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Sample records for aldrich research biochemicals

  1. 78 FR 5499 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration; Sigma Aldrich Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... October 2, 2012, 77 FR 60145, Sigma Aldrich Research Biochemicals, Inc., 1-3 Strathmore Road, Natick...-Methyl-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine (7395)... I Dimethyltryptamine (7435) I The company plans to...

  2. 78 FR 32458 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Sigma Aldrich Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... February 21, 2013, 78 FR 12102, Sigma ] Aldrich Research Biochemicals, Inc., 1-3 Strathmore Road, Natick... (TCP) I (7470). N-Benzylpiperazine (BZP) (7493) I Heroin (9200) I Normorphine (9313) I...

  3. 77 FR 31390 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Sigma Aldrich Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... February 6, 2012, 77 FR 5847, Sigma Aldrich Research Biochemicals, Inc., 1-3 Strathmore Road, Natick...-diisopropyltryptamine (7439)....... I 1- piperidine (7470)..... I N-Benzylpiperazine (7493) I Heroin (9200)...

  4. 78 FR 12102 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Sigma Aldrich Research Biochemicals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ...: Drug Schedule Cathinone (1235) I Methcathinone (1237) I ] Aminorex (1585) I Alpha-ethyltryptamine (7249) I Lysergic acid diethylamide (7315) I Tetrahydrocannabinols (7370) I 4-Bromo-2,5...-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (7400)....... I N-Hydroxy-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine I (7402)....

  5. The Design of Advanced Learning Engines: An Interview with Clark Aldrich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Joel; Aldrich, Clark

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Clark Aldrich, whose expertise as an "e-learning guru" (one of three identified by "Fortune" magazine in November 2000) rests on substantial foundations: his service as the Gartner Group research director who initiated and developed the firm's e-learning coverage, his leadership of the world class team that…

  6. [Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. A report of a new mutation].

    PubMed

    Guillén-Rocha, Nelva; López-Rocha, Eunice; Danielian, Silvia; Segura-Méndez, Nora; López-González, Lucina; Lugo-Reyes, Saúl Oswaldo

    2014-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome was first reported clinically in 1937, and in 1954 the classic triad was identified: eccema, recurrent infections and thrombocytopenia with an X-linked transmission. Its incidence is estimated at 1 to 10 in one million live births per year. Wiskott Aldrich syndrome is caused by mutations in a gene in the short arm of chromosome X that encodes the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp), which identification and sequencing was first performed in 1994, and since then about 300 mutations have been reported. This paper describes the case of a boy with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, with clinical and genetic diagnosis, with a considerable diagnostic delay attributable to an atypical presentation misdiagnosed as immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25177856

  7. [The use of antimicrobial stabilizers in biochemical research].

    PubMed

    Pishak, V P; Iarmol'chuk, G M

    2000-01-01

    The ability of highly active antimicrobial biochemical stabilizers to sustain samples (T = 4 degrees C to 8 degrees C) till biochemical analysis in 20-50 days was tested. A new generation of delayed biochemical assays with the use of these stabilizers can be invoked in metabolic studies of cosmonauts and aviators, personnel of atomic submarines, pole explorers and other occupational groups. PMID:10826068

  8. Perspective of biochemical research in the neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Rider, J A; Dawson, G; Siakotos, A N

    1992-02-15

    The search for biochemical abnormalities in the neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL) or Batten disease was initiated with the discovery of normal levels of gangliosides in juvenile amaurotic idiocy. The primary goal of most biochemical studies has been to discover the unique biochemical marker for carriers and at-risk individual. Ceroid, the singular pathomorphologic trait of NCL, was isolated and shown to differ from a similar but normal product of aged cells, lipofuscin. In spite of the availability of stored product, the chemical analysis of ceroid has not elucidated the unique biochemical defect in the NCL, as has been the case for other lysosomal storage disorders. The NCL were thought to be a result of lipid peroxidation because ceroid is also found in disorders of impaired vitamin E metabolism or results from a diet deficient in the antioxidant, vitamin E. In addition, tissue analysis indicated losses of polyunsaturated fatty acids in affecteds and carriers, as well as the presence of a secondary product of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal, in affected and carrier NCL dogs. With the exception of a fluorescent compound isolated from retinal ceroid, studies aimed at discovering the disease-specific fluorophores of ceroid have been largely inconclusive. The discovery of elevated dolichols in urine and brain tissue of NCL patients led to another hypothesis, that the basic biochemical defect in NCL involved the metabolism of dolichols and retinoids. However, the more recent view is that dolichol metabolism is secondary to the unknown NCL lesion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1609832

  9. Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome: diagnosis, current management, and emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Buchbinder, David; Nugent, Diane J; Fillipovich, Alexandra H

    2014-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by the triad of eczema, thrombocytopenia, and severe and often recurrent infections. Despite the rarity of this disorder, our understanding of the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of WAS has continued to increase. Advances in the use of diagnostic tools, the provision of supportive care, and improvements in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with this disorder. Exciting advancements in the care of patients with WAS have also occurred, including the successful application of autologous gene-modified hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24817816

  10. Autoimmunity in Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome: An Unsolved Enigma

    PubMed Central

    Catucci, Marco; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Pala, Francesca; Bosticardo, Marita; Villa, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is a severe X-linked Primary Immunodeficiency that affects 1–10 out of 1 million male individuals. WAS is caused by mutations in the WAS Protein (WASP) expressing gene that leads to the absent or reduced expression of the protein. WASP is a cytoplasmic protein that regulates the formation of actin filaments in hematopoietic cells. WASP deficiency causes many immune cell defects both in humans and in the WAS murine model, the Was−/− mouse. Both cellular and humoral immune defects in WAS patients contribute to the onset of severe clinical manifestations, in particular microthrombocytopenia, eczema, recurrent infections, and a high susceptibility to develop autoimmunity and malignancies. Autoimmune diseases affect from 22 to 72% of WAS patients and the most common manifestation is autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by vasculitis, arthritis, neutropenia, inflammatory bowel disease, and IgA nephropathy. Many groups have widely explored immune cell functionality in WAS partially explaining how cellular defects may lead to pathology. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of autoimmune manifestations have not been clearly described yet. In the present review, we report the most recent progresses in the study of immune cell function in WAS that have started to unveil the mechanisms contributing to autoimmune complications in WAS patients. PMID:22826711

  11. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-06-12

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings. PMID:27306309

  12. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-06-01

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings.

  13. 77 FR 67675 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, SA INTL GMBH C/O., Sigma Aldrich Co...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ..., 2012, 77 FR 50162, SA INTL GMBH C/O., Sigma Aldrich Co., LLC., 3500 Dekalb Street, St. Louis, Missouri... (7437) I Psilocyn (7438) I 1- piperidine I (7470). N-Benzylpiperazine (7493) I Heroin (9200)...

  14. 78 FR 39339 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; SA INTL GMBH C/O., Sigma Aldrich Co., LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ..., 78 FR 19015, SA INTL GMBH C/O., Sigma Aldrich Co. LLC., 3500 Dekalb Street, St. Louis, Missouri 63118... Heroin (9200) I Normorphine (9313) I Etonitazene (9624) I Amphetamine (1100) II Methamphetamine (1105)...

  15. Molecular characterization of two Malaysian patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baharin, Mohd Farid; Kader Ibrahim, Sabeera Begum; Yap, Song Hong; Abdul Manaf, Aina Mariana; Mat Ripen, Adiratna; Dhaliwal, Jasbir Singh

    2015-08-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency condition characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema and recurrent infections. It is caused by mutations in the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) gene. We investigated two Malay boys who presented with congenital thrombocytopenia, eczema and recurrent infections. Here we report two cases of WASP mutation in Malaysia from two unrelated families. One had a novel missense mutation in exon 1 while the other had a nonsense mutation in exon 2. Both patients succumbed to diseaserelated complications. A differential diagnosis of WAS should be considered in any male child who present with early onset thrombocytopenia, especially when this is associated with eczema and recurrent infections. PMID:26277674

  16. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Presenting with JMML-Like Blood Picture and Normal Sized Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rajesh B.; Shanmukhaiah, Chandrakala; Bamborde, Shailesh; Wasekar, Nilesh; Toshniwal, Manoj; Mohite, Aniket; Patil, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to report the case of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) that presented with unusual laboratory features. Clinical Presentation and Intervention. Male neonate admitted with symptoms related to thrombocytopenia, whose initial diagnosis was considered as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and JMML (juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia) but subsequently diagnosis was confirmed as WAS. Conclusion. This case shows that a suspicion of WAS is warranted in the setting of neonatal thrombocytopenia with JMML-like blood picture and normal sized platelets. PMID:27340577

  17. Disorders of regulatory T cell function in patients with the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Zabay, J M; Fontán, G; Campos, A; García-Rodriguez, M C; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Bootello, A; de la Concha, E G

    1984-01-01

    Three patients with the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome were studied. One of them had no past history of relevant infections. The other two presented different degrees of humoral and cellular immunodeficiency and their T cells in vitro showed a defect in regulatory activity of Ig production in PWM stimulated cultures. This defect was not observed in the third patient. All three had normal numbers of B cells, producing normal amounts of Ig in vitro when co-cultured with normal T cells. It is suggested that the immunoregulatory T cell abnormality might play an important role in the pathogenesis of the humoral immunodeficiency. PMID:6609033

  18. The early history of (32) P as a radioactive tracer in biochemical research: A personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Gest, Howard

    2005-05-01

    The concept of using radioactive isotopes as "tracers" of chemical conversions was conceived and developed by inorganic chemist Georg de Hevesy (Nobel Laureate in Chemistry 1943). In 1935, he began to apply the technique to various biological processes using (32) P, and his experiments revealed the dynamic character of physiology and metabolism. Following de Hevesy's lead, Samuel Ruben (University of California, Berkeley) exploited (32) P in 1937-38 for investigation of phospholipid metabolism. Between 1937 and 1940, Ruben and colleague Martin Kamen spearheaded tracer studies in various biological systems using (32) P, short-lived (11) C, and other radioactive isotopes. During this period, Kamen was responsible for cyclotron-produced radioactive tracers and was able to sustain de Hevesy's research by supplying him with (32) P. In 1940, Ruben and Kamen discovered long-lived (14) C, which later proved to be a very powerful tool for analysis of complex biochemical processes, such as the path of carbon in photosynthesis. Between 1946 and 1950, (32) P was used in studies of bacteriophage replication and photosynthetic metabolism. This memoir surveys the history of these early investigations. PMID:21638569

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of lignocellulosic biofuel production via a biochemical process: guiding technology selection and research focus.

    PubMed

    Sohel, M Imroz; Jack, Michael W

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an exergy analysis of bioethanol production process from lignocellulosic feedstock via a biochemical process to asses the overall thermodynamic efficiency and identify the main loss processes. The thermodynamic efficiency of the biochemical process was found to be 35% and the major inefficiencies of this process were identified as: the combustion of lignin for process heat and power production and the simultaneous scarification and co-fermentation process accounting for 67% and 27% of the lost exergy, respectively. These results were also compared with a previous analysis of a thermochemical process for producing biofuel. Despite fundamental differences, the biochemical and thermochemical processes considered here had similar levels of thermodynamic efficiency. Process heat and power production was the major contributor to exergy loss in both of the processes. Unlike the thermochemical process, the overall efficiency of the biochemical process largely depends on how the lignin is utilized. PMID:21036607

  20. [Biochemical and histological research on lung tissue in experimental carbon disulfide exposure].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A; Petrova, S; Donchev, N

    1987-01-01

    During an experiment on two species of test animals (guinea pigs and white male rats) is studied the effect of carbon sulfide on the biochemical and structural characteristic of the lung. Duration of the experiments 30 days with guinea pigs and 90 days-white male rats. A complex of biochemical and histological methods is applied. Disturbances in the metabolic processes of the lung are established: a) raised activity of the hydrolytic enzymes; b) increased activity of the glycolytic enzymes and c) stronger protein synthesis. The observed metabolic disturbances are based, most probably, on the circulation infringements, occurring in the lung tissue under the effect of carbon sulfide. PMID:3441458

  1. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  2. 77 FR 50162 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; SA INTL GMBH C/O., Sigma Aldrich Co., LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; SA INTL GMBH C/O., Sigma Aldrich Co., LLC Correction In notice document 2012-19191 appearing on pages 47106-47108 in the issue...

  3. Research on: A. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands; B. Biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae of forest trees

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, D.H.

    1990-12-01

    This report furnishes a list of compiled and ongoing studies and a list of publications which resulted from the research accomplished by Institute scientists and other collaborators. The research accomplished can be placed in four categories: I. Research on borrow pit rehabilitation with 12 publications; II. Research on artificial regeneration of southern pines with 34 publications; III. Research on artificial regeneration of eastern hardwoods with 16 publications; and IV. Cooperative research with the University of Georgia on biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae with 5 publications. Major accomplishments of this research are: 1. Procedures to successfully reclaim borrow pits with sludge, subsoiling and seedlings with specific mycorrhizae. 2. Protocols to successfully artificially regenerate southern pines (particularly ling leaf pine) and certain eastern hardwoods. 3. Basic understanding of the biochemistry of mycorrhizae and the discovery of a new pathway for sucrose utilization in plants. 67 refs.

  4. Identification of Catalysts and Materials for a High-Energy Density Biochemical Fuel Cell: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-345

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, M.; Svedruzic, D.

    2013-07-01

    The proposed research attempted to identify novel biochemical catalysts, catalyst support materials, high-efficiency electron transfer agents between catalyst active sites and electrodes, and solid-phase electrolytes in order to maximize the current density of biochemical fuel cells that utilize various alcohols as substrates.

  5. Abnormalities of follicular helper T-cell number and function in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Rongxin; Li, Wenyan; Zhao, Hongyi; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhou, Lina; Du, Hongqiang; Luo, Guangjin; Wu, Junfeng; Niu, Linlin; An, Yunfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ding, Yuan; Song, Wenxia; Liu, Chaohong; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-06-23

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is a hematopoietic-specific regulator of actin nucleation. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients show immunodeficiencies, most of which have been attributed to defective T-cell functions. T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are the major CD4(+) T-cell subset with specialized B-cell helper capabilities. Aberrant Tfh cells activities are involved in immunopathologies such as autoimmunity, immunodeficiencies, and lymphomas. We found that in WAS patients, the number of circulating Tfh cells was significantly reduced due to reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis, and Tfh cells were Th2 and Th17 polarized. The expression of inducible costimulator (ICOS) in circulating Tfh cells was higher in WAS patients than in controls. BCL6 expression was decreased in total CD4(+) T and Tfh cells of WAS patients. Mirroring the results in patients, the frequency of Tfh cells in WAS knockout (KO) mice was decreased, as was the frequency of BCL6(+) Tfh cells, but the frequency of ICOS(+) Tfh cells was increased. Using WAS chimera mice, we found that the number of ICOS(+) Tfh cells was decreased in WAS chimera mice, indicating that the increase in ICOS(+) Tfh cells in WAS KO mice was cell extrinsic. The data from in vivo CD4(+) naive T-cell adoptive transfer mice as well as in vitro coculture of naive B and Tfh cells showed that the defective function of WASp-deficient Tfh cells was T-cell intrinsic. Consistent findings in both WAS patients and WAS KO mice suggested an essential role for WASp in the development and memory response of Tfh cells and that WASp deficiency causes a deficient differentiation defect in Tfh cells by downregulating the transcription level of BCL6. PMID:27170596

  6. A novel protocol to identify mutations in patients with wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, L N; Lutskiy, M I; Cooley, J; Kenney, D M; Rosen, F S; Remold-O'Donnell, E

    2002-01-01

    Mutations of WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) underlie the severe immunodeficiency/platelet disorder Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and its milder variant X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT). The affected gene, a 12-exon structure on the X-chromosome, is expressed exclusively in blood cells. The encoded product WASP is a 502-amino-acid scaffolding protein that functions in stimulus-induced nucleation of actin filaments to form dynamic cell surface projections. To date, more than 150 mutations have been identified in 300 WAS/XLT kindred worldwide, generally through methodologies that include sophisticated exon screening steps such as single-strand conformation analysis. We report here a simpler protocol, which was designed for use in clinical settings to identify the mutations of newly diagnosed patients. The approach relies on directly sequencing amplified exons according to a staggered schedule based on statistical evaluation of previous cases. In a 2 1/2-year trial, samples from 28 consecutive patients were analyzed; these included 3 "blindly labeled" previously studied cases. The mutations that were identified include a broad spectrum (8 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splice site mutations, 11 small insertion/deletions, 1 large deletion) and were broadly distributed (in 10 of the 12 exons). All mutations were verified and no discrepancies were encountered. Per patient, a mean of six DNA sequencing reactions and 6-7 h of staff effort sufficed for mutation identification and verification, indicating that the protocol is cost-effective. This cumulative experience demonstrates the suitability, reliability, and versatility of the new protocol. PMID:12367583

  7. Abnormalities of follicular helper T-cell number and function in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Rongxin; Li, Wenyan; Zhao, Hongyi; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhou, Lina; Du, Hongqiang; Luo, Guangjin; Wu, Junfeng; Niu, Linlin; An, Yunfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ding, Yuan; Song, Wenxia; Liu, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is a hematopoietic-specific regulator of actin nucleation. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients show immunodeficiencies, most of which have been attributed to defective T-cell functions. T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are the major CD4+ T-cell subset with specialized B-cell helper capabilities. Aberrant Tfh cells activities are involved in immunopathologies such as autoimmunity, immunodeficiencies, and lymphomas. We found that in WAS patients, the number of circulating Tfh cells was significantly reduced due to reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis, and Tfh cells were Th2 and Th17 polarized. The expression of inducible costimulator (ICOS) in circulating Tfh cells was higher in WAS patients than in controls. BCL6 expression was decreased in total CD4+ T and Tfh cells of WAS patients. Mirroring the results in patients, the frequency of Tfh cells in WAS knockout (KO) mice was decreased, as was the frequency of BCL6+ Tfh cells, but the frequency of ICOS+ Tfh cells was increased. Using WAS chimera mice, we found that the number of ICOS+ Tfh cells was decreased in WAS chimera mice, indicating that the increase in ICOS+ Tfh cells in WAS KO mice was cell extrinsic. The data from in vivo CD4+ naive T-cell adoptive transfer mice as well as in vitro coculture of naive B and Tfh cells showed that the defective function of WASp-deficient Tfh cells was T-cell intrinsic. Consistent findings in both WAS patients and WAS KO mice suggested an essential role for WASp in the development and memory response of Tfh cells and that WASp deficiency causes a deficient differentiation defect in Tfh cells by downregulating the transcription level of BCL6. PMID:27170596

  8. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates TGF-β1-mediated lung vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Brant M; Hu, Meng; Zheng, Anni; Zhao, Xueke; Che, Pulin; Brandon, Angela; Anjum, Naseem; Snapper, Scott; Creighton, Judy; Guan, Jun-Lin; Han, Qimei; Cai, Guo-Qiang; Han, Xiaosi; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Ding, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    TGF-β1 induces an increase in paracellular permeability and actin stress fiber formation in lung microvascular endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells via small Rho GTPase. The molecular mechanism involved is not fully understood. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) has an essential role in actin structure dynamics. We hypothesized that N-WASP plays a critical role in these TGF-β1-induced responses. In these cell monolayers, we demonstrated that N-WASP down-regulation by short hairpin RNA prevented TGF-β1-mediated disruption of the cortical actin structure, actin stress filament formation, and increased permeability. Furthermore, N-WASP down-regulation blocked TGF-β1 activation mediated by IL-1β in alveolar epithelial cells, which requires actin stress fiber formation. Control short hairpin RNA had no effect on these TGF-β1-induced responses. TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Y256 of N-WASP via activation of small Rho GTPase and focal adhesion kinase mediates TGF-β1-induced paracellular permeability and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In vivo, compared with controls, N-WASP down-regulation increases survival and prevents lung edema in mice induced by bleomycin exposure-a lung injury model in which TGF-β1 plays a critical role. Our data indicate that N-WASP plays a crucial role in the development of TGF-β1-mediated acute lung injury by promoting pulmonary edema via regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics.-Wagener, B. M., Hu, M., Zheng, A., Zhao, X., Che, P., Brandon, A., Anjum, N., Snapper, S., Creighton, J., Guan, J.-L., Han, Q., Cai, G.-Q., Han, X., Pittet, J.-F., Ding, Q. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates TGF-β1-mediated lung vascular permeability. PMID:27025963

  9. Unification of some biochemical methods of research in the pre- and post-flight periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigranyan, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The biochemical methods for determination of various parameters and factors during pre- and post-flight periods, as used by American and Soviet teams dealing with space flight medicine are compared. The emphasis is on the exchange of information on the study of the blood and urine content of space travelers before and after space flight. A series of electrolytic, enzymatic, and hormonal factors is discussed.

  10. Research and teaching with the AFTOL SBD: an informatics resource for fungal subcellular and biochemical data.

    PubMed

    Arun Kumar, T K; Blackwell, Meredith; Letcher, Peter M; Roberson, Robert W; McLaughlin, David J

    2013-12-01

    The Structural and Biochemical Database (SBD), developed as part of the US NSF-funded Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life (AFTOL), is a multi-investigator project. It is a major resource to present and manage morphological and biochemical information on Fungi and serves as a phyloinformatics tool for the scientific community. It also is an important resource for teaching mycology. The database, available at http://aftol.umn.edu, includes new and previously published subcellular data on Fungi, supplemented with images and literature links. Datasets automatically combined in NEXUS format from the site permit independent and combined (with molecular data) phylogenetic analyses. Character lists, a major feature of the site, serve as primary reference documents of subcellular and biochemical characters that distinguish taxa across the major fungal lineages. The character lists illustrated with images and drawings are informative for evolutionary and developmental biologists as well as educators, students and the public. Fungal Subcellular Ontology (FSO), developed as part of this effort is a primary initiative to provide a controlled vocabulary describing subcellular structures unique to Fungi. FSO establishes a full complement of terms that provide an operating ontological framework for the database. Examples are provided for using the database for teaching. PMID:24563838

  11. Outcome following Gene Therapy in Patients with Severe Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Blondeau, Johanna; Caccavelli, Laure; Charrier, Sabine; Buckland, Karen; Picard, Capucine; Six, Emmanuelle; Himoudi, Nourredine; Gilmour, Kimberly; McNicol, Anne-Marie; Hara, Havinder; Xu-Bayford, Jinhua; Rivat, Christine; Touzot, Fabien; Mavilio, Fulvio; Lim, Annick; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Héritier, Sébastien; Lefrere, Francois; Magalon, Jeremy; Pengue-Koyi, Isabelle; Honnet, Géraldine; Blanche, Stéphane; Sherman, Eric A.; Male, Frances; Berry, Charles; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fischer, Alain; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Galy, Anne; Cavazzana, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Importance Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare primary immunodeficiency associated with severe microthrombocytopenia. Partially HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is associated with significant co-morbidity. Objective To assess the outcome and safety of autologous HSC gene therapy in WAS. Design Gene-corrected autologous HSC were infused in 7 consecutive WAS patients (age range: 0.8 to 15.5 years, mean 7 years) following myeloablative conditioning. Setting and participants: Patients with severe WAS lacking HLA-matched related or unrelated HSC donors were treated between December 2010 and January 2014. The follow up of patients in this intermediate analysis ranged from 9 to 42 months. Intervention A single infusion of gene-modified CD34+ cells with an advanced lentiviral vector. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Primary outcomes were improvement at 24 months in eczema, the frequency and severity of infections, bleeding tendency, autoimmunity and reduction in disease-related days of hospitalization. Secondary outcomes were improvement in immunological and haematological parameters, and evidence for safety through vector integration analysis. Results Six out of the 7 patients were alive at the time of last follow-up (mean and median follow-up time: 28 and 27 months respectively) and showed sustained clinical benefit. One patient died 7 months after treatment from pre-existing drug- resistant herpes virus infections. Eczema and susceptibility to infections resolved in all 6 patients. Autoimmunity improved in 5/5 patients. No severe bleeding episodes were recorded after treatment, and at last follow up 6/6 patients were free from blood product support and thrombopoietic agonists. Hospitalization days were reduced from 25 days (median) in the 2 years pretreatment to 0 days (median) in the 2 years post treatment. All 6 surviving patients exhibited high-level, stable engraftment of functionally corrected lymphoid cells. The degree of

  12. Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein is involved in αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shigeru; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D

    2006-01-01

    The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disorder. The most common symptom seen in WAS patients is bleeding. One of the main causes of bleeding is defective platelet aggregation. The causative gene of WAS encodes WAS protein (WASP). Here, we show that WASP binds to the calcium- and integrin-binding protein (CIB) in platelets. CIB was originally identified as a protein binding to the αIIb cytoplasmic tail of platelet integrin αIIbβ3, which has a primary role in platelet aggregation. We also show that the WASP–CIB complex is important in αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion, and that in patients mutant forms of WASP are expressed at reduced levels or show lower affinities for CIB than wild-type WASP. Our results indicate that impaired complex formation between mutant WASPs and CIB reduces αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion and causes defective platelet aggregation, resulting in bleeding. PMID:16582881

  13. A Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is involved in endocytosis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hiro-Omi; Zheng, Lu; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Endocytosis is vital for hyphal tip growth in filamentous fungi and is involved in the tip localization of various membrane proteins. To investigate the function of a Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) in endocytosis of filamentous fungi, we identified a WASP ortholog-encoding gene, wspA, in Aspergillus nidulans and characterized it. The wspA product, WspA, localized to the tips of germ tubes during germination and actin rings in the subapical regions of mature hyphae. wspA is essential for the growth and functioned in the polarity establishment and maintenance during germination of conidia. We also investigated its function in endocytosis and revealed that endocytosis of SynA, a synaptobrevin ortholog that is known to be endocytosed at the subapical regions of hyphal tips in A. nidulans, did not occur when wspA expression was repressed. These results suggest that WspA plays roles in endocytosis at hyphal tips and polarity establishment during germination. PMID:26927610

  14. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins in the nucleus: aWASH with possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Verboon, Jeffrey M; Sugumar, Bina; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Actin and proteins that regulate its dynamics or interactions have well-established roles in the cytoplasm where they function as key components of the cytoskeleton to control diverse processes, including cellular infrastructure, cellular motility, cell signaling, and vesicle transport. Recent work has also uncovered roles for actin and its regulatory proteins in the nucleus, primarily in mechanisms governing gene expression. The Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) family of proteins, comprising the WASP/N-WASP, SCAR/WAVE, WHAMM/JMY/WHAMY, and WASH subfamilies, function in the cytoplasm where they activate the Arp2/3 complex to form branched actin filaments. WAS proteins are present in the nucleus and have been implicated as transcriptional regulators. We found that Drosophila Wash, in addition to transcriptional effects, is involved in global nuclear architecture. Here we summarize the regulation and function of nuclear WAS proteins, and highlight how our work with Wash expands the possibilities for the functions of these proteins in the nucleus. PMID:26305109

  15. Neural Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein Is Required for Accurate Chromosome Congression and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Joo; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2011-01-01

    The accurate distribution and segregation of replicated chromosomes through mitosis is crucial for cellular viability and development of organisms. Kinetochores are responsible for the proper congression and segregation of chromosomes. Here, we show that neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) localizes to and forms a complex with kinetochores in mitotic cells. Depletion of NWASP by RNA interference causes chromosome misalignment, prolonged mitosis, and abnormal chromosomal segregation, which is associated with decreased proliferation of N-WASP-deficient cells. N-WASP-deficient cells display defects in the kinetochores recruitment of inner and outer kinetochore components, CENP-A, CENP-E, and Mad2. Live-cell imaging analysis of GFP-α-tubulin revealed that depletion of N-WASP impairs microtubule attachment to chromosomes in mitotic cells. All these results indicate that N-WASP plays a role in efficient assembly of kinetochores and attachment of microtubules to chromosomes, which is essential for accurate chromosome congression and segregation. PMID:21533546

  16. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Simon, Karen L.; Kirby, Martha R.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg) obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO) mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS. PMID:26448644

  17. A Novel WASP Gene Mutation in a Chinese Boy with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Hu, Cheng; Dang, Dan; Guo, Ying-Jie

    2014-09-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare inherited X-linked recessive immunodeficiency disease characterized by eczema, thrombocytopenia, immune deficiency, and bloody diarrhea and is caused by WASP gene mutations. This study reports a case of WAS with a novel mutation. A newborn Chinese infant was admitted to the hospital because of intermittent bloody stools, recurrent infections, and persistent thrombocytopenia. Genetic analysis of the coding sequences and flanking splice sites of the WASP gene showed a novel WASP gene deletion mutation (1144delA) at exon 10. Family history showed that both his mother and aunt had a heterozygous genotype of the WASP gene. The infant died at the age of 4 months due to persistent thrombocytopenia and severe pneumonia. A novel WASP gene deletion (1144delA) at exon 10 was identified in a Chinese infant with WAS. This base deletion results in a frame-shift mutation of the gene for an early stop codon at amino acid 444. PMID:25332617

  18. Linkage of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome with polymorphic DNA sequences from the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Siminovitch, K.A.

    1987-05-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is one of several human immunodeficiency diseases inherited as an X-linked trait. The location of WAS on the X chromosome is unknown. The authors have studied 10 kindreds segregating for WAS for linkage with cloned, polymorphic DNA markers and have demonstrated significant linkage between WAS and two loci, DXS14 and DXS7, that map to the proximal short arm of the X chromosome. Maximal logarithm of odds (lod scores) for WAS-DXS14 and WAS-DWS7 were 4.29 (at 0 = 0.03) and 4.12 (at 0 = 0.00), respectively. Linkage data between WAS and six markers loci indicate the order of the loci to be (DXYS1-DXS1)-WAS-DXS14-DXS7-(DXS84-OTC). These results suggest that the WAS locus lies within the pericentric region of the X chromosome and provide an initial step toward identifying the WAS gene and improving the genetic counselling WAS families.

  19. Characterization of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) mutants using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rajmohan, Rajamuthiah; Raodah, Arshad; Wong, Ming Hwa; Thanabalu, Thirumaran

    2009-12-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by alterations in the WAS protein (WASP), and 80% of the missense mutations are located in the WH1 domain, the region essential for interaction with the WASP-interacting protein (WIP). It has been suggested that loss of WASP-WIP interaction is causal to the disease. Las17p (yeast WASP) is essential for growth at 37 degrees C. The growth defect of the las17Delta strain can be suppressed by the expression of human WASP together with WIP. Using the las17Delta strain, we have analyzed 52 missense mutations in the gene encoding WASP and found that 13 of these mutant proteins were unable to suppress the growth defect of the las17Delta strain. The majority of these 13 mutations cause the classic WAS in humans and are located within the WH1 domain, while none of the 12 mutations outside the WH1 domain abolished the activity of WASP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. This suggests that some of the mutations (13 out of 40) in the WH1 domain cause the syndrome in humans by perturbing the WASP-WIP complex formation, while the rest of the mutations cause the syndrome without affecting the WASP-WIP complex formation, but may affect the activity of the complex. PMID:19817875

  20. [System of internal laboratory control over the quality of clinical biochemical research].

    PubMed

    Marinov, S; Tsvetkova, R; Parashkevova, E

    1987-01-01

    An analysis and testing of the system of on-laboratory control on the quality of biochemical investigations with the use of control cards, has been performed. The system provides for the working out of control cards, the carrying out of control investigations, the evaluation of the results, and the correction of the control cards. Data for the built-up of the cards has been obtained with the practice of as many as 30 replications with one and the same sample, under the same conditions, the values of the average quadratic deviation (S) being in compliance with Tonks criterion. The action of control is substantiated through doubling the study of 10 per cent of the samples of each batch for each analysis and evaluation of the differences with regard to S by a two-mark system. An average mark from 0.00 to 2.00 per batch of samples is formed for each analysis. Filled in control cards for the total calcium and inorganic phosphorus are presented as an example. The changes in the S values are followed up after the introduction of control cards for 9 indices. With 7 indices reproducibility has proved higher. A total of 90 series of analyses have been controlled and evaluated--54 series (60 per cent) have proved 'good' (from 1.5 to 2.00), 22 series (24.44 per cent)--'satisfactory' (from 1.00 to 1.49), and 14 series (15.56 per cent)--'bad' (from 0.00 to 1.00 or at differences greater than 2.5 S) which implied that the respective analyses of the series of samples had to be replicated. A total of 24 control cards for various indices have been built up. PMID:3617472

  1. A complex of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein with mammalian verprolins plays an important role in monocyte chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Shigeru

    2006-06-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is a product of the gene defective in an Xid disorder, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. WASP expression is limited to hemopoietic cells, and WASP regulates the actin cytoskeleton. It has been reported that monocytes/macrophages from WASP-deficient Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients are severely defective in chemotaxis, resulting in recurrent infection. However, the molecular basis of such chemotactic defects is not understood. Recently, the WASP N-terminal region was found to bind to the three mammalian verprolin homologs: WASP interacting protein (WIP); WIP and CR16 homologous protein (WICH)/WIP-related protein (WIRE); and CR16. Verprolin was originally found to play an important role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in yeast. We have shown that WASP, WIP, and WICH/WIRE are expressed predominantly in the human monocyte cell line THP-1 and that WIP and WICH/WIRE are involved in monocyte chemotaxis. When WASP binding to verprolins was blocked, chemotactic migration of monocytes was impaired in both THP-1 cells and primary human monocytes. Increased expression of WASP and WIP enhanced monocyte chemotaxis. Blocking WASP binding to verprolins impaired cell polarization but not actin polymerization. These results indicate that a complex of WASP with mammalian verprolins plays an important role in chemotaxis of monocytes. Our results suggest that WASP and mammalian verprolins function as a unit in monocyte chemotaxis and that the activity of this unit is critical to establish cell polarization. In addition, our results also indicate that the WASP-verprolin complex is involved in other functions such as podosome formation and phagocytosis. PMID:16709815

  2. Evidence for Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Gene Therapy for Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome in Preclinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Francesco; Bosticardo, Marita; Charrier, Sabine; Draghici, Elena; Locci, Michela; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Panaroni, Cristina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Sanvito, Francesca; Doglioni, Claudio; Liabeuf, Marie; Gjata, Bernard; Montus, Marie; Siminovitch, Katherine; Aiuti, Alessandro; Naldini, Luigi; Dupré, Loïc; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Galy, Anne; Villa, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is a life-threatening X-linked disease characterized by immunodeficiency, thrombocytopenia, autoimmunity, and malignancies. Gene therapy could represent a therapeutic option for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow (BM) donor. In this study, we analyzed the long-term outcome of WAS gene therapy mediated by a clinically compatible lentiviral vector (LV) in a large cohort of wasnull mice. We demonstrated stable and full donor engraftment and Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) expression in various hematopoietic lineages, up to 12 months after gene therapy. Importantly, we observed a selective advantage for T and B lymphocytes expressing transgenic WASP. T-cell receptor (TCR)-driven T-cell activation, as well as B-cell's ability to migrate in response to CXCL13, was fully restored. Safety was evaluated throughout the long-term follow-up of primary and secondary recipients of WAS gene therapy. WAS gene therapy did not affect the lifespan of treated animals. Both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tumors arose, but we excluded the association with gene therapy in all cases. Demonstration of long-term efficacy and safety of WAS gene therapy mediated by a clinically applicable LV is a key step toward the implementation of a gene therapy clinical trial for WAS. PMID:19259069

  3. Wasp, the Drosophila Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Homologue, Is Required for Cell Fate Decisions Mediated by Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yaacov, Sari; Le Borgne, Roland; Abramson, Irit; Schweisguth, Francois; Schejter, Eyal D.

    2001-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins, encoded by the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene family, bridge signal transduction pathways and the microfilament-based cytoskeleton. Mutations in the Drosophila homologue, Wasp (Wsp), reveal an essential requirement for this gene in implementation of cell fate decisions during adult and embryonic sensory organ development. Phenotypic analysis of Wsp mutant animals demonstrates a bias towards neuronal differentiation, at the expense of other cell types, resulting from improper execution of the program of asymmetric cell divisions which underlie sensory organ development. Generation of two similar daughter cells after division of the sensory organ precursor cell constitutes a prominent defect in the Wsp sensory organ lineage. The asymmetric segregation of key elements such as Numb is unaffected during this division, despite the misassignment of cell fates. The requirement for Wsp extends to additional cell fate decisions in lineages of the embryonic central nervous system and mesoderm. The nature of the Wsp mutant phenotypes, coupled with genetic interaction studies, identifies an essential role for Wsp in lineage decisions mediated by the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:11149916

  4. Impact on biochemical research of the discovery of stable isotopes: the outcome of the serendipic meeting of a refugee with the discoverer of heavy isotopes at Columbia University

    SciTech Connect

    Shemin, D.

    1987-03-01

    As late as the 1930s, approaches to biochemical research not only were rather primitive, but a certain amount of mysticism still surrounded the biochemical events that occur in the living cell. To a great extent, this was due to the lack of techniques needed to uncover the subtle reactions in the living cell. In the early 1930s, an accidental meeting of two scientists revolutionized approaches in biochemical studies and led to the scientific explosion in molecular biology that has occurred during the last few decades. The dark political storm in Germany deposited Dr. Rudolf Schoenheimer on the New York shore, where he met Professor Urey, who recently had discovered ''heavy'' hydrogen. Schoenheimer suggested that biological compounds tagged with heavy atoms of hydrogen would enable investigators to follow their metabolic pathways. This intellectual leap revolutionized the thinking and design of experiments and made it possible to uncover the myriad reactions that occur in the living cell.

  5. [The effect of space flight on metabolism: the results of biochemical research in rat experiments on the Kosmos biosatellites].

    PubMed

    Popova, I A; Grigor'ev, A I

    1992-01-01

    Cosmos biosatellites research program was the unique possibility to study the metabolic features influenced by space flight factors. Based on the existing ideas about relationships between some metabolic responses, the state of metabolism and the systems of its control in the rats flown in space was evaluated to differentiate the processes occurred in microgravity, possibly under effect of this factor and during first postflight hours. The biochemical results of studying the rats exposed to space environments during 7, 14, 18.5 and 19.5 days and sacrificed 4-11 h after landing (Cosmos-782, -936, -1129, -1667, -2044 flight) are used. The major portion of data are in line with understanding that after landing when the microgravity-adapted rats again return to 1-g environments they display an acute stress reaction. A postflight stress reaction is manifested itself in a specific way as compared to adequate and well studied model of acute and chronic stress and dictates subsequent metabolic changes. Postflight together with the acute stressful and progressing readaptation shifts the metabolic signs of previous adaptation to microgravity are shown up. In the absence of engineering feasibility to control or record the state of metabolism inflight it can only presupposed what metabolic status is typical of the animals in space environments and that its development is triggered by a decreased secretion of the biologically active growth hormone. This concept is confirmed by the postflight data. PMID:1307036

  6. A neural-specific splicing event generates an active form of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Yann; Demay, Florence; Salbert, Gilles

    2004-09-01

    Actin polymerization is required for cellular events such as podosome, lamellipode or filopode formation in migrating cells, and members of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family have essential roles in regulating actin dynamics at the cell leading edge. However, WASP proteins need first to be activated in order to be able to target actin polymerization. Here, we show the occurrence of a neural-specific splicing event, which is favoured by the nuclear orphan receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor I, and generates a truncated WASP protein deleted of exon 2-encoded amino acids. This deletion relocates the protein to the plasma membrane and induces the formation of actin-rich podosome-like structures that also contain paxillin and vinculin. Furthermore, expression of the truncated protein in PC12 cells, as well as in primary neurons, stimulates neuritogenesis. These data underscore the importance of the neural-specific splicing of WASP RNA during development. PMID:15332112

  7. Unraveling the molecular effects of mutation L270P on Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein: insights from molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Chandrasekaran; Rao, Sethumadhavan; Ramalingam, Rajasekaran

    2016-09-01

    Missense mutation L270P disrupts the auto-inhibited state of "Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein" (WASP), thereby constitutively activating the mutant structure, a key event for pathogenesis of X-linked neutropenia (XLN). In this study, we comprehensively deciphered the molecular feature of activated mutant structure by all atom molecular dynamics (MD) approach. MD analysis revealed that mutant structure exposed a wide variation in the spatial environment of atoms, resulting in enhanced residue flexibility. The increased flexibility of residues favored to decrease the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions in mutant structure. The reduction of hydrogen bonds in the mutant structure resulted to disrupt the local folding of secondary structural elements that eventually affect the proper folding of mutants. The unfolded state of mutant structure established more number of inter-molecular hydrogen bonding interaction at interface level due to the conformational variability, thus mediated high binding affinity with its interacting partner, Cdc42. PMID:26457828

  8. B-cell reconstitution after lentiviral vector–mediated gene therapy in patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Maria Carmina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Pala, Francesca; Ferrua, Francesca; Uva, Paolo; Brigida, Immacolata; Sereni, Lucia; van der Burg, Mirjam; Ottaviano, Giorgio; Albert, Michael H.; Grazia Roncarolo, Maria; Naldini, Luigi; Aiuti, Alessandro; Villa, Anna; Bosticardo, Marita

    2015-01-01

    Background Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a severe X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, recurrent infections, and susceptibility to autoimmunity and lymphomas. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice; however, administration of WAS gene–corrected autologous hematopoietic stem cells has been demonstrated as a feasible alternative therapeutic approach. Objective Because B-cell homeostasis is perturbed in patients with WAS and restoration of immune competence is one of the main therapeutic goals, we have evaluated reconstitution of the B-cell compartment in 4 patients who received autologous hematopoietic stem cells transduced with lentiviral vector after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen combined with anti-CD20 administration. Methods We evaluated B-cell counts, B-cell subset distribution, B cell–activating factor and immunoglobulin levels, and autoantibody production before and after gene therapy (GT). WAS gene transfer in B cells was assessed by measuring vector copy numbers and expression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Results After lentiviral vector-mediated GT, the number of transduced B cells progressively increased in the peripheral blood of all patients. Lentiviral vector-transduced progenitor cells were able to repopulate the B-cell compartment with a normal distribution of B-cell subsets both in bone marrow and the periphery, showing a WAS protein expression profile similar to that of healthy donors. In addition, after GT, we observed a normalized frequency of autoimmune-associated CD19+CD21−CD35− and CD21low B cells and a reduction in B cell–activating factor levels. Immunoglobulin serum levels and autoantibody production improved in all treated patients. Conclusions We provide evidence that lentiviral vector-mediated GT induces transgene expression in the B-cell compartment, resulting in ameliorated B-cell development and functionality and contributing to immunologic

  9. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  10. Gene Correction of iPSCs from a Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Patient Normalizes the Lymphoid Developmental and Functional Defects.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Tamara J; Van Caeneghem, Yasmine; Pourebrahim, Rasoul; Ma, Chao; Ni, Zhenya; Garate, Zita; Crane, Ana M; Li, Xuan Shirley; Liao, Wei; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel; Segovia, Jose Carlos; Paschon, David E; Rebar, Edward J; Holmes, Michael C; Kaufman, Dan; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Davis, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the WAS protein (WASp). Here, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were derived from a WAS patient (WAS-iPSC) and the endogenous chromosomal WAS locus was targeted with a wtWAS-2A-eGFP transgene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) to generate corrected WAS-iPSC (cWAS-iPSC). WASp and GFP were first expressed in the earliest CD34(+)CD43(+)CD45(-) hematopoietic precursor cells and later in all hematopoietic lineages examined. Whereas differentiation to non-lymphoid lineages was readily obtained from WAS-iPSCs, in vitro T lymphopoiesis from WAS-iPSC was deficient with few CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive and mature CD3(+) T cells obtained. T cell differentiation was restored for cWAS-iPSCs. Similarly, defects in natural killer cell differentiation and function were restored on targeted correction of the WAS locus. These results demonstrate that the defects exhibited by WAS-iPSC-derived lymphoid cells were fully corrected and suggests the potential therapeutic use of gene-corrected WAS-iPSCs. PMID:27396937

  11. Deletion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marisa A P; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K S; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Worth, Austen J; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P A; Snapper, Scott B; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C I; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O; Forsell, Mattias N E; Thrasher, Adrian J; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8(+) T cells at the expense of CD4(+) T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  12. Fractionation of Suwannee River fulvic acid and aldrich humic acid on alpha-Al2O3: spectroscopic evidence.

    PubMed

    Claret, Francis; Schäfer, Thorsten; Brevet, Julien; Reiller, Pascal E

    2008-12-01

    Sorptive fractionation of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and Purified Aldrich Humic Acid (PAHA) on alpha-Al2O3 at pH 6 was probed in the supernatant using different spectroscopic techniques. Comparison of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis with UV/vis spectrophotometric measurements at 254 nm, including specific UV absorbance (SUVA) calculation, revealed a decrease in chromophoric compounds for the nonsorbed extracts after a 24 h contact time. This fractionation, only observable below a certain ratio between initial number of sites of humic substances and of alpha-Al2O3, seems to indicate a higher fractionation for PAHA. C(1s) near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) confirmed this trend and points to a decrease in phenolic moieties in the supernatant and to an eventual increase in phenolic moieties on the surface. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS) of Eu(III) as luminescent probe showed a decrease in the ratio between the (5)D0-->(7)F2 and (5)D0-->(7)F1 transitions for the fractionated organic matter (OM) that is thought to be associated with a lower energy transfer from the OM to Eu(III) due to the loss of polar aromatics. These modifications in the supernatant are a hint for the modification of sorbed humic extracts on the surface. PMID:19192802

  13. Fractionation of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid and Aldrich Humic Acid on α-Al2O3: Spectroscopic Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Claret, F.; Schäfer, T; Brevet, J; Reiller, P

    2008-01-01

    Sorptive fractionation of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and Purified Aldrich Humic Acid (PAHA) on a-Al2O3 at pH 6 was probed in the supernatant using different spectroscopic techniques. Comparison of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis with UV/vis spectrophotometric measurements at 254 nm, including specific UV absorbance (SUVA) calculation, revealed a decrease in chromophoric compounds for the nonsorbed extracts after a 24 h contact time. This fractionation, only observable below a certain ratio between initial number of sites of humic substances and of a-Al2O3, seems to indicate a higher fractionation for PAHA. C(1s) near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) confirmed this trend and points to a decrease in phenolic moieties in the supernatant and to an eventual increase in phenolic moieties on the surface. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS) of Eu(III) as luminescent probe showed a decrease in the ratio between the 5D0?7F2 and 5D0?7F1 transitions for the fractionated organic matter (OM) that is thought to be associated with a lower energy transfer from the OM to Eu(III) due to the loss of polar aromatics. These modifications in the supernatant are a hint for the modification of sorbed humic extracts on the surface.

  14. Newborn screening for severe T and B cell lymphopenia identifies a fraction of patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borte, Stephan; Fasth, Anders; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Winiarski, Jacek; Hammarström, Lennart

    2014-11-01

    The lack or marked reduction of recently formed T and B cells provides a basis for neonatal screening for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Newborns with other conditions are also identified if a severe T or B cell lymphopenia is present at birth. We retrospectively analyzed Guthrie card samples from 11 children with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), a rare disease that requires early diagnosis and treatment, to determine whether combined T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) screening could identify these patients. 4 of 11 patients showed markedly reduced TREC or KREC copy numbers in their DBS as compared to storage-time matched controls and prospectively screened Swedish and German newborns. No correlation was observed between the WAS gene mutations, the clinical severity/course and the result of the screening assay. A diagnosis of WAS should thus be considered in newborns with positive TREC or KREC screening results. PMID:25217881

  15. Comparison of insulators and promoters for expression of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein using lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Koldej, Rachel M; Carney, Gael; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Zhou, Sheng; Zhan, Jun; Sorrentino, Brian P; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy for the treatment of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) presents an alternative to the current use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. We describe the development of a self-inactivating lentiviral vector containing chromatin insulators for treatment of WAS and compare a gammaretroviral (MND), human cellular (EF1α), and the human WASp gene promoter for expression patterns in vivo during murine hematopoiesis using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker. Compared with the EF1α and the WASp promoters, expression from the MND promoter in mouse transplant recipients was much higher in all lineages examined. Importantly, there was sustained expression in the platelets of secondary recipient animals, necessary to correct the thrombocytopenia defect in WAS patients. Analysis of WAS protein expression in transduced human EBV-immortalized B-cells and transduced patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells also demonstrated stronger expression per copy from the MND promoter compared with the other promoters. In addition, when analyzed in an LM02 activation assay, the addition of an insulator to MND-promoter-containing constructs reduced transactivation of the LM02 gene. We propose a clinical trial design in which cytokine-mobilized, autologous, transduced CD34(+) cells are administered after myelosuppression. PMID:23786330

  16. Deletion of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein triggers Rac2 activity and increased cross-presentation by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Keszei, Marton; Oliveira, Mariana; Sunahara, Karen K. S.; Andersson, John; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Worth, Austen J.; Liedén, Agne; Kuo, I-Chun; Wallin, Robert P. A.; Snapper, Scott B.; Eidsmo, Liv; Scheynius, Annika; Karlsson, Mikael C. I.; Bouma, Gerben; Burns, Siobhan O.; Forsell, Mattias N. E.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nylén, Susanne; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WASp gene. Decreased cellular responses in WASp-deficient cells have been interpreted to mean that WASp directly regulates these responses in WASp-sufficient cells. Here, we identify an exception to this concept and show that WASp-deficient dendritic cells have increased activation of Rac2 that support cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Using two different skin pathology models, WASp-deficient mice show an accumulation of dendritic cells in the skin and increased expansion of IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node and spleen. Specific deletion of WASp in dendritic cells leads to marked expansion of CD8+ T cells at the expense of CD4+ T cells. WASp-deficient dendritic cells induce increased cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells by activating Rac2 that maintains a near neutral pH of phagosomes. Our data reveals an intricate balance between activation of WASp and Rac2 signalling pathways in dendritic cells. PMID:27425374

  17. Next Generation Sequencing Reveals Skewing of the T and B Cell Receptor Repertoires in Patients with Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Amy E.; Volpi, Stefano; Dobbs, Kerry; Fiorini, Claudia; Tsitsikov, Erdyni; de Boer, Helen; Barlan, Isil B.; Despotovic, Jenny M.; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco J.; Hanson, I. Celine; Kanariou, Maria G.; Martínez-Beckerat, Roxana; Mayorga-Sirera, Alvaro; Mejia-Carvajal, Carmen; Radwan, Nesrine; Weiss, Aaron R.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Lee, Yu Nee; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2014-01-01

    The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is due to mutations of the WAS gene encoding for the cytoskeletal WAS protein, leading to abnormal downstream signaling from the T cell and B cell antigen receptors (TCR and BCR). We hypothesized that the impaired signaling through the TCR and BCR in WAS would subsequently lead to aberrations in the immune repertoire of WAS patients. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), the T cell receptor β and B cell immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) repertoires of eight patients with WAS and six controls were sequenced. Clonal expansions were identified within memory CD4+ cells as well as in total, naïve and memory CD8+ cells from WAS patients. In the B cell compartment, WAS patient IGH repertoires were also clonally expanded and showed skewed usage of IGHV and IGHJ genes, and increased usage of IGHG constant genes, compared with controls. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates significant abnormalities of the immune repertoire in WAS patients using NGS. PMID:25101082

  18. Altered BCR and TLR signals promote enhanced positive selection of autoreactive transitional B cells in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Nikita S.; Brahmandam, Archana; Thouvenel, Christopher D.; Becker-Herman, Shirly; Jacobs, Holly M.; Schwartz, Marc A.; Allenspach, Eric J.; Khim, Socheath; Panigrahi, Anil K.; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Candotti, Fabio; Torgerson, Troy R.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder frequently associated with systemic autoimmunity, including autoantibody-mediated cytopenias. WAS protein (WASp)–deficient B cells have increased B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, suggesting that these pathways might impact establishment of the mature, naive BCR repertoire. To directly investigate this possibility, we evaluated naive B cell specificity and composition in WASp-deficient mice and WAS subjects (n = 12). High-throughput sequencing and single-cell cloning analysis of the BCR repertoire revealed altered heavy chain usage and enrichment for low-affinity self-reactive specificities in murine marginal zone and human naive B cells. Although negative selection mechanisms including deletion, anergy, and receptor editing were relatively unperturbed, WASp-deficient transitional B cells showed enhanced proliferation in vivo mediated by antigen- and Myd88-dependent signals. Finally, using both BCR sequencing and cell surface analysis with a monoclonal antibody recognizing an intrinsically autoreactive heavy chain, we show enrichment in self-reactive cells specifically at the transitional to naive mature B cell stage in WAS subjects. Our combined data support a model wherein modest alterations in B cell–intrinsic, BCR, and TLR signals in WAS, and likely other autoimmune disorders, are sufficient to alter B cell tolerance via positive selection of self-reactive transitional B cells. PMID:26371186

  19. Two sisters with clinical diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: Is the condition in the family autosomal recessive?

