesis of aldosterone. RO 1-8307 produced a prolonged clinical and biochemical remission in the two patients considered to have primary aldosteronism but did not influence blood pressure in five of seven patients in whom excessive aldosterone was probably not a major factor in the hypertension. It is concluded that the antihypertensive action of RO 1-8307, and perhaps of heparin as well, is largely due to suppression of aldosterone secretion. ImagesFig. 6 PMID:4222823

  4. ß-adrenoceptor blockers increase cardiac sympathetic innervation by inhibiting autoreceptor suppression of axon growth.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Gwenaëlle L; Bhattacherjee, Aritra; Tague, Sarah E; Hasan, Wohaib; Smith, Peter G

    2010-09-15

    β-Adrenoceptor antagonists are used widely to reduce cardiovascular sympathetic tone, but withdrawal is accompanied by sympathetic hyperactivity. Receptor supersensitivity accounts for some but not all aspects of this withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, we investigated effects of β-blockers on sympathetic innervation. Rats received infusions of adrenergic receptor blockers or saline for 1 week. The nonselective β-blocker propranolol and the β(1)-antagonist metoprolol both increased myocardial sympathetic axon density. At 2 d after propranolol discontinuation, β-receptor sensitivity and responsiveness to isoproterenol were similar to controls. However, tyramine-induced mobilization of norepinephrine stores produced elevated ventricular contractility consistent with enhanced sympathetic neuroeffector properties. In addition, rats undergoing discontinuation showed exaggerated increases in mean arterial pressure in response to air puff or noise startle. In sympathetic neuronal cell cultures, both propranolol and metoprolol increased axon outgrowth but the β(2)-blocker ICI 118551 did not. Norepinephrine synthesis suppression by α-methyl-p-tyrosine also increased sprouting and concurrent dobutamine administration reduced it, confirming that locally synthesized norepinephrine inhibits outgrowth via β(1)-adrenoceptors. Immunohistochemistry revealed β(1)-adrenoceptor protein on sympathetic axon terminations. In rats with coronary artery ligation, propranolol reversed heart failure-induced ventricular myocardial sympathetic axon depletion, but did not affect infarct-associated sympathetic hyperinnervation. We conclude that sympathetic neurons possess β(1)-autoreceptors that negatively regulate axon outgrowth. Chronic β-adrenoceptor blockade disrupts this feedback system, leading to ventricular sympathetic axon proliferation and increased neuroeffector gain, which are likely to contribute to β-blocker withdrawal syndrome.

  5. Assessment of the Quantitative Value Usefulness of the Aldosterone-Renin Ratio (ARR) for Primary Aldosteronism (AQUARR) Study.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, Giuseppe; Mareso, Sara; Bisogni, Valeria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Azzolini, Matteo; Cesari, Maurizio; Seccia, Teresa Maria; Calò, Lorenzo; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Current guidelines recommend use of the aldosterone-renin ratio (ARR) for the case detection of primary aldosteronism (PA), the most common cause of secondary hypertension, in selected hypertensive patients. "Confirmatory" tests are then recommended in patients who tested positive at the ARR to exclude from further diagnostic work-up false positive results. Based on our experience we hypothesized that the ARR carries quantitative information, which can avoid the need of confirmatory tests. We herein describe a study protocol to identify the ARR cut-off value with a high specificity for the exclusion of aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) based on analysis of two large prospectively collected datasets of patients in which a conclusive diagnosis of APA was made by the four corners criteria. This will also serve to investigate the diagnostic gain provided over this ARR cut-off value by one confirmatory test, the captopril challenge test. Hence, with this protocol we expect to identify an ARR cut-off value that might prevent further testing in patients with either a low or a high probability of APA. This could translate in a higher diagnostic accuracy and, by preventing unnecessary invasive testing, into a substantial saving of money, time, and resources.

  6. Calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers and digitalis poisoning: management in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Ojetti, V; Migneco, A; Bononi, F; De Lorenzo, A; Gentiloni Silveri, N

    2005-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers intoxications account for up to 65% of deaths for cardiovascular drugs, causing severe clinical symptoms refractory to standard medications. The most serious poisonings are those resulting from verapamil and propanolol ingestion. Both support and antidotic therapy are necessary for these potentially unstable patients. Supportive measures and the use of digoxin-specific antibody fragments are first line treatment for digitalis glycoside poisoning.

  7. Optimal Use of Beta-Blockers for Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Young; Baek, Sang Hong

    2016-01-01

    Beta-blockers are the cornerstone treatment for congestive heart failure (HF). Current HF guidelines commonly recommend β-blockers for the treatment of HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The effect of β-blockers, however, is less clear for HF patients with preserved LVEF, unstable severe acute HF, or right ventricular failure. This review summarizes the effect of β-blockers in various clinical situations and suggests a strategy for optimal use. (Circ J 2016; 80: 565-571).

  8. Renal mineralocorticoid receptor and electrolyte homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Terker, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    The renal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a steroid hormone receptor essential for maintaining electrolyte homeostasis. Its role in mediating effects of aldosterone was likely vital in enabling the evolution of terrestrial life. Dysregulated aldosterone-MR signaling has been identified as the cause of multiple clinical diseases, suggesting the physiological importance of the MR. While the physiology of this pathway has been studied for over 60 years, only more recently have genetic mouse models been available to dissect its function in vivo. This review will focus on recent advances in our knowledge of MR function with an emphasis on these models. PMID:26136532

  9. Efficacy of the Irreversible ErbB Family Blocker Afatinib in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)–Pretreated Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Metastases or Leptomeningeal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tufman, Amanda; Wehler, Thomas; Pelzer, Theo; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Schütz, Martin; Serke, Monika; Stöhlmacher-Williams, Jan; Märten, Angela; Maria Huber, Rudolf; Dickgreber, Nicolas J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Afatinib is an effective first-line treatment in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and has shown activity in patients progressing on EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). First-line afatinib is also effective in patients with central nervous system (CNS) metastasis. Here we report on outcomes of pretreated NSCLC patients with CNS metastasis who received afatinib within a compassionate use program. Methods: Patients with NSCLC progressing after at least one line of chemotherapy and one line of EGFR-TKI treatment received afatinib. Medical history, patient demographics, EGFR mutational status, and adverse events including tumor progression were documented. Results: From 2010 to 2013, 573 patients were enrolled and 541 treated with afatinib. One hundred patients (66% female; median age, 60 years) had brain metastases and/or leptomeningeal disease with 74% having documented EGFR mutation. Median time to treatment failure for patients with CNS metastasis was 3.6 months, and did not differ from a matched group of 100 patients without CNS metastasis. Thirty-five percent (11 of 31) of evaluable patients had a cerebral response, five (16%) responded exclusively in brain. Response duration (range) was 120 (21–395) days. Sixty-six percent (21 of 32) of patients had cerebral disease control on afatinib. Data from one patient with an impressive response showed an afatinib concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid of nearly 1 nMol. Conclusion: Afatinib appears to penetrate into the CNS with concentrations high enough to have clinical effect on CNS metastases. Afatinib may therefore be an effective treatment for heavily pretreated patients with EGFR-mutated or EGFR–TKI-sensitive NSCLC and CNS metastasis. PMID:25247337

  10. [Beta-blockers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sova, Milan; Kamasová, Monika; Václavík, Jan; Sovová, Eliška; Hajdová, Lenka; Kolek, Vítězslav

    2016-04-01

    This general article discusses the problems of beta-blockers use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its aim is to refute exaggerated concerns of physicians over possible undesirable effects of beta-blockers on the patient respiratory functions and present new data on the effects of beta-blockers on the extent of COPD exacerbations, bronchial reactivity and mortality of patients.

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor activation in obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2009-08-01

    Obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome have become major public health concerns. Nowadays, aldosterone is recognized as an important mediator of cardiovascular and renal damage. In the kidney, aldosterone injures glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes), the final filtration barrier to plasma macromolecules, leading to proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists effectively ameliorate proteinuria in patients or in animal models of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as in patients who experience 'aldosterone breakthrough.' Recently, clinical and experimental studies have shown that plasma aldosterone concentration is associated with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome. We showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)/cp, an experimental model of obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome, are prone to glomerular podocyte injury, proteinuria and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, especially when the animals are fed a high-salt diet. Inappropriate activation of the aldosterone/MR system underlies the renal and cardiac injuries. Adipocyte-derived aldosterone-releasing factors (ARFs), although still unidentified, may account for aldosterone excess and the resultant target organ complication in SHR/cp. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that MR activation triggers target organ disease even in normal or low aldosterone states. We identified a small GTP (guanosine triphosphate)-binding protein, Rac1, as a novel activator of MR, and showed that this ligand-independent MR activation by Rac1 contributes to the nephropathy of several CKD models. We expect that ARFs and Rac1 can be novel therapeutic targets for metabolic syndrome and CKD. Future large-scale clinical trials are awaited to prove the efficacy of MR blockade in patients with obesity hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  12. Metformin inhibits aldosterone-induced cardiac fibroblast activation, migration and proliferation in vitro, and reverses aldosterone+salt-induced cardiac fibrosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mummidi, Srinivas; Das, Nitin A; Carpenter, Andrea J; Kandikattu, Hemanthkumar; Krenz, Maike; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Valente, Anthony J; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2016-09-01

    The overall goals of this study were to investigate whether metformin exerts anti-fibrotic effects in aldosterone (Aldo)+salt-treated wild type mouse hearts, and determine the underlying molecular mechanisms in isolated adult cardiac fibroblasts (CF). In vitro, Aldo induced CF activation, migration, and proliferation, and these effects were inhibited by metformin. Further, Aldo induced PPM1A (Protein Phosphatase Magnesium Dependent 1A) activation and inhibited AMPK phosphorylation. At a pharmacologically relevant concentration, metformin restored AMPK activation, and inhibited Aldo-induced Nox4/H2O2-dependent TRAF3IP2 induction, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and CF migration and proliferation. Further, metformin potentiated the inhibitory effects of spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, on Aldo-induced collagen expression, and CF migration and proliferation. These results were recapitulated in vivo, where metformin reversed Aldo+salt-induced oxidative stress, suppression of AMPK activation, TRAF3IP2 induction, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and cardiac fibrosis, without significantly modulating systolic blood pressure. These in vitro and in vivo data indicate that metformin has the potential to reduce adverse cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  13. Profile of the intestinal mucosal corticosteroid receptors in the domestic duck

    SciTech Connect

    DiBattista, J.A.; Mehdi, A.Z.; Sandor, T.

