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Sample records for ale hydrodynamics code

  1. 3D unstructured mesh ALE hydrodynamics with the upwind discontinuous galerkin method

    SciTech Connect

    Kershaw, D S; Milovich, J L; Prasad, M K; Shaw, M J; Shestakov, A I

    1999-05-07

    The authors describe a numerical scheme to solve 3D Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics on an unstructured mesh using a discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM) and an explicit Runge-Kutta time discretization. Upwinding is achieved through Roe's linearized Riemann solver with the Harten-Hyman entropy fix. For stabilization, a 3D quadratic programming generalization of van Leer's 1D minmod slope limiter is used along with a Lapidus type artificial viscosity. This DGM scheme has been tested on a variety of hydrodynamic test problems and appears to be robust making it the basis for the integrated 3D inertial confinement fusion modeling code (ICF3D). For efficient code development, they use C++ object oriented programming to easily separate the complexities of an unstructured mesh from the basic physics modules. ICF3D is fully parallelized using domain decomposition and the MPI message passing library. It is fully portable. It runs on uniprocessor workstations and massively parallel platforms with distributed and shared memory.

  2. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A; Eder, E; Liu, W; Barnard, J; Friedman, A; Logan, G; Fisher, A; Masers, N; Bertozzi, A

    2011-11-04

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related

  3. SULEC: Benchmarking a new ALE finite-element code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.; Ellis, S.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a 2-D/3-D arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian (ALE) finite-element code, SULEC, based on known techniques from literature. SULEC is successful in tackling many of the problems faced by numerical models of lithosphere and mantle processes, such as the combination of viscous, elastic, and plastic rheologies, the presence of a free surface, the contrast in viscosity between lithosphere and the underlying asthenosphere, and the occurrence of large deformations including viscous flow and offset on shear zones. The aim of our presentation is (1) to describe SULEC, and (2) to present a set of analytical and numerical benchmarks that we use to continuously test our code. SULEC solves the incompressible momentum equation coupled with the energy equation. It uses a structured mesh that is built of quadrilateral or brick elements that can vary in size in all dimensions, allowing to achieve high resolutions where required. The elements are either linear in velocity with constant pressure, or quadratic in velocity with linear pressure. An accurate pressure field is obtained through an iterative penalty (Uzawa) formulation. Material properties are carried on tracer particles that are advected through the Eulerian mesh. Shear elasticity is implemented following the approach of Moresi et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 184, 2003], brittle materials deform following a Drucker-Prager criterion, and viscous flow is by temperature- and pressure-dependent power-law creep. The top boundary of our models is a true free surface (with free surface stabilisation) on which simple surface processes models may be imposed. We use a set of benchmarks that test viscous, viscoelastic, elastic and plastic deformation, temperature advection and conduction, free surface behaviour, and pressure computation. Part of our benchmark set is automated allowing easy testing of new code versions. Examples include Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, Stokes flow, relaxation of viscous topography, viscous pure shear

  4. SOLA-STAR: a one-dimensional ICED-ALE hydrodynamics program for spherically symmetric flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a simple, general-purpose, and efficient algorithm for solving one-dimensional spherically symmetric, transient fluid-dynamics problems using a variation of the ICED-ALE technique. Included are the finite difference equations, three test problems that illustrate various capabilities of the program, and a complete code description, including a listing, sample data decks and output, a summary of important variable names, and hints for conversion to other operating systems.

  5. TORUS: Radiation transport and hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, Tim

    2014-04-01

    TORUS is a flexible radiation transfer and radiation-hydrodynamics code. The code has a basic infrastructure that includes the AMR mesh scheme that is used by several physics modules including atomic line transfer in a moving medium, molecular line transfer, photoionization, radiation hydrodynamics and radiative equilibrium. TORUS is useful for a variety of problems, including magnetospheric accretion onto T Tauri stars, spiral nebulae around Wolf-Rayet stars, discs around Herbig AeBe stars, structured winds of O supergiants and Raman-scattered line formation in symbiotic binaries, and dust emission and molecular line formation in star forming clusters. The code is written in Fortran 2003 and is compiled using a standard Gnu makefile. The code is parallelized using both MPI and OMP, and can use these parallel sections either separately or in a hybrid mode.

  6. Using Pulsed Power for Hydrodynamic Code Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ). A...bank at the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ). A cylindrical aluminum liner that is magnetically imploded onto a central target by self-induced...James Degnan, George Kiuttu Air Force Research Laboratory Albuquerque, NM 87117 Abstract As part of ongoing hydrodynamic code

  7. An implicit Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Charles E.

    2000-05-01

    An implicit version of the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code SPHINX has been written and is working. In conjunction with the SPHINX code the new implicit code models fluids and solids under a wide range of conditions. SPH codes are Lagrangian, meshless and use particles to model the fluids and solids. The implicit code makes use of the Krylov iterative techniques for solving large linear-systems and a Newton-Raphson method for non-linear corrections. It uses numerical derivatives to construct the Jacobian matrix. It uses sparse techniques to save on memory storage and to reduce the amount of computation. It is believed that this is the first implicit SPH code to use Newton-Krylov techniques, and is also the first implicit SPH code to model solids. A description of SPH and the techniques used in the implicit code are presented. Then, the results of a number of tests cases are discussed, which include a shock tube problem, a Rayleigh-Taylor problem, a breaking dam problem, and a single jet of gas problem. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with analytic solutions, experimental results, and the explicit SPHINX code. In the case of the single jet of gas case it has been demonstrated that the implicit code can do a problem in much shorter time than the explicit code. The problem was, however, very unphysical, but it does demonstrate the potential of the implicit code. It is a first step toward a useful implicit SPH code.

  8. A comparison of cosmological hydrodynamic codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Cen, Renyue; Ryu, Dongsu; Hernquist, Lars; Evrard, August E.; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of the simulation results of various hydrodynamic codes. Starting with identical initial conditions based on the cold dark matter scenario for the growth of structure, with parameters h = 0.5 Omega = Omega(sub b) = 1, and sigma(sub 8) = 1, we integrate from redshift z = 20 to z = O to determine the physical state within a representative volume of size L(exp 3) where L = 64 h(exp -1) Mpc. Five indenpendent codes are compared: three of them Eulerian mesh-based and two variants of the smooth particle hydrodynamics 'SPH' Lagrangian approach. The Eulerian codes were run at N(exp 3) = (32(exp 3), 64(exp 3), 128(exp 3), and 256(exp 3)) cells, the SPH codes at N(exp 3) = 32(exp 3) and 64(exp 3) particles. Results were then rebinned to a 16(exp 3) grid with the exception that the rebinned data should converge, by all techniques, to a common and correct result as N approaches infinity. We find that global averages of various physical quantities do, as expected, tend to converge in the rebinned model, but that uncertainites in even primitive quantities such as (T), (rho(exp 2))(exp 1/2) persists at the 3%-17% level achieve comparable and satisfactory accuracy for comparable computer time in their treatment of the high-density, high-temeprature regions as measured in the rebinned data; the variance among the five codes (at highest resolution) for the mean temperature (as weighted by rho(exp 2) is only 4.5%. Examined at high resolution we suspect that the density resolution is better in the SPH codes and the thermal accuracy in low-density regions better in the Eulerian codes. In the low-density, low-temperature regions the SPH codes have poor accuracy due to statiscal effects, and the Jameson code gives the temperatures which are too high, due to overuse of artificial viscosity in these high Mach number regions. Overall the comparison allows us to better estimate errors; it points to ways of improving this current generation ofhydrodynamic

  9. A multi-dimensional finite volume cell-centered direct ALE solver for hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, G.; Ghidaglia, J.-M.; Perlat, J.-P.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we describe a second order multi-dimensional scheme, belonging to the class of direct Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods, for the solution of non-linear hyperbolic systems of conservation law. The scheme is constructed upon a cell-centered explicit Lagrangian solver completed with an edge-based upwinded formulation of the numerical fluxes, computed from the MUSCL-Hancock method, to obtain a full ALE formulation. Numerical fluxes depend on nodal grid velocities which are either set or computed to avoid most of the mesh problems typically encountered in purely Lagrangian simulations. In order to assess the robustness of the scheme, most results proposed in this paper have been obtained by computing the grid velocities as a fraction of the Lagrangian nodal velocities, the ratio being set before running the test case. The last part of the paper describes preliminary results about the triple point test case run in the ALE framework by computing the grid velocities with the fully adaptive Large Eddy Limitation (L.E.L.) method proposed in [1]. Such a method automatically computes the grid velocities at each node defining the mesh from the local characteristics of the flow. We eventually discuss the advantages and the drawback of the coupling.

  10. Axially symmetric pseudo-Newtonian hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Kim, Hee Il; Choptuik, Matthew William; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2012-08-01

    We develop a numerical hydrodynamics code using a pseudo-Newtonian formulation that uses the weak-field approximation for the geometry, and a generalized source term for the Poisson equation that takes into account relativistic effects. The code was designed to treat moderately relativistic systems such as rapidly rotating neutron stars. The hydrodynamic equations are solved using a finite volume method with high-resolution shock-capturing techniques. We implement several different slope limiters for second-order reconstruction schemes and also investigate higher order reconstructions such as the piecewise parabolic method, essentially non-oscillatory method (ENO) and weighted ENO. We use the method of lines to convert the mixed spatial-time partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that depend only on time. These ODEs are solved using second- and third-order Runge-Kutta methods. The Poisson equation for the gravitational potential is solved with a multigrid method, and to simplify the boundary condition, we use compactified coordinates which map spatial infinity to a finite computational coordinate using a tangent function. In order to confirm the validity of our code, we carry out four different tests including one- and two-dimensional shock tube tests, stationary star tests of both non-rotating and rotating models, and radial oscillation mode tests for spherical stars. In the shock tube tests, the code shows good agreement with analytic solutions which include shocks, rarefaction waves and contact discontinuities. The code is found to be stable and accurate: for example, when solving a stationary stellar model the fractional changes in the maximum density, total mass, and total angular momentum per dynamical time are found to be 3 × 10-6, 5 × 10-7 and 2 × 10-6, respectively. We also find that the frequencies of the radial modes obtained by the numerical simulation of the steady-state star agree very well with those obtained by

  11. DISH CODE A deeply simplified hydrodynamic code for applications to warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    More, Richard

    2007-08-22

    DISH is a 1-dimensional (planar) Lagrangian hydrodynamic code intended for application to experiments on warm dense matter. The code is a simplified version of the DPC code written in the Data and Planning Center of the National Institute for Fusion Science in Toki, Japan. DPC was originally intended as a testbed for exploring equation of state and opacity models, but turned out to have a variety of applications. The Dish code is a "deeply simplified hydrodynamic" code, deliberately made as simple as possible. It is intended to be easy to understand, easy to use and easy to change.

  12. KEPLER: General purpose 1D multizone hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, T. A.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    KEPLER is a general purpose stellar evolution/explosion code that incorporates implicit hydrodynamics and a detailed treatment of nuclear burning processes. It has been used to study the complete evolution of massive and supermassive stars, all major classes of supernovae, hydrostatic and explosive nucleosynthesis, and x- and gamma-ray bursts on neutron stars and white dwarfs.

  13. General Relativistic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code developments: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Joshua; Silberman, Zachary; Rizzo, Monica

    2017-01-01

    We report on our progress in developing a new general relativistic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code, which will be appropriate for studying the properties of accretion disks around black holes as well as compact object binary mergers and their ejecta. We will discuss in turn the relativistic formalisms being used to handle the evolution, our techniques for dealing with conservative and primitive variables, as well as those used to ensure proper conservation of various physical quantities. Code tests and performance metrics will be discussed, as will the prospects for including smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes within other numerical relativity codebases, particularly the publicly available Einstein Toolkit. We acknowledge support from NSF award ACI-1550436 and an internal RIT D-RIG grant.

  14. pyro: A teaching code for computational astrophysical hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, M.

    2014-10-01

    We describe pyro: a simple, freely-available code to aid students in learning the computational hydrodynamics methods widely used in astrophysics. pyro is written with simplicity and learning in mind and intended to allow students to experiment with various methods popular in the field, including those for advection, compressible and incompressible hydrodynamics, multigrid, and diffusion in a finite-volume framework. We show some of the test problems from pyro, describe its design philosophy, and suggest extensions for students to build their understanding of these methods.

  15. A new hydrodynamics code for Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, S.-C.; Chu, M.-C.; Lin, L.-M.

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional hydrodynamics code for Type Ia supernova (SNIa) simulations is presented. The code includes a fifth-order shock-capturing scheme WENO, detailed nuclear reaction network, flame-capturing scheme and sub-grid turbulence. For post-processing, we have developed a tracer particle scheme to record the thermodynamical history of the fluid elements. We also present a one-dimensional radiative transfer code for computing observational signals. The code solves the Lagrangian hydrodynamics and moment-integrated radiative transfer equations. A local ionization scheme and composition dependent opacity are included. Various verification tests are presented, including standard benchmark tests in one and two dimensions. SNIa models using the pure turbulent deflagration model and the delayed-detonation transition model are studied. The results are consistent with those in the literature. We compute the detailed chemical evolution using the tracer particles' histories, and we construct corresponding bolometric light curves from the hydrodynamics results. We also use a GPU to speed up the computation of some highly repetitive subroutines. We achieve an acceleration of 50 times for some subroutines and a factor of 6 in the global run time.

  16. RAMSES: A new N-body and hydrodynamical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Romain

    2010-11-01

    A new N-body and hydrodynamical code, called RAMSES, is presented. It has been designed to study structure formation in the universe with high spatial resolution. The code is based on Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) technique, with a tree based data structure allowing recursive grid refinements on a cell-by-cell basis. The N-body solver is very similar to the one developed for the ART code (Kravtsov et al. 97), with minor differences in the exact implementation. The hydrodynamical solver is based on a second-order Godunov method, a modern shock-capturing scheme known to compute accurately the thermal history of the fluid component. The accuracy of the code is carefully estimated using various test cases, from pure gas dynamical tests to cosmological ones. The specific refinement strategy used in cosmological simulations is described, and potential spurious effects associated to shock waves propagation in the resulting AMR grid are discussed and found to be negligible. Results obtained in a large N-body and hydrodynamical simulation of structure formation in a low density LCDM universe are finally reported, with 256^3 particles and 4.1 10^7 cells in the AMR grid, reaching a formal resolution of 8192^3. A convergence analysis of different quantities, such as dark matter density power spectrum, gas pressure power spectrum and individual haloes temperature profiles, shows that numerical results are converging down to the actual resolution limit of the code, and are well reproduced by recent analytical predictions in the framework of the halo model.

  17. Adding kinetics and hydrodynamics to the CHEETAH thermochemical code

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E., Howard, W.M., Souers, P.C.

    1997-01-15

    In FY96 we released CHEETAH 1.40, which made extensive improvements on the stability and user friendliness of the code. CHEETAH now has over 175 users in government, academia, and industry. Efforts have also been focused on adding new advanced features to CHEETAH 2.0, which is scheduled for release in FY97. We have added a new chemical kinetics capability to CHEETAH. In the past, CHEETAH assumed complete thermodynamic equilibrium and independence of time. The addition of a chemical kinetic framework will allow for modeling of time-dependent phenomena, such as partial combustion and detonation in composite explosives with large reaction zones. We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood detonation framework in CHEETAH, which allows for the treatment of nonideal detonations and explosive failure. A second major effort in the project this year has been linking CHEETAH to hydrodynamic codes to yield an improved HE product equation of state. We have linked CHEETAH to 1- and 2-D hydrodynamic codes, and have compared the code to experimental data. 15 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  19. CHOLLA: A New Massively Parallel Hydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2015-04-01

    We present Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures (Cholla ), a new three-dimensional hydrodynamics code that harnesses the power of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate astrophysical simulations. Cholla models the Euler equations on a static mesh using state-of-the-art techniques, including the unsplit Corner Transport Upwind algorithm, a variety of exact and approximate Riemann solvers, and multiple spatial reconstruction techniques including the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). Using GPUs, Cholla evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously and can update over 10 million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction. Owing to the massively parallel architecture of GPUs and the design of the Cholla code, astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (≳2563) can easily be computed on a single device. We use the Message Passing Interface library to extend calculations onto multiple devices and demonstrate nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs. A suite of test problems highlights the physical accuracy of our modeling and provides a useful comparison to other codes. We then use Cholla to simulate the interaction of a shock wave with a gas cloud in the interstellar medium, showing that the evolution of the cloud is highly dependent on its density structure. We reconcile the computed mixing time of a turbulent cloud with a realistic density distribution destroyed by a strong shock with the existing analytic theory for spherical cloud destruction by describing the system in terms of its median gas density.

  20. CHOLLA: A NEW MASSIVELY PARALLEL HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2015-04-15

    We present Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures (Cholla ), a new three-dimensional hydrodynamics code that harnesses the power of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate astrophysical simulations. Cholla models the Euler equations on a static mesh using state-of-the-art techniques, including the unsplit Corner Transport Upwind algorithm, a variety of exact and approximate Riemann solvers, and multiple spatial reconstruction techniques including the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). Using GPUs, Cholla evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously and can update over 10 million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction. Owing to the massively parallel architecture of GPUs and the design of the Cholla code, astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (≳256{sup 3}) can easily be computed on a single device. We use the Message Passing Interface library to extend calculations onto multiple devices and demonstrate nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs. A suite of test problems highlights the physical accuracy of our modeling and provides a useful comparison to other codes. We then use Cholla to simulate the interaction of a shock wave with a gas cloud in the interstellar medium, showing that the evolution of the cloud is highly dependent on its density structure. We reconcile the computed mixing time of a turbulent cloud with a realistic density distribution destroyed by a strong shock with the existing analytic theory for spherical cloud destruction by describing the system in terms of its median gas density.

  1. RAM: a Relativistic Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2005-06-06

    The authors have developed a new computer code, RAM, to solve the conservative equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on parallel computers. They have implemented a characteristic-wise, finite difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme using the full characteristic decomposition of the SRHD equations to achieve fifth-order accuracy in space. For time integration they use the method of lines with a third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme. They have also implemented fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta time integration schemes for comparison. The implementation of AMR and parallelization is based on the FLASH code. RAM is modular and includes the capability to easily swap hydrodynamics solvers, reconstruction methods and physics modules. In addition to WENO they have implemented a finite volume module with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) for reconstruction and the modified Marquina approximate Riemann solver to work with TVD Runge-Kutta time integration. They examine the difficulty of accurately simulating shear flows in numerical relativistic hydrodynamics codes. They show that under-resolved simulations of simple test problems with transverse velocity components produce incorrect results and demonstrate the ability of RAM to correctly solve these problems. RAM has been tested in one, two and three dimensions and in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. they have demonstrated fifth-order accuracy for WENO in one and two dimensions and performed detailed comparison with other schemes for which they show significantly lower convergence rates. Extensive testing is presented demonstrating the ability of RAM to address challenging open questions in relativistic astrophysics.

  2. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  3. TESS: A RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMICS CODE ON A MOVING VORONOI MESH

    SciTech Connect

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I. E-mail: macfadyen@nyu.edu

    2011-12-01

    We have generalized a method for the numerical solution of hyperbolic systems of equations using a dynamic Voronoi tessellation of the computational domain. The Voronoi tessellation is used to generate moving computational meshes for the solution of multidimensional systems of conservation laws in finite-volume form. The mesh-generating points are free to move with arbitrary velocity, with the choice of zero velocity resulting in an Eulerian formulation. Moving the points at the local fluid velocity makes the formulation effectively Lagrangian. We have written the TESS code to solve the equations of compressible hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics for both relativistic and non-relativistic fluids on a dynamic Voronoi mesh. When run in Lagrangian mode, TESS is significantly less diffusive than fixed mesh codes and thus preserves contact discontinuities to high precision while also accurately capturing strong shock waves. TESS is written for Cartesian, spherical, and cylindrical coordinates and is modular so that auxiliary physics solvers are readily integrated into the TESS framework and so that this can be readily adapted to solve general systems of equations. We present results from a series of test problems to demonstrate the performance of TESS and to highlight some of the advantages of the dynamic tessellation method for solving challenging problems in astrophysical fluid dynamics.

  4. An Invariant-Preserving ALE Method for Solids under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Christon, Mark A

    2012-07-17

    We are proposing a fundamentally new approach to ALE methods for solids undergoing large deformation due to extreme loading conditions. Our approach is based on a physically-motivated and mathematically rigorous construction of the underlying Lagrangian method, vector/tensor reconstruction, remapping, and interface reconstruction. It is transformational because it deviates dramatically from traditionally accepted ALE methods and provides the following set of unique attributes: (1) a three-dimensional, finite volume, cell-centered ALE framework with advanced hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories for solids; (2) a new physically and mathematically consistent reconstruction method for vector/tensor fields; (3) advanced invariant-preserving remapping algorithm for vector/tensor quantities; (4) moment-of-fluid (MoF) interface reconstruction technique for multi-material problems with solids undergoing large deformations. This work brings together many new concepts, that in combination with emergent cell-centered Lagrangian hydrodynamics methods will produce a cutting-edge ALE capability and define a new state-of-the-art. Many ideas in this work are new, completely unexplored, and hence high risk. The proposed research and the resulting algorithms will be of immediate use in Eulerian, Lagrangian and ALE codes under the ASC program at the lab. In addition, the research on invariant preserving reconstruction/remap of tensor quantities is of direct interest to ongoing CASL and climate modeling efforts at LANL. The application space impacted by this work includes Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), Z-pinch, munition-target interactions, geological impact dynamics, shock processing of powders and shaped charges. The ALE framework will also provide a suitable test-bed for rapid development and assessment of hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories. Today, there are no invariant-preserving ALE algorithms for treating solids with large deformations. Therefore

  5. THEHYCO-3DT: Thermal hydrodynamic code for the 3 dimensional transient calculation of advanced LMFBR core

    SciTech Connect

    Vitruk, S.G.; Korsun, A.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The multilevel mathematical model of neutron thermal hydrodynamic processes in a passive safety core without assemblies duct walls and appropriate computer code SKETCH, consisted of thermal hydrodynamic module THEHYCO-3DT and neutron one, are described. A new effective discretization technique for energy, momentum and mass conservation equations is applied in hexagonal - z geometry. The model adequacy and applicability are presented. The results of the calculations show that the model and the computer code could be used in conceptual design of advanced reactors.

  6. Numerical simulations of hydrodynamic instabilities: Perturbation codes PANSY, PERLE, and 2D code CHIC applied to a realistic LIL target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallo, L.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Maire, P. H.; Breil, J.; Morse, R.-L.; Schurtz, G.

    2006-06-01

    This paper deals with ablation front instabilities simulations in the context of direct drive ICF. A simplified DT target, representative of realistic target on LIL is considered. We describe here two numerical approaches: the linear perturbation method using the perturbation codes Perle (planar) and Pansy (spherical) and the direct simulation method using our Bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code Chic. Numerical solutions are shown to converge, in good agreement with analytical models.

  7. TPCI: the PLUTO-CLOUDY Interface . A versatile coupled photoionization hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Banerjee, R.; Mignone, A.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-04-01

    We present an interface between the (magneto-) hydrodynamics code PLUTO and the plasma simulation and spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. By combining these codes, we constructed a new photoionization hydrodynamics solver: the PLUTO-CLOUDY Interface (TPCI), which is well suited to simulate photoevaporative flows under strong irradiation. The code includes the electromagnetic spectrum from X-rays to the radio range and solves the photoionization and chemical network of the 30 lightest elements. TPCI follows an iterative numerical scheme: first, the equilibrium state of the medium is solved for a given radiation field by CLOUDY, resulting in a net radiative heating or cooling. In the second step, the latter influences the (magneto-) hydrodynamic evolution calculated by PLUTO. Here, we validated the one-dimensional version of the code on the basis of four test problems: photoevaporation of a cool hydrogen cloud, cooling of coronal plasma, formation of a Strömgren sphere, and the evaporating atmosphere of a hot Jupiter. This combination of an equilibrium photoionization solver with a general MHD code provides an advanced simulation tool applicable to a variety of astrophysical problems. A copy of the code is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/576/A21

  8. The multigrid method for semi-implicit hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, A.; Dendy, J.E. Jr.; Ruppel, H.

    1980-03-01

    The multigrid method is applied to the pressure iteration in both Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, and computational examples of its efficiency are presented. In addition a general technique for speeding up the calculation of very low Mach number flows is presented. The latter feature is independent of the multigrid algorithm.

  9. Multigrid method for semi-implicit hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, A.; Dendy, J.E. Jr.; Ruppel, H.

    1980-03-01

    The multigrid method is applied to the pressure iteration in both Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, and computational examples of its efficiency are presented. In addition a general technique for speeding up the calculation of very low Mach number flows is presented. The latter feature is independent of the multigrid algorithm.

  10. A new relativistic hydrodynamics code for high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazuhisa; Akamatsu, Yukinao; Nonaka, Chiho

    2016-10-01

    We construct a new Godunov type relativistic hydrodynamics code in Milne coordinates, using a Riemann solver based on the two-shock approximation which is stable under the existence of large shock waves. We check the correctness of the numerical algorithm by comparing numerical calculations and analytical solutions in various problems, such as shock tubes, expansion of matter into the vacuum, the Landau-Khalatnikov solution, and propagation of fluctuations around Bjorken flow and Gubser flow. We investigate the energy and momentum conservation property of our code in a test problem of longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion with an initial condition for high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We also discuss numerical viscosity in the test problems of expansion of matter into the vacuum and conservation properties. Furthermore, we discuss how the numerical stability is affected by the source terms of relativistic numerical hydrodynamics in Milne coordinates.

  11. Terminal Ballistic Application of Hydrodynamic Computer Code Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    this test , the length to diameter ratio was two, and therefore, edge effects are important. The results of HEMP code calculations are also plotted ...distribut ion s of Al l i son and Vitali8 are also plotted in Figure 13. Good agreement exists between the experimental and calculated collapse...Vineland Avenue Dr. J. Kury North Hollywood , CA 91602 E. D. Giroux Dr. E . Lee 1 Systems , Science ~ Software Dr. H. Horn ig ATTN : Dr. R. Sedgw ick

  12. SMITE - A Second Order Eulerian Code for Hydrodynamic and Elastic-Plastic Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    et al Mathematical Applications Group, Incorporated Prepared for: Ballistic Research Laboratories August 1975 DISTRIBI,TED BY: mi] National...SMITE - A SECOND ORDER EULERIAN CODE FOR HYDRODYNAMIC AND ELASTIC-PLASTIC PROBLEMS Prepared by Mathematical Applications Group, Inc. 3...AODRcis jMathematical Applications Group, Inc. 13 Westchester Plaza IFlmsford, New York 10523 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK AREA t WORK

  13. CRASH: A BLOCK-ADAPTIVE-MESH CODE FOR RADIATIVE SHOCK HYDRODYNAMICS-IMPLEMENTATION AND VERIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Holst, B.; Toth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Myra, E. S.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P.; Powell, K. G.; Holloway, J. P.; Stout, Q.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.; Karni, S.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code, a block-adaptive-mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with a gray or multi-group method and uses a flux-limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. Electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include flux-limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite-volume discretization in either one-, two-, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator-split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) an explicit step of a shock-capturing hydrodynamic solver; (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space; and (3) an implicit solution of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. The applications are for astrophysics and laboratory astrophysics. The CRASH code is an extension of the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a new radiation transfer and heat conduction library and equation-of-state and multi-group opacity solvers. Both CRASH and BATS-R-US are part of the publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework.

  14. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (ID & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  15. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (1D & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  16. Modeling Three-Dimensional Shock Initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-08

    A recent SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate and study code predictions. These SMIS tests used a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments into a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. This SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because (1) SMIS tests facilitate the investigation of 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) within the context of a considerable suite of diagnostics, and (2) many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. A particular goal of these model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the ALE3D implementation of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth reactive flow model [2] within a fully 3-dimensional regime of SDT. The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations reproduce observed 'Go/No-Go' 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  17. Modified-Gravity-GADGET: a new code for cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchwein, Ewald; Baldi, Marco; Springel, Volker

    2013-11-01

    We present a new massively parallel code for N-body and cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models. The code employs a multigrid-accelerated Newton-Gauss-Seidel relaxation solver on an adaptive mesh to efficiently solve for perturbations in the scalar degree of freedom of the modified gravity model. As this new algorithm is implemented as a module for the P-GADGET3 code, it can at the same time follow the baryonic physics included in P-GADGET3, such as hydrodynamics, radiative cooling and star formation. We demonstrate that the code works reliably by applying it to simple test problems that can be solved analytically, as well as by comparing cosmological simulations to results from the literature. Using the new code, we perform the first non-radiative and radiative cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of an f (R)-gravity model. We also discuss the impact of active galactic nucleus feedback on the matter power spectrum, as well as degeneracies between the influence of baryonic processes and modifications of gravity.