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, T.; Hayashi, K.; Matsumoto, T.

    1995-10-09

    We report two sisters in a family representing manifestations of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder. An elder sister had suffered from recurrent infections, small thrombocytopenic petechiae, purpura, and eczema for 7 years. The younger sister had the same manifestations as the elder sister`s for a 2-year period, and died of intracranial bleeding at age 2 years. All the laboratory data of the two patients were compatible with WAS, although they were females. Sialophorin analysis with the selective radioactive labeling method of this protein revealed that in the elder sister a 115-KD band that should be specific for sialophorin was reduced in quantity, and instead an additional 135-KD fragment was present as a main band. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the sialophorin gene and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the PCR product demonstrated that there were no detectable size-change nor electrophoretic mobility change in the DNA from both patients. The results indicated that their sialophorin gene structure might be normal. Studies on the mother-daughter transmission of X chromosome using a pERT84-MaeIII polymorphic marker mapped at Xp21 and HPRT gene polymorphism at Xq26 suggested that each sister had inherited a different X chromosome from the mother. Two explanations are plausible for the occurrence of the WAS in our patients: the WAS in the patients is attributable to an autosomal gene mutation which may regulate the sialophorin gene expression through the WAS gene, or, alternatively, the condition in this family is an autosomal recessive disorder separated etiologically from the X-linked WAS. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Researchers Hooked on Teaching. Noted Scholars Discuss the Synergies of Teaching and Research. Foundations for Organizational Science Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Rae, Ed.; Frost, Peter J., Ed.

    This collection of 19 essays is organized into a narrative of the teaching-research dilemma. The essays include: (1) "Struggling With Balance" (Cynthia V. Fukami); (2) "My Career as a Teacher: Promise, Failure, Redemption" (Howard E. Aldrich); (3) "Teaching and Research: A Puzzling Dichotomy" (Barbara A. Gutek); (4) "If It's Not Teaching and…

  1. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ways to give How your gift saves lives Donate cord blood Cord blood is changing lives Federal cord blood ... Cord blood options Sibling directed donation How to donate cord blood Participating hospitals Cord blood FAQs Learn if you ...

  2. The mouse homolog of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) gene is highly conserved and maps near the scurfy (sf) mutation on the X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Derry, J.M.J.; Wiedemann, P.; Wang, Y.; Kerns, J.A.; Lemahieu, V.; Francke, U.

    1995-09-20

    The mouse WASP gene, the homolog of the gene mutation in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, has been isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence is 86% identical to human WASP sequence. A distinct feature of the mouse gene is an expanded polymorphic GGA trinucleotide repeat that codes for polyglycine and varies from 15 to 17 triplets in Mus musculus strains. The genomic structure of the mouse gene closely resembles the human with respect to exon-intron positions and intron lengths. The mouse WASP gene is expressed as an {approx}2.4-kb mRNA in thymus and spleen. Chromosomal mapping in an interspecific M. musculus/M. spretus backcross placed in the WASP locus near the centromere of the mouse X chromosome, inseparable form Gata1, Tcfe3, and scurfy (sf). This localization makes WASP a candidate for involvement in scurfy, a T cell-mediated fatal lymphoreticular disease of mice that has previously been proposed as a mouse homolog of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Northern analysis of sf tissue samples indicated the presence of a consequence of lymphocytic infiltration, but no abnormalities in the amount or size of mRNA present. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Platelet actin nodules are podosome-like structures dependent on Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and ARP2/3 complex.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Natalie S; Pollitt, Alice Y; Davies, Amy; Malinova, Dessislava; Nash, Gerard B; Hannon, Mike J; Pikramenou, Zoe; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Hartwig, John H; Owen, Dylan M; Thrasher, Adrian J; Watson, Stephen P; Thomas, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    The actin nodule is a novel F-actin structure present in platelets during early spreading. However, only limited detail is known regarding nodule organization and function. Here we use electron microscopy, SIM and dSTORM super-resolution, and live-cell TIRF microscopy to characterize the structural organization and signalling pathways associated with nodule formation. Nodules are composed of up to four actin-rich structures linked together by actin bundles. They are enriched in the adhesion-related proteins talin and vinculin, have a central core of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and are depleted of integrins at the plasma membrane. Nodule formation is dependent on Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and the ARP2/3 complex. WASp(-/-) mouse blood displays impaired platelet aggregate formation at arteriolar shear rates. We propose actin nodules are platelet podosome-related structures required for platelet-platelet interaction and their absence contributes to the bleeding diathesis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. PMID:26028144

  4. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in a girl caused by heterozygous WASP mutation and extremely skewed X-chromosome inactivation: a novel association with maternal uniparental isodisomy 6.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Tomohito; Takada, Hidetoshi; Ishimura, Masataka; Kirino, Makiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro; Hara, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked disease characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema and immune deficiency, caused primarily by mutations in the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) gene. Female carriers are usually asymptomatic because of the preferential activation of the normal, nonmutated X-chromosome in their hematopoietic cells. We report our observations of a female child with WAS, who displayed symptoms of congenital thrombocytopenia. DNA sequencing analysis of the WASP gene revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 10. The expressions of WASP and normal WASP mRNA were defective. We found preferential inactivation of the X-chromosome on which wild-type WASP was located. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray testing and the analysis of the polymorphic variable number of tandem repeat regions revealed maternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 6 (UPD6). Our results underscore the importance of WASP evaluation in females with congenital thrombocytopenia and suggest that UPD6 might be related to the pathophysiology of nonrandom X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:25633059

  5. Platelet actin nodules are podosome-like structures dependent on Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein and ARP2/3 complex

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, Natalie S.; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Davies, Amy; Malinova, Dessislava; Nash, Gerard B.; Hannon, Mike J.; Pikramenou, Zoe; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Hartwig, John H.; Owen, Dylan M.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Watson, Stephen P.; Thomas, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    The actin nodule is a novel F-actin structure present in platelets during early spreading. However, only limited detail is known regarding nodule organization and function. Here we use electron microscopy, SIM and dSTORM super-resolution, and live-cell TIRF microscopy to characterize the structural organization and signalling pathways associated with nodule formation. Nodules are composed of up to four actin-rich structures linked together by actin bundles. They are enriched in the adhesion-related proteins talin and vinculin, have a central core of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and are depleted of integrins at the plasma membrane. Nodule formation is dependent on Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and the ARP2/3 complex. WASp−/− mouse blood displays impaired platelet aggregate formation at arteriolar shear rates. We propose actin nodules are platelet podosome-related structures required for platelet–platelet interaction and their absence contributes to the bleeding diathesis of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome. PMID:26028144

  6. A Program on Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San, Ka-Yiu; McIntire, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an introduction to the Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering program at Rice University. Describes the development of the academic and enhancement programs, including organizational structure and research project titles. (YP)

  7. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  8. Clinical significance and expression of the PRSS3 and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family verprolin-homologous protein 1 for the early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Azizmohammadi, Sima; Safari, Aghdas; Seifoleslami, Mehri; Rabati, Rahman Ghaffarzadegan; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Yahaghi, Hamid; Azizmohammadi, Susan

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we evaluate the clinical significance of the PRSS3 and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family verprolin-homologous protein 1 (WAVE1) in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) by immunohistochemistry.In current study, all adjacent non-cancerous tissues showed absent or low expression of PRSS3. The expression of PRSS3 was significantly increased in the EOCs than adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Moreover, the expression of WAVE1 was significantly observed in all EOC tissues when compared with normal tissues. Furthermore, WAVE1 expression was absent in 35 (89.74 %) adjacent non-cancerous tissues.Our findings showed that high expression of PRSS3 was markedly linked to FIGO stage (P = 0.02), advanced grade (P = 0.017), and lymph node metastases (P = 0.001), but no relationship was determined with other clinicopathological parameters. Furthermore, high expression of WAVE1 was significantly correlated with FIGO stage (P = 0.001), grade of tumor (P = 0.011), and residual tumor size (P = 0.041), but no significant associations were found between WAVE1 expression and age, lymph node metastasis, and histological subtypes (all P > 0.05). In conclusion, our study showed that increased expression of PRSS3 and WAVE1 may be involved in development of EOC. PMID:26662304

  9. IL-2 in the tumor microenvironment is necessary for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficient NK cells to respond to tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Joanna S; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Baptista, Marisa A P; Wagner, Arnika K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Gwalani, Lavesh Amar; Poli, Cecilia; Panda, Sudeepta K; Kärre, Klas; Kaech, Susan M; Wermeling, Fredrik; Andersson, John; Orange, Jordan S; Brauner, Hanna; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-01-01

    To kill target cells, natural killer (NK) cells organize signaling from activating and inhibitory receptors to form a lytic synapse. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients have loss-of-function mutations in the actin regulator WASp and suffer from immunodeficiency with increased risk to develop lymphoreticular malignancies. NK cells from WAS patients fail to form lytic synapses, however, the functional outcome in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that WASp KO NK cells had decreased capacity to degranulate and produce IFNγ upon NKp46 stimulation and this was associated with reduced capacity to kill MHC class I-deficient hematopoietic grafts. Pre-treatment of WASp KO NK cells with IL-2 ex vivo restored degranulation, IFNγ production, and killing of MHC class I negative hematopoietic grafts. Moreover, WASp KO mice controlled growth of A20 lymphoma cells that naturally produced IL-2. WASp KO NK cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1, LAG-3, and KLRG1, all receptors associated with cellular exhaustion and NK cell memory. NK cells isolated from WAS patient spleen cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1 and had low to negative expression of CD56, a phenotype associated with NK cells exhaustion. Finally, in a cohort of neuroblastoma patients we identified a strong correlation between WASp, IL-2, and patient survival. PMID:27477778

  10. IL-2 in the tumor microenvironment is necessary for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficient NK cells to respond to tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kritikou, Joanna S.; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Wagner, Arnika K.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Gwalani, Lavesh Amar; Poli, Cecilia; Panda, Sudeepta K.; Kärre, Klas; Kaech, Susan M.; Wermeling, Fredrik; Andersson, John; Orange, Jordan S.; Brauner, Hanna; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    To kill target cells, natural killer (NK) cells organize signaling from activating and inhibitory receptors to form a lytic synapse. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients have loss-of-function mutations in the actin regulator WASp and suffer from immunodeficiency with increased risk to develop lymphoreticular malignancies. NK cells from WAS patients fail to form lytic synapses, however, the functional outcome in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that WASp KO NK cells had decreased capacity to degranulate and produce IFNγ upon NKp46 stimulation and this was associated with reduced capacity to kill MHC class I-deficient hematopoietic grafts. Pre-treatment of WASp KO NK cells with IL-2 ex vivo restored degranulation, IFNγ production, and killing of MHC class I negative hematopoietic grafts. Moreover, WASp KO mice controlled growth of A20 lymphoma cells that naturally produced IL-2. WASp KO NK cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1, LAG-3, and KLRG1, all receptors associated with cellular exhaustion and NK cell memory. NK cells isolated from WAS patient spleen cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1 and had low to negative expression of CD56, a phenotype associated with NK cells exhaustion. Finally, in a cohort of neuroblastoma patients we identified a strong correlation between WASp, IL-2, and patient survival. PMID:27477778

  11. Activation by Cdc42 and Pip2 of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (Wasp) Stimulates Actin Nucleation by Arp2/3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Henry N.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2000-01-01

    We purified native WASp (Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein) from bovine thymus and studied its ability to stimulate actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex. WASp alone is inactive in the presence or absence of 0.5 μM GTP-Cdc42. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) micelles allowed WASp to activate actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex, and this was further enhanced twofold by GTP-Cdc42. Filaments nucleated by Arp2/3 complex and WASp in the presence of PIP2 and Cdc42 concentrated around lipid micelles and vesicles, providing that Cdc42 was GTP-bound and prenylated. Thus, the high concentration of WASp in neutrophils (9 μM) is dependent on interactions with both acidic lipids and GTP-Cdc42 to activate actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex. The results also suggest that membrane binding increases the local concentrations of Cdc42 and WASp, favoring their interaction. PMID:10995437

  12. Signalling to actin assembly via the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein)-family proteins and the Arp2/3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Thomas H; Sharp, Stewart J; Machesky, Laura M

    2004-01-01

    The assembly of a branched network of actin filaments provides the mechanical propulsion that drives a range of dynamic cellular processes, including cell motility. The Arp2/3 complex is a crucial component of such filament networks. Arp2/3 nucleates new actin filaments while bound to existing filaments, thus creating a branched network. In recent years, a number of proteins that activate the filament nucleation activity of Arp2/3 have been identified, most notably the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) family. WASP-family proteins activate the Arp2/3 complex, and consequently stimulate actin assembly, in response to extracellular signals. Structural studies have provided a significant refinement in our understanding of the molecular detail of how the Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments. There has also been much progress towards an understanding of the complicated signalling processes that regulate WASP-family proteins. In addition, the use of gene disruption in a number of organisms has led to new insights into the specific functions of individual WASP-family members. The present review will discuss the Arp2/3 complex and its regulators, in particular the WASP-family proteins. Emphasis will be placed on recent developments in the field that have furthered our understanding of actin dynamics and cell motility. PMID:15040784

  13. Nanoparticles as biochemical sensors

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Faddah, Layla M

    2010-01-01

    There is little doubt that nanoparticles offer real and new opportunities in many fields, such as biomedicine and materials science. Such particles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including cells and organelles, potentially leading to new approaches in nanomedicine. Sensors for small molecules of biochemical interest are of critical importance. This review is an attempt to trace the use of nanomaterials in biochemical sensor design. The possibility of using nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies as markers for proteins will be elucidated. Moreover, capabilities and applications for nanoparticles based on gold, silver, magnetic, and semiconductor materials (quantum dots), used in optical (absorbance, luminescence, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance), electrochemical, and mass-sensitive sensors will be highlighted. The unique ability of nanosensors to improve the analysis of biochemical fluids is discussed either through considering the use of nanoparticles for in vitro molecular diagnosis, or in the biological/biochemical analysis for in vivo interaction with the human body. PMID:24198472

  14. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

  15. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  16. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  17. Complete Biochemical (Prostate-specific Antigen) Response to Sipuleucel-T With Enzalutamide in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: A Case Report With Implications for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Julie N.; Drake, Charles G.; Beer, Tomasz M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the case of a patient with castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer who achieved a complete and durable biochemical response after treatment with sipuleucel-T while continuing with enzalutamide and to explore the immunologic basis for such a response. MATERIALS AND METHODS We obtained serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements and bone scans to assess the patient’s response to enzalutamide followed by the addition of sipuleucel-T. Using preclinical and clinical data, we describe his response through known immunobiologic mechanisms. RESULTS This patient’s PSA level became undetectable during treatment with enzalutamide and began to increase again after 14 months. He opted for treatment with sipuleucel-T, while continuing with the enzalutamide. This resulted in another complete PSA response 6 months after exposure to sipuleucel-T. CONCLUSION Sipuleucel-T typically does not produce significant PSA reductions, and, to the best of our knowledge, only 1 previous report of a durable complete PSA response in a patient with metastatic disease has been published. The timing of this response supports an immune mechanism. The biologic rationale for the combination, coupled with the clinical result observed in our patient, provides a basis for studies of the combination of sipuleucel-T and enzalutamide. PMID:23374810

  18. Research on Effects and Compatibility Taking of Different Sports Supplements on the Biochemical Indicators and Body Functions of Elite Walking Athletes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Scientific training, elimination of fatigue, and reasonable nutrition is the three important parts of successful training. Especially in the fatigue recovery and reasonable nutrition of track and field endurance project, which is more important than other project significance? This paper is to more scientific nutritional intervention on the walking athletes to improve athletic performance and provide experimental evidence 12 male and 12 female athletes were selected from the Chinese national walking team were given the nutrition intervention of a variety of sports supplements for 9 weeks. The serum testosterone (T), blood urea (BU), and serum creative phosphokinase (CK) and other indicators were tested in several weekends. The results showed that the different exercise taking supplements can increase the T levels of male and female walking athletes, and promote the body protein synthesis and the function of rapid recovery, reduce the levels of serum CK and BU abnormalities after the intensity training, and ensure the smooth completion of the training and a normal competitive level. The different exercise taking supplements can improve the biochemical indicators and improve the level of physical function. PMID:26998179

  19. CDC’s Second National Report on Biochemical Indicators of Diet and Nutrition in the US Population is a valuable tool for researchers and policy makers123

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Christine M.; Sternberg, Maya R.; Schleicher, Rosemary L.; Haynes, Bridgette M.H.; Rybak, Michael E.; Pirkle, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The CDC’s National Report on Biochemical Indicators of Diet and Nutrition in the US Population (Nutrition Report) is a serial publication that provides ongoing assessment of the population’s nutritional status. The Nutrition Report presents data on blood and urine biomarker concentrations (selected water- and fat-soluble vitamins and nutrients, trace elements, dietary bioactive compounds) from a representative sample of the population participating in the NHANES. The Second Nutrition Report (released in 2012) contains reference information (means and percentiles) for 58 biomarkers measured during all or part of 2003–2006, stratified by age, sex, and race-ethnicity. Where available, we presented cutpoint-based prevalence data during 2003–2006, and data on changes in biomarker concentrations or prevalence since 1999. Blood vitamin concentrations were generally higher in older (≥60 y) compared to younger (20–39 y) adults and lower in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic blacks compared to non-Hispanic whites. Nearly 80% of Americans (≥6 y) were not at risk for deficiencies in any of the 7 vitamins studied (A, B-6, B-12, C, D, E and folate). Deficiency rates varied by age, sex, and race-ethnicity. About 90% of women (12–49 y) were not at risk for iron deficiency, but only 68% were not at risk for deficiencies in iron and all 7 vitamins. Young women (20–39 y) had median urine iodine concentrations bordering on insufficiency. First-time data are presented on plasma concentrations of 24 saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Tabulation and graphical presentation of NHANES data in the Second Nutrition Report benefits those organizations involved in developing and evaluating nutrition policy. PMID:23596164

  20. Multiplexing oscillatory biochemical signals.

    PubMed

    de Ronde, Wiet; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2014-04-01

    In recent years it has been increasingly recognized that biochemical signals are not necessarily constant in time and that the temporal dynamics of a signal can be the information carrier. Moreover, it is now well established that the protein signaling network of living cells has a bow-tie structure and that components are often shared between different signaling pathways. Here we show by mathematical modeling that living cells can multiplex a constant and an oscillatory signal: they can transmit these two signals simultaneously through a common signaling pathway, and yet respond to them specifically and reliably. We find that information transmission is reduced not only by noise arising from the intrinsic stochasticity of biochemical reactions, but also by crosstalk between the different channels. Yet, under biologically relevant conditions more than 2 bits of information can be transmitted per channel, even when the two signals are transmitted simultaneously. These observations suggest that oscillatory signals are ideal for multiplexing signals. PMID:24685537

  1. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients Procedure for Accessing Lab Services Data Package Requirements AIDS Therapies Resource Guide In Vitro Efficacy Evaluations ... Assurances to Users Application and Approval Process User Requirements Malaria Vaccine Production Services Data Sharing and Release ...

  2. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  3. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Interacting Protein Deficiency Uncovers the Role of the Co-receptor CD19 as a Generic Hub for PI3 Kinase Signaling in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, Selina Jessica; Gasparrini, Francesca; Burbage, Marianne; Aggarwal, Shweta; Frederico, Bruno; Geha, Raif S.; Way, Michael; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Batista, Facundo D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Humans with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome display a progressive immunological disorder associated with compromised Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Interacting Protein (WIP) function. Mice deficient in WIP recapitulate such an immunodeficiency that has been attributed to T cell dysfunction; however, any contribution of B cells is as yet undefined. Here we have shown that WIP deficiency resulted in defects in B cell homing, chemotaxis, survival, and differentiation, ultimately leading to diminished germinal center formation and antibody production. Furthermore, in the absence of WIP, several receptors, namely the BCR, BAFFR, CXCR4, CXCR5, CD40, and TLR4, were impaired in promoting CD19 co-receptor activation and subsequent PI3 kinase (PI3K) signaling. The underlying mechanism was due to a distortion in the actin and tetraspanin networks that lead to altered CD19 cell surface dynamics. In conclusion, our findings suggest that, by regulating the cortical actin cytoskeleton, WIP influences the function of CD19 as a general hub for PI3K signaling. PMID:26453379

  4. Misleading biochemical laboratory test results

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Amin A.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients. PMID:6375845

  5. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  6. Physical forcing and physical/biochemical variability of the Mediterranean Sea: a review of unresolved issues and directions for future research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanotte-Rizzoli, P.; Artale, V.; Borzelli-Eusebi, G. L.; Brenner, S.; Civitarese, G.; Crise, A.; Font, J.; Gacic, M.; Kress, N.; Marullo, S.; Ozsoy, E.; Ribera d'Alcalà, M.; Roether, W.; Schroeder, K.; Sofianos, S.; Tanhua, T.; Theocharis, A.; Alvarez, M.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Bergamasco, A.; Cardin, V.; Carniel, S.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Garcia-Ladona, E.; Garcia-Lafuente, J. M.; Gogou, A.; Gregoire, M.; Hainbucher, D.; Kontoyannis, H.; Kovacevic, V.; Krasakapoulou, E.; Krokos, G.; Incarbona, A.; Mazzocchi, M. G.; Orlic, M.; Pascual, A.; Poulain, P.-M.; Rubino, A.; Siokou-Frangou, J.; Souvermezoglou, E.; Sprovieri, M.; Taupier-Letage, I.; Tintoré, J.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2013-07-01

    convection cells are much more amenable to direct observational surveys and mooring arrays. An ubiquitous, energetic mesoscale and sub-mesoscale eddy field is superimposed to and interacts with the sub-basin scale, wind-driven gyres that characterize the upper thermocline circulation. Three different scales of motion are therefore superimposed producing a richness of interaction processes which typify similar interactions in unexplored ocean regions. Both wide and narrow shelves are present separated by steep continental slopes from the deep interiors. Cross-shelf fluxes of physical as well biogeochemical parameters are crucial in determining the properties of the shallow versus deep local ecosystems and their trophic chain. Most importantly, the Mediterranean Sea is a basin of contrasting ecosystems, from the strongly oligotrophic deep interiors to the fully eutrophic northern Adriatic characterized by recurrent, anomalous algal blooms and related anoxia events. This review focuses on the identification of the major unresolved scientific issues and wants also to provide directions for future research which may lead to the formulation of interdisciplinary, collaborative implementation plans to address these issues both theoretically and observationally.

  7. Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01

    SciTech Connect

    Mydin, Aminudin R.; Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A.; Armstrong, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

  8. A randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of Pycnogenol and Bacopa CDRI08 herbal medicines on cognitive, cardiovascular, and biochemical functioning in cognitively healthy elderly people: the Australian Research Council Longevity Intervention (ARCLI) study protocol (ANZCTR12611000487910)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges associated with our ageing population is the increasing incidence of age-associated cognitive decline, which has significant implications for an individual's ability to lead a productive and fulfilling life. In pure economic terms the costs of ageing reflects decreased productivity and engagement with the workforce. The maintenance of brain health underpinning intact cognition is a key factor to maintaining a positive, engaged, and productive lifestyle. In light of this, the role of diet, including supplementation with nutritional and even pharmacological interventions capable of ameliorating the neurocognitive changes that occur with age constitute vital areas of research. Methods In order to reduce cognitive ageing, the ARC longevity intervention (ARCLI) was developed to examine the effects of two promising natural pharmacologically active supplements on cognitive performance. ARCLI is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 3-arm clinical trial in which 465 participants will be randomized to receive an extract of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI08 300 mg/day), Pycnogenol (150 mg/day), or placebo daily for 12 months. Participants will be tested at baseline and then at 3, 6 and 12 months post-randomization on a wide battery of cognitive, neuropsychological and mood measures, cardiovascular (brachial and aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressures as well as arterial stiffness), biochemical (assays to measure inflammation, oxidative stress and safety) as well as genetic assessments (telomere length and several Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms). The primary aim is to investigate the effects of these supplements on cognitive performance. The secondary aims are to explore the time-course of cognitive enhancement as well as potential cardiovascular and biochemical mechanisms underpinning cognitive enhancement over the 12 months of administration. ARCLI will represent one of the largest and most comprehensive experimental clinical

  9. A Course in... Biochemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Terry K-L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a chemical engineering course for senior undergraduates and first year graduate students in biochemical engineering. Discusses five experiments used in the course: aseptic techniques, dissolved oxygen measurement, oxygen uptake by yeast, continuous sterilization, and cultivation of microorganisms. (MVL)

  10. [Biochemical antenatal screening for fetal anomalies.].

    PubMed

    Torfadóttir, G; Jónsson, J J

    2001-05-01

    Biochemical antenatal screening started 30 years ago. Initially, the goal was to detect neural tube defects by measuring a-fetoprotein in maternal serum (MS-AFP) and amniotic fluid (AF-AFP). The serendipitous discovery of an association between low AFP maternal serum concentration and chromosomal anomalies resulted in increased research interest in biochemical screening in pregnancy. Subsequently double, triple or quadruple tests in 2nd trimester of pregnancy became widely used in combination with fetal chromosome determination in at risk individuals. In Iceland, antenatal screening for chromosomal anomalies has essentially been based on fetal chromosome studies offered to pregnant women 35 years or older. This strategy needs to be revised. Recently first trimester biochemical screening based on maternal serum pregnancy associated plasma protein A (MS-PAPP-A) and free b-human chorionic gonadotropin (MS-free b-hCG) and multivariate risk assessment has been developed. This screening test can be improved if done in conjunction with nuchal translucency measurements in an early sonography scan. PMID:17018982

  11. [Research in the PhD Program led by János Fehér between 1993 and 2010 at the Biochemical Research Laboratory, 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University].

    PubMed

    Blázovics, Anna

    2010-11-21

    Author wish to express gratitude to late professor János Fehér for the invitation to participate in "Free Radical and Immunological References of Hepatology" PhD program in 1993 and for providing opportunity to establish a laboratory at the 2nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University. He established a joint medical and biological research that is continuing unbrokenly. In this research group, between 1993 and 2010, eleven Ph.D. students received their scientific degrees and two candidate dissertations were prepared. Three students are working in this very exciting field even today. Author would like to salute before János Fehér's remembrance by giving a list of results of topics under her leadership. PMID:21071304

  12. Approaches to Chemical and Biochemical Information and Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privman, Vladimir

    2012-02-01

    We outline models and approaches for error control required to prevent buildup of noise when ``gates'' and other ``network elements'' based on (bio)chemical reaction processes are utilized to realize stable, scalable networks for information and signal processing. We also survey challenges and possible future research. [4pt] [1] Control of Noise in Chemical and Biochemical Information Processing, V. Privman, Israel J. Chem. 51, 118-131 (2010).[0pt] [2] Biochemical Filter with Sigmoidal Response: Increasing the Complexity of Biomolecular Logic, V. Privman, J. Halamek, M. A. Arugula, D. Melnikov, V. Bocharova and E. Katz, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 14103-14109 (2010).[0pt] [3] Towards Biosensing Strategies Based on Biochemical Logic Systems, E. Katz, V. Privman and J. Wang, in: Proc. Conf. ICQNM 2010 (IEEE Comp. Soc. Conf. Publ. Serv., Los Alamitos, California, 2010), pages 1-9.

  13. BEST: Biochemical Engineering Simulation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-01-01

    The idea of developing a process simulator that can describe biochemical engineering (a relatively new technology area) was formulated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the late 1980s. The initial plan was to build a consortium of industrial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners to enhance a commercial simulator with biochemical unit operations. DOE supported this effort; however, before the consortium was established, the process simulator industry changed considerably. Work on the first phase of implementing various fermentation reactors into the chemical process simulator, ASPEN/SP-BEST, is complete. This report will focus on those developments. Simulation Sciences, Inc. (SimSci) no longer supports ASPEN/SP, and Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech) has developed an add-on to its ASPEN PLUS (also called BioProcess Simulator [BPS]). This report will also explain the similarities and differences between BEST and BPS. ASPEN, developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for DOE in the late 1970s, is still the state-of-the-art chemical process simulator. It was selected as the only simulator with the potential to be easily expanded into the biochemical area. ASPEN/SP, commercially sold by SimSci, was selected for the BEST work. SimSci completed work on batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation reactors in 1993, just as it announced it would no longer commercially support the complete ASPEN/SP product. BEST was left without a basic support program. Luckily, during this same time frame, AspenTech was developing a biochemical simulator with its version of ASPEN (ASPEN PLUS), which incorporates most BEST concepts. The future of BEST will involve developing physical property data and models appropriate to biochemical systems that are necessary for good biochemical process design.

  14. Long-term outcome and lineage-specific chimerism in 194 patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome treated by hematopoietic cell transplantation in the period 1980-2009: an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Moratto, Daniele; Giliani, Silvia; Bonfim, Carmem; Mazzolari, Evelina; Fischer, Alain; Ochs, Hans D; Cant, Andrew J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Cowan, Morton J; Albert, Michael H; Small, Trudy; Pai, Sung-Yun; Haddad, Elie; Lisa, Antonella; Hambleton, Sophie; Slatter, Mary; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Picard, Capucine; Torgerson, Troy R; Burroughs, Lauri; Koliski, Adriana; Neto, Jose Zanis; Porta, Fulvio; Qasim, Waseem; Veys, Paul; Kavanau, Kristina; Hönig, Manfred; Schulz, Ansgar; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2011-08-11

    In this retrospective collaborative study, we have analyzed long-term outcome and donor cell engraftment in 194 patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) who have been treated by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the period 1980- 2009. Overall survival was 84.0% and was even higher (89.1% 5-year survival) for those who received HCT since the year 2000, reflecting recent improvement of outcome after transplantation from mismatched family donors and for patients who received HCT from an unrelated donor at older than 5 years. Patients who went to transplantation in better clinical conditions had a lower rate of post-HCT complications. Retrospective analysis of lineage-specific donor cell engraftment showed that stable full donor chimerism was attained by 72.3% of the patients who survived for at least 1 year after HCT. Mixed chimerism was associated with an increased risk of incomplete reconstitution of lymphocyte count and post-HCT autoimmunity, and myeloid donor cell chimerism < 50% was associated with persistent thrombocytopenia. These observations indicate continuous improvement of outcome after HCT for WAS and may have important implications for the development of novel protocols aiming to obtain full correction of the disease and reduce post-HCT complications. PMID:21659547

  15. Overview of the DOE/SERI Biochemical Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J D

    1986-09-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute manages a program of research and development on the biochemical conversion of renewable lignocellulosic materials to liquid fuels for the Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division. The Biochemical Conversion Program is mission oriented so effort is concentrated on technologies which appear to have the greatest potential for being adopted by the private sector to economically convert lignocellulosic materials into high value liquid transportation fuels such as ethanol. The program is structured to supply the technology for such fuels to compete economically first as an octane booster or fuel additive, and, with additional improvements, as a neat fuel. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Biochemical Engineering. Part II: Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes types of industrial techniques involving biochemical products, specifying the advantages and disadvantages of batch and continuous processes, and contrasting biochemical and chemical engineering. See SE 506 318 for Part I. (AL)

  17. Dialogues as Teaching Tools in the Biochemical Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts-Kirchhoff, Elizabeth S.; Caspers, Mary Lou

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the implementation of a group project whose goal was to write a dialogue that explores one area in which advances in biochemical research give rise to ethical and societal considerations. Reports that the project was regarded highly by students. (Author/MM)

  18. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  19. Biochemical responses of the Skylab crewman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    The biochemical investigations of the Skylab crewmen were designed to study the physiological changes that were observed on flight crews returning from previous space flight missions as well as to study those changes expected to result from prolonged weightless exposure. These studies can be divided into two broad categories. One category included routine blood studies similar to those used in clinical medical practice. The second included research-type endocrine analyses used to investigate more thoroughly the metabolic/endocrine responses to the space flight environment. The premission control values indicated that all Skylab crewmen were healthy and were free from biochemical abnormalities. The routine results during and after flight showed slight but significant changes in electrolytes, glucose, total protein, osmolality, uric acid, cholesterol, and creatinine. Plasma hormal changes included adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol, angiotensin I, aldosterone, insulin, and thyroxine. The 24-hour urine analyses results revealed increased excretion of cortisol, catecholamines, antidiuretic hormone, and aldosterone as well as excretion of significant electrolyte and uric acid during the Skylab flights.

  20. Biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Paganini, Adam W

    2015-06-01

    The change in oceanic carbonate chemistry due to increased atmospheric PCO2  has caused pH to decline in marine surface waters, a phenomenon known as ocean acidification (OA). The effects of OA on organisms have been shown to be widespread among diverse taxa from a wide range of habitats. The majority of studies of organismal response to OA are in short-term exposures to future levels of PCO2 . From such studies, much information has been gathered on plastic responses organisms may make in the future that are beneficial or harmful to fitness. Relatively few studies have examined whether organisms can adapt to negative-fitness consequences of plastic responses to OA. We outline major approaches that have been used to study the adaptive potential for organisms to OA, which include comparative studies and experimental evolution. Organisms that inhabit a range of pH environments (e.g. pH gradients at volcanic CO2 seeps or in upwelling zones) have great potential for studies that identify adaptive shifts that have occurred through evolution. Comparative studies have advanced our understanding of adaptation to OA by linking whole-organism responses with cellular mechanisms. Such optimization of function provides a link between genetic variation and adaptive evolution in tuning optimal function of rate-limiting cellular processes in different pH conditions. For example, in experimental evolution studies of organisms with short generation times (e.g. phytoplankton), hundreds of generations of growth under future conditions has resulted in fixed differences in gene expression related to acid-base regulation. However, biochemical mechanisms for adaptive responses to OA have yet to be fully characterized, and are likely to be more complex than simply changes in gene expression or protein modification. Finally, we present a hypothesis regarding an unexplored area for biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification. In this hypothesis, proteins and membranes exposed to the

  1. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  2. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. PMID:25691415

  3. Occurrence of bacteria and biochemical markers on public surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kelly A; Watt, Pamela M; Boone, Stephanie A; Gerba, Charles P

    2005-06-01

    From 1999-2003, the hygiene of 1061 environmental surfaces from shopping, daycare, and office environments, personal items, and miscellaneous activities (i.e., gymnasiums, airports, movie theaters, restaurants, etc.), in four US cities, was monitored. Samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliform bacteria, protein, and biochemical markers. Biochemical markers, i.e., hemoglobin (blood marker), amylase (mucus, saliva, sweat, and urine marker), and urea (urine and sweat marker) were detected on 3% (26/801); 15% (120/801), and 6% (48/801) of the surfaces, respectively. Protein (general hygiene marker) levels > or = 200 microg/10 cm2 were present on 26% (200/801) of the surfaces tested. Surfaces from children's playground equipment and daycare centers were the most frequently contaminated (biochemical markers on 36%; 15/42 and 46%; 25/54, respectively). Surfaces from the shopping, miscellaneous activities, and office environments were positive for biochemical markers with a frequency of 21% (69/333), 21% (66/308), and 11% (12/105), respectively). Sixty samples were analyzed for biochemical markers and bacteria. Total and fecal coliforms were detected on 20% (12/60) and 7% (4/ 60) of the surfaces, respectively. Half and one-third of the sites positive for biochemical markers were also positive for total and fecal coliforms, respectively. Artificial contamination of public surfaces with an invisible fluorescent tracer showed that contamination from outside surfaces was transferred to 86% (30/ 35) of exposed individual's hands and 82% (29/35) tracked the tracer to their home or personal belongings hours later. Results provide information on the relative hygiene of commonly encountered public surfaces and aid in the identification of priority environments where contaminant occurrence and risk of exposure may be greatest. Children's playground equipment is identified as a priority surface for additional research on the occurrence of and potential exposure to infectious

  4. Assessing phenotypic, biochemical, and molecular diversity in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was conducted to elucidate phenotypic and biochemical diversity in 60 coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) accessions maintained at the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station and examine relationships between amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and patterns of phenot...

  5. Biochemical Conversion: Using Enzymes, Microbes, and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-26

    This fact sheet describes the Bioenergy Technologies Office's biochemical conversion work and processes. BETO conducts collaborative research, development, and demonstration projects to improve several processing routes for the conversion of cellulosic biomass.

  6. Biochemical Analysis of Microbial Rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Julia A; Keffer, Jessica L; Miller, Kelsey J

    2016-01-01

    Ion-pumping rhodopsins transfer ions across the microbial cell membrane in a light-dependent fashion. As the rate of biochemical characterization of microbial rhodopsins begins to catch up to the rate of microbial rhodopsin identification in environmental and genomic sequence data sets, in vitro analysis of their light-absorbing properties and in vivo analysis of ion pumping will remain critical to characterizing these proteins. As we learn more about the variety of physiological roles performed by microbial rhodopsins in different cell types and environments, observing the localization patterns of the rhodopsins and/or quantifying the number of rhodopsin-bearing cells in natural environments will become more important. Here, we provide protocols for purification of rhodopsin-containing membranes, detection of ion pumping, and observation of functional rhodopsins in laboratory and environmental samples using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153387

  7. Diagnosis of hyperandrogenism: biochemical criteria.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z

    2006-06-01

    Biochemical derangements in ovarian, adrenal, and peripheral androgen production and metabolism play an important role in underlying causes of hyperandrogenism. Specific diagnostic serum markers such as testosterone (total) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), respectively, may be helpful in the diagnosis of ovarian and adrenal hyperandrogenism, respectively. Validated immunoassays or mass spectrometry assays should be used to quantify testosterone, DHEAS and other principal androgens. Free testosterone measurements, determined by equilibrium dialysis or the calculated method, are advocated for routine evaluation of more subtle forms of hyperandrogenism. The skin, with its pilosebaceous units (PSUs), is an important site of active androgen production. A key regulator in PSUs is 5alpha-reductase, which transforms testosterone or androstenedione to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT in blood is not effective in indicating the presence of hyperandrogenism. However, distal metabolites of DHT have been shown to be good markers of clinical manifestations of hirsutism, acne and alopecia. Assays for these peripheral markers need improvement for routine clinical testing. PMID:16772150

  8. Biochemical nature of Russell Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Francesca Mossuto, Maria; Ami, Diletta; Anelli, Tiziana; Fagioli, Claudio; Maria Doglia, Silvia; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Professional secretory cells produce and release abundant proteins. Particularly in case of mutations and/or insufficient chaperoning, these can aggregate and become toxic within or amongst cells. Immunoglobulins (Ig) are no exception. In the extracellular space, certain Ig-L chains form fibrils causing systemic amyloidosis. On the other hand, Ig variants lacking the first constant domain condense in dilated cisternae of the early secretory compartment, called Russell Bodies (RB), frequently observed in plasma cell dyscrasias, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. RB biogenesis can be recapitulated in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells by expressing mutant Ig-μ, providing powerful models to investigate the pathophysiology of endoplasmic reticulum storage disorders. Here we analyze the aggregation propensity and the biochemical features of the intra- and extra-cellular Ig deposits in human cells, revealing β-aggregated features for RB. PMID:26223695

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome: a model for defective actin reorganization, cell trafficking and synapse formation. Curr Opin Immunol. 2003 Oct; ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  10. The role of thermodynamics in biochemical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stockar, Urs

    2013-09-01

    This article is an adapted version of the introductory chapter of a book whose publication is imminent. It bears the title "Biothermodynamics - The role of thermodynamics in biochemical engineering." The aim of the paper is to give a very short overview of the state of biothermodynamics in an engineering context as reflected in this book. Seen from this perspective, biothermodynamics may be subdivided according to the scale used to formalize the description of the biological system into three large areas: (i) biomolecular thermodynamics (most fundamental scale), (ii) thermodynamics of metabolism (intermediary scale), and (iii) whole-cell thermodynamics ("black-box" description of living entities). In each of these subareas, the main available theoretical approaches and the current and the potential applications are discussed. Biomolecular thermodynamics (i) is especially well developed and is obviously highly pertinent for the development of downstream processing. Its use ought to be encouraged as much as possible. The subarea of thermodynamics of live cells (iii), although scarcely applied in practice, is also expected to enhance bioprocess research and development, particularly in predicting culture performances, for understanding the driving forces for cellular growth, and in developing, monitoring, and controlling cellular cultures. Finally, there is no question that thermodynamic analysis of cellular metabolism (ii) is a promising tool for systems biology and for many other applications, but quite a large research effort is still needed before it may be put to practical use.

  11. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  12. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  13. Biochemical mechanisms of quinidine cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, E; Weber, E; Zbinden, G

    1986-01-01

    "Quinidine-like action" and the synonym "membrane-stabilizing activity" are often encountered descriptions for adverse cardiac effects of drugs. Quinidine, 50 mg/kg/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks, was found to cause disturbance of intracardiac conduction in rats. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effect of the same dose of quinidine on biochemical activities involved in the energy metabolism of the heart. Electron transfer activities in heart mitochondria were progressively slowed down. At the same time, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation was observed and mitochondrial creatinephosphate kinase activity decreased. Concomitantly, mitochondria showed a progressive loss in semipermeability, manifested by an increasing creatine content. Total adenine nucleotides (especially ATP) content declined to 65% of control values to return to normal levels at the end of the 4 week treatment period. Calcium-binding activity and various ATPases (Na/K, Mg, Ca) of myocyte membranes (sarcolemma + sarcoplasmatic reticulum fraction) were also impaired by quinidine. Protein synthesis in total heart tissue and heart mitochondria, an energy-requiring process, was also moderately inhibited by quinidine. Maximal quinidine concentration in heart tissue was 0.123 microgram/g fresh weight 24 h after the last of 19 medications. PMID:2427825

  14. Biochemical Characterization of Indole Prenyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xia; Liu, Yan; Xie, Xiulan; Zheng, Xiao-Dong; Li, Shu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The putative prenyltransferase gene ACLA_031240 belonging to the dimethylallyltryptophan synthase superfamily was identified in the genome sequence of Aspergillus clavatus and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The soluble His-tagged protein EAW08391 was purified to near homogeneity and used for biochemical investigation with diverse aromatic substrates in the presence of different prenyl diphosphates. It has shown that in the presence of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the recombinant enzyme accepted very well simple indole derivatives with l-tryptophan as the best substrate. Product formation was also observed for tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides but with much lower conversion yields. In contrast, no product formation was detected in the reaction mixtures of l-tryptophan with geranyl or farnesyl diphosphate. Structure elucidation of the enzyme products by NMR and MS analyses proved unequivocally the highly regiospecific regular prenylation at C-5 of the indole nucleus of the simple indole derivatives. EAW08391 was therefore termed 5-dimethylallyltryptophan synthase, and it filled the last gap in the toolbox of indole prenyltransferases regarding their prenylation positions. Km values of 5-dimethylallyltryptophan synthase were determined for l-tryptophan and DMAPP at 34 and 76 μm, respectively. Average turnover number (kcat) at 1.1 s−1 was calculated from kinetic data of l-tryptophan and DMAPP. Catalytic efficiencies of 5-dimethylallyltryptophan synthase for l-tryptophan at 25,588 s−1·m−1 and for other 11 simple indole derivatives up to 1538 s−1·m−1 provided evidence for its potential usage as a catalyst for chemoenzymatic synthesis. PMID:22123822

  15. PHA bioplastics, biochemicals, and energy from crops.

    PubMed

    Somleva, Maria N; Peoples, Oliver P; Snell, Kristi D

    2013-02-01

    Large scale production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in plants can provide a sustainable supply of bioplastics, biochemicals, and energy from sunlight and atmospheric CO(2). PHAs are a class of polymers with various chain lengths that are naturally produced by some microorganisms as storage materials. The properties of these polyesters make them functionally equivalent to many of the petroleum-based plastics that are currently in the market place. However, unlike most petroleum-derived plastics, PHAs can be produced from renewable feedstocks and easily degrade in most biologically active environments. This review highlights research efforts over the last 20 years to engineer the production of PHAs in plants with a focus on polyhydroxybutryrate (PHB) production in bioenergy crops with C(4) photosynthesis. PHB has the potential to be a high volume commercial product with uses not only in the plastics and materials markets, but also in renewable chemicals and feed. The major challenges of improving product yield and plant fitness in high biomass yielding C(4) crops are discussed in detail. PMID:23294864

  16. Biochemical studies of the tracheobronchial epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, M.J.; Kaufman, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    Tracheobronchial epithelium has been a focus of intense investigation in the field of chemical carcinogenesis. We have reviewed some biochemical investigations that have evolved through linkage with carcinogenesis research. These areas of investigation have included kinetics of carcinogen metabolism, identification of carcinogen metabolites, levels of carcinogen binding to DNA, and analysis of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Such studies appear to have provided a reasonable explanation for the susceptibilities of the respiratory tracts of rats and hamsters to carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene. Coinciding with the attempts to understand the initiation of carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract has also been a major thrust aimed at effecting its prevention both in humans and in animal models for human bronchogenic carcinoma. These studies have concerned the effects of derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) and their influence on normal cell biology and biochemistry of this tissue. Recent investigations have included the effects of retinoid deficiency on the synthesis of RNA and the identification of RNA species associated with this biological state, and also have included the effects of retinoids on the synthesis of mucus-related glycoproteins. Tracheal organ cultures from retinoid-deficient hamsters have been used successfully to indicate the potency of synthetic retinoids by monitoring the reversal of squamous metaplasia. Techniques applied to this tissue have also served to elucidate features of the metabolism of retinoic acid using high pressure liquid chromatography. 94 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Exploring the remote sensing of foliar biochemical concentrations with AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Geoffrey M.; Curran, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data shows promise for the estimation of foliar biochemical concentrations at the scale of the canopy. There are, however, several problems associated with the use of AVIRIS data in this way and these are detailed in recent Plant Biochemical Workshop Report. The research reported was concentrated upon three of these problems: field sampling of forest canopies, wet laboratory assay of foliar chemicals, and the visualization of AVIRIS data.

  18. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1984-01-01

    This potpourri surveys research on various topics: neurologically based curricula, midafternoon slumps in student attention, accounting for contexts in research, feelings of powerlessness among students and teachers, further equity implications of computers in schools, misreporting of research findings, and accounting for media transfer in…

  19. Causal correlation of foliar biochemical concentrations with AVIRIS spectra using forced entry linear regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Terence P.; Curran, Paul J.; Kupiec, John A.

    1995-01-01

    A major goal of airborne imaging spectrometry is to estimate the biochemical composition of vegetation canopies from reflectance spectra. Remotely-sensed estimates of foliar biochemical concentrations of forests would provide valuable indicators of ecosystem function at regional and eventually global scales. Empirical research has shown a relationship exists between the amount of radiation reflected from absorption features and the concentration of given biochemicals in leaves and canopies (Matson et al., 1994, Johnson et al., 1994). A technique commonly used to determine which wavelengths have the strongest correlation with the biochemical of interest is unguided (stepwise) multiple regression. Wavelengths are entered into a multivariate regression equation, in their order of importance, each contributing to the reduction of the variance in the measured biochemical concentration. A significant problem with the use of stepwise regression for determining the correlation between biochemical concentration and spectra is that of 'overfitting' as there are significantly more wavebands than biochemical measurements. This could result in the selection of wavebands which may be more accurately attributable to noise or canopy effects. In addition, there is a real problem of collinearity in that the individual biochemical concentrations may covary. A strong correlation between the reflectance at a given wavelength and the concentration of a biochemical of interest, therefore, may be due to the effect of another biochemical which is closely related. Furthermore, it is not always possible to account for potentially suitable waveband omissions in the stepwise selection procedure. This concern about the suitability of stepwise regression has been identified and acknowledged in a number of recent studies (Wessman et al., 1988, Curran, 1989, Curran et al., 1992, Peterson and Hubbard, 1992, Martine and Aber, 1994, Kupiec, 1994). These studies have pointed to the lack of a physical

  20. Cariporide and other new and powerful NHE1 inhibitors as potentially selective anticancer drugs--an integral molecular/biochemical/metabolic/clinical approach after one hundred years of cancer research.

    PubMed

    Harguindey, Salvador; Arranz, Jose Luis; Polo Orozco, Julian David; Rauch, Cyril; Fais, Stefano; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Reshkin, Stephan J

    2013-01-01

    In recent years an increasing number of publications have emphasized the growing importance of hydrogen ion dynamics in modern cancer research, from etiopathogenesis and treatment. A proton [H+]-related mechanism underlying the initiation and progression of the neoplastic process has been recently described by different research groups as a new paradigm in which all cancer cells and tissues, regardless of their origin and genetic background, have a pivotal energetic and homeostatic disturbance of their metabolism that is completely different from all normal tissues: an aberrant regulation of hydrogen ion dynamics leading to a reversal of the pH gradient in cancer cells and tissues (↑pHi/↓pHe, or "proton reversal"). Tumor cells survive their hostile microenvironment due to membrane-bound proton pumps and transporters, and their main defensive strategy is to never allow internal acidification because that could lead to their death through apoptosis. In this context, one of the primary and best studied regulators of both pHi and pHe in tumors is the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1). An elevated NHE1 activity can be correlated with both an increase in cell pH and a decrease in the extracellular pH of tumors, and such proton reversal is associated with the origin, local growth, activation and further progression of the metastatic process. Consequently, NHE1 pharmaceutical inhibition by new and potent NHE1 inhibitors represents a potential and highly selective target in anticancer therapy. Cariporide, being one of the better studied specific and powerful NHE1 inhibitors, has proven to be well tolerated by humans in the cardiological context, however some side-effects, mainly related to drug accumulation and cerebrovascular complications were reported. Thus, cariporide could become a new, slightly toxic and effective anticancer agent in different human malignancies. PMID:24195657

  1. Cariporide and other new and powerful NHE1 inhibitors as potentially selective anticancer drugs – an integral molecular/biochemical/metabolic/clinical approach after one hundred years of cancer research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years an increasing number of publications have emphasized the growing importance of hydrogen ion dynamics in modern cancer research, from etiopathogenesis and treatment. A proton [H+]-related mechanism underlying the initiation and progression of the neoplastic process has been recently described by different research groups as a new paradigm in which all cancer cells and tissues, regardless of their origin and genetic background, have a pivotal energetic and homeostatic disturbance of their metabolism that is completely different from all normal tissues: an aberrant regulation of hydrogen ion dynamics leading to a reversal of the pH gradient in cancer cells and tissues (↑pHi/↓pHe, or “proton reversal”). Tumor cells survive their hostile microenvironment due to membrane-bound proton pumps and transporters, and their main defensive strategy is to never allow internal acidification because that could lead to their death through apoptosis. In this context, one of the primary and best studied regulators of both pHi and pHe in tumors is the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1). An elevated NHE1 activity can be correlated with both an increase in cell pH and a decrease in the extracellular pH of tumors, and such proton reversal is associated with the origin, local growth, activation and further progression of the metastatic process. Consequently, NHE1 pharmaceutical inhibition by new and potent NHE1 inhibitors represents a potential and highly selective target in anticancer therapy. Cariporide, being one of the better studied specific and powerful NHE1 inhibitors, has proven to be well tolerated by humans in the cardiological context, however some side-effects, mainly related to drug accumulation and cerebrovascular complications were reported. Thus, cariporide could become a new, slightly toxic and effective anticancer agent in different human malignancies. PMID:24195657

  2. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE): biochemical features and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Lara, M C; Valentino, M L; Torres-Torronteras, J; Hirano, M; Martí, R

    2007-06-01

    Over the last 15 years, important research has expanded our knowledge of the clinical, molecular genetic, and biochemical features of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). The characterization of mitochondrial involvement in this disorder and the seminal determination of its genetic cause, have opened new possibilities for more detailed and deeper studies on the pathomechanisms in this progressive and fatal disease. It has been established that MNGIE is caused by mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TP), which lead to absolute or nearly complete loss of its catalytic activity, producing systemic accumulations of its substrates, thymidine (dThd) and deoxyuridine (dUrd). Findings obtained from in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the biochemical imbalances specifically impair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, repair, or both leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. We have proposed that therapy for MNGIE should be aimed at reducing the concentrations of these toxic nucleosides to normal or nearly normal levels. The first treatment, allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) reported in 2006, produced a nearly full biochemical correction of the dThd and dUrd imbalances in blood. Clinical follow-up of this and other patients receiving alloSCT is necessary to determine whether this and other therapies based on a permanent restoration of TP will be effective treatment for MNGIE. PMID:17549623

  3. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen

    In May of 1999, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences hosted a conference on ways to improve the scientific quality of educational research. In medicine, thanks to work 40 years ago by 2 researchers, Howard Hyatt and Frederick Mosteller, the commitment of medical professionals to base their diagnoses and prescriptions on clinical trials in…

  4. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  5. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  6. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  7. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  8. 40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides data...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides... required to support registration of biochemical pesticides. Sections 158.2080 through 158.2084 identify...