    1985-07-01

    The corticosteroid receptor profile of the intestinal tract of the domestic duck (maintained on either a low-sodium (LS) or a high-sodium (HS) diet) was investigated. Using tritiated triamcinolone acetonide (TA), corticosterone, or aldosterone as ligands, cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid receptors (MR, type I) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR, type II) were found in the mucosal cytosol of the jejunum and colon. The diet little influenced the GR binding parameters, while the MR (aldosterone) binding parameters showed a down-regulation following LS diets. The competition hierarchy of radioinert steroids on the formation of the (TH)corticosterone-receptor complex was corticosterone = cortisol = 11-deoxycorticosterone greater than aldosterone = TA = dexamethasone much greater than 11-deoxycortisol; with (TH)aldosterone, the competition was corticosterone = progesterone = 11-deoxycorticosterone greater than aldosterone = cortisol = TA = dexamethasone greater than 11-deoxycortisol greater than 11-dehydrocorticosterone. On linear sucrose gradients, receptor-ligand complexes sedimented with a single peak at 8.5 S (hypotonic gradient) and 4.0-4.5 S (hypertonic gradient), respectively. Heat-activated (TH)TA- and (TH)aldosterone-receptor complexes bound avidly to DNA-cellulose and, upon ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, the presence of the negatively charged unactivated and the more positively charged activated complexes could be shown.

  14. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  15. SFE/SFHTA/AFCE Consensus on Primary Aldosteronism, part 2: First diagnostic steps.

    PubMed

    Douillard, Claire; Houillier, Pascal; Nussberger, Juerg; Girerd, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    In patients with suspected primary aldosteronism (PA), the first diagnostic step, screening, must have high sensitivity and negative predictive value. The aldosterone-to-renin ratio (ARR) is used because it has higher sensitivity and lower variability than other measures (serum potassium, plasma aldosterone, urinary aldosterone). ARR is calculated from the plasma aldosterone (PA) and plasma renin activity (PRA) or direct plasma renin (DR) values. These measurements must be taken under standard conditions: in the morning, more than 2hours after awakening, in sitting position after 5 to 15minutes, with normal dietary salt intake, normal serum potassium level and without antihypertensive drugs significantly interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. To rule out ARR elevation due to very low renin values, ARR screening is applied only if aldosterone is>240pmol/l (90pg/ml); DR values<5mIU/l are assimilated to 5mIU/l and PRA values<0.2ng/ml/h to 0.2ng/ml/h. We propose threshold ARR values depending on the units used and a conversion factor (pg to mIU) for DR. If ARR exceeds threshold, PA should be suspected and exploration continued. If ARR is below threshold or if plasma aldosterone is<240pmol/l (90pg/ml) on two measurements, diagnosis of PA is excluded.

  16. Effect of exposure to hypoxia from birth on aldosterone in rabbits: role of unesterified fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Raff, H; Jankowski, B M; Goodfriend, T L; Baker, J E; Papanek, P E

    1997-04-01

    Hypoxia and fluid and electrolyte disturbances are serious risks to normal postnatal development. Because a decrease in inspired O2 (hypoxic hypoxia) inhibits aldosterone synthesis in the adult and aldosterone controls water and electrolyte balance, we studied adrenocortical function in rabbits exposed to normobaric normoxia or hypoxic hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2 0.09) from birth. At 21 days of age, rabbits were anesthetized, the adrenals were rapidly removed, and the adrenal capsules containing mostly zona glomerulosa cells were separated. Cells were dispersed with collagenase and studied in vitro. Hypoxia in vivo resulted in a 73% decrease in basal aldosterone release and a 86% decrease in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-stimulated aldosterone release in vitro. We hypothesized that increased unesterified fatty acids could be partly responsible for inhibition of aldosterone synthesis. Total serum unesterified fatty acids in hypoxic kits were significantly increased (298 +/- 14 micromol/l) compared with normoxic kits (184 +/- 31 micromol/l). When cells from hypoxic rabbits were washed with fatty acid-free albumin and studied under conditions devoid of fatty acids, aldosterone production was partially restored. Corticosterone production was not affected by washing. Washing had no effect on aldosterone synthesis by cells from normoxic rats. Finally, exposing washed zona glomerulosa cells to oleic acid (10-50 microM) inhibited aldosteronogenesis. We conclude that exposure to hypoxia from birth attenuates aldosterone production in part due to an increase in levels of unesterified fatty acid levels.

  17. Role of aldosterone in the remnant kidney model in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, E L; Kren, S; Hostetter, T H

    1996-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) participates in the injury sustained by the remnant kidney. Our studies assessed the importance of aldosterone in that model and the response of aldosterone to drugs interfering with the RAAS. Initially, four groups of rats were studied: SHAM-operated rats, untreated remnant rats (REM), REM rats treated with losartan and enalapril (REM AIIA), and REM AIIA rats infused with exogenous aldosterone (REM AIIA + ALDO). The last group was maintained with aldosterone levels comparable to those in untreated REM rats by constant infusion of exogenous aldosterone. REM rats had larger adrenal glands and a > 10-fold elevation in plasma aldosterone compared to SHAM. REM AIIA rats demonstrated significant suppression of the hyperaldosteronism as well as marked attenuation of proteinuria, hypertension, and glomerulosclerosis compared to REM. REM AIIA + ALDO rats manifested greater proteinuria, hypertension, and glomerulosclerosis than REM AIIA rats. Indeed, by 4 wk of observation all of these features of the experimental disease were similar in magnitude in REM AIIA + ALDO and untreated REM. In separate REM rats spironolactone administration did not reduce glomerular sclerosis but did transiently reduce proteinuria, lowered arterial pressure, and lessened cardiac hypertrophy. In summary, aldosterone contributes to hypertension and renal injury in the remnant kidney model. PMID:8770880

  18. Beta-blockers in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayes, P E; Schulz, S C

    1987-01-01

    Studies evaluating the antianxiety and antipanic properties of beta-blockers do not support their routine use in treating either generalized anxiety disorder or panic disorder. The use of propranolol for anxiety disorders accompanied by physical symptoms, especially cardiovascular complaints, may be effective in some patients when combined with benzodiazepines or perhaps in some non-responders to conventional treatment. Better designed studies are needed to evaluate the exact role of beta-blocking agents in treating anxiety. The efficacy of propranolol in patients with panic disorder has not been widely researched, but preliminary results have not been encouraging. Propranolol may provide symptomatic relief in some patients with residual somatic complaints (i.e., palpitations and tachycardia), when combined with the patient's ongoing drug regimen. Because beta-blockers may induce depression, they should be used cautiously--if at all--in panic patients with concurrent depressive illness.

  19. CNS-related (side-)effects of beta-blockers with special reference to mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Koella, W P

    1985-01-01

    beta-Adrenoreceptor antagonists are liable to produce behavioural side-effects such as drowsiness, fatigue, lethargy, sleep disorders, nightmares, depressive moods, and hallucinations. These undesirable actions indicate that beta-blockers affect not only peripheral autonomic activity but also some central nervous mechanisms. In experimental animals beta-blockers have been found to reduce spontaneous motor activity, to counteract isolation-, lesion-, stimulation- and amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, and to produce slow-wave and paradoxical sleep disturbances. Furthermore, central effects such as tranquilizing influences are used for the treatment of conditions such as anxiety. Several different mechanisms of action could be responsible for these CNS effects: Centrally mediated specific actions on centrally located beta-adrenergic receptors, known to exist downstream from, and at the terminals of, 'vigilance-enhancing' central noradrenergic pathways. Centrally mediated specific actions on centrally located receptors of the non-adrenergic type; an affinity of some beta-blockers towards 5-HT-receptors is well documented. Centrally mediated non-specific actions on centrally located neurones, owing to the membrane-stabilizing effects of beta-blockers. Peripherally mediated actions whereby beta-blockers induce changes in the autonomic activity in the periphery, which are relayed to the CNS to induce changes in activity of a variety of central systems. It can be assumed that with any one of the beta-blockers all these mechanisms come into play, yet with varying degrees depending on characteristics of the drugs such as lipophilicity and hydrophilicity, the ratio of antagonist versus (partial) agonist properties, affinity to 'alien' receptor sites, strength of membrane-stabilizing activity, stereospecific affinity, and potency.

  20. TASK channels are not required to mount an aldosterone secretory response to metabolic acidosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Nick A.; Yao, Junlan; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Barrett, Paula Q.

    2010-01-01

    The stimulation of aldosterone production by acidosis enhances proton excretion and serves to limit disturbances in systemic acid-base equilibrium. Yet, the mechanisms by which protons stimulate aldosterone production from cells of the adrenal cortex remain largely unknown. TWIK-related acid sensitive K channels (TASK) are inhibited by extracellular protons within the physiological range and have emerged as important regulators of aldosterone production in the adrenal cortex. Here we show that congenic C57BL/6J mice with genetic deletion of TASK-1 (K2P3.1) and TASK-3 (K2P9.1) channel subunits overproduce aldosterone and display an enhanced sensitivity to steroidogenic stimuli, including a more pronounced steroidogenic response to chronic NH4Cl loading. Thus, we conclude that TASK channels are not required for the stimulation of aldosterone production by protons but their inhibition by physiological acidosis may contribute to full expression of the steroidogenic response. PMID:21111026

  1. Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Primary Aldosteronism: What is New in the 2016 Update?

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Damian G; Yanes Cardozo, Licy L

    2016-01-01

    Primary Aldosteronism is the single most common cause of secondary hypertension and is associated with increased target organ injury. The Endocrine Society has recently released the updated Clinical Practice Guideline for Primary Aldosteronism entitled “The Management of Primary Aldosteronism: Case Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline”. We review the updated Clinical Practice Guideline, highlighting the new recommendations and the implications that they may have in clinical practice. The recognition by the Endocrine Society’s Task Force that Primary Aldosteronism is a public health issue and that the population at risk for screening should be significantly expanded will surely have an impact in the clinical practice which hopefully will translate in better detection, diagnosis and treatment of patients with Primary Aldosteronism. PMID:28018978

  2. An update on non-peptide angiotensin receptor antagonists and related RAAS modulators.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, G K; Sodhi, R K; Singh, M

    2007-08-02

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) is an important regulator of blood pressure and fluid-electrolyte homeostasis. RAAS has been implicated in pathogenesis of hypertension, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal failure. Aliskiren is the first non-peptide orally active renin inhibitor approved by FDA. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors are associated with frequent side effects such as cough and angio-oedema. Recently, the role of ACE2 and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) in the formation of an important active metabolite/mediator of RAAS, ang 1-7, has initiated attempts towards development of ACE2 inhibitors and combined ACE/NEP inhibitors. Furukawa and colleagues developed a series of low molecular weight nonpeptide imidazole analogues that possess weak but selective, competitive AT1 receptor blocking property. Till date, many compounds have exhibited promising AT1 blocking activity which cause a more complete RAAS blockade than ACE inhibitors. Many have reached the market for alternative treatment of hypertension, heart failure and diabetic nephropathy in ACE inhibitor intolerant patients and still more are waiting in the queue. But, the hallmark of this area of drug research is marked by a progress in understanding molecular interaction of these blockers at the AT1 receptor and unraveling the enigmatic influence of AT2 receptors on growth/anti-growth, differentiation and the regeneration of neuronal tissue. Different modeling strategies are underway to develop tailor made molecules with the best of properties like Dual Action (Angiotensin And Endothelin) Receptor Antagonists (DARA), ACE/NEP inhibitors, triple inhibitors, AT2 agonists, AT1/TxA2 antagonists, balanced AT1/AT2 antagonists, and nonpeptide renin inhibitors. This abstract gives an overview of these various angiotensin receptor antagonists.