  18. High strain Lagrangian hydrodynamics: A three dimensional SPH code for dynamic material response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.; Hipp, Jim R.; Libersky, Larry D.; Petschek, Albert G.

    1993-03-01

    MAGI, a three-dimensional shock and material response code which is based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics is described. Calculations are presented and compared with experimental results. The SPH method is unique in that it employs no spatial mesh. The absence of a grid leads to some nice features such as the ability to handle large distortions in a pure Lagrangian frame and a natural treatment of voids. Both of these features are important in the tracking of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact, a difficult problem for which Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics seems ideally suited. It is believed this is the first application of SPH to the dynamics of elastic-plastic solid.

  19. Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2010-03-10

    We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

  20. Simulating hypervelocity impact effects on structures using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code MAGI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libersky, Larry; Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of interaction occurring between space debris and orbiting structures is of great interest to the planning and survivability of space assets. Computer simulation of the impact events using hydrodynamic codes can provide some understanding of the processes but the problems involved with this fundamental approach are formidable. First, any realistic simulation is necessarily three-dimensional, e.g., the impact and breakup of a satellite. Second, the thickness of important components such as satellite skins or bumper shields are small with respect to the dimension of the structure as a whole, presenting severe zoning problems for codes. Thirdly, the debris cloud produced by the primary impact will yield many secondary impacts which will contribute to the damage and possible breakup of the structure. The problem was approached by choosing a relatively new computational technique that has virtues peculiar to space impacts. The method is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

  1. Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

  2. A 3+1 dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Huovinen, P.; Bleicher, M.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the details of 3+1 dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code for the simulations of quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The code solves the equations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics in the Israel-Stewart framework. With the help of ideal-viscous splitting, we keep the ability to solve the equations of ideal hydrodynamics in the limit of zero viscosities using a Godunov-type algorithm. Milne coordinates are used to treat the predominant expansion in longitudinal (beam) direction effectively. The results are successfully tested against known analytical relativistic inviscid and viscous solutions, as well as against existing 2+1D relativistic viscous code. Catalogue identifier: AETZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 825 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 92 750 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: any with a C++ compiler and the CERN ROOT libraries. Operating system: tested on GNU/Linux Ubuntu 12.04 x64 (gcc 4.6.3), GNU/Linux Ubuntu 13.10 (gcc 4.8.2), Red Hat Linux 6 (gcc 4.4.7). RAM: scales with the number of cells in hydrodynamic grid; 1900 Mbytes for 3D 160×160×100 grid. Classification: 1.5, 4.3, 12. External routines: CERN ROOT (http://root.cern.ch), Gnuplot (http://www.gnuplot.info/) for plotting the results. Nature of problem: relativistic hydrodynamical description of the 3-dimensional quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Solution method: finite volume Godunov-type method. Running time: scales with the number of hydrodynamic cells; typical running times on Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz, single thread mode, 160

  3. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  4. Simulation of a ceramic impact experiment using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPHINX. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPHINX, and we discuss how the model differs from others. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we simulate an experiment in which a tungsten rod strikes a target of heavily confined ceramic. Simulations in 3D at relatively coarse resolution yield poor results. However, 2D plane-strain approximations to the test produce crack patterns that are strikingly similar to the data, although the fracture model needs further refinement to match some of the finer details. We conclude with an outline of plans for continuing research and development.

  5. Modelling of Be Disks in Binary Systems Using the Hydrodynamic Code PLUTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, I. H.; Panoglou, D.; Jones, C. E.; Carciofi, A. C.

    2016-11-01

    The study of the gas structure and dynamics of Be star disks is critical to our understanding of the Be star phenomenon. The central star is the major force driving the evolution of these disks, however other external forces may also affect the formation of the disk, for example, the gravitational torque produced in a close binary system. We are interested in understanding the gravitational effects of a low-mass binary companion on the formation and growth of a disk in a close binary system. To study these effects, we used the grid-based hydrodynamic code PLUTO. Because this code has not been used to study such systems before, we compared our simulations against codes used in previous work on binary systems. We were able to simulate the formation of a disk in both an isolated and binary system. Our current results suggest that PLUTO is in fact a well suited tool to study the dynamics of Be disks.

  6. The escape of high explosive products: An exact-solution problem for verification of hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, Scott William

    2016-10-22

    This paper documents the escape of high explosive (HE) products problem. The problem, first presented by Fickett & Rivard, tests the implementation and numerical behavior of a high explosive detonation and energy release model and its interaction with an associated compressible hydrodynamics simulation code. The problem simulates the detonation of a finite-length, one-dimensional piece of HE that is driven by a piston from one end and adjacent to a void at the other end. The HE equation of state is modeled as a polytropic ideal gas. The HE detonation is assumed to be instantaneous with an infinitesimal reaction zone. Via judicious selection of the material specific heat ratio, the problem has an exact solution with linear characteristics, enabling a straightforward calculation of the physical variables as a function of time and space. Lastly, implementation of the exact solution in the Python code ExactPack is discussed, as are verification cases for the exact solution code.

  7. Investigating the Magnetorotational Instability with Dedalus, and Open-Souce Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Keaton J; /UC, Berkeley, aff SLAC

    2012-08-31

    The magnetorotational instability is a fluid instability that causes the onset of turbulence in discs with poloidal magnetic fields. It is believed to be an important mechanism in the physics of accretion discs, namely in its ability to transport angular momentum outward. A similar instability arising in systems with a helical magnetic field may be easier to produce in laboratory experiments using liquid sodium, but the applicability of this phenomenon to astrophysical discs is unclear. To explore and compare the properties of these standard and helical magnetorotational instabilities (MRI and HRMI, respectively), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities were added to Dedalus, an open-source hydrodynamics simulator. Dedalus is a Python-based pseudospectral code that uses external libraries and parallelization with the goal of achieving speeds competitive with codes implemented in lower-level languages. This paper will outline the MHD equations as implemented in Dedalus, the steps taken to improve the performance of the code, and the status of MRI investigations using Dedalus.

  8. High Strain Lagrangian Hydrodynamics. A Three-Dimensional SPH Code for Dynamic Material Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libersky, Larry D.; Petschek, Albert G.; Carney, Theodore C.; Hipp, Jim R.; Allahdadi, Firooz A.

    1993-11-01

    MAGI, a three-dimensional shock and material response code which is based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is described. Calculations are presented and compared with experimental results. The SPH method is unique in that it employs no spatial mesh. The absence of a grid leads to some nice features such as the ability to handle large distortions in a pure Lagrangian frame and a natural treatment of voids. Both of these features are important in the tracking of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact—a difficult problem for which SPH seems ideally suited. We believe this is the first application of SPH to the dynamics of elastic-plastic solids.

  9. Prediction of material strength and fracture of glass using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The design of many military devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics, that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in truck and jeep windshields and in helicopters; and rock and concrete that are used in underground bunkers. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass, and data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, the authors did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  10. A new multidimensional, energy-dependent two-moment transport code for neutrino-hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, O.; Obergaulinger, M.; Janka, H.-T.

    2015-11-01

    We present the new code ALCAR developed to model multidimensional, multienergy-group neutrino transport in the context of supernovae and neutron-star mergers. The algorithm solves the evolution equations of the zeroth- and first-order angular moments of the specific intensity, supplemented by an algebraic relation for the second-moment tensor to close the system. The scheme takes into account frame-dependent effects of the order O(v/c) as well as the most important types of neutrino interactions. The transport scheme is significantly more efficient than a multidimensional solver of the Boltzmann equation, while it is more accurate and consistent than the flux-limited diffusion method. The finite-volume discretization of the essentially hyperbolic system of moment equations employs methods well-known from hydrodynamics. For the time integration of the potentially stiff moment equations we employ a scheme in which only the local source terms are treated implicitly, while the advection terms are kept explicit, thereby allowing for an efficient computational parallelization of the algorithm. We investigate various problem set-ups in one and two dimensions to verify the implementation and to test the quality of the algebraic closure scheme. In our most detailed test, we compare a fully dynamic, one-dimensional core-collapse simulation with two published calculations performed with well-known Boltzmann-type neutrino-hydrodynamics codes and we find very satisfactory agreement.

  11. The escape of high explosive products: An exact-solution problem for verification of hydrodynamics codes

    DOE PAGES

    Doebling, Scott William

    2016-10-22

    This paper documents the escape of high explosive (HE) products problem. The problem, first presented by Fickett & Rivard, tests the implementation and numerical behavior of a high explosive detonation and energy release model and its interaction with an associated compressible hydrodynamics simulation code. The problem simulates the detonation of a finite-length, one-dimensional piece of HE that is driven by a piston from one end and adjacent to a void at the other end. The HE equation of state is modeled as a polytropic ideal gas. The HE detonation is assumed to be instantaneous with an infinitesimal reaction zone. Viamore » judicious selection of the material specific heat ratio, the problem has an exact solution with linear characteristics, enabling a straightforward calculation of the physical variables as a function of time and space. Lastly, implementation of the exact solution in the Python code ExactPack is discussed, as are verification cases for the exact solution code.« less

  12. AN OPEN-SOURCE NEUTRINO RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    O’Connor, Evan

    2015-08-15

    We present an open-source update to the spherically symmetric, general-relativistic hydrodynamics, core-collapse supernova (CCSN) code GR1D. The source code is available at http://www.GR1Dcode.org. We extend its capabilities to include a general-relativistic treatment of neutrino transport based on the moment formalisms of Shibata et al. and Cardall et al. We pay special attention to implementing and testing numerical methods and approximations that lessen the computational demand of the transport scheme by removing the need to invert large matrices. This is especially important for the implementation and development of moment-like transport methods in two and three dimensions. A critical component of neutrino transport calculations is the neutrino–matter interaction coefficients that describe the production, absorption, scattering, and annihilation of neutrinos. In this article we also describe our open-source neutrino interaction library NuLib (available at http://www.nulib.org). We believe that an open-source approach to describing these interactions is one of the major steps needed to progress toward robust models of CCSNe and robust predictions of the neutrino signal. We show, via comparisons to full Boltzmann neutrino-transport simulations of CCSNe, that our neutrino transport code performs remarkably well. Furthermore, we show that the methods and approximations we employ to increase efficiency do not decrease the fidelity of our results. We also test the ability of our general-relativistic transport code to model failed CCSNe by evolving a 40-solar-mass progenitor to the onset of collapse to a black hole.

  13. An Open-source Neutrino Radiation Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Evan

    2015-08-01

    We present an open-source update to the spherically symmetric, general-relativistic hydrodynamics, core-collapse supernova (CCSN) code GR1D. The source code is available at http://www.GR1Dcode.org. We extend its capabilities to include a general-relativistic treatment of neutrino transport based on the moment formalisms of Shibata et al. and Cardall et al. We pay special attention to implementing and testing numerical methods and approximations that lessen the computational demand of the transport scheme by removing the need to invert large matrices. This is especially important for the implementation and development of moment-like transport methods in two and three dimensions. A critical component of neutrino transport calculations is the neutrino-matter interaction coefficients that describe the production, absorption, scattering, and annihilation of neutrinos. In this article we also describe our open-source neutrino interaction library NuLib (available at http://www.nulib.org). We believe that an open-source approach to describing these interactions is one of the major steps needed to progress toward robust models of CCSNe and robust predictions of the neutrino signal. We show, via comparisons to full Boltzmann neutrino-transport simulations of CCSNe, that our neutrino transport code performs remarkably well. Furthermore, we show that the methods and approximations we employ to increase efficiency do not decrease the fidelity of our results. We also test the ability of our general-relativistic transport code to model failed CCSNe by evolving a 40-solar-mass progenitor to the onset of collapse to a black hole.

  14. Modeling The Shock Initiation of PBX-9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate the code predictions. The SMIS tests use a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments at a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model [2] in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT). The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations accurately reproduce the 'Go/No-Go' threshold of the Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied in a predictive fashion for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  15. One-Dimensional Lagrangian Code for Plasma Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Fusion Pellet Driven by Ion Beams.

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 The MEDUSA-IB code performs implosion and thermonuclear burn calculations of an ion beam driven ICF target, based on one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and transport theory. It can calculate the following values in spherical geometry through the progress of implosion and fuel burnup of a multi-layered target. (1) Hydrodynamic velocities, density, ion, electron and radiation temperature, radiation energy density, Rs and burn rate of target as a function of coordinates and time, (2) Fusion gain as a function of time, (3) Ionization degree, (4) Temperature dependent ion beam energy deposition, (5) Radiation, -particle and neutron spectra as a function of time.

  16. Global Time Dependent Solutions of Stochastically Driven Standard Accretion Disks: Development of Hydrodynamical Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Naveel; Maqbool, Bari; Iqbal, Naseer; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-07-01

    X-ray binaries and AGNs are powered by accretion discs around compact objects, where the x-rays are emitted from the inner regions and uv emission arise from the relatively cooler outer parts. There has been an increasing evidence that the variability of the x-rays in different timescales is caused by stochastic fluctuations in the accretion disc at different radii. These fluctuations although arise in the outer parts of the disc but propagate inwards to give rise to x-ray variability and hence provides a natural connection between the x-ray and uv variability. There are analytical expressions to qualitatively understand the effect of these stochastic variabilities, but quantitative predictions are only possible by a detailed hydrodynamical study of the global time dependent solution of standard accretion disc. We have developed numerical efficient code (to incorporate all these effects), which considers gas pressure dominated solutions and stochastic fluctuations with the inclusion of boundary effect of the last stable orbit.

  17. Measuring Extinction with ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Roberts, D.; Stewart, J.; Smith, J.; Fitch, J.

    2007-12-01

    ALE (Astronomical LIDAR for Extinction) is deployed at the University of New Mexico's (UNM) Campus Observatory in Albuquerque, NM. It has begun a year-long testing phase prior deployment at McDonald Observatory in support of the CCD/Transit Instrument II (CTI-II). ALE is designed to produce a high-precision measurement of atmospheric absorption and scattering above the observatory site every ten minutes of every moderately clear night. LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is the VIS/UV/IR analog of radar, using a laser, telescope and time-gated photodetector instead of a radio transmitter, dish and receiver. In the case of ALE -- an elastic backscatter LIDAR -- 20ns-long, eye-safe laser pulses are launched 2500 times per second from a 0.32m transmitting telescope co-mounted with a 50mm short-range receiver on an alt-az mounted 0.67m long-range receiver. Photons from the laser pulse are scattered and absorbed as the pulse propagates through the atmosphere, a portion of which are scattered into the field of view of the short- and long-range receiver telescopes and detected by a photomultiplier. The properties of a given volume of atmosphere along the LIDAR path are inferred from both the altitude-resolved backscatter signal as well as the attenuation of backscatter signal from altitudes above it. We present ALE profiles from the commissioning phase and demonstrate some of the astronomically interesting atmospheric information that can be gleaned from these data, including, but not limited to, total line-of-sight extinction. This project is funded by NSF Grant 0421087.

  18. Implementation of a simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces in hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2000-10-01

    A simple model was recently described for predicting the time evolution of the width of the mixing layer at an unstable fluid interface [J. D. Ramshaw, Phys. Rev. E 58, 5834 (1998); ibid. 61, 5339 (2000)]. The ordinary differential equations of this model have been heuristically generalized into partial differential equations suitable for implementation in multicomponent hydrodynamics codes. The central ingredient in this generalization is a nun-diffusional expression for the species mass fluxes. These fluxes describe the relative motion of the species, and thereby determine the local mixing rate and spatial distribution of mixed fluid as a function of time. The generalized model has been implemented in a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code. The model equations and implementation procedure are summarized, and comparisons with experimental mixing data are presented.

  19. Multi-Material ALE with AMR for Modeling Hot Plasmas and Cold Fragmenting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alice, Koniges; Nathan, Masters; Aaron, Fisher; David, Eder; Wangyi, Liu; Robert, Anderson; David, Benson; Andrea, Bertozzi

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new 3D multi-physics multi-material code, ALE-AMR, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to the microstructural regimes. The code is unique in its ability to model hot radiating plasmas and cold fragmenting solids. New numerical techniques were developed for many of the physics packages to work efficiently on a dynamically moving and adapting mesh. We use interface reconstruction based on volume fractions of the material components within mixed zones and reconstruct interfaces as needed. This interface reconstruction model is also used for void coalescence and fragmentation. A flexible strength/failure framework allows for pluggable material models, which may require material history arrays to determine the level of accumulated damage or the evolving yield stress in J2 plasticity models. For some applications laser rays are propagating through a virtual composite mesh consisting of the finest resolution representation of the modeled space. A new 2nd order accurate diffusion solver has been implemented for the thermal conduction and radiation transport packages. One application area is the modeling of laser/target effects including debris/shrapnel generation. Other application areas include warm dense matter, EUV lithography, and material wall interactions for fusion devices.

  20. Code Development of Three-Dimensional General Relativistic Hydrodynamics with AMR (Adaptive-Mesh Refinement) and Results from Special and General Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönmez, Orhan

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, the general procedure to solve the general relativistic hydrodynamical (GRH) equations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) is presented. In order to achieve, the GRH equations are written in the conservation form to exploit their hyperbolic character. The numerical solutions of GRH equations are obtained by high resolution shock Capturing schemes (HRSC), specifically designed to solve nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. These schemes depend on the characteristic information of the system. The Marquina fluxes with MUSCL left and right states are used to solve GRH equations. First, different test problems with uniform and AMR grids on the special relativistic hydrodynamics equations are carried out to verify the second-order convergence of the code in one, two and three dimensions. Results from uniform and AMR grid are compared. It is found that adaptive grid does a better job when the number of resolution is increased. Second, the GRH equations are tested using two different test problems which are Geodesic flow and Circular motion of particle In order to do this, the flux part of GRH equations is coupled with source part using Strang splitting. The coupling of the GRH equations is carried out in a treatment which gives second order accurate solutions in space and time.

  1. APSARA: A multi-dimensional unsplit fourth-order explicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code for arbitrary curvilinear grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwathanarat, A.; Grimm-Strele, H.; Müller, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new fourth-order, finite-volume hydrodynamics code named Apsara. The code employs a high-order, finite-volume method for mapped coordinates with extensions for nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. Apsara can handle arbitrary structured curvilinear meshes in three spatial dimensions. The code has successfully passed several hydrodynamic test problems, including the advection of a Gaussian density profile and a nonlinear vortex and the propagation of linear acoustic waves. For these test problems, Apsara produces fourth-order accurate results in case of smooth grid mappings. The order of accuracy is reduced to first-order when using the nonsmooth circular grid mapping. When applying the high-order method to simulations of low-Mach number flows, for example, the Gresho vortex and the Taylor-Green vortex, we discover that Apsara delivers superior results to codes based on the dimensionally split, piecewise parabolic method (PPM) widely used in astrophysics. Hence, Apsara is a suitable tool for simulating highly subsonic flows in astrophysics. In the first astrophysical application, we perform implicit large eddy simulations (ILES) of anisotropic turbulence in the context of core collapse supernova (CCSN) and obtain results similar to those previously reported.

  2. Combining node-centered parallel radiation transport and higher-order multi-material cell-centered hydrodynamics methods in three-temperature radiation hydrodynamics code TRHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-06-01

    Higher-order cell-centered multi-material hydrodynamics (HD) and parallel node-centered radiation transport (RT) schemes are combined self-consistently in three-temperature (3T) radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) code TRHD (Sijoy and Chaturvedi, 2015) developed for the simulation of intense thermal radiation or high-power laser driven RHD. For RT, a node-centered gray model implemented in a popular RHD code MULTI2D (Ramis et al., 2009) is used. This scheme, in principle, can handle RT in both optically thick and thin materials. The RT module has been parallelized using message passing interface (MPI) for parallel computation. Presently, for multi-material HD, we have used a simple and robust closure model in which common strain rates to all materials in a mixed cell is assumed. The closure model has been further generalized to allow different temperatures for the electrons and ions. In addition to this, electron and radiation temperatures are assumed to be in non-equilibrium. Therefore, the thermal relaxation between the electrons and ions and the coupling between the radiation and matter energies are required to be computed self-consistently. This has been achieved by using a node-centered symmetric-semi-implicit (SSI) integration scheme. The electron thermal conduction is calculated using a cell-centered, monotonic, non-linear finite volume scheme (NLFV) suitable for unstructured meshes. In this paper, we have described the details of the 2D, 3T, non-equilibrium, multi-material RHD code developed with a special attention to the coupling of various cell-centered and node-centered formulations along with a suite of validation test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. We also report the parallel performance of RT module. Finally, in order to demonstrate the full capability of the code implementation, we have presented the simulation of laser driven shock propagation in a layered thin foil. The simulation results are found to be in good

  3. Recent Hydrodynamics Improvements to the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard.R. Schultz

    2009-07-01

    The hydrodynamics section of the RELAP5-3D computer program has been recently improved. Changes were made as follows: (1) improved turbine model, (2) spray model for the pressurizer model, (3) feedwater heater model, (4) radiological transport model, (5) improved pump model, and (6) compressor model.

  4. Comparison of Particle Flow Code and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modelling of Landslide Run outs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preh, A.; Poisel, R.; Hungr, O.

    2009-04-01

    In most continuum mechanics methods modelling the run out of landslides the moving mass is divided into a number of elements, the velocities of which can be established by numerical integration of Newtońs second law (Lagrangian solution). The methods are based on fluid mechanics modelling the movements of an equivalent fluid. In 2004, McDougall and Hungr presented a three-dimensional numerical model for rapid landslides, e.g. debris flows and rock avalanches, called DAN3D.The method is based on the previous work of Hungr (1995) and is using an integrated two-dimensional Lagrangian solution and meshless Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) principle to maintain continuity. DAN3D has an open rheological kernel, allowing the use of frictional (with constant porepressure ratio) and Voellmy rheologies and gives the possibility to change material rheology along the path. Discontinuum (granular) mechanics methods model the run out mass as an assembly of particles moving down a surface. Each particle is followed exactly as it moves and interacts with the surface and with its neighbours. Every particle is checked on contacts with every other particle in every time step using a special cell-logic for contact detection in order to reduce the computational effort. The Discrete Element code PFC3D was adapted in order to make possible discontinuum mechanics models of run outs. Punta Thurwieser Rock Avalanche and Frank Slide were modelled by DAN as well as by PFC3D. The simulations showed correspondingly that the parameters necessary to get results coinciding with observations in nature are completely different. The maximum velocity distributions due to DAN3D reveal that areas of different maximum flow velocity are next to each other in Punta Thurwieser run out whereas the distribution of maximum flow velocity shows almost constant maximum flow velocity over the width of the run out regarding Frank Slide. Some 30 percent of total kinetic energy is rotational kinetic energy in

  5. GENESIS: A High-Resolution Code for Three-dimensional Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Martí, J. M.; Müller, E.

    1999-05-01

    The main features of a three-dimensional, high-resolution special relativistic hydro code based on relativistic Riemann solvers are described. The capabilities and performance of the code are discussed. In particular, we present the results of extensive test calculations that demonstrate that the code can accurately and efficiently handle strong shocks in three spatial dimensions. Results of the performance of the code on single and multiprocessor machines are given. Simulations (in double precision) with <=7×106 computational cells require less than 1 Gbyte of RAM memory and ~7×10-5 CPU s per zone and time step (on a SCI Cray-Origin 2000 with a R10000 processor). Currently, a version of the numerical code is under development, which is suited for massively parallel computers with distributed memory architecture (such as, e.g., Cray T3E).

  6. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  7. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamic Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. I. Method and Code Tests in Spherical Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald

    2010-07-01

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the "ray-by-ray plus" approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  8. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMIC CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. I. METHOD AND CODE TESTS IN SPHERICAL SYMMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.d

    2010-07-15

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the 'ray-by-ray plus' approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  9. ZEUS-2D: A radiation magnetohydrodynamics code for astrophysical flows in two space dimensions. I - The hydrodynamic algorithms and tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    A detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer is presented. Attention is given to the hydrodynamic (HD) algorithms which form the foundation for the more complex MHD and radiation HD algorithms. The effect of self-gravity on the flow dynamics is accounted for by an iterative solution of the sparse-banded matrix resulting from discretizing the Poisson equation in multidimensions. The results of an extensive series of HD test problems are presented. A detailed description of the MHD algorithms in ZEUS-2D is presented. A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-constrained transport method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  10. Modelling of the magnetic field effects in hydrodynamic codes using a second order tensorial diffusion scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breil, J.; Maire, P.-H.; Nicolaï, P.; Schurtz, G.

    2008-05-01

    In laser produced plasmas large self-generated magnetic fields have been measured. The classical formulas by Braginskii predict that magnetic fields induce a reduction of the magnitude of the heat flux and its rotation through the Righi-Leduc effect. In this paper a second order tensorial diffusion method used to correctly solve the Righi-Leduc effect in multidimensional code is presented.

  11. Scalability of the CTH Hydrodynamics Code on the Sun HPC 10000 Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    the Sun HPC 10000 computer system. The scalability of the message-passing code on this symmetrical multiple processor architecture is presented and is...compared to the ideal linear multiple processor performance. The computed results are also compared to experimental data for the purpose of validating the shock physics application on the Sun HPC 10000 system.

  12. ALES: An Innovative Argument-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, Safia; Sawamura, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an Argument-Learning System (ALES). The idea is based on the AIF (argumentation interchange format) ontology using "Walton theory". ALES uses different mining techniques to manage a highly structured arguments repository. This repository was designed, developed and implemented by the authors. The aim is to…

  13. A Multigroup diffusion Solver Using Pseudo Transient Continuation for a Radiaiton-Hydrodynamic Code with Patch-Based AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Offner, S R

    2007-03-02

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({Psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {Psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {Psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates

  14. A Multigroup diffusion solver using pseudo transient continuation for a radiation-hydrodynamic code with patch-based AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Offner, S R

    2006-09-21

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({Psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {Psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {Psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates

  15. Advanced life events (ALEs) that impede aging-in-place among seniors.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Lee A; Ramirez-Zohfeld, Vanessa; Sunkara, Priya; Forcucci, Chris; Campbell, Dianne; Mitzen, Phyllis; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the wishes of many seniors to age-in-place in their own homes, critical events occur that impede their ability to do so. A gap exists as to what these advanced life events (ALEs) entail and the planning that older adults perceive is necessary. The purpose of this study was to identify seniors' perceptions and planning toward ALEs that may impact their ability to remain in their own home. We conducted focus groups with 68 seniors, age ≥65 years (mean age 73.8 years), living in the community (rural, urban, and suburban), using open-ended questions about perceptions of future heath events, needs, and planning. Three investigators coded transcriptions using constant comparative analysis to identify emerging themes, with disagreements resolved via consensus. Subjects identified five ALEs that impacted their ability to remain at home: (1) Hospitalizations, (2) Falls, (3) Dementia, (4) Spousal Loss, and (5) Home Upkeep Issues. While recognizing that ALEs frequently occur, many subjects reported a lack of planning for ALEs and perceived that these ALEs would not happen to them. Themes for the rationale behind the lack of planning emerged as: uncertainty in future, being too healthy/too sick, offspring influences, denial/procrastination, pride, feeling overwhelmed, and financial concerns. Subjects expressed reliance on offspring for navigating future ALEs, although many had not communicated their needs with their offspring. Overcoming the reasons for not planning for ALEs is crucial, as being prepared for future home needs provides seniors a voice in their care while engaging key supporters (e.g., offspring).