  9. Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance.

  10. Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  11. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model

    SciTech Connect

    Aden, Andy

    2008-05-01

    Since 2001, NREL has kept track of technical research progress in the biochemical process through what are known as “State of Technology” (SOT) assessments. The purpose of this report is to update the FY 2005 SOT model with the latest research results from the past two years.

  12. Biochemical simulations: stochastic, approximate stochastic and hybrid approaches

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Computer simulations have become an invaluable tool to study the sometimes counterintuitive temporal dynamics of (bio-)chemical systems. In particular, stochastic simulation methods have attracted increasing interest recently. In contrast to the well-known deterministic approach based on ordinary differential equations, they can capture effects that occur due to the underlying discreteness of the systems and random fluctuations in molecular numbers. Numerous stochastic, approximate stochastic and hybrid simulation methods have been proposed in the literature. In this article, they are systematically reviewed in order to guide the researcher and help her find the appropriate method for a specific problem. PMID:19151097

  13. Remote sensing of forest canopy and leaf biochemical contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, David L.; Matson, Pamela A.; Card, Don H.; Aber, John D.; Wessman, Carol; Swanberg, Nancy; Spanner, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Recent research on the remote sensing of forest leaf and canopy biochemical contents suggests that the shortwave IR region contains this information; laboratory analyses of dry ground leaves have yielded reliable predictive relationships between both leaf nitrogen and lignin with near-IR spectra. Attention is given to the application of these laboratory techniques to a limited set of spectra from fresh, whole leaves of conifer species. The analysis of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer data reveals that total water content variations in deciduous forest canopies appear as overall shifts in the brightness of raw spectra.

  14. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  15. Reconfigurable neuromorphic computation in biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hui-Ju Katherine; Jiang, Jie-Hong R; Fages, Francois

    2015-08-01

    Implementing application-specific computation and control tasks within a biochemical system has been an important pursuit in synthetic biology. Most synthetic designs to date have focused on realizing systems of fixed functions using specifically engineered components, thus lacking flexibility to adapt to uncertain and dynamically-changing environments. To remedy this limitation, an analog and modularized approach to realize reconfigurable neuromorphic computation with biochemical reactions is presented. We propose a biochemical neural network consisting of neuronal modules and interconnects that are both reconfigurable through external or internal control over the concentrations of certain molecular species. Case studies on classification and machine learning applications using the DNA strain displacement technology demonstrate the effectiveness of our design in both reconfiguration and autonomous adaptation. PMID:26736417

  16. Biochemical computation for spine structural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Jun; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    The structural plasticity of dendritic spines is considered to be essential for various forms of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. The process is mediated by a complex signaling network consisting of numerous species of molecules. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the biochemical signaling is regulated in a complicated manner due to geometrical restrictions from the unique morphology of the dendritic branches and spines. Recent advances in optical techniques have enabled the exploration of the spatiotemporal aspects of the signal regulations in spines and dendrites and have provided many insights into the principle of the biochemical computation that underlies spine structural plasticity. PMID:26139370

  17. Simulation of Biochemical Pathway Adaptability Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J

    2005-01-26

    -driven experimentation. This LDRD will focus on developing prototype software for the evolutionary computation and demonstrating its efficacy on a well-known biochemical pathway in yeast. Expected outcomes from this LDRD project included a demonstration of computational modeling of evolvability in a biochemical pathway, an important collaboration with the Systems Biology department at Harvard University, several proposals to secure external long-term funding from one or more sources and the nucleus of a new, focused research effort at LLNL in computational genomics, focused principally on Genomes to Life goals. All of these goals were achieved.

  18. Survey of Biochemical Education in Japanese Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Reports findings of questionnaires sent to faculty in charge of biochemical education in medical schools and other programs from dentistry to agriculture. Total class hours have declined since 1984. New trends include bioethics and computer-assisted learning. Tables show trends in lecture hours, lecture content, laboratory hours, core subject…

  19. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  20. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  1. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  2. A Course in Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals (Revisited).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, J. E.; Ollis, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Provides: (1) a glossary of terms used in biochemical engineering; (2) a list of key developments in the field; and (3) emphases placed in 15 topic areas in a course restructured on the basis of these developments. Topic areas include enzyme kinetics/applications, genetics and microbial control, transport phenomena, and others. (JN)

  3. Predictive biochemical assays for late radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Siemann, D.W.; Shapiro, D.L.; Van Houtte, P.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Surfactant precursors or other products of Type II pneumocytes have the potential to be the first biochemical marker for late radiation effects. This is particularly clinically important in the combined modality era because of the frequent occurrence of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. Accordingly, correlative studies have been pursued with the Type II pneumocyte as a beginning point to understand the complex pathophysiology of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. From our ultrastructural and biochemical studies, it is evident that Type II pneumocytes are an early target of radiation and the release of surfactant into the alveolus shortly after exposure persists for days and weeks. Through the use of lavaging techniques, alveolar surfactant has been elevated after pulmonary irradiation. In three murine strains and in the rabbit, there is a strong correlation with surfactant release at 7 and/or 28 days in vivo with later lethality in months. In vitro studies using cultures of type II pneumocytes also demonstrate dose response and tolerance factors that are comparable to the in vivo small and large animal diagnostic models. New markers are being developed to serve as a predictive index for later lethal pneumonopathies. With the development of these techniques, the search for early biochemical markers in man has been undertaken. Through the use of biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural techniques, a causal relationship between radiation effects on type II pneumocytes, pulmonary cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and their roles in the production of pneumonitis and fibrosis will evolve.

  4. 2009 Biochemical Conversion Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion platform review meeting, held on April 14-16, 2009, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown, Denver, Colorado.

  5. Characterizing autism spectrum disorders by key biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Megha; Timmerman, Christina K; Schwartz, Joshua L; Pham, Daniel L; Meffert, Mollie K

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) presents a substantial challenge for diagnosis, classification, research, and treatment. Investigations into the underlying molecular etiology of ASD have often yielded mixed and at times opposing findings. Defining the molecular and biochemical underpinnings of heterogeneity in ASD is crucial to our understanding of the pathophysiological development of the disorder, and has the potential to assist in diagnosis and the rational design of clinical trials. In this review, we propose that genetically diverse forms of ASD may be usefully parsed into entities resulting from converse patterns of growth regulation at the molecular level, which lead to the correlates of general synaptic and neural overgrowth or undergrowth. Abnormal brain growth during development is a characteristic feature that has been observed both in children with autism and in mouse models of autism. We review evidence from syndromic and non-syndromic ASD to suggest that entities currently classified as autism may fundamentally differ by underlying pro- or anti-growth abnormalities in key biochemical pathways, giving rise to either excessive or reduced synaptic connectivity in affected brain regions. We posit that this classification strategy has the potential not only to aid research efforts, but also to ultimately facilitate early diagnosis and direct appropriate therapeutic interventions. PMID:26483618

  6. Characterizing autism spectrum disorders by key biochemical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Megha; Timmerman, Christina K.; Schwartz, Joshua L.; Pham, Daniel L.; Meffert, Mollie K.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) presents a substantial challenge for diagnosis, classification, research, and treatment. Investigations into the underlying molecular etiology of ASD have often yielded mixed and at times opposing findings. Defining the molecular and biochemical underpinnings of heterogeneity in ASD is crucial to our understanding of the pathophysiological development of the disorder, and has the potential to assist in diagnosis and the rational design of clinical trials. In this review, we propose that genetically diverse forms of ASD may be usefully parsed into entities resulting from converse patterns of growth regulation at the molecular level, which lead to the correlates of general synaptic and neural overgrowth or undergrowth. Abnormal brain growth during development is a characteristic feature that has been observed both in children with autism and in mouse models of autism. We review evidence from syndromic and non-syndromic ASD to suggest that entities currently classified as autism may fundamentally differ by underlying pro- or anti-growth abnormalities in key biochemical pathways, giving rise to either excessive or reduced synaptic connectivity in affected brain regions. We posit that this classification strategy has the potential not only to aid research efforts, but also to ultimately facilitate early diagnosis and direct appropriate therapeutic interventions. PMID:26483618

  7. Kombucha tea fermentation: Microbial and biochemical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Chakraborty, Writachit; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-03-01

    Kombucha tea, a non-alcoholic beverage, is acquiring significant interest due to its claimed beneficial properties. The microbial community of Kombucha tea consists of bacteria and yeast which thrive in two mutually non-exclusive compartments: the soup or the beverage and the biofilm floating on it. The microbial community and the biochemical properties of the beverage have so far mostly been described in separate studies. This, however, may prevent understanding the causal links between the microbial communities and the beneficial properties of Kombucha tea. Moreover, an extensive study into the microbial and biochemical dynamics has also been missing. In this study, we thus explored the structure and dynamics of the microbial community along with the biochemical properties of Kombucha tea at different time points up to 21 days of fermentation. We hypothesized that several biochemical properties will change during the course of fermentation along with the shifts in the yeast and bacterial communities. The yeast community of the biofilm did not show much variation over time and was dominated by Candida sp. (73.5-83%). The soup however, showed a significant shift in dominance from Candida sp. to Lachancea sp. on the 7th day of fermentation. This is the first report showing Candida as the most dominating yeast genus during Kombucha fermentation. Komagateibacter was identified as the single largest bacterial genus present in both the biofilm and the soup (~50%). The bacterial diversity was higher in the soup than in the biofilm with a peak on the seventh day of fermentation. The biochemical properties changed with the progression of the fermentation, i.e., beneficial properties of the beverage such as the radical scavenging ability increased significantly with a maximum increase at day 7. We further observed a significantly higher D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone content and caffeine degradation property compared to previously described Kombucha tea fermentations. Our

  8. Self-organizing ontology of biochemically relevant small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The advent of high-throughput experimentation in biochemistry has led to the generation of vast amounts of chemical data, necessitating the development of novel analysis, characterization, and cataloguing techniques and tools. Recently, a movement to publically release such data has advanced biochemical structure-activity relationship research, while providing new challenges, the biggest being the curation, annotation, and classification of this information to facilitate useful biochemical pattern analysis. Unfortunately, the human resources currently employed by the organizations supporting these efforts (e.g. ChEBI) are expanding linearly, while new useful scientific information is being released in a seemingly exponential fashion. Compounding this, currently existing chemical classification and annotation systems are not amenable to automated classification, formal and transparent chemical class definition axiomatization, facile class redefinition, or novel class integration, thus further limiting chemical ontology growth by necessitating human involvement in curation. Clearly, there is a need for the automation of this process, especially for novel chemical entities of biological interest. Results To address this, we present a formal framework based on Semantic Web technologies for the automatic design of chemical ontology which can be used for automated classification of novel entities. We demonstrate the automatic self-assembly of a structure-based chemical ontology based on 60 MeSH and 40 ChEBI chemical classes. This ontology is then used to classify 200 compounds with an accuracy of 92.7%. We extend these structure-based classes with molecular feature information and demonstrate the utility of our framework for classification of functionally relevant chemicals. Finally, we discuss an iterative approach that we envision for future biochemical ontology development. Conclusions We conclude that the proposed methodology can ease the burden of

  9. A general method for modeling biochemical and biomedical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Roberto; Lerd Ng, Jia; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    The impressive achievements of biomedical science have come mostly from experimental research with human subjects, animal models, and sophisticated laboratory techniques. Additionally, theoretical chemistry has been a major aid in designing new drugs. Here we introduce a method which is similar to others already well known in theoretical systems biology, but which specifically addresses biochemical changes as the human body responds to medical interventions. It is common in systems biology to use first-order differential equations to model the time evolution of various chemical concentrations, and we as physicists can make a significant impact through designing realistic models and then solving the resulting equations. Biomedical research is rapidly advancing, and the technique presented in this talk can be applied in arbitrarily large models containing tens, hundreds, or even thousands of interacting species, to determine what beneficial effects and side effects may result from pharmaceuticals or other medical interventions.

  10. Biochemical Genetic Pathways that Modulate Aging in Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandro; Wang, Adrienne M.; Bennett, Christopher F.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying biological aging have been extensively studied in the past 20 years with the avail of mainly four model organisms: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, and the domestic mouse Mus musculus. Extensive research in these four model organisms has identified a few conserved genetic pathways that affect longevity as well as metabolism and development. Here, we review how the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirtuins, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and mitochondrial stress-signaling pathways influence aging and life span in the aforementioned models and their possible implications for delaying aging in humans. We also draw some connections between these biochemical pathways and comment on what new developments aging research will likely bring in the near future. PMID:26525455

  11. Reconstructing biochemical pathways from time course data.

    PubMed

    Srividhya, Jeyaraman; Crampin, Edmund J; McSharry, Patrick E; Schnell, Santiago

    2007-03-01

    Time series data on biochemical reactions reveal transient behavior, away from chemical equilibrium, and contain information on the dynamic interactions among reacting components. However, this information can be difficult to extract using conventional analysis techniques. We present a new method to infer biochemical pathway mechanisms from time course data using a global nonlinear modeling technique to identify the elementary reaction steps which constitute the pathway. The method involves the generation of a complete dictionary of polynomial basis functions based on the law of mass action. Using these basis functions, there are two approaches to model construction, namely the general to specific and the specific to general approach. We demonstrate that our new methodology reconstructs the chemical reaction steps and connectivity of the glycolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis from time course experimental data. PMID:17370261

  12. Application of biochemical interactions in fossil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1994-12-31

    Certain extreme environments tolerant microorganisms interact with heavy crude oils by means of multiple biochemical reactions, asphaltenes, and bituminous materials. These reactions proceed via pathways which involve characteristic components of oils and coals such as asphaltenes, and in the chemically related constituents found in bituminous coals. These chemical components serve as markers of the interactions between microorganisms and fossil fuels. Studies in which temperature, pressure, and salinity tolerant microorganisms have been allowed to interact with different crude oils and bituminous coals, have shown that biochemically induced changes occur in the distribution of hydrocarbons and in the chemical nature of organometallic and heterocyclic compounds. Such structural chemical rearrangements have direct applications in monitoring the efficiency, the extent, and the chemical nature of the fossil fuels bioconversion. Recent developments of chemical marker applications in the monitoring of fossil fuels bioconversion will be discussed.

  13. Construction and analysis of biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, Michael; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2012-09-01

    Bioprocesses are being implemented for a range of different applications including the production of fuels, chemicals and drugs. Hence, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and model how they function and how they can be modified or designed to give the optimal performance. Here we discuss the construction and analysis of biochemical networks which are the first logical steps towards this goal. The construction of a reaction network is possible through reconstruction: extracting information from literature and from databases. This can be supplemented by reaction prediction methods which can identify steps which are missing from the current knowledge base. Analysis of biochemical systems generally requires some experimental input but can be used to identify important reactions and targets for enhancing the performance of the organism involved. Metabolic flux, pathway and metabolic control analysis can be used to determine the limits, capabilities and potential targets for enhancement respectively.

  14. Biochemical correlates of neurosensory changes in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Reschke, Millard F.

    1989-01-01

    The possible existence of a relationship between space motion sickness and chemical and biochemical variables measured in body fluids is studied. Clinical chemistry and endocrine measurements from blood and urine samples taken before and after Space Shuttle flights were analyzed along with the occurrence of SMS during flight and provocative testing before flight. Significant positive correlations were observed with serum chloride and significant negative correlations with serum phosphate, serum uric acid, and plasma thyroid stimulating hormone.

  15. Integrated analysis of the genomic, biochemical, and physiological responses of a model ecosystem to global change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our aim is to understand and integrate the molecular, biochemical, physiological and ecological responses of plants in the field to factors of global climate change. This research used Free Air-gas Concentration Enrichment (FACE) technology to enrich [CO2] and [O3] to levels predicted for 2050, in a...

  16. Biochemical Activities of 320 ToxCast Chemicals Evaluated Across 239 Functional Targets

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ToxCast research program is profiling chemical bioactivity in order to generate predictive signatures of toxicity. The present study evaluated 320 chemicals across 239 biochemical assays. ToxCast phase I chemicals include 309 unique structures, most of which are pesticide ...

  17. Stoichiometric network theory for nonequilibrium biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Beard, Daniel A; Liang, Shou-dan

    2003-02-01

    We introduce the basic concepts and develop a theory for nonequilibrium steady-state biochemical systems applicable to analyzing large-scale complex isothermal reaction networks. In terms of the stoichiometric matrix, we demonstrate both Kirchhoff's flux law sigma(l)J(l)=0 over a biochemical species, and potential law sigma(l) mu(l)=0 over a reaction loop. They reflect mass and energy conservation, respectively. For each reaction, its steady-state flux J can be decomposed into forward and backward one-way fluxes J = J+ - J-, with chemical potential difference deltamu = RT ln(J-/J+). The product -Jdeltamu gives the isothermal heat dissipation rate, which is necessarily non-negative according to the second law of thermodynamics. The stoichiometric network theory (SNT) embodies all of the relevant fundamental physics. Knowing J and deltamu of a biochemical reaction, a conductance can be computed which directly reflects the level of gene expression for the particular enzyme. For sufficiently small flux a linear relationship between J and deltamu can be established as the linear flux-force relation in irreversible thermodynamics, analogous to Ohm's law in electrical circuits. PMID:12542691

  18. Hydrogel-based piezoresistive biochemical microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Margarita; Schulz, Volker; Gerlach, Gerald; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Solzbacher, Florian; Magda, Jules J.; Tathireddy, Prashant; Lin, Genyao; Orthner, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This work is motivated by a demand for inexpensive, robust and reliable biochemical sensors with high signal reproducibility and long-term-stable sensitivity, especially for medical applications. Micro-fabricated sensors can provide continuous monitoring and on-line control of analyte concentrations in ambient aqueous solutions. The piezoresistive biochemical sensor containing a special biocompatible polymer (hydrogel) with a sharp volume phase transition in the neutral physiological pH range near 7.4 can detect a specific analyte, for example glucose. Thereby the hydrogel-based biochemical sensors are useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. The response of the glucosesensitive hydrogel was studied at different regimes of the glucose concentration change and of the solution supply. Sensor response time and accuracy with which a sensor can track gradual changes in glucose was estimated. Additionally, the influence of various recommended sterilization methods on the gel swelling properties and on the mechano-electrical transducer of the pH-sensors has been evaluated in order to choose the most optimal sterilization method for the implantable sensors. It has been shown that there is no negative effect of gamma irradiation with a dose of 25.7 kGy on the hydrogel sensitivity. In order to achieve an optimum between sensor signal amplitude and sensor response time, corresponding calibration and measurement procedures have been proposed and evaluated for the chemical sensors.

  19. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  20. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation.

    PubMed

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes. PMID:25064394

  1. [INVITED] Tilted fiber grating mechanical and biochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tuan; Liu, Fu; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) is a new kind of fiber-optic sensor that possesses all the advantages of well-established Bragg grating technology in addition to being able to excite cladding modes resonantly. This device opens up a multitude of opportunities for single-point sensing in hard-to-reach spaces with very controllable cross-sensitivities, absolute and relative measurements of various parameters, and an extreme sensitivity to materials external to the fiber without requiring the fiber to be etched or tapered. Over the past five years, our research group has been developing multimodal fiber-optic sensors based on TFBG in various shapes and forms, always keeping the device itself simple to fabricate and compatible with low-cost manufacturing. This paper presents a brief review of the principle, fabrication, characterization, and implementation of TFBGs, followed by our progress in TFBG sensors for mechanical and biochemical applications, including one-dimensional TFBG vibroscopes, accelerometers and micro-displacement sensors; two-dimensional TFBG vector vibroscopes and vector rotation sensors; reflective TFBG refractometers with in-fiber and fiber-to-fiber configurations; polarimetric and plasmonic TFBG biochemical sensors for in-situ detection of cell, protein and glucose.

  2. Influence of low-frequency vibration on changes of biochemical parameters of living rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, Cezary; Damijan, Zbigniew; Panuszka, Ryszard

    2001-05-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate how some selected biochemical parameters of living rats depend on exposure of low-frequency vibrations. Experiments were run on 30 Wistar rats randomly segregated into three groups: (I) 20 days old (before puberty), (II) 70th day after; (III) control group. The exposure was repeated seven times, for 3 h, at the same time of day. Vibrations applied during the first tests of the experiment had acceleration 1.22 m/s2 and frequency 20 Hz. At the 135th day the rats' bones were a subject of morphometric/biochemical examination. The results of biochemical tests proved decrease in LDL and HDL cholesterol levels for exposed rats as well as the Ca contents in blood plasma. There was evident increasing of Ca in blood plasma in exposed rats for frequency of exposition.

  3. CADLIVE toolbox for MATLAB: automatic dynamic modeling of biochemical networks with comprehensive system analysis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kentaro; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Miyabe, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Yu; Kurata, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical modeling has become a standard technique to understand the dynamics of complex biochemical systems. To promote the modeling, we had developed the CADLIVE dynamic simulator that automatically converted a biochemical map into its associated mathematical model, simulated its dynamic behaviors and analyzed its robustness. To enhance the feasibility by CADLIVE and extend its functions, we propose the CADLIVE toolbox available for MATLAB, which implements not only the existing functions of the CADLIVE dynamic simulator, but also the latest tools including global parameter search methods with robustness analysis. The seamless, bottom-up processes consisting of biochemical network construction, automatic construction of its dynamic model, simulation, optimization, and S-system analysis greatly facilitate dynamic modeling, contributing to the research of systems biology and synthetic biology. This application can be freely downloaded from http://www.cadlive.jp/CADLIVE_MATLAB/ together with an instruction. PMID:24623466

  4. Autonomous bio-chemical decontaminator (ABCD) against weapons of mass destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyacinthe, Berg P.

    2006-05-01

    The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and the use of such elements pose an eminent asymmetric threat with disastrous consequences to the national security of any nation. In particular, the use of biochemical warfare agents against civilians and unprotected troops in international conflicts or by terrorists against civilians is considered as a very peculiar threat. Accordingly, taking a quarantine-before-inhalation approach to biochemical warfare, the author introduces the notion of autonomous biochemical decontamination against WMD. In the unfortunate event of a biochemical attack, the apparatus proposed herein is intended to automatically detect, identify, and more importantly neutralize a biochemical threat. Along with warnings concerning a cyber-WMD nexus, various sections cover discussions on human senses and computer sensors, corroborating evidence related to detection and neutralization of chemical toxins, and cyber-assisted olfaction in stand alone, peer-to-peer, and network settings. In essence, the apparatus can be used in aviation and mass transit security to initiate mass decontamination by dispersing a decontaminant aerosol or to protect the public water supply against a potential bioterrorist attack. Future effort may involve a system-on-chip (SoC) embodiment of this apparatus that allows a safer environment for the emerging phenomenon of cyber-assisted olfaction and morph cell phones into ubiquitous sensors/decontaminators. Although this paper covers mechanisms and protocols to avail a neutralizing substance, further research will need to explore the substance's various pharmacological profiles and potential side effects.

  5. Biochemical, endocrine, and hematological factors in human oxygen tolerance extension: Predictive studies 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Clark, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Predictive Studies VI (Biochemical, endocrine, and hematological factors in human oxygen tolerance extension) Program consisted of two related areas of research activity, integrated in design and performance, that were each based on an ongoing analysis of human organ oxygen tolerance data obtained for the continuous oxygen exposures of the prior Predictive Studies V Program. The two research areas effectively blended broad investigation of systematically varied intermittent exposure patterns in animals with very selective evaluation of specific exposure patterns in man.

  6. Biochemical paths in humans and cells: Frontiers of AMS bioanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Palmblad, N. M.; Ognibene, T.; Kabir, M. M.; Buchholz, B. A.; Bench, G.

    2007-06-01

    The publication rate of 3H and 14C use in biomedical research decreased by a factor of three since 1990 when the first applications of AMS in biomedicine were published. Against this decrease, the high sensitivity of AMS for these isotopes in small isolated samples has made significant contributions. New smaller spectrometers and increased commercial availability of AMS have solved some of the issues surrounding availability and cost, but improved quantitation in non-isotopic methods now compete with some early uses of AMS. We review the strength of AMS for quantifying rare biochemical events and chemical passages through individual people or cells and consider these as the frontiers of quantitation leading to profitable science unavailable to other techniques.

  7. Guiding lights: recent developments in optogenetic control of biochemical signals.

    PubMed

    Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I

    2013-03-01

    Optogenetics arises from the innovative application of microbial opsins in mammalian neurons and has since been a powerful technology that fuels the advance of our knowledge in neuroscience. In recent years, there has been growing interest in designing optogenetic tools extendable to broader cell types and biochemical signals. To date, a variety of photoactivatable proteins (refers to induction of protein activity in contrast to fluorescence) have been developed based on the understanding of plant and microbial photoreceptors including phototropins, blue light sensors using flavin adenine dinucleotide proteins, cryptochromes, and phytochromes. Such tools offered researchers reversible, quantitative, and precise spatiotemporal control of enzymatic activity, protein-protein interaction, protein translocation, as well as gene transcription in cells and in whole animals. In this review, we will briefly introduce these photosensory proteins, describe recent developments in optogenetics, and compare and contrast different methods based on their advantages and limitations. PMID:23417571

  8. Morphological, kinetic, membrane biochemical and genetic aspects of intestinal enteroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie A; Clandinin, M Tom; Thomson, Alan BR

    2009-01-01

    The process of intestinal adaptation (“enteroplasticity”) is complex and multifaceted. Although a number of trophic nutrients and non-nutritive factors have been identified in animal studies, successful, reproducible clinical trials in humans are awaited. Understanding mechanisms underlying this adaptive process may direct research toward strategies that maximize intestinal function and impart a true clinical benefit to patients with short bowel syndrome, or to persons in whom nutrient absorption needs to be maximized. In this review, we consider the morphological, kinetic and membrane biochemical aspects of enteroplasticity, focus on the importance of nutritional factors, provide an overview of the many hormones that may alter the adaptive process, and consider some of the possible molecular profiles. While most of the data is derived from rodent studies, wherever possible, the results of human studies of intestinal enteroplasticity are provided. PMID:19230039

  9. Genetic and Biochemical Mechanisms of Pollen Wall Development.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianxin; Cui, Meihua; Yang, Li; Kim, Yu-Jin; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-11-01

    The pollen wall is a specialized extracellular cell wall matrix that surrounds male gametophytes and plays an essential role in plant reproduction. Uncovering the mechanisms that control the synthesis and polymerization of the precursors of pollen wall components has been a major research focus in plant biology. We review current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying pollen wall development in eudicot model Arabidopsis thaliana and monocot model rice (Oryza sativa), focusing on the genes involved in the biosynthesis, transport, and assembly of various precursors of pollen wall components. The conserved and divergent aspects of the genes involved as well as their regulation are addressed. Current challenges and future perspectives are also highlighted. PMID:26442683

  10. Automatic analysis of computation in biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Egri-Nagy, Attila; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L; Rhodes, John L; Schilstra, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    We propose a modeling and analysis method for biochemical reactions based on finite state automata. This is a completely different approach compared to traditional modeling of reactions by differential equations. Our method aims to explore the algebraic structure behind chemical reactions using automatically generated coordinate systems. In this paper we briefly summarize the underlying mathematical theory (the algebraic hierarchical decomposition theory of finite state automata) and describe how such automata can be derived from the description of chemical reaction networks. We also outline techniques for the flexible manipulation of existing models. As a real-world example we use the Krebs citric acid cycle. PMID:18606208

  11. [Morphological and biochemical criteria for cell death].

    PubMed

    Chernikov, V P; Belousova, T A; Kakturskiĭ, L V

    2010-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of classifications of and criteria for cell death in the light of the 2009 recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death is presented as a lecture. Motivation is given for the necessity of using the unified criteria in the description of cell death and more than one study in its verification. The major structural and biochemical signs of four typical types of cell death--apoptosis, autophagia, keratinization, and necrosis are compared. Data are given on the major atypical forms of cell death--mitotic catastrophe, anoikis, exitotoxicity, Wallerian degeneration, paraptosis, pyroptosis, pyronecrosis, and entosis. PMID:20734836

  12. Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min

    1995-05-01

    During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry.

  13. Biochemical mechanisms of laser vascular tissue fusion.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, C R; Murray, L W; Kopchok, G E; Rosenbaum, D; White, R A

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the biochemical changes that occur in argon laser-fused canine veins compared with control segments of vein. Laser fusions were formed using 0.5 W argon laser energy (1100-1500 J/cm2). Immediately following tissue fusion, blood flow was reestablished to test the integrity of the welds. 1-mm3 sections of the anastomoses and control sections were minced and protein extraction was performed by solubilizing the tissue in hot SDS Laemmli gel sample buffer. The proteins were separated electrophoretically on 5 and 10% polyacylamide SDS gels and silver stained. The analysis demonstrated significant biochemical differences between control and lased veins. We noted increases in several proteins after laser welding: the putative beta chain of type V collagen (5/5 gels), the putative gamma chain of type I collagen (4/5 gels), a 156-kDa protein (based on collagen molecular weight standards) 7/7 gels), an 82-kDa protein (8/9 gels), and several proteins of lower molecular weight (3/8 gels). The increases may be due to crosslinking of lower molecular weight proteins, degradation of higher molecular weight proteins, or increased solubility of certain proteins. These findings suggest that laser welding may occur by formation of crosslinks or by denaturation and reannealment of structural proteins. PMID:1863584

  14. Biochemical mechanisms of nephrotoxicity: application for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Claus U; Serkova, Natalie J

    2007-08-01

    This review describes biochemical pathways of nephrotoxicity and the application of metabolic biomarkers as they relate to nephrotoxicity. Specific and sensitive biomarkers constitute the missing link in the continuum of exposure to toxins and susceptibility, disease development and possible therapeutic intervention. Important requirements for biomarker development are a detailed understanding of biochemical pathways involved in nephrotoxicity, minimal invasiveness and capacity to screen large at-risk populations. Lastly, possible biomarker candidates should be organ specific and equally applicable in preclinical drug testing as well as in clinical care of patients. This review discusses four major metabolic pathways associated with disturbed renal homeostasis: i) direct metabolic evidence of abnormal excretion of endogenous metabolites; ii) disturbances in kidney osmolarity and renal osmolyte homeostasis; iii) impaired energy state followed by dysregulation of glucose, fatty acid and ketone body metabolism; and iv) oxidative stress in renal tissues. Each of these pathways can be monitored by specific surrogate markers in urine and blood using modern metabolomics technologies. PMID:17696804

  15. Biochemical Manifestation of HIV Lipodystrophy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ihenetu, Kenneth; Mason, Darius

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), including protease inhibitors (PI) have led to dramatic improvements in the quality and quantity of life in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, a significant number of AIDS patients on HAART develop characteristic changes in body fat redistribution referred to as lipodystrophy syndrome (LDS). Features of LDS include hypertrophy in the neck fat pad (buffalo hump), increased fat in the abdominal region (protease paunch), gynecomastia and loss of fat in the mid-face and extremities. Methods The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge regarding this syndrome. This article reviews the published investigations on biochemical manifestation of HIV lipodystrophy syndrome. Results It is estimated that approximately 64% of patients treated with PI will experience this syndrome. Biochemically, these patients have increased triglycerides (Trig), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and extremely low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). Conclusions and Public Health Implications It is hoped that awareness of this syndrome would aid in early diagnosis and better patient management, possibly leading to a lower incidence of cardiovascular complications among these patients.

  16. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

    1998-09-20

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  17. Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  18. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  19. Biochemical basis for the biological clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Pletcher, Jake; Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Lian-Ying; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    NADH oxidases at the external surface of plant and animal cells (ECTO-NOX proteins) exhibit stable and recurring patterns of oscillations with potentially clock-related, entrainable, and temperature-compensated period lengths of 24 min. To determine if ECTO-NOX proteins might represent the ultradian time keepers (pacemakers) of the biological clock, COS cells were transfected with cDNAs encoding tNOX proteins having a period length of 22 min or with C575A or C558A cysteine to alanine replacements having period lengths of 36 or 42 min. Here we demonstrate that such transfectants exhibited 22, 36, or 40 to 42 h circadian patterns in the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a common clock-regulated protein, in addition to the endogenous 24 h circadian period length. The fact that the expression of a single oscillatory ECTO-NOX protein determines the period length of a circadian biochemical marker (60 X the ECTO-NOX period length) provides compelling evidence that ECTO-NOX proteins are the biochemical ultradian drivers of the cellular biological clock.

  20. LucidDraw: Efficiently visualizing complex biochemical networks within MATLAB

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biochemical networks play an essential role in systems biology. Rapidly growing network data and versatile research activities call for convenient visualization tools to aid intuitively perceiving abstract structures of networks and gaining insights into the functional implications of networks. There are various kinds of network visualization software, but they are usually not adequate for visual analysis of complex biological networks mainly because of the two reasons: 1) most existing drawing methods suitable for biochemical networks have high computation loads and can hardly achieve near real-time visualization; 2) available network visualization tools are designed for working in certain network modeling platforms, so they are not convenient for general analyses due to lack of broader range of readily accessible numerical utilities. Results We present LucidDraw as a visual analysis tool, which features (a) speed: typical biological networks with several hundreds of nodes can be drawn in a few seconds through a new layout algorithm; (b) ease of use: working within MATLAB makes it convenient to manipulate and analyze the network data using a broad spectrum of sophisticated numerical functions; (c) flexibility: layout styles and incorporation of other available information about functional modules can be controlled by users with little effort, and the output drawings are interactively modifiable. Conclusions Equipped with a new grid layout algorithm proposed here, LucidDraw serves as an auxiliary network analysis tool capable of visualizing complex biological networks in near real-time with controllable layout styles and drawing details. The framework of the algorithm enables easy incorporation of extra biological information, if available, to influence the output layouts with predefined node grouping features. PMID:20074382

  1. Thin membrane sensor with biochemical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, George D. (Inventor); Worley, III, Jennings F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A modular biosensor system for chemical or biological agent detection utilizes electrochemical measurement of an ion current across a gate membrane triggered by the reaction of the target agent with a recognition protein conjugated to a channel blocker. The sensor system includes a bioresponse simulator or biochemical switch module which contains the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate, and in which the detection reactions occur, and a transducer module which contains a gate membrane and a measuring electrode, and in which the presence of agent is sensed electrically. In the poised state, ion channels in the gate membrane are blocked by the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate. Detection reactions remove the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate from the ion channels, thus eliciting an ion current surge in the gate membrane which subsequently triggers an output alarm. Sufficiently large currents are generated that simple direct current electronics are adequate for the measurements. The biosensor has applications for environmental, medical, and industrial use.

  2. Biochemical characterization of human Upf1 helicase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhihong; Morisawa, Gaku; Song, Haiwei

    2010-01-01

    We present here the biochemical characterization of human Upf1 helicase core (hUpf1c). hUpf1c is overexpressed as a GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified using chromatographic methods. In vitro ATP binding and single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding activities are measured using dot-blot technique. Measurement of RNA-dependent ATPase activity is performed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The ATP-modulated ssRNA binding activity is examined by surface plasma resonance (SPR). The binding of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to hUpf1c is checked by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, gel shift assay). PMID:20225160

  3. Identifying biochemical phenotypic differences between cryptic species

    PubMed Central

    Liebeke, Manuel; Bruford, Michael W.; Donnelly, Robert K.; Ebbels, Timothy M. D.; Hao, Jie; Kille, Peter; Lahive, Elma; Madison, Rachael M.; Morgan, A. John; Pinto-Juma, Gabriela A.; Spurgeon, David J.; Svendsen, Claus; Bundy, Jacob G.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular genetic methods can distinguish divergent evolutionary lineages in what previously appeared to be single species, but it is not always clear what functional differences exist between such cryptic species. We used a metabolomic approach to profile biochemical phenotype (metabotype) differences between two putative cryptic species of the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. There were no straightforward metabolite biomarkers of lineage, i.e. no metabolites that were always at higher concentration in one lineage. Multivariate methods, however, identified a small number of metabolites that together helped distinguish the lineages, including uncommon metabolites such as Nε-trimethyllysine, which is not usually found at high concentrations. This approach could be useful for characterizing functional trait differences, especially as it is applicable to essentially any species group, irrespective of its genome sequencing status. PMID:25252836

  4. The biochemical anatomy of cortical inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Heller, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Wenzhu; Selimi, Fekrije; Earnheart, John C; Ślimak, Marta A; Santos-Torres, Julio; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines; Aoki, Chiye; Chait, Brian T; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD) exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from the cerebral cortex. We show that these synaptic complexes contain a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, neural cell-scaffolding and adhesion molecules, but that they are entirely lacking in cell signaling proteins. This fundamental distinction between the functions of type 1 and type 2 synapses in the nervous system has far reaching implications for models of synaptic plasticity, rapid adaptations in neural circuits, and homeostatic mechanisms controlling the balance of excitation and inhibition in the mature brain. PMID:22768092

  5. The Biochemical Anatomy of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Elizabeth A.; Zhang, Wenzhu; Selimi, Fekrije; Earnheart, John C.; Ślimak, Marta A.; Santos-Torres, Julio; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines; Aoki, Chiye; Chait, Brian T.; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Classical electron microscopic studies of the mammalian brain revealed two major classes of synapses, distinguished by the presence of a large postsynaptic density (PSD) exclusively at type 1, excitatory synapses. Biochemical studies of the PSD have established the paradigm of the synapse as a complex signal-processing machine that controls synaptic plasticity. We report here the results of a proteomic analysis of type 2, inhibitory synaptic complexes isolated by affinity purification from the cerebral cortex. We show that these synaptic complexes contain a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, neural cell-scaffolding and adhesion molecules, but that they are entirely lacking in cell signaling proteins. This fundamental distinction between the functions of type 1 and type 2 synapses in the nervous system has far reaching implications for models of synaptic plasticity, rapid adaptations in neural circuits, and homeostatic mechanisms controlling the balance of excitation and inhibition in the mature brain. PMID:22768092

  6. [Biochemical and immunological markers of autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Biktagirova, E M; Sattarova, L I; Vagapova, G R; Skibo, Y V; Chuhlovina, E N; Kravtsova, O A; Abramova, Z I

    2016-05-01

    Correlations between biochemical and immunological markers of programmed cell death (apoptosis), and the functional state of the thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism, hypothyroidism) have been investigated in autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) (also known as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis). Annexin V, TRAIL and TNF-a, as well as DNA-hydrolyzing antibodies were used as the main markers. Increased levels of TRAIL were found in the serum of AT patients (hyperthyroidism>hypothyroidism>euthyroidism) compared with healthy individuals. The highest frequency of antibodies to denatured DNA (Abs-dDNA) had the highest frequency in AT patients (97%) compared with healthy controls. Among these patients, 75% had hyperthyroidism, 85% had hypothyroidism, and 84.7% had euthyroidism. Abs hydrolyzing activity demonstrated correlation dependence with symptoms of the thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27563001

  7. Biochemical pathways in seed oil synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D; Stymne, Sten; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-06-01

    Oil produced in plant seeds is utilized as a major source of calories for human nutrition, as feedstocks for non-food uses such as soaps and polymers, and can serve as a high-energy biofuel. The biochemical pathways leading to oil (triacylglycerol) synthesis in seeds involve multiple subcellular organelles, requiring extensive lipid trafficking. Phosphatidylcholine plays a central role in these pathways as a substrate for acyl modifications and likely as a carrier for the trafficking of acyl groups between organelles and membrane subdomains. Although much has been clarified regarding the enzymes and pathways responsible for acyl-group flux, there are still major gaps in our understanding. These include the identity of several key enzymes, how flux between alternative pathways is controlled and the specialized cell biology leading to biogenesis of oil bodies that store up to 80% of carbon in seeds. PMID:23529069

  8. Biochemical pathology of otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Juhn, S K; Sipilä, P; Jung, T T; Edlin, J

    1984-01-01

    The sequential cytologic and biochemical events of middle ear effusion (MEE) were studied in experimental models of serous otitis media (SOM) and purulent otitis media (POM) in chinchilla. In the SOM model, the initial appearance of neutrophils was followed by macrophages. In the POM model, neutrophils were the predominant cells in MEE and the number of neutrophils was about 100-fold higher than in the SOM model. The activity of lysozyme in MEE was higher in POM than in SOM and correlated with the number of neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes. The results of the present study suggest that neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes are one of the main sources for lysozyme levels in MEE during otitis media. PMID:6598270

  9. Pattern Selection by Dynamical Biochemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Palau-Ortin, David; Formosa-Jordan, Pau; Sancho, José M.; Ibañes, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves cells to decide their fate upon the action of biochemical signals. This decision is often spatiotemporally coordinated such that a spatial pattern arises. The dynamics that drive pattern formation usually involve genetic nonlinear interactions and positive feedback loops. These complex dynamics may enable multiple stable patterns for the same conditions. Under these circumstances, pattern formation in a developing tissue involves a selection process: why is a certain pattern formed and not another stable one? Herein we computationally address this issue in the context of the Notch signaling pathway. We characterize a dynamical mechanism for developmental selection of a specific pattern through spatiotemporal changes of the control parameters of the dynamics, in contrast to commonly studied situations in which initial conditions and noise determine which pattern is selected among multiple stable ones. This mechanism can be understood as a path along the parameter space driven by a sequence of biochemical signals. We characterize the selection process for three different scenarios of this dynamical mechanism that can take place during development: the signal either 1) acts in all the cells at the same time, 2) acts only within a cluster of cells, or 3) propagates along the tissue. We found that key elements for pattern selection are the destabilization of the initial pattern, the subsequent exploration of other patterns determined by the spatiotemporal symmetry of the parameter changes, and the speeds of the path compared to the timescales of the pattern formation process itself. Each scenario enables the selection of different types of patterns and creates these elements in distinct ways, resulting in different features. Our approach extends the concept of selection involved in cellular decision-making, usually applied to cell-autonomous decisions, to systems that collectively make decisions through cell

  10. Biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine GEP tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine gut and pancreatic tumors are known to contain and secret different peptide hormones and amines. During the last two decades, many radioimmunoassays and Elizas have been developed to analyze these substances in blood and urine, which has enabled clinicians to improve the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with various neuroendocrine tumors. Due to cost constraints in medical care, it is important to try to define the most useful biochemical markers from the clinical point of view. The glycoprotein chromogranin A has been shown to be a useful marker for diagnosing various neuroendocrine tumors, both by histopathology and circulating tumor markers. In patients with demonstrable endocrine tumors, about 90 percent of the patients present high circulating levels of chromogranin A. A hundred-fold increase of plasma chromogranin is seen in patients with midgut carcinoid tumors and liver metastases. The plasma levels of chromogranin A reflect the tumor mass and can be used for monitoring the patient during treatment and follow-up, although the day-to-day variation might be 30-40 percent. High circulating levels of the chromogranin A might be an indicator of bad prognosis in patients with malignant carcinoid tumors. Besides analyzing plasma chromogranin A, specific analyses such as urinary 5-HIAA in midgut carcinoid patients, serum gastrin in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and insulin/proinsulin in patients with hypoglycemia should be performed. In patients with small tumor masses or intermittent symptoms, provocative tests such as a meal stimulation test, secretin test or pentagastrin stimulation of tachykinin release can supplement the basal measurements of peptides and amines. To fully evaluate the growth potential in neuroendocrine tumors, traditional biochemical markers should be supplemented with indicators of growth proliferation (Ki-67, PCNA) and immunohistochemical staining for the adhesion molecule CD44 and the PDGF-alpha receptor

  11. Robust simplifications of multiscale biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Ovidiu; Gorban, Alexander N; Zinovyev, Andrei; Lilienbaum, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Background Cellular processes such as metabolism, decision making in development and differentiation, signalling, etc., can be modeled as large networks of biochemical reactions. In order to understand the functioning of these systems, there is a strong need for general model reduction techniques allowing to simplify models without loosing their main properties. In systems biology we also need to compare models or to couple them as parts of larger models. In these situations reduction to a common level of complexity is needed. Results We propose a systematic treatment of model reduction of multiscale biochemical networks. First, we consider linear kinetic models, which appear as "pseudo-monomolecular" subsystems of multiscale nonlinear reaction networks. For such linear models, we propose a reduction algorithm which is based on a generalized theory of the limiting step that we have developed in [1]. Second, for non-linear systems we develop an algorithm based on dominant solutions of quasi-stationarity equations. For oscillating systems, quasi-stationarity and averaging are combined to eliminate time scales much faster and much slower than the period of the oscillations. In all cases, we obtain robust simplifications and also identify the critical parameters of the model. The methods are demonstrated for simple examples and for a more complex model of NF-κB pathway. Conclusion Our approach allows critical parameter identification and produces hierarchies of models. Hierarchical modeling is important in "middle-out" approaches when there is need to zoom in and out several levels of complexity. Critical parameter identification is an important issue in systems biology with potential applications to biological control and therapeutics. Our approach also deals naturally with the presence of multiple time scales, which is a general property of systems biology models. PMID:18854041

  12. Scaling up Semi-Arid Grassland Biochemical Content from the Leaf to the Canopy Level: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuhong; Mui, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing imagery is being used intensively to estimate the biochemical content of vegetation (e.g., chlorophyll, nitrogen, and lignin) at the leaf level. As a result of our need for vegetation biochemical information and our increasing ability to obtain canopy spectral data, a few techniques have been explored to scale leaf-level biochemical content to the canopy level for forests and crops. However, due to the contribution of non-green materials (i.e., standing dead litter, rock, and bare soil) from canopy spectra in semi-arid grasslands, it is difficult to obtain information about grassland biochemical content from remote sensing data at the canopy level. This paper summarizes available methods used to scale biochemical information from the leaf level to the canopy level and groups these methods into three categories: direct extrapolation, canopy-integrated approach, and inversion of physical models. As for semi-arid heterogeneous grasslands, we conclude that all methods are useful, but none are ideal. It is recommended that future research should explore a systematic upscaling framework which combines spatial pattern analysis, canopy-integrated approach, and modeling methods to retrieve vegetation biochemical content at the canopy level. PMID:22163513

  13. Physiological, Biochemical, and Molecular Mechanisms of Heat Stress Tolerance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Nahar, Kamrun; Alam, Md. Mahabub; Roychowdhury, Rajib; Fujita, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    High temperature (HT) stress is a major environmental stress that limits plant growth, metabolism, and productivity worldwide. Plant growth and development involve numerous biochemical reactions that are sensitive to temperature. Plant responses to HT vary with the degree and duration of HT and the plant type. HT is now a major concern for crop production and approaches for sustaining high yields of crop plants under HT stress are important agricultural goals. Plants possess a number of adaptive, avoidance, or acclimation mechanisms to cope with HT situations. In addition, major tolerance mechanisms that employ ion transporters, proteins, osmoprotectants, antioxidants, and other factors involved in signaling cascades and transcriptional control are activated to offset stress-induced biochemical and physiological alterations. Plant survival under HT stress depends on the ability to perceive the HT stimulus, generate and transmit the signal, and initiate appropriate physiological and biochemical changes. HT-induced gene expression and metabolite synthesis also substantially improve tolerance. The physiological and biochemical responses to heat stress are active research areas, and the molecular approaches are being adopted for developing HT tolerance in plants. This article reviews the recent findings on responses, adaptation, and tolerance to HT at the cellular, organellar, and whole plant levels and describes various approaches being taken to enhance thermotolerance in plants. PMID:23644891

  14. Optical tweezers and multiphoton microscopies integrated photonic tool for mechanical and biochemical cell processes studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Faustino, W. M.; Fontes, A.; Fernandes, H. P.; Barjas-Castro, M. d. L.; Metze, K.; Giorgio, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-09-01

    The research in biomedical photonics is clearly evolving in the direction of the understanding of biological processes at the cell level. The spatial resolution to accomplish this task practically requires photonics tools. However, an integration of different photonic tools and a multimodal and functional approach will be necessary to access the mechanical and biochemical cell processes. This way we can observe mechanicaly triggered biochemical events or biochemicaly triggered mechanical events, or even observe simultaneously mechanical and biochemical events triggered by other means, e.g. electricaly. One great advantage of the photonic tools is its easiness for integration. Therefore, we developed such integrated tool by incorporating single and double Optical Tweezers with Confocal Single and Multiphoton Microscopies. This system can perform 2-photon excited fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation microscopies together with optical manipulations. It also can acquire Fluorescence and SHG spectra of specific spots. Force, elasticity and viscosity measurements of stretched membranes can be followed by real time confocal microscopies. Also opticaly trapped living protozoas, such as leishmania amazonensis. Integration with CARS microscopy is under way. We will show several examples of the use of such integrated instrument and its potential to observe mechanical and biochemical processes at cell level.

  15. The need for combined inorganic, biochemical, and nutritional studies of chromium(III).

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B; Love, Sharifa T

    2012-09-01

    The history of biochemical and nutritional studies of the element is unfortunately full of twists and turns, most leading to dead ends. Chromium (Cr), as the trivalent ion, has been proposed to be an essential element, a body mass and muscle development agent, and, in the form of the most popular Cr-containing nutritional supplement, to be toxic when given orally to mammals. None of these proposals, despite significant attention in the popular media, has proven to be correct. Trivalent chromium has also been proposed as a therapeutic agent to increase insulin sensitivity and affect lipid metabolism, although a molecular mechanism for such actions has not been elucidated. Greater cooperative research interactions between nutritionists, biochemists, and chemists might have avoided the earlier issues in nutritional and biochemical Cr research and is necessary to establish the potential role of Cr as a therapeutic agent at a molecular level. PMID:22976981

  16. Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants: Physiological, Biochemical, and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting growth and productivity of plants in many areas of the world due to increasing use of poor quality of water for irrigation and soil salinization. Plant adaptation or tolerance to salinity stress involves complex physiological traits, metabolic pathways, and molecular or gene networks. A comprehensive understanding on how plants respond to salinity stress at different levels and an integrated approach of combining molecular tools with physiological and biochemical techniques are imperative for the development of salt-tolerant varieties of plants in salt-affected areas. Recent research has identified various adaptive responses to salinity stress at molecular, cellular, metabolic, and physiological levels, although mechanisms underlying salinity tolerance are far from being completely understood. This paper provides a comprehensive review of major research advances on biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms regulating plant adaptation and tolerance to salinity stress. PMID:24804192

  17. A Biochemical Approach to the Problem of Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sidney McDonald

    1985-01-01

    The paper presents the case of a sixth-grade boy, labeled dyslexic, who responded positively to a biochemical approach. Remedy of iron, zinc, and Vitamin B-6 deficiencies as well as an imbalance of fatty acids resulted in improvements in hair and skin and also in reading. A biochemical approach to behavior problems is proposed. (Author/CL)

  18. Physiological control - A physical view: Life and the biochemical oscillator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iberall, A. S.

    1971-01-01

    The history and progress of physical interpretations of physiological control, viewing life as a biochemical oscillator, are surveyed. Special attention is given to the author's studies (1964, 1965, 1968 and 1969) and to studies of Katchalsky (1969) who demonstrated a 1,000-A scale which may provide a basis for a biochemical oscillator.

  19. Simulation studies in biochemical signaling and enzyme reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelatury, Sudarshan R.; Vagula, Mary C.

    2014-06-01

    Biochemical pathways characterize various biochemical reaction schemes that involve a set of species and the manner in which they are connected. Determination of schematics that represent these pathways is an important task in understanding metabolism and signal transduction. Examples of these Pathways are: DNA and protein synthesis, and production of several macro-molecules essential for cell survival. A sustained feedback mechanism arises in gene expression and production of mRNA that lead to protein synthesis if the protein so synthesized serves as a transcription factor and becomes a repressor of the gene expression. The cellular regulations are carried out through biochemical networks consisting of reactions and regulatory proteins. Systems biology is a relatively new area that attempts to describe the biochemical pathways analytically and develop reliable mathematical models for the pathways. A complete understanding of chemical reaction kinetics is prohibitively hard thanks to the nonlinear and highly complex mechanisms that regulate protein formation, but attempting to numerically solve some of the governing differential equations seems to offer significant insight about their biochemical picture. To validate these models, one can perform simple experiments in the lab. This paper introduces fundamental ideas in biochemical signaling and attempts to take first steps into the understanding of biochemical oscillations. Initially, the two-pool model of calcium is used to describe the dynamics behind the oscillations. Later we present some elementary results showing biochemical oscillations arising from solving differential equations of Elowitz and Leibler using MATLAB software.