  3. Aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations are common in normal adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Tomlins, Scott A; Kuick, Rork; Cani, Andi K; Giordano, Thomas J; Hovelson, Daniel H; Liu, Chia-Jen; Sanjanwala, Aalok R; Edwards, Michael A; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Nanba, Kazutaka; Rainey, William E

    2015-08-18

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) represents the most common cause of secondary hypertension, but little is known regarding its adrenal cellular origins. Recently, aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs) with high expression of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) were found in both normal and PA adrenal tissue. PA-causing aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) harbor mutations in genes encoding ion channels/pumps that alter intracellular calcium homeostasis and cause renin-independent aldosterone production through increased CYP11B2 expression. Herein, we hypothesized that APCCs have APA-related aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations. APCCs were studied in 42 normal adrenals from kidney donors. To clarify APCC molecular characteristics, we used microarrays to compare the APCC transcriptome with conventional adrenocortical zones [zona glomerulosa (ZG), zona fasciculata, and zona reticularis]. The APCC transcriptome was most similar to ZG but with an enhanced capacity to produce aldosterone. To determine if APCCs harbored APA-related mutations, we performed targeted next generation sequencing of DNA from 23 APCCs and adjacent normal adrenal tissue isolated from both formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and frozen tissues. Known aldosterone driver mutations were identified in 8 of 23 (35%) APCCs, including mutations in calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L-type, α1D-subunit (CACNA1D; 6 of 23 APCCs) and ATPase, Na(+)/(K+) transporting, α1-polypeptide (ATP1A1; 2 of 23 APCCs), which were not observed in the adjacent normal adrenal tissue. Overall, we show three major findings: (i) APCCs are common in normal adrenals, (ii) APCCs harbor somatic mutations known to cause excess aldosterone production, and (iii) the mutation spectrum of aldosterone-driving mutations is different in APCCs from that seen in APA. These results provide molecular support for APCC as a precursor of PA.

  4. Calpain-10 Activity Underlies Angiotensin II-Induced Aldosterone Production in an Adrenal Glomerulosa Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Seremwe, Mutsa; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone important in the regulation of blood pressure. Aberrant production of aldosterone results in the development and progression of diseases including hypertension and congestive heart failure; therefore, a complete understanding of aldosterone production is important for developing more effective treatments. Angiotensin II (AngII) regulates steroidogenesis, in part through its ability to increase intracellular calcium levels. Calcium can activate calpains, proteases classified as typical or atypical based on the presence or absence of penta-EF-hands, which are involved in various cellular responses. We hypothesized that calpain, in particular calpain-10, is activated by AngII in adrenal glomerulosa cells and underlies aldosterone production. Our studies showed that pan-calpain inhibitors reduced AngII-induced aldosterone production in 2 adrenal glomerulosa cell models, primary bovine zona glomerulosa and human adrenocortical carcinoma (HAC15) cells, as well as CYP11B2 expression in the HAC15 cells. Although AngII induced calpain activation in these cells, typical calpain inhibitors had no effect on AngII-elicited aldosterone production, suggesting a lack of involvement of classical calpains in this process. However, an inhibitor of the atypical calpain, calpain-10, decreased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Consistent with this result, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of calpain-10 inhibited aldosterone production and CYP11B2 expression, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of calpain-10 resulted in increased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Our results indicate that AngII-induced activation of calpain-10 in glomerulosa cells underlies aldosterone production and identify calpain-10 or its downstream pathways as potential targets for the development of drug therapies for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:25836666

  5. Effect of Animal Facility Construction on Basal Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal and Renin-Aldosterone Activity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, Eric D.; Cullinan, William E.; Ziegler, Dana R.; Cohen, Eric P.

    2011-01-01

    Although loud noise and intense vibration are known to alter the behavior and phenotype of laboratory animals, little is known about the effects of nearby construction. We studied the effect of a nearby construction project on the classic stress hormones ACTH, corticosterone, renin, and aldosterone in rats residing in a barrier animal facility before, for the first 3 months of a construction project, and at 1 month after all construction was completed. During some of the construction, noise and vibrations were not obvious to investigators inside the animal rooms. Body weight matched for age was not altered by nearby construction. During nearby construction, plasma ACTH, corticosterone, and aldosterone were approximately doubled compared with those of pre- and postconstruction levels. Expression of CRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, CRH receptor and POMC mRNA in the anterior pituitary, and most mRNAs for steroidogenic genes in the adrenal gland were not significantly changed during construction. We conclude that nearby construction can cause a stress response without long-term effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis gene expression and body weight. PMID:21248141

  6. What is the role of aldosterone excess in resistant hypertension and how should it be investigated and treated?

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2011-12-01

    Resistant hypertension has evolved as an important global health care problem. Primary aldosteronism is one of several potentially reversible causes of resistant hypertension. Primary aldosteronism can be effectively treated, when recognized, with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, such as spironolactone and eplerenone. Each of these compounds can reduce blood pressure as monotherapy or when given with a range of other antihypertensive drug classes. These compounds have distinctive pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic patterns that require some forethought in their use before they are prescribed. However, as the use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has gradually increased, the hazards inherent to use of such drugs has become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove fatal if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia develop. However, for most patients the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the prudent clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered as a likelihood in any patient receiving one or the other of these medications. As such, steps should be taken to lessen the likelihood of it occurring if therapy is being contemplated with agents in this class.

  7. Pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and clinical properties of benidipine hydrochloride, a novel, long-acting calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kozo; Nagashima, Ken; Miki, Hiroyuki

    2006-04-01

    Benidipine is a dihydropyridine-derived calcium channel blocker developed in Japan, with several unique mechanisms of action, that is, triple calcium channels (L, N, and T) blocking action with a membrane approach. Benidipine has relatively high vascular selectivity and is expected to show protective effects on vascular endothelial cells. Renal protective effects of benidipine also have been shown in several basic and clinical studies. Moreover, anti-oxidative action and enhancing nitric oxide production have been noted with this drug, following its cardio-protective effects in patients with ischemic heart diseases. In fact, benidipine exerted a better prognostic effect than other calcium channel blockers in the therapy for patients with vasospastic angina. In addition, benidipine showed reliable antihypertensive, renoprotective effects if used in combination with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) when adequate anti-hypertensive effects are not achieved by ARBs alone, indicating that benidipine is an useful calcium channel blocker in combination therapy for hypertension. Benidipine was launched on the Japanese market 14 years ago, but few severe side effects have been reported, suggesting that this is a drug with established safety and long-acting pharmacological effects.

  8. Attenuation of malonate toxicity in primary mesencephalic cultures using the GABA transport blocker, NO-711.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A H; Bernard, L P; Nicklas, W J; Zeevalk, G D

    2001-04-01

    Cultured rat mesencephalic neurons were used to assess the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport blockers on toxicity caused by malonate, a reversible, competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase. Previous studies utilizing an ex vivo chick retinal preparation have shown that GABA release and cell swelling are early consequences of acute energy impairment and that GABA transport blockers attenuate this toxicity. The present results demonstrate that the nonsubstrate GABA transport blocker, NO-711 (1 nM-1 microM), dose-dependently protected cultured mesencephalic dopamine (DA) and GABA neurons from malonate-induced toxicity. Similar protection was demonstrated with nipecotic acid (1 mM) and SKF89976A (100 nM), substrate and nonsubstrate GABA transport blockers, respectively. These compounds by themselves produced no signs of toxicity, although nipecotic acid caused a long-term decrease in GABA uptake not associated with toxicity. Compounds which decrease intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are protective in this model, but NO-711 did not prevent the rise in intracellular ROS induced by malonate, indicating its protective effects were downstream of ROS production. Supplementation of malonate treated cultures with the GABA(A) agonist, muscimol (10 microM), increased the toxicity toward the DA and GABA neuron populations. Antagonists at the GABA(A) and glycine receptors provided partial protection to both the GABA and DA neurons. These findings suggest that the GABA transporter, GABA(A), and/or glycine channels contribute to cell damage associated with energy impairment in this model.

  9. Pharmacodynamic models of various beta blockers: an explanation for the long duration of action of bopindolol.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J

    1986-01-01

    Models describing the time course of effects (pharmacodynamic models) of various beta blockers in man are used to explain the long duration of action of bopindolol. No matter what effect is used [reduction in exercise heart rate (RER) or isoproterenol dose ratio (DR)] human data show clearly that bopindolol is very potent compared to other beta blockers such as atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol, practolol, and propranolol. In pharmacokinetic terms, however, these drugs show no pronounced difference in their elimination half-life (ranging between 4 and 8 h). Also the site of action of the therapeutic effects (beta 1 receptors) is obviously identical for all beta blockers. Furthermore, there is no evidence to suggest that bopindolol (the prodrug) or hydrolyzed bopindolol (the active substance) is further metabolized to a slowly eliminated active metabolite. Thus, drug disposition provides no argument to explain the long-lasting effects of bopindolol as compared other beta blockers. The long duration of action of bopindolol seems to reflect an usually flat plasma concentration-response curve.

  10. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers memantine, MRZ 2/579 and other amino-alkyl-cyclohexanes antagonise 5-HT(3) receptor currents in cultured HEK-293 and N1E-115 cell systems in a non-competitive manner.

    PubMed

    Rammes, G; Rupprecht, R; Ferrari, U; Zieglgänsberger, W; Parsons, C G

    2001-06-22

    The type 3 serotonin (5-HT(3)) receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel. In concentration-clamp experiments, we investigated the effects of the uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists memantine, amantadine and MRZ 2/579 on 5-HT receptors stabley expressed in HEK-293 cells and on native 5-HT(3) receptors in the N1E-115 cell line. All agents antagonized serotonin (10 microM)-induced inward currents with similar potency to that reported for NMDA receptors. This effect was characterized by inducing a pronounced receptor desensitization, and was probably non-competitive and voltage-independent. In contrast, (S)-ketamine was much weaker as an antagonist of 5-HT(3) receptors than NMDA receptors. Similar effects on 5-HT(3) receptors have been reported previously for a variety of anti-depressants and it is possible that the clinical anti-depressant effects reported for both memantine and amantadine are mediated, at least in part, by antagonistic effects at 5-HT(3) receptors.