  16. A general higher-order remap algorithm for ALE calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, Vincent P

    2011-01-05

    A numerical technique for solving the equations of fluid dynamics with arbitrary mesh motion is presented. The three phases of the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methodology are outlined: the Lagrangian phase, grid relaxation phase and remap phase. The Lagrangian phase follows a well known approach from the HEMP code; in addition the strain rate andflow divergence are calculated in a consistent manner according to Margolin. A donor cell method from the SALE code forms the basis of the remap step, but unlike SALE a higher order correction based on monotone gradients is also added to the remap. Four test problems were explored to evaluate the fidelity of these numerical techniques, as implemented in a simple test code, written in the C programming language, called Cercion. Novel cell-centered data structures are used in Cercion to reduce the complexity of the programming and maximize the efficiency of memory usage. The locations of the shock and contact discontinuity in the Riemann shock tube problem are well captured. Cercion demonstrates a high degree of symmetry when calculating the Sedov blast wave solution, with a peak density at the shock front that is similar to the value determined by the RAGE code. For a flyer plate test problem both Cercion and FLAG give virtually the same velocity temporal profile at the target-vacuum interface. When calculating a cylindrical implosion of a steel shell, Cercion and FLAG agree well and the Cercion results are insensitive to the use of ALE.

  17. Cookoff response of PBXN-109: material characterization and ALE3D model

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Tran, T D; Cunningham, B J; Weese, R K; Maienschein, J L

    2000-10-24

    Materials properties measurements are made for the RDX-based explosive, PBXN-109, and an initial ALE3D model for cookoff is discussed. A significant effort is underway in the U.S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to understand the thermal explosion behavior of this material. Benchmark cookoff experiments are being performed by the U.S. Navy to validate DOE materials models and computer codes. The ALE3D computer code can model the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of heating and ignition in cookoff tests. In order to provide a predictive capability, materials characterization measurements are being performed to specify parameters in these models. We report on progress in the development of these ALE3D materials models and present measurements as a function of temperature for thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX).

  18. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  19. An efficient two-dimensional ALE modelling and experimental validation for pulsed laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-11-01

    We have developed two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) code which is used to study the physical processes, the plasma absorption, the crater profile, and the temperature distribution on metallic target and below the surface. The ALE method overcomes problems with Lagrangian moving mesh distortion by mesh smoothing and conservative quantities remapping from Lagrangian mesh to smoothed one. The results of numerical simulation of pulsed laser ablation are presented. The study presents particular interest for the analysis of experimental results obtained during pulsed laser ablation.

  20. Scaling and performance of a 3-D radiation hydrodynamics code on message-passing parallel computers: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J C; Norman, M

    1999-10-28

    This report details an investigation into the efficacy of two approaches to solving the radiation diffusion equation within a radiation hydrodynamic simulation. Because leading-edge scientific computing platforms have evolved from large single-node vector processors to parallel aggregates containing tens to thousands of individual CPU's, the ability of an algorithm to maintain high compute efficiency when distributed over a large array of nodes is critically important. The viability of an algorithm thus hinges upon the tripartite question of numerical accuracy, total time to solution, and parallel efficiency.

  1. SALE-3D: a simplified ALE computer program for calculating three-dimensional fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents a simplified numerical fluid-dynamics computing technique for calculating time-dependent flows in three dimensions. An implicit treatment of the pressure equation permits calculation of flows far subsonic without stringent constraints on the time step. In addition, the grid vertices may be moved with the fluid in Lagrangian fashion or held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or moved in some prescribed manner to give a continuous rezoning capability. This report describes the combination of Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) to form the ICEd-ALE technique in the framework of the Simplified-ALE (SALE-3D) computer program, for which a general flow diagram and complete FORTRAN listing are included. Sample problems show how to modify the code for a variety of applications. SALE-3D is patterned as closely as possible on the previously reported two-dimensional SALE program.

  2. SIMULATING THE COMMON ENVELOPE PHASE OF A RED GIANT USING SMOOTHED-PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS AND UNIFORM-GRID CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola; Fryer, Chris L.; Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Herwig, Falk; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to study the rapid infall phase of the common envelope (CE) interaction of a red giant branch star of mass equal to 0.88 M{sub Sun} and a companion star of mass ranging from 0.9 down to 0.1 M{sub Sun }. We first compare the results obtained using two different numerical techniques with different resolutions, and find very good agreement overall. We then compare the outcomes of those simulations with observed systems thought to have gone through a CE. The simulations fail to reproduce those systems in the sense that most of the envelope of the donor remains bound at the end of the simulations and the final orbital separations between the donor's remnant and the companion, ranging from 26.8 down to 5.9 R{sub Sun }, are larger than the ones observed. We suggest that this discrepancy vouches for recombination playing an essential role in the ejection of the envelope and/or significant shrinkage of the orbit happening in the subsequent phase.

  3. Recent Advances in the Modeling of the Transport of Two-Plasmon-Decay Electrons in the 1-D Hydrodynamic Code LILAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Yaakobi, B.

    2015-11-01

    The modeling of the fast-electron transport in the 1-D hydrodynamic code LILAC was modified because of the addition of cross-beam-energy-transfer (CBET) in implosion simulations. Using the old fast-electron with source model CBET results in a shift of the peak of the hard x-ray (HXR) production from the end of the laser pulse, as observed in experiments, to earlier in the pulse. This is caused by a drop in the laser intensity of the quarter-critical surface from CBET interaction at lower densities. Data from simulations with the laser plasma simulation environment (LPSE) code will be used to modify the source algorithm in LILAC. In addition, the transport model in LILAC has been modified to include deviations from the straight-line algorithm and non-specular reflection at the sheath to take into account the scattering from collisions and magnetic fields in the corona. Simulation results will be compared with HXR emissions from both room-temperature plastic and cryogenic target experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. Comparison of ALE and SPH Simulations of Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section into Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of multi-terrain impact has been identified as an important research area for improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program on Rotorcraft Crashworthiness. As part of this effort, two vertical drop tests were conducted of a 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section into water. For the first test, the fuselage section was impacted in a baseline configuration without energy absorbers. For the second test, the fuselage section was retrofitted with a composite honeycomb energy absorber. Both tests were conducted at a nominal velocity of 25-ft/s. A detailed finite element model was developed to represent each test article and water impact was simulated using both Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) approaches in LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Analytical predictions were correlated with experimental data for both test configurations. In addition, studies were performed to evaluate the influence of mesh density on test-analysis correlation.

  5. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. IV. The Neutrino Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M ⊙, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, langErang, of \\bar{\

  6. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  7. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  8. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.

    Core-collapse supernovae are some of the most energetic events in the Universe, they herald the birth of neutron stars and black holes, are a major site for nucleosynthesis, influence galactic hydrodynamics, and trigger further star formation. As such, it is important to understand the mechanism of explosion. Moreover, observations imply that asymmetries are, in the least, a feature of the mechanism, and theory suggests that multi-dimensional hydrodynamics may be crucial for successful explosions. In this dissertation, we present theoretical investigations into the multi-dimensional nature of the supernova mechanism. It had been suggested that nuclear reactions might excite non-radial g-modes (the [straight epsilon]-mechanism) in the cores of progenitors, leading to asymmetric explosions. We calculate the eigenmodes for a large suite of progenitors including excitation by nuclear reactions and damping by neutrino and acoustic losses. Without exception, we find unstable g-modes for each progenitor. However, the timescales for growth are at least an order of magnitude longer than the time until collapse. Thus, the [straight epsilon]- mechanism does not provide appreciable amplification of non-radial modes before the core undergoes collapse. Regardless, neutrino-driven convection, the standing accretion shock instability, and other instabilities during the explosion provide ample asymmetry. To adequately simulate these, we have developed a new hydrodynamics code, BETHE-hydro that uses the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach, includes rotational terms, solves Poisson's equation for gravity on arbitrary grids, and conserves energy and momentum in its basic implementation. By using time-dependent arbitrary grids that can adapt to the numerical challenges of the problem, this code offers unique flexibility in simulating astrophysical phenomena. Finally, we use BETHE-hydro to investigate the conditions and criteria for supernova explosions by the neutrino

  9. How to Build a Time Machine: Interfacing Hydrodynamics, Ionization Calculations and X-ray Spectral Codes for Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Thanks to Chandra and XMM-Newton, spatially resolved spectroscopy of SNRsin the X-ray band has become a reality. Several impressive data sets forejecta-dominated SNRs can now be found in the archives, the Cas A VLP justbeing one (albeit probably the most spectacular) example. However, it isoften hard to establish quantitative, unambiguous connections between theX-ray observations of SNRs and the dramatic events involved in a corecollapse or thermonuclear SN explosion. The reason for this is that thevery high quality of the data sets generated by Chandra and XMM for thelikes of Cas A, SNR 292.0+1.8, Tycho, and SN 1006 has surpassed our abilityto analyze them. The core of the problem is in the transient nature of theplasmas in SNRs, which results in anintimate relationship between the structure of the ejecta and AM, the SNRdynamics arising from their interaction, and the ensuing X-rayemission. Thus, the ONLY way to understand the X-ray observations ofejecta-dominated SNRs at all levels, from the spatially integrated spectrato the subarcsecond scales that can be resolved by Chandra, is to couplehydrodynamic simulations to nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) calculationsand X-ray spectral codes. I will review the basic ingredients that enterthis kind of calculations, and what are the prospects for using them tounderstand the X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in young SNRs. Thisunderstanding (when it is possible), can turn SNRs into veritable timemachines, revealing the secrets of the titanic explosions that generatedthem hundreds of years ago.

  10. A new multi-dimensional general relativistic neutrino hydrodynamics code for core-collapse supernovae. IV. The neutrino signal

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2014-06-10

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M {sub ☉}, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, (E), of ν-bar {sub e} and heavy-lepton neutrinos and even their crossing during the accretion phase for stars with M ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} as observed in previous 1D and 2D simulations with state-of-the-art neutrino transport. We establish a roughly linear scaling of 〈E{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉 with the proto-neutron star (PNS) mass, which holds in time as well as for different progenitors. Convection inside the PNS affects the neutrino emission on the 10%-20% level, and accretion continuing beyond the onset of the explosion prevents the abrupt drop of the neutrino luminosities seen in artificially exploded 1D models. We demonstrate that a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis of SN neutrino signals in IceCube will offer sensitive diagnostics for the SN core dynamics up to at least ∼10 kpc distance. Strong, narrow-band signal modulations indicate quasi-periodic shock sloshing motions due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and the frequency evolution of such 'SASI neutrino chirps' reveals shock expansion or contraction. The onset of the explosion is accompanied by a shift of the modulation frequency below 40-50 Hz, and post-explosion, episodic accretion downflows will be signaled by activity intervals stretching over an extended frequency range in the wavelet spectrogram.

  11. Dietary ALEs are a risk to human health--NOT!

    PubMed

    Baynes, John W

    2007-09-01

    Advanced lipoxidation end-products (ALEs) are formed by reaction of protein with lipid-derived reactive peroxyl and carbonyl compounds produced during food processing and cooking. There is concern that ALEs may induce damage in the gastrointestinal tract, affecting gut health, or enter the body and promote vascular inflammation and tissue damage. However, there is no direct evidence that ALE-proteins are a source of damage in the intestines or that they are transported into the circulation and cause pathology. Modification of proteins by ALEs impedes their digestion, and reactive ALEs released by gastrointestinal proteases would react with proteins or peptides in the gut, limiting their absorption. There are also potent enzymatic mechanisms for detoxifying ALEs or their precursors prior to their entry into the circulation. If ALEs gain access to the circulation, a battery of protective enzymes in tissue provides a second level of defense. These enzymes may be induced in intestinal epithelia and liver by low doses of ALEs, and adaptive responses would provide enhanced protection against future exposure to ALEs. Overall, except in persons with compromised organ function, e. g., vascular, hepatic, or renal diseases, there is little evidence that food ALEs will have any significant pathological effects.

  12. Measurement and ALE3D Simulation of Violence in a Deflagration Experiment With LX-10 and Aermet-100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; Nichols, A L; deHaven, M R; Strand, O T

    2006-06-22

    We describe the results of a Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) for LX-10 (94.7 % HMX, 5.3 % Viton A) confined in an AerMet 100 (iron-cobalt-nickel alloy) tube with reinforced end caps. The experimental measurements are compared with predictions of an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE3D) computer model. ALE3D is a three-dimensional multi-physics computer code capable of solving coupled equations describing thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of materials. In particular, we focus on the processes linked to fracture and fragmentation of the AerMet tube driven by the LX-10 deflagration.

  13. Modeling Explosive/Rock Interaction During Presplitting Using ALE Computational Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Richard P.; Preece, Dale S.

    1999-04-27

    Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) computational techniques allow treatment of gases, liq- uids, and solids in the same simulation. ALE methods include the ability to treat shockwaves in gases, liquids, and solids and the interaction of shockwaves with each other and with media from one of the other categories. ALE codes can also treat explosive detonation and the expansion of the explosive gases and their interaction with air and solids. ALEGRA is a 3-DALE code that has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the past few years. ALEGRA has been applied to a 2-D simulation of presplitting using decoupled explosives in rock blasting with very interesting results. The detonation of the explosive at the bottom of the hole sends a shock wave up the borehole driven by the explosive gas expanding into air. The explosive gas compresses the air against the stemming column where it rebounds and recompresses at the bottom of the borehole. This type of ringing takes several cycles to damp out. The explosively induced expansion of the borehole is also treated by ALEGRA as well as the shock wave imparted to the rock. The presentation of this paper will include sev- eral computer animations to aid in understanding this complex phenomenon.

  14. Cookoff Response of PBXN-109: Material Characterization and ALE3D Thermal Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Tran, T D; Cunningham, B J; Weese, R K; Maienschein, J L

    2001-08-21

    Materials properties measurements are made for the RDX-based explosive, PBXN-109, and initial ALE3D model predictions are given for the cookoff temperature in a U.S. Navy test. This work is part of an effort in the U.S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to understand the thermal explosion behavior of this material. Benchmark cookoff experiments are being performed by the U.S. Navy to validate DOE materials models and computer codes. The ALE3D computer code can model the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of heating, ignition, and explosion in cookoff tests. In our application, a standard three-step step model is selected for the chemical kinetics. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. Materials characterization measurements are given for thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX). These measurements and those of the other project participants are used to determine parameters in the ALE3D chemical, mechanical, and thermal models. Time-dependent, two-dimensional results are given for the temperature and material expansion. The results show predicted cookoff temperatures slightly higher than the measured values.

  15. Cookoff Response of PBXN-109: Material Characterization and ALE3D Thermal Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Tran, T D; Cunningham, B J; Weese, R K; Maienschein, J L

    2001-05-29

    Materials properties measurements are made for the RDX-based explosive, PBXN-109, and initial ALE3D model predictions are given for the cookoff temperature in a U.S. Navy test. This work is part of an effort in the U.S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to understand the thermal explosion behavior of this material. Benchmark cookoff experiments are being performed by the U.S. Navy to validate DOE materials models and computer codes. The ALE3D computer code can model the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of heating, ignition, and explosion in cookoff tests. In our application, a standard three-step step model is selected for the chemical kinetics. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. Materials characterization measurements are given for thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX). These measurements and those of the other project participants are used to determine parameters in the ALE3D chemical, mechanical, and thermal models. Time-dependent, two-dimensional results are given for the temperature and material expansion. The results show predicted cookoff temperatures slightly higher than the measured values.

  16. The HULL Hydrodynamics Computer Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    Mark A. Fry, Capt, USAF Richard E. Durrett, Major, USAF Gary P. Ganong , Major, USAF Daniel A. Matuska, Major, USAF Mitchell D. Stucker, Capt, USAF... Ganong , G.P., and Roberts, W.A., The Effect of the Nuclear Environment on Crater Ejecta Trajectories for Surface Bursts, AFWL-TR-68-125, Air Force...unication. 17. Ganong , G.P.. et al.. Private communication. 18- A?^o9;ceG-Seapoan1 L^^y^ AFWL.TR-69.19, 19. Needham, C.E., TheorpHrai r=i^ i

  17. Kull ALE: I. Unstructured Mesh Advection, Interface Capturing, and Multiphase 2T RHD with Material Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-02-11

    Several advection algorithms are presented within the remap framework for unstructured mesh ALE codes. The methods discussed include a generic advection scheme based on a finite volume approach, and three groups of algorithms for the treatment of material boundary interfaces. The interface capturing algorithms belong to the Volume of Fluid (VoF) class of methods to approximate material interfaces from the local fractional volume of fluid distribution in arbitrary unstructured polyhedral meshes appropriate for the Kull code. Also presented are several schemes for extending single material radiation diffusion solvers to account for multi-material interfaces.

  18. TRHD: Three-temperature radiation-hydrodynamics code with an implicit non-equilibrium radiation transport using a cell-centered monotonic finite volume scheme on unstructured-grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2015-05-01

    Three-temperature (3T), unstructured-mesh, non-equilibrium radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) code have been developed for the simulation of intense thermal radiation or high-power laser driven radiative shock hydrodynamics in two-dimensional (2D) axis-symmetric geometries. The governing hydrodynamics equations are solved using a compatible unstructured Lagrangian method based on a control volume differencing (CVD) scheme. A second-order predictor-corrector (PC) integration scheme is used for the temporal discretization of the hydrodynamics equations. For the radiation energy transport, frequency averaged gray model is used in which the flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation is used to recover the free-streaming limit of the radiation propagation in optically thin regions. The proposed RHD model allows to have different temperatures for the electrons and ions. In addition to this, the electron and thermal radiation temperatures are assumed to be in non-equilibrium. Therefore, the thermal relaxation between the electrons and ions and the coupling between the radiation and matter energies are required to be computed self-consistently. For this, the coupled flux limited electron heat conduction and the non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are solved simultaneously by using an implicit, axis-symmetric, cell-centered, monotonic, nonlinear finite volume (NLFV) scheme. In this paper, we have described the details of the 2D, 3T, non-equilibrium RHD code developed along with a suite of validation test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. We have also conducted a performance analysis with different linearity preserving interpolation schemes that are used for the evaluation of the nodal values in the NLFV scheme. Finally, in order to demonstrate full capability of the code implementation, we have presented the simulation of laser driven thin Aluminum (Al) foil acceleration. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement

  19. SALE: a simplified ALE computer program for fluid flow at all speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.; Hirt, C.W.

    1980-06-01

    A simplified numerical fluid-dynamics computing technique is presented for calculating two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds. It combines an implicit treatment of the pressure equation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique with the grid rezoning philosophy of the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. As a result, it can handle flow speeds from supersonic to the incompressible limit in a grid that may be moved with the fluid in typical Lagrangian fashion, or held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or moved in some arbitrary way to give a continuous rezoning capability. The report describes the combined (ICEd-ALE) technique in the framework of the SALE (Simplified ALE) computer program, for which a general flow diagram and complete FORTRAN listing are included. A set of sample problems show how to use or modify the basic code for a variety of applications. Numerical listings are provided for a sample problem run with the SALE program.

  20. ALE3D Model Predictions and Materials Characterization for the Cookoff Response of PBXN-109

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Nichols, A L; Wardell, J F; Atwood, A I; Curran, P O

    2002-03-19

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of PBXN-109 (RDX, AI, HTPB, DOA) in support of an effort by the U. S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) to validate computational models. The U.S. Navy is performing benchmark tests for the slow cookoff of PBXN-109 in a sealed tube. Candidate models are being tested using the ALE3D code, which can simulate the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. A void model is employed to represent the air in gaps. ALE3D model 'parameters are specified using measurements of thermal and mechanical properties including thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, and bulk modulus. A standard three-step chemical kinetics model is used during the thermal ramp, and a pressure-dependent burn front model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate of pristine and thermally damaged material are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. Results are given for calculations in which heating, ignition, and explosion are modeled in a single simulation. We compare model results to measurements for the cookoff temperature and tube wall strain.

  1. Hydrodynamic Hunters.

    PubMed

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Al Juboori, Mohammed; Weistuch, Corey; Miller, Nicholas; Nguyen, Tyler; Meyerhoff, Viktoria; McCoy, Bryan; Perkins, Stephanie; Wallgren, Ross; Ray, Bruce D; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Anderson, Gregory G; Pressé, Steve

    2017-03-28

    The Gram-negative Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (BV) is a model bacterial predator that hunts other bacteria and may serve as a living antibiotic. Despite over 50 years since its discovery, it is suggested that BV probably collides into its prey at random. It remains unclear to what degree, if any, BV uses chemical cues to target its prey. The targeted search problem by the predator for its prey in three dimensions is a difficult problem: it requires the predator to sensitively detect prey and forecast its mobile prey's future position on the basis of previously detected signal. Here instead we find that rather than chemically detecting prey, hydrodynamics forces BV into regions high in prey density, thereby improving its odds of a chance collision with prey and ultimately reducing BV's search space for prey. We do so by showing that BV's dynamics are strongly influenced by self-generated hydrodynamic flow fields forcing BV onto surfaces and, for large enough defects on surfaces, forcing BV in orbital motion around these defects. Key experimental controls and calculations recapitulate the hydrodynamic origin of these behaviors. While BV's prey (Escherichia coli) are too small to trap BV in hydrodynamic orbit, the prey are also susceptible to their own hydrodynamic fields, substantially confining them to surfaces and defects where mobile predator and prey density is now dramatically enhanced. Colocalization, driven by hydrodynamics, ultimately reduces BV's search space for prey from three to two dimensions (on surfaces) even down to a single dimension (around defects). We conclude that BV's search for individual prey remains random, as suggested in the literature, but confined, however-by generic hydrodynamic forces-to reduced dimensionality.

  2. An analysis of options available for developing a common laser ray tracing package for Ares and Kull code frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Weeratunga, S K

    2008-11-06

    Ares and Kull are mature code frameworks that support ALE hydrodynamics for a variety of HEDP applications at LLNL, using two widely different meshing approaches. While Ares is based on a 2-D/3-D block-structured mesh data base, Kull is designed to support unstructured, arbitrary polygonal/polyhedral meshes. In addition, both frameworks are capable of running applications on large, distributed-memory parallel machines. Currently, both these frameworks separately support assorted collections of physics packages related to HEDP, including one for the energy deposition by laser/ion-beam ray tracing. This study analyzes the options available for developing a common laser/ion-beam ray tracing package that can be easily shared between these two code frameworks and concludes with a set of recommendations for its development.

  3. An AMR capable finite element diffusion solver for ALE hydrocodes [An AMR capable diffusion solver for ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A. C.; Bailey, D. S.; Kaiser, T. B.; Eder, D. C.; Gunney, B. T. N.; Masters, N. D.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, R. W.

    2015-02-01

    Here, we present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite AMR mesh. This approach is suitable for including diffusion based physics modules to hydrocodes that support ALE and AMR capabilities. To illustrate, we proffer our implementations of diffusion based radiation transport and heat conduction in a hydrocode called ALE-AMR. Numerical experiments conducted with the diffusion solver and associated physics packages yield 2nd order convergence in the L2 norm.

  4. Quantum cohomology and quantum hydrodynamics from supersymmetric quiver gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Sciarappa, Antonio; Tanzini, Alessandro; Vasko, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We study the connection between N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories, quantum cohomology and quantum integrable systems of hydrodynamic type. We consider gauge theories on ALE spaces of A and D-type and discuss how they describe the quantum cohomology of the corresponding Nakajima's quiver varieties. We also discuss how the exact evaluation of local BPS observables in the gauge theory can be used to calculate the spectrum of quantum Hamiltonians of spin Calogero integrable systems and spin Intermediate Long Wave hydrodynamics. This is explicitly obtained by a Bethe Ansatz Equation provided by the quiver gauge theory in terms of its adjacency matrix.

  5. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  6. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  7. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  8. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Instead of computing a large number of coarsely zoned hydrodynamic models covering the entire atmospheric instability strip, the author computed a single model as well as computer limitations allow. The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks was modified to include radiative transfer effects in optically thin zones.

  9. Quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Kobayashi, Michikazu; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum hydrodynamics in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) has been recently one of the most important topics in low temperature physics. In these systems, a macroscopic wave function (order parameter) appears because of Bose-Einstein condensation, which creates quantized vortices. Turbulence consisting of quantized vortices is called quantum turbulence (QT). The study of quantized vortices and QT has increased in intensity for two reasons. The first is that recent studies of QT are considerably advanced over older studies, which were chiefly limited to thermal counterflow in 4He, which has no analog with classical traditional turbulence, whereas new studies on QT are focused on a comparison between QT and classical turbulence. The second reason is the realization of atomic BECs in 1995, for which modern optical techniques enable the direct control and visualization of the condensate and can even change the interaction; such direct control is impossible in other quantum condensates like superfluid helium and superconductors. Our group has made many important theoretical and numerical contributions to the field of quantum hydrodynamics of both superfluid helium and atomic BECs. In this article, we review some of the important topics in detail. The topics of quantum hydrodynamics are diverse, so we have not attempted to cover all these topics in this article. We also ensure that the scope of this article does not overlap with our recent review article (arXiv:1004.5458), “Quantized vortices in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates”, and other review articles.

  10. ALE3D Model Predictions and Experimental Analysis of the Cookoff Response of Comp B*

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; McClelland, M A; Wardell, J F; Reaugh, J E; Nichols, A L; Tran, T D

    2003-11-24

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of Comp B (RDX,TNT) in a Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX). Candidate models and numerical strategies are being tested using the ALE3D code which simulates the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The mechanical behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the equation of state of the solid and gas species, respectively. A gamma-law model is employed for the air in gaps, and a mixed material model is used for the interface between air and explosive. A three-step chemical kinetics model is used for each of the RDX and TNT reaction sequences during the heating and ignition phases, and a pressure-dependent deflagration model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. We compare model predictions to measurements for temperature fields, ignition temperature, and tube wall strain during the heating, ignition, and explosive phases.

  11. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the

  12. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  13. Detection of multiple sinusoids using a parallel ale

    SciTech Connect

    David, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper introduces an Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE) whose parallel structure enables the detection and enhancement of multiple sinusoids. A function describing the performance surface is derived for the case where several line signals are buried in white noise. A steepest descent adaptive algorithm is derived, and simulations are used to demonstrate its performance.

  14. Hydrodynamic supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Genty, G; Dudley, J M; Akhmediev, N

    2013-08-02

    We report the experimental observation of multi-bound-soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) in the context of hydrodynamic surface gravity waves. Higher-order N-soliton solutions with N=2, 3 are studied in detail and shown to be associated with self-focusing in the wave group dynamics and the generation of a steep localized carrier wave underneath the group envelope. We also show that for larger input soliton numbers, the wave group experiences irreversible spectral broadening, which we refer to as a hydrodynamic supercontinuum by analogy with optics. This process is shown to be associated with the fission of the initial multisoliton into individual fundamental solitons due to higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS. Numerical simulations using an extended NLS model described by the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation, show excellent agreement with experiment and highlight the universal role that higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS play in supercontinuum generation.

  15. Second order multidimensional sign-preserving remapping for ALE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Ryan N; Szmelter, J.

    2010-12-15

    A second-order conservative sign-preserving remapping scheme for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods is developed utilising concepts of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The algorithm is inherently multidimensional, and so does not introduce splitting errors. The remapping is implemented in a two-dimensional, finite element ALE solver employing staggered quadrilateral meshes. The MPDATA remapping uses a finite volume discretization developed for volume coordinates. It is applied for the remapping of density and internal energy arranged as cell centered, and velocity as nodal, dependent variables. In the paper, the advection of scalar fields is examined first for test cases with prescribed mesh movement. A direct comparison of MPDATA with the performance of the van Leer MUSCL scheme indicates advantages of a multidimensional approach. Furthermore, distinctly different performance between basic MPDATA and the infinite gauge option is illustrated using benchmarks involving transport of a sign changing velocity field. Further development extends the application of MPDATA remapping to the full ALE solver with a staggered mesh arrangement for density, internal energy and momentum using volume coordinates. At present, two options of the algorithm - basic and infinite gauge - are implemented. To ensure a meaningful assessment, an identical Lagrangian solver and computational mesh update routines are used with either MPDATA or van Leer MUSCL remapping. The evaluation places particular focus on the abilities of both schemes to accurately model multidimensional problems. Theoretical considerations are supported with numerical examples. In addition to the prescribed mesh movement cases for advection of scalars, the demonstrations include two-dimensional Eulerian and ALE flow simulations on quadrilateral meshes with both fixed and variable timestep control. The key comparisons include the standard test cases of Sod and Noh

  16. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  17. ALE shock calculations using a stabilized serendipity rezoning scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Budge, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    A rezone stencil for ALE shock calculations has been developed based on a stabilized variant of the serendipity element. This rezone stencil is compared to the Winslow rezone stencil. Unlike the Winslow stencil, which equalizes element volumes as well as node angles, the serendipity stencil equalizes node angles only. This may be advantageous for calculations involving strong density gradients such as those associated with shock compression. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Grid adaptation and remapping for arbitrary lagrangian eulerian (ALE) methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Methods to include automatic grid adaptation tools within the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method are described. Two main developments will be described. First, a new grid adaptation approach is described, based on an automatic and accurate estimate of the local truncation error. Second, a new method to remap the information between two grids is presented, based on the MPDATA approach. The Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method solves hyperbolic equations by splitting the operators is two phases. First, in the Lagrangian phase, the equations under consideration are written in a Lagrangian frame and are discretized. In this phase, the grid moves with the solution, the velocity of each node being the local fluid velocity. Second, in the Eulerian phase, a new grid is generated and the information is transferred to the new grid. The advantage of considering this second step is the possibility of avoiding mesh distortion and tangling typical of pure Lagrangian methods. The second phase of the ALE method is the primary topic of the present communication. In the Eulerian phase two tasks need to be completed. First, a new grid need to be created (we will refer to this task as rezoning). Second, the information is transferred from the grid available at the end of the Lagrangian phase to the new grid (we will refer to this task as remapping). New techniques are presented for the two tasks of the Eulerian phase: rezoning and remapping.