  20. Alternative aircraft anti-icing formulations with reduced aquatic toxicity and biochemical oxygen demand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Harris; Joback, Kevin; Geis, Steven; Bowman, George; Mericas, Dean; Corsi, Steven R.; Ferguson, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The current research was conducted to identify alternative aircraft and pavement deicer and anti-icer formulations with improved environmental characteristics compared to currently used commercial products (2007). The environmental characteristics of primary concern are the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and aquatic toxicity of the fully formulated products. Except when the distinction among products is necessary for clarity, “deicer” will refer to aircraft-deicing fluids (ADFs), aircraft anti-icing fluids (AAFs), and pavementdeicing materials (PDMs).

  1. Model-Based Design of Biochemical Microreactors

    PubMed Central

    Elbinger, Tobias; Gahn, Markus; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Hante, Falk M.; Voll, Lars M.; Leugering, Günter; Knabner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical pathways is an important resource in Synthetic Biology, as the predictive power of simulating synthetic pathways represents an important step in the design of synthetic metabolons. In this paper, we are concerned with the mathematical modeling, simulation, and optimization of metabolic processes in biochemical microreactors able to carry out enzymatic reactions and to exchange metabolites with their surrounding medium. The results of the reported modeling approach are incorporated in the design of the first microreactor prototypes that are under construction. These microreactors consist of compartments separated by membranes carrying specific transporters for the input of substrates and export of products. Inside the compartments of the reactor multienzyme complexes assembled on nano-beads by peptide adapters are used to carry out metabolic reactions. The spatially resolved mathematical model describing the ongoing processes consists of a system of diffusion equations together with boundary and initial conditions. The boundary conditions model the exchange of metabolites with the neighboring compartments and the reactions at the surface of the nano-beads carrying the multienzyme complexes. Efficient and accurate approaches for numerical simulation of the mathematical model and for optimal design of the microreactor are developed. As a proof-of-concept scenario, a synthetic pathway for the conversion of sucrose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was chosen. In this context, the mathematical model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal distributions of the metabolite concentrations, as well as application relevant quantities like the outflow rate of G6P. These computations are performed for different scenarios, where the number of beads as well as their loading capacity are varied. The computed metabolite distributions show spatial patterns, which differ for different experimental arrangements. Furthermore, the total output of G6P

  2. Model-Based Design of Biochemical Microreactors.

    PubMed

    Elbinger, Tobias; Gahn, Markus; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Hante, Falk M; Voll, Lars M; Leugering, Günter; Knabner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical pathways is an important resource in Synthetic Biology, as the predictive power of simulating synthetic pathways represents an important step in the design of synthetic metabolons. In this paper, we are concerned with the mathematical modeling, simulation, and optimization of metabolic processes in biochemical microreactors able to carry out enzymatic reactions and to exchange metabolites with their surrounding medium. The results of the reported modeling approach are incorporated in the design of the first microreactor prototypes that are under construction. These microreactors consist of compartments separated by membranes carrying specific transporters for the input of substrates and export of products. Inside the compartments of the reactor multienzyme complexes assembled on nano-beads by peptide adapters are used to carry out metabolic reactions. The spatially resolved mathematical model describing the ongoing processes consists of a system of diffusion equations together with boundary and initial conditions. The boundary conditions model the exchange of metabolites with the neighboring compartments and the reactions at the surface of the nano-beads carrying the multienzyme complexes. Efficient and accurate approaches for numerical simulation of the mathematical model and for optimal design of the microreactor are developed. As a proof-of-concept scenario, a synthetic pathway for the conversion of sucrose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was chosen. In this context, the mathematical model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal distributions of the metabolite concentrations, as well as application relevant quantities like the outflow rate of G6P. These computations are performed for different scenarios, where the number of beads as well as their loading capacity are varied. The computed metabolite distributions show spatial patterns, which differ for different experimental arrangements. Furthermore, the total output of G6P

  3. Applied spectrophotometry: analysis of a biochemical mixture.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Toni A; Schultz, Emeric; Borland, Michael G; Pugh, Michael Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Spectrophotometric analysis is essential for determining biomolecule concentration of a solution and is employed ubiquitously in biochemistry and molecular biology. The application of the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Lawis routinely used to determine the concentration of DNA, RNA or protein. There is however a significant difference in determining the concentration of a given species (RNA, DNA, protein) in isolation (a contrived circumstance) as opposed to determining that concentration in the presence of other species (a more realistic situation). To present the student with a more realistic laboratory experience and also to fill a hole that we believe exists in student experience prior to reaching a biochemistry course, we have devised a three week laboratory experience designed so that students learn to: connect laboratory practice with theory, apply the Beer-Lambert-Bougert Law to biochemical analyses, demonstrate the utility and limitations of example quantitative colorimetric assays, demonstrate the utility and limitations of UV analyses for biomolecules, develop strategies for analysis of a solution of unknown biomolecular composition, use digital micropipettors to make accurate and precise measurements, and apply graphing software. PMID:23625877

  4. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  5. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  6. Biochemical markers in butadiene-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Hayes, R.B.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Henderson, R.F.

    1994-11-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is used to manufacture a wide range of polymers and copolymers including styrene-butadiene rubber, polybutadiene, and acrylonitrile-butadiene-syrene resins. The carcinogenicity of BD has been determined in life-span inhalation studies in both Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice. Results suggest a marked species difference in the carcinogenic effects of BD. For example, female mice exposed to as low as 6.25 ppm BD exhibited increased alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms. In contrast, BD was only a weak carcinogen in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were observed to have an increase only in mammary tumors after exposure to 1000 ppm. A biochemical study of highly exposed BD workers and unexposed controls is providing valuable information on BD metabolism in humans, and how this relates to the development of intermediate biologic effects. A group of heavily exposed workers were identified in a BD production facility in China. The purpose of this paper is to report the initial results from the sampling trip in the first quarter of 1994.

  7. Induced biochemical interactions in crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1996-08-01

    In the evolution of oil from sedimentary to reservoir conditions, the hydrogen to carbon ratios decrease while the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur to carbon ratios increase. During this process, the oils become heavier and richer in asphaltenes. In terms of chemical composition, the oils become enriched in resins, asphaltenes, and polar compounds containing the heteroatoms and metals. Over the geological periods of time, the chemical and physical changes have been brought about by chemical, biological (biochemical) and physical (temperature and pressure) means as well as by the catalytic effects of the sedimentary matrices, migration, flooding, and other physical processes. Therefore, different types of oils are the end products of a given set of such interactions which were brought about by multiple and simultaneous physicochemical processes involving electron transfer, free radical, and chemical reactions. A biocatalyst introduced into a reaction mixture of the type produced by such reactions will seek available chemical reaction sites and react at the most favorable ones. The rates and the chemical pathways by which the biocatalytic reactions will proceed will depend on the oil type and the biocatalyst(s). Some of the possible reaction pathways that may occur in such complex mixtures are discussed.

  8. BALL - biochemical algorithms library 1.3

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Biochemical Algorithms Library (BALL) is a comprehensive rapid application development framework for structural bioinformatics. It provides an extensive C++ class library of data structures and algorithms for molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics. Using BALL as a programming toolbox does not only allow to greatly reduce application development times but also helps in ensuring stability and correctness by avoiding the error-prone reimplementation of complex algorithms and replacing them with calls into the library that has been well-tested by a large number of developers. In the ten years since its original publication, BALL has seen a substantial increase in functionality and numerous other improvements. Results Here, we discuss BALL's current functionality and highlight the key additions and improvements: support for additional file formats, molecular edit-functionality, new molecular mechanics force fields, novel energy minimization techniques, docking algorithms, and support for cheminformatics. Conclusions BALL is available for all major operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and MacOS X. It is available free of charge under the Lesser GNU Public License (LPGL). Parts of the code are distributed under the GNU Public License (GPL). BALL is available as source code and binary packages from the project web site at http://www.ball-project.org. Recently, it has been accepted into the debian project; integration into further distributions is currently pursued. PMID:20973958

  9. Control analysis for autonomously oscillating biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Reijenga, Karin A; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kholodenko, Boris N; Snoep, Jacky L

    2002-01-01

    It has hitherto not been possible to analyze the control of oscillatory dynamic cellular processes in other than qualitative ways. The control coefficients, used in metabolic control analyses of steady states, cannot be applied directly to dynamic systems. We here illustrate a way out of this limitation that uses Fourier transforms to convert the time domain into the stationary frequency domain, and then analyses the control of limit cycle oscillations. In addition to the already known summation theorems for frequency and amplitude, we reveal summation theorems that apply to the control of average value, waveform, and phase differences of the oscillations. The approach is made fully operational in an analysis of yeast glycolytic oscillations. It follows an experimental approach, sampling from the model output and using discrete Fourier transforms of this data set. It quantifies the control of various aspects of the oscillations by the external glucose concentration and by various internal molecular processes. We show that the control of various oscillatory properties is distributed over the system enzymes in ways that differ among those properties. The models that are described in this paper can be accessed on http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za. PMID:11751299

  10. Biochemical and proteomic characterization of alkaptonuric chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as "black" AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as "white" AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both "white" and "black" AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in "black" AKU chondrocytes. PMID:22213341

  11. Biochemical and Proteomic Characterization of Alkaptonuric Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as “black” AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as “white” AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both “white” and “black” AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in “black” AKU chondrocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3333–3343, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22213341

  12. In Situ Biospectroscopic Investigation of Rapid Ischemic and Postmortem Induced Biochemical Alterations in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in imaging technologies have pushed novel spectroscopic modalities such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge to the forefront of direct in situ investigation of brain biochemistry. However, few studies have examined the extent to which sample preparation artifacts confound results. Previous investigations using traditional analyses, such as tissue dissection, homogenization, and biochemical assay, conducted extensive research to identify biochemical alterations that occur ex vivo during sample preparation. In particular, altered metabolism and oxidative stress may be caused by animal death. These processes were a concern for studies using biochemical assays, and protocols were developed to minimize their occurrence. In this investigation, a similar approach was taken to identify the biochemical alterations that are detectable by two in situ spectroscopic methods (FTIR, XAS) that occur as a consequence of ischemic conditions created during humane animal killing. FTIR and XAS are well suited to study markers of altered metabolism such as lactate and creatine (FTIR) and markers of oxidative stress such as aggregated proteins (FTIR) and altered thiol redox (XAS). The results are in accordance with previous investigations using biochemical assays and demonstrate that the time between animal death and tissue dissection results in ischemic conditions that alter brain metabolism and initiate oxidative stress. Therefore, future in situ biospectroscopic investigations utilizing FTIR and XAS must take into consideration that brain tissue dissected from a healthy animal does not truly reflect the in vivo condition, but rather reflects a state of mild ischemia. If studies require the levels of metabolites (lactate, creatine) and markers of oxidative stress (thiol redox) to be preserved as close as possible to the in vivo condition, then rapid freezing of brain tissue via decapitation into

  13. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  14. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  15. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  16. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  17. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  18. [INVESTIGATION OF BLOOD BIOCHEMICAL INDICES DURING BICYCLE ERGOMETRY].

    PubMed

    Davydov, B V; Stepanova, G P; Krivitsyna, Z A; Vorontsov, A L; Voronkov, Yu I

    2015-01-01

    Our investigations showed that physical work (bicycle ergometry) alters the biochemical status of male volunteers. On the 5th minute of bicycle endometry capillary blood looses significantly glucose and increases magnesium, phosphorus and particularly lactic acid. Creatine phosphokinase activity and trygliceride levels did not deviate much from baseline values. All the changes had a similar trend equally in the supine and sitting position. Therefore, biochemical investigations may complement essentially the physiological and neurophysiological tests of human adaptability to physical loads. The investigation utilized the dry chemistry technology of rapid biochemical diagnostics. PMID:26738302

  19. Pumped biochemical reactions, nonequilibrium circulation, and stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Qian, H; Qian, M

    2000-03-01

    Based on a master equation formalism for mesoscopic, unimolecular biochemical reactions, we show the periodic oscillation arising from severe nonequilibrium pumping is intimately related to the periodic motion in recently studied stochastic resonance (SR). The white noise in SR is naturally identified with the temperature in the biochemical reactions; the drift in the SR is associated with the circular flux in nonequilibrium steady state (NESS). As in SR, an optimal temperature for biochemical oscillation is shown to exist. A unifying framework for Hill's theory of NESS and the SR without periodic forcing is presented. The new formalism provides an analytically solvable model for SR. PMID:11017261

  20. The Biochemical Prognostic Factors of Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung Won; Shin, Dong Yeob; Kim, Kwang Joon; Hwang, Sena

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SHT) are common in clinical practice. However, the clinical significance of SHT, including prognosis, has not been established. Further clarifying SHT will be critical in devising a management plan and treatment guidelines for SHT patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic factors of SHT. Methods We reviewed the medical records of Korean patients who visited the endocrinology outpatient clinic of Severance Hospital from January 2008 to September 2012. Newly-diagnosed patients with SHT were selected and reviewed retrospectively. We compared two groups: the SHT maintenance group and the spontaneous improvement group. Results The SHT maintenance group and the spontaneous improvement group had initial thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels that were significantly different (P=0.035). In subanalysis for subjects with TSH levels between 5 to 10 µIU/mL, the spontaneous improvement group showed significantly lower antithyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO-Ab) titer than the SHT maintenance group (P=0.039). Regarding lipid profiles, only triglyceride level, unlike total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, was related to TSH level, which is correlated with the severity of SHT. Diffuse thyroiditis on ultrasonography only contributed to the severity of SHT, not to the prognosis. High sensitivity C-reactive protein and urine iodine excretion, generally regarded as possible prognostic factors, did not show any significant relation with the prognosis and severity of SHT. Conclusion Only initial TSH level was a definite prognostic factor of SHT. TPO-Ab titer was also a helpful prognostic factor for SHT in cases with mildly elevated TSH. Other than TSH and TPO-Ab, we were unable to validate biochemical prognostic factors in this retrospective study for Korean SHT patients. PMID:25031888

  1. Low Power Laser Stimulation Of Biochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbe, Robert F.; Rettmer, Rebecca L.; Davis, Holly

    1988-06-01

    Scattered clinical reports suggest that low power (LP) laser irradiation may induce a biostimulation of cell growth and/or metabolism, especially relating to healing processes. On the other hand, few basic science, in-depth reports relating to such effects have appeared. Hence, a mechanism of action of LP laser irradiation on cells is unknown. A systematic evaluation has been undertaken in order to define more clearly the experimental conditions for producing biostimulation and to provide some basis for action of LP laser irradiation. A Ga-Al-As diode laser emitting in the near infrared (904 nm) was used to effectively penetrate cells at energy levels that are in the mW range. The LP laser was pulsed at 50 ns and 200 hz. Human fibroblasts growing in culture served as the experimental model. Since LP laser irradiation has been reported to stimulate collagen synthesis, we first investigated the induction of hydroxyproline formation, a collagen precursor. This biosynthetic process could be increased two-fold at a twice daily energy input of 4.5 mJ. With proline supplementation, hydroxylation increased eight-fold. At approximately the same energy level and irradiation conditions, cells also had a three-fold increased uptake of ascorbic acid, a required cofactor for hydroxylation of proline. These findings considered together with published biochemical studies of collagen suggest that higher levels of intracellular ascorbate catalyze hydroxylation of proline and, concomitantly, induce collagen formation. Other data relevant to cell morphology and viability suggest that the LP laser irradiation had no effect on cell proliferation but rather was a transient effect on intermediary metabolism manifested as changes that may be unique to collagen.

  2. Biochemical composition and physicochemical properties of broccoli flours.

    PubMed

    Campas-Baypoli, Olga N; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia I; Bueno-Solano, Carolina; Núñez-Gastélum, Jose A; Reyes-Moreno, Cuauhtémoc; López-Cervantes, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the biochemical composition and physicochemical properties of three different flours prepared from broccoli crop remains. Florets, leaves and stalks of broccoli were dried at 60 degrees C, and the flours obtained were analysed for proximate composition, amino acid profile, fatty acid composition, and physicochemical properties. The florets flour showed the highest protein content (22.41 g/100 g dry weight); ash was higher in leaves flour (14.67 g/100 g dry weight), and the lipid content was similar in the flours of leaves and stalks. The stalks flour had high crude fibre content and low protein content. All flours presented a high water absorption index. Tyrosine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, proline and valine were found in larger concentration. The most abundant fatty acids in the lipids were linolenic acid (C18:3n3), palmitic acid (C16:0) and linoleic acid (C18:2n6). Broccoli flours prepared in this study are good source of nutrients and could be utilized as dietary supplements. PMID:19259885

  3. Biochemical Analyses of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Icopini, G. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis demonstrates respiratory flexibility by the transfer of electrons to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. Researchers postulate that the bacterium utilizes surface proteins to facilitate the respiratory mechanism for dissimilatory iron(III) reduction. Previous genetic and biochemical studies has shown that iron reduction is associated with the outer membrane of the cell. The identity of the terminal reductase is not yet known. S. oneidensis has been shown to use soluble extra-cellular compounds to facilitate iron(III) reduction as well as expression of novel proteins on the cell surface when interacting with iron(III) oxides. Our results show that the outer membrane fraction possess enzymatic activity for converting Fe(III) to Fe(II) as measured by ferrozine complexation. AQDS, extra-cellular organic extracts, and iron(III) both soluble and solid have been assayed for activity with outer membrane fractions. Zymograms of the membrane fractions separated by isoelectric focusing and native PAGE electrophoresis stained using ferrozine have implicated proteins that are directly involved in the Fe(III) reduction process. A proteomics analysis of outer membrane proteins has also been implemented to identify different expression patterns under Fe(III) reducing conditions. Proteins that are unique to Fe(III) reduction have been isolated and identified using N-terminal sequence analysis. We will also attempt to examine the effect of enzymatic iron(III) reduction on isotopic partitioning from in vitro assays.

  4. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines current developments

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.

    1997-03-10

    A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the R&D effort allowed to identify a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became a basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource and therefore differs, the emerging technology has to be also flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

  5. Mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation: Structural and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sabanero, Myrna; Azorín-Vega, Juan Carlos; Flores-Villavicencio, Lérida Liss; Castruita-Dominguez, J Pedro; Vallejo, Miguel Angel; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria; Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro; Sosa-Aquino, Modesto

    2016-02-01

    Acute or chronic exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor that may be hazardous to health. It has been reported that exposure to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv/year) and subsequently exposure to high doses produces greater effects in people. It has been reported that people who have been exposed to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv/year) and subsequently are exposed to high doses, have greater effects. However, at a molecular and biochemical level, it is an unknown alteration. This study, analyzes the susceptibility of a biological system (HeLa ATCC CCL-2 human cervix cancer cell line) to ionizing radiation (6 and 60 mSv/90 s). Our research considers multiple variables such as: total protein profile, mitochondrial metabolic activity (XTT assay), cell viability (Trypan blue exclusion assay), cytoskeleton (actin microfilaments), nuclei (DAPI), and genomic DNA. The results indicate, that cells exposed to ionizing radiation show structural alterations in nuclear phenotype and aneuploidy, further disruption in the tight junctions and consequently on the distribution of actin microfilaments. Similar alterations were observed in cells treated with a genotoxic agent (200 μM H2O2/1h). In conclusion, this multi-criteria assessment enables precise comparisons of the effects of radiation between various line cells. However, it is necessary to determine stress markers for integration of the effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:26656429

  6. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Current developments

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Bajsarowicz, V.; McCloud, M.

    1997-07-07

    A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the r and D effort identified a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became the basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource, the emerging technology has to be flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

  7. Antioxidants in Chinese herbal medicines: a biochemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Z; Huang, S H; Tan, B K H; Sun, J; Whiteman, M; Zhu, Y-C

    2004-08-01

    Recently, intense interest has focused on the antioxidant properties of natural products. In particular, Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) have become hot topics for life science researchers since many are reported to possess cardioprotective compounds, many of which remain to be identified. Indeed, the exact mechanisms by which CHM work remain unknown. Although many of these herbal remedies are undoubtedly efficacious, few have been scientifically investigated for their active chemical constituents and biological activities. We have previously reported higher activities of antioxidant defence enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferases in the liver of rats treated with the herb Salvia miltiorrhiza in a model of acute myocardial infarction. Using well established in vitro antioxidant assays employing 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) we have shown that in addition to elevating endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity, Salvia miltiorrhiza and other CHM traditionally used for cardiovascular disorders (such as Rhizoma ligustici, Herba leonuri, Radix achyranthis bidentatae, and Camellia sinensis) contain potent antioxidant moieties in addition to their phenolic constituents. Furthermore, these novel non-phenolic components are effective inhibitors of oxidative reactions mediated by the inflammatory oxidants, peroxynitrite,hypochlorous acid and hydroxyl radical as well as iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. In this review, we discuss the various antioxidant properties of CHM in the context of their biochemical mechanisms. PMID:15282631

  8. The ONIOM molecular dynamics method for biochemical applications: cytidine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-03-22

    Abstract We derived and implemented the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method for biochemical applications. The implementation allows the characterization of the functions of the real enzymes taking account of their thermal motion. In this method, the direct MD is performed by calculating the ONIOM energy and gradients of the system on the fly. We describe the first application of this ONOM-MD method to cytidine deaminase. The environmental effects on the substrate in the active site are examined. The ONIOM-MD simulations show that the product uridine is strongly perturbed by the thermal motion of the environment and dissociates easily from the active site. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  9. Label-Free Optical Ring Resonator Bio/Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongying; Suter, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xudong

    Optical micro-ring resonator sensors are an emerging category of label-free optical sensors for bio/chemical sensing that have recently been under intensive investigation. Researchers of this technology have been motivated by a tremendous breadth of different applications, including medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, homeland security, and food quality control, which require sensitive analytical tools. Ring resonator sensors use total internal reflection to support circulating optical resonances called whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The WGMs have an evanescent field of several hundred nanometers into the surrounding medium, and can therefore detect the refractive index change induced when the analyte binds to the resonator surface. Despite the small physical size of a resonator, the circulating nature of the WGM creates extremely long effective lengths, greatly increasing light-matter interaction and improving its sensing performance. Moreover, only small sample volume is needed for detection because the sensors can be fabricated in sizes well below 100 μm. The small footprint allows integration of those ring resonator sensors onto lab-on-a-chip types of devices for multiplexed detection.

  10. Automatising the analysis of stochastic biochemical time-series

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Mathematical and computational modelling of biochemical systems has seen a lot of effort devoted to the definition and implementation of high-performance mechanistic simulation frameworks. Within these frameworks it is possible to analyse complex models under a variety of configurations, eventually selecting the best setting of, e.g., parameters for a target system. Motivation This operational pipeline relies on the ability to interpret the predictions of a model, often represented as simulation time-series. Thus, an efficient data analysis pipeline is crucial to automatise time-series analyses, bearing in mind that errors in this phase might mislead the modeller's conclusions. Results For this reason we have developed an intuitive framework-independent Python tool to automate analyses common to a variety of modelling approaches. These include assessment of useful non-trivial statistics for simulation ensembles, e.g., estimation of master equations. Intuitive and domain-independent batch scripts will allow the researcher to automatically prepare reports, thus speeding up the usual model-definition, testing and refinement pipeline. PMID:26051821

  11. LeishCyc: a biochemical pathways database for Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Maria A; MacRae, James I; De Souza, David P; Saunders, Eleanor C; McConville, Malcolm J; Likić, Vladimir A

    2009-01-01

    Background Leishmania spp. are sandfly transmitted protozoan parasites that cause a spectrum of diseases in more than 12 million people worldwide. Much research is now focusing on how these parasites adapt to the distinct nutrient environments they encounter in the digestive tract of the sandfly vector and the phagolysosome compartment of mammalian macrophages. While data mining and annotation of the genomes of three Leishmania species has provided an initial inventory of predicted metabolic components and associated pathways, resources for integrating this information into metabolic networks and incorporating data from transcript, protein, and metabolite profiling studies is currently lacking. The development of a reliable, expertly curated, and widely available model of Leishmania metabolic networks is required to facilitate systems analysis, as well as discovery and prioritization of new drug targets for this important human pathogen. Description The LeishCyc database was initially built from the genome sequence of Leishmania major (v5.2), based on the annotation published by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. LeishCyc was manually curated to remove errors, correct automated predictions, and add information from the literature. The ongoing curation is based on public sources, literature searches, and our own experimental and bioinformatics studies. In a number of instances we have improved on the original genome annotation, and, in some ambiguous cases, collected relevant information from the literature in order to help clarify gene or protein annotation in the future. All genes in LeishCyc are linked to the corresponding entry in GeneDB (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute). Conclusion The LeishCyc database describes Leishmania major genes, gene products, metabolites, their relationships and biochemical organization into metabolic pathways. LeishCyc provides a systematic approach to organizing the evolving information about Leishmania biochemical networks and is

  12. Modulation of specific biochemical blood parameters by helminth infection in laboratory Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Szweda, M; Szarek, J; Babińska, I; Sokół, R; Raś-Noryńska, M; Kołodziejska-Sawerska, A; Mecik-Kronenberg, T

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the independent effect of helminths infection on biochemical blood parameters in Beagles intended for laboratory use which may contribute to a change of experimental results. As a result of research, the authors confirmed the negative effect of helminth invasion on the metabolism of the liver and kidney in laboratory dogs. Stool samples from thirty Beagle puppies were examined for parasites before the puppies were moved to the animal facility, and all were dewormed with Vetminth paste on the day they were moved. Stool examination was performed three more times and animals were given Drontal Plus flavor (Bayer) and Baycox 5% (Bayer). A fourth parasitological examination revealed no intestinal parasites in the feces. Three blood biochemical tests were performed. Experimental results clearly indicate the significant impact of intestinal parasites in dogs used in experiments. PMID:22844719

  13. [Odor Emission Characteristics from Biochemical Treatment Facilities of Kichen Waste in China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yuan-gang; Lu, Zhi-qiang; Han, Meng; Shang, Xi-bin; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Xining, Ningbo and Beijing were closen as the representative cities about biochemical treatment of kichen waste. The treatment facilities of these cities were investigated and set as the sampling points. The main compositions and the material contents were analyzed by GC/MS, the odor concertration was obtained by the Triangle odor bag method. The results showed that oxygenated hydrocarbons including alcohol, aldehyde, ketone, ester were higher than others in the odor gases, however, the largest contribution to odor pollution were sulfocompounds and the 2nd materials were terpenes; According to the research of the three enterprises, ethyl alcohol, limonene, sulfuretted hydrogen, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, acetaldehyde and ethyl acetate were likely to be considered as the typical odorants from the biochemical treatment facilities of kichen waste. PMID:26841591

  14. Design and implementation of multi-campus, modular master classes in biochemical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuyts, Niek; Bruneel, Dorine; Meyers, Myriam; Van Hoof, Etienne; De Vos, Leander; Langie, Greet; Rediers, Hans

    2015-07-01

    The Master of Science in engineering technology: biochemical engineering is organised in KU Leuven at four geographically dispersed campuses. To sustain the Master's programmes at all campuses, it is clear that a unique education profile at each campus is crucial. In addition, a rationalisation is required by increased cooperation, increased exchange of lecturers, and increased student mobility. To achieve this, a multicampus education system for the M.Sc. in engineering technology: biochemical engineering was developed by offering modules that are also available for students of other campuses. Such a module is primarily based on the research expertise present at the campus. In the development, special attention has been given to the optimal organisation of the modules, evaluation, required modifications of the current curricula, and the practical consequences for students following the module at another campus. Even in the first year of implementation, around 30% of the students followed a multicampus module, which indicates the potential success of the multicampus concept described here.

  15. Comparison of cold resistance physiological and biochemical features of four Herba Rhodiola seedlings under low temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Shuling; Zhao, Kentian; Ma, Lingfa; Yang, Jingjun; Chang, Yuwei; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2016-03-01

    To discuss the cold resistance performance of different Herba Rhodiolae and successfully transplant Herba Rhodiolae to the Gansu plateau area for nursing, domestication and planting, this paper systematically studies six physiological and biochemical features of Rhodiola kirilowii, Rhodiola algida, Rhodiola crenulata and Herba Rhodiolae that are closely associated with cold resistance features and concludes with the cold resistance capability of Rhodiola kirilowii. In the selected six main indexes of the Herba Rhodiolae, the POD, SOD and CAT activity and MDA and Pro content in the leaf are the main physiological and biochemical indexes to indicate the cold resistance performance of four Herba Rhodiolae seedlings and can be regarded as the preliminary indexes to assess the winter performance of Herba Rhodiolae. The research work will provide the theoretical basis for the wild variants of Herba Rhodiolae and GAPJ base construction. PMID:26981000

  16. Comparison of cold resistance physiological and biochemical features of four Herba Rhodiola seedlings under low temperature

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuling; Zhao, Kentian; Ma, Lingfa; Yang, Jingjun; Chang, Yuwei; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the cold resistance performance of different Herba Rhodiolae and successfully transplant Herba Rhodiolae to the Gansu plateau area for nursing, domestication and planting, this paper systematically studies six physiological and biochemical features of Rhodiola kirilowii, Rhodiola algida, Rhodiola crenulata and Herba Rhodiolae that are closely associated with cold resistance features and concludes with the cold resistance capability of Rhodiola kirilowii. In the selected six main indexes of the Herba Rhodiolae, the POD, SOD and CAT activity and MDA and Pro content in the leaf are the main physiological and biochemical indexes to indicate the cold resistance performance of four Herba Rhodiolae seedlings and can be regarded as the preliminary indexes to assess the winter performance of Herba Rhodiolae. The research work will provide the theoretical basis for the wild variants of Herba Rhodiolae and GAPJ base construction. PMID:26981000

  17. Serological and biochemical genetic markers and their associations with psychiatric disorders : a review.

    PubMed

    Balgir, R S

    1983-10-01

    The studies pertaining to associations of serological and biochemical genetic markers (blood groups in particular and scrum proteins and enzymes in general) with the psychiatric disorders such as psychoses in general, Schizophrenia, manic-depressive psychosis including unipolar and bipolar affective disorders and neuroses have been critically examined. The reasons for inconsistent findings of various investigators have been pointed out to assist the future researchers to overcome the previous drawbacks. Implications of associations of genetic markers with the psychiatric disorders have been discussed and future areas of research suggested. PMID:21847304

  18. SEROLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL GENETIC MARKERS AND THEIR ASSOCIATIONS WITH PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS : A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Balgir, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY The studies pertaining to associations of serological and biochemical genetic markers (blood groups in particular and scrum proteins and enzymes in general) with the psychiatric disorders such as psychoses in general, Schizophrenia, manic-depressive psychosis including unipolar and bipolar affective disorders and neuroses have been critically examined. The reasons for inconsistent findings of various investigators have been pointed out to assist the future researchers to overcome the previous drawbacks. Implications of associations of genetic markers with the psychiatric disorders have been discussed and future areas of research suggested. PMID:21847304

  19. NERVOUS-SYSTEM SPECIFIC PROTEINS AS BIOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances in neuroimmunology and protein purification methodology have led to the identification of nervous-system specific proteins. Their intimate relationship to the cellular and functional heterogeneity of the nervous system, makes these proteins ideal biochemical marke...

  20. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Biochemical Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzullo, Leslie

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  1. Generation of KCL029 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in WAS gene.

    PubMed

    Miere, Cristian; Hewitson, Heema; Wood, Victoria; Kadeva, Neli; Cornwell, Glenda; Codognotto, Stefano; Stephenson, Emma; Ilic, Dusko

    2016-01-01

    The KCL029 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried a c.814T>C mutation in the WAS gene, which is linked to the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare, inherited, X-linked, recessive disease characterized by immune dysregulation and microthrombocytopenia. The line is also carrier for a mutation p.N1152H in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator CFTR. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays. PMID:27345811

  2. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs

    PubMed Central

    Gawthrop, Peter J.; Crampin, Edmund J.

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks. PMID:25383030

  3. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs.

    PubMed

    Gawthrop, Peter J; Crampin, Edmund J

    2014-11-01

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks. PMID:25383030

  4. Between biochemists and embryologists -- the biochemical study of embryonic induction in the 1930s.

    PubMed

    Armon, Rony

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Hans Spemann of the "organizer" tissue and its ability to induce the formation of the amphibian embryo's neural tube inspired leading embryologists to attempt to elucidate embryonic inductions' underlying mechanism. Joseph Needham, who during the 1930s conducted research in biochemical embryology, proposed that embryonic induction is mediated by a specific chemical entity embedded in the inducing tissue, surmising that chemical to be a hormone of sterol-like structure. Along with embryologist Conrad H. Waddington, they conducted research aimed at the isolation and functional characterization of the underlying agent. As historians clearly pointed out, embryologists came to question Needham's biochemical approach; he failed to locate the hormone he sought and eventually abandoned his quest. Yet, this study finds that the difficulties he ran into resulted primarily from the limited conditions for conducting his experiments at his institute. In addition, Needham's research reflected the interests of leading biochemists in hormone and cancer research, because it offered novel theoretical models and experimental methods for engaging with the function of the hormones and carcinogens they isolated. Needham and Waddington were deterred neither by the mounting challenges nor by the limited experimental infrastructure. Like their colleagues in hormone and cancer research, they anticipated difficulties in attempting to establish causal links between complex biological phenomena and simple chemical triggering. PMID:21181430

  5. Biochemical and behavioural phenotyping of a mouse model for GAMT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Torremans, An; Marescau, Bart; Possemiers, Ilse; Van Dam, Debby; D'Hooge, Rudi; Isbrandt, Dirk; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2005-04-15

    Deficiency of guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT) is the first described creatine (CT) deficiency syndrome in man, biochemically characterized by accumulation of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and depletion of CT. Patients exhibit severe developmental and muscular problems. We created a mouse model for GAMT deficiency, which exerts biochemical changes comparable with those found in human GAMT-deficient subjects. CT and creatinine (CTN) levels are significantly decreased and GAA is increased in knockout (KO) mice. In patients, other guanidino compounds (GCs) appear to be altered as well, which may also contribute to the symptomatology. Extensive evaluation of GCs levels in the GAMT mouse model was therefore considered appropriate. Concentrations of 13 GCs in plasma, 24-h urine, brain and muscle of GAMT mice were measured. We also report on the detailed behavioural characterization of this model for GAMT deficiency. Besides an increase of GAA and a decrease of CT and CTN in plasma, 24-h urine, brain and muscle of KO mice, we observed a significant increase of other GCs in brain and muscle that was sometimes reflected in plasma and/or urine. KO mice displayed mild cognitive impairment. In general, it could be concluded that the GAMT mouse model is very useful for biochemical research of GAMT deficiency, but shows only a mild cognitive deficit. PMID:15792821

  6. The equation for prediction of blood viscosity from biochemical laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, B.; Yigitarslan, S.

    2015-03-01

    In most cases, the viscosity of blood is measured after adulteration with heparin or EDTA. The aim of the present research was to derive an equation that can be used for determination of viscosity from biochemical data. Blood samples taken from seven healthy people were analyzed in biochemical laboratory and their viscosities were measured by adding EDTA as anticoagulant. Ten parameters of biochemical laboratory including blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, thrombocytes) and their functional products that directly affect the blood viscosity were chosen. Several equations relating viscosity to those parameters were derived by using a computer program. According to the regression analysis of the functions derived, the viscosity equation was obtained. This equation can be used for determination of blood viscosity from classical laboratory analysis. The advantages of using the derived equation are elimination of anticoagulant addition and elimination of Fahraeus_Lindquist effect. After proving that the equation is acceptable for numerous people, apparent viscosity changes can be followed during any disease and successfulness of anticoagulant drugs can be investigated.

  7. Design and Fabrication of Piezoresistive Based Encapsulated Poly-Si Cantilevers for Bio/chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, N. P. Vamsi; Murthy, T. R. Srinivasa; Reddy, K. Jayaprakash; Sangeeth, K.; Hegde, G. M.

    Cantilever-based sensing is a growing research field not only within micro regime but also in nano technology. The technology offers a method for rapid, on-line and in-situ monitoring of specific bio/chemical substances by detecting the nanomechanical responses of a cantilever sensor. Cantilever with piezoresistive based detection scheme is more attractive because of its electronics compatibility. Majority of commercially available micromachined piezoresistive sensors are bulk micromachined devices and are fabricated using single crystal silicon wafers. As substrate properties are not important in surface micromachining, the expensive silicon wafers can be replaced by cheaper substrates, such as poly-silicon, glass or plastic. Here we have designed SU-8 based bio/chemical compatible micro electro mechanical device that includes an encapsulated polysilicon piezoresistor for bio/chemical sensing. In this paper we report the design, fabrication and analysis of the encapsulated poly-Si cantilevers. Design and theoretical analysis are carried out using Finite Element Analysis software. For fabrication of poly-silicon piezoresistive cantilevers we followed the surface micromachining process steps. Preliminary characterization of the cantilevers is presented.

  8. Estimating Biochemical Parameters of Tea (camellia Sinensis (L.)) Using Hyperspectral Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, M.; Skidmore, A. K.; Schlerf, M.; Liu, Y.; Wang, T.

    2012-07-01

    Tea (Camellia Sinensis (L.)) is an important economic crop and the market price of tea depends largely on its quality. This research aims to explore the potential of hyperspectral remote sensing on predicting the concentration of biochemical components, namely total tea polyphenols, as indicators of tea quality at canopy scale. Experiments were carried out for tea plants growing in the field and greenhouse. Partial least squares regression (PLSR), which has proven to be the one of the most successful empirical approach, was performed to establish the relationship between reflectance and biochemical concentration across six tea varieties in the field. Moreover, a novel integrated approach involving successive projections algorithms as band selection method and neural networks was developed and applied to detect the concentration of total tea polyphenols for one tea variety, in order to explore and model complex nonlinearity relationships between independent (wavebands) and dependent (biochemicals) variables. The good prediction accuracies (r2 > 0.8 and relative RMSEP < 10 %) achieved for tea plants using both linear (partial lease squares regress) and nonlinear (artificial neural networks) modelling approaches in this study demonstrates the feasibility of using airborne and spaceborne sensors to cover wide areas of tea plantation for in situ monitoring of tea quality cheaply and rapidly.

  9. Development of web based database on biochemical characteristics of rapeseed-mustard.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Bala, Manju

    2013-01-01

    Rapeseed-mustard oil is an essential dietary component, in India. The modification of rapeseed- mustard for fatty acid composition of seed oil to develop new genotypes having alternative oil and meal characteristics has been an important objective in quality breeding. Moreover, Breeding efforts in India are in progress to develop double low varieties to meet the internationally acceptable standards of oil and seed meal. So, information on the nutritional and anti-nutritional make-up of rapeseed-mustard oil and seed meal of the existing germplasm would be quite useful for the researchers especially breeders involved in the quality improvement programmes. In the present study database on biochemical characteristics of rapeseed-mustard has been developed using open source technology LAMP. The database provides the information on 14 important biochemical characters such as oil, saturated fatty acids, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, eicosenoic, erucic acid, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ω6/ω3 ratio, protein, glucosinolate, phenol, and fiber content. It offers web interface to submit and search data in the database. The database presently comprises biochemical characteristics of germplasm accessions, advance breeding lines and notified varieties of rapeseed-mustard. The database developed will be useful to the breeders in the selection of desired genotype with specific traits. PMID:23861571

  10. The Thermotolerant Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus Is a Useful Organism for Structural and Biochemical Studies of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hayashi; Shima, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Yuh; Hoshida, Hisashi; Kakuta, Soichiro; Kondo-Kakuta, Chika; Noda, Nobuo N; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Itoh, Takehiko; Akada, Rinji; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is a conserved degradation process in which autophagosomes are generated by cooperative actions of multiple autophagy-related (Atg) proteins. Previous studies using the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided various insights into the molecular basis of autophagy; however, because of the modest stability of several Atg proteins, structural and biochemical studies have been limited to a subset of Atg proteins, preventing us from understanding how multiple Atg proteins function cooperatively in autophagosome formation. With the goal of expanding the scope of autophagy research, we sought to identify a novel organism with stable Atg proteins that would be advantageous for in vitro analyses. Thus, we focused on a newly isolated thermotolerant yeast strain, Kluyveromyces marxianus DMKU3-1042, to utilize as a novel system elucidating autophagy. We developed experimental methods to monitor autophagy in K. marxianus cells, identified the complete set of K. marxianus Atg homologs, and confirmed that each Atg homolog is engaged in autophagosome formation. Biochemical and bioinformatic analyses revealed that recombinant K. marxianus Atg proteins have superior thermostability and solubility as compared with S. cerevisiae Atg proteins, probably due to the shorter primary sequences of KmAtg proteins. Furthermore, bioinformatic analyses showed that more than half of K. marxianus open reading frames are relatively short in length. These features make K. marxianus proteins broadly applicable as tools for structural and biochemical studies, not only in the autophagy field but also in other fields. PMID:26442587

  11. A method for zooming of nonlinear models of biochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Models of biochemical systems are typically complex, which may complicate the discovery of cardinal biochemical principles. It is therefore important to single out the parts of a model that are essential for the function of the system, so that the remaining non-essential parts can be eliminated. However, each component of a mechanistic model has a clear biochemical interpretation, and it is desirable to conserve as much of this interpretability as possible in the reduction process. Furthermore, it is of great advantage if we can translate predictions from the reduced model to the original model. Results In this paper we present a novel method for model reduction that generates reduced models with a clear biochemical interpretation. Unlike conventional methods for model reduction our method enables the mapping of predictions by the reduced model to the corresponding detailed predictions by the original model. The method is based on proper lumping of state variables interacting on short time scales and on the computation of fraction parameters, which serve as the link between the reduced model and the original model. We illustrate the advantages of the proposed method by applying it to two biochemical models. The first model is of modest size and is commonly occurring as a part of larger models. The second model describes glucose transport across the cell membrane in baker's yeast. Both models can be significantly reduced with the proposed method, at the same time as the interpretability is conserved. Conclusions We introduce a novel method for reduction of biochemical models that is compatible with the concept of zooming. Zooming allows the modeler to work on different levels of model granularity, and enables a direct interpretation of how modifications to the model on one level affect the model on other levels in the hierarchy. The method extends the applicability of the method that was previously developed for zooming of linear biochemical models to

  12. Evaluation of Nutritional Biochemical Parameters in Haemodialysis Patients over a Ten-year Period

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, AIQ; Castillo, RF; Jimenez, FJ Gomez; Negrillo, AM Nuñez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Protein-energy malnutrition as well as systemic inflammation and metabolic disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney failure who require renal replacement therapy (haemodialysis). Such malnutrition is a factor that significantly contributes to their morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated the nutritional status of haemodialysis patients by assessing biochemical and anthropometric parameters in order to determine whether these patients suffered disorders reflecting nutritional deterioration directly related to time on haemodialysis. Subjects and Method: This research comprised 90 patients of both genders with chronic kidney failure, who regularly received haemodialysis at our unit over a period of ten years. The patients' blood was tested quarterly for plasma albumin, total cholesterol and total proteins, and tested monthly for transferrin. The patients' weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were monitored. Body mass index was calculated using the formula: weight (kg)/height (m2) and classified in one of the following categories defined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Database on Body Mass Index: (i) underweight [BMI < 18.50], (ii) normal [BMI 18.50 – 24.99], (iii) overweight [BMI 25 – 29.99], (iv) obese [BMI ≥ 30]. Results: In the ten-year period of the study, the patients experienced a substantial decline in their biochemical parameters. Nevertheless, their BMI did not show any significant changes despite the patients' state of malnutrition. Conclusions: The prevalence of malnutrition in haemodialysis patients was evident. Nevertheless, the BMI of the subjects did not correspond to the biochemical parameters measured. Consequently, the results showed that the nutritional deterioration of these patients was mainly reflected in their biochemical parameters rather than in their anthropometric measurements. PMID:26426172

  13. Microfluidics meets metabolomics to reveal the impact of Campylobacter jejuni infection on biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Mercier, Kelly A; McRitchie, Susan; Cavallo, Tammy B; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Stewart, Delisha; Sumner, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Microfluidic devices that are currently being used in pharmaceutical research also have a significant potential for utilization in investigating exposure to infectious agents. We have established a microfluidic device cultured with Caco-2 cells, and utilized metabolomics to investigate the biochemical responses to the bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. In the microfluidic devices, Caco-2 cells polarize at day 5, are uniform, have defined brush borders and tight junctions, and form a mucus layer. Metabolomics analysis of cell culture media collected from both Caco-2 cell culture systems demonstrated a more metabolic homogenous biochemical profile in the media collected from microfluidic devices, compared with media collected from transwells. GeneGo pathway mapping indicated that aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis was perturbed by fluid flow, suggesting that fluid dynamics and shear stress impacts the cells translational quality control. Both microfluidic device and transwell culturing systems were used to investigate the impact of Campylobacter jejuni infection on biochemical processes. Caco-2 cells cultured in either system were infected at day 5 with C. jejuni 81-176 for 48 h. Metabolomics analysis clearly differentiated C. jejuni 81-176 infected and non-infected medias collected from the microfluidic devices, and demonstrated that C. jejuni 81-176 infection in microfluidic devices impacts branched-chain amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. In contrast, no distinction was seen in the biochemical profiles of infected versus non-infected media collected from cells cultured in transwells. Microfluidic culturing conditions demonstrated a more metabolically homogenous cell population, and present the opportunity for studying host-pathogen interactions for extended periods of time. PMID:27231016

  14. SIM-GC-MS analysis of biochemical evolution in Amanita genus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristoiu, Dumitru; Kovacs, Emoke Dalma; Cobzac, Codruta; Parvu, Marcel; Ristoiu, Tania; Kovacs, Melinda Haydee

    2010-11-01

    Amanita is one of the most well known basidiomycetes genus throughout the world because some of its species that are acknowledged due to their toxic and/or hallucinogenic properties. Considering these properties in the last decades become more important for scientist to dignify exactly the chemical content of these mushroom species. Latter researches shown that A. phalloides contain two main groups of toxins: the amatoxins and the phallotoxins. As regards A. rubescens there are not so much studies referring to its biochemical "fingerprint". Two species (A. rubescens and A. phalloides) of Amanita genus were studied in order to determine the biochemical hall-mark at nanoscale for these basidiomycete's species. Parts as caps, gills, flesh and stem of these mushrooms were analyzed on quadrupole mass spectrometer engaged with a gas chromatograph (GC-qMS) using selective ion monitoring mode (SIM). The biochemical profiles of these species had shown the presence of compounds like fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), alkaloids, and volatile compounds (including alcohol compounds, carbonyl compounds, terpenes). The levels of biochemical compounds from these species were compared between the two types of species and also between young, mature and old samples for the same species as well as between the parts of mushroom. After this comparison were between the two species it was observed that in case of A. phalloides the alkaloid content were higher usually with almost 50 %. As regards presence of volatile compounds they have almost similar level in both mushroom species. Considering the levels of fatty acid methyl esters, their levels were higher with 30 - 40 % in case of A. rubescens.

  15. A biochemical/biophysical 3D FE intervertebral disc model.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Y; Huyghe, J M; van Donkelaar, C C; Ito, K

    2010-10-01

    Present research focuses on different strategies to preserve the degenerated disc. To assure long-term success of novel approaches, favorable mechanical conditions in the disc tissue are essential. To evaluate these, a model is required that can determine internal mechanical conditions which cannot be directly measured as a function of assessable biophysical characteristics. Therefore, the objective is to evaluate if constitutive and material laws acquired on isolated samples of nucleus and annulus tissue can be used directly in a whole-organ 3D FE model to describe intervertebral disc behavior. The 3D osmo-poro-visco-hyper-elastic disc (OVED) model describes disc behavior as a function of annulus and nucleus tissue biochemical composition, organization and specific constituent properties. The description of the 3D collagen network was enhanced to account for smaller fibril structures. Tissue mechanical behavior tests on isolated nucleus and annulus samples were simulated with models incorporating tissue composition to calculate the constituent parameter values. The obtained constitutive laws were incorporated into the whole-organ model. The overall behavior and disc properties of the model were corroborated against in vitro creep experiments of human L4/L5 discs. The OVED model simulated isolated tissue experiments on confined compression and uniaxial tensile test and whole-organ disc behavior. This was possible, provided that secondary fiber structures were accounted for. The fair agreement (radial bulge, axial creep deformation and intradiscal pressure) between model and experiment was obtained using constitutive properties that are the same for annulus and nucleus. Both tissue models differed in the 3D OVED model only by composition. The composition-based modeling presents the advantage of reducing the numbers of material parameters to a minimum and to use tissue composition directly as input. Hence, this approach provides the possibility to describe internal

  16. Impact of Delayed Analysis in Avian Blood Biochemical Values Measured With the Abaxis VetScan VS2.

    PubMed

    Hoppes, Sharman M; Boyd, Janice D; Brightsmith, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    For biochemical analysis with a point-of-care biochemical analyzer, standard procedure is to analyze the sample as rapidly as possible (<1 hour) after venipuncture to minimize any changes in analyte concentrations that might occur over time. However, under some circumstances, such as when collecting blood at remote field sites, a longer delay may be unavoidable. This study evaluates the effect of delayed analysis time under unrefrigerated conditions on avian (psittacine) biochemical analyte concentrations obtained with the VetScan VS2 using Avian/Reptilian Profile Plus rotors. Venipuncture was performed on a group of 36 psittacine birds as part of routine health checks in a research aviary (Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine, College Station, TX, USA). Whole blood was kept at room temperature and analyzed at 4 time intervals: <1, 3, 6, and 24 hours after venipuncture. At 3 hours or less after collection, most biochemical parameters changed by <2%, with the exception of phosphorus (decrease of about -9%). Major increases by 24 hours after collection were observed in phosphorus (+67%) and potassium (+103%) concentrations, whereas aspartate aminotransferase (AST), uric acid, glucose, and sodium concentrations also showed statistically significant changes. Our results suggest that accurate information from analyses using the VetScan VS2 may be obtained for up to 3 hours after venipuncture without refrigeration, but researchers and clinicians do need to exercise care when interpreting blood chemistry analyte concentrations obtained after multihour delays between venipuncture and sample analysis. PMID:26378666

  17. Determining the gross biochemical composition of cells and tissue with Raman spectrosocpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Dominguez, Jorge; Carpenter, Susan; Powers, Tamara M.; Guerra, Anabel; Short, Kurt W.; Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Freyer, James P.

    2006-02-01

    The biochemical composition of mammalian cells has been estimated by Raman spectroscopy and the results compared with other biochemical methods. The Raman spectroscopy estimates were performed by fitting measured Raman and infrared spectra of dense cell suspensions to a linear combination of basis components (RNA, DNA, protein, lipid, glycoen). The Raman spectroscopy results are compared to biochemical analyses performed by extraction and quantfication of the biochemical components. Both absolute and relative measurements of biochemical composition are compared. Both the Raman and biochemical results indicate that there are signficant differences in gross biochemical composition dependent on growth stage and tumorigneicity.