  11. Beta-Blockers in Children with Congenital Heart Disease Before a Corrective Procedure.

    PubMed

    Buchhorn, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease, mainly due to large left to right shunts, is as high as 20%. Heart failure has a high impact on prognosis, growth and neurodevelopment. Prior to surgery or after palliative procedures children need a medical heart failure therapy. The traditional therapy with digoxin, diuretics and ACE-inhibitors is not supported by prospective randomized trials. Propranolol had a significant beneficial effect on the clinical heart failure score, neurohormonal activation, heart rate variability and cardiac remodeling in the prospective randomized trial CHF-Pro-Infant. Beta-blocker dosages depend on heart rate with a target between 100 and 110 bpm in infants and an average dose of 2mg/kg/day after a titration period of 2 to 3 weeks. Within the last 18 years after the first case the author treated only infants with severe heart failure and highly elevated Pro-BNP-levels (8879 pg/ml on average). However we never observed serious side effects due to worsening heart failure, severe bradycardia or pulmonary obstruction. Diuretics are given as low as necessary to prevent the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with its detrimental effect on cardiac remodeling.

  12. Pathogenesis of hypertension: interactions among sodium, potassium, and aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Büssemaker, Eckhart; Hillebrand, Uta; Hausberg, Martin; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Oberleithner, Hans

    2010-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a major cause of disease-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is nearly absent in populations that consume natural foods low in sodium. However, in industrial countries, where the individual intake of sodium is at least 10 times higher, the prevalence of hypertension is approximately 40%. Major population-based studies link a high-sodium and low-potassium diet to an increase in blood pressure. A hallmark of arterial hypertension is endothelial dysfunction characterized by decreased synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). Plasma sodium and potassium are major determinants for the mechanical stiffness of endothelial cells. High plasma sodium levels stiffen endothelial cells and block NO synthesis. Aldosterone is a prerequisite for this action. However, high plasma potassium levels soften endothelial cells and activate NO release. There is increasing evidence that sodium can be stored transiently in considerable amounts and osmotically inactive in the interstitium. Taken together, it is recommended to maintain plasma sodium levels in the low physiologic range and potassium levels in the high physiologic range while suppressing plasma aldosterone as much as possible. A restriction in sodium intake that is accompanied by increased intake of potassium can profoundly improve the prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  13. Primary aldosteronism and impaired natriuresis in mice underexpressing TGFβ1

    PubMed Central

    Kakoki, Masao; Pochynyuk, Oleh M.; Hathaway, Catherine M.; Tomita, Hirofumi; Hagaman, John R.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Zaika, Oleg L.; Mamenko, Mykola; Kayashima, Yukako; Matsuki, Kota; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Grant, Ruriko; Bertorello, Alejandro M.; Smithies, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To uncover the potential cardiovascular effects of human polymorphisms influencing transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) expression, we generated mice with Tgfb1 mRNA expression graded in five steps from 10% to 300% normal. Adrenal expression of the genes for mineralocorticoid-producing enzymes ranged from 50% normal in the hypermorphs at age 12 wk to 400% normal in the hypomorphs accompanied with proportionate changes in plasma aldosterone levels, whereas plasma volumes ranged from 50% to 150% normal accompanied by marked compensatory changes in plasma angiotensin II and renin levels. The aldosterone/renin ratio ranged from 0.3 times normal in the 300% hypermorphs to six times in the 10% hypomorphs, which have elevated blood pressure. Urinary output of water and electrolytes are markedly decreased in the 10% hypomorphs without significant change in the glomerular filtration rate. Renal activities for the Na+, K+-ATPase, and epithelial sodium channel are markedly increased in the 10% hypomorphs. The hypertension in the 10% hypomorphs is corrected by spironolactone or amiloride at doses that do not change blood pressure in wild-type mice. Thus, changes in Tgfb1 expression cause marked progressive changes in multiple systems that regulate blood pressure and fluid homeostasis, with the major effects being mediated by changes in adrenocortical function. PMID:23503843

  14. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jue Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  15. Attenuation of thermal nociception and hyperalgesia by VR1 blockers

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Carolina; Humet, Marc; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Gomis, Ana; Caprini, Marco; Viana, Felix; De la Peña, Elvira; Sanchez-Baeza, Francisco; Carbonell, Teresa; De Felipe, Carmen; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Belmonte, Carlos; Messeguer, Angel; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Vanilloid receptor subunit 1 (VR1) appears to play a critical role in the transduction of noxious chemical and thermal stimuli by sensory nerve endings in peripheral tissues. Thus, VR1 antagonists are useful compounds to unravel the contribution of this receptor to pain perception, as well as to induce analgesia. We have used a combinatorial approach to identify new, nonpeptidic channel blockers of VR1. Screening of a library of trimers of N-alkylglycines resulted in the identification of two molecules referred to as DD161515 {N-[2-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)ethyl]glycyl]-[N-[2,4-dichlorophenethyl]glycyl]-N-(2,4-dichlorophenethyl)glycinamide} and DD191515 {[N-[3-(N,N-diethylamino)propyl]glycyl]-[N-[2,4-dichlorophenethyl]glycyl]-N-(2,4-dichlorophenethyl)glycinamide} that selectively block VR1 channel activity with micromolar efficacy, rivaling that characteristic of vanilloid-related inhibitors. These compounds appear to be noncompetitive VR1 antagonists that recognize a receptor site distinct from that of capsaicin. Intraperitoneal administration of both trialkylglycines into mice significantly attenuated thermal nociception as measured in the hot plate test. It is noteworthy that these compounds eliminated pain and neurogenic inflammation evoked by intradermal injection of capsaicin into the animal hindpaw, as well as the thermal hyperalgesia induced by tissue irritation with nitrogen mustard. In contrast, responses to mechanical stimuli were not modified by either compound. Modulation of sensory nerve fibers excitability appears to underlie the peptoid analgesic activity. Collectively, these results indicate that blockade of VR1 activity attenuates chemical and thermal nociception and hyperalgesia, supporting the tenet that this ionotropic receptor contributes to chemical and thermal sensitivity and pain perception in vivo. These trialkylglycine-based, noncompetitive VR1 antagonists may likely be developed into analgesics to treat inflammatory pain. PMID:11854530

  16. ACT‐ONE ‐ ACTION at last on cancer cachexia by adapting a novel action beta‐blocker

    PubMed Central

    Laviano, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Novel action beta‐blockers combine many different pharmacological effects. The espindolol exhibits effects through β and central 5‐HT1α receptors to demonstrate pro‐anabolic, anti‐catabolic, and appetite‐stimulating actions. In the ACT‐ONE trial, espindolol reversed weight loss and improved handgrip strength in patients with cachexia due to non‐small cell lung cancer or colorectal cancer. With this trial, another frontier of cachexia management is in sight. Nonetheless, more efficacy and safety data is needed before new therapeutic indications for novel action beta‐blockers can be endorsed. PMID:27625919

  17. Binding modes of noncompetitive GABA-channel blockers revisited using engineered affinity-labeling reactions combined with new docking studies.

    PubMed

    Charon, Sébastien; Taly, Antoine; Rodrigo, Jordi; Perret, Philippe; Goeldner, Maurice

    2011-04-13

    The binding modes of noncompetitive GABA(A)-channel blockers were re-examined taking into account the recent description of the 3D structure of prokaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which provided access to new mammalian or insect GABA receptor models, emphasizing their transmembrane portion. Two putative binding modes were deciphered for this class of compounds, including the insecticide fipronil, located nearby either the intra- or the extracellular part of the membrane, respectively. These results are in full agreement with previously described affinity-labeling reactions performed with GABA(A) noncompetitive blockers (Perret et al. J. Biol. Chem.1999, 274, 25350-25354).

  18. ACT-ONE - ACTION at last on cancer cachexia by adapting a novel action beta-blocker.

    PubMed

    Lainscak, Mitja; Laviano, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Novel action beta-blockers combine many different pharmacological effects. The espindolol exhibits effects through β and central 5-HT1α receptors to demonstrate pro-anabolic, anti-catabolic, and appetite-stimulating actions. In the ACT-ONE trial, espindolol reversed weight loss and improved handgrip strength in patients with cachexia due to non-small cell lung cancer or colorectal cancer. With this trial, another frontier of cachexia management is in sight. Nonetheless, more efficacy and safety data is needed before new therapeutic indications for novel action beta-blockers can be endorsed.

  19. Ménage à trois: aldosterone, sodium and nitric oxide in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Fels, Johannes; Oberleithner, Hans; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina

    2010-12-01

    Aldosterone, a mineralocorticoid hormone mainly synthesized in the adrenal cortex, has been recognized to be a regulator of cell mechanics. Recent data from a number of laboratories implicate that, besides kidney, the cardiovascular system is an important target for aldosterone. In the endothelium, it promotes the expression of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) and modifies the morphology of cells in terms of mechanical stiffness, surface area and volume. Additionally, it renders the cells highly sensitive to small changes in extracellular sodium and potassium. In this context, the time course of aldosterone action is pivotal. In the fast (seconds to minutes), non-genomic signalling pathway vascular endothelial cells respond to aldosterone with transient swelling, softening and insertion of ENaC in the apical plasma membrane. In parallel, nitric oxide (NO) is released from the cells. In the long-term (hours), aldosterone has opposite effects: The mechanical stiffness increases, the cells shrink and NO production decreases. This leads to the conclusion that both the physiology and pathophysiology of aldosterone action in the vascular endothelium are closely related. Aldosterone, at concentrations in the physiological range and over limited time periods can stabilize blood pressure and regulate tissue perfusion while chronically high concentrations of this hormone over extended time periods impair sodium homeostasis promoting endothelial dysfunction and the development of tissue fibrosis.