  19. Chromatin hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Rabin, Yitzhak; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2014-05-06

    Following recent observations of large scale correlated motion of chromatin inside the nuclei of live differentiated cells, we present a hydrodynamic theory-the two-fluid model-in which the content of a nucleus is described as a chromatin solution with the nucleoplasm playing the role of the solvent and the chromatin fiber that of a solute. This system is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active scalar and vector events that are associated with free energy consumption, such as ATP hydrolysis. Scalar events drive the longitudinal viscoelastic modes (where the chromatin fiber moves relative to the solvent) while vector events generate the transverse modes (where the chromatin fiber moves together with the solvent). Using linear response methods, we derive explicit expressions for the response functions that connect the chromatin density and velocity correlation functions to the corresponding correlation functions of the active sources and the complex viscoelastic moduli of the chromatin solution. We then derive general expressions for the flow spectral density of the chromatin velocity field. We use the theory to analyze experimental results recently obtained by one of the present authors and her co-workers. We find that the time dependence of the experimental data for both native and ATP-depleted chromatin can be well-fitted using a simple model-the Maxwell fluid-for the complex modulus, although there is some discrepancy in terms of the wavevector dependence. Thermal fluctuations of ATP-depleted cells are predominantly longitudinal. ATP-active cells exhibit intense transverse long wavelength velocity fluctuations driven by force dipoles. Fluctuations with wavenumbers larger than a few inverse microns are dominated by concentration fluctuations with the same spectrum as thermal fluctuations but with increased intensity.

  20. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Description of Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K.

    2012-06-15

    The quantum hydrodynamic approach is based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting fluid-like equations of motion describe the flow of probability and an accurate solution to these equations is equivalent to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic approach provides new insight into the mechanisms as well as an alternative computational approach for treating tunneling phenomena. New concepts include well-defined 'quantum trajectories', 'quantum potential', and 'quantum force' all of which have classical analogues. The quantum potential and its associated force give rise to all quantum mechanical effects such as zero point energy, tunneling, and interference. A new numerical approach called the Iterative Finite Difference Method (IFDM) will be discussed. The IFDM is used to solve the set of non-linear coupled hydrodynamic equations. It is 2nd-order accurate in both space and time and exhibits exponential convergence with respect to the iteration count. The stability and computational efficiency of the IFDM is significantly improved by using a 'smart' Eulerian grid which has the same computational advantages as a Lagrangian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) grid. The IFDM is also capable of treating anharmonic potentials. Example calculations using the IFDM will be presented which include: a one-dimensional Gaussian wave packet tunneling through an Eckart barrier, a one-dimensional bound-state Morse oscillator, and a two-dimensional (2D) model collinear reaction using an anharmonic potential energy surface. Approximate treatments of the quantum hydrodynamic equations will also be discussed which could allow scaling of the calculations to hundreds of degrees of freedom which is important for treating tunneling phenomena in condensed phase systems.

  1. Biotransformation of hop aroma terpenoids by ale and lager yeasts.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew J; Dickinson, J Richard

    2003-03-01

    Terpenoids are important natural flavour compounds, which are introduced to beer via hopping. It has been shown recently that yeasts are able to biotransform some monoterpene alcohols. As a first step towards examining whether yeasts are capable of altering hop terpenoids during the brewing of beer, we investigated whether they were transformed when an ale and lager yeast were cultured in the presence of a commercially available syrup. Both yeasts transformed the monoterpene alcohols geraniol and linalool. The lager yeast also produced acetate esters of geraniol and citronellol. The major terpenoids of hop oil, however, were not biotransformed. Oxygenated terpenoids persisted much longer than the alkenes.

  2. Modeling thermally driven energetic response of high explosives in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C.; McCallen, R.C.; Neely, R.; Nichols, A.L. III; Sharp, R.

    1998-10-01

    The authors have improved their ability to model the response of energetic materials to thermal stimuli and the processes involved in the energetic response. Traditionally, the analyses of energetic materials have involved coupled thermal transport/chemical reaction codes. This provides only a reasonable estimate of the time and location of ensuing rapid reaction. To predict the violence of the reaction, the mechanical motion must be included in the wide range of time scales associated with the thermal hazard. The ALE3D code has been modified to assess the hazards associated with heating energetic materials in weapons by coupling to thermal transport model and chemistry models. They have developed an implicit time step option to efficiently and accurately compute the hours of heating to reaction of the energetic material. Since, on these longer time scales materials can be expected to have significant motion, it is even more important to provide high-order advection for all components, including the chemical species. They show two examples of coupled thermal/mechanical/chemical models of energetic materials in thermal environments.

  3. Advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end products (AGEs and ALEs): an overview of their mechanisms of formation.

    PubMed

    Vistoli, G; De Maddis, D; Cipak, A; Zarkovic, N; Carini, M; Aldini, G

    2013-08-01

    Advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pathogenetic role in the development and progression of different oxidative-based diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis, and neurological disorders. AGEs and ALEs represent a quite complex class of compounds that are formed by different mechanisms, by heterogeneous precursors and that can be formed either exogenously or endogenously. There is a wide interest in AGEs and ALEs involving different aspects of research which are essentially focused on set-up and application of analytical strategies (1) to identify, characterize, and quantify AGEs and ALEs in different pathophysiological conditions; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of their biological effects; and (3) to discover compounds able to inhibit AGEs/ALEs damaging effects not only as biological tools aimed at validating AGEs/ALEs as drug target, but also as promising drugs. All the above-mentioned research stages require a clear picture of the chemical formation of AGEs/ALEs but this is not simple, due to the complex and heterogeneous pathways, involving different precursors and mechanisms. In view of this intricate scenario, the aim of the present review is to group the main AGEs and ALEs and to describe, for each of them, the precursors and mechanisms of formation.

  4. The temperature dependence of maltose transport in ale and lager strains of brewer's yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vidgren, Virve; Multanen, Jyri-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura; Londesborough, John

    2010-01-01

    Lager beers are traditionally made at lower temperatures (6–14 °C) than ales (15–25 °C). At low temperatures, lager strains (Saccharomyces pastorianus) ferment faster than ale strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Two lager and two ale strains had similar maltose transport activities at 20 °C, but at 0 °C the lager strains had fivefold greater activity. AGT1, MTT1 and MALx1 are major maltose transporter genes. In nine tested lager strains, the AGT1 genes contained premature stop codons. None of five tested ale strains had this defect. All tested lager strains, but no ale strain, contained MTT1 genes. When functional AGT1 from an ale strain was expressed in a lager strain, the resultant maltose transport activity had the high temperature dependence characteristic of ale yeasts. Lager yeast MTT1 and MALx1 genes were expressed in a maltose-negative laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae. The resultant Mtt1 transport activity had low temperature dependence and the Malx1 activity had high temperature dependence. Faster fermentation at low temperature by lager strains than ale strains may result from their different maltose transporters. The loss of Agt1 transporters during the evolution of lager strains may have provided plasma membrane space for the Mtt1 transporters that perform better at a low temperature. PMID:20402791

  5. Developing an Argument Learning Environment Using Agent-Based ITS (ALES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, Safia; Sawamura, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an agent-based educational environment to teach argument analysis (ALES). The idea is based on the Argumentation Interchange Format Ontology (AIF)using "Walton Theory". ALES uses different mining techniques to manage a highly structured arguments repertoire. This repertoire was designed, developed and implemented by us. Our aim…

  6. The temperature dependence of maltose transport in ale and lager strains of brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Multanen, Jyri-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura; Londesborough, John

    2010-06-01

    Lager beers are traditionally made at lower temperatures (6-14 degrees C) than ales (15-25 degrees C). At low temperatures, lager strains (Saccharomyces pastorianus) ferment faster than ale strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Two lager and two ale strains had similar maltose transport activities at 20 degrees C, but at 0 degrees C the lager strains had fivefold greater activity. AGT1, MTT1 and MALx1 are major maltose transporter genes. In nine tested lager strains, the AGT1 genes contained premature stop codons. None of five tested ale strains had this defect. All tested lager strains, but no ale strain, contained MTT1 genes. When functional AGT1 from an ale strain was expressed in a lager strain, the resultant maltose transport activity had the high temperature dependence characteristic of ale yeasts. Lager yeast MTT1 and MALx1 genes were expressed in a maltose-negative laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae. The resultant Mtt1 transport activity had low temperature dependence and the Malx1 activity had high temperature dependence. Faster fermentation at low temperature by lager strains than ale strains may result from their different maltose transporters. The loss of Agt1 transporters during the evolution of lager strains may have provided plasma membrane space for the Mtt1 transporters that perform better at a low temperature.

  7. Analysing Interlanguage Stages ALEs Pass through in the Acquisition of the Simple Past Tense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourssi, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Building on previous studies of cross-linguistic influence (CLI) on SLA, and principled criteria for confirming its existence in L2 data, an empirical study was run on 74 Arab learners of English (ALEs). A detailed analysis was made of interlanguage stages of the simple past tense forms in 222 written texts produced by ALEs in the classroom…

  8. Deposition of CdSe by EC-ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Mkhulu K.; Cox, Stephen M.; Flowers, Billy H.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Pham, Long; Srisook, Nattapong; Happek, Uwe; Stickney, John L.

    2004-10-01

    The optimization of a program for CdSe thin film deposition using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE uses surface limited reactions, underpotential deposition, to form compound thin film deposits one atomic layer at a time on Au substrates. Cyclic voltammograms showing deposition of Cd and Se on the Au substrate were first performed to identify cycle potentials. CdSe thin films were formed using an automated flow deposition system, by alternately depositing Se and Cd atomic layers, forming a compound monolayer each cycle. In total, 200 cycle deposits were formed using a series of different potentials, to better optimize the deposition conditions. Electron probe microanalysis of the deposits showed Cd/Se ratio between 1.01 and 1.13. X-ray diffraction indicated the deposits were zinc blende, with a (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The thickness of the deposits were determined using ellipsometry, and found to be around 70 nm. AFM studies of the morphology of substrates and deposits indicated that conformal films were formed. The band gaps of the deposits was determined using UV-VIS absorption measurements, photoconductivity and reflection adsorption FTIR, and all suggested a value of 1.74 eV, consistent with literature values.

  9. ALE-Phase-field simulations of floating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Pengtao

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we will present a hybrid Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian(ALE)-Phase-Field method for the direct numerical simulation of multiphase flows where fluid interfaces, moving rigid particles, and moving contact lines coexist. Practical applications include Pickering emulsions, froth flotation, and biolocomotion at fluid interface. An ALE algorithm based on the finite element method and an adaptive moving mesh is used to track the moving boundaries of rigid particles. A phase-field method based on the same moving mesh is used to capture the fluid interfaces; meanwhile, the Cahn-Hilliard diffusion automatically takes care of the stress singularity at the moving contact line when a fluid interface intersects a solid surface. To fully resolve the diffuse interface, mesh is locally refined at the fluid interface. All the governing equations, i.e., equations for fluids, interfaces, and particles, are solved implicitly in a unified variational framework. In the end we will present some recent results on the water entry problem and the capillary interaction between floating particles (a.k.a. the Cheerios effect), with a focus on the effect of contact-line dynamics.

  10. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  11. Testing hydrodynamics schemes in galaxy disc simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, C. G.; Dobbs, C.; Pettitt, A.; Konstandin, L.

    2016-08-01

    We examine how three fundamentally different numerical hydrodynamics codes follow the evolution of an isothermal galactic disc with an external spiral potential. We compare an adaptive mesh refinement code (RAMSES), a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHNG), and a volume-discretized mesh-less code (GIZMO). Using standard refinement criteria, we find that RAMSES produces a disc that is less vertically concentrated and does not reach such high densities as the SPHNG or GIZMO runs. The gas surface density in the spiral arms increases at a lower rate for the RAMSES simulations compared to the other codes. There is also a greater degree of substructure in the SPHNG and GIZMO runs and secondary spiral arms are more pronounced. By resolving the Jeans length with a greater number of grid cells, we achieve more similar results to the Lagrangian codes used in this study. Other alterations to the refinement scheme (adding extra levels of refinement and refining based on local density gradients) are less successful in reducing the disparity between RAMSES and SPHNG/GIZMO. Although more similar, SPHNG displays different density distributions and vertical mass profiles to all modes of GIZMO (including the smoothed particle hydrodynamics version). This suggests differences also arise which are not intrinsic to the particular method but rather due to its implementation. The discrepancies between codes (in particular, the densities reached in the spiral arms) could potentially result in differences in the locations and time-scales for gravitational collapse, and therefore impact star formation activity in more complex galaxy disc simulations.

  12. Calibration of 3D ALE finite element model from experiments on friction stir welding of lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourment, Lionel; Gastebois, Sabrina; Dubourg, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    In order to support the design of such a complex process like Friction Stir Welding (FSW) for the aeronautic industry, numerical simulation software requires (1) developing an efficient and accurate Finite Element (F.E.) formulation that allows predicting welding defects, (2) properly modeling the thermo-mechanical complexity of the FSW process and (3) calibrating the F.E. model from accurate measurements from FSW experiments. This work uses a parallel ALE formulation developed in the Forge® F.E. code to model the different possible defects (flashes and worm holes), while pin and shoulder threads are modeled by a new friction law at the tool / material interface. FSW experiments require using a complex tool with scroll on shoulder, which is instrumented for providing sensitive thermal data close to the joint. Calibration of unknown material thermal coefficients, constitutive equations parameters and friction model from measured forces, torques and temperatures is carried out using two F.E. models, Eulerian and ALE, to reach a satisfactory agreement assessed by the proper sensitivity of the simulation to process parameters.

  13. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  14. A Cell-Centered Multiphase ALE Scheme With Structural Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Timothy Alan

    2012-04-16

    A novel computational scheme has been developed for simulating compressible multiphase flows interacting with solid structures. The multiphase fluid is computed using a Godunov-type finite-volume method. This has been extended to allow computations on moving meshes using a direct arbitrary-Eulerian- Lagrangian (ALE) scheme. The method has been implemented within a Lagrangian hydrocode, which allows modeling the interaction with Lagrangian structural regions. Although the above scheme is general enough for use on many applications, the ultimate goal of the research is the simulation of heterogeneous energetic material, such as explosives or propellants. The method is powerful enough for application to all stages of the problem, including the initial burning of the material, the propagation of blast waves, and interaction with surrounding structures. The method has been tested on a number of canonical multiphase tests as well as fluid-structure interaction problems.

  15. The Montana ALE (Autonomous Lunar Excavator) Systems Engineering Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    On May 2 1-26, 20 12, the third annual NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition will be held at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This event brings together student teams from universities around the world to compete in an engineering challenge. Each team must design, build and operate a robotic excavator that can collect artificial lunar soil and deposit it at a target location. Montana State University, Bozeman, is one of the institutions selected to field a team this year. This paper will summarize the goals of MSU's lunar excavator project, known as the Autonomous Lunar Explorer (ALE), along with the engineering process that the MSU team is using to fulfill these goals, according to NASA's systems engineering guidelines.

  16. Astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2009-04-01

    The paper presents a detailed review of the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with particular focus on its astrophysical applications. We start by introducing the basic ideas and concepts and thereby outline all ingredients that are necessary for a practical implementation of the method in a working SPH code. Much of SPH's success relies on its excellent conservation properties and therefore the numerical conservation of physical invariants receives much attention throughout this review. The self-consistent derivation of the SPH equations from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid is the common theme of the remainder of the text. We derive a modern, Newtonian SPH formulation from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid. It accounts for changes of the local resolution lengths which result in corrective, so-called "grad-h-terms". We extend this strategy to special relativity for which we derive the corresponding grad-h equation set. The variational approach is further applied to a general-relativistic fluid evolving in a fixed, curved background space-time. Particular care is taken to explicitly derive all relevant equations in a coherent way.

  17. Hierarchical material models for fragmentation modeling in NIF-ALE-AMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. C.; Masters, N. D.; Dixit, P.; Benson, D. J.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, R. W.; Gunney, B. T. N.; Wang, P.; Becker, R.

    2008-05-01

    Fragmentation is a fundamental process that naturally spans micro to macroscopic scales. Recent advances in algorithms, computer simulations, and hardware enable us to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes in a real simulation through a heterogeneous multiscale mathematical model. We apply this model to the problem of predicting how targets in the NIF chamber dismantle, so that optics and diagnostics can be protected from damage. The mechanics of the initial material fracture depend on the microscopic grain structure. In order to effectively simulate the fragmentation, this process must be modeled at the subgrain level with computationally expensive crystal plasticity models. However, there are not enough computational resources to model the entire NIF target at this microscopic scale. In order to accomplish these calculations, a hierarchical material model (HMM) is being developed. The HMM will allow fine-scale modeling of the initial fragmentation using computationally expensive crystal plasticity, while the elements at the mesoscale can use polycrystal models, and the macroscopic elements use analytical flow stress models. The HMM framework is built upon an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability. We present progress in implementing the HMM in the NIF-ALE-AMR code. Additionally, we present test simulations relevant to NIF targets.

  18. HYDRODYNAMIC COMPRESSIVE FORGING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDRODYNAMICS), (*FORGING, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, LUBRICANTS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), DIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , STRAIN...MECHANICS), BERYLLIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , CASTING ALLOYS , PRESSURE, FAILURE(MECHANICS).

  19. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Remington, B A; Arnett, D; Fryxell, B A; Drake, R P

    1998-11-10

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, they are attempting to rigorously scale the physics of the laboratory in supernova. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to hydrodynamics on the SN-size scales is presented and requirements established. Initial results were reported in [1]. Next the appropriate conditions are generated on the NOVA laser. 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates is generated. This scales the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D vs. 3D difference in growth at the He-H interface of Sn 1987A.

  20. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiment on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Castor, J.; Rubenchik, A.; Berning, M.

    1996-02-12

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. On quite a separate front, the detrimental effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has long been known. Tools from both areas are being tested on a common project. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using hydrodynamics codes at the Laboratory, and astrophysical codes successfully used to model the hydrodynamics of supernovae. A two-layer package composed of Cu and CH{sub 2} with a single mode sinusoidal 1D perturbation at the interface, shocked by indirect laser drive from the Cu side of the package, produced significant Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in the nonlinear regime. The scale and gross structure of the growth was successfully modeled, by mapping an early-time simulation done with 1D HYADES, a radiation transport code, into 2D CALE, a LLNL hydrodynamics code. The HYADES result was also mapped in 2D into the supernova code PROMETHEUS, which was also able to reproduce the scale and gross structure of the growth.

  1. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiment on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Castor, J.; Rubenchik, A.

    1996-02-01

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. On quite a separate front, the detrimental effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has long been known. Tools from both areas are being tested on a common project. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using hydrodynamics codes at the Laboratory, and astrophysical codes successfully used to model the hydrodynamics of supernovae. A two-layer package composed of Cu and CH2 with a single mode sinusoidal 1D perturbation at the interface, shocked by indirect laser drive from the Cu side of the package, produced significant Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in the nonlinear regime. The scale and gross structure of the growth was successfully modeled, by mapping an early-time simulation done with 1D HYADES, a radiation transport code, into 2D CALE, a LLNL hydrodynamics code. The HYADES result was also mapped in 2D into the supernova code PROMETHEUS, which was also able to reproduce the scale and gross structure of the growth.

  2. Field temperature measurements at Erta'Ale Lava Lake, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, Pierre-Yves; Caillet, Marc; Haefeli, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The shield volcano Erta'Ale, situated in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia, is known for its active lava lake. In February 2001, our team visited this lake, located inside an 80-m-deep pit, to perform field temperature measurements. The distribution and variation of temperature inside the lake were obtained on the basis of infrared radiation measurements performed from the rim of the pit and from the lake shores. The crust temperature was also determined from the lake shores with a thermocouple to calibrate the pyrometer. We estimated an emissivity of the basalt of 0.74 from this experiment. Through the application of the Stefan-Boltzmann law, we then obtained an estimate of the total radiative heat flux, constrained by pyrometer measurements of the pit, and visual observations of the lake activity. Taking into account the atmospheric convective heat flux, the convected magma mass flux needed to balance the energy budget was subsequently derived and found to represent between 510 and 580 kg s-1. The surface circulation of this mass flux was also analyzed through motion processing techniques applied to video images of the lake. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00445-002-0224-3.

  3. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; Charest, Marc R.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved at the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.

  4. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; ...

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved atmore » the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.« less

  5. Circumstellar Hydrodynamics and Spectral Radiation in ALGOLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Dirk Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Algols are the remnants of binary systems that have undergone large scale mass transfer. This dissertation presents the results of the coupling of a hydrodynamical model and a radiative model of the flow of gas from the inner Lagrangian point. The hydrodynamical model is a fully Lagrangian, three-dimensional scheme with a novel treatment of viscosity and an implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method to compute pressure gradients. Viscosity is implemented by allowing particles within a specified interaction length to share momentum. The hydrodynamical model includes a provision for computing the self-gravity of the disk material, although it is not used in the present application to Algols. Hydrogen line profiles and equivalent widths computed with a code by Drake and Ulrich are compared with observations of both short and long period Algols. More sophisticated radiative transfer computations are done with the escape probability code of Ko and Kallman which includes the spectral lines of thirteen elements. The locations and velocities of the gas particles, and the viscous heating from the hydro program are supplied to the radiative transfer program, which computes the equilibrium temperature of the gas and generates its emission spectrum. Intrinsic line profiles are assumed to be delta functions and are properly Doppler shifted and summed for gas particles that are not eclipsed by either star. Polarization curves are computed by combining the hydro program with the Wilson-Liou polarization program. Although the results are preliminary, they show that polarization observations show great promise for studying circumstellar matter.

  6. Calculation of Chemical Detonation Waves With Hydrodynamics and Thermochemical Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Souers, P C; Vitello, P A

    2001-08-01

    We model detonation waves for solid explosives, using 2-D Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics, with an equation of state (EOS) based on thermochemical equilibrium, coupled with simple kinetic rate laws for a few reactants. The EOS for the product species is based on either a BKWC EOS or on an exponential-6 potential model, whose parameters are fitted to a wide range of shock Hugoniot and static compression data. We show some results for the non ideal explosive, urea nitrate. Such a model is a powerful tool for studying such processes as initiation, detonation wave propagation and detonation wave propagation as a function of cylindrical radius.

  7. Staggered grid lagrangian method with local structured adaptive mesh refinement for modeling shock hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliot, N S

    2000-09-26

    A new method for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations has been developed. The method combines staggered grid Lagrangian techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This method is a precursor to a more general adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE-AMR) algorithm under development, which will facilitate the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a Lagrange step, which is the focus of the work described here. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. These new algorithmic components are first developed in one dimension and are then generalized to two dimensions. Solutions of several model problems involving shock hydrodynamics are presented and discussed.

  8. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  9. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Rubenchik, A.; Drake, R. P.; Fryxell, B. A.; Muller, E.

    1997-12-01

    The critical roles of hydrodynamic instabilities in SN 1987A and in ICF are well known; 2D-3D differences are important in both areas. In a continuing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using LLNL hydro codes, and astrophysics codes used to model supernovae. Initial investigations with two-layer planar packages having 2D sinusoidal interface perturbations are described in Ap.J. 478, L75 (1997). Early-time simulations done with the LLNL 1D radiation transport code HYADES are mapped into the 2D LLNL code CALE and into the multi-D supernova code PROMETHEUS. Work is underway on experiments comparing interface instability growth produced by 2D sinusoidal versus 3D cross-hatch and axisymmetric cylindrical perturbations. Results of the simulations will be presented and compared with experiment. Implications for interpreting supernova observations and for supernova modelling will be discussed. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  10. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J. O.

    1999-06-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al., Astrophys. J.478, L75 (1997) The Nova laser is used to shock two-layer targets, producing Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the interfaces between the layers, analogous to instabilities seen at the interfaces of SN 1987A. Because the hydrodynamics in the laser experiments at intermediate times (3-40 ns) and in SN 1987A at intermediate times (5 s-104 s) are well described by the Euler equations, the hydrodynamics scale between the two regimes. The experiments are modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS, thus serving as a benchmark for PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike and bubble velocities in the experiment using potential flow theory and a modified Ott thin shell theory is presented. A numerical study of 2D vs. 3D differences in instability growth at the O-He and He-H interface of SN 1987A, and the design for analogous laser experiments are presented. We discuss further work to incorporate more features of the SN in the experiments, including spherical geometry, multiple layers and density gradients. Past and ongoing work in laboratory and laser astrophysics is reviewed, including experimental work on supernova remnants (SNRs). A numerical study of RM instability in SNRs is presented.

  11. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R.P.; Fryxell, B.A.; Teyssier, R.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane {ital et al.} [Astrophys. J. {bold 478}, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 4}, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer{endash}Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. {bold 51}, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, {ital Numerical Astrophysics} (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482{endash}497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. {bold 54}, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  12. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R. P.; Fryxell, B. A.; Teyssier, R.; Moore, K.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al. [Astrophys. J. 478, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few ×103 s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. 51, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, Numerical Astrophysics (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482-497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. 54, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  13. Resurgence in extended hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Inês; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been understood that the hydrodynamic series generated by the Müller-Israel-Stewart theory is divergent and that this large-order behavior is consistent with the theory of resurgence. Furthermore, it was observed that the physical origin of this is the presence of a purely damped nonhydrodynamic mode. It is very interesting to ask whether this picture persists in cases where the spectrum of nonhydrodynamic modes is richer. We take the first step in this direction by considering the simplest hydrodynamic theory which, instead of the purely damped mode, contains a pair of nonhydrodynamic modes of complex conjugate frequencies. This mimics the pattern of black brane quasinormal modes which appear on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT description of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. We find that the resulting hydrodynamic series is divergent in a way consistent with resurgence and precisely encodes information about the nonhydrodynamic modes of the theory.

  14. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25361168

  15. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production.

  16. First light with ALES: A 2-5 micron adaptive optics Integral Field Spectrograph for the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip; Montoya, Manny; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Leisenring, Jarron; Durney, Oli; Woodward, Charles E.; Wilson, John; Nelson, Matt; Bailey, Vanessa; Defrere, Denis; Stone, Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Integral field spectrographs are an important technology for exoplanet imaging, due to their ability to take spectra in a high-contrast environment, and improve planet detection sensitivity through spectral differential imaging. ALES is the first integral field spectrograph capable of imaging exoplanets from 3-5 μm, and will extend our ability to characterize self-luminous exoplanets into a wavelength range where they peak in brightness. ALES is installed inside LBTI/LMIRcam on the Large Binocular Telescope, taking advantage of existing AO systems, camera optics, and a HAWAII-2RG detector. The new optics that comprise ALES are a Keplerian magnifier, a silicon lenslet array with diffraction suppressing pinholes, a direct vision prism, and calibration optics. All of these components are installed in filter wheels making ALES a completely modular design. ALES saw first light at the LBT in June 2015.

  17. Simple Waves in Ideal Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M

    2008-09-03

    In the dynamic diffusion limit of radiation hydrodynamics, advection dominates diffusion; the latter primarily affects small scales and has negligible impact on the large scale flow. The radiation can thus be accurately regarded as an ideal fluid, i.e., radiative diffusion can be neglected along with other forms of dissipation. This viewpoint is applied here to an analysis of simple waves in an ideal radiating fluid. It is shown that much of the hydrodynamic analysis carries over by simply replacing the material sound speed, pressure and index with the values appropriate for a radiating fluid. A complete analysis is performed for a centered rarefaction wave, and expressions are provided for the Riemann invariants and characteristic curves of the one-dimensional system of equations. The analytical solution is checked for consistency against a finite difference numerical integration, and the validity of neglecting the diffusion operator is demonstrated. An interesting physical result is that for a material component with a large number of internal degrees of freedom and an internal energy greater than that of the radiation, the sound speed increases as the fluid is rarefied. These solutions are an excellent test for radiation hydrodynamic codes operating in the dynamic diffusion regime. The general approach may be useful in the development of Godunov numerical schemes for radiation hydrodynamics.