  18. Identification of Biochemical Network Modules Based on Shortest Retroactive Distances

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; Hassoun, Soha; Lee, Kyongbum

    2011-01-01

    Modularity analysis offers a route to better understand the organization of cellular biochemical networks as well as to derive practically useful, simplified models of these complex systems. While there is general agreement regarding the qualitative properties of a biochemical module, there is no clear consensus on the quantitative criteria that may be used to systematically derive these modules. In this work, we investigate cyclical interactions as the defining characteristic of a biochemical module. We utilize a round trip distance metric, termed Shortest Retroactive Distance (ShReD), to characterize the retroactive connectivity between any two reactions in a biochemical network and to group together network components that mutually influence each other. We evaluate the metric on two types of networks that feature feedback interactions: (i) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and (ii) liver metabolism supporting drug transformation. For both networks, the ShReD partitions found hierarchically arranged modules that confirm biological intuition. In addition, the partitions also revealed modules that are less intuitive. In particular, ShReD-based partition of the metabolic network identified a ‘redox’ module that couples reactions of glucose, pyruvate, lipid and drug metabolism through shared production and consumption of NADPH. Our results suggest that retroactive interactions arising from feedback loops and metabolic cycles significantly contribute to the modularity of biochemical networks. For metabolic networks, cofactors play an important role as allosteric effectors that mediate the retroactive interactions. PMID:22102800

  19. Maximizing the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Alessandro; Popleteeva, Marina; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2013-01-01

    Most recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have focused on achieving spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit. However, the inherent capability of fluorescence microscopy to non-invasively resolve different biochemical or physical environments in biological samples has not yet been formally described, because an adequate and general theoretical framework is lacking. Here, we develop a mathematical characterization of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence detection with Fisher information analysis. To improve the precision and the resolution of quantitative imaging methods, we demonstrate strategies for the optimization of fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence anisotropy and hyperspectral detection, as well as different multi-dimensional techniques. We describe optimized imaging protocols, provide optimization algorithms and describe precision and resolving power in biochemical imaging thanks to the analysis of the general properties of Fisher information in fluorescence detection. These strategies enable the optimal use of the information content available within the limited photon-budget typically available in fluorescence microscopy. This theoretical foundation leads to a generalized strategy for the optimization of multi-dimensional optical detection, and demonstrates how the parallel detection of all properties of fluorescence can maximize the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy, an approach we term Hyper Dimensional Imaging Microscopy (HDIM). Our work provides a theoretical framework for the description of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence microscopy, irrespective of spatial resolution, and for the development of a new class of microscopes that exploit multi-parametric detection systems. PMID:24204821

  20. Microstereolithography and its application to biochemical IC chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koji; Maruo, Shoji; Hasegawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Takao

    2001-06-01

    The world's first micro stereo lithography, named IH process, was proposed and developed by the speaker in 1992. By now, several types of micro stereo lithography systems have been developed. Three-dimensional resolution of solidification has reached to 0.2 micron at present. These 3D micro fabrication processes using UV curable polymer gave a big impact on not only MEMS but also optics. The latest version of IH process enables us to make a movable micro mechanism without assemble process or sacrificial layer technique often used in silicon process. It is well known that the IH process is the mother of two-photon micro stereo lithography and its applications. Recently new micro chemical device named Biochemical IC Chip was proposed and developed by the speaker. This chip is based on the module IC chip-set like today's TTL family. IH process enable to make the biochemical IC including real three-dimensional micro fluid channels. Various kinds of Biochemical IC chips such as micro pump, switching valve, reactor, concentrator and detector have already been fabricated successfully. Basic performance of micro chemical devices constructed by the biochemical IC chips were demonstrated. The biochemical IC chips will open new bioscience and medicine based on innovative technology.

  1. Maximizing the Biochemical Resolving Power of Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Alessandro; Popleteeva, Marina; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2013-01-01

    Most recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have focused on achieving spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit. However, the inherent capability of fluorescence microscopy to non-invasively resolve different biochemical or physical environments in biological samples has not yet been formally described, because an adequate and general theoretical framework is lacking. Here, we develop a mathematical characterization of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence detection with Fisher information analysis. To improve the precision and the resolution of quantitative imaging methods, we demonstrate strategies for the optimization of fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence anisotropy and hyperspectral detection, as well as different multi-dimensional techniques. We describe optimized imaging protocols, provide optimization algorithms and describe precision and resolving power in biochemical imaging thanks to the analysis of the general properties of Fisher information in fluorescence detection. These strategies enable the optimal use of the information content available within the limited photon-budget typically available in fluorescence microscopy. This theoretical foundation leads to a generalized strategy for the optimization of multi-dimensional optical detection, and demonstrates how the parallel detection of all properties of fluorescence can maximize the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy, an approach we term Hyper Dimensional Imaging Microscopy (HDIM). Our work provides a theoretical framework for the description of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence microscopy, irrespective of spatial resolution, and for the development of a new class of microscopes that exploit multi-parametric detection systems. PMID:24204821

  2. Techno-Economic Analysis of Bioconversion of Methane into Biofuel and Biochemical (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Q.; Tao, L.; Pienkos, P .T.; Guarnieri, M.; Palou-Rivera, I.

    2014-10-01

    In light of the relatively low price of natural gas and increasing demands of liquid transportation fuels and high-value chemicals, attention has begun to turn to novel biocatalyst for conversion of methane (CH4) into biofuels and biochemicals [1]. A techno-economic analysis (TEA) was performed for an integrated biorefinery process using biological conversion of methane, such as carbon yield, process efficiency, productivity (both lipid and acid), natural gas and other raw material prices, etc. This analysis is aimed to identify research challenges as well provide guidance for technology development.

  3. Computer simulation of initial events in the biochemical mechanisms of DNA damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Holley, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the systematic and quantitative correlation between the physical events of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and the ensuing chemical and biochemical processes leading to DNA damage is one of the goals in radiation research. Significant progress has been made toward achieving the stated goal by using theoretical modeling techniques. These techniques are strongly dependent on computer simulation procedures. A review of such techniques with details of various stages of simulation development, including a comparison with available experimental data, is presented in this article.

  4. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

  5. Computer simulation of initial events in the biochemical mechanisms of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Holley, W R

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the systematic and quantitative correlation between the physical events of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and the ensuing chemical and biochemical processes leading to DNA damage is one of the goals in radiation research. Significant progress has been made toward achieving the stated goal by using theoretical modeling techniques. These techniques are strongly dependent on computer simulation procedures. A review of such techniques with details of various stages of simulation development, including a comparison with available experimental data, is presented in this article. PMID:11537895

  6. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  7. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    PubMed

    Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Niemeyer, Claudia; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Nunes, Adauto L V; Rameh-de-Albuquerque, Luciana C; Sant'Anna, Sávio S; Catão-Dias, José L

    2012-09-01

    The hyacinth macaw (Anodorhyncus hyacinthinus), considered the largest psittacine bird species in the world, is an endangered species, with a remaining population of approximately 6500 birds in the wild. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to verify differences related to sex, samples from 29 hyacinth macaws (14 males, 15 females) were obtained from birds apprehended from illegal wildlife trade and subsequently housed at the Sorocaba Zoo, Brazil. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Compared with published reference values, differences were found in mean concentrations of total red blood cell count, corpuscular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin level, total white blood cell count, aspartate aminotransferase level, creatine kinase concentration, alkaline phosphatase concentration, and phosphorus level. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this endangered species in captivity or rehabilitation centers. PMID:23156973

  8. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Taha, Abid Sharif; Watson, Ryan William; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Bürkle, Marcellus; Hammer, Sven

    2007-12-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is considered the world's most endangered parrot, with the last wild bird disappearing in 2001 and only 74 birds in captivity. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to look for differences relative to sex, age, and season, we obtained blood samples from 46 captive Spix's macaws (23 male, 23 female) housed in aviaries at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Adult and juvenile birds differed in mean concentrations of glucose, total protein, amylase, cholesterol, and phosphorus; in percentages of heterophils and lymphocytes; and in the absolute lymphocyte count. Total protein, cholesterol, and phosphorus concentrations; hematocrit; and heterophil and lymphocyte counts differed significantly by season. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this highly endangered species. PMID:18351006

  9. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  10. Biochemical markers in oral submucous fibrosis: A review and update

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, V V; Satelur, K; Komali, Y

    2013-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant oral condition effectively linked to the causative habit of chewing areca nut. Since its first description in the 1950s, numerous epidemiological, biochemical, histological, and genetic studies have been reported. While most studies point out to the cause and effect of areca nut, co-additive factors are also implicated in the progression and malignant transformation of this condition. Biochemical investigations have concentrated on outlining such changes in the blood, serum or tissues of these patients and have given insights on the possible pathogenesis of OSMF. This article attempts to compile details of biochemical investigations in OSMF and summarize and infer on the findings. PMID:24348612

  11. [Biochemical markers of bone metabolism and their importance].

    PubMed

    Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Schwetz, V

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory analyses of biochemical markers for bone and mineral metabolism can play a key role in the assessment of patients with osteoporosis. They may help to assess bone turnover in the diagnostic work-up and aid decision-making as well as selection of pharmaceutical therapy options. Recent publications on therapy response have shown that biochemical markers of bone turnover are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy success in individual osteoporosis patients and the assessment of bone mineral density gain during therapy. PMID:27146404

  12. Physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    This review considers the physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation. The composition of bile and structure of a bile canaliculus, biosynthesis and conjugation of bile acids, bile phospholipids, formation of bile micellar structures, and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids are described. In general, the review focuses on the molecular physiology of the transporting systems of the hepatocyte sinusoidal and apical membranes. Knowledge of physiological and biochemical basis of bile formation has implications for understanding the mechanisms of development of pathological processes, associated with diseases of the liver and biliary tract. PMID:24259965

  13. Susceptibility to antibiotics and biochemical properties of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strains.

    PubMed

    Dzierzewicz, Z; Cwalina, B; Jaworska-Kik, M; Weglarz, L; Wilczok, T

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility to several antibiotics and biochemical properties of intestinal and soil strains of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria were investigated using the tests: ATB ANA, Sceptor Anaerobic MIC/ID and API ZYM. It was demonstrated that the D. desulfuricans strains were resistant to penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, metronidazole, erythromycin, rifampicin and teicoplanin. The strains initially susceptible to imipenem became resistant to this drug following 72 h incubation with it. Of 25 analyzed antibiotics there was none that after 72 h action on the bacteria was effective in relation to all of the investigated strains. The differences in susceptibility of D. desulfuricans strains to antibiotics were not associated with the strains' biochemical properties. PMID:12197616

  14. Biochemical parameters of plants as indicators of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, A K; Gautam, Mukesh

    2007-01-01

    In the present study species like Mangifera indica, Linn., Cassia fistula, Linn., and Eucalyptus hybrid were exposed to different air pollution load for short duration (active biomonitoring). Variation in biochemical parameters like chlorophyll, protein, soluble sugar free amino acid, ascorbic acid, nitrate reductase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in the leaves were found to be pollution load dependent. These variations can be used as indicators of air pollution for early diagnosis of stress or as a marker for physiological damage to trees prior to the onset of visible injury symptoms. Just by analyzing these biochemical indicators air quality can also be assessed. PMID:17717999

  15. [Genetic analysis of biochemical differences of Yersinia pestis strains].

    PubMed

    Eroshenko, G A; Odinokov, G N; Kukleva, L M; Kutyrev, V V

    2012-01-01

    Literature data and results of our experimental studies on genetic base of biochemical differentiation of Yersinia pestis strains of various subspecies and biovars are summarized in the review. Data on variability of genes coding biochemical features (sugar and alcohol fermentation, nitrate reduction), the differential development of which are the base of existing phenotypic schemes of Y. pestis strains classification, are presented. Variability of these genes was shown to have possible use for the development of genetic classification of Y. pestis strains of various subspecies and biovars. PMID:22830282

  16. Rapid methods for biochemical testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberger, P C; Blazevic, D J

    1974-11-01

    Rapid biochemical tests for nitrate, indole, gelatin, starch, esculin, and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside were performed on 112 strains of anaerobic bacteria. All tests were incubated under aerobic conditions, and results were recorded within 4 h. The tests for nitrate, indole, and starch showed a 95% or greater correlation when compared to the standard biochemical tests. Tests for esculin and gelatin showed an agreement of 86 and 77%, respectively. PathoTec test strips for nitrate, indole, esculin, o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, Voges-Proskauer, and urease were also tested and showed encouraging results. PMID:4613268

  17. Monotone and near-monotone biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Monotone subsystems have appealing properties as components of larger networks, since they exhibit robust dynamical stability and predictability of responses to perturbations. This suggests that natural biological systems may have evolved to be, if not monotone, at least close to monotone in the sense of being decomposable into a “small” number of monotone components, In addition, recent research has shown that much insight can be attained from decomposing networks into monotone subsystems and the analysis of the resulting interconnections using tools from control theory. This paper provides an expository introduction to monotone systems and their interconnections, describing the basic concepts and some of the main mathematical results in a largely informal fashion. PMID:19003437

  18. Hematologic and biochemical reference intervals for specific pathogen free 6-week-old Hampshire-Yorkshire crossbred pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hematologic and biochemical reference intervals depend on many factors, including age. A review of the literature highlights the lack of reference intervals for 6-wk-old specific pathogen free (SPF) Hampshire-Yorkshire crossbred pigs. For translational research, 6-wk-old pigs represent an important animal model for both human juvenile colitis and diabetes mellitus type 2 given the similarities between the porcine and human gastrointestinal maturation process. The aim of this study was to determine reference intervals for hematological and biochemical parameters in healthy 6-wk-old crossbred pigs. Blood samples were collected from 66 clinically healthy Hampshire-Yorkshire pigs. The pigs were 6 wks old, represented both sexes, and were housed in a SPF facility. Automated hematological and biochemical analysis were performed using an ADVIA 120 Hematology System and a Cobas 6000 C501 Clinical Chemistry Analyzer. Results Reference intervals were calculated using both parametric and nonparametric methods. The mean, median, minimum, and maximum values were calculated. Conclusion As pigs are used more frequently as medical models of human disease, having reference intervals for commonly measured hematological and biochemical parameters in 6-wk-old pigs will be useful. The reference intervals calculated in this study will aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of both naturally occurring and experimentally induced disease. In comparison to published reference intervals for older non SPF pigs, notable differences in leukocyte populations, and in levels of sodium, potassium, glucose, protein, and alkaline phosphatase were observed. PMID:24410946

  19. Overall View of Chemical and Biochemical Weapons

    PubMed Central

    Pitschmann, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a brief history of chemical warfare, which culminated in the signing of the Chemical Weapons Convention. It describes the current level of chemical weapons and the risk of using them. Furthermore, some traditional technology for the development of chemical weapons, such as increasing toxicity, methods of overcoming chemical protection, research on natural toxins or the introduction of binary technology, has been described. In accordance with many parameters, chemical weapons based on traditional technologies have achieved the limit of their development. There is, however, a big potential of their further development based on the most recent knowledge of modern scientific and technical disciplines, particularly at the boundary of chemistry and biology. The risk is even higher due to the fact that already, today, there is a general acceptance of the development of non-lethal chemical weapons at a technologically higher level. In the future, the chemical arsenal will be based on the accumulation of important information from the fields of chemical, biological and toxin weapons. Data banks obtained in this way will be hardly accessible and the risk of their materialization will persist. PMID:24902078

  20. Behavior and biochemical analysis of phencyclidine

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: (1) to develop the radial maze as a tool for the study of phencyclidine (PCP) and related drugs; (2) to evaluate verapamil and colonidine, two proposed treatments for PCP intoxication, as potential antagonists of PCP in the radial maze; and (3) to evaluate the functionality of two distinct types of PCP binding sites as receptors by comparing, for a series of drugs, activity in competitive binding experiments with behavioral activity. The radial maze proved to be a useful tool for the study of PCP and related drugs. With training, rats became highly efficient at obtaining the 8 food pellets placed in the maze. However, PCP and related drugs disrupted this performance, causing numerous reentries into previously visited arms. Results of correlation analyses comparing rank-order affinities with rank-order potencies of (+)SKF-10,047 (the prototypical sigma-opioid agonist), PCP, and several PCP analogs support the involvement of ({sup 3}H)-1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl piperidine binding sites (TCP sites) in mediating both the discriminative stimulus properties of PCP and disruption of performance in a 4-arm radial maze.

  1. Biochemical Parameters of Orienteers Competing in a Long Distance Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikan, Vladimir; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Measured important biochemical parameters in a group of orienteers two hours before beginning and immediately after an orienteering marathon. Found levels of dehydration. Suggests a drinking regimen which is designed for orienteering races. Concludes that no runner having kidney or liver abnormalities or changes in the urine should be allowed to…

  2. BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF TWO PROMOTERS OF HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of administration of two promoters of hepatocarcinogenesis on five hepatic biochemical parameters were examined in adult female rats. Two treatments of phenobarbital (100 mg/kg) 21 and 4 hours before sacrifice caused large increases in hepatic ODC activity and cytochr...

  3. [Interpopulation differeces biochemical adaptation at population of Gorny Altai].

    PubMed

    Chanchaeva, E A; Aĭzman, R I

    2014-01-01

    The factual nutrition of aborigines Russian, altay and kazah nationalities of Gorny Altai were studied. As a result, interpopulating differences of population's nutrition witch quantitative consumption macronutrients have been influence and dependence on the nationality has been determined. Biochemical parameters of blood with quantitative composition of ration's macronutrients are correlated. PMID:25272709

  4. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  5. ANALYSIS OF FETOTOXICITY USING BIOCHEMICAL ENDPOINTS OF ORGAN DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biochemical differentiation of the brain, lungs, liver, and kidneys of the late gestation rat fetus was examined to characterize the immediate implications of retarded growth on fetal development. Initially, the normative profile of development of the brain (weight, DNA conte...

  6. Process review of lignocellulose biochemical conversion to fuel ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review is meant to give a general technical review of the state-of-the-art in process technology for the biochemical conversion of lignocellulose to fuel ethanol. The proceeding details the chemical structure of biomass and basic process steps needed for extracting carbohydrates as sugars and ...

  7. Biochemical and physiological consequences of the Apollo flight diet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hander, E. W.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.; Rummel, J.; Rambaut, P.; Johnson, P. C.

    1971-01-01

    Six male subjects subsisting on a typical Apollo flight diet for five consecutive days were evaluated for changes in biochemical and physiological status. Laboratory examinations failed to demonstrate any significant changes of the kind previously attributed to weightlessness, such as in serum electrolytes, endocrine values, body fluid, or hematologic parameters.

  8. Variation of biochemical gene markers in the population of Tomsk

    SciTech Connect

    Kucher, A.N.; Ivanova, O.F.; Puzyrev, V.P.; Tsymbalyuk, I.V.; Trotsenko, B.A.

    1994-11-01

    Variation of seven biochemical gene markers (Tf, Gc, Hp, ACP1, PGM1, PGD, and EsD) in the population of Tomsk was examined. The genetic structure of this population is compared to that of other urban populations from different regions of Russia. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Biochemical basis of the effects of modified and controlled atmospheres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review provides updated information on the biochemical and physiological effects of modified and controlled atmospheres (MA & CA) on fruits and vegetables. In addition to conventional MA and CA storage which uses low oxygen and high carbon dioxide, there has been some interest recently in usin...

  10. Biochemical profile of gin women laborers in Tirupur

    PubMed Central

    Jannet, J. V.; Jeyanthi, G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Ginning factories discharge large amounts of cotton dusts that lead to decreased pulmonary function in the exposed subjects. An attempt was made to study the biochemical profile of women laborers employed in ginning factory located in Tirupur, a textile based city in Coimbatore district of Tamilnadu, India. The blood parameters that were analyzed were hemoglobin, total and differential count of leucocytes, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), total proteins, immunoglobulins, total and isozymic content of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and histamine. Student's ‘t’ test was carried out to compare the results with the control women. Correlation analysis was done between/within the biochemical parameters and also between the pulmonary function parameters results reported earlier by Jannet and Jeyanthi. Significant changes in the levels of hemoglobin, ESR, immunoglobins and histamine were reported in this study. Correlation studies between the pulmonary function parameters and biochemical parameters revealed significant negative correlation of FVC, FEV1 and PEF with ESR (P <0.05). There was also positive correlation between immunoglobin G and histamine. A significant negative correlation was observed between LDH1 and LDH3 and between albumin and γ globulin. The study suggested that the ginning factory women laborers exhibited significant changes in the levels of certain biochemical parameters apart from the pulmonary functional changes. PMID:21938218

  11. Annelid Aminotransferase Activity--An Exercise in Basic Biochemical Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, A. R.; Alcock, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A practical exercise is described that allows students to investigate a specific problem using a variety of biochemical techniques. The need for a thorough understanding of the theoretical principles underlying these processes is emphasized. A program of private study and assessment is suggested to enable the progress of students to be followed.…

  12. BIOCHEMICAL INDICES OF EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS: A SPECIES COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existence of endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment has been clearly established in several studies. Exposure of organisms to both natural and synthetic xenoestrogens have been found to alter biochemical homeostatis and, in some cases, result in reproductive and d...

  13. [Experiments using rats on Kosmos biosatellites: morphologic and biochemical studies].

    PubMed

    Il'in, E A; Kaplanskiĭ, A S; Savina, E A

    1989-01-01

    Results of morphological and biochemical investigations of rats flown on Cosmos biosatellites are discussed. It is emphasized that most changes occurring during exposure to microgravity are directly or indirectly related to lower musculoskeletal loads which in turn produce deconditioning of different physiological systems and organism as a whole. It is concluded that this deconditioning is associated with both metabolic and structural changes. PMID:2685464

  14. Biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Diming; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-01-15

    Smartphone has been widely integrated with sensors, such as test strips, sensor chips, and hand-held detectors, for biochemical detections due to its portability and ubiquitous availability. Utilizing built-in function modules, smartphone is often employed as controller, analyzer, and displayer for rapid, real-time, and point-of-care monitoring, which can significantly simplify design and reduce cost of the detecting systems. This paper presents a review of biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detections. The biosensors and bioelectronics based on smartphone can mainly be classified into biosensors using optics, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemistry, and near-field communication. The developments of these biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone are reviewed along with typical biochemical detecting cases. Sensor strategies, detector attachments, and coupling methods are highlighted to show designs of the compact, lightweight, and low-cost sensor systems. The performances and advantages of these designs are introduced with their applications in healthcare diagnosis, environment monitoring, and food evaluation. With advances in micro-manufacture, sensor technology, and miniaturized electronics, biosensor and bioelectronic devices on smartphone can be used to perform biochemical detections as common and convenient as electronic tag readout in foreseeable future. PMID:26319170

  15. Biochemical and Structural Studies of RNA Modification and Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Chio Mui

    2009-01-01

    RNA modification, RNA interference, and RNA repair are important events in the cell. This thesis presents three projects related to these three fields. By using both biochemical and structural methods, we characterized enzymatic activities of pseudouridine synthase TruD, solved the structure of "A. aeolicus" GidA, and reconstituted a novel…

  16. Physiologic and biochemical aspects of skeletal muscle denervation and reinnervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Mayer, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the physiologic and biochemical changes that occur in mammalian skeletal muscle following denervation and reinnervation are considered and some comparisons are made with changes observed following altered motor function. The nature of the trophic influence by which nerves control muscle properties are discussed, including the effects of choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase and the role of the acetylcholine receptor.

  17. MATLAB-Based Teaching Modules in Biochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kilho; Comolli, Noelle K.; Kelly, William J.; Huang, Zuyi

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models play an important role in biochemical engineering. For example, the models developed in the field of systems biology have been used to identify drug targets to treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms. In addition, competitive binding models for chromatography processes have been developed to predict expanded…

  18. Classic and contemporary approaches to modeling biochemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William W.; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent interest in modeling biochemical networks raises questions about the relationship between often complex mathematical models and familiar arithmetic concepts from classical enzymology, and also about connections between modeling and experimental data. This review addresses both topics by familiarizing readers with key concepts (and terminology) in the construction, validation, and application of deterministic biochemical models, with particular emphasis on a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Networks of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are the natural language for describing enzyme kinetics in a mass action approximation. We illustrate this point by showing how the familiar Briggs-Haldane formulation of Michaelis-Menten kinetics derives from the outer (or quasi-steady-state) solution of a dynamical system of ODEs describing a simple reaction under special conditions. We discuss how parameters in the Michaelis-Menten approximation and in the underlying ODE network can be estimated from experimental data, with a special emphasis on the origins of uncertainty. Finally, we extrapolate from a simple reaction to complex models of multiprotein biochemical networks. The concepts described in this review, hitherto of interest primarily to practitioners, are likely to become important for a much broader community of cellular and molecular biologists attempting to understand the promise and challenges of “systems biology” as applied to biochemical mechanisms. PMID:20810646

  19. USE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS AS BIOCHEMICAL REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) from the nation is managed predominantly in anitary landfills. ue to the physical, chemical and biological makeup f he aste he landfill acts as a biochemical reactor and degrades the organic matter. urrent practices are to use covers and liners as engi...

  20. Biochemical basis of heterogeneity in acute presentations of propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Sindgikar, Seema Pavaman; Rao, Suchetha; Shenoy, Rathika D; Kamath, Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA), an uncommon organic acidemia has varied clinical and metabolic presentation causing difficulty and delay in the diagnosis. We report a case of PA in an infant who presented with failure to thrive, acute encephalopathy due to severe hyperammonemia without acidosis and fungal sepsis. The biochemical basis of severe hyperammonemia is discussed. PMID:24381430

  1. [About the biochemical criteria of heroin (narcotic) intoxication].

    PubMed

    Korshunov, G V; BYchkov, E N; Borodulin, V B; Arsent'eva, L A; Serkova, S A; Bel'skaia, N A

    2013-06-01

    The article deals with the data of study of biochemical indicators and activity of particular proteolytic enzymes in blood serum of patients with heroin drug addiction. The results can be applied to detect the typical laboratory changes intrinsic to this kind of intoxication. PMID:24340942

  2. Metstoich--Teaching Quantitative Metabolism and Energetics in Biochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kelvin W. W.; Barford, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Metstoich, a metabolic calculator developed for teaching, can provide a novel way to teach quantitative metabolism to biochemical engineering students. It can also introduce biochemistry/life science students to the quantitative aspects of life science subjects they have studied. Metstoich links traditional biochemistry-based metabolic approaches…

  3. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 1. MODEL FORMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multilayer biochemical dry deposition model has been developed based on the NOAA Multilayer Model (MLM) to study gaseous exchanges between the soil, plants, and the atmosphere. Most of the parameterizations and submodels have been updated or replaced. The numerical integration ...

  4. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 2. MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multilayer biochemical dry deposition model (MLBC) described in the accompanying paper was tested against half-hourly eddy correlation data from six field sites under a wide range of climate conditions with various plant types. Modeled CO2, O3, SO2<...

  5. Predictive factors for biochemical recurrence in radical prostatectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Orcun; Un, Sitki; Yoldas, Mehmet; İsoglu, Cemal Selcuk; Karabicak, Mustafa; Ergani, Batuhan; Koc, Gokhan; Zorlu, Ferruh; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radical prostatectomy (RP) is considered the best treatment for the management of localized prostate cancer in patients with life expectancy over 10 years. However, a complete recovery is not guaranteed for all patients who received/underwent RP treatment. Biochemical recurrence is frequently observed during the post-operative follow-up period. The main objective in this study is to evaluate the predictive factors of biochemical recurrence in localized prostate cancer patients who underwent RP surgery Material and methods The study included 352 patients with prostate cancer treated by RP at a single institution between February 2004 and June 2014. Detailed pathological and follow-up data of all patients were obtained and analyzed to determine the results. Results Mean follow-up duration was 39.7 months. 83 patients (23%) experienced biochemical recurrence (BCR) during the follow-up period. Mean BCR duration range was 6.56 (1–41) months. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, Gleason score (GS), PSA and extra-capsular tumour spread (ECS) variables were found to be statistically significant as BCR predictive factors. Conclusions According to our study results, it is thought that PSA, GS and ECS can all be used for guidance in choosing a treatment modality for post-RP biochemical recurrence and metastatic disease as predictive factors. However, there is no consensus in this matter and it is still debated. PMID:26855791

  6. BIOCHEMICAL AND NEUROPATHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF TRIPHENYL PHOSPHITE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The putative neurotoxicity of the organophosphorus compound triphenyl phosphite (TPP) was examined in Long Evans, adult male rats. Animals were exposed to two 1.0 ml/kg (1184 mg/kg) injections (sc) of TPP spaced 1 week apart and sampled for biochemical and neuropathological exami...

  7. Study on color difference estimation method of medicine biochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhong; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Hongxia; Sun, Jiashi; Zhou, Fengkun

    2006-01-01

    The biochemical analysis in medicine is an important inspection and diagnosis method in hospital clinic. The biochemical analysis of urine is one important item. The Urine test paper shows corresponding color with different detection project or different illness degree. The color difference between the standard threshold and the test paper color of urine can be used to judge the illness degree, so that further analysis and diagnosis to urine is gotten. The color is a three-dimensional physical variable concerning psychology, while reflectance is one-dimensional variable; therefore, the estimation method of color difference in urine test can have better precision and facility than the conventional test method with one-dimensional reflectance, it can make an accurate diagnose. The digital camera is easy to take an image of urine test paper and is used to carry out the urine biochemical analysis conveniently. On the experiment, the color image of urine test paper is taken by popular color digital camera and saved in the computer which installs a simple color space conversion (RGB -> XYZ -> L *a *b *)and the calculation software. Test sample is graded according to intelligent detection of quantitative color. The images taken every time were saved in computer, and the whole illness process will be monitored. This method can also use in other medicine biochemical analyses that have relation with color. Experiment result shows that this test method is quick and accurate; it can be used in hospital, calibrating organization and family, so its application prospect is extensive.

  8. Laser correlation spectroscopy for determining biochemical parameters of whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolevich, Alexander N.; Prigun, Natali P.

    1999-02-01

    Correlation spectroscopy methods are widely used to study dynamical, morphological and optical parameters of biological objects. This work makes an attempt to explore these methods (in particular, due to their expressively) for diagnosing whole blood under normal and pathological states (cardiovascular diseases). Not only morphological characteristics of blood elements are known to change under diseases, but also its biochemical composition does. However, the biochemical analysis of blood is rather time and labor consuming. The paper is directed to investigate the correlation between optical characteristics of light scattering by blood and its biochemical parameters. Samples of whole blood were in vitro investigated for ills with different diagnoses and extend of cardio-vascular diseases as well as for essentially healthy donors. Simultaneous with the above characteristics we have monitored volumetric concentration of lipoproteides, erythrocytes and hemoglobin. The analysis of obtained results has show that the width of spectrum is greater for samples from healthy persons then from ills. Comparison of measured data on frequency spectrum, diffuse reflectivity's, biochemical and morphological blood parameters of the studied samples has shown the high correlation between the spectrum halfwidth and concentration of lipoproteides, erythrocyte setting rate. Some poorer correlation with spectrum occurs for concentration of hemoglobin and cholesterol. Thus, these are revealed an opportunity to design on express non-invasive method for determining the possibility of atherosclerotic disease.

  9. The Stereochemistry of Biochemical Molecules: A Subject to Revisit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centelles, Josep J.; Imperial, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Although Fischer's convention for stereoisomers is useful for simple molecules, the stereochemistry of complex biochemical molecules is often poorly indicated in textbooks. This article reports on errors in stereochemistry of complex hydrosoluble vitamin B12 molecule. Twenty-five popular biochemistry textbooks were examined for their treatment of…

  10. Determination of antifungal, biochemical and physiological features of Trichoderma koningiopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichoderma koningiopsis is a species that has been recently identified and has not yet been published, but is in press. Due to the absence of reported data on this species, antifungal, biochemical and physiological features were analyzed for the Trichoderma koningiopsis strain isolated from root se...

  11. Biochemical characteristics of various strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chiodini, R J

    1986-07-01

    Biochemical activities of 20 wild-type strains and of 2 laboratory strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis were evaluated. Biochemical activities evaluated were growth at 30 C, 37 C, and 42 C; production of urease, niacin, pyrazinamidase, arylsulfatase, and catalase; hydrolyzation of Tween 80; reduction of nitrate and tellurite; and growth in 5% NaCl. Antimicrobial susceptibility to thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (10 micrograms/ml), neotetrazolium chloride (1:40,000), streptomycin (2 micrograms/ml), rifampin (0.25 micrograms/ml), and isoniazid (10 micrograms/ml) also was determined. Generally, M paratuberculosis was biochemically inactive, with only a few strains producing pyrazinamidase and maintaining catalase activity after heating. All strains grew optimally at 37 C, grew slightly at 30 C, and did not grow at 42 C. Wild-type strains did not grow in the presence of neotetrazolium chloride, streptomycin, and rifampin, and grew in the presence of thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide and isoniazid. Although biochemical evaluation can be used as an aid in the identification of M paratuberculosis, growth rate, and mycobactin dependency remain major criteria for positive identification. PMID:3740613

  12. Physiological, biochemical and transcriptional analysis of onion bulbs during storage

    PubMed Central

    Chope, Gemma A.; Cools, Katherine; Hammond, John P.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Terry, Leon A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims During the transition from endo-dormancy to eco-dormancy and subsequent growth, the onion bulb undergoes the transition from sink organ to source, to sustain cell division in the meristematic tissue. The mechanisms controlling these processes are not fully understood. Here, a detailed analysis of whole onion bulb physiological, biochemical and transcriptional changes in response to sprouting is reported, enabling a better knowledge of the mechanisms regulating post-harvest onion sprout development. Methods Biochemical and physiological analyses were conducted on different cultivars (‘Wellington’, ‘Sherpa’ and ‘Red Baron’) grown at different sites over 3 years, cured at different temperatures (20, 24 and 28 °C) and stored under different regimes (1, 3, 6 and 6 → 1 °C). In addition, the first onion oligonucleotide microarray was developed to determine differential gene expression in onion during curing and storage, so that transcriptional changes could support biochemical and physiological analyses. Key Results There were greater transcriptional differences between samples at harvest and before sprouting than between the samples taken before and after sprouting, with some significant changes occurring during the relatively short curing period. These changes are likely to represent the transition from endo-dormancy to sprout suppression, and suggest that endo-dormancy is a relatively short period ending just after curing. Principal component analysis of biochemical and physiological data identified the ratio of monosaccharides (fructose and glucose) to disaccharide (sucrose), along with the concentration of zeatin riboside, as important factors in discriminating between sprouting and pre-sprouting bulbs. Conclusions These detailed analyses provide novel insights into key regulatory triggers for sprout dormancy release in onion bulbs and provide the potential for the development of biochemical or transcriptional markers for sprout

  13. Electron spin resonance scanning probe spectroscopy for ultrasensitive biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jason P; Ryan, Jason T; Shrestha, Pragya R; Liu, Zhanglong; Vaz, Canute; Kim, Ji-Hong; Georgiou, Vasileia; Cheung, Kin P

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy's affinity for detecting paramagnetic free radicals, or spins, has been increasingly employed to examine a large variety of biochemical interactions. Such paramagnetic species are broadly found in nature and can be intrinsic (defects in solid-state materials systems, electron/hole pairs, stable radicals in proteins) or, more often, purposefully introduced into the material of interest (doping/attachment of paramagnetic spin labels to biomolecules of interest). Using ESR to trace the reactionary path of paramagnetic spins or spin-active proxy molecules provides detailed information about the reaction's transient species and the label's local environment. For many biochemical systems, like those involving membrane proteins, synthesizing the necessary quantity of spin-labeled biomolecules (typically 50 pmol to 100 pmol) is quite challenging and often limits the possible biochemical reactions available for investigation. Quite simply, ESR is too insensitive. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach that greatly enhances ESR's sensitivity (>20000× improvement) by developing a near-field, nonresonant, X-band ESR spectrometric method. Sensitivity improvement is confirmed via measurement of 140 amol of the most common nitroxide spin label in a ≈593 fL liquid cell at ambient temperature and pressure. This experimental approach eliminates many of the typical ESR sample restrictions imposed by conventional resonator-based ESR detection and renders the technique feasible for spatially resolved measurements on a wider variety of biochemical samples. Thus, our approach broadens the pool of possible biochemical and structural biology studies, as well as greatly enhances the analytical power of existing ESR applications. PMID:25867553

  14. Sublethal Microcystin Exposure and Biochemical Outcomes among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Soares, Raquel M.; Servaites, Jerome C.; Delgado, Alvima G.; Magalhães, Valéria F.; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Azevedo, Sandra M. F. O.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Serum microcystin concentrations were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which measures free serum microcystin LR equivalents (ME). We describe serum ME concentrations and biochemical outcomes among a subset of patients during 8 weeks following exposure. Thirteen patients were included; 6 were males, patients’ median age was 45 years (range 16–80), one was seropositive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The median serum ME concentration was 0.33 ng/mL (range: <0.16–0.96). One hundred thirty nine blood samples were collected following exposure. Patients’ biochemical outcomes varied, but overall indicated a mixed liver injury. Linear regression evaluated each patient’s weekly mean biochemical outcome with their maximum serum ME concentration; a measure of the extrinsic pathway of clotting function, prothrombin time, was negatively and significantly associated with serum ME concentrations. This group of exposed patients’ biochemical outcomes display evidence of a mixed liver injury temporally associated with microcystin exposure. Interpretation of biochemical outcomes are complicated by the study population’s underlying chronic disease status. It is clear that dialysis patients are a distinct ‘at risk’ group for cyanotoxin exposures due to direct intravenous exposure to dialysate prepared from surface drinking water supplies. Careful monitoring and treatment of water supplies used to prepare dialysate is required to prevent future cyanotoxin exposure events. PMID:23894497

  15. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2015-02-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise bout of matched intensity and duration. Rats and humans ran on a treadmill at 86% of maximal velocity until exhaustion. Pre and post exercise we measured 30 blood chemistry parameters, which evaluate iron status, lipid profile, glucose regulation, protein metabolism, liver, and renal function. ANOVA indicated that almost all biochemical parameters followed a similar alteration pattern post exercise in rats and humans. In fact, there were only 2/30 significant species × exercise interactions (in testosterone and globulins), indicating different responses to exercise between rats and humans. On the contrary, the main effect of exercise was significant in 15/30 parameters and marginally nonsignificant in other two parameters (copper, P = 0.060 and apolipoprotein B, P = 0.058). Our major finding is that the rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in those basic blood biochemical parameters reported here. The physiological resemblance of rat and human blood responses after exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill indicates that the use of blood chemistry in rats for exercise physiology research is justified. PMID:25677548

  16. Clinical, endocrinological and biochemical effects of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-08-01

    suggested that this trace element may have a role in the in vivo regulation of prolactin release. Thymopoietin, a hormone needed for T-cell maturation, has also been shown to be zinc dependent. It is clear that zinc may have several roles in biochemical and hormonal functions of various endocrine organs. Future research in this area is very much needed. PMID:3905080

  17. Biomedical and biochemical applications of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gelpí, E

    1995-05-26

    This review centres on the application of various LC-MS and LC-MS-MS techniques to the study and solution of practical problems in biomedical research. For this purpose it covers a selection of publications in this area included in the MEDLINE database for the period 1991-mid-1994. As shown herein, LC-MS is increasingly gaining in importance in the biomedical field, especially after the revolution brought about by the introduction of the new liquid-phase atmospheric pressure ionization (API) techniques, such as electrospray (ES) and ionspray. The information in this database shows that thermospray (TS), which clearly dominated LC-MS coupling in the 1980s, is on a downward trend relative to the more modern API techniques which will certainly dominate this application field in the present decade. Studies on drug metabolism, therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacology have been traditionally carried out by GC-MS. However, LC-MS has lately been replacing classical GC-MS techniques in many of these applications. For instance, LC-ES-MS has greatly facilitated the application of both qualitative and quantitative LC-MS methods to highly polar molecules. This is possible without the need to resort to elaborate sample handling and derivatization procedures for relatively high-molecular-mass compounds such as drug conjugates, biosynthetic and natural peptides and therapeutic proteins obtained by recombinant DNA technology, all of them formerly totally inaccessible to the standard GC-MS or LC-MS methods. With regard to studies on metabolism and biochemical phenomena of endogenous compounds, LC-ES-MS is also becoming very strong in the analysis of structural biopolymers such as peptides, proteins, glycoproteins and glycolipids, and also lower molecular mass compounds such as fatty acids, vitamins, steroids and nucleic acids. For example, structural verification of post-translational modifications in proteins can be efficiently obtained in the time frame of an LC run and

  18. Uroncor consensus statement: Management of biochemical recurrence after radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer: From biochemical failure to castration resistance.

    PubMed

    López Torrecilla, José; Hervás, Asunción; Zapatero, Almudena; Gómez Caamaño, Antonio; Macías, Victor; Herruzo, Ismael; Maldonado, Xavier; Gómez Iturriaga, Alfonso; Casas, Francesc; González San Segundo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients who experience biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy is highly challenging. The clinician must not only choose the type of treatment, but also the timing and optimal sequence of treatment administration. When biochemical failure occurs, numerous treatment scenarios are possible, thus making it more difficult to select the optimal approach. Moreover, rapid and ongoing advances in treatment options require that physicians make decisions that could impact both survival and quality of life. The aim of the present consensus statement, developed by the Urological Tumour Working Group (URONCOR) of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), is to provide cancer specialists with the latest, evidence-based information needed to make the best decisions for the patient under all possible treatment scenarios. The structure of this consensus statement follows the typical development of disease progression after biochemical failure, with the most appropriate treatment recommendations given for each stage. The consensus statement is organized into three separate chapters, as follows: biochemical failure with or without local recurrence and/or metastasis; progression after salvage therapy; and treatment of castration-resistant patients. PMID:26109913

  19. Students' Ability to Organize Biochemical and Biochemistry-Related Terms Correlates with Their Performance in a Biochemical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    Organization is believed to be related to understanding and memory. Whether this belief was applicable in biochemical education was examined about two years after students had experienced biochemistry classes in their first year. The ability of organizing information in biochemistry was judged from the number of correct links of 886 biochemical…

  20. Acidic deposition, cation mobilization, and biochemical indicators of stress in healthy red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Shortle, W.C.; Smith, K.T.; Minocha, R.

    1997-05-01

    Dendrochemical and biochemical markers link stress in apparently healthy red spruce trees (Picea rubens) to acidic deposition. Previous reports related visible damage of trees at high elevations to root and soil processes. In this report, dendrochemical and foliar biochemical markers indicate perturbations in biological processes in healthy red spruce trees across the northeastern USA. Previous research on the dendrochemistry of red spruce stemwood indicated that under uniform environmental conditions, stemwood concentrations of Ca and Mg decreased with increasing radial distance from the pith. For nine forest locations, frequency analysis shows that 28 and 52% of samples of red spruce stemwood formed in the 1960s are enriched in Ca and Mg, respectively, relative to wood formed prior to and after the 1960s. This enrichment in trees throughout the northeastern USA may be interpretable as a signal of increased availability of essential cations in forest soils. Such a temporary increase in the availability of Ca and Mg could be caused by cation mobilization, a consequence of increased acidic deposition. During cation mobilization, essential and Ca and Mg as well as potentially harmful Al become more available for interaction with binding sites in the soil and absorbing roots. As conditions which favor cation mobilization continue, Ca and Mg can be leached or displaced from the soil. A measure of the interaction between Ca and Al is the Al/Ca binding ratio (molar charge ratio of exchangeable Al to exchangeable Ca). As the Al/Ca binding ratio in the root zone increased from 0.3 to 1.9, the foliar concentration of the biochemical stress marker putrescine also increased form 45 to 145 nm g{sup {minus}1}. The correlation of the putrescine concentration to the Al/Ca binding ratio (adj. r{sup 2} = 0.68, P <0.027) suggests that foliar stress may be linked to soil chemistry. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Energy allocation in Daphnia magna exposed to xenobiotics: A biochemical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, W.M. De; Janssen, C.R.; Persoone, G.

    1995-12-31

    A new approach to sublethal aquatic toxicity testing based on a biochemical assessment of the energy budget of Daphnia magna was developed and evaluated. With this method energy consumption (E{sub c}) is estimated by measuring the electron transport activity based on the calorimetric measurement of a tetrazolium salt reduction. Total available energy (E{sub a}) is assessed by measuring the lipid, protein and sugar content of the test organism using calorimetric methods. E{sub a} {minus} E{sup c} can subsequently be calculated and represents the ``surplus`` energy available for growth and reproduction. D. magna neonates were exposed to cadmium and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid for 4 days after which the electron transport activity and the total lipid, protein and sugar content of the test organisms were determined. Using the enthalpy of combustion of the different macromolecular groups and converting the oxygen consumption into oxyenthalpic equivalents, an estimation of the total energy budget of the test organisms was made. Additionally, the age specific survival and reproduction and the growth of D. magna populations exposed to the same sublethal concentrations was assessed in 21 day life table experiments. Energy allocation patterns of stressed D. magna obtained with the new biochemical approach were similar to those obtained with the conventional Scope for Growth determinations. Although more research is needed, comparison between the suborganismal (biochemical) and supraorganismal (life table) endpoints indicate that the proposed short-term assay based on energy allocation could be used to predict long-term effects on the survival, growth and reproduction of daphnids.

  2. Biochemical and microbial features of shallow marine sediments along the Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Franco; Marchetto, Davide; Pini, Francesco; Fani, Renato; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Berto, Daniela; Giani, Michele

    2010-09-01

    Shallow marine sediments were collected from seven stations (three of which located at Gerlache Inlet, two at Tethys Bay, one at Adelie Cove and one just beneath the Italian Research Base) along the Terra Nova Bay coast (Ross Sea, Antarctica). Their chemical, biochemical and microbiological properties were studied in order to provide further insights in the knowledge of this Antarctic benthic ecosystem. Overall, the organic carbon (OC) represented the major fraction of total carbon (TC) and displayed concentrations similar to or slightly lower than those previously measured in Antarctic bottom sediments. The biopolymeric carbon within OC ranged from 4.1% to 19.9% and showed a wide trophic range (65-834 μg g -1 d.w.). Proteins (PRT) represented on average the main biochemical class contributing to labile organic carbon, followed by lipids (LIP) and carbohydrates (CHO). The activity of aminopeptidase, β- D-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase and esterase was checked, giving the highest values at Tethys Bay and at the deepest water sediments. The principal component analysis, which was computed considering physical, chemical (elemental and biochemical sedimentary composition) and microbiological parameters (including bacterial abundance, ectoenzymatic activities, T-RFs richness and diversity indices), allowed to obtain two main clusters ("Tethys Bay" and "other stations"). Based on data obtained, two representative 16S rRNA clone libraries using samples from Tethys Bay and Gerlache Inlet were constructed. The sequences of 171 clones were compared to those available in public databases to determine their approximate phylogenetic affiliations. Both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were disclosed, with the majority of them affiliated with the Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria. The occurrence of strictly anaerobic bacteria suggests that sediments might also undergo anoxic conditions that, in turn, could favor the accumulation of PRT in respect

  3. Acidic deposition, cation mobilization, and biochemical indicators of stress in healthy red spruce

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shortle, W.C.; Smith, K.T.; Minocha, R.; Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Dendrochemical and biochemical markers link stress in apparently healthy red spruce trees (Picea rubens) to acidic deposition. Acidic deposition to spruce forests of the northeastern USA increased sharply during the 1960s. Previous reports related visible damage of trees at high elevations to root and soil processes. In this report, dendrochemical and foliar biochemical markers indicate perturbations in biological processes in healthy red spruce trees across the northeastern USA. Previous research on the dendrochemistry of red spruce stemwood indicated that under uniform environmental conditions, stemwood concentrations of Ca and Mg decreased with increasing radial distance from the pith. For nine forest locations, frequency analysis shows that 28 and 52% of samples of red spruce stemwood formed in the 1960s are enriched in Ca and Mg, respectively, relative to wood formed prior to and after the 1960s. This enrichment in trees throughout the northeastern USA may be interpretable as a signal of increased availability of essential cations in forest soils. Such a temporary increase in the availability of Ca and Mg could be caused by cation mobilization, a consequence of increased acidic deposition. During cation mobilization, essential Ca and Mg as well as potentially harmful Al become more available for interaction with binding sites in the soil and absorbing roots. As conditions which favor cation mobilization continue, Ca and Mg can be leached or displaced from the soil. A measure of the interaction between Ca and Al is the Al/Ca binding ratio (molar charge ratio of exchangeable Al to exchangeable Ca). As the Al/Ca binding ratio in the root zone increased from 0.3 to 1.9, the foliar concentration of the biochemical stress marker putrescine also increased from 45 to 145 nm g-1. The correlation of the putrescine concentration to the Al/Ca binding ratio (adj. r2 = 0.68, P < 0.027) suggests that foliar stress may be linked to soil chemistry.

  4. The End of Alzheimer’s disease - from biochemical pharmacology to ecopsychosociology: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The future of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) field involves a more complete understanding not only the state of current scientific approaches, but also the linguistic and cultural context of preclinical and clinical research and policy activities. The challenges surrounding dementia are large and growing but are only part of broader social and health concerns. In this latter context, the current state of research in the AD area is reviewed together with necessary priorities in moving forward. Creating a more optimistic future will depend less on genetic and reductionist approaches and more on environmental and intergenerative approaches that will aid in recalibrating the study of AD from an almost exclusive focus on biochemical, molecular and genetic aspects to better encompass “real world” ecological and psychosocial models of health PMID:24304687

  5. State-of-the-Art of (Bio)Chemical Sensor Developments in Analytical Spanish Groups

    PubMed Central

    Plata, María Reyes; Contento, Ana María; Ríos, Angel

    2010-01-01

    (Bio)chemical sensors are one of the most exciting fields in analytical chemistry today. The development of these analytical devices simplifies and miniaturizes the whole analytical process. Although the initial expectation of the massive incorporation of sensors in routine analytical work has been truncated to some extent, in many other cases analytical methods based on sensor technology have solved important analytical problems. Many research groups are working in this field world-wide, reporting interesting results so far. Modestly, Spanish researchers have contributed to these recent developments. In this review, we summarize the more representative achievements carried out for these groups. They cover a wide variety of sensors, including optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric or electro-mechanical devices, used for laboratory or field analyses. The capabilities to be used in different applied areas are also critically discussed. PMID:22319260

  6. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #26, January - March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.

    2010-04-01

    January-March, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding and improving sugar measurements in biomass hydrolysates; expansion of the NREL/DOE Biochemical Pilot Plant.

  7. ESTIMATING GASEOUS EXCHANGES BETWEEN THE ATMOSPHERE AND PLANTS USING A COUPLED BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study gaseous exchanges between the soil, biosphere and atmosphere, a biochemical model was coupled with the latest version of Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model. The biochemical model describes photosynthesis and respiration and their coupling with stomatal resistance for...

  8. Label-free optical resonant sensors for biochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Campanella, Clarissa Martina; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Campanella, Carlo Edoardo; Armenise, Mario Nicola

    2013-03-01

    For a number of years, the scientific community has been paying growing attention to the monitoring and enhancement of public health and the quality of life through the detection of all dangerous agents for the human body, including gases, proteins, virus, and bacterial agents. When these agents are detected through label-free biochemical sensors, the molecules are not modified structurally or functionally by adding fluorescent or radioactive dyes. This work focuses on label-free optical ring resonator-based configurations suited for bio-chemical sensing, highlighting their physical aspects and specific applications. Resonant wavelength shift and the modal splitting occurring when the analyte interacts with microresonant structures are the two major physical aspects analyzed in this paper. Competitive optical platforms proposed in the literature are also illustrated together with their properties and performance.

  9. Biomechanical and biochemical remodeling of stromal extracellular matrix in cancer.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., dynamic reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations which, together with stromal changes including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  10. Development of a biochemical switching device: mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M

    1990-01-01

    There are many examples of enzymes that share substrates or cofactors in a cyclic manner. Techniques have been developed that use cyclic enzyme systems to assay quantitatively small amounts of biochemical substances (cofactor, substrate), however, only a few studies of the control of these systems have been published. The author previously showed with computer simulations that cyclic enzyme systems have the reliability of ON-OFF types of operation (McCulloch-Pitts' neuronic equation) and the applicability for a switching circuit in a biocomputer. The switching time was inevitably determined in accordance with the difference in amount between two inputs of the system. A unique switching mechanism of cyclic enzyme systems (basic switching element) and the effects of excitatory stimuli on switching properties of the integrated biochemical switching system are demonstrated. PMID:2082931

  11. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  12. The role of cardiac biochemical markers in aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Calvin W L; Djohan, Andie H; Lang, Chim C

    2016-06-01

    Calcified aortic stenosis is one of the most common causes of heart failure in the elderly. Current guidelines recommend aortic valve replacement in patients with severe disease and evidence of decompensation based on either symptoms or impaired systolic ejection fraction. However, symptoms are often subjective whilst impaired ejection fraction is not a sensitive marker of ventricular decompensation. Interest has surrounded the use of cardiac biochemical markers as objective measures of left ventricular decompensation in aortic stenosis. We will first examine mechanisms of release of biochemical markers associated with myocardial wall stress (BNP/NT-proBNP), myocardial fibrosis (markers of collagen metabolism, galectin-3, soluble ST2) and myocyte death/myocardial ischemia (high-sensitivity cardiac troponins, heart-type fatty acid binding protein, myosin-binding protein C); and discuss future directions of these markers. PMID:26900722

  13. Biochemical markers in the assessment of bone disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.

    1997-01-01

    As the mean age of our population increases, increasing attention has been paid to the diseases associated with aging, including diseases of the skeleton such as osteoporosis. Effective means of treating and possibly preventing such skeletal disorders are emerging, making their early recognition an important goal for the primary care physician. Although bone density measurements and skeletal imaging studies remain of primary diagnostic importance in this regard, a large number of assays for biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption are being developed that promise to complement the densitometry measurements and imaging studies, providing an assessment of the rates of bone turnover and an earlier evaluation of the effects of therapy. In this review, emphasizing the recent literature, the major biochemical markers currently in use or under active investigation are described, and their application in a number of diseases of the skeleton including osteoporosis is evaluated.