  20. Interleukin-33/ST2 system attenuates aldosterone-induced adipogenesis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Rousseau, Elodie; Álvarez, Virginia; Calvier, Laurent; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Leroy, Céline; Miana, María; Jurado-López, Raquel; Briones, Ana M; Jaisser, Frederic; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; López-Andrés, Natalia

    2015-08-15

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) but not soluble ST2 (sST2) exerts anti-inflammatory and protective effects in several tissues. Aldosterone, a proinflammatory mediator which promotes adipogenesis, is elevated in obese patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between IL-33/ST2 system and Aldosterone in adipose tissue. Rats fed a high fat diet presented increased sST2 expression, diminished IL-33/sST2 ratio and enhanced levels of differentiation and inflammation in adipose tissue as compared to controls. A similar pattern was observed in adipose tissue from C57BL/6 Aldosterone-treated mice. In both animal models, Aldosterone was correlated with sST2. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with IL-33 delayed adipocyte differentiation diminished lipid accumulation and decreased inflammation. Aldosterone decreased IL-33 and increased sST2 expressions in differentiated adipocytes. Aldosterone-induced adipocyte differentiation and inflammation were blocked by IL-33 treatment, but sST2 did not exert any effects. The crosstalk between IL-33/ST2 and Aldosterone could be relevant in the metabolic consequences of obesity.

  1. Dysregulated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system contributes to pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    De Man, Frances; Tu, Ly; Handoko, Louis; Rain, Silvia; Ruiter, Gerrina; François, Charlène; Schalij, Ingrid; Dorfmüller, Peter; Simonneau, Gérald; Fadel, Elie; Perros, Frederic; Boonstra, Anco; Postmus, Piet; Van Der Velden, Jolanda; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Humbert, Marc; Eddahibi, Saadia; Guignabert, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH) often have a low cardiac output. To compensate, neurohormonal systems like renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system are upregulated but this may have long-term negative effects on the progression of iPAH. Objectives Assess systemic and pulmonary RAAS-activity in iPAH-patients and determine the efficacy of chronic RAAS-inhibition in experimental PAH. Measurements and Main Results We collected 79 blood samples from 58 iPAH-patients in the VU University Medical Center Amsterdam (between 2004–2010), to determine systemic RAAS-activity. We observed increased levels of renin, angiotensin (Ang) I and AngII, which was associated with disease progression (p<0.05) and mortality (p<0.05). To determine pulmonary RAAS-activity, lung specimens were obtained from iPAH-patients (during lung transplantation, n=13) and controls (during lobectomy or pneumonectomy for cancer, n=14). Local RAAS-activity in pulmonary arteries of iPAH-patients was increased, demonstrated by elevated ACE-activity in pulmonary endothelial cells and increased AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor expression and signaling. In addition, local RAAS- upregulation was associated with increased pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation via enhanced AT1-receptor signaling in iPAH-patients compared to controls. Finally, to determine the therapeutic potential of RAAS-activity, we assessed the chronic effects of an AT1-receptor antagonist (losartan) in the monocrotaline PAH-rat model (60 mg/kg). Losartan delayed disease progression, decreased RV afterload and pulmonary vascular remodeling and restored right ventricular-arterial coupling in PAH-rats. Conclusions Systemic and pulmonary RAAS-activities are increased in iPAH-patients and associated with increased pulmonary vascular remodeling. Chronic inhibition of RAAS by losartan is beneficial in experimental PAH. PMID:22859525

  2. Association of Aldosterone Synthase Polymorphism (CYP11B2 -344T>C) and Genetic Ancestry with Atrial Fibrillation and Serum Aldosterone in African Americans with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bress, Adam; Han, Jin; Patel, Shitalben R.; Desai, Ankit A.; Mansour, Ibrahim; Groo, Vicki; Progar, Kristin; Shah, Ebony; Stamos, Thomas D.; Wing, Coady; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Kittles, Rick; Cavallari, Larisa H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which aldosterone synthase genotype (CYP11B2) and genetic ancestry correlate with atrial fibrillation (AF) and serum aldosterone in African Americans with heart failure. Clinical data, echocardiographic measurements, and a genetic sample for determination of CYP11B2 -344T>C (rs1799998) genotype and genetic ancestry were collected from 194 self-reported African Americans with chronic, ambulatory heart failure. Genetic ancestry was determined using 105 autosomal ancestry informative markers. In a sub-set of patients (n = 126), serum was also collected for determination of circulating aldosterone. The CYP11B2 −344C allele frequency was 18% among the study population, and 19% of patients had AF. Multiple logistic regression revealed that the CYP11B2 −344CC genotype was a significant independent predictor of AF (OR 12.7, 95% CI 1.60–98.4, p = 0.0150, empirical p = 0.011) while holding multiple clinical factors, left atrial size, and percent European ancestry constant. Serum aldosterone was significantly higher among patients with AF (p = 0.036), whereas increased West African ancestry was inversely correlated with serum aldosterone (r = −0.19, p = 0.037). The CYP11B2 −344CC genotype was also overrepresented among patients with extreme aldosterone elevation (≥90th percentile, p = 0.0145). In this cohort of African Americans with chronic ambulatory heart failure, the CYP11B2 −344T>C genotype was a significant independent predictor of AF while holding clinical, echocardiographic predictors, and genetic ancestry constant. In addition, increased West African ancestry was associated with decreased serum aldosterone levels, potentially providing an explanation for the lower risk for AF observed among African Americans. PMID:23936266

  3. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer.

  4. Molecular Mechanism of Dihydropyridine Ca(2+) Channel Blockers in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Aya

    2016-01-01

     Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive and fatal disease of unidentified pathogenesis. IPAH is pathologically characterized as sustained vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling of the pulmonary artery. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) triggers vasoconstriction and stimulates cell proliferation leading to vascular remodeling. However, dihydropyridine-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel blockers are only effective in very few patients with IPAH (<10%). It is unclear why dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers are not therapeutically effective in a majority of IPAH patients. We have previously shown that extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) is upregulated in PASMCs from IPAH patients, and it contributes to enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt responses and augmented cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers on [Ca(2+)]cyt responses mediated by CaSR were examined in IPAH-PASMCs. Nifedipine (dihydropyridines) enhanced the CaSR-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt in IPAH-PASMCs, but not in PASMCs from normal subjects. Nicardipine (dihydropyridines) and Bay K 8644 (a dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel activator) also augmented the CaSR-mediated [Ca(2+)]cyt increase in IPAH-PASMCs. In contrast, non-dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers such as diltiazem (benzothiazepines) and verapamil (phenylalkylamines) had no effect on the [Ca(2+)]cyt response in IPAH-PASMCs. Finally, in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertensive rats, nifedipine caused further increase in right ventricular systolic pressure and thus right ventricular hypertrophy. In conclusion, dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blockers could exacerbate symptoms of pulmonary hypertension in IPAH patients with upregulated CaSR in PASMCs.

  5. High-affinity antibodies to the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.P.; Sharp, A.; Strom, M.; Kahl, S.D.

    1986-05-01

    Antibodies with high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers have been produced in rabbits by immunization with dihydropyridine-protein conjugates. Anti-dihydropyridine antibodies were found to specifically bind (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine, (/sup 3/H)-nimodipine, (/sup 3/H)nisoldipine, and (/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 (all 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers) with high affinity, while (/sup 3/H)verapamil, (/sup 3/H)diltiazem, and (/sup 3/H)trifluoperazine were not recognized. The average dissociation constant of the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine-antibody complex was 0.06 (+/- 0.02) X 10(-9) M for an antiserum studied in detail and ranged from 0.01 to 0.24 X 10(-9) M for all antisera. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding was specific for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel modifiers and the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition ranged between 0.25 and 0.90 nM. Structurally unrelated Ca2+-channel blockers, calmodulin antagonists, inactive metabolites of nitrendipine, and UV-inactivated nisoldipine did not modify (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to the anti-dihydropyridine antibodies. Dihydropyridines without a bulky substituent in the 4-position of the heterocycle were able to displace (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding, but the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition were greater than 800 nM. In summary, anti-dihydropyridine antibodies have been shown to have high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers and to exhibit dihydropyridine binding properties similar to the membrane receptor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers.

  6. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo.

  7. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo. PMID:26788916

  8. Angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibition in heart failure: mechanistic action and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J; DeVore, Adam D; Velazquez, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly common syndrome associated with high mortality and economic burden, and there has been a paucity over the past decade of new pharmacotherapies that improve outcomes. However, recent data from a large randomized controlled trial compared the novel agent LCZ696, a dual-acting angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi), with the well established angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril and found significant reduction in mortality among the chronic reduced ejection fraction HF population. Preclinical and clinical data suggest that neprilysin inhibition provides beneficial outcomes in HF patients by preventing the degradation of natriuretic peptides and thereby promoting natriuresis and vasodilatation and counteracting the negative cardiorenal effects of the up-regulated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Agents such as omapatrilat combined neprilysin and ACE inhibition but had increased rates of angioedema. Goals of an improved safety profile provided the rationale for the development of the ARNi LCZ696. Along with significant reductions in mortality and hospitalizations, clinical trials suggest that LCZ696 may improve surrogate markers of HF severity. In this paper, we review the preclinical and clinical data that led to the development of LCZ696, the understanding of the underlying mechanistic action, and the robust clinical impact that LCZ696 may have in the near future.

  9. Sodium channel blockers in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kalso, Eija

    2005-01-01

    Subtypes of tetrodotoxin resistant voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in the development of certain types of neuropathic pains. After nerve injury hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing develop at the site of injury and also in the dorsal root ganglion cell bodies. This hyperexcitability results at least partly from accumulation of sodium channels at the site of injury. The facts that these sodium channels seem to exist in peripheral nerves only and that they can be blocked at the resting state (use-dependent block) offer the possibility to develop drugs, which selectively block these damaged, overexcited nerves. At the moment no such drugs are available. However, some of the most potent drugs that are currently used to manage neuropathic pain e.g. amitriptyline and other tricyclic antidepressants, also block these channels in addition to having several other mechanisms of action. Also most anticonvulsants that are used to alleviate neuropathic pain are sodium channel blockers. Lidocaine, the prototype drug, has been shown to be effective in peripheral neuropathic pain. Its use is limited by the fact that it cannot be administered orally. An oral local anesthetic type sodium channel blocker, mexiletine is an antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in neuropathic pain. However, effective doses may be difficult to achieve because of adverse effects.