  18. Hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocák, Miroslav; Müller, Ewald; Weiss, Achim; Kifonidis, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    We desribe and discuss hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash using an initial model of a 1.25 M⊙ star with a metallicity of 0.02 near at its peak. Past research concerned with the dynamics of the core helium flash is inconclusive. Its results range from a confirmation of the standard picture, where the star remains in hydrostatic equilibrium during the flash (Deupree 1996), to a disruption or a significant mass loss of the star (Edwards 1969; Cole & Deupree 1980). However, the most recent multidimensional hydrodynamic study (Dearborn et al. 2006) suggests a quiescent behavior of the core helium flash and seems to rule out an explosive scenario. Here we present partial results of a new comprehensive study of the core helium flash, which seem to confirm this qualitative behavior and give a better insight into operation of the convection zone powered by helium burning during the flash. The hydrodynamic evolution is followed on a computational grid in spherical coordinates using our new version of the multi-dimensional hydrodynamic code HERAKLES, which is based on a direct Eulerian implementation of the piecewise parabolic method.

  19. Skew resisting hydrodynamic seal

    DOEpatents

    Conroy, William T.; Dietle, Lannie L.; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.

    2001-01-01

    A novel hydrodynamically lubricated compression type rotary seal that is suitable for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion. Particularly, the seal geometry ensures constraint of a hydrodynamic seal in a manner preventing skew-induced wear and provides adequate room within the seal gland to accommodate thermal expansion. The seal accommodates large as-manufactured variations in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the sealing material, provides a relatively stiff integral spring effect to minimize pressure-induced shuttling of the seal within the gland, and also maintains interfacial contact pressure within the dynamic sealing interface in an optimum range for efficient hydrodynamic lubrication and environment exclusion. The seal geometry also provides for complete support about the circumference of the seal to receive environmental pressure, as compared the interrupted character of seal support set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,873,576 and 6,036,192 and provides a hydrodynamic seal which is suitable for use with non-Newtonian lubricants.

  20. Extended ALE Method for fluid-structure interaction problems with large structural displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basting, Steffen; Quaini, Annalisa; Čanić, Sunčica; Glowinski, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Standard Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods for the simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems fail due to excessive mesh deformations when the structural displacement is large. We propose a method that successfully deals with this problem, keeping the same mesh connectivity while enforcing mesh alignment with the structure. The proposed Extended ALE Method relies on a variational mesh optimization technique, where mesh alignment with the structure is achieved via a constraint. This gives rise to a constrained optimization problem for mesh optimization, which is solved whenever the mesh quality deteriorates. The performance of the proposed Extended ALE Method is demonstrated on a series of numerical examples involving 2D FSI problems with large displacements. Two-way coupling between the fluid and structure is considered in all the examples. The FSI problems are solved using either a Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm, or a Robin-Neumann algorithm. The Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm is enhanced by an adaptive relaxation procedure based on Aitken's acceleration. We show that the proposed method has excellent performance in problems with large displacements, and that it agrees well with a standard ALE method in problems with mild displacement.

  1. Computational brittle fracture using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPBM. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPBM. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we have simulated a number of experiments. We discuss three of these simulations in this paper. The first experiment consists of a brittle steel sphere impacting a plate. The experimental sphere fragment patterns are compared to the calculations. The second experiment is a steel flyer plate in which the recovered steel target crack patterns are compared to the calculated crack patterns. We also briefly describe a simulation of a tungsten rod impacting a heavily confined alumina target, which has been recently reported on in detail.

  2. SPHGR: Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    SPHGR (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction) is a python based open-source framework for analyzing smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations. Its basic form can run a baryonic group finder to identify galaxies and a halo finder to identify dark matter halos; it can also assign said galaxies to their respective halos, calculate halo & galaxy global properties, and iterate through previous time steps to identify the most-massive progenitors of each halo and galaxy. Data about each individual halo and galaxy is collated and easy to access. SPHGR supports a wide range of simulations types including N-body, full cosmological volumes, and zoom-in runs. Support for multiple SPH code outputs is provided by pyGadgetReader (ascl:1411.001), mainly Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015).

  3. The moving mesh code SHADOWFAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the moving mesh code SHADOWFAX, which can be used to evolve a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. The code is written in C++ and its source code is made available to the scientific community under the GNU Affero General Public Licence. We outline the algorithm and the design of our implementation, and demonstrate its validity through the results of a set of basic test problems, which are also part of the public version. We also compare SHADOWFAX with a number of other publicly available codes using different hydrodynamical integration schemes, illustrating the advantages and disadvantages of the moving mesh technique.

  4. Combining Hydrodynamic and Evolution Calculations of Rotating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deupree, R. G.

    1996-12-01

    Rotation has two primary effects on stellar evolutionary models: the direct influence on the model structure produced by the rotational terms, and the indirect influence produced by rotational instabilities which redistribute angular momentum and composition inside the model. Using a two dimensional, fully implicit finite difference code, I can follow events on both evolutionary and hydrodynamic timescales, thus allowing the simulation of both effects. However, there are several issues concerning how to integrate the results from hydrodynamic runs into evolutionary runs that must be examined. The schemes I have devised for the integration of the hydrodynamic simulations into evolutionary calculations are outlined, and the positive and negative features summarized. The practical differences among the various schemes are small, and a successful marriage between hydrodynamic and evolution calculations is possible.

  5. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  6. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  7. The hydrodynamics of galaxy formation on Kiloparsec scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Michael L.; Anninos, Wenbo Yuan; Centrella, Joan

    1993-01-01

    Two dimensional numerical simulations of Zeldovich pancake fragmentation in a dark matter dominated universe were carried out to study the hydrodynamical and gravitational effects on the formation of structures such as protogalaxies. Preliminary results were given in Yuan, Centrella and, Norman (1991). Here we report a more exhaustive study to determine the sensitivity of protogalaxies to input parameters. The numerical code we used for the simulations combines the hydrodynamical code ZEUS-2D (Stone and Norman, 1992) which was modified to include the expansion of the universe and radiative cooling of the gas with a particle-mesh code which follows the motion of dark matter particles. The resulting hybrid code is able to handle highly nonuniform grids which we utilized to obtain a high resolution (much greater than 1 kpc) in the dense region of the pancake.

  8. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms. PMID:24943377

  9. Hydrodynamics of insect spermatozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, On Shun; Lauga, Eric

    2010-11-01

    Microorganism motility plays important roles in many biological processes including reproduction. Many microorganisms propel themselves by propagating traveling waves along their flagella. Depending on the species, propagation of planar waves (e.g. Ceratium) and helical waves (e.g. Trichomonas) were observed in eukaryotic flagellar motion, and hydrodynamic models for both were proposed in the past. However, the motility of insect spermatozoa remains largely unexplored. An interesting morphological feature of such cells, first observed in Tenebrio molitor and Bacillus rossius, is the double helical deformation pattern along the flagella, which is characterized by the presence of two superimposed helical flagellar waves (one with a large amplitude and low frequency, and the other with a small amplitude and high frequency). Here we present the first hydrodynamic investigation of the locomotion of insect spermatozoa. The swimming kinematics, trajectories and hydrodynamic efficiency of the swimmer are computed based on the prescribed double helical deformation pattern. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental measurements, and explore the dependence of the swimming performance on the geometric and dynamical parameters.

  10. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-08-07

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms.

  11. Nonlinear hydrodynamics of cosmological sheets. 1: Numerical techniques and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anninos, Wenbo Y.; Norman, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    We present the numerical techniques and tests used to construct and validate a computer code designed to study the multidimensional nonlinear hydrodynamics of large-scale sheet structures in the universe, especially the fragmentation of such structures under various instabilities. This code is composed of two codes, the hydrodynamical code ZEUS-2D and a particle-mesh code. The ZEUS-2D code solves the hydrodynamical equations in two dimensions using explicit Eulerian finite-difference techniques, with modifications made to incorporate the expansion of the universe and the gas cooling due to Compton scattering, bremsstrahlung, and hydrogen and helium cooling. The particle-mesh code solves the equation of motion for the collisionless dark matter. The code uses two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates with a nonuniform grid in one direction to provide high resolution for the sheet structures. A series of one-dimensional and two-dimensional linear perturbation tests are presented which are designed to test the hydro solver and the Poisson solver with and without the expansion of the universe. We also present a radiative shock wave test which is designed to ensure the code's capability to handle radiative cooling properly. And finally a series of one-dimensional Zel'dovich pancake tests used to test the dark matter code and the hydro solver in the nonlinear regime are discussed and compared with the results of Bond et al. (1984) and Shapiro & Struck-Marcell (1985). Overall, the code is shown to produce accurate and stable results, which provide us a powerful tool to further our studies.

  12. Nonlinear hydrodynamics of cosmological sheets. 1: Numerical techniques and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Wenbo Y.; Norman, Michael J.

    1994-07-01

    We present the numerical techniques and tests used to construct and validate a computer code designed to study the multidimensional nonlinear hydrodynamics of large-scale sheet structures in the universe, especially the fragmentation of such structures under various instabilities. This code is composed of two codes, the hydrodynamical code ZEUS-2D and a particle-mesh code. The ZEUS-2D code solves the hydrodynamical equations in two dimensions using explicit Eulerian finite-difference techniques, with modifications made to incorporate the expansion of the universe and the gas cooling due to Compton scattering, bremsstrahlung, and hydrogen and helium cooling. The particle-mesh code solves the equation of motion for the collisionless dark matter. The code uses two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates with a nonuniform grid in one direction to provide high resolution for the sheet structures. A series of one-dimensional and two-dimensional linear perturbation tests are presented which are designed to test the hydro solver and the Poisson solver with and without the expansion of the universe. We also present a radiative shock wave test which is designed to ensure the code's capability to handle radiative cooling properly. And finally a series of one-dimensional Zel'dovich pancake tests used to test the dark matter code and the hydro solver in the nonlinear regime are discussed and compared with the results of Bond et al. (1984) and Shapiro & Struck-Marcell (1985). Overall, the code is shown to produce accurate and stable results, which provide us a powerful tool to further our studies.

  13. RHALE: A 3-D MMALE code for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Peery, J.S.; Budge, K.G.; Wong, M.K.W.; Trucano, T.G.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes RHALE, a multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (MMALE) shock physics code. RHALE is the successor to CTH, Sandia`s 3-D Eulerian shock physics code, and will be capable of solving problems that CTH cannot adequately address. We discuss the Lagrangian solid mechanics capabilities of RHALE, which include arbitrary mesh connectivity, superior artificial viscosity, and improved material models. We discuss the MMALE algorithms that have been extended for arbitrary grids in both two- and three-dimensions. The MMALE addition to RHALE provides the accuracy of a Lagrangian code while allowing a calculation to proceed under very large material distortions. Coupling an arbitrary quadrilateral or hexahedral grid to the MMALE solution facilitates modeling of complex shapes with a greatly reduced number of computational cells. RHALE allows regions of a problem to be modeled with Lagrangian, Eulerian or ALE meshes. In addition, regions can switch from Lagrangian to ALE to Eulerian based on user input or mesh distortion. For ALE meshes, new node locations are determined with a variety of element based equipotential schemes. Element quantities are advected with donor, van Leer, or Super-B algorithms. Nodal quantities are advected with the second order SHALE or HIS algorithms. Material interfaces are determined with a modified Young`s high resolution interface tracker or the SLIC algorithm. RHALE has been used to model many problems of interest to the mechanics, hypervelocity impact, and shock physics communities. Results of a sampling of these problems are presented in this paper.

  14. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code mesa. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code arepo. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Different reconstruction methods are tested that can specifically control the convective behaviour of the model. After mapping to a grid, a relaxation procedure that includes damping of spurious velocities yields stable models in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. Initially convectively stable configurations lead to stable hydrodynamical models while for stratifications that are convectively unstable in the stellar evolution code, simulations recover the convective behaviour of the initial model and show large convective plumes with Mach numbers up to 0.8. Examples are shown for a 2 M⊙ red giant and a 0.67 M⊙ asymptotic giant branch star. A detailed analysis shows that the improved method reliably provides stable models of giant envelopes that can be used as initial conditions for subsequent hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions involving giant stars.

  15. Postexplosion hydrodynamics of supernovae in red supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Woosley, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    Shock propagation, mixing, and clumping are studied in the explosion of red supergiants as Type II supernovae using a two-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. We show that extensive Rayleigh-Talor instabilities develop in the ejecta in the wake of the reverse shock wave. In all cases, the shell structure of the progenitor is obliterated to leave a clumpy, well-mixed supernova remnant. However, the occurrence of mass loss during the lifetime of the progenitor can significantly reduce the amount of mixing. These results are independent of the Type II supernova explosion mechanism.

  16. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  17. Polar Codes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    density parity check (LDPC) code, a Reed–Solomon code, and three convolutional codes. iii CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...the most common. Many civilian systems use low density parity check (LDPC) FEC codes, and the Navy is planning to use LDPC for some future systems...other forward error correction methods: a turbo code, a low density parity check (LDPC) code, a Reed–Solomon code, and three convolutional codes

  18. MUFASA: galaxy formation simulations with meshless hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davé, Romeel; Thompson, Robert; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-11-01

    We present the MUFASA suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, which employs the GIZMO meshless finite mass (MFM) code including H2-based star formation, nine-element chemical evolution, two-phase kinetic outflows following scalings from the Feedback in Realistic Environments zoom simulations, and evolving halo mass-based quenching. Our fiducial (50 h-1 Mpc)3 volume is evolved to z = 0 with a quarter billion elements. The predicted galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) reproduces observations from z = 4 → 0 to ≲ 1.2σ in cosmic variance, providing an unprecedented match to this key diagnostic. The cosmic star formation history and stellar mass growth show general agreement with data, with a strong archaeological downsizing trend such that dwarf galaxies form the majority of their stars after z ˜ 1. We run 25 and 12.5 h-1 Mpc volumes to z = 2 with identical feedback prescriptions, the latter resolving all hydrogen-cooling haloes, and the three runs display fair resolution convergence. The specific star formation rates broadly agree with data at z = 0, but are underpredicted at z ˜ 2 by a factor of 3, re-emphasizing a longstanding puzzle in galaxy evolution models. We compare runs using MFM and two flavours of smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and show that the GSMF is sensitive to hydrodynamics methodology at the ˜×2 level, which is sub-dominant to choices for parametrizing feedback.

  19. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    1996-11-01

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and movements that the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull. The first part of the book is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections and wings, and to propellers in uniform flow, with guidance for design and pragmatic analysis of performance. The second part covers the development of unsteady forces arising from operation in nonuniform hull wakes. A final chapter discusses the optimization of efficiency of compound propulsors. Researchers in ocean technology and naval architecture will find this book appealing.

  20. How to fake hydrodynamic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romatschke, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Flow signatures in experimental data from relativistic ion collisions, are usually interpreted as a fingerprint of the presence of a hydrodynamic phase during the evolution of these systems. I review some theoretical ideas to 'fake' this hydrodynamic behavior in p+A and A+A collisions. I find that transverse flow and femtoscopic measurements can easily be forged through non-hydrodynamic evolution, while large elliptic flow requires some non-vanishing interactions in the hot phase.

  1. Hydrodynamic synchronization of flagellar oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we highlight the physics of synchronization in collections of beating cilia and flagella. We survey the nonlinear dynamics of synchronization in collections of noisy oscillators. This framework is applied to flagellar synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions. The time-reversibility of hydrodynamics at low Reynolds numbers requires swimming strokes that break time-reversal symmetry to facilitate hydrodynamic synchronization. We discuss different physical mechanisms for flagellar synchronization, which break this symmetry in different ways.

  2. Molecular Hydrodynamics from Memory Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as t-3 /2 . We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, which is at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. Lastly, we discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales, and the crossover between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  3. Integrated field, satellite and petrological observations of the November 2010 eruption of Erta Ale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Lorraine; Barnie, Talfan; Blundy, Jon; Brooker, Richard A.; Keir, Derek; Lewi, Elias; Saunders, Kate

    2012-12-01

    Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, erupted in November 2010, emplacing new lava flows on the main crater floor, the first such eruption from the southern pit into the main crater since 1973, and the first eruption at this remote volcano in the modern satellite age. For many decades, Erta Ale has contained a persistently active lava lake which is ordinarily confined, several tens of metres below the level of the main crater, within the southern pit. We combine on-the-ground field observations with multispectral imaging from the SEVIRI satellite to reconstruct the entire eruptive episode beginning on 11 November and ending prior to 14 December 2010. A period of quiescence occurred between 14 and 19 November. The main eruptive activity developed between 19 and 22 November, finally subsiding to pre-eruptive levels between 8 and 15 December. The estimated total volume of lava erupted is ˜0.006 km3. The mineralogy of the 2010 lava is plagioclase + clinopyroxene + olivine. Geochemically, the lava is slightly more mafic than previously erupted lava lining the caldera floor, but lies within the range of historical lavas from Erta Ale. SIMS analysis of olivine-hosted melt inclusions shows the Erta Ale lavas to be relatively volatile-poor, with H2O contents ≤1,300 ppm and CO2 contents of ≤200 ppm. Incompatible trace and volatile element systematics of melt inclusions show, however, that the November 2010 lavas were volatile-saturated, and that degassing and crystallisation occurred concomitantly. Volatile saturation pressures are in the range 7-42 MPa, indicating shallow crystallisation. Calculated pre-eruption and melt inclusion entrapment temperatures from mineral/liquid thermometers are ˜1,150 °C, consistent with previously published field measurements.

  4. PINTofALE : Package for the interactive analysis of line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V.; Drake, J. J.

    2000-06-01

    PINTofALE was developed to analyze spectroscopic data from coronal sources in the 1-1500 Å range. It is based on a modular set of IDL tools that interact with an atomic database and with observational data. The tools allow us to easily identify spectral lines, measure fluxes, and carry out more detailed modeling. The package has been extended to handle analysis of high-resolution X-ray spectra that will be obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  5. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-05-01

    The design of offshore floating wind turbines uses design codes that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At the present, most codes include only first-order hydrodynamics, which induce forces and motions varying with the same frequency as the incident waves. Effects due to second- and higher-order hydrodynamics are often ignored in the offshore industry, because the forces induced typically are smaller than the first-order forces. In this report, first- and second-order hydrodynamic analysis used in the offshore oil and gas industry is applied to two different wind turbine concepts--a spar and a tension leg platform.

  6. Hydrodynamics of Bacterial Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Libchaber, A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of the last several decades, the study of microbial communities has identified countless examples of cooperation between microorganisms. Generally—as in the case of quorum sensing—cooperation is coordinated by a chemical signal that diffuses through the community. Less well understood is a second class of cooperation that is mediated through physical interactions between individuals. To better understand how the bacteria use hydrodynamics to manipulate their environment and coordinate their actions, we study the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus. These bacteria live in the diffusive boundary layer just above the muddy bottoms of ponds. As buried organic material decays, sulfide diffuses out of the mud. Oxygen from the pond diffuses into the boundary layer from above. These bacteria form communities—called veils— which are able to transport nutrients through the boundary layer faster than diffusion, thereby increasing their metabolic rate. In these communities, bacteria attach to surfaces and swim in place. As millions of bacteria beat their flagella, the community induces a macroscopic fluid flow, which mix the boundary layer. Here we present experimental observations and mathematical models that elucidate the hydrodynamics linking the behavior of an individual bacterium to the collective dynamics of the community. We begin by characterizing the flow of water around an individual bacterium swimming in place. We then discuss the flow of water and nutrients around a small number of individuals. Finally, we present observations and models detailing the macroscopic dynamics of a Thiovulum veil.

  7. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  8. Pilot-Wave Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Yves Couder, Emmanuel Fort, and coworkers recently discovered that a millimetric droplet sustained on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath may self-propel through a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This article reviews experimental evidence indicating that the walking droplets exhibit certain features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic, quantum realm. It then reviews theoretical descriptions of this hydrodynamic pilot-wave system that yield insight into the origins of its quantum-like behavior. Quantization arises from the dynamic constraint imposed on the droplet by its pilot-wave field, and multimodal statistics appear to be a feature of chaotic pilot-wave dynamics. I attempt to assess the potential and limitations of this hydrodynamic system as a quantum analog. This fluid system is compared to quantum pilot-wave theories, shown to be markedly different from Bohmian mechanics and more closely related to de Broglie's original conception of quantum dynamics, his double-solution theory, and its relatively recent extensions through researchers in stochastic electrodynamics.

  9. The role lipid aldehydes and ALEs in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common causes of blindness in people of working age in developed countries. The retinal vasculature is central to the development of diabetic retinopathy, but there is accumulating evidence that neuroretinal dysfunction and degeneration also contributes to the aetiology and progression of this disease. The precise mechanisms through which diabetes causes neuroretinal dysfunction and degeneration remain to be fully established, but recent evidence from our own group has suggested that lipid aldehyde generation and the formation of advanced lipoxidation end-products (ALEs) plays a key contributory role. In the present talk, I will outline our recent data suggesting that the progressive and selective accumulation of the acrolein-derived ALE, FDP-lysine, in retinal Müller glial cells during diabetes is involved in the pathogenesis of neuroretinal dysfunction during diabetic retinopathy. More recent unpublished data will also be presented suggesting that FDP-lysine accumulation in the diabetic retina may occur primarily through a mechanism involving the downregulation of aldehyde detoxification enzymes. Current studies examining potential therapeutic strategies for preventing ALE accumulation in the diabetic retina will also be briefly discussed.

  10. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Clinical coding. Code breakers.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Steve

    2005-02-24

    --The advent of payment by results has seen the role of the clinical coder pushed to the fore in England. --Examinations for a clinical coding qualification began in 1999. In 2004, approximately 200 people took the qualification. --Trusts are attracting people to the role by offering training from scratch or through modern apprenticeships.

  12. GAMER: GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2016-12-01

    GAMER (GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement) serves as a general-purpose adaptive mesh refinement + GPU framework and solves hydrodynamics with self-gravity. The code supports adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), hydrodynamics with self-gravity, and a variety of GPU-accelerated hydrodynamic and Poisson solvers. It also supports hybrid OpenMP/MPI/GPU parallelization, concurrent CPU/GPU execution for performance optimization, and Hilbert space-filling curve for load balance. Although the code is designed for simulating galaxy formation, it can be easily modified to solve a variety of applications with different governing equations. All optimization strategies implemented in the code can be inherited straightforwardly.

  13. MONTE CARLO RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMICS WITH IMPLICIT METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    We explore the application of Monte Carlo transport methods to solving coupled radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD) problems. We use a time-dependent, frequency-dependent, three-dimensional radiation transport code that is special relativistic and includes some detailed microphysical interactions such as resonant line scattering. We couple the transport code to two different one-dimensional (non-relativistic) hydrodynamics solvers: a spherical Lagrangian scheme and a Eulerian Godunov solver. The gas–radiation energy coupling is treated implicitly, allowing us to take hydrodynamical time-steps that are much longer than the radiative cooling time. We validate the code and assess its performance using a suite of radiation hydrodynamical test problems, including ones in the radiation energy dominated regime. We also develop techniques that reduce the noise of the Monte Carlo estimated radiation force by using the spatial divergence of the radiation pressure tensor. The results suggest that Monte Carlo techniques hold promise for simulating the multi-dimensional RHD of astrophysical systems.

  14. Prototype Mixed Finite Element Hydrodynamics Capability in ARES

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N

    2008-07-10

    This document describes work on a prototype Mixed Finite Element Method (MFEM) hydrodynamics algorithm in the ARES code, and its application to a set of standard test problems. This work is motivated by the need for improvements to the algorithms used in the Lagrange hydrodynamics step to make them more robust. We begin by identifying the outstanding issues with traditional numerical hydrodynamics algorithms followed by a description of the proposed method and how it may address several of these longstanding issues. We give a theoretical overview of the proposed MFEM algorithm as well as a summary of the coding additions and modifications that were made to add this capability to the ARES code. We present results obtained with the new method on a set of canonical hydrodynamics test problems and demonstrate significant improvement in comparison to results obtained with traditional methods. We conclude with a summary of the issues still at hand and motivate the need for continued research to develop the proposed method into maturity.

  15. General formulation of transverse hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-06-15

    General formulation of hydrodynamics describing transversally thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing transversally thermalized matter is emphasized.

  16. Hydrocyclone separation hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.A.; Ruzanov, S.R.; Lunyushkina, I.A.

    1987-10-20

    The lack of an adequate hydrodynamic model for a hydrocyclone has so far been the main obstacle to devising a general method for designing such apparatus. The authors present a method of calculating the liquid flow in the working zone. The results have been used to calculate the separating power in application to dilute suspensions. The Navier-Stokes equations and the equation of continuity are used in examining the behavior together with assumptions based on experiment: the conditions for stationary axisymmetric flow, constant turbulent viscosity, and a constant radial profile for the tangential low speed at all the heights. The boundary conditions are those for liquid slip at the side walls and absence of vortex drainage at the axis. The results enable one to choose the dimensions for particular separations.

  17. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  18. Hydrodynamics, resurgence, and transasymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2015-12-01

    The second order hydrodynamical description of a homogeneous conformal plasma that undergoes a boost-invariant expansion is given by a single nonlinear ordinary differential equation, whose resurgent asymptotic properties we study, developing further the recent work of Heller and Spalinski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 072501 (2015)]. Resurgence clearly identifies the nonhydrodynamic modes that are exponentially suppressed at late times, analogous to the quasinormal modes in gravitational language, organizing these modes in terms of a trans-series expansion. These modes are analogs of instantons in semiclassical expansions, where the damping rate plays the role of the instanton action. We show that this system displays the generic features of resurgence, with explicit quantitative relations between the fluctuations about different orders of these nonhydrodynamic modes. The imaginary part of the trans-series parameter is identified with the Stokes constant, and the real part with the freedom associated with initial conditions.

  19. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well polarized flocks. The continuum equations are derived by coarse graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. When the inertia is large, we find a novel instability that signals the transition to complex spatio-temporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks. This work was supported by the NSF Awards DMR-1305184 and DGE-1068780 at Syracuse University and NSF Award PHY11-25915 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Grant No. 2919 at the KITP at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

  20. Hydrodynamics of Peristaltic Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios; Hart, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    A curious class of animals called salps live in marine environments and self-propel by ejecting vortex rings much like jellyfish and squid. However, unlike other jetting creatures that siphon and eject water from one side of their body, salps produce vortex rings by pumping water through siphons on opposite ends of their hollow cylindrical bodies. In the simplest cases, it seems like some species of salp can successfully move by contracting just two siphons connected by an elastic body. When thought of as a chain of timed contractions, salp propulsion is reminiscent of peristaltic pumping applied to marine locomotion. Inspired by salps, we investigate the hydrodynamics of peristaltic propulsion, focusing on the scaling relationships that determine flow rate, thrust production, and energy usage in a model system. We discuss possible actuation methods for a model peristaltic vehicle, considering both the material and geometrical requirements for such a system.

  1. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael; Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  2. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  3. A HYDROCHEMICAL HYBRID CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL PROBLEMS. I. CODE VERIFICATION AND BENCHMARKS FOR A PHOTON-DOMINATED REGION (PDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Kazutaka; Morata, Oscar; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko; Shang, Hsien; Krasnopolsky, Ruben

    2015-07-20

    A two-dimensional hydrochemical hybrid code, KM2, is constructed to deal with astrophysical problems that would require coupled hydrodynamical and chemical evolution. The code assumes axisymmetry in a cylindrical coordinate system and consists of two modules: a hydrodynamics module and a chemistry module. The hydrodynamics module solves hydrodynamics using a Godunov-type finite volume scheme and treats included chemical species as passively advected scalars. The chemistry module implicitly solves nonequilibrium chemistry and change of energy due to thermal processes with transfer of external ultraviolet radiation. Self-shielding effects on photodissociation of CO and H{sub 2} are included. In this introductory paper, the adopted numerical method is presented, along with code verifications using the hydrodynamics module and a benchmark on the chemistry module with reactions specific to a photon-dominated region (PDR). Finally, as an example of the expected capability, the hydrochemical evolution of a PDR is presented based on the PDR benchmark.