  14. BIOMECHANICAL and BIOCHEMICAL REMODELING of STROMAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., Dynamic Reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations, which together with stromal changes, including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review, we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  15. The free energy cost of accurate biochemical oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuansheng; Wang, Hongli; Ouyang, Qi; Tu, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    Oscillation is an important cellular process that regulates timing of different vital life cycles. However, in the noisy cellular environment, oscillations can be highly inaccurate due to phase fluctuations. It remains poorly understood how biochemical circuits suppress phase fluctuations and what is the incurred thermodynamic cost. Here, we study three different types of biochemical oscillations representing three basic oscillation motifs shared by all known oscillatory systems. In all the systems studied, we find that the phase diffusion constant depends on the free energy dissipation per period following the same inverse relation parameterized by system specific constants. This relationship and its range of validity are shown analytically in a model of noisy oscillation. Microscopically, we find that the oscillation is driven by multiple irreversible cycles that hydrolyze the fuel molecules such as ATP; the number of phase coherent periods is proportional to the free energy consumed per period. Experimental evidence in support of this general relationship and testable predictions are also presented. PMID:26566392

  16. Biochemical markers of neurodegeneration in hereditary diffuse leucoencephalopathy with spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Philipp; Kohl, Zacharias; Gölitz, Philipp; Coras, Roland; Blümcke, Ingmar; Brück, Wolfgang; Dörfler, Arnd; Maihöfner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse leucoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease with unknown pathophysiology. Diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is increasingly based on biomarkers. Although lumbar puncture is routinely performed during the diagnostic workup of HDLS, reports on alterations of neurodegeneration-specific biochemical markers have not been documented so far. We report a 35-year-old woman with clinical, radiological and neuropathological signs of HDLS. She suffered from a rapidly progressive frontal lobe syndrome. Brain MRI revealed diffuse leucoencephalopathy with predominant involvement of the periventricular white matter and corpus callosum. Although she was severely impaired and leucoencephalopathy was prominent, only cerebrospinal fluid total-τ was moderately elevated. Other markers of neuronal (NSE) and astrocytic (S100B) damage were within normal range. Therefore, biochemical markers of central nervous system damage are not helpful in the diagnosis of HDLS. PMID:24891473

  17. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Sulfur Assimilation by Salmonella pullorum1

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Bruce C.; Schoenhard, Delbert E.

    1970-01-01

    The biochemical basis for a cysteine requirement in Salmonella pullorum strain MS35 is presented. Before determining the missing biochemical functions, it was established that the assimilatory sulfate-reducing pathway for this species is an inorganic one in which 3′-phosphoadenylylsulfate (PAPS), sulfite, and sulfide are intermediates. A requirement for 2′- and 3′-adenosine monophosphate was found for in vitro synthesis of PAPS, possibly because 2′- and 3′-adenosine monophosphate inhibits endogenous nucleases that destroy PAPS. The cysteine requirement of strain MS35 was attributed to a defect at 37 C in sulfate permeation and temperature sensitivity in sulfite reduction. At 25 C, sulfite was metabolized to sulfide. A novel property of sulfate-utilizing revertants was their unselected ability to assimilate thiosulfate sulfur at 25 C but not at 37 C. PMID:4908669

  19. Electrolyte-Gated Graphene Ambipolar Frequency Multipliers for Biochemical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Feng, Lingyan; Mayer, Dirk; Panaitov, Gregory; Kireev, Dmitry; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-13

    In this Letter, the ambipolar properties of an electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) have been explored to fabricate frequency-doubling biochemical sensor devices. By biasing the ambipolar GFETs in a common-source configuration, an input sinusoidal voltage at frequency f applied to the electrolyte gate can be rectified to a sinusoidal wave at frequency 2f at the drain electrode. The extraordinary high carrier mobility of graphene and the strong electrolyte gate coupling provide the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler an unprecedented unity gain, as well as a detection limit of ∼4 pM for 11-mer single strand DNA molecules in 1 mM PBS buffer solution. Combined with an improved drift characteristics and an enhanced low-frequency 1/f noise performance by sampling at doubled frequency, this good detection limit suggests the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler a highly promising biochemical sensing platform. PMID:26928906

  20. The Metabolic Syndrome and Biochemical Recurrence following Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jennifer M.; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L.; Morgenstern, Hal; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Bock, Cathryn H.; Nock, Nora; Rundle, Andrew; Jankowski, Michelle; Rybicki, Benjamin A.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome refers to a set of conditions that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, particularly among African American men. This study aimed to estimate the association of metabolic syndrome with biochemical recurrence (BCR) in a racially diverse population. Among 383 radical prostatectomy patients, 67 patients had documented biochemical recurrence. Hypertension was significantly, positively associated with the rate of BCR (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.1; 95%  CI = 1.1, 3.8). There were distinct racial differences in the prevalence of individual metabolic syndrome components; however, the observed associations with BCR did not differ appreciably by race. We conclude that hypertension may contribute to a poorer prognosis in surgically treated prostate cancer patients. Our findings suggest that targeting components of the metabolic syndrome which are potentially modifiable through lifestyle interventions may be a viable strategy to reduce risk of BCR in prostate cancer. PMID:22096652

  1. Intrachromosomal mapping of seven biochemical loci in barley, Hordeum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Liu, C J; Heun, M; Gale, M D

    1993-10-01

    Seven biochemical loci, AmpA, Amy1, Amy2, Est-H5, Hor1, Hor2, and Wsp-H1, have been intrachromosomally mapped in the barley genome using a previously published RFLP-based genetic map. In all cases, the map locations confirmed prior chromosome assignments and agreed closely with the map positions of their homoeoloci in hexaploid wheat. PMID:24190199

  2. Simultaneous morphological and biochemical endogenous optical imaging of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Javier A.; Park, Jesung; Pande, Paritosh; Shrestha, Sebina; Serafino, Michael J.; Rico Jimenez, J. de Jesus; Clubb, Fred; Walton, Brian; Buja, L. Maximilian; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Feldman, Marc D.; Adame, Jessie; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to validate novel imaging technology for simultaneous morphological and biochemical endogenous optical imaging of coronary atherosclerotic plaque. Methods and results Optical coherence tomography (OCT) generates high-resolution 3D images of plaque morphology and endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) characterizes biochemical composition. Both imaging modalities rely on plaque's intrinsic optical characteristics, making contrast agents unnecessary. A multimodal OCT/FLIM system was utilized to generate luminal biochemical maps superimposed on high-resolution (7 µm axial and 13 µm lateral) structural volumetric images. Forty-seven fresh postmortem human coronary segments were imaged: pathological intimal thickening (PIT, n = 26), fibroatheroma (FA, n = 12), thin-cap FA (TCFA, n = 2), and fibrocalcific plaque (CA, n = 7), determined by histopathology. Multimodal images were evaluated, and each plaque identified as PIT, FA, TCFA, or CA based on expert OCT readers, and as having high-lipid (HL), high-collagen (HC), or low-collagen/low-lipid (LCL) luminal composition based on linear discriminant analysis of FLIM. Of 47 plaques, 89.4% (42/47) of the plaques were correctly identified based on OCT/FLIM evaluation using tissue histopathology and immunohistochemistry as the gold standard. Four of the misclassifications corresponded to confusing PIT with HL luminal composition for FA with HL cap. The other corresponded to confusing FA with a HC cap for FA with an LCL cap. Conclusion We have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate simultaneous OCT/FLIM morphological and biochemical characterization of coronary plaques at spatial resolutions and acquisition speeds compatible with catheter-based intravascular imaging. The success of this pilot study sets up future development of a multimodal intravascular imaging system that will enable studies that could help improve our understanding of plaque pathogenesis. PMID:25722204

  3. Biochemical responses of the Skylab crewmen: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    Continuous metabolic and endocrinic monitoring of Skylab crewmen established significant biochemical changes that varied in magnitude and direction but disappeared shortly after return to earth. These changes indicate adaptation by the body to the combined stresses of weightlessness. Transient changes in fluid and electrolyte metabolisms lead to the conclusion that a homeostasis condition had been achieved. Unstable states persisted in the metabolisms of bone mineral, protein, and carbohydrates.

  4. The role of configurational entropy in biochemical cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Jusuf, Sutjano; Loll, Patrick J; Axelsen, Paul H

    2002-04-10

    Cooperativity is a common biochemical phenomenon in which two or more otherwise independent processes are thermodynamically coupled. Because cooperative processes are usually attended by changes in molecular conformation, thermodynamic coupling is usually attributed to an enthalpy-driven mechanism. In the family of glycopeptide antibiotics that includes vancomycin, however, cooperative phenomena occur that cannot be explained by conformational change. In this communication, we demonstrate that cooperativity in these systems can arise solely from changes in vibrational activity. PMID:11929222

  5. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. 158.2070 Section 158.2070 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product...

  6. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. 158.2070 Section 158.2070 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product...

  7. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. 158.2070 Section 158.2070 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product...

  8. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. 158.2070 Section 158.2070 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product...

  9. 40 CFR 158.2070 - Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides product performance data requirements. 158.2070 Section 158.2070 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2070 Biochemical pesticides product...

  10. Discovering Reliable Sources of Biochemical Thermodynamic Data to Aid Students' Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Me´ndez, Eduardo; Cerda´, María F.

    2016-01-01

    Students of physical chemistry in biochemical disciplines need biochemical examples to capture the need, not always understood, of a difficult area in their studies. The use of thermodynamic data in the chemical reference state may lead to incorrect interpretations in the analysis of biochemical examples when the analysis does not include relevant…

  11. Examining the Relationship between Gender and Drug-Using Behaviors in Adolescents: The Use of Diagnostic Assessments and Biochemical Analyses of Urine Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William H.; Moore, David D.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relationship between gender and drug use among adolescents using diagnostic assessments and biochemical analyses of urine samples. Statistical significance was found in the relationship between gender and marijuana use. The study confirms that more research is needed in this area. (Author/MKA)

  12. Biochemical Characterization of Hypothetical Proteins from Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Han-Pil; Juarez, Silvia; Ciordia, Sergio; Fernandez, Marisol; Bargiela, Rafael; Albar, Juan P.; Mazumdar, Varun; Anton, Brian P.; Kasif, Simon; Ferrer, Manuel; Steffen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The functional characterization of Open Reading Frames (ORFs) from sequenced genomes remains a bottleneck in our effort to understand microbial biology. In particular, the functional characterization of proteins with only remote sequence homology to known proteins can be challenging, as there may be few clues to guide initial experiments. Affinity enrichment of proteins from cell lysates, and a global perspective of protein function as provided by COMBREX, affords an approach to this problem. We present here the biochemical analysis of six proteins from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 26695, a focus organism in COMBREX. Initial hypotheses were based upon affinity capture of proteins from total cellular lysate using derivatized nano-particles, and subsequent identification by mass spectrometry. Candidate genes encoding these proteins were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified and characterized biochemically and their biochemical parameters compared with the native ones. These proteins include a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase (HP0959), an ATPase (HP1079), an adenosine deaminase (HP0267), a phosphodiesterase (HP1042), an aminopeptidase (HP1037), and new substrates were characterized for a peptidoglycan deacetylase (HP0310). Generally, characterized enzymes were active at acidic to neutral pH (4.0–7.5) with temperature optima ranging from 35 to 55°C, although some exhibited outstanding characteristics. PMID:23825549

  13. Design of a biochemical circuit motif for learning linear functions.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Matthew R; Minnich, Amanda; Lane, Terran; Stefanovic, Darko

    2014-12-01

    Learning and adaptive behaviour are fundamental biological processes. A key goal in the field of bioengineering is to develop biochemical circuit architectures with the ability to adapt to dynamic chemical environments. Here, we present a novel design for a biomolecular circuit capable of supervised learning of linear functions, using a model based on chemical reactions catalysed by DNAzymes. To achieve this, we propose a novel mechanism of maintaining and modifying internal state in biochemical systems, thereby advancing the state of the art in biomolecular circuit architecture. We use simulations to demonstrate that the circuit is capable of learning behaviour and assess its asymptotic learning performance, scalability and robustness to noise. Such circuits show great potential for building autonomous in vivo nanomedical devices. While such a biochemical system can tell us a great deal about the fundamentals of learning in living systems and may have broad applications in biomedicine (e.g. autonomous and adaptive drugs), it also offers some intriguing challenges and surprising behaviours from a machine learning perspective. PMID:25401175

  14. Inactivation of food-borne viruses using natural biochemical substances.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Baert, Leen; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-08-01

    Food-borne viruses such as human Noroviruses (NoVs), hepatitis A virus (HAV), Rotaviruses (RoVs) are a public health concern worldwide. Biochemical substances, which occur naturally in plants, animals or microorganisms, might possess considerable antimicrobial properties. In this study, the reported effects of biochemical substances on food-borne viruses are reviewed. The biochemical substances are grouped into several categories including (i) polyphenols and proanthocyanins, (ii) saponin, (iii) polysaccharides, (iv) organic acids, (v) proteins and polypeptides, (vi) essential oils. Although not fully understood, the mechanism of action for the antiviral activity of the natural compounds is presented. Generally, it is thought to be the prevention of the viral attachment to host cells, either by causing damage on the viral capsids or change of the receptors on the cell membranes. It is recommended that further studies are undertaken not only on the wide-range screening for novel antiviral substances, but also on the mechanism in-depth as well as the exploration for their potential application in controlling virus contamination in foods or food processing. PMID:23628607

  15. Endothelial cells and cathepsins: Biochemical and biomechanical regulation.

    PubMed

    Platt, Manu O; Shockey, W Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Cathepsins are mechanosensitive proteases that are regulated not only by biochemical factors, but are also responsive to biomechanical forces in the cardiovascular system that regulate their expression and activity to participate in cardiovascular tissue remodeling. Their elastinolytic and collagenolytic activity have been implicated in atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and in heart valve disease, all of which are lined by endothelial cells that are the mechanosensitive monolayer of cells that sense and respond to fluid shear stress as the blood flows across the surfaces of the arteries and valve leaflets. Inflammatory cytokine signaling is integrated with biomechanical signaling pathways by the endothelial cells to transcribe, translate, and activate either the cysteine cathepsins to remodel the tissue or to express their inhibitors to maintain healthy cardiovascular tissue structure. Other cardiovascular diseases should now be included in the study of the cysteine cathepsin activation because of the additional biochemical cues they provide that merges with the already existing hemodynamics driving cardiovascular disease. Sickle cell disease causes a chronic inflammation including elevated TNFα and increased numbers of circulating monocytes that alter the biochemical stimulation while the more viscous red blood cells due to the sickling of hemoglobin alters the hemodynamics and is associated with accelerated elastin remodeling causing pediatric strokes. HIV-mediated cardiovascular disease also occurs earlier in than the broader population and the influence of HIV-proteins and antiretrovirals on endothelial cells must be considered to understand these accelerated mechanisms in order to identify new therapeutic targets for prevention. PMID:26458976

  16. How special is the biochemical function of native proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Gao, Mu; Zhou, Hongyi

    2016-01-01

    Native proteins perform an amazing variety of biochemical functions, including enzymatic catalysis, and can engage in protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that are essential for life. A key question is how special are these functional properties of proteins. Are they extremely rare, or are they an intrinsic feature? Comparison to the properties of compact conformations of artificially generated compact protein structures selected for thermodynamic stability but not any type of function, the artificial (ART) protein library, demonstrates that a remarkable number of the properties of native-like proteins are recapitulated. These include the complete set of small molecule ligand-binding pockets and most protein-protein interfaces. ART structures are predicted to be capable of weakly binding metabolites and cover a significant fraction of metabolic pathways, with the most enriched pathways including ancient ones such as glycolysis. Native-like active sites are also found in ART proteins. A small fraction of ART proteins are predicted to have strong protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Overall, it appears that biochemical function is an intrinsic feature of proteins which nature has significantly optimized during evolution. These studies raise questions as to the relative roles of specificity and promiscuity in the biochemical function and control of cells that need investigation. PMID:26962440

  17. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, E Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A; Anderson, James V; Morris, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea), non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems. PMID:25540647

  18. Biochemical sensing by nanofluidic crystal in a confined space.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenda; Wang, Baojun; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-24

    Electrokinetics at nanoscale has attracted broad attention as a promising conductivity based biochemical sensing principle with a good selectivity. The nanoparticle crystal, formed by self-assembling nanoparticles inside a microstructure, has been utilized to fulfill a nanoscale electrokinetics based biochemical sensing platform, named nanofluidic crystal in our previous works. This paper introduces a novel nanofluidic crystal scheme by packing nanoparticles inside a well-designed confined space to improve the device-to-device readout consistency. A pair of electrodes was patterned at the bottom of this tunnel-shaped confined space for ionic current recording. The readout from different chips (n = 16) varied within 8.4% under the same conditions, which guaranteed a self-calibration-free biochemical sensing. Biotin and Pb(2+) were successfully detected by using nanofluidic crystal devices packed with streptavidin and DNAzyme modified nanoparticles, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) were both 1 nM. This electrically readable nanofluidic crystal sensing approach may find applications in low cost and fast disease screening in limited resource environments. PMID:27098158

  19. Biochemical principle of Limulus test for detecting bacterial endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Sadaaki

    2007-01-01

    A hemocyte lysate from horseshoe crab (Limulus) produced a gel, when exposed to Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This gelation reaction of the lysate, so-called Limulus test, has been widely employed as a simple and very sensitive assay method for endotoxins. Recent biochemical studies on the principle of Limulus test indicate that the hemocytes contain several serine protease zymogens, which constitute a coagulation cascade triggered by endotoxins, and that there is a (1,3)-β-D-glucan-mediated coagulation pathway which also results in the formation of gel. Up to now, six protein components, designated coagulogen, proclotting enzyme, factor B, factor C, and factor G, all of which are closely associated with the endotoxin-mediated coagulation pathway, have been purified and biochemically characterized. The molecular structures of these proteins have also been elucidated. Moreover, the reconstitution experiments using the isolated clotting factors, factor C, factor B, proclotting enzyme and coagulogen in the presence of endotoxin, leads to the formation of coagulin gel. Here, I will focus on the biochemical principle of Limulus test for detecting bacterial endotoxins, and its activation and regulation mechanism on the LPS-mediated coagulation cascade. PMID:24019589

  20. Micro biochemical sensor based on SOI planar optical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yang; Dong, Ying

    2014-02-01

    A novel biochemical sensor based on planar optical waveguide is presented in this paper. The features of the sensor are as follows, the planar optical waveguide is made of SOI (Silicon-On-Insulator) material, a Mach Zehnder (M-Z) Interferometer structure is adopted as the sensing part, the sensor chip is fabricated using CMOS compatible technology and the size of the sensor chip is on the micron scale. Compared with the traditional biochemical sensors, this new type of sensor has such notable advantages as miniaturization, integration, high sensitivity and strong anti-interference capability, which provide the sensor with potential applications where traditional biochemical sensors cannot be used. At first, the benefits of SOI material comparing to other optical waveguide materials were analyzed in this paper. Then, according to the optical waveguide mode theory, M-Z interferometer waveguide was designed for the single mode behavior. By theoretical analysis of the radiation loss in the Y-junction of the planar waveguide interferometer, the relationship between the branch angle and the radiation loss was obtained. The power transfer function and the parametric equation of sensitivity of the M-Z interferometer were obtained through analysis of the waveguide structure. At last, the resolution of the effective refractive index and the characteristics of sensitivity of the sensor based on SOI M-Z Interferometer waveguide were simulated and analyzed by utilizing MATLAB software. As a result, the sensitivity of SOI M-Z Interferometer sensor can reach the order of 10-7 magnitude.

  1. Effect of Different Psychoactive Substances on Serum Biochemical Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sanli, Dilek Beker; Bilici, Rabia; Suner, Ozgur; Citak, Serhat; Kartkaya, Kazim; Mutlu, Fezan Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychoactive substances affect mainly central nervous system and brain function causing changes in behavior. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different psychoactive substances on serum biochemical parameters. Patients and Methods: The study included 324 drug dependents, and 69 controls. The patient group was determined according to DSM-IV (The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition) criteria. All patients and control subjects were tested for routine biochemical parameters and urine toxicology parameters for psychoactive substance use. Cases and controls with accompanying diseases like diabetes, cancer, metabolic disorders etc. are excluded from the study. Moreover, an association between urine toxicology results and changes in biochemical parameters was evaluated for statistical significance. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT), uric acid, creatinine, urea, albumin, Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) medians between the dependent and control groups (P < 0.05). We found a statistically significant difference in sodium and albumin levels between the opium-dependent and control groups (P < 0.05). In the benzodiazepin dependent group, we found a significant difference in GGT, urea, glucose, sodium, T protein, and AST levels (P < 0.05). Moreover, a statistically significant difference was observed in triglyceride and GGT levels between the ethyl glucuronide and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In psychoactive substance dependents, serum routine biochemistry parameters can be used to predict the need for intensive monitoring and treatment programs. PMID:26405680

  2. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, E. Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A.; Anderson, James V.; Morris, Craig F.

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea), non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems. PMID:25540647

  3. Design of a biochemical circuit motif for learning linear functions

    PubMed Central

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Minnich, Amanda; Lane, Terran; Stefanovic, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Learning and adaptive behaviour are fundamental biological processes. A key goal in the field of bioengineering is to develop biochemical circuit architectures with the ability to adapt to dynamic chemical environments. Here, we present a novel design for a biomolecular circuit capable of supervised learning of linear functions, using a model based on chemical reactions catalysed by DNAzymes. To achieve this, we propose a novel mechanism of maintaining and modifying internal state in biochemical systems, thereby advancing the state of the art in biomolecular circuit architecture. We use simulations to demonstrate that the circuit is capable of learning behaviour and assess its asymptotic learning performance, scalability and robustness to noise. Such circuits show great potential for building autonomous in vivo nanomedical devices. While such a biochemical system can tell us a great deal about the fundamentals of learning in living systems and may have broad applications in biomedicine (e.g. autonomous and adaptive drugs), it also offers some intriguing challenges and surprising behaviours from a machine learning perspective. PMID:25401175

  4. Basic statistical recipes for the emergence of biochemical discernment.

    PubMed

    Michel, Denis

    2011-09-01

    An essential step towards understanding life would be to identify the very basic mechanisms responsible for the discerning behaviour of living biochemical systems, absent from randomly reacting chemical soups. One intuitively feels that this question goes beyond the particular nature of the biological molecules and should relate to general physical principles. The pre-eminent physicist Ludwig Boltzmann early envisioned life as a struggle for entropy, in concordance with the subsequent principle of self-organization out of equilibrium. Re-examination of elementary steady state biochemical systems from a statistical perspective supports this view and shows that sigmoidal responses arising from microstates elimination, are sufficient to explain innermost characteristics of life, including its capacity to convert random molecular interactions into accurate biological reactions. A primary operating strategy to achieve this goal is the introduction of time-irreversible transitions in molecular state conversion cycles by injection of free energy, which confers decisional capacity to single macromolecules. Selected examples from various fields of molecular biology such as enzymology and gene expression, are provided to show that these non-equilibrium steady state mechanisms remain important in contemporary biochemical systems. But in addition, information archiving allowed the emergence of the time-reversible counterparts of these mechanisms, mediated by evolutionary pre-organized macromolecular complexes capable of generating discernment in a non-dissipative manner. PMID:21839109

  5. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach. PMID:26920245

  6. Short-term effects of different organic amendments on soil chemical, biochemical and biological indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelli, Donato; Aly, Adel; Yirga Dagnachew, Ababu; Piscitelli, Lea; Dumontet, Stefano; Miano, Teodoro

    2014-05-01

    The limited availability of animal manure and the high cost of good quality compost lead to difficult soil quality management under organic agriculture. Therefore, it is important to find out alternative organic soil amendments and more flexible strategies that are able to sustain crop productivity and maintain and enhance soil quality. A three years study was carried out in the experimental fields of the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari located in Valenzano, Italy. The main objective of this research is to investigate the effects of different fertility management strategies on soil quality in order to estimate the role of innovative matrices for their use in organic farming. The experiment consists of seven treatments applied to a common crop rotation. The treatments include alternative organic amendments (1- olive mill wastewater OMW, 2- residues of mushroom cultivation MUS, 3- coffee chaff COF), common soil amendments (4- compost COM, 5- faba bean intercropping LEG, 6- cow manure - MAN) and as a reference treatment (7- mineral fertilizer COV). The soil quality was assessed before and after the application of the treatments, through biological (microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, soil respiration and metabolic quotient), biochemical (soil enzymatic activities: β-glucosidase, alkaline phospatase, urease, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis), and chemical (pH, soil organic carbon, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorous, exchangeable potassium, dissolved organic carbon and total dissolved nitrogen) indicators. Based on the results obtained after the second year, all treatments were able to improve various soil chemical parameters as compared to mineral fertilizer. The incorporation of COF and OMW seemed to be more effective in improving soil total N and exchangeable K, while MAN significantly increased available P. All the amendments enhance dissolved organic C, soil respiration, microbial biomass and metabolic quotient as

  7. Biochemical characterization of Arabidopsis APYRASE family reveals their roles in regulating endomembrane NDP/NMP homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsan-Yu; Lao, Jeemeng; Manalansan, Bianca; Loqué, Dominique; Roux, Stanley J; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2015-11-15

    Plant apyrases are nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) and have been implicated in an array of functions within the plant including the regulation of extracellular ATP. Arabidopsis encodes a family of seven membrane bound apyrases (AtAPY1-7) that comprise three distinct clades, all of which contain the five conserved apyrase domains. With the exception of AtAPY1 and AtAPY2, the biochemical and the sub-cellular characterization of the other members are currently unavailable. In this research, we have shown all seven Arabidopsis apyrases localize to internal membranes comprising the cis-Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and endosome, indicating an endo-apyrase classification for the entire family. In addition, all members, with the exception of AtAPY7, can function as endo-apyrases by complementing a yeast double mutant (Δynd1Δgda1) which lacks apyrase activity. Interestingly, complementation of the mutant yeast using well characterized human apyrases could only be accomplished by using a functional ER endo-apyrase (NTPDase6), but not the ecto-apyrase (NTPDase1). Furthermore, the substrate specificity analysis for the Arabidopsis apyrases AtAPY1-6 indicated that each member has a distinct set of preferred substrates covering various NDPs (nucleoside diphosphates) and NTPs. Combining the biochemical analysis and sub-cellular localization of the Arabidopsis apyrases family, the data suggest their possible roles in regulating endomembrane NDP/NMP (nucleoside monophosphate) homoeostasis. PMID:26338998

  8. Biochemical characterization of an isoprene synthase from Campylopus introflexus (heath star moss).

    PubMed

    Lantz, Alexandra T; Cardiello, Joseph F; Gee, Taylor A; Richards, Michaelin G; Rosenstiel, Todd N; Fisher, Alison J

    2015-09-01

    Each year, plants emit terragram quantities of the reactive hydrocarbon isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) into the earth's atmosphere. In isoprene-emitting plants, the enzyme isoprene synthase (ISPS) catalyzes the production of isoprene from the isoprenoid intermediate dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP). While isoprene is emitted from all major classes of land plants, to date ISPSs from angiosperms only have been characterized. Here, we report the identification and initial biochemical characterization of a DMADP-dependent ISPS from the isoprene-emitting bryophyte Campylopus introflexus (heath star moss). The partially-purified C. introflexus ISPS (CiISPS) exhibited a Km for DMADP of 0.37 ± 0.28 mM, a pH optimum of 8.6 ± 0.5, and a temperature optimum of 40 ± 3 °C in vitro. Like ISPSs from angiosperms, the CiISPS required the presence of a divalent cation. However, unlike angiosperm ISPSs, the CiISPS utilized Mn(2+) preferentially over Mg(2+). Efforts are currently underway in our laboratory to further purify the CiISPS and clone the cDNA sequence encoding this novel enzyme. Our discovery of the first bryophyte ISPS paves the way for future studies concerning the evolutionary origins of isoprene emission in land plants and may help generate new bryophyte model systems for physiological and biochemical research on plant isoprene function. PMID:26113160

  9. Annular Bragg resonators (ABR): the ideal tool for biochemical sensing, nonlinear optics, and cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jacob; Green, William M. J.; Yariv, Amnon

    2006-02-01

    Circular resonators are fundamentally interesting elements that are essential for research involving highly confined fields and strong photon-atom interactions such as cavity QED, as well as for practical applications in optical communication systems as and biochemical sensing. The important characteristics of a ring resonator are the Q-factor, the free spectral range (FSR) and the modal volume, where the last two are primarily determined by the resonator dimensions. The Total-Internal-Reflection (TIR) mechanism employed in "conventional" resonators couples between these characteristics and limits the ability to realize compact devices with large FSR, small modal volume and high Q. Recently, we proposed and analyzed a new class of a resonator in an annular geometry that is based on a single defect surrounded by radial Bragg reflectors on both sides. The radial Bragg confinement breaks the link between the characteristics of the mode and paves a new way for the realization of compact and low loss resonators. Such properties as well as the unique mode profile of the ABRs make this class of devices an excellent tool for ultra-sensitive biochemical detection as well as for studies in nonlinear optics and cavity QED.

  10. Researcher / Researched: Repositioning Research Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meerwald, Agnes May Lin

    2013-01-01

    "Researcher / Researched" calls for a complementary research methodology by proposing autoethnography as both a method and text that crosses the boundaries of conventional and alternative methodologies in higher education. Autoethnography rearticulates the researcher / researched positions by blurring the boundary between them. This…

  11. Network representations and methods for the analysis of chemical and biochemical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sandefur, Conner I.; Mincheva, Maya; Schnell, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Systems biologists increasingly use network representations to investigate biochemical pathways and their dynamic behaviours. In this critical review, we discuss four commonly used network representations of chemical and biochemical pathways. We illustrate how some of these representations reduce network complexity but result in the ambiguous representation of biochemical pathways. We also examine the current theoretical approaches available to investigate the dynamic behaviour of chemical and biochemical networks. Finally, we describe how the critical chemical and biochemical pathways responsible for emergent dynamic behaviour can be identified using network mining and functional mapping approaches. PMID:23857078

  12. A new trend to determine biochemical parameters by quantitative FRET assays

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jia-yu; Song, Yang; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been widely used in biological and biomedical research because it can determine molecule or particle interactions within a range of 1–10 nm. The sensitivity and efficiency of FRET strongly depend on the distance between the FRET donor and acceptor. Historically, FRET assays have been used to quantitatively deduce molecular distances. However, another major potential application of the FRET assay has not been fully exploited, that is, the use of FRET signals to quantitatively describe molecular interactive events. In this review, we discuss the use of quantitative FRET assays for the determination of biochemical parameters, such as the protein interaction dissociation constant (Kd), enzymatic velocity (kcat) and Km. We also describe fluorescent microscopy-based quantitative FRET assays for protein interaction affinity determination in cells as well as fluorimeter-based quantitative FRET assays for protein interaction and enzymatic parameter determination in solution. PMID:26567729

  13. Biochemical basis of drought tolerance in hybrid Populus grown under field production conditions. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, T.J.; Tuskan, G.A.; Wierman, C.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this cooperative effort was to assess the use of osmotically active compounds as molecular selection criteria for drought tolerance in Populus in a large-scale field trial. It is known that some plant species, and individuals within a plant species, can tolerate increasing stress associated with reduced moisture availability by accumulating solutes. The biochemical matrix of such metabolites varies among species and among individuals. The ability of Populus clones to tolerate drought has equal value to other fiber producers, i.e., the wood products industry, where irrigation is used in combination with other cultural treatments to obtain high dry weight yields. The research initially involved an assessment of drought stress under field conditions and characterization of changes in osmotic constitution among the seven clones across the six moisture levels. The near-term goal was to provide a mechanistic basis for clonal differences in productivity under various irrigation treatments over time.

  14. A Computational Model of Cell Migration in Response to Biochemical Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, Nicholas C; Kruse, Kara L; Nutaro, James J; Ward, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    The Computational Sciences and Engineering Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is partnering with the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine to design a computational model describing various factors related to the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) in response to arterial injury. This research focuses on modeling the chemotactic and haptotactic processes that stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell migration into the intima. A hybrid discrete-continuous mathematical model of cell migration in response to biochemical diffusion was developed in C++. Chemoattractant diffusion is modeled as a continuous partial differential equation, whereas migration of the cells is modeled as a series of discrete events. Results obtained from the discrete state model for cell migration agree with those obtained from Boyden chamber experiments.

  15. Sensors, Volume 3, Part II, Chemical and Biochemical Sensors Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpel, Wolfgang; Jones, T. A.; Kleitz, Michel; Lundström, Ingemar; Seiyama, Tetsuro

    1997-06-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This is the second of two volumes focusing on chemical and biochemical sensors. It includes a detailed description of biosensors which often make use of transducer properties of the basic sensors and usually have additional biological components. This volume provides a unique overview of the applications, the possibilities and limitations of sensors in comparison with conventional instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Specific facettes of applications are presented by specialists from different fields including environmental, biotechnological, medical, or chemical process control. This book is an indispensable reference work for both specialits and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  16. Data on biochemical indexes of HFD-fed mice treatment with metformin or resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenjun; Li, Aiyun; Feng, Xin; Hou, Ting; Liu, Kang; Liu, Baolin; Zhang, Ning

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the changes of physiological and biochemical indexes, male mice were fed a regular diet or short time high fat diet (HFD) for 10 days with oral administration of saline, metformin, resveratrol, or injected intraperitoneally (ip) with digoxin respectively every day. Food intake and body weight were recorded simultaneously. Blood was collected after mice were sacrificed and then tested with commercial kits. The data manifested that metformin and resveratrol only ameliorate free fatty acids and glycerol in HFD-fed mice. Data interpretation of this part can be found in the research article "Metformin and resveratrol ameliorate muscle insulin resistance through preventing lipolysis and inflammation in hypoxic adipose tissue" (Zhao et al.,) [1]. PMID:27547796

  17. Toward better understanding of postharvest deterioration: biochemical changes in stored cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Coelho, Bianca; Moresco, Rodolfo; Domínguez, Moralba Garcia; Sánchez, Teresa; Meléndez, Jorge Luis Luna; Dufour, Dominique; Ceballos, Hernan; Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, Luis Augusto; Hershey, Clair; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    Food losses can occur during production, postharvest, and processing stages in the supply chain. With the onset of worldwide food shortages, interest in reducing postharvest losses in cassava has been increasing. In this research, the main goal was to evaluate biochemical changes and identify the metabolites involved in the deterioration of cassava roots. We found that high levels of ascorbic acid (AsA), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), dry matter, and proteins are correlated with overall lower rates of deterioration. On the other hand, soluble sugars such as glucose and fructose, as well as organic acids, mainly, succinic acid, seem to be upregulated during storage and may play a role in the deterioration of cassava roots. Cultivar Branco (BRA) was most resilient to postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD), while Oriental (ORI) was the most susceptible. Our findings suggest that PPO, AsA, and proteins may play a distinct role in PPD delay. PMID:27247771

  18. [Biochemical diagnostics in acute pancreatitis recognition and outcome predicition].

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Paweł; Kozma, Ewa M; Olczyk, Krystyna; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna

    2004-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common disease associated with an improper activation of pancreatic zymogens leading to autodigestion of the gland and if excessive--to multiple organ dysfunction. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis manifested by 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis is a life threatening disorder requiring subsequent management in intensive care unit. Unfortunately, none of biochemical tests presently used for laboratory assessment of acute pancreatitis at the early stage of the disease is able to estimate accurately: diagnosis, etiology and severity. At present, diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on evaluation of serum amylase and lipase activity due to easy availability and simplicity of these enzymatic tests. Low specificity of the mentioned enzymes resulted in studies concerning pancreatic isoamylase, elastase-1, chymotrypsine, procarboxy-peptidase B, trypsinogen-2 and immunoreactive trypsinogen usefulness in the laboratory diagnosis of AP. The prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis using multifactorial scoring systems is cumbersome especially due to their complexity. On the other hand the biochemical method of choice, estimation of serum C reactive protein, is useless in the early phase of disease. Unfortunately, the computed tomography--the most accurate method in severity assessing--is not always available. Recent studies have brought some progress in severity predicting, such as phospholipase A2, cellular immunity markers, cytokines, activation peptides of trypsinogen and carboxypeptidase B, procalcitonine, pancreatitis associated protein and serum amyloid A. All these newly introduced biochemical methods allow to look optimistically into the future of laboratory diagnostics of the acute pancreatitis believing that the problem of diagnosing and predicting the AP severity will be solved. PMID:15850341

  19. Biochemical and hematological changes in low-level aluminum intoxication.

    PubMed

    González-Revaldería, J; Casares, M; de Paula, M; Pascual, T; Giner, V; Miravalles, E

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical and hematological changes in patients on routine hemodialysis treatment when they were accidentally exposed to moderately high serum aluminum concentrations during a period of time of less than four months. We studied the changes in biochemical and hematological measurements in 33 patients on dialysis in our hospital before and during the exposure to about 0.85 pmol/l of aluminum in dialysis water due to a malfunction of the reverse osmosis system of water purification. Patients showed a decrease in the hemoglobin concentration from 115+/-12.4 g/l to 108+/-12.2 g/l (p=0.026) and in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration from 5.15+/-0.22 to 5.02+/-0.30 mmol/l (p=0.014). Ferritin was decreased from 243+/-192 microg/l to 196+/-163 microg/l (p=0.047) and transferrin saturation from 0.20+/-0.06 to 0.15+/-0.07 (p=0.004). Biochemical measurements related to calcium-phosphate metabolism did not change. Otherwise, all patients showed an increase in serum aluminum from 0.56+/-0.44 to 1.63+/-0.52 micromol/l (p<0.001). No differences were detected in serum aluminum between patients receiving and not receiving oral aluminum salts. Even moderately high aluminum concentrations maintained during a short period of time could produce significant hematological alterations and a depletion of body iron stores before clinical manifestations were evident. PMID:10905758

  20. Dissociative Electron Attachment to Anthralin to Model Its Biochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A; Komolov, Alexei S

    2014-08-21

    The antipsoriatic drug anthralin (dithranol) is known to be extensively accumulated inside mitochondria of keratinocytes and to interact with the electron flow of the respiratory chain. Primary products of the one-electron reduction of polyphenolic anthralin observed in vivo are its dehydrogenated anions, which are formed by H-atom abstraction. The same species are mainly generated at low electron energies by dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to anthralin molecules in vacuo. A likely mechanism for the biochemical transformations of anthralin under reductive conditions in vivo is hypothesized on the basis of its DEA properties. The involvement of excited electronic states generated by ultraviolet irradiation of skin is discussed. PMID:26278099

  1. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation corrects biochemical derangements in MNGIE.

    PubMed

    Hirano, M; Martí, R; Casali, C; Tadesse, S; Uldrick, T; Fine, B; Escolar, D M; Valentino, M L; Nishino, I; Hesdorffer, C; Schwartz, J; Hawks, R G; Martone, D L; Cairo, M S; DiMauro, S; Stanzani, M; Garvin, J H; Savage, D G

    2006-10-24

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a multisystemic autosomal recessive disease due to primary thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency. To restore TP activity, we performed reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantations (alloSCTs) in two patients. In the first, alloSCT failed to engraft, but the second achieved mixed donor chimerism, which partially restored buffy coat TP activity and lowered plasma nucleosides. Thus, alloSCT can correct biochemical abnormalities in the blood of patients with MNGIE, but clinical efficacy remains unproven. PMID:16971696

  2. Construction and engineering of large biochemical pathways via DNA assembler

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA assembler enables rapid construction and engineering of biochemical pathways in a one-step fashion by exploitation of the in vivo homologous recombination mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has many applications in pathway engineering, metabolic engineering, combinatorial biology, and synthetic biology. Here we use two examples including the zeaxanthin biosynthetic pathway and the aureothin biosynthetic gene cluster to describe the key steps in the construction of pathways containing multiple genes using the DNA assembler approach. Methods for construct design, pathway assembly, pathway confirmation, and functional analysis are shown. The protocol for fine genetic modifications such as site-directed mutagenesis for engineering the aureothin gene cluster is also illustrated. PMID:23996442

  3. TRADITIONAL BIOCHEMICAL ASSAYS FOR STUDYING TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 9

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Cynthia A.; Rose, William A.; Botelho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of receptor activation and regulation can offer therapeutic targets for disease treatment. Evidence is emerging for a role of the normally foreign responsive Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of autoimmunity through response to self-patterns. Regulatory mechanisms governing this class of receptors are poorly understood, and failures within this system likely contribute to development of autoimmunity. In this article, we review biochemical assays used to study one of the self-pattern responsive TLRs, TLR9, and suggest that these studies are critical for development of new targets for autoimmune therapies. PMID:23323977

  4. The clinical and biochemical study of pesticide sprayers.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A K; Gupta, B N; Mathur, A K; Mathur, N; Mahendra, P N; Bharti, R S

    1991-07-01

    Clinical, haematological and biochemical studies of 34 subjects, occupationally exposed to different types of pesticides, were conducted. The findings have been compared with those observed in 14 control subjects. Inhibition of cholinesterase activity was observed in the exposed group. Serum alkaline phosphatase was also found to be raised. Radiological examination revealed pneumonitic patches in the chest skiagrams of three exposed subjects. Paraesthesia with hyporeflexia was also found in 8.8% of exposed subjects. The findings suggest that exposure to multiple pesticides over many years affects the normal functioning of different organ systems and may produce characteristic clinical effects. PMID:1679651

  5. Rieger syndrome: a clinical, molecular, and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Amendt, B A; Semina, E V; Alward, W L

    2000-10-01

    Rieger syndrome (RIEG 1; MIM 180500) is an autosomal dominant disorder of morphogenesis. It is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by malformations of the eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. RIEG belongs to the Axenfeld-Rieger group of anomalies, which includes Axenfeld anomaly and Rieger anomaly (or Rieger eye malformation), which display ocular features only. Recently, mutations in the homeodomain transcription factor, PITX2, have been shown to be associated with Rieger syndrome. This review discusses the clinical manifestations of Rieger syndrome and how they correlate with the current molecular and biochemical studies on this human disorder. PMID:11092457

  6. Advances in Metabolic Engineering of Cyanobacteria for Photosynthetic Biochemical Production.

    PubMed

    Lai, Martin C; Lan, Ethan I

    2015-01-01

    Engineering cyanobacteria into photosynthetic microbial cell factories for the production of biochemicals and biofuels is a promising approach toward sustainability. Cyanobacteria naturally grow on light and carbon dioxide, bypassing the need of fermentable plant biomass and arable land. By tapping into the central metabolism and rerouting carbon flux towards desirable compound production, cyanobacteria are engineered to directly convert CO₂ into various chemicals. This review discusses the diversity of bioproducts synthesized by engineered cyanobacteria, the metabolic pathways used, and the current engineering strategies used for increasing their titers. PMID:26516923

  7. Single-molecule detection: applications to ultrasensitive biochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Alonso; Shera, E. Brooks

    1995-06-01

    Recent developments in laser-based detection of fluorescent molecules have made possible the implementation of very sensitive techniques for biochemical analysis. We present and discuss our experiments on the applications of our recently developed technique of single-molecule detection to the analysis of molecules of biological interest. These newly developed methods are capable of detecting and identifying biomolecules at the single-molecule level of sensitivity. In one case, identification is based on measuring fluorescence brightness from single molecules. In another, molecules are classified by determining their electrophoretic velocities.

  8. Fibre optic system for biochemical and microbiological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penwill, L. A.; Slater, J. H.; Hayes, N. W.; Tremlett, C. J.

    2007-07-01

    This poster will discuss state-of-the-art fibre optic sensors based on evanescent wave technology emphasising chemophotonic sensors for biochemical reactions and microbe detection. Devices based on antibody specificity and unique DNA sequences will be described. The development of simple sensor devices with disposable single use sensor probes will be illustrated with a view to providing cost effective field based or point of care analysis of major themes such as hospital acquired infections or bioterrorism events. This presentation will discuss the nature and detection thresholds required, the optical detection techniques investigated, results of sensor trials and the potential for wider commercial application.

  9. Synchronization in Biochemical Substance Exchange Between Two Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Balaž, Igor

    In this paper, Mihailović et al. [Mod. Phys. Lett. B 25 (2011) 2407-2417] introduce a simplified model of cell communication in a form of coupled difference logistic equations. Then we investigated stability of exchange of signaling molecules under variability of internal and external parameters. However, we have not touched questions about synchronization and effect of noise on biochemical substance exchange between cells. In this paper, we consider synchronization in intercellular exchange in dependence of environmental and cell intrinsic parameters by analyzing the largest Lyapunov exponent, cross sample entropy and bifurcation maps.

  10. Biochemical and cultural characteristics of invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R M; Toledo, M R; Trabulsi, L R

    1980-01-01

    The biochemical characteristics of 97 invasive Escherichia coli strains of different O serogroups were studied. Considered as a group, the behavior of the strains was quite variable. However, none of them decarboxylated lysine and all but seven strains, belonging to the O124 serogroup, were nonmotile. The growth of 25 strains obtained on MacConkey, salmonella-shigella, xylose-lysine-desoxycholate, and Hektoen enteric agars was compared. MacConkey and Hektoen enteric agars yielded the highest average growth for these strains, whereas salmonella-shigella agar had the lowest average counts. PMID:6991526

  11. Biochemical screening for inherited metabolic disorders in the mentally retarded.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H E; Goodman, R; Schram, J; Diamond, E; Daneel, A

    1981-11-01

    A biochemical screening programme for the detection of inherited metabolic disease was carried out on urine and blood samples from inmates of the Alexandra Institute for the mentally retarded, Cape Town. Of the 1087 patients screened, positive results for phenylketonuria were obtained in 3, for cystinuria in 2 and for Hartnup disease in 1. The overall frequency of metabolic disorders was 0,6%. It is evident that genetic metabolic disease as detected by current screening procedures makes only a small contribution to the overall burden of mental retardation. PMID:6795726

  12. Advances in Metabolic Engineering of Cyanobacteria for Photosynthetic Biochemical Production

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Martin C.; Lan, Ethan I.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering cyanobacteria into photosynthetic microbial cell factories for the production of biochemicals and biofuels is a promising approach toward sustainability. Cyanobacteria naturally grow on light and carbon dioxide, bypassing the need of fermentable plant biomass and arable land. By tapping into the central metabolism and rerouting carbon flux towards desirable compound production, cyanobacteria are engineered to directly convert CO2 into various chemicals. This review discusses the diversity of bioproducts synthesized by engineered cyanobacteria, the metabolic pathways used, and the current engineering strategies used for increasing their titers. PMID:26516923

  13. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Kundari, Noor Anis Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-12-29

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10{sup −5} Ci/m{sup 3}. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod’s model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0

  14. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise bout of matched intensity and duration. Rats and humans ran on a treadmill at 86% of maximal velocity until exhaustion. Pre and post exercise we measured 30 blood chemistry parameters, which evaluate iron status, lipid profile, glucose regulation, protein metabolism, liver, and renal function. ANOVA indicated that almost all biochemical parameters followed a similar alteration pattern post exercise in rats and humans. In fact, there were only 2/30 significant species × exercise interactions (in testosterone and globulins), indicating different responses to exercise between rats and humans. On the contrary, the main effect of exercise was significant in 15/30 parameters and marginally nonsignificant in other two parameters (copper, P = 0.060 and apolipoprotein B, P = 0.058). Our major finding is that the rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in those basic blood biochemical parameters reported here. The physiological resemblance of rat and human blood responses after exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill indicates that the use of blood chemistry in rats for exercise physiology research is justified. PMID:25677548

  15. Biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid simulation waste containing detergent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundari, Noor Anis; Putra, Sugili; Mukaromah, Umi

    2015-12-01

    Research of biochemical process of low level radioactive liquid waste containing detergent has been done. Thse organic liquid wastes are generated in nuclear facilities such as from laundry. The wastes that are cotegorized as hazard and poison materials are also radioactive. It must be treated properly by detoxification of the hazard and decontamination of the radionuclides to ensure that the disposal of the waste meets the requirement of standard quality of water. This research was intended to determine decontamination factor and separation efficiensies, its kinetics law, and to produce a supernatant that ensured the environmental quality standard. The radioactive element in the waste was thorium with activity of 5.10-5 Ci/m3. The radioactive liquid waste which were generated in simulation plant contains detergents that was further processed by aerobic biochemical process using SGB 103 bacteria in a batch reactor equipped with aerators. Two different concentration of samples were processed and analyzed for 212 hours and 183 hours respectively at a room temperature. The product of this process is a liquid phase called as supernatant and solid phase material called sludge. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), and its alpha activity were analyzed. The results show that the decontamination factor and the separation efficiency of the lower concentration samples are higher compared to the samples with high concentration. Regarding the decontamination factor, the result for 212 hours processing of waste with detergent concentration of 1.496 g/L was 3.496 times, whereas at the detergent concentration of 0.748 g/L was 15.305 times for 183 hours processing. In case of the separation efficiency, the results for both samples were 71.396% and 93.465% respectively. The Bacterial growth kinetics equation follow Monod's model and the decreasing of COD and BOD were first order with the rate constant of 0.01 hour-1.

  16. Biochemical markers for assessment of calcium economy and bone metabolism: application in clinical trials from pharmaceutical agents to nutritional products.

    PubMed

    Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; Kohrt, Wendy; Levasseur, Régis; Warren, Michelle; Whiting, Susan; Kraenzlin, Marius

    2014-12-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Substantial progress in both laboratory analyses and clinical use of biochemical markers has modified the strategy of anti-osteoporotic drug development. The present review examines the use of biochemical markers in clinical research aimed at characterising the influence of foods or nutrients on bone metabolism. The two types of markers are: (i) specific hormonal factors related to bone; and (ii) bone turnover markers (BTM) that reflect bone cell metabolism. Of the former, vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-I indicate responses to variations in the supply of bone-related nutrients, such as vitamin D, Ca, inorganic phosphate and protein. Thus modification in bone remodelling, the key process upon which both pharmaceutical agents and nutrients exert their anti-catabolic or anabolic actions, is revealed. Circulating BTM reflect either osteoclastic resorption or osteoblastic formation. Intervention with pharmacological agents showed that early changes in BTM predicted bone loss and subsequent osteoporotic fracture risk. New trials have documented the influence of nutrition on bone-tropic hormonal factors and BTM in adults, including situations of body-weight change, such as anorexia nervosa, and weight loss by obese subjects. In osteoporosis-prevention studies involving dietary manipulation, randomised cross-over trials are best suited to evaluate influences on bone metabolism, and insight into effects on bone metabolism may be gained within a relatively short time when biochemical markers are monitored. PMID:25394580

  17. CyanoPhyChe: A Database for Physico-Chemical Properties, Structure and Biochemical Pathway Information of Cyanobacterial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arun, P. V. Parvati Sai; Bakku, Ranjith Kumar; Subhashini, Mranu; Singh, Pankaj; Prabhu, N. Prakash; Suzuki, Iwane; Prakash, Jogadhenu S. S.