  10. H2-blocker modulates heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ooie, T; Saikawa, T; Hara, M; Ono, H; Seike, M; Sakata, T

    1999-01-01

    The use of H2-blockers in the treatment of patients with peptic ulcer has become popular. However, this treatment has adverse cardiovascular effects. The aim of this study was to investigate proarrhythmic rhythm and autonomic nervous activity by analyzing heart rate variability in patients treated with omeprazole, ranitidine, and plaunotol. Nineteen patients (mean age 67.5 +/- 2.7 years) with active gastric ulcer were treated with omeprazole (20 mg/day) for 8 weeks, then ranitidine (300 mg/day) for the next 4 months, and finally plaunotol (240 mg/day). At each stage of the treatment, Holter electrocardiography was performed, and heart rate variability and arrhythmias analyzed. Heart rate variability yielded power in the low- (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency components (0.15-0.4 Hz). Although both ranitidine and omeprazole induced little change in cardiac rhythm, the high-frequency power was higher (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 ms, P < 0.05) and the ratio of low-to-high frequency power was lower (1.41 +/-0.10 vs 1.59 +/- 0.09. P < 0.05) during ranitidine than during plaunotol treatment. Cosinor analysis of heart rate variability revealed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency power during omeprazole compared with during ranitidine and plaunotol treatment. Ranitidine modulated high-frequency power which may be related to the adverse cardiovascular effects of H2-blocker.

  11. Evolution of β-blockers: from anti-anginal drugs to ligand-directed signalling.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jillian G; Hill, Stephen J; Summers, Roger J

    2011-04-01

    Sir James Black developed β-blockers, one of the most useful groups of drugs in use today. Not only are they being used for their original purpose to treat angina and cardiac arrhythmias, but they are also effective therapeutics for hypertension, cardiac failure, glaucoma, migraine and anxiety. Recent studies suggest that they might also prove useful in diseases as diverse as osteoporosis, cancer and malaria. They have also provided some of the most useful tools for pharmacological research that have underpinned the development of concepts such as receptor subtype selectivity, agonism and inverse agonism, and ligand-directed signalling bias. This article examines how β-blockers have evolved and indicates how they might be used in the future.

  12. Therapeutic considerations in the African-American patient with hypertension: considerations with calcium channel blocker therapy.

    PubMed

    Flack, John M; Sica, Domenic A

    2005-04-01

    African Americans have a higher prevalence, earlier onset, and more rapid progression of hypertensive end-organ disease, as well as excessive hypertensive mortality compared with other racial/ethnic groups. Most differences in hypertension and pressure-related complications between African Americans and whites appear to be quantitative and not qualitative. Improving the diagnosis, treatment, and control of hypertension in this highly vulnerable population is a major health care goal for the new millennium. In this regard the dietary pattern to be promoted for reduction of hypertension risk in African Americans is one of increased consumption of dairy products, fruit, and vegetables as well as a continued emphasis on decreased Na+ intake. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, multi-drug approaches are generally required, with diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (or angiotensin receptor blockers), and calcium channel blocker therapy as oft-selected components of most such treatment regimens.

  13. Use of non-selective β-blockers is associated with decreased tumor proliferative indices in early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Alexa; Amaya, Clarissa N; Belmont, Andres; Diab, Nabih; Trevino, Richard; Villanueva, Geri; Rains, Steven; Sanchez, Luis A; Badri, Nabeel; Otoukesh, Salman; Khammanivong, Ali; Liss, Danielle; Baca, Sarah T; Aguilera, Renato J; Dickerson, Erin B; Torabi, Alireza; Dwivedi, Alok K; Abbas, Aamer; Chambers, Karinn; Bryan, Brad A; Nahleh, Zeina

    2017-01-24

    Previous studies suggest beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) antagonists (β-blockers) decrease breast cancer progression, tumor metastasis, and patient mortality; however the mechanism for this is unknown. Immunohistochemical analysis of normal and malignant breast tissue revealed overexpression of β1-AR and β3-AR in breast cancer. A retrospective cross-sectional study of 404 breast cancer patients was performed to determine the effect of β-blocker usage on tumor proliferation. Our analysis revealed that non-selective β-blockers, but not selective β-blockers, reduced tumor proliferation by 66% (p < 0.0001) in early stage breast cancer compared to non-users. We tested the efficacy of propranolol on an early stage breast cancer patient, and quantified the tumor proliferative index before and after treatment, revealing a propranolol-mediated 23% reduction (p = 0.02) in Ki67 positive tumor cells over a three-week period. The anti-proliferative effects of β-blockers were measured in a panel of breast cancer lines, demonstrating that mammary epithelial cells were resistant to propranolol, and that most breast cancer cell lines displayed dose dependent viability decreases following treatment. Selective β-blockers alone or in combination were not as effective as propranolol at reducing breast cancer cell proliferation. Molecular analysis revealed that propranolol treatment of the SK-BR-3 breast cancer line, which showed high sensitivity to beta blockade, led to a reduction in Ki67 protein expression, decreased phosphorylation of the mitogenic signaling regulators p44/42 MAPK, p38 MAPK, JNK, and CREB, increased phosphorylation of the cell survival/apoptosis regulators AKT, p53, and GSK3β. In conclusion, use of non-selective β-blockers in patients with early stage breast cancer may lead to decreased tumor proliferation.

  14. Use of non-selective β-blockers is associated with decreased tumor proliferative indices in early stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Nabih; Trevino, Richard; Villanueva, Geri; Rains, Steven; Sanchez, Luis A.; Badri, Nabeel; Otoukesh, Salman; Khammanivong, Ali; Liss, Danielle; Baca, Sarah T.; Aguilera, Renato J.; Dickerson, Erin B.; Torabi, Alireza; Dwivedi, Alok K.; Abbas, Aamer; Chambers, Karinn; Bryan, Brad A.; Nahleh, Zeina

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies suggest beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) antagonists (β-blockers) decrease breast cancer progression, tumor metastasis, and patient mortality; however the mechanism for this is unknown. Immunohistochemical analysis of normal and malignant breast tissue revealed overexpression of β1-AR and β3-AR in breast cancer. A retrospective cross-sectional study of 404 breast cancer patients was performed to determine the effect of β-blocker usage on tumor proliferation. Our analysis revealed that non-selective β-blockers, but not selective β-blockers, reduced tumor proliferation by 66% (p < 0.0001) in early stage breast cancer compared to non-users. We tested the efficacy of propranolol on an early stage breast cancer patient, and quantified the tumor proliferative index before and after treatment, revealing a propranolol-mediated 23% reduction (p = 0.02) in Ki67 positive tumor cells over a three-week period. The anti-proliferative effects of β-blockers were measured in a panel of breast cancer lines, demonstrating that mammary epithelial cells were resistant to propranolol, and that most breast cancer cell lines displayed dose dependent viability decreases following treatment. Selective β-blockers alone or in combination were not as effective as propranolol at reducing breast cancer cell proliferation. Molecular analysis revealed that propranolol treatment of the SK-BR-3 breast cancer line, which showed high sensitivity to beta blockade, led to a reduction in Ki67 protein expression, decreased phosphorylation of the mitogenic signaling regulators p44/42 MAPK, p38 MAPK, JNK, and CREB, increased phosphorylation of the cell survival/apoptosis regulators AKT, p53, and GSK3β. In conclusion, use of non-selective β-blockers in patients with early stage breast cancer may lead to decreased tumor proliferation. PMID:28031536

  15. Evaluation of insulin sensitivity and secretion in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Yatabe, Midori; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    In primary aldosteronism (PA), insulin response to glucose is not fully understood. Insulin action was elucidated using indices in 32 PA and 21 essential hypertension (EH) patients. These patients were evaluated using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) indices, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and insulinogenic index (IGI), which were expressed for insulin sensitivity/secretion and the early phase of insulin secretion. Insulin sensitivity and early phase of insulin secretion were decreased in PA, and there was a negative correlation between serum potassium concentration and insulin sensitivity indices. These findings suggest that glucose intolerance in PA may be caused by hypokalemia-induced insulin resistance and hypokalemia-independent impairment of early-phase insulin secretion.

  16. Hypokalemic myopathy in primary aldosteronism: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuifen; Xin, Jun; Xin, Minghua; Zou, Hai; Jing, Lie; Zhu, Caoyong; Lei, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is a rare disorder. The majority of patients with PA present with typical features and are easily diagnosed. This disorder is usually diagnosed with hypokalemia, hypertension or an adrenal mass. However, patients with atypical symptoms may present a challenge for diagnosis and treatment. In the present study, a case of PA is described that presented with hypokalemic myopathy simulating polymyositis. The patient was a 44-year-old woman who presented with weakness and difficulty walking. The patient was initially suspected to have PM and was treated with methylprednisolone. The patient was found to have hypokalemia which persisted despite high-dose supplementation of potassium. Adrenal computed tomography revealed a right adrenal mass. Surgical adrenalectomy was conducted. The final pathological diagnosis was benign adrenocortical adenoma. The serum tests remained normal and the patient's symptoms were resolved during the 8-month follow-up. PMID:28101185

  17. SP 01-3 ALDOSTERONE ANTAGONISTS IN HEART FAILURE.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Colin

    2016-09-01

    Aldosterone's deleterious pathophysiological effects on the cardiovascular system if blocked by mineralcorticord antagonists (MRAs) logically should lead to improvement in heart function and outcomes in heart failure (HF). The first trial to test this hypothesis was tthe RALES trial in 1999 which treated patients with class III-IV HF with spironolactone. It showed significant reduction in mortality and cardiovascular hospitalzation rates. This was confirmed & extended in EMHASIS-HF RCT with classs II-III being treated with ACEIs & BB who received placebo or elperinone (a MRA) with again a statistically significant fall in mortality & hospitalization.The possible cardioprotective effects of MRA post acute myocardial infarct (MI) is less clear. The EPHESUS RCT in 2003 demostrated that elperinone given 3-14 days AMI in patients with early signs of HF reduced mortality & morbidity. However in the ALBTROSS trial using spironolactone 2 days after AMI showed no benfit in patients without HF but in a subgroup with ST elevation there was a 80% reduction in mortality after 6 months. However a recent meta-analysis from 25 RCT with data invovling 19,333 patients with either HF or post MI assigned aldosterone antagonists (AA)or placebo showed a 18% reduction in mortality including a 20% fall in CV mortality and a 19% reduction in SCD.The role of AA in HFPEF is even even more contraversial. The TOPCAT RCT of 3445 patients with symptomatc HFPEF randomised to spironolactone failed to meet the primary composite end point of death, aborted cardiac arrest or hospitalization although there was a reduction in hospitalization for HF (HR 0.83 P = 0.04).The differences between selective or non-selective MRAs, their ADRs & off target effects will also be discussed.

  18. Mineralocorticoid receptors in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Caprio, Massimiliano; Fève, Bruno

    2009-11-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates aldosterone effects on salt homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. MR activation also promotes inflammation, cardiovascular remodelling and endothelial dysfunction, and affects adipose tissue differentiation and function. Some of these effects derive from MR activation by glucocorticoids. Recent epidemiological studies show that the incidence of metabolic syndrome increases across quartiles of aldosterone, implicating the MR as a central player in metabolic homeostasis, involving electrolyte, water and energy balance. This review summarizes the current understanding of MR-mediated effects in diverse tissues and the role of aldosterone as a cardiometabolic risk factor, and discusses the possible relationship between inappropriate MR activation (by both mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids) and the development of metabolic syndrome.