  4. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M. L.; Levatin, J. A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  5. Hydrodynamic body shape analysis and their impact on swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Zeng; Zhan, Jie-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the hydrodynamic characteristics of different adult male swimmer's body shape using computational fluid dynamics method. This simulation strategy is carried out by CFD fluent code with solving the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the RNG k-ε turbulence closure. The water free surface is captured by the volume of fluid (VOF) method. A set of full body models, which is based on the anthropometrical characteristics of the most common male swimmers, is created by Computer Aided Industrial Design (CAID) software, Rhinoceros. The analysis of CFD results revealed that swimmer's body shape has a noticeable effect on the hydrodynamics performances. This explains why male swimmer with an inverted triangle body shape has good hydrodynamic characteristics for competitive swimming.

  6. Hydrodynamical noise and Gubser flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Grönqvist, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamical noise is introduced on top of Gubser's analytical solution to viscous hydrodynamics. With respect to the ultra-central collision events of Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-p at the LHC energies, we solve the evolution of noisy fluid systems and calculate the radial flow velocity correlations. We show that the absolute amplitude of the hydrodynamical noise is determined by the multiplicity of the collision event. The evolution of azimuthal anisotropies, which is related to the generation of harmonic flow, receives finite enhancements from hydrodynamical noise. Although it is strongest in the p-p systems, the effect of hydrodynamical noise on flow harmonics is found to be negligible, especially in the ultra-central Pb-Pb collisions. For the short-range correlations, hydrodynamical noise contributes to the formation of a near-side peak on top of the correlation structure originated from initial state fluctuations. The shape of the peak is affected by the strength of hydrodynamical noise, whose height and width grow from the Pb-Pb system to the p-Pb and p-p systems.

  7. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  8. Special Relativistic Hydrodynamics with Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2016-12-01

    Special relativistic hydrodynamics with weak gravity has hitherto been unknown in the literature. Whether such an asymmetric combination is possible has been unclear. Here, the hydrodynamic equations with Poisson-type gravity, considering fully relativistic velocity and pressure under the weak gravity and the action-at-a-distance limit, are consistently derived from Einstein’s theory of general relativity. An analysis is made in the maximal slicing, where the Poisson’s equation becomes much simpler than our previous study in the zero-shear gauge. Also presented is the hydrodynamic equations in the first post-Newtonian approximation, now under the general hypersurface condition. Our formulation includes the anisotropic stress.

  9. Constraining relativistic viscous hydrodynamical evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2009-04-15

    We show that by requiring positivity of the longitudinal pressure it is possible to constrain the initial conditions one can use in second-order viscous hydrodynamical simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We demonstrate this explicitly for (0+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics and discuss how the constraint extends to higher dimensions. Additionally, we present an analytic approximation to the solution of (0+1)-dimensional second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution equations appropriate to describe the evolution of matter in an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision.

  10. Extreme hydrodynamic load calculations for fixed steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, P.R. de; Vugts, J.; Gudmestad, O.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the expected differences between the planned ISO code for design of offshore structures and the present Standard Norwegian Practice (SNP), concerning the extreme hydrodynamic design load calculation for fixed steel space frame structures. Since the ISO code is expected to be similar to the API RP2A LRFD code, the provisions of API RP2A LRFD are used to represent the ISO standard. It should be noted that the new ISO code may include NewWave theory, in addition to the wave theories recommended by the API. Design loads and associated failure probabilities resulting from the application of the code provisions are compared for a typical North Sea structure, the Europipe riser platform 16/11-E.

  11. Reduction of dissipation in Lagrange cell-centered hydrodynamics (CCH) through corner gradient reconstruction (CGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, D. E.; Morgan, N. R.; Carney, T. C.; Kenamond, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    This work presents an extension of a second order cell-centered hydrodynamics scheme on unstructured polyhedral cells [13] toward higher order. The goal is to reduce dissipation, especially for smooth flows. This is accomplished by multiple piecewise linear reconstructions of conserved quantities within the cell. The reconstruction is based upon gradients that are calculated at the nodes, a procedure that avoids the least-square solution of a large equation set for polynomial coefficients. Conservation and monotonicity are guaranteed by adjusting the gradients within each cell corner. Results are presented for a wide variety of test problems involving smooth and shock-dominated flows, fluids and solids, 2D and 3D configurations, as well as Lagrange, Eulerian, and ALE methods.

  12. High-order Eulerian incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics with transition to Lagrangian free-surface motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. J.; Stansby, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    The incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) method is derived in Eulerian form with high-order smoothing kernels to provide increased accuracy for a range of steady and transient internal flows. Periodic transient flows, in particular, demonstrate high-order convergence and accuracies approaching, for example, spectral mesh-based methods. The improved accuracies are achieved through new high-order Gaussian kernels applied over regular particle distributions with time stepping formally up to 2nd order for transient flows. The Eulerian approach can be easily extended to model free surface flows by merging from Eulerian to Lagrangian regions in an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fashion, and a demonstration with periodic wave propagation is presented. In the long term, it is envisaged that the method will greatly increase the accuracy and efficiency of SPH methods, while retaining the flexibility of SPH in modelling free surface and multiphase flows.

  13. Lotic Water Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David Ryan; Tasseff, Byron Alexander

    2015-01-23

    Water-related natural disasters, for example, floods and droughts, are among the most frequent and costly natural hazards, both socially and economically. Many of these floods are a result of excess rainfall collecting in streams and rivers, and subsequently overtopping banks and flowing overland into urban environments. Floods can cause physical damage to critical infrastructure and present health risks through the spread of waterborne diseases. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed Lotic, a state-of-the-art surface water hydrodynamic model, to simulate propagation of flood waves originating from a variety of events. Lotic is a two-dimensional (2D) flood model that has been used primarily for simulations in which overland water flows are characterized by movement in two dimensions, such as flood waves expected from rainfall-runoff events, storm surge, and tsunamis. In 2013, LANL developers enhanced Lotic through several development efforts. These developments included enhancements to the 2D simulation engine, including numerical formulation, computational efficiency developments, and visualization. Stakeholders can use simulation results to estimate infrastructure damage and cascading consequences within other sets of infrastructure, as well as to inform the development of flood mitigation strategies.

  14. Two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic calculations for a nominal 1-Mt nuclear explosion near the ground

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, H.G.; Jones, E.M.; Sandford, M.T. II; Whitaker, R.W.; Anderson, R.C.; Kodis, J.W.

    1982-03-01

    The two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic code SN-YAQUI was used to calculate the evolution of a hypothetical nuclear fireball of 1-Mt yield at a burst altitude of 500 m. The ground-reflected shock wave interacts strongly with the fireball and induces the early formation of a rapidly rotating ring-shaped vortex. The hydrodynamic and radiation phenomena are discussed.

  15. Hydrodynamic model for picosecond propagation of laser-created nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Vikrant; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of a free-electron-laser pulse with a moderate or large size cluster is known to create a quasi-neutral nanoplasma, which then expands on hydrodynamic timescale, i.e., > 1 ps. To have a better understanding of ion and electron data from experiments derived from laser-irradiated clusters, one needs to simulate cluster dynamics on such long timescales for which the molecular dynamics approach becomes inefficient. We therefore propose a two-step Molecular Dynamics-Hydrodynamic scheme. In the first step we use molecular dynamics code to follow the dynamics of an irradiated cluster until all the photo-excitation and corresponding relaxation processes are finished and a nanoplasma, consisting of ground-state ions and thermalized electrons, is formed. In the second step we perform long-timescale propagation of this nanoplasma with a computationally efficient hydrodynamic approach. In the present paper we examine the feasibility of a hydrodynamic two-fluid approach to follow the expansion of spherically symmetric nanoplasma, without accounting for the impact ionization and three-body recombination processes at this stage. We compare our results with the corresponding molecular dynamics simulations. We show that all relevant information about the nanoplasma propagation can be extracted from hydrodynamic simulations at a significantly lower computational cost when compared to a molecular dynamics approach. Finally, we comment on the accuracy and limitations of our present model and discuss possible future developments of the two-step strategy.

  16. A Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method for 2D ALE Meshes in HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Britton; Marinak, Marty; Weber, Chris; Peterson, Luc

    2016-10-01

    The Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method in HYDRA has been extended to handle general 2D r-z meshes. Previously the method was only for orthogonal 2D meshes. The new method can be employed with the ALE methodology for managing mesh motion that is used to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities on NIF capsule implosions. The results of an examination of this kind will be compared to those obtained by the corresponding diffusion method. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. The ALE Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Simulatio of Air Flow Through Pulsating Human Vocal Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistauer, Miloslav; Kučera, Václav; Prokopová, Jaroslav; Horáček, Jaromír

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this work is the simulation of viscous compressible flows in human vocal folds during phonation. The computational domain is a bounded subset of IR2, whose geometry mimics the shape of the human larynx. During phonation, parts of the solid impermeable walls are moving in a prescribed manner, thus simulating the opening and closing of the vocal chords. As the governing equations we take the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in ALE form. Space semidiscretization is carried out by the discontinuous Galerkin method combined with a linearized semi-implicit approach. Numerical experiments are performed with the resulting scheme.

  18. Migration trachéale d'une canule de trachéotomie: complication exceptionnelle

    PubMed Central

    Chouikh, Chakib; El Moqaddem, Amine; Benmakhlouf, Anas; Naanaa, Saad; El Koraichi, Alae; El Kettani, Salma; Jahidi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    La trachéotomie est un geste chirurgical de survie largement pratiqué dans les services des urgences et de réanimation. En fonction de l'indication de sa réalisation, elle peut être transitoire ou définitive. Dans ce dernier cas le port d'une canule de trachéotomie de manière prolongée peut exposer à certaines complications qui peuvent s'avérer graves. Nous présentons un cas très rare d'un enfant présentant un syndrome de Guillain Barré, trachéotomisé depuis 4 ans suite à une sténose trachéale par intubation prolongée et portant une canule de trachéotomie métallique de type KRISHABER qui s'est présenté aux urgences dans un tableau de détresse respiratoire suite à la migration trachéale de sa canule. La trachéotomie est l'ouverture à la peau de la trachée cervicale, et à la mise d'une canule qui a pour but de permettre la respiration en court-circuitant les voies aériennes supérieures. De réalisation simple et codifiée le plus souvent, elle présente des risques de complications post opératoires notamment tardives. Les plus décrites sont les granulomes, les sténoses trachéales, les infections, et les fistules. La migration trachéale de la canule de trachéotomie reste exceptionnelle. Elle résulte d'un mauvais entretien qui fragilise la canule et doit être prise en charge en urgence. La trachéotomie définitive nécessite une surveillance régulière, un entretien et des soins de canules rigoureux pour éviter la survenue de complications qui peuvent être graves. Chez l'enfant, l'utilisation de canules souples en PVC ou en silicone doit être préférée aux canules métalliques. PMID:25368730

  19. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; wallace, R.; Mangan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-18

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. The target consists of two-layer planar package composed on 85 micron Cu backed by 500 micron CH2, having a single mode sinusoidal perturbation at the interface, with gamma = 200 microns, nuo + 20 microns. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar (10- 15x10{sup 12} dynes/cm2) shock at the interface, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshov instability followed by the Raleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at the intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamic codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. We are designing experiments to test the differences in the growth of 2D vs 3D single mode perturbations; such differences may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented.

  20. Reciprocal relations in dissipationless hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikovsky, L. A.

    2014-12-15

    Hidden symmetry in dissipationless terms of arbitrary hydrodynamics equations is recognized. We demonstrate that all fluxes are generated by a single function and derive conventional Euler equations using the proposed formalism.

  1. Numerical modelling of spallation in 2D hydrodynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maw, J. R.; Giles, A. R.

    1996-05-01

    A model for spallation based on the void growth model of Johnson has been implemented in 2D Lagrangian and Eulerian hydrocodes. The model has been extended to treat complete separation of material when voids coalesce and to describe the effects of elevated temperatures and melting. The capabilities of the model are illustrated by comparison with data from explosively generated spall experiments. Particular emphasis is placed on the prediction of multiple spall effects in weak, low melting point, materials such as lead. The correlation between the model predictions and observations on the strain rate dependence of spall strength is discussed.

  2. A modified Henyey method for computing radiative transfer hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks (1972), which is limited to optically thick regions and employs the diffusion approximation for radiative transfer, is modified to include radiative transfer effects in the optically thin regions of a model star. A modified Henyey method is used to include the solution of the radiative transfer equation in this implicit code, and the convergence properties of this method are proven. A comparison is made between two hydrodynamic models of a classical Cepheid with a 12-day period, one of which was computed with the diffusion approximation and the other with the modified Henyey method. It is found that the two models produce nearly identical light and velocity curves, but differ in the fact that the former never has temperature inversions in the atmosphere while the latter does when sufficiently strong shocks are present.

  3. Hybrid Hard and Soft Decision Decoding of Reed-Solomon Codes for M-ary Frequency-Shift Keying

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    efficient modulation schemes such as M-ary phase-shift keying. Since JTIDS /Link-16 uses quasi-orthogonal, cyclic code-shift keying (CCSK), in this...keying. Since JTIDS /Link-16 uses quasi-orthogonal, cyclic code-shift keying (CCSK), in this thesis, soft decision decoding of RS encoded symbols is...87 VII. APPLICATION OF HYBRID HD SD RS DECODING IN ALE AND JTIDS /LINK-16

  4. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  5. An analysis of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.W.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Mello, F.J.; Hicks, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine its applicability in the field of solid dynamics. An important result of the work is a rigorous von Neumann stability analysis which provides a simple criterion for the stability or instability of the method in terms of the stress state and the second derivative of the kernel function. Instability, which typically occurs only for solids in tension, results not from the numerical time integration algorithm, but because the SPH algorithm creates an effective stress with a negative modulus. The analysis provides insight into possible methods for removing the instability. Also, SPH has been coupled into the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO, and a weighted residual derivation of the SPH equations has been obtained.

  6. Atmospheric emissions and trends of nitrous oxide deduced from 10 years of ALE-GAGE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, R.; Cunnold, D.; Alyea, F.; Rasmussen, R.; Simmonds, P.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) obtained during the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE) and the Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (GAGE) for a period from 1978 to 1988 are presented and interpreted. It is observed that the average concentration in the Northern Hemisphere is 0.75 +/- 0.16 ppbv higher than in the Southern Hemisphere and that the global average linear trend in N2O lies in the range from 0.25 to 0.31 percent/year. The measured trends and latitudinal distributions are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that stratospheric photodissociation is the major atmospheric sink for N2O, while the cause of the N2O trend is suggested to be a combination of a growing tropical source and a growing Northern mid-latitude source. A 10-year average global N2O emission rate of (20.5 +/- 2.4) x 10 to the 12th g N2O/year is deduced from the ALE/GAGE data.

  7. Validation of Air-Backed Underwater Explosion Experiments with ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L D

    2005-02-04

    This paper summarizes an exercise carried out to validate the process of implementing LLNL's ALE3D to predict the permanent deformation and rupture of an air-backed steel plate subjected to underwater shock. Experiments were performed in a shock tank at the Naval Science and Technology Laboratory in Visakhapatnam India, and the results are documented in reference. A consistent set of air-backed plates is subjected to shocks from increasing weights of explosives ranging from 10g-80g. At 40g and above, rupture is recorded in the experiment and, without fracture mechanics implemented in ALE3D, only the cases of 10g, 20g, and 30g are presented here. This methodology applies the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) Equation of State (EOS) to predict the pressure of the expanding detonation products, the Gruneisein EOS for water under highly dynamic compressible flow - both on 1-point integrated 3-d continuum elements. The steel plates apply a bilinear elastic-plastic response with failure and are simulated with 3-point integrated shell elements. The failure for this exercise is based on effective (or equivalent) plastic strain.

  8. ALE3D Simulation of Heating and Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment with LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; Nichols, A L; deHaven, M R; Strand, O T

    2006-06-26

    We performed a computational and experimental analysis of fast cookoff of LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 2 kbar steel tube with reinforced end caps. A Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) was completed in which three radiant heaters were used to heat the vessel until ignition, resulting in a moderately violent explosion after 20.4 minutes. Thermocouple measurements showed tube temperatures as high as 340 C at ignition and LX-10 surface temperatures as high as 279 C, which is near the melting point of HMX. Three micro-power radar systems were used to measure mean fragment velocities of 840 m/s. Photonics Doppler Velocimeters (PDVs) showed a rapid acceleration of fragments over 80 {micro}s. A one-dimensional ALE3D cookoff model at the vessel midplane was used to simulate the heating, thermal expansion, LX-10 decomposition composition, and closing of the gap between the HE (High Explosive) and vessel wall. Although the ALE3D simulation terminated before ignition, the model provided a good representation of heat transfer through the case and across the dynamic gap to the explosive.

  9. ALE3D Simulation and Measurement of Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment with LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; deHaven, M R

    2006-11-22

    We performed a computational and experimental analysis of fast cookoff of LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 2 kbar steel tube with reinforced end caps. A Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) was completed in which three radiant heaters were used to heat the vessel until ignition, resulting in a moderately violent explosion after 20.4 minutes. Thermocouple measurements showed tube temperatures as high as 340 C at ignition and LX-10 surface temperatures as high as 279 C, which is near the melting point of HMX. Three micro-power radar systems were used to measure mean fragment velocities of 840 m/s. Photonics Doppler Velocimeters (PDVs) showed a rapid acceleration of fragments over 80 {micro}s. A one-dimensional ALE3D cookoff model at the vessel midplane was used to simulate the heating, thermal expansion, LX-10 decomposition composition, and closing of the gap between the HE (High Explosive) and vessel wall. Although the ALE3D simulation terminated before ignition, the model provided a good representation of heat transfer through the case and across the dynamic gap to the explosive.

  10. ALE Meta-Analysis of Schizophrenics Performing the N-Back Task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Zachary

    2010-10-01

    MRI/fMRI has already proven itself as a valuable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many illnesses of the brain, including cognitive problems. By exploiting the differences in magnetic susceptibility between oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, fMRI can measure blood flow in various regions of interest within the brain. This can determine the level of brain activity in relation to motor or cognitive functions and provide a metric for tissue damage or illness symptoms. Structural imaging techniques have shown lesions or deficiencies in tissue volumes in schizophrenics corresponding to areas primarily in the frontal and temporal lobes. These areas are currently known to be involved in working memory and attention, which many schizophrenics have trouble with. The ALE (Activation Likelihood Estimation) Meta-Analysis is able to statistically determine the significance of brain area activations based on the post-hoc combination of multiple studies. This process is useful for giving a general model of brain function in relation to a particular task designed to engage the affected areas (such as working memory for the n-back task). The advantages of the ALE Meta-Analysis include elimination of single subject anomalies, elimination of false/extremely weak activations, and verification of function/location hypotheses.

  11. The Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment and the Global Atmospheric Gas Experiment (ALE/GAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. Aslam K.

    1995-01-01

    The ALE/GAGE project was designed to determine the global atmospheric lifetimes of the chlorofluorocarbons CCl3F and CCl2F2 (F-11 and F-12), which had been identified as the main gases that cause stratospheric ozone depletion. The experimental procedures also provided the concentrations of CH3CCl3, CCl4 and N2O. The extended role of the project was to evaluate the mass balances of these gases as well. Methylchloroform (CH3CCl3) serves as a tracer of average atmospheric OH concentrations and hence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and can also deplete the ozone layer. Measurements of these gases were taken with optimized instruments in the field at a frequency of about 1 sample/hr. Toward the end of the present project methane measurements were added to the program. The final report deals with the research of the Oregon Graduate Institute (OGI) as part of the ALE/GAGE program between 4/1/1988 and 1/31/1991. The report defines the scope of the OGI project, the approach, and the results.

  12. Voxel-Based Morphometry ALE meta-analysis of Bipolar Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magana, Omar; Laird, Robert

    2012-03-01

    A meta-analysis was performed independently to view the changes in gray matter (GM) on patients with Bipolar disorder (BP). The meta-analysis was conducted on a Talairach Space using GingerALE to determine the voxels and their permutation. In order to achieve the data acquisition, published experiments and similar research studies were uploaded onto the online Voxel-Based Morphometry database (VBM). By doing so, coordinates of activation locations were extracted from Bipolar disorder related journals utilizing Sleuth. Once the coordinates of given experiments were selected and imported to GingerALE, a Gaussian was performed on all foci points to create the concentration points of GM on BP patients. The results included volume reductions and variations of GM between Normal Healthy controls and Patients with Bipolar disorder. A significant amount of GM clusters were obtained in Normal Healthy controls over BP patients on the right precentral gyrus, right anterior cingulate, and the left inferior frontal gyrus. In future research, more published journals could be uploaded onto the database and another VBM meta-analysis could be performed including more activation coordinates or a variation of age groups.

  13. Error Estimation And Accurate Mapping Based ALE Formulation For 3D Simulation Of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerdoux, Simon; Fourment, Lionel

    2007-05-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation is developed to simulate the different stages of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process with the FORGE3® F.E. software. A splitting method is utilized: a) the material velocity/pressure and temperature fields are calculated, b) the mesh velocity is derived from the domain boundary evolution and an adaptive refinement criterion provided by error estimation, c) P1 and P0 variables are remapped. Different velocity computation and remap techniques have been investigated, providing significant improvement with respect to more standard approaches. The proposed ALE formulation is applied to FSW simulation. Steady state welding, but also transient phases are simulated, showing good robustness and accuracy of the developed formulation. Friction parameters are identified for an Eulerian steady state simulation by comparison with experimental results. Void formation can be simulated. Simulations of the transient plunge and welding phases help to better understand the deposition process that occurs at the trailing edge of the probe. Flexibility and robustness of the model finally allows investigating the influence of new tooling designs on the deposition process.

  14. Black Widow Pulsar radiation hydrodynamics simulation using Castro: Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios Sazo, Maria; Zingale, Michael; Zhang, Weiqun

    2017-01-01

    A black widow pulsar (BWP) is a millisecond pulsar in a tight binary system with a low mass star. The fast rotating pulsar emits intense radiation, which injects energy and ablates the companion star. Observation of the ablation is seen as pulsar eclipses caused by a larger object than the companion star Roche lobe. This phenomenon is attributed to a cloud surrounding the evaporating star. We will present the methodology for modeling the interaction between the radiation coming from the pulsar and the companion star using the radiation hydrodynamics code Castro. Castro is an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code that solves the compressible hydrodynamic equations for astrophysical flows with simultaneous refinement in space and time. The code also includes self-gravity, nuclear reactions and radiation. We are employing the gray-radiation solver, which uses a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. In our setup, we are modeling the companion star with the radiation field as a boundary condition, coming from one side of the domain. In addition to a model setup in 2-d axisymmetry, we also have a 3-d setup, which is more physical given the nature of the system considering the companion is facing the pulsar on one side. We discuss the progress of our calculations, first results, and future work.The work at Stony Brook was supported by DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics grant DE-FG02-87ER40317

  15. ALE Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    200 300 Depth / nm Ffj Apipendix D Silicon - Germanium -Carbon Alloys Extending Si Based Heterostructure Engineering 1 Introduction This area of research...Layer Epitaxy of Silicon by Dichlorosilane Studied with Core Level Spectroscopy", J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 2303 (1992). 4. D.A. Lapiano-Smith and F...omitted on this publication. 5. D. A. Lapiano-Smith, F. J. Himpsel, and L. J. Terminello, "The Chemisorption and Reaction of Diethylsilane on Silicon (100

  16. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  17. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of high energy density experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinenko, A.

    2009-07-01

    A new one-dimensional hydrodynamic code for simulation of experiments involving the creation of high energy density in matter by means of laser or heavy ion beam irradiation is described. The code uses well-tested second order Lagrangian scheme in combination with the flux-limited van Leer convection algorithm for re-mapping to an arbitrary grid. Simple test cases with self-similar solutions are examined. Finally, the heating of solid targets by lasers and ions beams is investigated as examples.

  18. The hydrodynamics of colloidal gelation.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsigmond; Wang, Gang; Swan, James

    2015-12-14

    Colloidal gels are formed during arrested phase separation. Sub-micron, mutually attractive particles aggregate to form a system spanning network with high interfacial area, far from equilibrium. Models for microstructural evolution during colloidal gelation have often struggled to match experimental results with long standing questions regarding the role of hydrodynamic interactions. In nearly all models, these interactions are neglected entirely. In the present work, we report simulations of gelation with and without hydrodynamic interactions between the suspended particles executed in HOOMD-blue. The disparities between these simulations are striking and mirror the experimental-theoretical mismatch in the literature. The hydrodynamic simulations agree with experimental observations, however. We explore a simple model of the competing transport processes in gelation that anticipates these disparities, and conclude that hydrodynamic forces are essential. Near the gel boundary, there exists a competition between compaction of individual aggregates which suppresses gelation and coagulation of aggregates which enhances it. The time scale for compaction is mildly slowed by hydrodynamic interactions, while the time scale for coagulation is greatly accelerated. This enhancement to coagulation leads to a shift in the gel boundary to lower strengths of attraction and lower particle concentrations when compared to models that neglect hydrodynamic interactions. Away from the gel boundary, differences in the nearest neighbor distribution and fractal dimension persist within gels produced by both simulation methods. This result necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how dynamic, discrete element models for gelation kinetics are developed as well as how collective hydrodynamic interactions influence the arrest of attractive colloidal dispersions.

  19. Ethical coding.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Barry I

    2009-01-01

    It is ethical, legal, and proper for a dermatologist to maximize income through proper coding of patient encounters and procedures. The overzealous physician can misinterpret reimbursement requirements or receive bad advice from other physicians and cross the line from aggressive coding to coding fraud. Several of the more common problem areas are discussed.

  20. Verification of transport equations in a general purpose commercial CFD code.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melot, Matthieu; Nennemann, Bernd; Deschênes, Claire

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the Verification and Validation methodology is presented. This method aims to increase the reliability and the trust that can be placed into complex CFD simulations. The first step of this methodology, the code verification is presented in greater details. The CFD transport equations in steady state, transient and Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE, used for transient moving mesh) formulations in Ansys CFX are verified. It is shown that the expected spatial and temporal order of convergence are achieved for the steady state and the transient formulations. Unfortunately this is not completely the case for the ALE formulation. As for a lot of other commercial and in-house CFD codes, the temporal convergence of the velocity is limited to a first order where a second order would have been expected.

  1. Group-invariant solutions of hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coggeshall, S.V.

    1993-08-01

    Using the property of invariance under Lie groups of transformations, the equations of hydrodynamics are transformed from partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations, for which special analytic solutions can be found. These particular solutions can be used for (1) numerical benchmarks, (2) the basis for analytic models, and (3) insight into more general solutions. Additionally, group transformations can be used to construct new solutions from existing ones. A space-time projective group is used to generate complicated solutions from simpler solutions. Discussion of these procedures is presented along with examples of analytic of 1,2 and 3-D hydrodynamics.

  2. The unreasonable effectiveness of hydrodynamics in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Noronha, Jorge; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2016-12-01

    Event-by-event hydrodynamic simulations of AA and pA collisions involve initial energy densities with large spatial gradients. This is associated with the presence of large Knudsen numbers (Kn ≈ 1) at early times, which may lead one to question the validity of the hydrodynamic approach in these rapidly evolving, largely inhomogeneous systems. A new procedure to smooth out the initial energy densities is employed to show that the initial spatial eccentricities, εn, are remarkably robust with respect to variations in the underlying scale of initial energy density spatial gradients, λ. For √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV LHC initial conditions generated by the MCKLN code, εn (across centralities) remains nearly constant if the fluctuation scale varies by an order of magnitude, i.e., when λ varies from 0.1 to 1 fm. Given that the local Knudsen number Kn ≈ 1 / λ, the robustness of the initial eccentricities with respect to changes in the fluctuation scale suggests that the vn's cannot be used to distinguish between events with large Kn from events where Kn is in the hydrodynamic regime. We use the 2+1 Lagrangian hydrodynamic code v-USPhydro to show that this is indeed the case: anisotropic flow coefficients computed within event-by-event viscous hydrodynamics are only sensitive to long wavelength scales of order 1 /ΛQCD ≈ 1 fm and are incredibly robust with respect to variations in the initial local Knudsen number. This robustness can be used to justify the somewhat unreasonable effectiveness of the nearly perfect fluid paradigm in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Numerical Hydrodynamics in Special Relativity.