    2012-01-01

    CyanoPhyChe is a user friendly database that one can browse through for physico-chemical properties, structure and biochemical pathway information of cyanobacterial proteins. We downloaded all the protein sequences from the cyanobacterial genome database for calculating the physico-chemical properties, such as molecular weight, net charge of protein, isoelectric point, molar extinction coefficient, canonical variable for solubility, grand average hydropathy, aliphatic index, and number of charged residues. Based on the physico-chemical properties, we provide the polarity, structural stability and probability of a protein entering in to an inclusion body (PEPIB). We used the data generated on physico-chemical properties, structure and biochemical pathway information of all cyanobacterial proteins to construct CyanoPhyChe. The data can be used for optimizing methods of expression and characterization of cyanobacterial proteins. Moreover, the ‘Search’ and data export options provided will be useful for proteome analysis. Secondary structure was predicted for all the cyanobacterial proteins using PSIPRED tool and the data generated is made accessible to researchers working on cyanobacteria. In addition, external links are provided to biological databases such as PDB and KEGG for molecular structure and biochemical pathway information, respectively. External links are also provided to different cyanobacterial databases. CyanoPhyChe can be accessed from the following URL: http://bif.uohyd.ac.in/cpc. PMID:23185330

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    1994-06-01

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10 9) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10 13-15 on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels for tracing biochemical pathways in natural systems. 14C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. Our primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subjects research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. 3H, 41Ca and 26Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-10-20

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10{sup 9}) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10{sup 13--15} on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. {sup 14}C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. {sup 3} H, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 26}Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  20. Investigation on energy conversion technology using biochemical reaction elements, 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-03-01

    For measures taken for resource/energy and environmental issues, a study is made on utilization of microbial biochemical reaction. As a reaction system using chemical energy, cited is production of petroleum substitution substances and food/feed by CO2 fixation using hydrogen energy and hydrogen bacteria. As to photo energy utilization, regarded as promising are CO2 fixation using photo energy and microalgae, and production of hydrogen and useful carbon compound using photosynthetic organisms. As living organism/electric energy interconversion, cited is the culture of chemoautotrophic bacteria which fix CO2 using electric energy. For enhancing its conversion efficiency, it is important to develop a technology of gene manipulation of the bacteria and a system to use functional biochemical elements adaptable to the electrode reaction. With regard to utilization of the microorganism metabolic function, the paper presents emission of soluble nitrogen in the hydrosphere into the atmosphere using denitrifying bacteria, removal of phosphorus, reduction in environmental pollution caused by heavy metal dilute solutions, and recovery as resources, etc.

  1. Biochemical applications of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    An overview is presented on the application of surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy to biochemical problems. Use of SEIRA results in high surface sensitivity by enhancing the signal of the adsorbed molecule by approximately two orders of magnitude and has the potential to enable new studies, from fundamental aspects to applied sciences. This report surveys studies of DNA and nucleic acid adsorption to gold surfaces, development of immunoassays, electron transfer between metal electrodes and proteins, and protein–protein interactions. Because signal enhancement in SEIRA uses surface properties of the nano-structured metal, the biomaterial must be tethered to the metal without hampering its functionality. Because many biochemical reactions proceed vectorially, their functionality depends on proper orientation of the biomaterial. Thus, surface-modification techniques are addressed that enable control of the proper orientation of proteins on the metal surface. Figure Surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) on the studies of tethered protein monolayer (cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome c) on gold substrate (left), and its potential induced surface enhanced infrared difference absorption (SEIDA) spectrum PMID:17242890

  2. Biochemical analysis of the crude extract of Momordica charantia (L.).

    PubMed

    Dar, Ume Kalsoom; Owais, Farah; Ahmad, Manzoor; Rizwani, Ghazala H

    2014-11-01

    Momordica charantia (L.) commonly referred as bitter gourd, karela and balsam pear. Its fruit is used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. The study was conducted to find out the biochemical aspects of crude extract of whole fruit of M. charantia including seeds which includes blood test (Hemoglobin, RBC, Total leukocyte count, platelets count, HbA1C (Glycocylated heamoglobin Type A1C)), Lipid profile test and electrolyte balance. Hemoglobin (7.1±0.14), platelets count (827 ×109±1.95), Cholesterol level (111±2), HDL (high density lipoproteins) (20±1.22) at 10mg shows marked increase in values as compared to control. While 25 mg dose shows insignificant result. Electrolyte balance are found significant at 10mg and 25mg except bicarbonates (Na(+¬)=143±1.87, K-=3.45±0.35, Cl(-) =108±1.48). Another important property of M. charantia is the elevation of platelet counts, heamoglobin and specifically high-density lipoproteins (HDL). It also controls cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL at low dosage (10mg). Further studies can be conducted to find out which phytochemical components acts on specific biochemical activity. PMID:26045386

  3. Transient amplification limits noise suppression in biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, John; Lindemann, Anika; McCoy, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Cell physiology is orchestrated, on a molecular level, through complex networks of biochemical reactions. The propagation of random fluctuations through these networks can significantly impact cell behavior, raising challenging questions about how network design shapes the cell's ability to suppress or exploit these fluctuations. Here, drawing on insights from statistical physics, fluid dynamics, and systems biology, we explore how transient amplification phenomena arising from network connectivity naturally limit a biochemical system's ability to suppress small fluctuations around steady-state behaviors. We find that even a simple system consisting of two variables linked by a single interaction is capable of amplifying small fluctuations orders of magnitude beyond the levels predicted by linear stability theory. We also find that adding additional interactions can promote further amplification, even when these interactions implement classic design strategies known to suppress fluctuations. These results establish that transient amplification is an essential factor determining baseline noise levels in stable intracellular networks. Significantly, our analysis is not bound to specific systems or interaction mechanisms: we find that noise amplification is an emergent phenomenon found near steady states in any network containing sufficiently strong interactions, regardless of its form or function.

  4. Transient amplification limits noise suppression in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Dixon, John; Lindemann, Anika; McCoy, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    Cell physiology is orchestrated, on a molecular level, through complex networks of biochemical reactions. The propagation of random fluctuations through these networks can significantly impact cell behavior, raising challenging questions about how network design shapes the cell's ability to suppress or exploit these fluctuations. Here, drawing on insights from statistical physics, fluid dynamics, and systems biology, we explore how transient amplification phenomena arising from network connectivity naturally limit a biochemical system's ability to suppress small fluctuations around steady-state behaviors. We find that even a simple system consisting of two variables linked by a single interaction is capable of amplifying small fluctuations orders of magnitude beyond the levels predicted by linear stability theory. We also find that adding additional interactions can promote further amplification, even when these interactions implement classic design strategies known to suppress fluctuations. These results establish that transient amplification is an essential factor determining baseline noise levels in stable intracellular networks. Significantly, our analysis is not bound to specific systems or interaction mechanisms: we find that noise amplification is an emergent phenomenon found near steady states in any network containing sufficiently strong interactions, regardless of its form or function. PMID:26871109

  5. Biochemical reconstitution of abasic DNA lesion replication in Xenopus extracts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shuren; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Yan, Hong

    2007-01-01

    Cellular DNA is under constant attack from numerous exogenous and endogenous agents. The resulting DNA lesions, if not repaired timely, could stall DNA replication, leading to genome instability. To better understand the mechanism of DNA lesion replication at the biochemical level, we have attempted to reconstitute this process in Xenopus egg extracts, the only eukaryotic in vitro system that relies solely on cellular proteins for DNA replication. By using a plasmid DNA that carries a site-specific apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) lesion as template, we have found that DNA replication is stalled one nucleotide before the lesion. The stalling is temporary and the lesion is eventually replicated by both an error-prone mechanism and an error-free mechanism. This is the first biochemical system that recapitulates efficiently and faithfully all major aspects of DNA lesion replication. It has provided the first direct evidence for the existence of an error-free lesion replication mechanism and also demonstrated that the error-prone mechanism is a major contributor to lesion replication. PMID:17702761

  6. The human sunburn reaction: histologic and biochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrest, B.A.; Soter, N.A.; Stoff, J.S.; Mihm, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet-induced erythema reaction was investigated histologically and biochemically in four subjects, utilizing suction blister aspirates, analyzed for histamine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and Epon-embedded 1-mu skin biopsy sections from control skin and from irradiated skin at intervals for 72 hours after exposure to a Hanovia lamp. Major histologic alterations in the epidermis included dyskeratotic and vacuolated keratinocytes (sunburn cells), and disappearance of Langerhans cells. In the dermis the major changes were vascular, involving both the superficial and deep venular plexuses. Endothelial cell enlargement was first apparent within 30 minutes of irradiation, peaked at 24 hours, and persisted throughout the 72-hour study period. Mast cell degranulation and associated perivenular edema were first apparent at 1 hour and striking at the onset of erythema, 3 to 4 hours postirradiation; edema was absent and mast cells were again normal in number and granule content at 24 hours. Histamine levels rose approximately fourfold above control values immediately after the onset of erythema and returned to baseline within 24 hours. PGE2 levels were statistically elevated even before the onset of erythema and reached approximately 150% of the control value at 24 hours. These data provide the first evidence that histamine may mediate the early phase of the human sunburn reaction and increase our understanding of its complex histologic and biochemical sequelae.

  7. A markov model based analysis of stochastic biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Preetam; Ghosh, Samik; Basu, Kalyan; Das, Sajial K

    2007-01-01

    The molecular networks regulating basic physiological processes in a cell are generally converted into rate equations assuming the number of biochemical molecules as deterministic variables. At steady state these rate equations gives a set of differential equations that are solved using numerical methods. However, the stochastic cellular environment motivates us to propose a mathematical framework for analyzing such biochemical molecular networks. The stochastic simulators that solve a system of differential equations includes this stochasticity in the model, but suffer from simulation stiffness and require huge computational overheads. This paper describes a new markov chain based model to simulate such complex biological systems with reduced computation and memory overheads. The central idea is to transform the continuous domain chemical master equation (CME) based method into a discrete domain of molecular states with corresponding state transition probabilities and times. Our methodology allows the basic optimization schemes devised for the CME and can also be extended to reduce the computational and memory overheads appreciably at the cost of accuracy. The simulation results for the standard Enzyme-Kinetics and Transcriptional Regulatory systems show promising correspondence with the CME based methods and point to the efficacy of our scheme. PMID:17951818

  8. Deterministic modelling and stochastic simulation of biochemical pathways using MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M; Schmidt, H; Cho, K H; Wolkenhauer, O

    2006-03-01

    The analysis of complex biochemical networks is conducted in two popular conceptual frameworks for modelling. The deterministic approach requires the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs, reaction rate equations) with concentrations as continuous state variables. The stochastic approach involves the simulation of differential-difference equations (chemical master equations, CMEs) with probabilities as variables. This is to generate counts of molecules for chemical species as realisations of random variables drawn from the probability distribution described by the CMEs. Although there are numerous tools available, many of them free, the modelling and simulation environment MATLAB is widely used in the physical and engineering sciences. We describe a collection of MATLAB functions to construct and solve ODEs for deterministic simulation and to implement realisations of CMEs for stochastic simulation using advanced MATLAB coding (Release 14). The program was successfully applied to pathway models from the literature for both cases. The results were compared to implementations using alternative tools for dynamic modelling and simulation of biochemical networks. The aim is to provide a concise set of MATLAB functions that encourage the experimentation with systems biology models. All the script files are available from www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/ publications_matlab-paper.html. PMID:16986253

  9. Coarse-graining stochastic biochemical networks: adiabaticity and fast simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Hengartner, Nick

    2008-01-01

    We propose a universal approach for analysis and fast simulations of stiff stochastic biochemical kinetics networks, which rests on elimination of fast chemical species without a loss of information about mesoscoplc, non-Poissonian fluctuations of the slow ones. Our approach, which is similar to the Born-Oppenhelmer approximation in quantum mechanics, follows from the stochastic path Integral representation of the cumulant generating function of reaction events. In applications with a small number of chemIcal reactions, It produces analytical expressions for cumulants of chemical fluxes between the slow variables. This allows for a low-dimensional, Interpretable representation and can be used for coarse-grained numerical simulation schemes with a small computational complexity and yet high accuracy. As an example, we derive the coarse-grained description for a chain of biochemical reactions, and show that the coarse-grained and the microscopic simulations are in an agreement, but the coarse-gralned simulations are three orders of magnitude faster.

  10. Drug resistance and biochemical characteristics of Salmonella from turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Kolar, J J; Demczuk, W H; Harris, J E

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistance and biochemical characteristics of 2690 Salmonella strains belonging to 52 serovars and isolated from environmental and feed samples from 270 turkey flocks in Canada. Resistance of the Salmonella strains to the aminoglycoside antibiotics varied widely; none of the strains were resistant to amikacin, 14.2% were resistant to neomycin, 25.8% were resistant to gentamicin, and 27.7% of the strains were resistant to kanamycin. Most strains (97.6%) were resistant to the aminocyclitol, spectinomycin. Regarding resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics, 14.3% and 14.4% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and carbenicillin, respectively, whereas only 5 (0.2%) of the strains were resistant to cephalothin. None of the strains were resistant to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin or to polymyxin B. Resistance to chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin was found in 2.4% and 7% of the strains, respectively. Only 1.7% of the strains were resistant to the trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole combination, whereas 58.1% were resistant to sulfisoxazole. Thirty-eight percent of the strains were resistant to tetracycline. Salmonella serovars differed markedly in their drug resistance profiles. Biochemical characterization of the Salmonella showed that the S. anatum, S. saintpaul and S. reading serovars could be divided into distinct biotypes. PMID:8548684

  11. Structure and Biochemical Activities of Escherichia coli MgsA

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Asher N.; George, Nicholas P.; Marceau, Aimee H.; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L.

    2012-02-27

    Bacterial 'maintenance of genome stability protein A' (MgsA) and related eukaryotic enzymes play important roles in cellular responses to stalled DNA replication processes. Sequence information identifies MgsA enzymes as members of the clamp loader clade of AAA{sup +} proteins, but structural information defining the family has been limited. Here, the x-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli MgsA is described, revealing a homotetrameric arrangement for the protein that distinguishes it from other clamp loader clade AAA{sup +} proteins. Each MgsA protomer is composed of three elements as follows: ATP-binding and helical lid domains (conserved among AAA{sup +} proteins) and a tetramerization domain. Although the tetramerization domains bury the greatest amount of surface area in the MgsA oligomer, each of the domains participates in oligomerization to form a highly intertwined quaternary structure. Phosphate is bound at each AAA{sup +} ATP-binding site, but the active sites do not appear to be in a catalytically competent conformation due to displacement of Arg finger residues. E. coli MgsA is also shown to form a complex with the single-stranded DNA-binding protein through co-purification and biochemical studies. MgsA DNA-dependent ATPase activity is inhibited by single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Together, these structural and biochemical observations provide insights into the mechanisms of MgsA family AAA{sup +} proteins.

  12. Applications of biochemical processes in geothermal and other industries

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Jin, J.Z.

    1994-06-01

    Laboratory studies aimed at the development of economically and technically feasible, and environmentally acceptable technology for the disposal of geothermal sludges and wastes have led to the development of biochemical processes which meet the above conditions. A pilot-scale plant has been constructed and used to identify process variables and optimize processing conditions. The total process is flexible and can be used in several modes of operation which include (1) solubilization and removal of many metals, including radionuclides, from brines and sludges; (2) selective removal of a few metals; (3) concentration of metals; (4) recovery of metals; and (5) recovery of salts. The end product is a silica-type material which meets regulatory requirements, while the aqueous phase meets drinking water standards and can be reinjected and/or used for irrigation. Preliminary engineering studies of the metal and salt recovery technologies have indicated that significant cost benefits could be obtained by means of combined processing. Recent accomplishments in the development of new biochemical technologies will be discussed in this paper.

  13. Muscle wasting in chronic alcoholics: comparative histochemical and biochemical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Langohr, H D; Wiethölter, H; Peiffer, J

    1983-01-01

    The comparative electrophysiologic, histochemical, and biochemical investigation of the anterior tibial muscle of 13 alcoholics indicates that neuropathy could be the cause of the chronic muscle weakness and wasting. Myopathic alterations did not predominate in the findings. It was concluded that the proximal muscle atrophy could also be attributed to neurogenic damage. Histochemical reactions in muscle specimens showed a selective type 2 atrophy and a slight increase of the mean diameter of type 1 fibres. Biochemical investigations revealed that the activities of a number of enzymes representative of energy supplying pathways--the glycogenolysis and glycolysis--as well as acid phosphatase activity in the muscle were lowered. A relationship could be assumed between the lowered glycolytic activity and the decline of the mean diameter of type 2 fibres. Oxidative enzymes were of similar activity in the alcoholics and the control group. The glycolytic enzyme activities were particularly important, being the most sensitive indicators of the onset, intensity, and course of neurogenic damage. These activities probably normalise during reinnervation of a muscle earlier than do the morphologic alterations; however, they were markedly lower in alcoholics with impaired liver function and cachexia, probably because of the catabolic metabolic conditions present in these cases. Images PMID:6221080

  14. Glucosinolate biochemical diversity and innovation in the Brassicales.

    PubMed

    Mithen, Richard; Bennett, Richard; Marquez, Julietta

    2010-12-01

    Glucosinolates were analysed from herbarium specimens and living tissues from representative of all families of the Brassicales, following the phylogenetic schemes of Rodman et al. (1998) and Hall et al. (2002, 2004), including specimens of Akania, Setchellanthus, Emblingia, Stixis, Forchhammeria and members of the Capparaceae for which glucosinolate content had not previously been reported. The results are reviewed along with additional published data on glucosinolate content of members of the Brassicales. In addition to providing an overview of the evolution of glucosinolate biochemical diversity within the core Brassicales, there were three main findings. Firstly, the glucosinolate content of some 'orphan' taxa of the Brassicales, such as Setchellanthus and Emblingia were consistent with recent phylogentic analyses based upon DNA sequence comparisons, while further analyses of Tirania and Stixis is required. Secondly, methyl glucosinolate is found within the Capparaceae and Cleomaceae, but also, unexpectedly, within Forchhammeria, with implications for the biochemical and evolutionary origin of methyl glucosinolate and the phylogenetic relationships of Forchhammeria. Thirdly, whereas Old World Capparaceae contain methyl glucosinolate, New World Capparaceae, including New World Capparis, either contain methyl glucosinolates or glucosinolates of complex and unresolved structures, indicative of continued innovation in glucosinolate biosynthesis. These taxa may be productive sources of glucosinolate biosynthetic genes and alleles that are not found in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:20971483

  15. Hematological and Serum Biochemical Analyses in Experimental Caprine Besnoitiosis

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Namazi, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the hematological and biochemical changes in experimentally infected goats with Besnoitia caprae from the time of infection till 360 days post-infection (PI). Six male goats were inoculated subcutaneously with 13×107 bradyzoites of B. caprae, and blood samples were collected from the jugular vein. The total erythrocyte and total leukocyte counts, hematocrit value, and differential leukocyte counts were determined. Serum biochemical analysis, including the total protein, albumin, total globulin, cholesterol, triglyceride, chloride, testosterone, calcium (Ca2+), inorganic phosphorus, sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), iron (Fe2+), glucose, serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), fibrinogen, ceruloplasmin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase, was undertaken. Skin biopsy from the limbs were collected at weekly intervals and histologically examined for Besnoitia cysts. Cysts were present in the skin biopsies of the leg of the infected goats from day 28 PI. There were variations in hematological analyses, but no significant difference was seen. From day 30 to 360 PI, results showed that SAA, Hp, fibrinogen, and ceruloplasmin concentrations increased, whereas testosterone concentrations decreased. Infected goats exhibited decrease of albumin and increase of serum total protein and globulin concentrations. By contrast, there were no significant differences in the remained analyses concentrations. PMID:21738268

  16. In Vitro Reparative Dentin: a Biochemical and Morphological Study

    PubMed Central

    Teti, G.; Salvatore, V.; Ruggeri, A.; Manzoli, L.; Gesi, M.; Orsini, G.; Falconi, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, starting from human dental pulp cells cultured in vitro, we simulated reparative dentinogenesis using a medium supplemented with different odontogenic inductors. The differentiation of dental pulp cells in odontoblast-like cells was evaluated by means of staining, and ultramorphological, biochemical and biomolecular methods. Alizarin red staining showed mineral deposition while transmission electron microscopy revealed a synthesis of extracellular matrix fibers during the differentiation process. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the differentiated phenotype expressed odontoblast markers, such as Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) and Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP), as well as type I collagen. Quantitative data regarding the mRNA expression of DMP1, DSP and type I collagen were obtained by Real Time PCR. Immunofluorescence data demonstrated the various localizations of DSP and DMP1 during odontoblast differentiation. Based on our results, we obtained odontoblast-like cells which simulated the reparative dentin processes in order to better investigate the mechanism of odontoblast differentiation, and dentin extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization. PMID:24085272

  17. DNA damaging and biochemical effects of potassium tetraborate.

    PubMed

    Çelikezen, Fatih Çaglar; Turkez, Hasan; Togar, Basak; Izgi, Mehmet Sait

    2014-01-01

    Potassium tetraborate (PTB) is a product resulting from the controlled reaction of potassium hydroxide, water and boric acid (BA). It is used in many areas of industry such as disinfectant, detergent and treatment of contact lenses. PTB is one of the boron compounds which is most commonly used in many areas of industry although very limited information is available concerning its toxicity. Therefore, in this study, it is aimed to determine genetic and biochemical effects of PTB in human blood cell cultures (n=4). PTB was added into culture tubes at various concentrations (0-1280 µg/ml). Micronucleus (MN) and chromosomal aberration (CA) tests were performed for genotoxic damage influences estimation. In addition, biochemical parameters (total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidative status (TOS) were examined to determine oxidative effects. The results indicated that all tested concentrations of PTB were found to be non-genotoxic. In addition, low concentrations (1.25, 2.5 and 5 µg/ml) of PTB caused increases of TAC levels. Furthermore, all concentrations of PTB were not changed the TOS levels in cultured human blood cells. Based on these results, in this study it has been reported for the first time that PTB is not genotoxic and it increases the antioxidant capacity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:26417271

  18. Impact of flow velocity on biochemical processes - a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, A.; Roubinet, D.; Aquilina, L.; Bour, O.; Davy, P.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding and predicting hydraulic and chemical properties of natural environments are current crucial challenges. It requires considering hydraulic, chemical and biological processes and evaluating how hydrodynamic properties impact on biochemical reactions. In this context, an original laboratory experiment to study the impact of flow velocity on biochemical reactions along a one-dimensional flow streamline has been developed. Based on the example of nitrate reduction, nitrate-rich water passes through plastic tubes at several flow velocities (from 6.2 to 35 mm min-1), while nitrate concentration at the tube outlet is monitored for more than 500 h. This experimental setup allows assessing the biologically controlled reaction between a mobile electron acceptor (nitrate) and an electron donor (carbon) coming from an immobile phase (tube) that produces carbon during its degradation by microorganisms. It results in observing a dynamic of the nitrate transformation associated with biofilm development which is flow-velocity dependent. It is proposed that the main behaviors of the reaction rates are related to phases of biofilm development through a simple analytical model including assimilation. Experiment results and their interpretation demonstrate a significant impact of flow velocity on reaction performance and stability and highlight the relevance of dynamic experiments over static experiments for understanding biogeochemical processes.

  19. Modelling non-Markovian dynamics in biochemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biochemical reactions are often modelled as discrete-state continuous-time stochastic processes evolving as memoryless Markov processes. However, in some cases, biochemical systems exhibit non-Markovian dynamics. We propose here a methodology for building stochastic simulation algorithms which model more precisely non-Markovian processes in some specific situations. Our methodology is based on Constraint Programming and is implemented by using Gecode, a state-of-the-art framework for constraint solving. Results Our technique allows us to randomly sample waiting times from probability density functions that not necessarily are distributed according to a negative exponential function. In this context, we discuss an important case-study in which the probability density function is inferred from single-molecule experiments that describe the distribution of the time intervals between two consecutive enzymatically catalysed reactions. Noticeably, this feature allows some types of enzyme reactions to be modelled as non-Markovian processes. Conclusions We show that our methodology makes it possible to obtain accurate models of enzymatic reactions that, in specific cases, fit experimental data better than the corresponding Markovian models. PMID:26051249

  20. Modular microfluidics for point-of-care biochemical purifications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Millet, Larry J; Standaert, Robert F; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical separations are the heart of diagnostic assays and purification methods for biologics. On-chip miniaturization and modularization of separation procedures will enable the development of customized, portable devices for personalized health-care diagnostics and point-of-use production of treatments. In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of miniature ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography modules for on-chip clean-up of recombinantly-produced proteins. Our results demonstrate that these common separations techniques can be implemented in microfluidic modules with performance comparable to conventional approaches. We introduce embedded 3-D microfluidic interconnects for integrating micro-scale separation modules that can be arranged and reconfigured tomore » suit a variety of fluidic operations or biochemical processes. We demonstrate the utility of the modular approach with a platform for the enrichment of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Escherichia coli lysate through integrated affinity and size-exclusion chromatography modules.« less

  1. Biochemical and morphological characterization of MAGI-1 in neuronal tissue.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Sudo, Kaori; Nishimura, Yoshiaki V; Inaguma, Yutaka; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Nagata, Koh-Ichi

    2012-09-01

    The membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted organization (MAGI) proteins consist of three members, MAGI-1, MAGI-2 (also known as S-SCAM), and MAGI-3. Although MAGI-2 has been analyzed and shown to interact with a variety of postsynaptic proteins, functional analyses and characterization of MAGI-1 in neuronal tissues have been rare. In this study, we prepared a specific antibody against MAGI-1, anti-MAGI-1, and carried out biochemical and morphological analyses of MAGI-1 in rat neuronal tissues. By Western blotting, a high level of MAGI-1 was detected in nervous tissues, especially in olfactory bulb. Biochemical fractionation clarified that MAGI-1 was relatively enriched in the synaptosomal vesicle and synaptic plasma membrane fractions, whereas MAGI-2 and MAGI-3 appeared to be in the synaptic plasma membrane and postsynaptic density fractions. Immunofluorescent analyses revealed diffuse distribution of MAGI-1 in the cell body and processes of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons, whereas MAGI-2 and MAGI-3 were likely to be enriched at synapses. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that MAGI-1 was expressed in Purkinje cells, in hypocampal neurons in CA1 region, in the glomerulus region of olfactory bulb, and at the dorsal root entry zone in embryonic rat spinal cord. These results suggest neuronal roles of MAGI-1 different from those of MAGI-2/3. PMID:22605569

  2. Biochemical composition of three species of unionid mussels after emersion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greseth, Shari L.; Cope, W.G.; Rada, R.G.; Waller, D.L.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are emersed (exposed to air) during conservation activities such as surveys and relocations. Success of these activities depends upon the ability of mussels to survive emersion and to re-burrow in the substratum. We evaluated the acute sublethal effects of emersion on three species of unionid mussels [pocketbook, Lampsilis cardium (Rafinesque, 1820); pimpleback, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa (I. Lea, 1831); spike, Elliptio dilatata (Rafinesque, 1820)] by measuring three biochemicals (carbohydrate, lipid, protein) indicative of biochemical function and energy storage. Mussels were acclimated in water at 25??C and exposed to five air temperatures (15, 20, 25, 35 and 45??C) for 15, 30 and 60 min. After emersion, mussels were returned to water at 25??C and observed for 14 days. Samples of mantle tissue were taken after the 14-day postexposure period and analysed for carbohydrate, lipid and protein. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) did not reveal consistent trends in carbohydrate, lipid or protein concentrations due to sex of mussels, duration of emersion, air temperature or their interaction terms that indicated biological compensation to stress. Overall mean carbohydrate concentrations were greatest (range 447-615 mg/g dry wt) among the species, followed by protein (179-289 mg/g dry wt) and lipids (26.7-38.1 mg/g dry wt). These results have positive implications for conducting conservation activities, because emersion over the range of temperatures (15-35??C) and durations (15-60 min) examined did not appear acutely harmful to mussels.

  3. Advanced materials and biochemical processes for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; van Rooyen, D.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1987-04-01

    Two Geothermal Technology Division (GTD)-sponsored programs: (1) Geothermal Materials Development, and (2) Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines, are described. In the former, work in the following tasks is in progress: (1) high temperature elastomeric materials for dynamic sealing applications, (2) advanced high temperature (300/sup 0/C) lightweight (1.1 g/cc) well cementing materials, (3) thermally conductive composites for heat exchanger tubing, (4) corrosion rates for metals in brine-contaminated binary plant working fluids, and (5) elastomeric liners for well casing. Methods for the utilization and/or the low cost environmentally acceptable disposal of toxic geothermal residues are being developed in the second program. This work is performed in two tasks. In one, microorganisms that can interact with toxic metals found in geothermal residues to convert them into soluble species for subsequent reinjection back into the reservoir or to concentrate them for removal by conventional processes are being identified. In the second task, process conditions are being defined for the encapsulation of untreated or partially biochemically treated residues in Portland cement-based formulations and the subsequent utilization of the waste fractions in building materials. Both processing methods yield materials which appear to meet disposal criteria for non-toxic solid waste, and their technical and economic feasibilities have been established.

  4. Xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome: overlapping clinical and biochemical phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Greenhaw, G A; Hebert, A; Duke-Woodside, M E; Butler, I J; Hecht, J T; Cleaver, J E; Thomas, G H; Horton, W A

    1992-01-01

    Two siblings are described whose clinical presentation of cutaneous photosensitivity and central nervous system dysfunction is strongly reminiscent of the DeSanctis-Cacchione syndrome (DCS) variant of xeroderma pigmentosum. An extensive clinical evaluation supported a diagnosis of DCS and documented previously unreported findings. In vitro fibroblast studies showed UV sensitivity that was two to three times that of normal controls. However, neither a post-UV-irradiation DNA excision-repair defect indicative of XP nor a semiconservative DNA replication defect indicative of XP variant was found. Rather, a failure of RNA synthesis to recover to normal levels after UV exposure was observed, a biochemical abnormality seen in Cockayne syndrome (CS), one of the premature-aging syndromes with clinical UV sensitivity. These patients, therefore, clinically have XP, but their biochemical characteristics suggest CS. The reason(s) for the severe neurologic disease, in light of the relatively mild cutaneous abnormalities, is unclear. Other cases with unusual fibroblast responses to irradiation have been noted in the literature and, along with the data from our patients, reinforce the notion of the complexity of DNA maintenance and repair. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1372469

  5. The application of information theory to biochemical signaling systems

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Alex; Cheong, Raymond; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Cell signaling can be thought of fundamentally as an information transmission problem in which chemical messengers relay information about the external environment to the decision centers within a cell. Due to the biochemical nature of cellular signal transduction networks, molecular noise will inevitably limit the fidelity of any messages received and processed by a cell’s signal transduction networks, leaving it with an imperfect impression of its environment. Fortunately, Shannon’s information theory provides a mathematical framework independent of network complexity that can quantify the amount of information that can be transmitted despite biochemical noise. In particular, the channel capacity can be used to measure the maximum number of stimuli a cell can distinguish based upon the noisy responses of its signaling systems. Here, we provide a primer for quantitative biologists that covers fundamental concepts of information theory, highlights several key considerations when experimentally measuring channel capacity, and describes successful examples of the application of information theoretic analysis to biological signaling. PMID:22872091

  6. Biochemical and bioinformatic analysis of the MYO19 motor domain

    PubMed Central

    Adikes, Rebecca C.; Unrath, William C.; Yengo, Christopher M.; Quintero, Omar A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics are dependent on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletal systems. Evidence for the involvement of myosin motors has been described in many systems, and until recently a candidate mitochondrial transport motor had not been described in vertebrates. Myosin-XIX (MYO19) was predicted to represent a novel class of myosin and had previously been shown to bind to mitochondria and increase mitochondrial network dynamics when ectopically expressed. Our analyses comparing ∼40 MYO19 orthologs to ∼2000 other myosin motor domain sequences identified instances of homology well-conserved within class XIX myosins that were not found in other myosin classes, suggesting MYO19-specific mechanochemistry. Steady-state biochemical analyses of the MYO19 motor domain indicate that Homo sapiens MYO19 is a functional motor. Insect cell-expressed constructs bound calmodulin as a light chain at the predicted stoichiometry and displayed actin-activated ATPase activity. MYO19 constructs demonstrated high actin affinity in the presence of ATP in actin-cosedimentation assays, and translocated actin filaments in gliding assays. Expression of GFP-MYO19 containing a mutation impairing ATPase activity did not enhance mitochondrial network dynamics, as occurs with wild-type MYO19, indicating that myosin motor activity is required for mitochondrial motility. The measured biochemical properties of MYO19 suggest it is a high-duty ratio motor that could serve to transport mitochondria or anchor mitochondria, depending upon the cellular microenvironment. PMID:23568824

  7. Millisecond-scale biochemical response to change in strain.

    PubMed

    Bickham, Dale C; West, Timothy G; Webb, Martin R; Woledge, Roger C; Curtin, Nancy A; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2011-11-16

    Muscle fiber contraction involves the cyclical interaction of myosin cross-bridges with actin filaments, linked to hydrolysis of ATP that provides the required energy. We show here the relationship between cross-bridge states, force generation, and Pi release during ramp stretches of active mammalian skeletal muscle fibers at 20°C. The results show that force and Pi release respond quickly to the application of stretch: force rises rapidly, whereas the rate of Pi release decreases abruptly and remains low for the duration of the stretch. These measurements show that biochemical change on the millisecond timescale accompanies the mechanical and structural responses in active muscle fibers. A cross-bridge model is used to simulate the effect of stretch on the distribution of actomyosin cross-bridges, force, and Pi release, with explicit inclusion of ATP, ADP, and Pi in the biochemical states and length-dependence of transitions. In the simulation, stretch causes rapid detachment and reattachment of cross-bridges without release of Pi or ATP hydrolysis. PMID:22098743

  8. Profile of biochemical traits influencing tenderness of muscles from the beef round.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M J; Lonergan, S M; Fedler, C A; Prusa, K J; Binning, J M; Huff-Lonergan, E

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to define the biochemical differences that govern tenderness and palatability of economically important muscles from the beef round using cuts with known tenderness differences. At 24h postmortem, the longissimus dorsi (LD), gracillus (GR), adductor (AD), semimembranosus (SM), sartorius (SAR), vastus lateralis (VL), and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles were removed from ten market weight beef cattle. Sensory and biochemical characteristics were determined in each cut and compared with the LD. The GR, SAR and VI had sensory traits similar to the LD while the SM, AD and VL differed. The GR, SAR, AD, and SM all had multiple biochemical characteristics similar to the LD, while the VI and AD had numerous biochemical differences. While no one biochemical characteristic can be used to predict tenderness across all muscles, analysis of the biochemical characteristics revealed that in most beef round cuts postmortem proteolysis provided a good indication of the tenderization occurring during aging. PMID:22386323

  9. The impact of dietary protein intake on serum biochemical and haematological profiles in vervet monkeys.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Q; Veith, W J; Mouton, T

    2001-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of Westernised and traditional African diets on biochemical and haematological profiles in vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops). Twelve adult male vervet monkeys bred at the Medical Research Council, all over 4 years of age and weighing more than 5 kg each, were divided into two groups of six individuals. These monkeys were raised on a standard in-house diet post-weaning, before they were fed for 8 weeks on diets containing milk solids (17.2%) or maize + legume (17.4%), as sources of high crude protein (+/- 3.5 g/kg). High protein diets had no significant effect on serum biochemical indices such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) concentrations (P > 0.10). However, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations were significantly higher during week 8 (P < 0.05) for the maize + legume protein group. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP; P < 0.07), total protein (P < 0.0001), albumin (P < 0.02), and bilirubin (P < 0.003) were elevated in the milk solids group, while glucose levels were also significantly higher for the milk solids group (P < 0.05) between weeks 2 and 6. Elevated protein intake had no significant effect on haematological parameters such as red blood cells (RBC), platelet and white blood cell (WBC) counts, haemoglobin levels and monocyte and neutrophil concentrations (P > 0.10). In contrast, serum lymphocyte levels were significantly raised in the maize + legume protein group (P = 0.03), whereas values for the haematocrit (P < 0.002), mean cell volume (MCV; P < 0.03) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC; P < 0.0001) were higher in the monkeys that were fed the milk solids. This investigation showed that the type of dietary protein that is consumed may well affect certain biochemical and haematological indices in vervet monkeys. Compared to the group that were given the traditional African food regime, the animals on the Western-type milk solids diet showed significant

  10. Physiological and biochemical responses of Ricinus communis seedlings to different temperatures: a metabolomics approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    to be the main biochemical response to support growth at higher temperatures. The biochemical changes observed in response to the increasing temperature provide leads into understanding plant adaptation to harsh environmental conditions, which will be very helpful in developing strategies for R. communis crop improvement research. PMID:25109402

  11. SU-8 Cantilevers for Bio/chemical Sensing; Fabrication, Characterisation and Development of Novel Read-out Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Maria; Keller, Stephan; Lillemose, Michael; Johansson, Alicia; Dohn, Søren; Haefliger, Daniel; Blagoi, Gabriela; Havsteen-Jakobsen, Mogens; Boisen, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present the activities within our research group over the last five years with cantilevers fabricated in the polymer SU-8. We believe that SU-8 is an interesting polymer for fabrication of cantilevers for bio/chemical sensing due to its simple processing and low Young's modulus. We show examples of different integrated read-out methods and their characterisation. We also show that SU-8 cantilevers have a reduced sensitivity to changes in the environmental temperature and pH of the buffer solution. Moreover, we show that the SU-8 cantilever surface can be functionalised directly with receptor molecules for analyte detection, thereby avoiding gold-thiol chemistry.

  12. Phase-sensitive flow cytometry: New technology for analyzing biochemical, functional, and structural features in fluorochrome- labeled cells/particles

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) instruments rapidly measure biochemical, functional, and cytological properties of individual cells and macromolecular components, e.g., chromosomes, for clinical diagnostic medicine and biomedical and envirorunental research applications. These measurements are based on labeling cells with multiple fluorochromes for correlated analysis of macromolecules, such as DNA RNA, protein, and cell-surface receptors. This report describes the development of a phase-sensitive flow cytometer that provides unique capabilities for making laser-excited, phase-resolved measurements on fluorochrome-labelled cells and particles.

  13. Biochemical Characterization of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) helicase is a superfamily 1 helicase containing seven conserved motifs. We have cloned, expressed, and purified a Strep-fused recombinant MERS-CoV nonstructural protein 13 (M-nsp13) helicase. Characterization of its biochemical properties showed that it unwound DNA and RNA similarly to severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV nsp13 (S-nsp13) helicase. We showed that M-nsp13 unwound in a 5′-to-3′ direction and efficiently unwound the partially duplex RNA substrates with a long loading strand relative to those of the RNA substrates with a short or no loading strand. Moreover, the Km of ATP for M-nsp13 is inversely proportional to the length of the 5′ loading strand of the partially duplex RNA substrates. Finally, we also showed that the rate of unwinding (ku) of M-nsp13 is directly proportional to the length of the 5′ loading strand of the partially duplex RNA substrate. These results provide insights that enhance our understanding of the biochemical properties of M-nsp13. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are known to cause a wide range of diseases in humans and animals. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel coronavirus discovered in 2012 and is responsible for acute respiratory syndrome in humans in the Middle East, Europe, North Africa, and the United States of America. Helicases are motor proteins that catalyze the processive separation of double-stranded nucleic acids into two single-stranded nucleic acids by utilizing the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. MERS-CoV helicase is one of the most important viral replication enzymes of this coronavirus. Herein, we report the first bacterial expression, enzyme purification, and biochemical characterization of MERS-CoV helicase. The knowledge obtained from this study might be used to identify an inhibitor of MERS-CoV replication, and the helicase might be used as a therapeutic target.

  14. Hematologic and biochemical profiles in Standardbred mares during peripartum.

    PubMed

    Mariella, Jole; Pirrone, Alessandro; Gentilini, Fabio; Castagnetti, Carolina

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine physiological changes occurring in hematologic and biochemical parameters in mares between the last month of gestation and the first week after parturition. If a significant change was observed with respect to the reference interval of an adult horse, a further aim of the study was to establish different reference intervals. Blood samples were collected from 62 healthy pregnant Standardbred mares. Seventeen nonpregnant and nonlactating mares were used as a control group. In pregnant mares, blood sampling was conducted every three days from 1 month before the expected foaling date (335 days after the last mating), at parturition, and 7 days after foaling. The barren mares in the control group were sampled once. Results from samples collected 20 and 10 days before parturition, at parturition, and 7 days after were considered in the statistical analysis. A parametric method for all the parameters studied was used to establish reference intervals. Results were compared by repeated measures ANOVA. When significant differences were observed in relation to sampling time, a post hoc analysis was performed (Tukey test). The one-way ANOVA test followed by Dunnett's test was performed to evaluate the presence of a significant difference between each sampling time and the control group. Any significant difference in the blood count parameters at different sampling times was observed by repeated measure ANOVA. Hemoglobin (P < 0.01) and hematocrit (P < 0.01) 7 days after parturition and white blood cell count (P < 0.01) at parturition were significantly different from the control group. Erythrocyte indices and platelet count were within the normal reference intervals as established in the control group. In the biochemical panel, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, biliar acids, total protein, albumin-to-globulin ratio, and calcium were significantly different at different sampling times. Moreover, serum concentration of

  15. Biochemical Mechanisms Controlling Terminal Electron Transfer in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, R.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Tien, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens to use a variety of metals as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for cellular respiration makes it attractive for use in bioremediation and implies its importance to mineral cycling in the environment. This study is aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanisms that allow Geobacter sulfurreducens to use soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms as TEAs for cellular respiration and is the first of its kind to address the kinetics of manganese use as a TEA by G. sulfurreducens. First, G. sulfurreducens was conditioned to grow on various soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms. G. sulfurreducens demonstrated enhanced growth rates when cultured using soluble TEAs compared with insoluble TEAs. However, the lower growth rate on insoluble iron compared with soluble iron was observed concomitantly with a 1-2 log lower cell density in stationary phase in insoluble iron cultures and a lower growth yield per electron donor used in log growth phase. Furthermore, the growth yield per electron was similar with both soluble and insoluble iron. These results suggest that the net amount of energy available for biomass production achieved from reducing insoluble iron is lower than with soluble iron, which may be due to a different biochemical mechanism catalyzing the electron transfer to TEA dependent upon the solubility of the TEA. One scenario consistent with this notion is that protein(s) in the outer membrane of G. sulfurreducens that transfers electrons to insoluble TEAs does so in a manner that uncouples electron flow from the proton pump in the cellular membrane, similar to what we have observed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Both the growth rate and growth yield of G. sulfurreducens on insoluble manganese were higher than on insoluble iron, indicating that there is a difference in the flow of electrons to the TEA in these two situations. While the different redox potentials of these elements may affect these values

  16. Using Fermentation and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Products: Biochemical Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Information about the Biomass Program's collaborative projects to improve processing routes for biochemical conversion, which entails breaking down biomass to make the carbohydrates available for conversion into sugars.

  17. Physiological and biochemical effect of neem and other Meliaceae plants secondary metabolites against Lepidopteran insects

    PubMed Central

    Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan

    2013-01-01

    This review described the physiological and biochemical effects of various secondary metabolites from Meliaceae against major Lepidopteran insect pest including, Noctuidae and Pyralidae. The biochemical effect of major Meliaceae secondary metabolites were discussed more in this review. Several enzymes based on food materials have critical roles in nutritional indices (food utilization) of the insect pest population. Several research work has been referred and the effect of Meliaceae secondary metabolites on feeding parameters of insects by demonstrating food consumption, approximate digestibility of consumed food, efficiency of converting the ingested food to body substance, efficiency of converting digested food to body substance and consumption index was reviewed in detail. Further how the digestive enzymes including a-Amylases, α and β-glucosidases (EC 3.2.1.1), lipases (EC 3.1.1) Proteases, serine, cysteine, and aspartic proteinases affected by the Meliaceae secondary metabolites was reviewed. Further effect of Meliaceae secondary metabolites on detoxifying enzymes have been found to react against botanical insecticides including general esterases (EST), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and phosphatases was reviewed. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, E.C.3.1.3.1) and acid phosphatase (ACP, E.C.3.1.3.2) are hydrolytic enzymes, which hydrolyze phosphomonoesters under alkaline or acid conditions, respectively. These enzymes were affected by the secondary metabolites treatment. The detailed mechanism of action was further explained in this review. Acethylcholine esterase (AChE) is a key enzyme that terminates nerve impulses by catalyzing the hydrolysis of neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, in the nervous system of various organisms. How the AChE activity was altered by the Meliaceae secondary metabolites reviewed in detail. PMID:24391591

  18. Biochemical characterization of a factor X activator protein purified from Walterinnesia aegyptia venom.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sami U; Al-Saleh, Saad S

    2015-10-01

    Factor X of blood coagulation cascade can be activated by both intrinsic and extrinsic activating complex, trypsin and some kind of snake venom. A factor X activator protein is reported in Elapidae snake venom. The aim of this study was to evaluate biochemical properties of factor X activator protein because of its prospective application in biochemical research and therapeutics. Crude venom was fractionated on a HPLC system Gold 126/1667 using a combination of Protein PAK 125 and Protein PAK 60 Columns. Molecular weight was determined using SDS-PAGE. Walterinnesia aegyptia venom was fractionated into several protein peaks, but procoagulant and factor X activation activity coexisted into peak no.6. It appeared as single band on native PAGE and molecular weight was 60,000 ± 3. Purified up to 37-fold over crude venom. It shortened recalcification time, effect was dose-dependent and strictly Ca(2++)-dependent. Factor X activator seems to be able to activate factor X specifically because it showed no activation activity on human prothrombin, plasminogen, or protein C. It did not hydrolyze factor Xa substrate S-2222, thrombin substrate S-2238, plasmin substrate S-2251 or S-2302 and kalikrein substrate S-2266. It did not hydrolyze synthetic ester benzoyl arginine ethyl ester. Procoagulant activity was completely inhibited by irreversible serine protease inhibitors phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride and N-p-tosylphenylalanine chloromethyl ketone. This study illustrates that factor X activator from W. aegyptia is though different in many aspects from factor X activators of Viperidae and Crotalidae venoms, but shows several properties identical to factor X activators from Elapidae venoms. PMID:26407136

  19. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Behr, Julie; Gaskin, Byron; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng; Kunz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC) and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs. PMID:26366568

  20. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Julie; Gaskin, Byron; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng; Kunz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC) and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs. PMID:26366568

  1. Chemical and Biochemical Approaches in the Study of Histone Methylation and Demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Keqin Kathy; Luo, Cheng; Wang, Dongxia; Jiang, Hualiang; Zheng, Y. George

    2014-01-01

    Histone methylation represents one of the most critical epigenetic events in DNA function regulation in eukaryotic organisms. Classic molecular biology and genetics tools provide significant knowledge about mechanisms and physiological roles of histone methyltransferases and demethylases in various cellular processes. In addition to this stream line, development and application of chemistry and chemistry-related techniques are increasingly involved in biological study, and provide information otherwise difficulty to obtain by standard molecular biology methods. Herein, we review recent achievements and progress in developing and applying chemical and biochemical approaches in the study of histone methylation, including chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), chemical ligation, mass spectrometry (MS), biochemical assays, and inhibitor development. These technological advances allow histone methylation to be studied from genome-wide level to molecular and atomic levels. With ChIP technology, information can be obtained about precise mapping of histone methylation patterns at specific promoters, genes or other genomic regions. MS is particularly useful in detecting and analyzing methylation marks in histone and nonhistone protein substrates. Chemical approaches that permit site-specific incorporation of methyl groups into histone proteins greatly facilitate the investigation of the biological impacts of methylation at individual modification sites. Discovery and design of selective organic inhibitors of histone methyltransferases and demethylases provide chemical probes to interrogate methylation-mediated cellular pathways. Overall, these chemistry-related technological advances have greatly improved our understanding of the biological functions of histone methylation in normal physiology and diseased states, and also are of great potential to translate basic epigenetics research into diagnostic and therapeutic application in the clinic. PMID:22777714

  2. Integration of biochemical sensors into wearable biomaterial platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandhyala, Sidhartha; Walper, Scott A.; Cargill, Allison A.; Ozual, Abigail; Daniele, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    With rapidly inflating healthcare costs, a limited supply of physicians and an alarming surge in lifestyle diseases, radical changes must be made to improve preventative medicine and ensure a sustainable healthcare system. A compelling solution is to equip the population with wearable health monitors to continuously record representative and actionable physiological data. Herein, we present a preliminary design and evaluation of a biochemical sensor node enabled by a substrate comprised of a nanocellulose thin-film that conforms to the skin and carries a printed sensor element. The nanocellulose layer ensures conformal and biocompatible contact with the skin, while a printed layer provides a high surface-area electrode. While the recognition/transduction element can be exchanged for many different sensing motifs, we utilize the general structure of an electrochemical glucose sensor.