  19. A case of primary aldosteronism combined with acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kitae; Lee, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Sun Chul; Cha, Dae Ryong; Kang, Young Sun

    2014-12-01

    Aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma can induce various clinical manifestations as a result of chronic exposure to aldosterone. We report a rare case of a 37-year-old man who complained of general weakness and polyuria. He was diagnosed with aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Aldosterone enhances the secretion of potassium in the collecting duct, which can lead to hypokalemia. By contrast, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which manifests as polyuria and polydipsia, can occur in several clinical conditions such as acquired tubular disease and those attributed to toxins and congenital causes. Among them, hypokalemia can also damage tubular structures in response to vasopressin. The patient's urine output was >3 L/d and was diluted. Owing to the ineffectiveness of vasopressin, we eventually made a diagnosis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy and intraoperative kidney biopsy were subsequently performed. The pathologic finding of kidney biopsy revealed a decrease in aquaporin-2 on immunohistochemical stain.

  20. Is the vascular endothelium under the control of aldosterone? Facts and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Oberleithner, Hans

    2007-05-01

    Fluid and electrolyte balance in the human organism is controlled by aldosterone, a mineralocorticoid hormone of the suprarenal glands. The major target cells are localized in the kidney where the hormone controls transepithelial salt transport. Over the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that cells of the cardiovascular system are also targeted by the hormone. As an example, endothelial cells resemble similar mechanisms triggered by aldosterone as shown for the kidney. Although the pathological alterations induced by aldosterone excess are obvious, the physiological changes are largely unknown. On the basis of recent experiments, using atomic force microscopy as an imaging tool and a mechanical sensor, I present a hypothesis on the physiological role of aldosterone in endothelial function and its potential implications in the control of blood pressure.

  1. How should we manage heart failure developing in patients already treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers for hypertension, diabetes or coronary disease?

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Finn; Segura, Julian; Ruilope, Luis M

    2010-08-01

    An increasing number of patients in the community are being treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers for hypertension, coronary disease or diabetic renal and vascular complications. Some of these patients will develop heart failure despite such treatment. Based on data from hypertension trials it can be estimated that approximately 5% of treated patients will develop heart failure over 5 years. It is unclear whether patients developing heart failure on and off ACE-inhibitors or beta-blockers, respectively, at the time of heart failure diagnosis have similar prognosis.Treatment options for patients developing heart failure while already treated with ACE inhibitors/ARBs and beta-blockers are very limited if current heart failure guidelines are followed. In this review possible strategies are outlined and important areas for research are identified. It is suggested that trials are designed specifically to address prognosis and treatment in this growing population.

  2. Effects of aldosterone and potassium-sparing diuretics on electrical potential differences across the distal nephron.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J B; Kokko, J P

    1977-01-01

    We have previously shown that the transtubular potential of the rabbit cortical collecting tubule varies in concert with changes in plasma mineralocorticoid levels, while the potential of the distal convoluted tubule is invariant with such changes. In the present studies we have examined the effects of in vitro addition of d-aldosterone to isolated tubules, as well as the effects of triamterene and spirolactone. d-Aldosterone (0.2 mum added to the perfusate or 1 muM added to the bathing medium) resulted in a marked stimulation of the transtubular potential difference (lumen-negative) after a short latent period. d-Aldosterone had no effect on the potential difference of distal convoluted tubules of intact or adrenalectomized rabbits. Both the magnitude of the response and the length of the latent period in the cortical collecting tubule after aldosterone were markedly temperature-dependent. Triamterene caused a gradual but reversible inhibition of the potential difference in the cortical collecting tubule but had no effect in the distal tubule. Spirolactone, when added before aldosterone, blocked the electrical response to the hormone in the cortical collecting tubule, and produced a gradual inhibition of the potential difference in mineralocorticoid-stimulated tubules. Spirolactone had no effect on the potential difference of the distal tubule. We conclude that (a) the influence of aldosterone on the potential across the distal nephron is restricted to the distal convoluted tubule, (b) the electrical response to aldosterone and the latent period are temperature-dependent, (c) the response to aldosterone is blocked by spirolactone, and (d) triamterene inhibits the potential difference only in the cortical collecting tubule. PMID:830667

  3. Proteinase inhibitor homologues as potassium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Lancelin, J M; Foray, M F; Poncin, M; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1994-04-01

    We report here the NMR structure of dendrotoxin I, a powerful potassium channel blocker from the venom of the African Elapidae snake Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba), calculated from an experimentally-derived set of 719 geometric restraints. The backbone of the toxin superimposes on bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) with a root-mean-square deviation of < 1.7 A. The surface electrostatic potential calculated for dendrotoxin I and BPTI, reveal an important difference which might account for the differences in function of the two proteins. These proteins may provide examples of adaptation for specific and diverse biological functions while at the same time maintaining the overall three-dimensional structure of a common ancestor.

  4. Plasma aldosterone and glomerular filtration in hypertensive patients with preserved renal function.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Julián; Morillas, Pedro; Castillo, Jesús; Andrade, Helder; Guillén, Silvia; Núñez, Daniel; Quiles, Juan; Bertomeu, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of aldosterone in the pathophysiology of hypertension, cardiovascular disease and deteriorating renal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between aldosterone and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in hypertensive patients with preserved renal function. The study involved 186 consecutive hypertensive patients with a GFR >60 mL/min. The GFR was determined using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation and the patients' plasma aldosterone levels were measured. Patients with a GFR between 60-89 mL/min had a significantly higher plasma aldosterone level than those with a GFR >90 mL/min (20.02 ng/dL vs. 15.3 ng/dL; P< .05). Multivariate analysis showed that the plasma aldosterone level was independently associated with the GFR (B=-7.36; P< .001). In hypertensive patients with preserved kidney function, the plasma aldosterone level was observed to increase as the GFR decreased.

  5. Effect of a multistage ultraendurance triathlon on aldosterone, vasopressin, extracellular water and urine electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, B; Morales, N P Hernández; González, E Ruvalcaba; Gutierrez, A A Aguirre; Sevilla, J Noriega; Gómez, R Amézquita; Robledo, A R Estrada; Rodríguez, A L Marroquín; Fraire, O Salas; Andonie, J L; Lopez, L C; Kohler, G; Rosemann, T

    2012-02-01

    Prolonged endurance exercise over several days induces increase in extracellular water (ECW). We aimed to investigate an association between the increase in ECW and the change in aldosterone and vasopressin in a multistage ultraendurance triathlon, the 'World Challenge Deca Iron Triathlon' with 10 Ironman triathlons within 10 days. Before and after each Ironman, body mass, ECW, urinary [Na(+)], urinary [K(+)], urinary specific gravity, urinary osmolality and aldosterone and vasopressin in plasma were measured. The 11 finishers completed the total distance of 38 km swimming, 1800 km cycling and 422 km running within 145.5 (18.8) hours and 25 (22) minutes. ECW increased by 0.9 (1.1) L from 14.6 (1.5) L prerace to 15.5 (1.9) L postrace (P < 0.0001). Aldosterone increased from 70.8 (104.5) pg/mL to 102.6 (104.6) pg/mL (P = 0.033); vasopressin remained unchanged. The increase in ECW was related neither to postrace aldosterone nor to postrace vasopressin. In conclusion, ECW and aldosterone increased after this multistage ultraendurance triathlon, but vasopressin did not. The increase in ECW and the increase in aldosterone were not associated.

  6. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  7. Calcium channel blockers in cardiovascular pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Godfraind, Theophile

    2014-11-01

    This paper summarizes the pharmacological properties of calcium channel blockers (CCBs), their established therapeutic uses for cardiovascular disorders and the current improvement of their clinical effects through drug combinations. Their identification resulted from study of small molecules including coronary dilators, which were named calcium antagonists. Further experiments showed that they reduced contraction of arteries by inhibiting calcium entry and by interacting with binding sites identified on voltage-dependent calcium channels. This led to the denomination calcium channel blockers. In short-term studies, by decreasing total peripheral resistance, CCBs lower arterial pressure. By unloading the heart and increasing coronary blood flow, CCBs improve myocardial oxygenation. In long-term treatment, the decrease in blood pressure is more pronounced in hypertensive than in normotensive patients. A controversy on the safety of CCBs ended after a large antihypertensive trial (ALLHAT) sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. There are two main types of CCBs: dihydopyridine and non-dihydropyridine; the first type is vascular selective. Dihydropyrines are indicated for hypertension, chronic, stable and vasospastic angina. Non-dihydropyridines have the same indications plus antiarrythmic effects in atrial fibrillation or flutter and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. In addition, CCBs reduced newly formed coronary lesions in atherosclerosis. In order to reach recommended blood pressure goals, there is a recent therapeutic move by combination of CCBs with other antihypertensive agents particularly with inhibitors acting at the level of the renin-angiotensin system. They are also combined with statins. Prevention of dementia has been reported in hypertensive patients treated with nitrendipine, opening a way for further studies on CCBs' beneficial effect in cognitive deterioration associated with aging.