    PubMed

    Martí, José Maria; Müller, Ewald

    2003-01-01

    This review is concerned with a discussion of numerical methods for the solution of the equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD). Particular emphasis is put on a comprehensive review of the application of high-resolution shock-capturing methods in SRHD. Results of a set of demanding test bench simulations obtained with different numerical SRHD methods are compared. Three applications (astrophysical jets, gamma-ray bursts and heavy ion collisions) of relativistic flows are discussed. An evaluation of various SRHD methods is presented, and future developments in SRHD are analyzed involving extension to general relativistic hydrodynamics and relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics. The review further provides FORTRAN programs to compute the exact solution of a 1D relativistic Riemann problem with zero and nonzero tangential velocities, and to simulate 1D relativistic flows in Cartesian Eulerian coordinates using the exact SRHD Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction.

  4. ALES, the multi­mission Adaptive Leading Edge Sub­Waveform Retracker, design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Marcello; Benveniste, Jérôme; Vignudelli, Stefano; Cipollini, Paolo; Quartly, Graham; Snaith, Helen

    Satellite altimetry has revolutionized our understanding of ocean dynamics thanks to high repetition rate and global coverage. Nevertheless, coastal data has been flagged as unreliable due to land and calm water interference in the altimeter and radiometer footprint and high frequency tidal and atmospheric forcing. Our study addresses the first issue, i.e. retracking, presenting ALES, the Adaptive Leading Edge Subwaveform Retracker. ALES is potentially applicable to all the pulse­limited altimetry altimetry missions and its aim is to retrack with the same precision both open ocean and coastal data with the same algorithm. ALES selects part of each returned echo and models it with a classic ‘open ocean’ Brown functional form, by means of least square estimation whose convergence is found through the Nelder­Mead nonlinear optimization technique. By avoiding echoes from bright targets along the trailing edge, it is capable of retrieving the majority of coastal waveform up to 2 to 3 Km from the coasts. By adapting the estimation window to the significant wave height, it aims at preserving the precision of the standard data both in open ocean and in the coastal strip. ALES is validated against tide gauges in the Adriatic Sea and in the Greater Agulhas System for three different missions: Envisat, Jason­1 and Jason­2. Considerations on noise and biases provide a further verification of the strategy.

  5. The Neural Bases of Difficult Speech Comprehension and Speech Production: Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adank, Patti

    2012-01-01

    The role of speech production mechanisms in difficult speech comprehension is the subject of on-going debate in speech science. Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) analyses were conducted on neuroimaging studies investigating difficult speech comprehension or speech production. Meta-analysis 1 included 10 studies contrasting comprehension…

  6. Hydrodynamic behavior of fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltzius, Pierre

    1987-02-01

    Measurements of the radius of gyration RG and the hydrodynamic radius RH of colloidal silica aggregates are reported. These aggregates have fractal geometry and RH is proportional to RG for 500 Å<=RH<=7000 Å, with a ratio RH/RG=0.72+/-0.02. The results are compared with predictions for macromolecules of various shapes. The proportionality of the two radii can be understood with use of the pair correlation function of fractal objects and hydrodynamic interactions on the Oseen level. The value of the ratio remains to be explained.

  7. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  8. The neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function – An ALE meta-analysis of human functional brain imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jessica; Kopietz, Rainer; Frasnelli, Johannes; Wiesmann, Martin; Hummel, Thomas; Lundström, Johan N.

    2009-01-01

    Almost every odor we encounter in daily life has the capacity to produce a trigeminal sensation. Surprisingly, few functional imaging studies exploring human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function exist, and results are to some degree inconsistent. We utilized activation likelihood estimation (ALE), a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis tool, to analyze functional imaging data (fMRI/PET) following intranasal trigeminal stimulation with carbon dioxide (CO2), a stimulus known to exclusively activate the trigeminal system. Meta-analysis tools are able to identify activations common across studies, thereby enabling activation mapping with higher certainty. Activation foci of nine studies utilizing trigeminal stimulation were included in the meta-analysis. We found significant ALE scores, thus indicating consistent activation across studies, in the brainstem, ventrolateral posterior thalamic nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, precentral gyrus, as well as in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices – a network known for the processing of intranasal nociceptive stimuli. Significant ALE values were also observed in the piriform cortex, insula, and the orbitofrontal cortex, areas known to process chemosensory stimuli, and in association cortices. Additionally, the trigeminal ALE statistics were directly compared with ALE statistics originating from olfactory stimulation, demonstrating considerable overlap in activation. In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis map the human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal stimulation with high statistical certainty and demonstrate that the cortical areas recruited during the processing of intranasal CO2 stimuli include those outside traditional trigeminal areas. Moreover, through illustrations of the considerable overlap between brain areas that process trigeminal and olfactory information; these results demonstrate the interconnectivity of flavor processing. PMID:19913573

  9. Flocculation in ale brewing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: re-evaluation of the role of cell surface charge and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Holle, Ann Van; Machado, Manuela D; Soares, Eduardo V

    2012-02-01

    Flocculation is an eco-friendly process of cell separation, which has been traditionally exploited by the brewing industry. Cell surface charge (CSC), cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and the presence of active flocculins, during the growth of two (NCYC 1195 and NCYC 1214) ale brewing flocculent strains, belonging to the NewFlo phenotype, were examined. Ale strains, in exponential phase of growth, were not flocculent and did not present active flocculent lectins on the cell surface; in contrast, the same strains, in stationary phase of growth, were highly flocculent (>98%) and presented a hydrophobicity of approximately three to seven times higher than in exponential phase. No relationship between growth phase, flocculation and CSC was observed. For comparative purposes, a constitutively flocculent strain (S646-1B) and its isogenic non-flocculent strain (S646-8D) were also used. The treatment of ale brewing and S646-1B strains with pronase E originated a loss of flocculation and a strong reduction of CSH; S646-1B pronase E-treated cells displayed a similar CSH as the non-treated S646-8D cells. The treatment of the S646-8D strain with protease did not reduce CSH. In conclusion, the increase of CSH observed at the onset of flocculation of ale strains is a consequence of the presence of flocculins on the yeast cell surface and not the cause of yeast flocculation. CSH and CSC play a minor role in the auto-aggregation of the ale strains since the degree of flocculation is defined, primarily, by the presence of active flocculins on the yeast cell wall.

  10. Brain networks of perceptual decision-making: an fMRI ALE meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Keuken, Max C.; Müller-Axt, Christa; Langner, Robert; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Forstmann, Birte U.; Neumann, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In the recent perceptual decision-making literature, a fronto-parietal network is typically reported to primarily represent the neural substrate of human perceptual decision-making. However, the view that only cortical areas are involved in perceptual decision-making has been challenged by several neurocomputational models which all argue that the basal ganglia play an essential role in perceptual decisions. To consolidate these different views, we conducted an Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on the existing neuroimaging literature. The results argue in favor of the involvement of a frontal-parietal network in general perceptual decision-making that is possibly complemented by the basal ganglia, and modulated in substantial parts by task difficulty. In contrast, expectation of reward, an important aspect of many decision-making processes, shows almost no overlap with the general perceptual decision-making network. PMID:24994979

  11. Amber ale beer enriched with goji berries - The effect on bioactive compound content and sensorial properties.

    PubMed

    Ducruet, Julien; Rébénaque, Pierrick; Diserens, Serge; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Héritier, Isabelle; Andlauer, Wilfried

    2017-07-01

    Goji berries, traditionally used in Chinese medicine, are nowadays gaining popularity in the Western world. Efforts are made to enlarge the offer of goji containing foods. In this study, goji berries were added to ale type beer at different stages of the production process in order to develop a beverage with desirable sensory characteristic and high antioxidant capacity. The obtained beers differed significantly in terms of appearance, taste and antioxidant activity. Consumers preferred beers to which goji berries were added at the beginning of the brewing process. These beers were also characterized by lower turbidity, high color intensity, caramel- and coffee-like taste, high antioxidant activity and high content of bioactives such as rutin and 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid. To conclude, an addition of goji berries to traditional brewing process creates a perspective to enlarge the range of goji containing foods.

  12. A Discontinuous Galerkin ALE Method for Compressible Viscous Flows in Moving Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomtev, I.; Kirby, R. M.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    1999-10-01

    We present a matrix-free discontinuous Galerkin method for simulating compressible viscous flows in two- and three-dimensional moving domains. To this end, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) framework. Spatial discretization is based on standard structured and unstructured grids but using an orthogonal hierarchical spectral basis. The method is third-order accurate in time and converges exponentially fast in space for smooth solutions. A novelty of the method is the use of a force-directed algorithm from graph theory that requires no matrix inversion to efficiently update the grid while minimizing distortions. We present several simulations using the new method, including validation with published results from a pitching airfoil, and new results for flow past a three-dimensional wing subject to large flapping insect-like motion.

  13. Rigid HYM Connections on Tautological Bundles over ALE Crepant Resolutions in Dimension Three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeratu, Anda; Walpuski, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    For G a finite subgroup of SL(3,C) acting freely on C^3{setminus} 0 a crepant resolution of the Calabi-Yau orbifold C^3/G always exists and has the geometry of an ALE non-compact manifold. We show that the tautological bundles on these crepant resolutions admit rigid Hermitian-Yang-Mills connections. For this we use analytical information extracted from the derived category McKay correspondence of Bridgeland, King, and Reid [J. Amer. Math. Soc. 14 (2001), 535-554]. As a consequence we rederive multiplicative cohomological identities on the crepant resolution using the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem. These results are dimension three analogues of Kronheimer and Nakajima's results [Math. Ann. 288 (1990), 263-307] in dimension two.

  14. ALE meta‐analysis reveals dissociable networks for affective and discriminative aspects of touch

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Emotionally‐laden tactile stimulation—such as a caress on the skin or the feel of velvet—may represent a functionally distinct domain of touch, underpinned by specific cortical pathways. In order to determine whether, and to what extent, cortical functional neuroanatomy supports a distinction between affective and discriminative touch, an activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta‐analysis was performed. This meta‐analysis statistically mapped reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations from 17 published affective touch studies in which tactile stimulation was associated with positive subjective evaluation (n = 291, 34 experimental contrasts). A separate ALE meta‐analysis mapped regions most likely to be activated by tactile stimulation during detection and discrimination tasks (n = 1,075, 91 experimental contrasts). These meta‐analyses revealed dissociable regions for affective and discriminative touch, with posterior insula (PI) more likely to be activated for affective touch, and primary somatosensory cortices (SI) more likely to be activated for discriminative touch. Secondary somatosensory cortex had a high likelihood of engagement by both affective and discriminative touch. Further, meta‐analytic connectivity (MCAM) analyses investigated network‐level co‐activation likelihoods independent of task or stimulus, across a range of domains and paradigms. Affective‐related PI and discriminative‐related SI regions co‐activated with different networks, implicated in dissociable functions, but sharing somatosensory co‐activations. Taken together, these meta‐analytic findings suggest that affective and discriminative touch are dissociable both on the regional and network levels. However, their degree of shared activation likelihood in somatosensory cortices indicates that this dissociation reflects functional biases within tactile processing networks, rather than functionally and anatomically distinct

  15. ALE meta-analysis reveals dissociable networks for affective and discriminative aspects of touch.

    PubMed

    Morrison, India

    2016-04-01

    Emotionally-laden tactile stimulation-such as a caress on the skin or the feel of velvet-may represent a functionally distinct domain of touch, underpinned by specific cortical pathways. In order to determine whether, and to what extent, cortical functional neuroanatomy supports a distinction between affective and discriminative touch, an activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis was performed. This meta-analysis statistically mapped reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations from 17 published affective touch studies in which tactile stimulation was associated with positive subjective evaluation (n = 291, 34 experimental contrasts). A separate ALE meta-analysis mapped regions most likely to be activated by tactile stimulation during detection and discrimination tasks (n = 1,075, 91 experimental contrasts). These meta-analyses revealed dissociable regions for affective and discriminative touch, with posterior insula (PI) more likely to be activated for affective touch, and primary somatosensory cortices (SI) more likely to be activated for discriminative touch. Secondary somatosensory cortex had a high likelihood of engagement by both affective and discriminative touch. Further, meta-analytic connectivity (MCAM) analyses investigated network-level co-activation likelihoods independent of task or stimulus, across a range of domains and paradigms. Affective-related PI and discriminative-related SI regions co-activated with different networks, implicated in dissociable functions, but sharing somatosensory co-activations. Taken together, these meta-analytic findings suggest that affective and discriminative touch are dissociable both on the regional and network levels. However, their degree of shared activation likelihood in somatosensory cortices indicates that this dissociation reflects functional biases within tactile processing networks, rather than functionally and anatomically distinct pathways.

  16. The impact of different ale brewer’s yeast strains on the proteome of immature beer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well known that brewer’s yeast affects the taste and aroma of beer. However, the influence of brewer’s yeast on the protein composition of beer is currently unknown. In this study, changes of the proteome of immature beer, i.e. beer that has not been matured after fermentation, by ale brewer’s yeast strains with different abilities to degrade fermentable sugars were investigated. Results Beers were fermented from standard hopped wort (13° Plato) using two ale brewer’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains with different attenuation degrees. Both immature beers had the same alcohol and protein concentrations. Immature beer and unfermented wort proteins were analysed by 2-DE and compared in order to determine protein changes arising from fermentation. Distinct protein spots in the beer and wort proteomes were identified using Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and MS/MS and revealed common beer proteins, such as lipid transfer proteins (LTP1 and LTP2), protein Z and amylase-protease inhibitors. During fermentation, two protein spots, corresponding to LTP2, disappeared, while three protein spots were exclusively found in beer. These three proteins, all derived from yeast, were identified as cell wall associated proteins, that is Exg1 (an exo-β-1,3-glucanase), Bgl2 (an endo-β-1,2-glucanase), and Uth1 (a cell wall biogenesis protein). Conclusion Yeast strain dependent changes in the immature beer proteome were identified, i.e. Bgl2 was present in beer brewed with KVL011, while lacking in WLP001 beer. PMID:24079909

  17. Sharing code.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  18. Hydrodynamically mediated macrophyte silica dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schoelynck, J; Bal, K; Puijalon, S; Meire, P; Struyf, E

    2012-11-01

    In most aquatic ecosystems, hydrodynamic conditions are a key abiotic factor determining species distributions and abundance of aquatic plants. Resisting stress and keeping an upright position often relies on investment in tissue reinforcement, which is costly to produce. Silica could provide a more economical alternative. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the response of two submerged species, Egeria densa Planch. and Limnophila heterophylla (Roxb.) Benth., to dissolved silicic acid availability and exposure to hydrodynamic stress. The results were verified with a third species in a field study (Nuphar lutea (L.) Smith). Biogenic silica (BSi) concentration in both stems and leaves increases with increasing dissolved silica availability but also with the presence of hydrodynamic stress. We suggest that the inclusion of extra silica enables the plant to alternatively invest its energy in the production of lignin and cellulose. Although we found no significant effects of hydrodynamic stress on cellulose or lignin concentrations either in the laboratory or in the field, BSi was negatively correlated with cellulose concentration and positively correlated with lignin concentration in samples collected in the field study. This implies that the plant might perform with equal energy efficiency in both standing and running water environments. This could provide submerged species with a tool to respond to abiotic factors, to adapt to new ecological conditions and hence potentially colonise new environments.

  19. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  20. Physics and numerics of the tensor code (incomplete preliminary documentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.; Lettis, L.A. Jr.; Bryan, J.B.; Frary, N.R.

    1982-07-15

    The present TENSOR code is a descendant of a code originally conceived by Maenchen and Sack and later adapted by Cherry. Originally, the code was a two-dimensional Lagrangian explicit finite difference code which solved the equations of continuum mechanics. Since then, implicit and arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) algorithms have been added. The code has been used principally to solve problems involving the propagation of stress waves through earth materials, and considerable development of rock and soil constitutive relations has been done. The code has been applied extensively to the containment of underground nuclear tests, nuclear and high explosive surface and subsurface cratering, and energy and resource recovery. TENSOR is supported by a substantial array of ancillary routines. The initial conditions are set up by a generator code TENGEN. ZON is a multipurpose code which can be used for zoning, rezoning, overlaying, and linking from other codes. Linking from some codes is facilitated by another code RADTEN. TENPLT is a fixed time graphics code which provides a wide variety of plotting options and output devices, and which is capable of producing computer movies by postprocessing problem dumps. Time history graphics are provided by the TIMPLT code from temporal dumps produced during production runs. While TENSOR can be run as a stand-alone controllee, a special controller code TCON is available to better interface the code with the LLNL computer system during production jobs. In order to standardize compilation procedures and provide quality control, a special compiler code BC is used. A number of equation of state generators are available among them ROC and PMUGEN.

  1. An efficient radiative cooling approximation for use in hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, James C.; McInally, William G.; Faber, Joshua A.

    2015-02-01

    To make relevant predictions about observable emission, hydrodynamical simulation codes must employ schemes that account for radiative losses, but the large dimensionality of accurate radiative transfer schemes is often prohibitive. Stamatellos and collaborators introduced a scheme for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations based on the notion of polytropic pseudo-clouds that uses only local quantities to estimate cooling rates. The computational approach is extremely efficient and works well in cases close to spherical symmetry, such as in star formation problems. Unfortunately, the method, which takes the local gravitational potential as an input, can be inaccurate when applied to non-spherical configurations, limiting its usefulness when studying discs or stellar collisions, among other situations of interest. Here, we introduce the `pressure scale height method,' which incorporates the fluid pressure scaleheight into the determination of column densities and cooling rates, and show that it produces more accurate results across a wide range of physical scenarios while retaining the computational efficiency of the original method. The tested models include spherical polytropes as well as discs with specified density and temperature profiles. We focus on applying our techniques within an SPH code, although our method can be implemented within any particle-based Lagrangian or grid-based Eulerian hydrodynamic scheme. Our new method may be applied in a broad range of situations, including within the realm of stellar interactions, collisions, and mergers.

  2. Nanoparticle stochastic motion in the inertial regime and hydrodynamic interactions close to a cylindrical wall

    PubMed Central

    Vitoshkin, Helena; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equation together with the particle equations governing the motion of a nanosized particle or nanoparticle (NP) in a cylindrical tube. The effects of the confining boundary, its curvature, particle size, and particle density variations have all been investigated. To reveal how the nature of the temporal correlations (hydrodynamic memory) in the inertial regime is altered by the full hydrodynamic interaction due to the confining boundaries, we have employed the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method to determine the dynamical relaxation of a spherical NP located at various positions in the medium over a wide span of time scales compared to the fluid viscous relaxation time τv = a2/v, where a is the spherical particle radius and v is the kinematic viscosity. The results show that, as compared to the behavior of a particle in regions away from the confining boundary, the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) for a particle in the lubrication layer initially decays exponentially with a Stokes drag enhanced by a factor that is proportional to the ratio of the particle radius to the gap thickness between the particle and the wall. Independent of the particle location, beyond time scales greater than a2/v, the decay is always algebraic followed by a second exponential decay (attributed to the wall curvature) that is associated with a second time scale D2/v, where D is the vessel diameter. PMID:27830213

  3. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Moody, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. This model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  4. Hydrodynamic effects in the atmosphere of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. G., Jr.; Bunker, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical models of variable stars are established, using a nonlinear radiative transfer coupled hydrodynamics code. The variable Eddington method of radiative transfer is used. Comparisons are for models of W Virginis, beta Doradus, and eta Aquilae. From these models it appears that shocks are formed in the atmospheres of classical Cepheids as well as W Virginis stars. In classical Cepheids, with periods from 7 to 10 days, the bumps occurring in the light and velocity curves appear as the result of a compression wave that reflects from the star's center. At the head of the outward going compression wave, shocks form in the atmosphere. Comparisons between the hydrodynamic motions in W Virginis and classical Cepheids are made. The strong shocks in W Virginis do not penetrate into the interior as do the compression waves formed in classical Cepheids. The shocks formed in W Virginis stars cause emission lines, while in classical Cepheids the shocks are weaker.

  5. Development and Implementation of Radiation-Hydrodynamics Verification Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Marcath, Matthew J.; Wang, Matthew Y.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-08-22

    Analytic solutions to the radiation-hydrodynamic equations are useful for verifying any large-scale numerical simulation software that solves the same set of equations. The one-dimensional, spherically symmetric Coggeshall No.9 and No.11 analytic solutions, cell-averaged over a uniform-grid have been developed to analyze the corresponding solutions from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Eulerian Applications Project radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE. These Coggeshall solutions have been shown to be independent of heat conduction, providing a unique opportunity for comparison with xRAGE solutions with and without the heat conduction module. Solution convergence was analyzed based on radial step size. Since no shocks are involved in either problem and the solutions are smooth, second-order convergence was expected for both cases. The global L1 errors were used to estimate the convergence rates with and without the heat conduction module implemented.

  6. Non-linear hydrodynamical simulations of delta Scuti star pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M. R.; Guzik, J. A.; McNamara, B. J.

    1998-12-01

    We present the initial results of non-linear hydrodynamic simulations of the pulsation modes of delta Scuti stars. These models use the Ostlie and Cox (1993) Lagrangian hydrodynamic code, adapted to use the most recent OPAL (1996) opacities, the Stellingwerf (1974) periodic relaxation method of obtaining stable limit cycle pulsations, and time-dependent convection. Initial tests of first- and second-overtone pulsation models are consistent with the models of Bono, et al (1997) showing asymmetric lightcurves for first overtone rather than fundamental pulsations. Future modeling work will test several stellar models with varying masses, ages, metal and helium abundances and envelope abundance gradients. Ultimately, we hope to determine the role that abundances and, more specifically, helium abundance gradients in delta Scuti envelopes play in light curve shape. This work will be applied to a test sample of known radially-pulsating delta Scuti field stars and the newly-discovered delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables in the Galactic Bulge.

  7. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; ...

    2017-01-12

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated in this work via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. In conclusion, this model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling andmore » data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.« less

  8. Time Evolution of the Anisotropies of the Hydrodynamically Expanding Sqgp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, A.; Csanád, M.

    In high energy heavy ion collisions of RHIC and LHC, a strongly interacting quark gluon plasma (sQGP) is created. This medium undergoes a hydrodynamic evolution, before it freezes out to form a hadronic matter. The initial state of the sQGP is determined by the initial distribution of the participating nucleons and their interactions. Due to the finite number of nucleons, the initial distribution fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane anisotropy of the initial state can be translated into a series of anisotropy coefficients or eccentricities: second, third, fourth-order anisotropy etc. These anisotropies then evolve in time, and result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we investigate the time evolution of the anisotropies. With a numerical hydrodynamic code, we analyze how the speed of sound and viscosity influence this evolution.

  9. Code Verification Results of an LLNL ASC Code on Some Tri-Lab Verification Test Suite Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S R; Bihari, B L; Salari, K; Woodward, C S

    2006-12-29

    As scientific codes become more complex and involve larger numbers of developers and algorithms, chances for algorithmic implementation mistakes increase. In this environment, code verification becomes essential to building confidence in the code implementation. This paper will present first results of a new code verification effort within LLNL's B Division. In particular, we will show results of code verification of the LLNL ASC ARES code on the test problems: Su Olson non-equilibrium radiation diffusion, Sod shock tube, Sedov point blast modeled with shock hydrodynamics, and Noh implosion.

  10. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A. Rubenchik, A. Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-01

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200{mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20{mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50{percent} faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B. A.

    1997-04-15

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200 {mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20 {mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50% faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations.

  12. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes less than 30) asymmetries in OMEGA direct-drive implosions caused by laser illumination nonuniformities (beam-power imbalance and beam mispointing and mistiming) and target offset, mount, and layers nonuniformities were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic simulations. Simulations indicate that the performance degradation in cryogenic implosions is caused mainly by the target offsets ( 10 to 20 μm), beampower imbalance (σrms 10 %), and initial target asymmetry ( 5% ρRvariation), which distort implosion cores, resulting in a reduced hot-spot confinement and an increased residual kinetic energy of the stagnated target. The ion temperature inferred from the width of simulated neutron spectra are influenced by bulk fuel motion in the distorted hot spot and can result in up to 2-keV apparent temperature increase. Similar temperature variations along different lines of sight are observed. Simulated x-ray images of implosion cores in the 4- to 8-keV energy range show good agreement with experiments. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition designs on OMEGA requires reducing large-scale target and laser-imposed nonuniformities, minimizing target offset, and employing high-efficient mid-adiabat (α = 4) implosion designs that mitigate cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and suppress short-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor growth. These simulations use a new low-noise 3-D Eulerian hydrodynamic code ASTER. Existing 3-D hydrodynamic codes for direct-drive implosions currently miss CBET and noise-free ray-trace laser deposition algorithms. ASTER overcomes these limitations using a simplified 3-D laser-deposition model, which includes CBET and is capable of simulating the effects of beam-power imbalance, beam mispointing, mistiming, and target offset. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Anomalous hydrodynamics of fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegmann, P.

    2013-09-15

    We propose a comprehensive framework for quantum hydrodynamics of the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states. We suggest that the electronic fluid in the FQH regime can be phenomenologically described by the quantized hydrodynamics of vortices in an incompressible rotating liquid. We demonstrate that such hydrodynamics captures all major features of FQH states, including the subtle effect of the Lorentz shear stress. We present a consistent quantization of the hydrodynamics of an incompressible fluid, providing a powerful framework to study the FQH effect and superfluids. We obtain the quantum hydrodynamics of the vortex flow by quantizing the Kirchhoff equations for vortex dynamics.

  14. A hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics coupled model for evaluating bioreactors derived from CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2010-12-01

    Investigating how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. Traditional methods used to investigate flow-field cannot meet this challenge accurately and economically. Hydrodynamics model can solve this problem, but to understand a bioreactor in sufficient depth, it is often insufficient. In this paper, a coupled hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics model was formulated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate a gas-liquid-solid three-phase biotreatment system for the first time. The hydrodynamics model is used to formulate prediction of the flow field and the reaction kinetics model then portrays the reaction conversion process. The coupled model is verified and used to simulate the behavior of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production. The flow patterns were visualized and analyzed. The coupled model also demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production. The advantages and limitations of applying this coupled model are discussed.

  15. Sharing code

    PubMed Central

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing. PMID:25165519

  16. DualSPHysics: Open-source parallel CFD solver based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, A. J. C.; Domínguez, J. M.; Rogers, B. D.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Longshaw, S.; Canelas, R.; Vacondio, R.; Barreiro, A.; García-Feal, O.

    2015-02-01

    DualSPHysics is a hardware accelerated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code developed to solve free-surface flow problems. DualSPHysics is an open-source code developed and released under the terms of GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Along with the source code, a complete documentation that makes easy the compilation and execution of the source files is also distributed. The code has been shown to be efficient and reliable. The parallel power computing of Graphics Computing Units (GPUs) is used to accelerate DualSPHysics by up to two orders of magnitude compared to the performance of the serial version.

  17. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Paul R; Dimonte, Guy; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L; Dimonte, Guy; Dai, W; Kares, R. J.

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  18. Microscopic derivation of discrete hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Anero, Jesús G; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-12-28

    By using the standard theory of coarse graining based on Zwanzig's projection operator, we derive the dynamic equations for discrete hydrodynamic variables. These hydrodynamic variables are defined in terms of the Delaunay triangulation. The resulting microscopically derived equations can be understood, a posteriori, as a discretization on an arbitrary irregular grid of the Navier-Stokes equations. The microscopic derivation provides a set of discrete equations that exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy and the dissipative part of the dynamics produces strict entropy increase. In addition, the microscopic derivation provides a practical implementation of thermal fluctuations in a way that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied exactly. This paper points toward a close connection between coarse-graining procedures from microscopic dynamics and discretization schemes for partial differential equations.

  19. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  20. Tuberculose péritonéale pseudo tumorale mimant un cancer ovarien: un diagnostic différentiel important à considérer

    PubMed Central

    Moukit, Mounir; Fadel, Fatimazahra Ait El; Kouach, Jaouad; Babahabib, Abdellah; Dehayni, Mohammed; Rahali, Driss Moussaoui

    2016-01-01

    La tuberculose est une maladie infectieuse curable qui peut simuler dans sa localisation péritonéale un cancer ovarien avancé conduisant ainsi à une chirurgie étendue et inutile souvent chez des femmes en âge de reproduction. Nous rapportons un nouveau cas de tuberculose péritonéale pseudo tumorale chez une patiente âgée de 43 ans chez qui le diagnostic d’un cancer ovarien avec carcinose péritonéale avait été suspecté. La laparotomie exploratrice avec examen histologique extemporané ont permis de confirmer le diagnostic de tuberculose péritonéale. La patiente a bien répondu au traitement antituberculeux selon le protocole 2ERHZ/4RH. PMID:28292155

  1. Hydrodynamic Viscosity in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Wolfgang J.; Strittmatter, Peter A.; Biermann, Peter L.