  3. Fish protein hydrolysates: production, biochemical, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, H G; Rasco, B A

    2000-01-01

    Considerable amounts of fish processing byproducts are discarded each year. By developing enzyme technologies for protein recovery and modification, production of a broad spectrum of food ingredients and industrial products may be possible. Hydrolyzed vegetable and milk proteins are widely used food ingredients. There are few hydrolyzed fish protein foods with the exception of East Asian condiments and sauces. This review describes various manufacturing techniques for fish protein hydrolysates using acid, base, endogenous enzymes, and added bacterial or digestive proteases. The chemical and biochemical characteristics of hydrolyzed fish proteins are discussed. In addition, functional properties of fish protein hydrolysates are described, including solubility, water-holding capacity, emulsification, and foam-forming ability. Possible applications of fish protein hydrolysates in food systems are provided, and comparison with other food protein hydrolysates where pertinent. PMID:10674201

  4. Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Disease: Hormonal and Biochemical Influences

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-López, Faustino R.; Larrad-Mur, Luis; Kallen, Amanda; Chedraui, Peter; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is a complex process characterized by an increase in vascular wall thickness owing to the accumulation of cells and extracellular matrix between the endothelium and the smooth muscle cell wall. There is evidence that females are at lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) as compared to males. This has led to an interest in examining the contribution of genetic background and sex hormones to the development of CVD. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of factors, including those related to gender, that influence CVD. Methods Evidence analysis from PubMed and individual searches concerning biochemical and endocrine influences and gender differences, which affect the origin and development of CVD. Results Although still controversial, evidence suggests that hormones including estradiol and androgens are responsible for subtle cardiovascular changes long before the development of overt atherosclerosis. Conclusion Exposure to sex hormones throughout an individual's lifespan modulates many endocrine factors involved in atherosclerosis. PMID:20460551

  5. Biochemical switching device: how to turn on (off) the switch.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Sakai, T; Hayashi, K

    1989-01-01

    We previously showed with computer simulations that cyclic enzyme systems have the reliability of ON-OFF types of operation (McCulloch-Pitts' neuronic equation) and the applicability for a switching circuit in a biocomputer. The switching time was inevitably determined in accordance with the difference in amount between two inputs of the system. This characteristic is, however, a disadvantage for practical use of a switching device; we need to improve the system in order for the switching time to optionally be changed. We shall present here how to turn on (off) the switch independently of the modes of two inputs. By introducing pulse perturbation, we could optionally set up the switching time of a cyclic enzyme system (biochemical switching device). PMID:2720139

  6. Biochemical biomarkers in barnacles Balanus improvisus: pollution and seasonal effects.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Juliano; Monserrat, José Maria; Bianchini, Adalto

    2015-02-01

    Biochemical biomarkers were evaluated in the barnacle Balanus improvisus (Crustacea: Cirripedia) sampled from both polluted and reference sites in the Patos Lagoon Estuary, Southern Brazil. During winter, higher glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was recorded in the barnacles from the polluted sites, indicating environmental exposure to contaminants. Relatively low lipid peroxide levels (LPO) were also observed in barnacles from polluted sites, indicating that oxidative stress by lipid peroxidation was not a major threat in barnacles from those sites. Seasonal differences in the GST and total oxyradical scavenging capacity (TOSC) could have contributed to the low LPO levels in the summer relative to the levels in the winter. Catalase activity and metallothionein levels were not affected by contamination or seasonality. The seasonal changes observed in biomarker responses were paralleled by the differences in temperature, which could have affected physiological responses, including the balance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants. PMID:25460064

  7. Inorganic polyphosphate in Vibrio cholerae: genetic, biochemical, and physiologic features.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Tzeng, C M; Fraley, C D; Kornberg, A

    2000-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1, biotype El Tor, accumulates inorganic polyphosphate (poly P) principally as large clusters of granules. Poly P kinase (PPK), the enzyme that synthesizes poly P from ATP, is encoded by the ppk gene, which has been cloned from V. cholerae, overexpressed, and knocked out by insertion-deletion mutagenesis. The predicted amino acid sequence of PPK is 701 residues (81.6 kDa), with 64% identity to that of Escherichia coli, which it resembles biochemically. As in E. coli, ppk is part of an operon with ppx, the gene that encodes exopolyphosphatase (PPX). However, unlike in E. coli, PPX activity was not detected in cell extracts of wild-type V. cholerae. The ppk null mutant of V. cholerae has diminished adaptation to high concentrations of calcium in the medium as well as motility and abiotic surface attachment. PMID:11073913

  8. Acinetobacter lipases: molecular biology, biochemical properties and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Snellman, Erick A; Colwell, Rita R

    2004-10-01

    Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) have received increased attention recently, evidenced by the increasing amount of information about lipases in the current literature. The renewed interest in this enzyme class is due primarily to investigations of their role in pathogenesis and their increasing use in biotechnological applications. Also, many microbial lipases are available as commercial products, the majority of which are used in detergents, cosmetic production, food flavoring, and organic synthesis. Lipases are valued biocatalysts because they act under mild conditions, are highly stable in organic solvents, show broad substrate specificity, and usually show high regio- and/or stereo-selectivity in catalysis. A number of lipolytic strains of Acinetobacter have been isolated from a variety of sources and their lipases possess many biochemical properties similar to those that have been developed for biotechnological applications. This review discusses the biology of lipase expression in Acinetobacter, with emphasis on those aspects relevant to potential biotechnology applications. PMID:15378387

  9. Biochemical Properties and Biological Functions of FET Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jacob C; Cech, Thomas R; Parker, Roy R

    2015-01-01

    Members of the FET protein family, consisting of FUS, EWSR1, and TAF15, bind to RNA and contribute to the control of transcription, RNA processing, and the cytoplasmic fates of messenger RNAs in metazoa. FET proteins can also bind DNA, which may be important in transcription and DNA damage responses. FET proteins are of medical interest because chromosomal rearrangements of their genes promote various sarcomas and because point mutations in FUS or TAF15 can cause neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. Recent results suggest that both the normal and pathological effects of FET proteins are modulated by low-complexity or prion-like domains, which can form higher-order assemblies with novel interaction properties. Herein, we review FET proteins with an emphasis on how the biochemical properties of FET proteins may relate to their biological functions and to pathogenesis. PMID:25494299

  10. [Molecular hyperspectral imaging (MHSI) system and application in biochemical medicine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Ying; Li, Qing-Li; Wang, Yi-Ting; Liu, Jin-Gao; Xue, Yong-Qi

    2011-10-01

    A novel molecular hyperspectral imaging (MHSI) system based on AOTF (acousto-optic tunable filters) was presented. The system consists of microscope, AOTF-based spectrometer, matrix CCD, image collection card and computer. The spectral range of the MHSI is from 550 to 1 000 nm. The spectral resolution is less than 2 nm, and the spatial resolution is about 0.3 microm. This paper has also presented that spectral curves extracted from the corrected hyperspectral data of the sample, which have been preprocessed by the gray correction coefficient, can more truly represent biochemical characteristic of the sample. The system can supply not only single band images in the visible range, but also spectrum curve of random pixel of sample image. This system can be widely used in various fields of biomedicine, clinical medicine, material science and microelectronics. PMID:22250515

  11. A biochemical and genetic study of Leishmania donovani pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Will; Isea, Raúl; Rodriguez, Evelyn; Ramirez, Jose Luis

    2008-11-15

    Here we present a biochemical and molecular biology study of the enzyme pyruvate kinase (PYK) from the parasitic protozoa Leishmania donovani. The PYK gene was cloned, mutagenised and over expressed and its kinetic parameters determined. Like in other kinetoplastids, L. donovani PYK is allosterically stimulated by the effector fructose 2,6 biphosphate and not by fructose 1,6 biphosphate. When the putative effector binding site of L. donovani PYK was mutagenised, we obtained two mutants with extreme kinetic behavior: Lys453Leu, which retained a sigmoidal kinetics and was little affected by the effector; and His480Gln, which deployed a hyperbolic kinetics that was not changed by the addition of the effector. Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies revealed that the mutations not only altered the effector binding site of L. donovani PYK but also changed the folding of its domain C. PMID:18725273

  12. Microfabricated devices for performing chemical and biochemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.; Jacobson, S.C.; Foote, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    There is growing interest in microfabricated devices that perform chemical and biochemical analysis. The general goal is to use microfabrication tools to construct miniature devices that can perform a complete analysis starting with an unprocessed sample. Such devices have been referred to as lab-on-a-chip devices. Initial efforts on microfluidic laboratory-on-a-chip devices focused on chemical separations. There are many potential applications of these fluidic microchip devices. Some applications such as chemical process control or environmental monitoring would require that a chip be used over an extended period of time or for many analyses. Other applications such as forensics, clinical diagnostics, and genetic diagnostics would employ the chip devices as single use disposable devices.

  13. Comparison of biochemical microbial effects in enhanced oil recovery (MEOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Manowitz, B.

    1992-11-01

    Experimental data dealing with the interactions between certain microbial species and crude oils indicates that these interactions are selective and occur via biochemical pathways which can be characterized by the chemical composition of the initial crude oil and that of the end products. In the studies discussed in this paper, the microbial species used were thermophilic and/or thermoadapted microorganisms which thrive in harsh environments (e.g., pH, temperature, pressure, salinity). Crude oils chosen for biotreatment represented a wide range of oils, which varied from relatively light oils to heavy, high sulfur content oils. The crude oils used have also been distinguished in terms of their geological history, i.e., heavy, because they are immature or heavy, because they have been biodegraded. The significance of ``biodegraded`` vs. ``biotreated`` crude oil in MEOR also discussed.

  14. Comparison of biochemical microbial effects in enhanced oil recovery (MEOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Manowitz, B.

    1992-11-01

    Experimental data dealing with the interactions between certain microbial species and crude oils indicates that these interactions are selective and occur via biochemical pathways which can be characterized by the chemical composition of the initial crude oil and that of the end products. In the studies discussed in this paper, the microbial species used were thermophilic and/or thermoadapted microorganisms which thrive in harsh environments (e.g., pH, temperature, pressure, salinity). Crude oils chosen for biotreatment represented a wide range of oils, which varied from relatively light oils to heavy, high sulfur content oils. The crude oils used have also been distinguished in terms of their geological history, i.e., heavy, because they are immature or heavy, because they have been biodegraded. The significance of biodegraded'' vs. biotreated'' crude oil in MEOR also discussed.

  15. Comparison of biochemical microbial effects in enhanced oil recovery (MEOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Manowitz, B.

    1993-12-31

    Experimental data dealing with the interactions between certain microbial species and crude oils indicates that these interactions are selective and occur via biochemical pathways which can be characterized by the chemical composition of the initial crude oil and that of the end products. In the studies to be discussed in this paper, the microbial species used were thermophilic and/or thermoadapted microorganisms which thrive in harsh environments (e.g., pH, temperature, pressure, salinity). Crude oils chosen for biotreatment represented a wide range of oils, which varied from relatively light oils to heavy, high sulfur content oils. The crude oils used have also been distinguished in terms of their geological history, i.e., heavy, because they are immature or heavy, because they have been biodegraded. The significance of {open_quotes}biodegraded{close_quotes} vs. {open_quotes}biotreated{close_quotes} crude oil in MEOR will also be discussed.

  16. An infrared radiation based thermal biosensor for enzymatic biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Tao; Zhao, Xinyan; Yang, Zhaochu; Pires, Nuno M M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal biosensor based on the infrared radiation energy is proposed for calorimetric measurement of biochemical reactions. Having a good structure design combined with MEMS technology as well as employing the Si /SiGe quantum well sensing material with a high TCR and low 1/f noise, the sensor shows potentials to be high sensitive and real-time. The urea enzymatic reaction was tested to verify the performance of sensor, which demonstrates a linear detection range from 0.5mM to 150mM and a relative standard deviation less than 1%. For the sensor fabrication, wafer-level transfer bonding is a key process, which makes the integration of quantum well material and a free standing structure possible. It reduces the heat loss from the sensor to the surrounding environment. PMID:23365944

  17. Biochemical mechanisms of the antileishmanial activity of sodium stibogluconate.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J D; Waddell, D; Hanson, B D

    1985-01-01

    Pentavalent antimonial agents such as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam; Burroughs Wellcome Co., London, United Kingdom) are the drugs of choice for the treatment of leishmaniasis, but their biochemical mechanisms of action are virtually unknown. The viability of Leishmania mexicana (WR 227) promastigotes and amastigotes was decreased 40 to 61% by a 4-h exposure to 500 micrograms of Sb (in the form of stibogluconate) per ml. Such exposure also resulted in a 51 to 65% decrease in incorporation of label into DNA, RNA, and protein; a 56 to 65% decrease in incorporation of label into purine nucleoside triphosphate; and a 34 to 60% increase in incorporation of label into purine nucleoside monophosphate and diphosphate. It is postulated that the apparent decrease in ATP and GTP synthesis from ADP and GDP contributes to decreased macromolecular synthesis and to decreased Leishmania viability. Further experiments suggested that inhibition of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle may partially explain the inability to phosphorylate ADP. PMID:2411217

  18. Photonic crystal fiber long-period gratings for biochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindorf, Lars; Jensen, Jesper B.; Dufva, Martin; Hagsholm Pedersen, Lars; Høiby, Poul Erik; Bang, Ole

    2006-09-01

    We present experimental results showing that long-period gratings in photonic crystal fibers can be used as sensitive biochemical sensors. A layer of biomolecules was immobilized on the sides of the holes of the photonic crystal fiber and by observing the shift in the resonant wavelength of a long-period grating it was possible to measure the thickness of the layer. The long-period gratings were inscribed in a large-mode area silica photonic crystal fiber with a CO2 laser. The thicknesses of a monolayer of poly-L-lysine and double-stranded DNA was measured using the device. We find that the grating has a sensitivity of approximately 1.4nm/1nm in terms of the shift in resonance wavelength in nm per nm thickness of biomolecule layer.

  19. Biochemical physics modeling of biological nano-motors

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaría-Holek, I.; López-Alamilla, N. J.

    2014-01-14

    We present a biochemical physics model accounting for the dynamics and energetics of both translational and rotational protein motors. A modified version of the hand-over-hand mechanism considering competitive inhibition by ADP is presented. Transition state-like theory is used to reconstruct the time dependent free-energy landscape of the cycle catalyst process that allows to predicting the number of steps or rotations that a single motor can perform. In addition, following the usual approach of chemical kinetics, we calculate the average translational velocity and also the stopping time of processes involving a collectivity of motors, such as exocytosis and endocytosis processes. Finally, we formulate a stochastic model reproducing very well single realizations of kinesin and rotary ATPases.

  20. High-resolution mapping of bifurcations in nonlinear biochemical circuits.

    PubMed

    Genot, A J; Baccouche, A; Sieskind, R; Aubert-Kato, N; Bredeche, N; Bartolo, J F; Taly, V; Fujii, T; Rondelez, Y

    2016-08-01

    Analog molecular circuits can exploit the nonlinear nature of biochemical reaction networks to compute low-precision outputs with fewer resources than digital circuits. This analog computation is similar to that employed by gene-regulation networks. Although digital systems have a tractable link between structure and function, the nonlinear and continuous nature of analog circuits yields an intricate functional landscape, which makes their design counter-intuitive, their characterization laborious and their analysis delicate. Here, using droplet-based microfluidics, we map with high resolution and dimensionality the bifurcation diagrams of two synthetic, out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear programs: a bistable DNA switch and a predator-prey DNA oscillator. The diagrams delineate where function is optimal, dynamics bifurcates and models fail. Inverse problem solving on these large-scale data sets indicates interference from enzymatic coupling. Additionally, data mining exposes the presence of rare, stochastically bursting oscillators near deterministic bifurcations. PMID:27442281

  1. External physical and biochemical stimulation to enhance skeletal muscle bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Plock, Jan; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Cell based muscle tissue engineering carries the potential to revert the functional loss of muscle tissue caused by disease and trauma. Although muscle tissue can be bioengineered using various precursor cells, major limitations still remain. Recent findings In the last decades several cellular pathways playing a crucial role in muscle tissue regeneration have been described. These pathways can be influenced by external stimuli and they not only orchestrate the regenerative process after physiologic wear and muscle trauma, but they also play an important part in aging and maintaining the stem cell niche, which is required to maintain long-term muscle function. Summary In this review article we will highlight possible new avenues using external physical and biochemical stimulation in order to optimize muscle bioengineering. PMID:25453267

  2. A Biochemical Phenotype for a Disease Resistance Gene of Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Meeley, RB; Johal, GS; Briggs, SP; Walton, JD

    1992-01-01

    In maize, major resistance to the pathogenic fungus Cochliobolus (Helminthosporium) carbonum race 1 is determined by the dominant allele of the nuclear locus hm. The interaction between C. carbonum race 1 and maize is mediated by a pathogen-produced, low molecular weight compound called HC-toxin. We recently described an enzyme from maize, called HC-toxin reductase, that inactivates HC-toxin by pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of an essential carbonyl group. We now report that this enzyme activity is detectable only in extracts of maize that are resistant to C. carbonum race 1 (genotype Hm/Hm or Hm/hm). In several genetic analyses, in vitro HC-toxin reductase activity was without exception associated with resistance to C. carbonum race 1. The results indicate that detoxification of HC-toxin is the biochemical basis of Hm-specific resistance of maize to infection by C. carbonum race 1. PMID:12297630

  3. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) of artichoke waste: the inoculum effect.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Andrea; Serranti, Silvia; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate anaerobic digestibility of artichoke waste resulting from industrial transformation. A series of batch anaerobic digestion tests was performed in order to evaluate the biochemical methane potential of the matrix in respect of the process. A comparison of the different performances of the laboratory-scale reactors operating in mesophilic conditions and utilizing three different values of the inoculum/substrate ratio was carried out. The best performance was achieved with an inoculum/substrate ratio of 2. Artichoke-processing byproducts showed a classical organic waste decomposition behaviour: a fast start-up phase, an acclimation stage, and a final stabilization phase. Following this approach, artichoke waste reached chemical oxygen demand removal of about 90% in 40 days. The high methane yield (average 408.62 mL CH4 gvs (-1) voltatile solids), makes artichoke waste a good product to be utilized in anaerobic digestion plants for biogas production. PMID:24616343

  4. Isolation and biochemical analysis of Mucor bacilliformis monomorphic mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrera, J; Ruiz, A; Lopez-Romero, E

    1983-01-01

    Fourteen stable mutants of Mucor bacilliformis which grew yeastlike under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were isolated after treatment of growing mycelium with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Biochemical characterization of the mutants included determination of growth in different carbon and nitrogen sources, determination of sensitivity of respiration to cyanide and salicylhydroxamate, analysis of cytochrome spectra, determination of glutamate dehydrogenases, glutamine synthase, and ornithine decarboxylase activities, and measurement of cyclic AMP levels. Data showed that all mutants were defective in some aspect of oxidative metabolism and had low levels of ornithine decarboxylase, whereas other characters were variable. It was concluded that morphological transition in M. bacilliformis is probably associated with mitochondrial functions and expression of ornithine decarboxylase, but may be independent of cyclic AMP and glutamate dehydrogenase levels. The importance of genetic studies in the analysis of dimorphism is stressed. PMID:6137477

  5. [Cardiorenal syndrome: the role of new biochemical markers].

    PubMed

    Vernuccio, Federica; Grutta, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Filippo; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2012-12-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome is a pathophysiological heart and kidney disorder, in which acute or chronic dysfunction of one organ induces a damage in the other. It's a syndrome more and more often encountered in clinical practice and this implies the need to recognize the syndrome through biochemical markers with a good sensitivity and specificity, since its earliest stages in order to optimize therapy. In addition to widely validated biomarkers, such as BNP, pro BNP, creatinine, GFR and cystatin C, other promising molecules are available, like NGAL (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, KIM-1 (kidney injury molecule-1), MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic peptide), Netrin-1, interleuchin 18 and NAG (N-acetyl-β-glucosa-minidase). The role of these emerging biomarkers is still not completely clarified: hence the need of new clinical trials. PMID:23258238

  6. Improved Biochemical Strategies for Targeted Delivery of Taxoids

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Thota

    2008-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol ®) and docetaxel (Taxotere ®) are very important anti-tumor drugs in clinical use for cancer. However, their clinical utility is limited due to systemic toxicity, low solubility and inactivity against drug resistant tumors. To improve chemotherapeutic levels of these drugs, it would be highly desirable to design strategies which bypass the above limitations. In this respect various prodrug and drug targeting strategies have been envisioned either to improve oral bioavailability or tumor specific delivery of taxoids. Abnormal properties of cancer cells with respect to normal cells have guided in designing of these protocols. This review article records the designed biochemical strategies and their biological efficacies as potential taxoid chemotherapeutics. PMID:17419065

  7. CFTR is a monomer: biochemical and functional evidence.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-H; Chang, X-B; Aleksandrov, A A; Riordan, J R

    2002-07-01

    Although the CFTR protein alone is sufficient to generate a regulated chloride channel, it is unknown how many of the polypeptides form the channel. Using biochemical and functional assays, we demonstrate that the CFTR polypeptide is a monomer. CFTR sediments as a monomer in a linear, continuous sucrose gradient. Cells co-expressing different epitope-tagged CFTR provide no evidence of co-assembly in immunoprecipitation and nickel affinity binding experiments. Co-expressed wild-type and DF508 CFTR are without influence on each other in their ability to progress through the secretory pathway, suggesting they do not associate in the endoplasmic reticulum. No hybrid conducting single channels are seen in planar lipid bilayers with which membrane vesicles from cells co-expressing similar amounts of two different CFTR conduction species have been fused. PMID:12172647

  8. A novel nanoarchitecture with optical, solar, medical and biochemical utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, M. J.; Kempa, K.; Ren, Z. F.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss a nanoscale platform offering widespread utility in nanophotonics, photovoltaics, visual prosthetics, and biological and chemical sensing. As a subwavelength wave-guide architecture, these nanostructures can be used in array form for high efficiency solar cells, as well as in a wide range of nanoscale manipulations of light without deleterious plasmonic effects. They are also being developed as a high electrode-density (10^8/cm^2) retinal implant. Finally, a modification of the basic structure enables the fabrication of a highly sensitive ``nanocavity'' biochemical sensor. We will report on aspects of each application. We also thank the following collaborators: N. Argenti, D. Cai, T.C. Chiles, P. Dhakal, Y. Gao, T. Kirkpatrick, Y.C. Lan, G. McMahon, J.I. Oh, B. Rizal, J. Rybczynski.

  9. SIMULATING BIOCHEMICAL SIGNALING NETWORKS IN COMPLEX MOVING GEOMETRIES.

    PubMed

    Strychalski, Wanda; Adalsteinsson, David; Elston, Timothy C

    2010-01-01

    Signaling networks regulate cellular responses to environmental stimuli through cascades of protein interactions. External signals can trigger cells to polarize and move in a specific direction. During migration, spatially localized activity of proteins is maintained. To investigate the effects of morphological changes on intracellular signaling, we developed a numerical scheme consisting of a cut cell finite volume spatial discretization coupled with level set methods to simulate the resulting advection-reaction-diffusion system. We then apply the method to several biochemical reaction networks in changing geometries. We found that a Turing instability can develop exclusively by cell deformations that maintain constant area. For a Turing system with a geometry-dependent single or double peak solution, simulations in a dynamically changing geometry suggest that a single peak solution is the only stable one, independent of the oscillation frequency. The method is also applied to a model of a signaling network in a migrating fibroblast. PMID:24086102

  10. The biochemical basis for thermoregulation in heat-producing flowers.

    PubMed

    Umekawa, Yui; Seymour, Roger S; Ito, Kikukatsu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoregulation (homeothermy) in animals involves a complex mechanism involving thermal receptors throughout the body and integration in the hypothalamus that controls shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis. The flowers of some ancient families of seed plants show a similar degree of physiological thermoregulation, but by a different mechanism. Here, we show that respiratory control in homeothermic spadices of skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus renifolius) is achieved by rate-determining biochemical reactions in which the overall thermodynamic activation energy exhibits a negative value. Moreover, NADPH production, catalyzed by mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase in a chemically endothermic reaction, plays a role in the pre-equilibrium reaction. We propose that a law of chemical equilibrium known as Le Châtelier's principle governs the homeothermic control in skunk cabbage. PMID:27095582

  11. Electrophoretic approach to the biochemical systematics of gammarids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulnheim, H.-P.; Scholl, A.

    1981-12-01

    By utilizing the techniques for electrophoretic separation of proteins by vertical starch gels, the biochemical systematics of 10 Gammaridae species obtained from marine, brackish and freshwater habitats was studied. They included Chaetogammarus marinus, Gammarus zaddachi, G. salinus, G. oceanicus, G. tigrinus, G. chevreuxi, G. locusta, G. duebeni duebeni, G. d. celticus, G. pulex pulex, and G. fossarum. For comparison of electrophoretic mobilities selected enzymes (phosphoglucose isomerase, glutamate oxalacetate transaminase, arginine phosphokinase, hexokinase, leucine amino peptidase, mannose 6-phosphate isomerase) were assayed. They were used as diagnostic characters in terms of electrophoretic identities or diversities of most frequent alleles at polymorphic gene loci. These criteria could be applied to estimate intrageneric enzymic variation and degrees of genetic relatedness between the crustacean amphipod species under consideration, thereby complementing traditional morphological classification.

  12. The biochemical basis for thermoregulation in heat-producing flowers

    PubMed Central

    Umekawa, Yui; Seymour, Roger S.; Ito, Kikukatsu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoregulation (homeothermy) in animals involves a complex mechanism involving thermal receptors throughout the body and integration in the hypothalamus that controls shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis. The flowers of some ancient families of seed plants show a similar degree of physiological thermoregulation, but by a different mechanism. Here, we show that respiratory control in homeothermic spadices of skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus renifolius) is achieved by rate-determining biochemical reactions in which the overall thermodynamic activation energy exhibits a negative value. Moreover, NADPH production, catalyzed by mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase in a chemically endothermic reaction, plays a role in the pre-equilibrium reaction. We propose that a law of chemical equilibrium known as Le Châtelier’s principle governs the homeothermic control in skunk cabbage. PMID:27095582

  13. [The biochemical carcinogenesis of selected heavy metals in bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Rorbach-Dolata, Anna; Marchewka, Zofia; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer takes the second place in the classification of morbidity of urinary system cancers. Many chemical factors take part in cancerogenesis. It is suggested that exposure to heavy metals such as arsenic, chromium, nickel and cadmium as well as its metabolites may trigger the bladder cancer through inducing excessive reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress formation which are responsible for DNA damage. In patients with bladder cancer is observed the disorder of processes regulated by p-53, including apoptosis. There are many patients with bladder cancer with confirmed absence of retinoblastoma protein, which is responsible of holding on the process of coming up the cells with mutation into synthesis, where the replication process undergoes. It is mentioned that excessive expression of proto-oncogenes may also cause the bladder cancer. The article concerns biochemical effects of exposure to chosen heavy metals and their potential role in bladder cancer progression. PMID:26689010

  14. Biochemically designed polymers as self-organized materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, Shridhara; Sarma, Rupmoni; Marx, Kenneth A.; Kumar, Jayant; Tripathy, Sukant K.; Akkara, Joseph A.; Kaplan, David L.

    1997-02-01

    Self assembled molecular systems are a focus of attention for material scientists as they provide an inherent molecular level organization responsible for enhanced material properties. We have developed polymeric molecular systems with interesting optical properties by biochemical engineering, which can be self assembled to thin films. Horseradish peroxidase catalyzed polymerizations of phenolic monomers: 9-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid, acid red and decyl ester (d&l isomers) of tyrosine, have been achieved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The polymer of 8- hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid acts as a polymeric ligand that can be used for metal ion sensing. The polymer of acid red, with azo functional groups in the polymer backbone, shows interesting optical properties. Amphiphilic derivatives of tyrosine self assemble into tubules from micelles in aqueous solutions. These tubules have been enzymatically polymerized to polymeric tubules. The tubules are of 5 micrometers average diameter and > 200 micrometers length. The formation and properties of these tubules are discussed.

  15. Tolerance to aluminum toxicity: Certain basic biochemical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Ragunath, C.; Sivaguru, M.; Anbudurai, P.R.; James, M.R.; Balakumar, T. )

    1991-12-01

    Excessive acidity in cultivable soils is a serious challenge to crop production. One of the important toxic factors which become severe in acid soils is aluminum (Al) stress. Aluminum is a major constituent of mineral soils where it is present as aluminosilicates and other precipitated forms such as gibbsite (Lindsay 1979). When the pH of soil solutions falls below 4.5 the concentration of Al increases exponentially since its solubility is increased. Thereby, acid soils normally have more amounts of Al available for uptake by plants. While the nutritional role of Al in plants is still under question, its toxic effects have been investigated and reviewed extensively. In the present investigation the authors have attempted to analyze some basic biochemical aspects related to Al tolerance. The influence of two metabolic inhibitors, 2.4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and cycloheximide, and induction of tolerance to Al by Al pretreatment are envisaged.

  16. Acoustic physics of surface-attached biochemical species

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jonathan S.; Thompson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this Commentary, we discuss the paper Quantitative Determination of Size and Shape of Surface-Bound DNA Using an Acoustic Wave Sensor [Tsortos et al., Biophys. J. 94(7), 2706–2715 (2008)]. The paper under discussion presents a novel theory that uses the response of a Shear-Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave device to characterize surface-attached double- and triple-strand DNA. The authors relate the length and curvature of the DNA strands to the interfacial viscosity using classical polymer theory. In this Commentary, we discuss their results in the broader context of acoustic wave detection of biochemical interactions and some of the factors involved when probing “soft” surfaces. Specifically, we present a review of interfacial coupling and slip, and discuss how these phenomena can affect biosensors employing acoustic wave detection techniques. PMID:19404427

  17. Acoustic physics of surface-attached biochemical species.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jonathan S; Thompson, Michael

    2008-08-01

    In this Commentary, we discuss the paper Quantitative Determination of Size and Shape of Surface-Bound DNA Using an Acoustic Wave Sensor [Tsortos et al., Biophys. J. 94(7), 2706-2715 (2008)]. The paper under discussion presents a novel theory that uses the response of a Shear-Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave device to characterize surface-attached double- and triple-strand DNA. The authors relate the length and curvature of the DNA strands to the interfacial viscosity using classical polymer theory. In this Commentary, we discuss their results in the broader context of acoustic wave detection of biochemical interactions and some of the factors involved when probing "soft" surfaces. Specifically, we present a review of interfacial coupling and slip, and discuss how these phenomena can affect biosensors employing acoustic wave detection techniques. PMID:19404427

  18. Biochemical characteristics of four marine fish skins in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Kwon; Jin, Young-Guk; Rha, Sung-Ju; Kim, Seon-Jae; Hwang, Jae-Ho

    2014-09-15

    In this study, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of the fish skins of four industrial species: olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli), sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) and red sea bream (Pagrus major). There is high domestic demand in Korea for farming of these fish for human consumption. Crude protein contents in the skin of these fish ranged from 73% to 94% by dry weight; this was in part due to a high content of the structural protein, collagen. Among the four species, olive flounder had the thickest dermal and epidermal layers in the dorsal skin. This species was also associated with the highest extraction ratio of acid-soluble collagen. We also examined whether fish skin could be a cost-effective alternative to current fish meal sources. Our analysis indicates that, when supplemented with additional fish oils and essential amino acids, fish skin is a viable alternative for fish meal formulations. PMID:24767045

  19. Clinical and Biochemical Pitfalls in the Diagnosis of Peroxisomal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Klouwer, Femke C C; Huffnagel, Irene C; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A; Engelen, Marc; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomal disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic metabolic disorders, caused by a defect in peroxisome biogenesis or a deficiency of a single peroxisomal enzyme. The peroxisomal disorders include the Zellweger spectrum disorders, the rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata spectrum disorders, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and multiple single enzyme deficiencies. There are several core phenotypes caused by peroxisomal dysfunction that clinicians can recognize. The diagnosis is suggested by biochemical testing in blood and urine and confirmed by functional assays in cultured skin fibroblasts, followed by mutation analysis. This review describes the phenotype of the main peroxisomal disorders and possible pitfalls in (laboratory) diagnosis to aid clinicians in the recognition of this group of diseases. PMID:27089543

  20. Lead-induced biochemical changes in freshwater fish Oreochromis mossambicus

    SciTech Connect

    Ruparelia, S.G.; Verma, Y.; Mehta, N.S.; Salyed, S.R. )

    1989-08-01

    Lead, a non-essential and non-beneficial element has considerably added the problem of health hazard to human and experimental mammals. It has also received much attention over the past few years as potentially important aquatic pollutant. Fishes are of great nutritional significance and their intoxication by lead causes retardation of growth and deterioration in the nutritional value. Very little attention has been paid to biochemical changes which develop more quickly in response to toxicants than any apparent morphological changes. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of lead on plasma chemistry of freshwater fish Oreochromis mossambicus. This fish was selected because of its wide availability, edibility in India and its suitability as a model fish for toxicity testing. The variables such as glucose, cholesterol and protein representing carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism were studied.

  1. High-resolution mapping of bifurcations in nonlinear biochemical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genot, A. J.; Baccouche, A.; Sieskind, R.; Aubert-Kato, N.; Bredeche, N.; Bartolo, J. F.; Taly, V.; Fujii, T.; Rondelez, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Analog molecular circuits can exploit the nonlinear nature of biochemical reaction networks to compute low-precision outputs with fewer resources than digital circuits. This analog computation is similar to that employed by gene-regulation networks. Although digital systems have a tractable link between structure and function, the nonlinear and continuous nature of analog circuits yields an intricate functional landscape, which makes their design counter-intuitive, their characterization laborious and their analysis delicate. Here, using droplet-based microfluidics, we map with high resolution and dimensionality the bifurcation diagrams of two synthetic, out-of-equilibrium and nonlinear programs: a bistable DNA switch and a predator–prey DNA oscillator. The diagrams delineate where function is optimal, dynamics bifurcates and models fail. Inverse problem solving on these large-scale data sets indicates interference from enzymatic coupling. Additionally, data mining exposes the presence of rare, stochastically bursting oscillators near deterministic bifurcations.

  2. Overview of the biochemical and genetic processes in malignant mesothelioma*

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Isoldi, Mauro César

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly aggressive form of cancer, has a long latency period, and is resistant to chemotherapy. It is extremely fatal, with a mean survival of less than one year. The development of MM is strongly correlated with exposure to asbestos and erionite, as well as to simian virus 40. Although various countries have banned the use of asbestos, MM has proven to be difficult to control and there appears to be a trend toward an increase in its incidence in the years to come. In Brazil, MM has not been widely studied from a genetic or biochemical standpoint. In addition, there have been few epidemiological studies of the disease, and the profile of its incidence has yet to be well established in the Brazilian population. The objective of this study was to review the literature regarding the processes of malignant transformation, as well as the respective mechanisms of tumorigenesis, in MM. PMID:25210967

  3. Biochemical alterations induced in Hediste diversicolor under seawater acidification conditions.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Rosa; Pires, Adília; Moreira, Anthony; Wrona, Frederick J; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2016-06-01

    Seawater pH is among the environmental factors controlling the performance of marine organisms, especially in calcifying marine invertebrates. However, changes in non-calcifying organisms (including polychaetes) may also occur due to pH decrease. Polychaetes are often the most abundant group of organisms in estuarine systems, representing an important ecological and economic resource. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impacts of seawater acidification in the polychaete Hediste diversicolor, a species commonly used as bioindicator. For this, organisms were exposed to different pH levels (7.9, 7.6 and 7.3) during 28 days and several biochemical markers were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that pH decrease negatively affected osmotic regulation and polychaetes metabolism, with individuals under low pH (7.6 and 7.3) presenting higher carbonic anhydrase activity, lower energy reserves (protein and glycogen content) and higher metabolic rate (measured as Electron transport system activity). The increase on CA activity was associated to organisms osmoregulation capacity while the increase on ETS and decrease on energy reserves was associated to the polychaetes capacity to develop defense mechanisms (e.g. antioxidant defenses). In fact, despite having observed higher lipid peroxidation at pH 7.6, in polychaetes at the lowest tested pH (7.3) LPO levels were similar to values recorded in individuals under control pH (7.9). Such findings may result from higher antioxidant enzyme activity at the lowest tested pH, which prevented organisms from higher oxidative stress levels. Overall, our study demonstrated how polychaetes may respond to near-future ocean acidification conditions, exhibiting the capacity to develop biochemical strategies which will prevent organisms from lethal injuries. Such defense strategies will contribute for polychaetes populations maintenance and survival under predicted seawater acidification scenarios. PMID:27088614

  4. Simulation methods with extended stability for stiff biochemical Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With increasing computer power, simulating the dynamics of complex systems in chemistry and biology is becoming increasingly routine. The modelling of individual reactions in (bio)chemical systems involves a large number of random events that can be simulated by the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). The key quantity is the step size, or waiting time, τ, whose value inversely depends on the size of the propensities of the different channel reactions and which needs to be re-evaluated after every firing event. Such a discrete event simulation may be extremely expensive, in particular for stiff systems where τ can be very short due to the fast kinetics of some of the channel reactions. Several alternative methods have been put forward to increase the integration step size. The so-called τ-leap approach takes a larger step size by allowing all the reactions to fire, from a Poisson or Binomial distribution, within that step. Although the expected value for the different species in the reactive system is maintained with respect to more precise methods, the variance at steady state can suffer from large errors as τ grows. Results In this paper we extend Poisson τ-leap methods to a general class of Runge-Kutta (RK) τ-leap methods. We show that with the proper selection of the coefficients, the variance of the extended τ-leap can be well-behaved, leading to significantly larger step sizes. Conclusions The benefit of adapting the extended method to the use of RK frameworks is clear in terms of speed of calculation, as the number of evaluations of the Poisson distribution is still one set per time step, as in the original τ-leap method. The approach paves the way to explore new multiscale methods to simulate (bio)chemical systems. PMID:20701766

  5. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  6. Final Technical Report "Multiscale Simulation Algorithms for Biochemical Systems"

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, Linda R.

    2012-10-25

    Biochemical systems are inherently multiscale and stochastic. In microscopic systems formed by living cells, the small numbers of reactant molecules can result in dynamical behavior that is discrete and stochastic rather than continuous and deterministic. An analysis tool that respects these dynamical characteristics is the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA, Gillespie, 1976), a numerical simulation procedure that is essentially exact for chemical systems that are spatially homogeneous or well stirred. Despite recent improvements, as a procedure that simulates every reaction event, the SSA is necessarily inefficient for most realistic problems. There are two main reasons for this, both arising from the multiscale nature of the underlying problem: (1) stiffness, i.e. the presence of multiple timescales, the fastest of which are stable; and (2) the need to include in the simulation both species that are present in relatively small quantities and should be modeled by a discrete stochastic process, and species that are present in larger quantities and are more efficiently modeled by a deterministic differential equation (or at some scale in between). This project has focused on the development of fast and adaptive algorithms, and the fun- damental theory upon which they must be based, for the multiscale simulation of biochemical systems. Areas addressed by this project include: (1) Theoretical and practical foundations for ac- celerated discrete stochastic simulation (tau-leaping); (2) Dealing with stiffness (fast reactions) in an efficient and well-justified manner in discrete stochastic simulation; (3) Development of adaptive multiscale algorithms for spatially homogeneous discrete stochastic simulation; (4) Development of high-performance SSA algorithms.

  7. Alterations in phenotypic biochemical markers in bladder epithelium during tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Rao, J Y; Hemstreet, G P; Hurst, R E; Bonner, R B; Jones, P L; Min, K W; Fradet, Y

    1993-09-01

    Phenotypic biochemical markers of oncogenesis and differentiation were mapped in bladder biopsies to investigate changes that occur in bladder tumorigenesis and to identify markers for increased bladder cancer risk. Touch preparations from biopsy specimens from 30 patients were obtained from tumors, the adjacent bladder epithelium, and random distant bladder epithelium. Markers, including DNA ploidy, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and oncoproteins, were quantified in individual cells by using quantitative fluorescence image analysis. Cluster analysis revealed the markers fell into three independent groups: (i) G-actin and EGFR; (ii) ploidy, cytology, and p185 (HER-2/neu oncoprotein) (ERBB2); and (iii) p300, a low-grade tumor antigen. Each marker displayed a gradient of abnormality from distant field to adjacent field to tumor. Different patterns for each marker suggested a developmental sequence of bladder cancer oncogenesis; G-actin was altered in 58% of distant biopsies (vs. 0/6 normals, P < 0.001), ploidy and cytology were altered in < 20% of distant fields and approximately 80% of tumors, and the other markers were intermediate. Patterns of EGFR and p185 suggest low-and high-grade tracks diverge early (P < 0.05 by Mann-Whitney U test for EGFR and ANOVA for p185). In conclusion, this study shows that a sequence of phenotypic changes accompanies development and progression of bladder cancers. Biochemical alterations in cells of the bladder field are often detectable before abnormal pathology, and markers previously thought to be limited to tumors were found in the field. The hierarchy of expression may be useful in identifying high-risk patients, assessing completeness of response to therapy, and monitoring and predicting recurrence. PMID:8367495

  8. Purification and biochemical characterization of the D6 chemokine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Paul E; Simpson, Clare V; Nibbs, Robert J B; O'Hara, Maureen; Booth, Rhona; Poulos, Jemma; Isaacs, Neil W; Graham, Gerard J

    2004-01-01

    There is much interest in chemokine receptors as therapeutic targets in diseases such as AIDS, autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, and cancer. Hampering such studies is the lack of accurate three-dimensional structural models of these molecules. The CC-chemokine receptor D6 is expressed at exceptionally high levels in heterologous transfectants. Here we report the purification and biochemical characterization of milligram quantities of D6 protein from relatively small cultures of transfected mammalian cells. Importantly, purified D6 retains full functional activity, shown by displaceable binding of 125I-labelled MIP-1beta (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta) and by complete binding of the receptor to a MIP-1alpha affinity column. In addition, we show that D6 is decorated on the N-terminus by N-linked glycosylation. Mutational analysis reveals that this glycosylation is dispensable for ligand binding and high expression in transfected cells. Metabolic labelling has revealed the receptor to also be sulphated and phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is ligand independent and is not enhanced by ligand binding and internalization, suggesting similarities with the viral chemokine receptor homologue US28. Like US28, an analysis of the full cellular complement of D6 in transfected cells indicates that >80% is found associated with intracellular vesicular structures. This may account for the high quantities of D6 that can be synthesized in these cells. These unusual properties of D6, and the biochemical characterization described here, leads the way towards work aimed at generating the three-dimensional structure of this seven-transmembrane-spanning receptor. PMID:14723600

  9. Expression of Neurotransmitter Transporters for Structural and Biochemical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Yael; Danieli, Tsafi; Kanner, Baruch I.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters play essential roles in the process of neurotransmission. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters mediate storage inside secretory vesicles in a process that involves the exchange of lumenal H+ for cytoplasmic transmitter. Retrieval of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft catalyzed by sodium-coupled transporters is critical for the termination of the synaptic actions of the released neurotransmitter. Our current understanding of the mechanism of these transporters is based on functional and biochemical characterization but is lacking high-resolution structural information. Very few structures of membrane transport systems from mammalian origin have been solved to atomic resolution, mainly because of the difficulty in obtaining large amounts of purified protein. Development of high yield heterologous expression systems suitable for mammalian neurotransmitter transporters is essential to enable the production of purified protein for structural studies. Such a system makes possible also the production of mutants that can be used in biochemical and biophysical studies. We describe here a screen for the expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in cell-free and baculovirus expression systems and discuss the expression of VMAT2 in other systems as well (bacterial, yeast and mammalian cell lines). After screening and optimization, we achieved high yield (2–2.5 mg/liter) expression of functional VMAT2 in insect cells. The system was also used for the expression of three additional plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters. All were functional and expressed to high levels. Our results demonstrate the advantages of the baculovirus expression system for the expression of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters in a functional state. PMID:20566324

  10. Soil Biochemical Responses to Nitrogen Addition in a Bamboo Forest

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Li-hua; Chen, Gang; Peng, Yong; Hu, Hong-ling; Hu, Ting-xing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xian-wei; Liu, Li; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many vital ecosystem processes take place in the soils and are greatly affected by the increasing active nitrogen (N) deposition observed globally. Nitrogen deposition generally affects ecosystem processes through the changes in soil biochemical properties such as soil nutrient availability, microbial properties and enzyme activities. In order to evaluate the soil biochemical responses to elevated atmospheric N deposition in bamboo forest ecosystems, a two-year field N addition experiment in a hybrid bamboo (Bambusa pervariabilis × Dendrocalamopsis daii) plantation was conducted. Four levels of N treatment were applied: (1) control (CK, without N added), (2) low-nitrogen (LN, 50 kg N ha−1 year−1), (3) medium-nitrogen (MN, 150 kg N ha−1 year−1), and (4) high-nitrogen (HN, 300 kg N ha−1 year−1). Results indicated that N addition significantly increased the concentrations of NH4+, NO3−, microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass N, the rates of nitrification and denitrification; significantly decreased soil pH and the concentration of available phosphorus, and had no effect on the total organic carbon and total N concentration in the 0–20 cm soil depth. Nitrogen addition significantly stimulated activities of hydrolytic enzyme that acquiring N (urease) and phosphorus (acid phosphatase) and depressed the oxidative enzymes (phenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase) activities. Results suggest that (1) this bamboo forest ecosystem is moving towards being limited by P or co-limited by P under elevated N deposition, (2) the expected progressive increases in N deposition may have a potential important effect on forest litter decomposition due to the interaction of inorganic N and oxidative enzyme activities, in such bamboo forests under high levels of ambient N deposition. PMID:25029346

  11. Timescale analysis of rule-based biochemical reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Finley, Stacey D.

    2012-01-01

    The flow of information within a cell is governed by a series of protein-protein interactions that can be described as a reaction network. Mathematical models of biochemical reaction networks can be constructed by repetitively applying specific rules that define how reactants interact and what new species are formed upon reaction. To aid in understanding the underlying biochemistry, timescale analysis is one method developed to prune the size of the reaction network. In this work, we extend the methods associated with timescale analysis to reaction rules instead of the species contained within the network. To illustrate this approach, we applied timescale analysis to a simple receptor-ligand binding model and a rule-based model of Interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling in näive CD4+ T cells. The IL-12 signaling pathway includes multiple protein-protein interactions that collectively transmit information; however, the level of mechanistic detail sufficient to capture the observed dynamics has not been justified based upon the available data. The analysis correctly predicted that reactions associated with JAK2 and TYK2 binding to their corresponding receptor exist at a pseudo-equilibrium. In contrast, reactions associated with ligand binding and receptor turnover regulate cellular response to IL-12. An empirical Bayesian approach was used to estimate the uncertainty in the timescales. This approach complements existing rank- and flux-based methods that can be used to interrogate complex reaction networks. Ultimately, timescale analysis of rule-based models is a computational tool that can be used to reveal the biochemical steps that regulate signaling dynamics. PMID:21954150

  12. Biochemical composition of three species of unionid mussels after emersion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greseth, Shari L.; Cope, W.G.; Rada, R.G.; Waller, D.L.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are emersed (exposed to air) during conservation activities such as surveys and relocations. Success of these activities depends upon the ability of mussels to survive emersion and to re-burrow in the substratum. We evaluated the acute sublethal effects of emersion on three species of unionid mussels [pocketbook, Lampsilis cardium (Rafinesque, 1820); pimpleback, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa (I. Lea, 1831); spike, Elliptio dilatata (Rafinesque, 1820)] by measuring three biochemicals (carbohydrate, lipid, protein) indicative of biochemical function and energy storage. Mussels were acclimated in water at 25A?C and exposed to five air temperatures (15, 20, 25, 35 and 45A?C) for 15, 30 and 60 min. After emersion, mussels were returned to water at 25A?C and observed for 14 days. Samples of mantle tissue were taken after the 14-day postexposure period and analysed for carbohydrate, lipid and protein. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) did not reveal consistent trends in carbohydrate, lipid or protein concentrations due to sex of mussels, duration of emersion, air temperature or their interaction terms that indicated biological compensation to stress. Overall mean carbohydrate concentrations were greatest (range 447a??615 mg/g dry wt) among the species, followed by protein (179a??289 mg/g dry wt) and lipids (26.7a??38.1 mg/g dry wt). These results have positive implications for conducting conservation activities, because emersion over the range of temperatures (15a??35A?C) and durations (15a??60 min) examined did not appear acutely harmful to mussels.

  13. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  14. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  15. Biochemical pathology of lung damage produced by chemicals.

    PubMed

    Witschi, H; Côté, M G

    1976-01-01

    Damage to the lung may be caused by chemicals that gain access to the alveolar zone by inhalation or via the pulmonary circulation. Several agents toxic to the lung have recently been found to bind covalently to pulmonary macromolecules or to disrupt certain metabolic reactions. However, it has also been observed that extensive chemical lung injury is not necessarily preceded by a depression of pulmonary metabolic reactions. One possible explanation for this might be that biochemical changes due to cell death are often masked and/or compensated for by changes associated with lung tissue repair. Substantial cell proliferation as a response to toxic lung damage is a common phenomenon in lung pathology. This makes it necessary to develop models that permit analysis of the biochemical events triggering and accompanying cell growth in lung. We have recently examined some aspects of cell proliferation in mouse lung. Intraperitoneal injection of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) produces within 3-5 days extensive hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and general disorganization of the cellular components of the lung. Total lung weight and total DNA per lung almost double within this time and are accompanied by proportional increases in protein and lipids. RNA accumulates at a faster rate than DNA. The changes in lung composition are accompanied by dose-dependent increases in the in vivo incorporation of thymidine into DNA and of leucine into protein. The activities of several enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNA polymerase, uridine kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 5'-nucleotidase) increase substantially after BHT. Administration of BHT to mice seems to offer a convenient tool to study cell growth in the lungs of mice. PMID:1245236

  16. Biochemical contacts and collaborations between China and the U.K. since 1911.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Guy G

    2011-10-01

    Scientific contact lies at the heart of research and that between China and the U.K. is an important example of how it can come about. In 1911, when the Biochemical Society began, U.K. science was developing fast with profound discoveries in physics (the Rutherford atomic model) and biochemistry (the discovery of vitamins). In China, however, there was great social and political instability and a revolution. Since then, the turbulence of two world wars and a variety of deep global political tensions meant that the contacts between China and U.K. did not reflect the prodigious growth of biochemistry. There was, however, one particular and remarkable contact, that made by Joseph Needham, an outstanding biochemist. He visited China between 1943 and 1946, contacting many Chinese universities that were severely dislocated by war. Showing remarkable diplomatic abilities, Needham managed to arrange delivery of research and teaching equipment. His activities helped the universities to carry out their functions under near-impossible conditions and reminded them that they had friends abroad. Most remarkably, Joseph Needham developed an extraordinary grasp of Chinese culture, science and history and he opened the West to the extent and importance of Chinese science. Formal scientific and intellectual contacts between the scientific academic bodies in China and U.K., notably the Chinese Academy of Science and the Royal Society, resumed after British recognition of the Chinese Communist government in 1950. The delegations included outstanding scientists in biochemistry and related disciplines. Research activities, such as that concerning influenza, were soon established, whereas institutions, such as the Royal Society and the Wellcome Trust, acted a little later to support research. The outcomes have been long-term collaborations in such areas as insulin structure and function. There are now numerous joint activities in biochemistry and biomedicine supported by the MRC (Medical

  17. Simplification of biochemical models: a general approach based on the analysis of the impact of individual species and reactions on the systems dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Given the complex mechanisms underlying biochemical processes systems biology researchers tend to build ever increasing computational models. However, dealing with complex systems entails a variety of problems, e.g. difficult intuitive understanding, variety of time scales or non-identifiable parameters. Therefore, methods are needed that, at least semi-automatically, help to elucidate how the complexity of a model can be reduced such that important behavior is maintained and the predictive capacity of the model is increased. The results should be easily accessible and interpretable. In the best case such methods may also provide insight into fundamental biochemical mechanisms. Results We have developed a strategy based on the Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) method which can be used to perform a "biochemically-driven" model reduction of even large and complex kinetic ODE systems. We provide an implementation of the original CSP algorithm in COPASI (a COmplex PAthway SImulator) and applied the strategy to two example models of different degree of complexity - a simple one-enzyme system and a full-scale model of yeast glycolysis. Conclusion The results show the usefulness of the method for model simplification purposes as well as for analyzing fundamental biochemical mechanisms. COPASI is freely available at http://www.copasi.org. PMID:22390191

  18. Modularization of biochemical networks based on classification of Petri net t-invariants

    PubMed Central

    Grafahrend-Belau, Eva; Schreiber, Falk; Heiner, Monika; Sackmann, Andrea; Junker, Björn H; Grunwald, Stefanie; Speer, Astrid; Winder, Katja; Koch, Ina

    2008-01-01

    Background Structural analysis of biochemical networks is a growing field in bioinformatics and systems biology. The availability of an increasing amount of biological data from molecular biological networks promises a deeper understanding but confronts researchers with the problem of combinatorial explosion. The amount of qualitative network data is growing much faster than the amount of quantitative data, such as enzyme kinetics. In many cases it is even impossible to measure quantitative data because of limitations of experimental methods, or for ethical reasons. Thus, a huge amount of qualitative data, such as interaction data, is available, but it was not sufficiently used for modeling purposes, until now. New approaches have been developed, but the complexity of data often limits the application of many of the methods. Biochemical Petri nets make it possible to explore static and dynamic qualitative system properties. One Petri net approach is model validation based on the computation of the system's invariant properties, focusing on t-invariants. T-invariants correspond to subnetworks, which describe the basic system behavior. With increasing system complexity, the basic behavior can only be expressed by a huge number of t-invariants. According to our validation criteria for biochemical Petri nets, the necessary verification of the biological meaning, by interpreting each subnetwork (t-invariant) manually, is not possible anymore. Thus, an automated, biologically meaningful classification would be helpful in analyzing t-invariants, and supporting the understanding of the basic behavior of the considered biological system. Methods Here, we introduce a new approach to automatically classify t-invariants to cope with network complexity. We apply clustering techniques such as UPGMA, Complete Linkage, Single Linkage, and Neighbor Joining in combination with different distance measures to get biologically meaningful clusters (t-clusters), which can be interpreted

  19. Biochemical analysis and quantification of hematopoietic stem cells by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelig, Udi; Dror, Ziv; Iskovich, Svetlana; Zwielly, Amir; Ben-Harush, Miri; Nathan, Ilana; Mordechai, Shaul; Kapelushnik, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Identification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in different stages of maturation is one of the major issues in stem cell research and bone marrow (BM) transplantation. Each stage of maturation of HSCs is characterized by a series of distinct glycoproteins present on the cell plasma membrane surface, named a cluster of differentiation (CD). Currently, complicated and expensive procedures based on CD expression are needed for identification and isolation of HSCs. This method is under dispute, since the correct markers' composition is not strictly clear, thus there is need for a better method for stem cell characterization. In the present study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is employed as a novel optical method for identification and characterization of HSCs based on their entire biochemical features. FTIR spectral analysis of isolated mice HSCs reveals several spectral markers related to lipids, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates, which distinguish HSCs from BM cells. The unique ``open'' conformation of HSC DNA as identified by FTIR is exploited for HSCs quantification in the BM. The proposed method of FTIR spectroscopy for HSC identification and quantification can contribute to stem cell research and BM transplantation.

  20. (Bio)Chemical Tailoring of Biogenic 3-D Nanopatterned Templates with Energy-Relevant Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhage, Kenneth H; Kroger, Nils

    2014-09-08

    The overall aim of this research has been to obtain fundamental understanding of (bio)chemical methodologies that will enable utilization of the unique 3-D nanopatterned architectures naturally produced by diatoms for the syntheses of advanced functional materials attractive for applications in energy harvesting/conversion and storage. This research has been conducted in three thrusts: Thrust 1 (In vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom biosilica) is directed towards elucidating the fundamental mechanism(s) underlying the cellular processes of in vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom silica. Thrust 2 (Shape-preserving reactive conversion of diatom biosilica into porous, high-surface area inorganic replicas) is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of shape preservation and nanostructural evolution associated with the reactive conversion and/or coating-based conversion of diatom biosilica templates into porous inorganic replicas. Thrust 3 (Immobilization of energy-relevant enzymes in diatom biosilica and onto diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas) involves use of the results from both Thrust 1 and 2 to develop strategies for in vivo and in vitro immobilization of enzymes in/on diatom biosilica and diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas, respectively. This Final Report describes progress achieved in all 3 of these thrusts.