  8. High-dose insulin therapy in beta-blocker and calcium channel-blocker poisoning.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Kristin M; Kaczmarek, Kathleen M; Morgan, Jenifer; Holger, Joel S

    2011-04-01

    INTRODUCTION. High-dose insulin therapy, along with glucose supplementation, has emerged as an effective treatment for severe beta-blocker and calcium channel-blocker poisoning. We review the experimental data and clinical experience that suggests high-dose insulin is superior to conventional therapies for these poisonings. PRESENTATION AND GENERAL MANAGEMENT. Hypotension, bradycardia, decreased systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and cardiogenic shock are characteristic features of beta-blocker and calcium-channel blocker poisoning. Initial treatment is primarily supportive and includes saline fluid resuscitation which is essential to correct vasodilation and low cardiac filling pressures. Conventional therapies such as atropine, glucagon and calcium often fail to improve hemodynamic status in severely poisoned patients. Catecholamines can increase blood pressure and heart rate, but they also increase SVR which may result in decreases in cardiac output and perfusion of vascular beds. The increased myocardial oxygen demand that results from catecholamines and vasopressors may be deleterious in the setting of hypotension and decreased coronary perfusion. METHODS. The Medline, Embase, Toxnet, and Google Scholar databases were searched for the years 1975-2010 using the terms: high-dose insulin, hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia, beta-blocker, calcium-channel blocker, toxicology, poisoning, antidote, toxin-induced cardiovascular shock, and overdose. In addition, a manual search of the Abstracts of the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology and the Congress of the European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists published in Clinical Toxicology for the years 1996-2010 was undertaken. These searches identified 485 articles of which 72 were considered relevant. MECHANISMS OF HIGH-DOSE INSULIN BENEFIT. There are three main mechanisms of benefit: increased inotropy, increased intracellular glucose transport, and vascular dilatation. EFFICACY OF HIGH

  9. Renin angiotensin aldosterone system altered in resistant hypertension in Sub-Saharan African diabetes patients without evidence of primary hyperaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Edinga-Melenge, Bertille Elodie; Ama Moor, Vicky J; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N; Nguetse Djoumessi, Romance; Mengnjo, Michel K; Katte, Jean-Claude; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2017-01-01

    Background The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system may be altered in patients with resistant hypertension. This study aimed to evaluate the relation between renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity and resistant hypertension in Cameroonian diabetes patients with resistant hypertension. Methods We carried out a case-control study including 19 diabetes patients with resistant hypertension and 19 diabetes patients with controlled hypertension matched to cases according to age, sex and duration of hypertension since diagnosis. After collection of data, fasting blood was collected for measurement of sodium, potassium, chloride, active renin and plasma aldosterone of which the aldosterone-renin ratio was derived to assess the activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Then, each participant received 2000 ml infusion of saline solution after which plasma aldosterone was re-assayed. Results Potassium levels were lower among cases compared to controls (mean: (4.10 ± 0.63 mmol/l vs. 4.47 ± 0.58 mmol/l), though nonsignificant (p = 0.065). Active renin, plasma aldosterone both before and after the dynamic test and aldosterone-renin ratio were comparable between cases and controls (all p values > 0.05). Plasma aldosterone significantly decreased after the dynamic test in both groups (p < 0.001), but no participant exhibited a post-test value>280 pmol/l. We found a significant negative correlation between potassium ion and plasma aldosterone (ρ = −0.324; p = 0.047), the other correlations being weak and unsignificant. Conclusion Although this study failed to show an association between RH and primary hyperaldosteronism in our context, there was a hyperactivity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Moreover, this study confirms the importance of potassium dosage when screening the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. PMID:28321294

  10. A systematic review of the role of renin angiotensin aldosterone system genes in diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: The renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a vital role in regulating glucose metabolism and blood pressure, electrolyte and fluid homeostasis. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the association of the RAAS genes with diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications of retinopathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Materials and Methods: The relevant English-language studies were identified using the key words of DM, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), T2DM, renin angiotensin aldosterone polymorphisms or genotypes and RAAS from the search engines of MEDLINE/PubMed, and Scopus from January 1, 1995 to July 30, 2014. Inclusion criteria for selecting relevant studies were reporting the role of RAAS gene variants in the pathogenesis of T1DM or T2DM, diabetic retinopathy (DR), diabetic neuropathy and cardiovascular complication of DM. Results: The reviewers identified 204 studies of which 73 were eligible for inclusion in the present systematic review. The review indicates the angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T polymorphism might not affect the risk of DM. The role of angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene (AT1R) A1166C polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of DM could not be established. Studies indicate the absence of an association between three polymorphisms of AGT M235T, ACE I/D and AT1R A1166C and DR in DM patients. A protective role for ACE II genotype against diabetic peripheral neuropathy has been suggested. Also, the ACE I/D polymorphism might be associated with the risk of CVD in DM patients. Conclusion: More studies with adequate sample size that investigate the influence of all RAAS gene variants together on the risk of DM and its complications are necessary to provide a more clear picture of the RAAS genes polymorphisms involvement in the pathogenesis of DM and its complications. PMID:25657757

  11. Beta-blockers in COPD: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Brian; Wedzicha, Jadwiga; Devereux, Graham; Vestbo, Jørgen; Dransfield, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    The combined effects on the heart of smoking and hypoxaemia may contribute to an increased cardiovascular burden in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The use of beta-blockers in COPD has been proposed because of their known cardioprotective effects as well as reducing heart rate and improving systolic function. Despite the proven cardiac benefits of beta-blockers post-myocardial infarction and in heart failure they remain underused due to concerns regarding potential bronchoconstriction, even with cardioselective drugs. Initiating treatment with beta-blockers requires dose titration and monitoring over a period of weeks, and beta-blockers may be less well tolerated in older patients with COPD who have other comorbidities. Medium-term prospective placebo-controlled safety studies in COPD are warranted to reassure prescribers regarding the pulmonary and cardiac tolerability of beta-blockers as well as evaluating their potential interaction with concomitant inhaled long-acting bronchodilator therapy. Several retrospective observational studies have shown impressive reductions in mortality and exacerbations conferred by beta-blockers in COPD. However, this requires confirmation from long-term prospective placebo-controlled randomised controlled trials. The real challenge is to establish whether beta-blockers confer benefits on mortality and exacerbations in all patients with COPD, including those with silent cardiovascular disease where the situation is less clear.

  12. Management of beta-adrenergic blocker and calcium channel antagonist toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kerns, William

    2007-05-01

    State-of-the-art therapy for beta-adrenergic receptor blocker and calcium channel antagonist toxicity is reviewed in the light of new insights into drug-induced shock. A brief discussion of pathophysiology, including cardiac, hemodynamic, and metabolic effects of cardiac drug toxicity, provides a foundation for understanding the basis of therapy. The major focus of this review is a critical evaluation of antidotal use of calcium, glucagon, catecholamines, insulin-euglycemia, and other novel therapies based on investigational studies and cumulative clinical experience.

  13. Association of aldosterone excess and apnea-hypopnea index in patients with resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiao; Guo, Wenyu; Peng, Hu; Hu, Chengheng; Zhang, Henghong; Peng, Changnong; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    The present study was to investigate the association of aldosterone excess and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in patients with resistant hypertension. Patients with resistant hypertension were enrolled and baseline characteristics including plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and 24 h-urine aldosterone levels were collected and compared between groups with different degrees of AHI as assessed by polysomnography. Association of key variables and AHI was then evaluated by univariate and multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 534 patients with resistant hypertension were enrolled and mean age was 57 ± 11 years. Overall, mean number of AHI was 21.7 ± 9.6 and nearly 92.3% of resistant hypertensive patients had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Mean PAC and 24 h-urine aldosterone level was 12.4 ± 6.3 ng/dL and 13.1 ± 6.8 ug, respectively. Compared with other groups, participants in the severe OSA group (AHI ≥ 30) had significantly higher PAC and 24 h-urine aldosterone level. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that PAC and 24 h-urine aldosterone levels were positively associated with AHI, while spironolactone was negatively associated with AHI, independent of age, gender, body mass index, smoking, plasma renin activity and diuretics. OSA is highly prevalent in patients with resistant hypertension and both PAC and 24 h-urine aldosterone level are significantly associated with AHI. PMID:28327653

  14. Aldosterone-cortisol imbalance immediately after fontan operation with implications for abnormal fluid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2014-11-15

    Abnormal water metabolism is frequently observed after Fontan surgery. We hypothesized that patients' adrenal hormones show unique responses immediately after Fontan operation and that such a hormonal profile is related to postoperative hemodynamics and water imbalance. Twenty-eight patients who underwent a Fontan operation (n = 16) or a non-Fontan type operation (n = 12; controls) under cardiopulmonary bypass were studied. Postoperative urine cortisol and aldosterone levels were measured daily to minimize the influence of circadian rhythms and temporal hemodynamic variations. Cortisol excretion was markedly elevated on postoperative day (POD) 0 in controls, consistent with a stress-induced cortisol response. Cortisol excretion was not high on POD 0 in Fontan patients and was markedly lower than that in the controls (444 ± 150 vs 34 ± 6 μg/m(2)/day, p <0.05), indicating an adrenal insufficiency status. Conversely, aldosterone levels were significantly higher in Fontan patients than in controls immediately after surgery and remained so thereafter. The cortisol-to-aldosterone ratio was significantly lower in Fontan patients on POD 0 (p <0.05 vs controls); low cortisol-to-aldosterone ratios were associated with a longer pleural drainage duration and intensive care unit stay. Daily cortisol and aldosterone levels were significantly associated with postoperative hemodynamics; low cortisol levels correlated with low cardiac and urine outputs, whereas high aldosterone levels correlated with low cardiac output and increased blood pressure and central venous pressure. Thus, aldosterone-to-cortisol imbalance occurred specifically after the Fontan operation. This unique hormonal profile significantly affected patients' postoperative water balance and hemodynamics. Modulation of the adrenal hormone could be useful for reducing postoperative complications after the Fontan operation.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of occupational noise exposure on serum aldosterone and potassium among industrial workers

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Sajad; Nassiri, Parvin; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Pourbakht, Akram; Azam, Kamal; Golmohammadi, Taghi

    2016-01-01

    The existing literature indicates that occupational exposure to noise may have adverse effects on workers’ health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effects of exposure to different sound pressure levels (SPLs) on serum aldosterone and potassium concentration among Iranian blue collar workers in Golgohar Mining and Industrial Company in Sirjan, Kerman Province, Iran. This case-control study was performed on 45 workers of Golgohar Mining and Industrial Company. The subjects consisted of 30 workers from manufacturing departments and 15 office employees of the mining company. The controls, mainly with administrative jobs were exposed to 72 dBA SPL. Cases, in two separate groups, were exposed to noise levels of 88 dBA and 103 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity was measured at the desired locations. Noise measurements were performed according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9612. To measure the serum aldosterone and potassium concentrations, a 5 mL blood sample was taken from each worker at the specified time intervals and aldosterone concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test in the laboratory. Repeated measurement and Spearman's correlation coefficient analysis were used with α = 0.05. Exposure to the different levels of sound pressure resulted in different aldosterone concentrations and meanwhile an increase in the SPL did not affect the concentration of potassium. From 10:00 AM to 10:30 AM, as SPL increased, aldosterone concentrations did not increase significantly but from 13:30 PM to 14:00 PM, raised SPL led to a significant increase in aldosterone concentration. However, there was no correlation between the concentration of potassium and different factors. This study indicated that increases in SPLs affect aldosterone concentration but at the same time do not have significant effects on serum potassium level. PMID:26780955

  16. Prostaglandins, catecholamines, renin and aldosterone during hypertensive and normotensive pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J; Christensen, P; Johannesen, P; Kornerup, H J; Kristensen, S; Lauritsen, J G; Leyssac, P P; Rasmussen, A B; Wohlert, M

    1982-01-01

    Urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), plasma concentrations of renin (PRC), aldosterone (PAC), noradrenaline (PNA) and adrenaline (PA) were determined in the third trimester of pregnancy, 5 days and 3 months after delivery in preeclampsia and normo