    We propose a generalized accretion disk viscosity prescription based on hydrodynamically driven turbulence at the critical effective Reynolds number. This approach is consistent with recent re-analysis by Richard & Zahn (1999) of experimental results on turbulent Couette-Taylor flows. This new β-viscosity formulation applies to both selfgravitating and non-selfgravitating disks and is shown to yield the standard α-disk prescription in the case of shock dissipation limited, non-selfgravitating disks.

  2. Models of Jupiter's Growth Incorporating Thermal and Hydrodynamics Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Lissauer, J. J.; Hubickyj, O.; Bodenheimer, P.

    2008-12-01

    We have modeled the growth of Jupiter incorporating both thermal and hydrodynamical constraints on its accretion of gas from the circumsolar disk. We have used a planetary formation code, based on a Henyey- type stellar evolution code, to compute the planet's internal structure and a three-dimensional hydrodynamics code to calculate the planet's interactions with the protoplanetary disk. Our principal results are: (1) Three dimensional hydrodynamics calculations show that the flow of gas in the circumsolar disk limits the region occupied by the planet's tenuous gaseous envelope to within about 0.25 Rh (Hill sphere radii) of the planet's center, which is much smaller than the value of ~ 1 Rh that was assumed in previous studies. (2) This smaller size of the planet's envelope increases the planet's accretion time, but only by 5-- 10%. In general, in agreement with previous results of Hubickyj et al. [Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., 2005. Icarus, 179, 415-431], Jupiter formation times are in the range 2.5--3 Myr, assuming a protoplanetary disk with solid surface density of 10 g/cm2 and dust opacity in the protoplanet's envelope equal to 2% that of interstellar material. Thermal pressure limits the rate at which a planet less than a few dozen times as massive as Earth can accumulate gas from the protoplanetary disk, whereas hydrodynamics regulates the growth rate for more massive planets. (3) In a protoplanetary disk whose alpha-viscosity parameter is ~ 0.004, giant planets will grow to several times the mass of Jupiter unless the disk has a small local surface density when the planet begins to accrete gas hydrodynamically, or the disk is dispersed very soon thereafter. The large number of planets known with masses near Jupiter's compared with the smaller number of substantially more massive planets is more naturally explained by planetary growth within circumstellar disks whose alpha-viscosity parameter is ~ 0.0004. (4) Capture of Jupiter's irregular

  3. A microfluidic-based hydrodynamic trap for single particles.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Schroeder, Charles M

    2011-01-21

    The ability to confine and manipulate single particles in free solution is a key enabling technology for fundamental and applied science. Methods for particle trapping based on optical, magnetic, electrokinetic, and acoustic techniques have led to major advancements in physics and biology ranging from the molecular to cellular level. In this article, we introduce a new microfluidic-based technique for particle trapping and manipulation based solely on hydrodynamic fluid flow. Using this method, we demonstrate trapping of micro- and nano-scale particles in aqueous solutions for long time scales. The hydrodynamic trap consists of an integrated microfluidic device with a cross-slot channel geometry where two opposing laminar streams converge, thereby generating a planar extensional flow with a fluid stagnation point (zero-velocity point). In this device, particles are confined at the trap center by active control of the flow field to maintain particle position at the fluid stagnation point. In this manner, particles are effectively trapped in free solution using a feedback control algorithm implemented with a custom-built LabVIEW code. The control algorithm consists of image acquisition for a particle in the microfluidic device, followed by particle tracking, determination of particle centroid position, and active adjustment of fluid flow by regulating the pressure applied to an on-chip pneumatic valve using a pressure regulator. In this way, the on-chip dynamic metering valve functions to regulate the relative flow rates in the outlet channels, thereby enabling fine-scale control of stagnation point position and particle trapping. The microfluidic-based hydrodynamic trap exhibits several advantages as a method for particle trapping. Hydrodynamic trapping is possible for any arbitrary particle without specific requirements on the physical or chemical properties of the trapped object. In addition, hydrodynamic trapping enables confinement of a "single" target object in

  4. Recent progress in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The quark-gluon plasma created in a relativistic heavy-ion collisions possesses a sizable pressure anisotropy in the local rest frame at very early times after the initial nuclear impact and this anisotropy only slowly relaxes as the system evolves. In a kinetic theory picture, this translates into the existence of sizable momentum-space anisotropies in the underlying partonic distribution functions, < pL2> ≪ < pT2>. In such cases, it is better to reorganize the hydrodynamical expansion by taking into account momentum-space anisotropies at leading-order in the expansion instead of as a perturbative correction to an isotropic distribution. The resulting anisotropic hydrodynamics framework has been shown to more accurately describe the dynamics of rapidly expanding systems such as the quark-gluon plasma. In this proceedings contribution, I review the basic ideas of anisotropic hydrodynamics, recent progress, and present a few preliminary phenomenological predictions for identified particle spectra and elliptic flow.

  5. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jacob; Stewart, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of rings have traditionally been done using N-body methods, granting insight into the interactions of individual ring particles on varying scales. However, due to the scale of a typical ring system and the sheer number of particles involved, a global N-body simulation is too computationally expensive, unless particle collisions are replaced by stochastic forces (Bromley & Kenyon, 2013). Rings are extraordinarily flat systems and therefore are well-suited to existing geophysical shallow-water hydrodynamics models with well-established non-linear advection methods. By adopting a general relationship between pressure and surface density such as a polytropic equation of state, we can modify the shallow-water formula to treat a thin, compressible, self-gravitating, shearing fluid. Previous hydrodynamic simulations of planetary rings have been restricted to axisymmetric flows and therefore have not treated the response to nonaxisymmetric perturbations by moons (Schmidt & Tscharnuter 1999, Latter & Ogilvie 2010). We seek to expand on existing hydrodynamic methods and, by comparing our work with complementary N-body simulations and Cassini observations, confirm the veracity of our results at small scales before eventually moving to a global domain size. We will use non-Newtonian, dynamically variable viscosity to model the viscous transport caused by unresolved self-gravity wakes. Self-gravity will be added to model the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as density waves and edge waves. Support from NASA Outer Planets and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Particle hydrodynamics with tessellation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Steffen; Springel, Volker

    2010-08-01

    Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a well-established approach to model fluids in astrophysical problems, thanks to its geometric flexibility and ability to automatically adjust the spatial resolution to the clumping of matter. However, a number of recent studies have emphasized inaccuracies of SPH in the treatment of fluid instabilities. The origin of these numerical problems can be traced back to spurious surface effects across contact discontinuities, and to SPH's inherent prevention of mixing at the particle level. We here investigate a new fluid particle model where the density estimate is carried out with the help of an auxiliary mesh constructed as the Voronoi tessellation of the simulation particles instead of an adaptive smoothing kernel. This Voronoi-based approach improves the ability of the scheme to represent sharp contact discontinuities. We show that this eliminates spurious surface tension effects present in SPH and that play a role in suppressing certain fluid instabilities. We find that the new `Voronoi Particle Hydrodynamics' (VPH) described here produces comparable results to SPH in shocks, and better ones in turbulent regimes of pure hydrodynamical simulations. We also discuss formulations of the artificial viscosity needed in this scheme and how judiciously chosen correction forces can be derived in order to maintain a high degree of particle order and hence a regular Voronoi mesh. This is especially helpful in simulating self-gravitating fluids with existing gravity solvers used for N-body simulations.

  7. SPHRAY: A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Ray Tracer for Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Pelupessy, Inti

    2011-03-01

    SPHRAY, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) ray tracer, is designed to solve the 3D, time dependent, radiative transfer (RT) equations for arbitrary density fields. The SPH nature of SPHRAY makes the incorporation of separate hydrodynamics and gravity solvers very natural. SPHRAY relies on a Monte Carlo (MC) ray tracing scheme that does not interpolate the SPH particles onto a grid but instead integrates directly through the SPH kernels. Given initial conditions and a description of the sources of ionizing radiation, the code will calculate the non-equilibrium ionization state (HI, HII, HeI, HeII, HeIII, e) and temperature (internal energy/entropy) of each SPH particle. The sources of radiation can include point like objects, diffuse recombination radiation, and a background field from outside the computational volume. The MC ray tracing implementation allows for the quick introduction of new physics and is parallelization friendly. A quick Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) test taken from computer graphics applications allows for the acceleration of the raytracing component. We present the algorithms used in SPHRAY and verify the code by performing all the test problems detailed in the recent Radiative Transfer Comparison Project of Iliev et. al. The Fortran 90 source code for SPHRAY and example SPH density fields are made available online.

  8. ALE3D Simulation and Measurement of Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment for LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; deHaven, M R

    2006-05-23

    Fast cookoff is of interest in the areas of fire hazard reduction and the development of directed energy systems for defense. During a fast cookoff (thermal explosion), high heat fluxes cause rapid temperature increases and ignition in thin boundary layers. We are developing ALE3D models to describe the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior during the heating, ignition, and explosive phases. The candidate models and numerical strategies are being evaluated using benchmark cookoff experiments. Fast cookoff measurements were made in a Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) for LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 4130 steel tube with reinforced end caps. Gaps were present at the side and top of the explosive charge to allow for thermal expansion. The explosive was heated until explosion using radiant heaters. Temperatures were measured using thermocouples positioned on the tube wall and in the explosive. During the explosion, the tube expansion and fragment velocities were measured with strain gauges, Photonic-Doppler-Velocimeters (PDVs), and micropower radar units. A fragment size distribution was constructed from fragments captured in Lexan panels. ALE3D models for chemical, thermal, and mechanical behavior were developed for the heating and explosive processes. A multi-step chemical kinetics model is employed for the HMX while a one-step model is used for the Viton. A pressure-dependent deflagration model is employed during the expansion. A Steinberg-Guinan model represents the mechanical behavior of the solid constituents while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the equation of state of the solid and gas species, respectively. Parameters for the kinetics model were specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate were employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. The simulations include radiative and conductive transport across the dynamic gaps between the

  9. Benchmarking the Multidimensional Stellar Implicit Code MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffrey, T.; Pratt, J.; Viallet, M.; Baraffe, I.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Geroux, C.; Constantino, T.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of a numerical benchmark study for the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) based on widely applicable two- and three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics problems relevant to stellar interiors. MUSIC is an implicit large eddy simulation code that uses implicit time integration, implemented as a Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. A physics based preconditioning technique which can be adjusted to target varying physics is used to improve the performance of the solver. The problems used for this benchmark study include the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and the decay of the Taylor-Green vortex. Additionally we show a test of hydrostatic equilibrium, in a stellar environment which is dominated by radiative effects. In this setting the flexibility of the preconditioning technique is demonstrated. This work aims to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic test problems typically used during development of numerical methods and the complex flows of stellar interiors. A series of multidimensional tests were performed and analysed. Each of these test cases was analysed with a simple, scalar diagnostic, with the aim of enabling direct code comparisons. As the tests performed do not have analytic solutions, we verify MUSIC by comparing it to established codes including ATHENA and the PENCIL code. MUSIC is able to both reproduce behaviour from established and widely-used codes as well as results expected from theoretical predictions. This benchmarking study concludes a series of papers describing the development of the MUSIC code and provides confidence in future applications.

  10. Cosmological Hydrodynamics on a Moving Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernquist, Lars

    We propose to construct a model for the visible Universe using cosmological simulations of structure formation. Our simulations will include both dark matter and baryons, and will employ two entirely different schemes for evolving the gas: smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and a moving mesh approach as incorporated in the new code, AREPO. By performing simulations that are otherwise nearly identical, except for the hydrodynamics solver, we will isolate and understand differences in the properties of galaxies, galaxy groups and clusters, and the intergalactic medium caused by the computational approach that have plagued efforts to understand galaxy formation for nearly two decades. By performing simulations at different levels of resolution and with increasingly complex treatments of the gas physics, we will identify the results that are converged numerically and that are robust with respect to variations in unresolved physical processes, especially those related to star formation, black hole growth, and related feedback effects. In this manner, we aim to undertake a research program that will redefine the state of the art in cosmological hydrodynamics and galaxy formation. In particular, we will focus our scientific efforts on understanding: 1) the formation of galactic disks in a cosmological context; 2) the physical state of diffuse gas in galaxy clusters and groups so that they can be used as high-precision probes of cosmology; 3) the nature of gas inflows into galaxy halos and the subsequent accretion of gas by forming disks; 4) the co-evolution of galaxies and galaxy clusters with their central supermassive black holes and the implications of related feedback for galaxy evolution and the dichotomy between blue and red galaxies; 5) the physical state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the evolution of the metallicity of the IGM; and 6) the reaction of dark matter around galaxies to galaxy formation. Our proposed work will be of immediate significance for

  11. Modeling hydrodynamics, water quality, and benthic processes to predict ecological effects in Narragansett Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) was used to study the three dimensional (3D) circulation, water quality, and ecology in Narragansett Bay, RI. Predictions of the Bay hydrodynamics included the behavior of the water surface elevation, currents, salinity, and temperatur...

  12. The interaction of hydrodynamic shocks with self-gravitating clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falle, S. A. E. G.; Vaidya, B.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    We describe the results of 3D simulations of the interaction of hydrodynamic shocks with Bonnor-Ebert spheres performed with an adaptive mesh refinement code. The calculations are isothermal and the clouds are embedded in a medium in which the sound speed is either 4 or 10 times that in the cloud. The strengths of the shocks are such that they induce gravitational collapse in some cases and not in others, and we derive a simple estimate for the shock strength required for this to occur. These results are relevant to dense cores and Bok globules in star-forming regions subjected to shocks produced by stellar feedback.

  13. Fibrose rétropéritonéale: revue de littérature

    PubMed Central

    Jakhlal, Nabil; Elghazoui, Anouar; Jabbour, Youness; Karmouni, Tarik; Elkhader, Khalid; Koutani, Abdellatif; Ibenattya, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Résumé La fibrose rétropéritonéale (FRP) est une maladie rare, caractérisée par la présence d’un tissu fibro-inflammatoire aberrant qui se forme souvent autour de la portion sous-rénale de l’aorte abdominale et des artères iliaques. Une obstruction urétérale est souvent observée. Récemment, la FPR idiopathique est rapportée parmi les manifestations de la maladie à IgG4. L’imagerie joue un rôle important dans le diagnostic de la FRP. Les glucocorticoïdes sont le traitement de référence, utilisés en monothérapie ou en association avec d’autres agents médicamenteux. En cas d’échec des mesures conservatrices, la chirurgie peut être proposée. Récemment, des techniques minimalement invasives ont été utilisées. PMID:28163809

  14. An ALE Finite Element Approach for Two-Phase Flow with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Erik; Anjos, Gustavo; Thome, John; Ltcm Team; Gesar Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, two-phase flow with phase change is investigated through the Finite Element Method (FEM) in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework. The equations are discretized on an unstructured mesh where the interface between the phases is explicitly defined as a sub-set of the mesh. The two-phase interface position is described by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The methodology proposed for computing the curvature leads to very accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational costs. Such a methodology can be employed to study accurately many two-phase flow and heat transfer problems in industry such as oil extraction and refinement, design of refrigeration systems, modelling of microfluidic and biological systems and efficient cooling of electronics for computational purposes. The latter is the principal aim of the present research. The numerical results are discussed and compared to analytical solutions and reference results, thereby revealing the capability of the proposed methodology as a platform for the study of two-phase flow with phase change.

  15. Brewhouse-Resident Microbiota Are Responsible for Multi-Stage Fermentation of American Coolship Ale

    PubMed Central

    Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Bamforth, Charles W.; Mills, David A.

    2012-01-01

    American coolship ale (ACA) is a type of spontaneously fermented beer that employs production methods similar to traditional Belgian lambic. In spite of its growing popularity in the American craft-brewing sector, the fermentation microbiology of ACA has not been previously described, and thus the interface between production methodology and microbial community structure is unexplored. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), barcoded amplicon sequencing (BAS), quantitative PCR (qPCR) and culture-dependent analysis, ACA fermentations were shown to follow a consistent fermentation progression, initially dominated by Enterobacteriaceae and a range of oxidative yeasts in the first month, then ceding to Saccharomyces spp. and Lactobacillales for the following year. After one year of fermentation, Brettanomyces bruxellensis was the dominant yeast population (occasionally accompanied by minor populations of Candida spp., Pichia spp., and other yeasts) and Lactobacillales remained dominant, though various aerobic bacteria became more prevalent. This work demonstrates that ACA exhibits a conserved core microbial succession in absence of inoculation, supporting the role of a resident brewhouse microbiota. These findings establish this core microbial profile of spontaneous beer fermentations as a target for production control points and quality standards for these beers. PMID:22530036

  16. Drawing and writing: An ALE meta-analysis of sensorimotor activations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Brown, Steven

    2015-08-01

    Drawing and writing are the two major means of creating what are referred to as "images", namely visual patterns on flat surfaces. They share many sensorimotor processes related to visual guidance of hand movement, resulting in the formation of visual shapes associated with pictures and words. However, while the human capacity to draw is tens of thousands of years old, the capacity for writing is only a few thousand years old, and widespread literacy is quite recent. In order to compare the neural activations for drawing and writing, we conducted two activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses for these two bodies of neuroimaging literature. The results showed strong overlap in the activation profiles, especially in motor areas (motor cortex, frontal eye fields, supplementary motor area, cerebellum, putamen) and several parts of the posterior parietal cortex. A distinction was found in the left posterior parietal cortex, with drawing showing a preference for a ventral region and writing a dorsal region. These results demonstrate that drawing and writing employ the same basic sensorimotor networks but that some differences exist in parietal areas involved in spatial processing.

  17. Prospects for utilization of air liquefaction and enrichment system (ALES) propulsion in fully reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, W. H.; Yi, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    A concept is shown for a fully reusable, earth to orbit launch vehicle with horizontal takeoff and landing, employing an air-turborocket for low speed and a rocket for high speed acceleration, both using LH2 fuel. The turborocket employs a modified liquid air cycle to supply the oxidizer. The rocket uses 90 percent pure LOX that is collected from the atmosphere, separated, and stored during operation of the turborocket from about Mach 2 to Mach 5 or 6. The takeoff weight and the thrust required at takeoff are markedly reduced by collecting the rocket oxidizer in-flight. The paper shows an approach and the corresponding technology needs for using ALES propulsion in a SSTO vehicle. Reducing the trajectory altitude at the end of collection reduces the wing area and increases payload. The use of state-of-the-art materials, such as graphite polyimide, is critical to meet the structure weight objective for SSTO. Configurations that utilize 'waverider' aerodynamics show great promise to reduce the vehicle weight.

  18. Spent Fuel Ratio Estimates from Numerical Models in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Margraf, J. D.; Dunn, T. A.

    2016-08-02

    Potential threat of intentional sabotage of spent nuclear fuel storage facilities is of significant importance to national security. Paramount is the study of focused energy attacks on these materials and the potential release of aerosolized hazardous particulates into the environment. Depleted uranium oxide (DUO2) is often chosen as a surrogate material for testing due to the unreasonable cost and safety demands for conducting full-scale tests with real spent nuclear fuel. To account for differences in mechanical response resulting in changes to particle distribution it is necessary to scale the DUO2 results to get a proper measure for spent fuel. This is accomplished with the spent fuel ratio (SFR), the ratio of respirable aerosol mass released due to identical damage conditions between a spent fuel and a surrogate material like depleted uranium oxide (DUO2). A very limited number of full-scale experiments have been carried out to capture this data, and the oft-questioned validity of the results typically leads to overly-conservative risk estimates. In the present work, the ALE3D hydrocode is used to simulate DUO2 and spent nuclear fuel pellets impacted by metal jets. The results demonstrate an alternative approach to estimate the respirable release fraction of fragmented nuclear fuel.

  19. Brewhouse-resident microbiota are responsible for multi-stage fermentation of American coolship ale.

    PubMed

    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Bamforth, Charles W; Mills, David A

    2012-01-01

    American coolship ale (ACA) is a type of spontaneously fermented beer that employs production methods similar to traditional Belgian lambic. In spite of its growing popularity in the American craft-brewing sector, the fermentation microbiology of ACA has not been previously described, and thus the interface between production methodology and microbial community structure is unexplored. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), barcoded amplicon sequencing (BAS), quantitative PCR (qPCR) and culture-dependent analysis, ACA fermentations were shown to follow a consistent fermentation progression, initially dominated by Enterobacteriaceae and a range of oxidative yeasts in the first month, then ceding to Saccharomyces spp. and Lactobacillales for the following year. After one year of fermentation, Brettanomyces bruxellensis was the dominant yeast population (occasionally accompanied by minor populations of Candida spp., Pichia spp., and other yeasts) and Lactobacillales remained dominant, though various aerobic bacteria became more prevalent. This work demonstrates that ACA exhibits a conserved core microbial succession in absence of inoculation, supporting the role of a resident brewhouse microbiota. These findings establish this core microbial profile of spontaneous beer fermentations as a target for production control points and quality standards for these beers.

  20. SALE3D. ICEd-ALE Treatment of 3-D Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1992-01-14

    SALE3D calculates three-dimensional fluid flow at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a three-dimensional network of arbitrarily shaped, six-sided deformable cells, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.

  1. Natural hazards in the karst areas of the Viñales National Park, Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govea Blanco, Darlenys; Farfan Gonzalez, Hermes; Dias Guanche, Carlos; Parise, Mario; Ramirez, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Cuban karst is subject to several natural hazards, the great majority of which is hydro-meteorological in character: intense rainstorms, tropical cyclones, seawater inundation, etc. A further, serious problem is represented by droughts, that have become very severe during the recent years, due to longer persistence of the dry season. Beside these hazards, seismic shocks in the eastern part of the country, and mass movements in the mountain areas have also to be mentioned. In general, it has to be noted that both casualties and economic losses from natural disasters have slowly decreased during the last decades at Cuba. Viñales National Park, as many other natural landforms in the Cuban karst, has a great potential for development and exploitation in several different fields, from agriculture, to tourism and recreational activities. At these aims, it is necessary to preserve the natural landscape, its beauty and resources, and, at the same time, improve the quality of people living in these environments. In particular, to face the social changes at present occurring in the area is one of the most difficult task for those people that are in charge of land management and development. It has also to be remembered that "Valle de Viñales" has been included by UNESCO in the World Cultural Heritage List. The main scenarios of natural hazards in the Viñales National Park are described in this contribution, and analyzed by means of different methodologies. Flooded areas have been mapped in the field soon after the occurrence of an extreme event as the hurricane Ike, characterized by rainfall higher than 300 mm/day, and preceded only ten days before by hurricane Gustav, that discharged in the area an amount of 120 mm/day of rain. As a consequence of the temporal vicinity of the two events, the terranes were already highly saturated at the time of occurrence of hurricane Ike, which thus resulted to be one of the most extreme floods ever recorded in the area. Electrostatic

  2. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  3. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2002-10-19

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  4. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2004-01-28

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  5. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  6. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  7. Hydrodynamic instability experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G.; Schneider, M.; Frerking, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments are conducted on the Nova laser with strong radiatively driven shocks (Mach > 20) in planar, two-fluid targets with Atwood number A < 0. Single mode interfacial perturbations are used to test linear theory and 3D random perturbations are used to study turbulent mix. Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are conducted on a new facility called the Linear Electric Motor (LEM) in which macroscopic fluids are accelerated electromagnetically with arbitrary acceleration profiles. The initial experiments are described. Hydrodynamic simulations in 2D are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, but these studies show that simulations in 3D with good radiation transport and equation of state are needed.

  8. Hydrodynamic Synchronisation of Model Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putz, V. B.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    We define a model microswimmer with a variable cycle time, thus allowing the possibility of phase locking driven by hydrodynamic interactions between swimmers. We find that, for extensile or contractile swimmers, phase locking does occur, with the relative phase of the two swimmers being, in general, close to 0 or π, depending on their relative position and orientation. We show that, as expected on grounds of symmetry, self T-dual swimmers, which are time-reversal covariant, do not phase-lock. We also discuss the phase behaviour of a line of tethered swimmers, or pumps. These show oscillations in their relative phases reminiscent of the metachronal waves of cilia.

  9. Hydrodynamics of post CHF region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; De Jarlais, G.

    1984-04-01

    Among various two-phase flow regimes, the inverted flow in the post-dryout region is relatively less well understood due to its special heat transfer conditions. The review of existing data indicates further research is needed in the areas of basic hydrodynamics related to liquid core disintegration mechanisms, slug and droplet formations, entrainment, and droplet size distributions. In view of this, the inverted flow is studied in detail both analytically and experimentally. Criteria for initial flow regimes in the post-dryout region are given. Preliminary models for subsequent flow regime transition criteria are derived together with correlations for a mean droplet diameter based on the adiabatic simulation data.

  10. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity.

    PubMed

    Font, José A

    2000-01-01

    The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A representative sample of available numerical schemes is discussed and particular emphasis is paid to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of relevant astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields, including gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes and evolution of neutron stars, is also presented.

  11. Foundation of Hydrodynamics of Strongly Interacting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and quantum mechanics have many elements in common, as the density field and velocity fields are common variables that can be constructed in both descriptions. Starting with the Schroedinger equation and the Klein-Gordon for a single particle in hydrodynamical form, we examine the basic assumptions under which a quantum system of particles interacting through their mean fields can be described by hydrodynamics.

  12. Microscale hydrodynamics near moving contact lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garoff, Stephen; Chen, Q.; Rame, Enrique; Willson, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrodynamics governing the fluid motions on a microscopic scale near moving contact lines are different from those governing motion far from the contact line. We explore these unique hydrodynamics by detailed measurement of the shape of a fluid meniscus very close to a moving contact line. The validity of present models of the hydrodynamics near moving contact lines as well as the dynamic wetting characteristics of a family of polymer liquids are discussed.

  13. Thermal transport in a noncommutative hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Geracie, M. Son, D. T.

    2015-03-15

    We find the hydrodynamic equations of a system of particles constrained to be in the lowest Landau level. We interpret the hydrodynamic theory as a Hamiltonian system with the Poisson brackets between the hydrodynamic variables determined from the noncommutativity of space. We argue that the most general hydrodynamic theory can be obtained from this Hamiltonian system by allowing the Righi-Leduc coefficient to be an arbitrary function of thermodynamic variables. We compute the Righi-Leduc coefficient at high temperatures and show that it satisfies the requirements of particle-hole symmetry, which we outline.

  14. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, James; Graziani, Frank; Marinak, Marty; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  15. WEC3: Wave Energy Converter Code Comparison Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Combourieu, Adrien; Lawson, Michael; Babarit, Aurelien; Ruehl, Kelley; Roy, Andre; Costello, Ronan; Laporte Weywada, Pauline; Bailey, Helen

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the recently launched Wave Energy Converter Code Comparison (WEC3) project and present preliminary results from this effort. The objectives of WEC3 are to verify and validate numerical modelling tools that have been developed specifically to simulate wave energy conversion devices and to inform the upcoming IEA OES Annex VI Ocean Energy Modelling Verification and Validation project. WEC3 is divided into two phases. Phase 1 consists of a code-to-code verification and Phase II entails code-to-experiment validation. WEC3 focuses on mid-fidelity codes that simulate WECs using time-domain multibody dynamics methods to model device motions and hydrodynamic coefficients to model hydrodynamic forces. Consequently, high-fidelity numerical modelling tools, such as Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics simulation, and simple frequency domain modelling tools were not included in the WEC3 project.

  16. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  17. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. I - Deep envelope models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks has been modified to include radiative transfer effects. This modified code has been used to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12 days. It is shown that in this particular model the hydrogen ionization region plays only a small role in producing the observed phase lag between the light and velocity curves. The cause of the bumps on the model's light curve is examined, and a mechanism is presented to explain those Cepheids with two secondary features on their light curves. This mechanism is shown to be consistent with the Hertzsprung sequence only if the evolutionary mass-luminosity law is used.

  18. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

  19. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This "rotating balance" was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  20. The hydrodynamics of lamprey locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan C.

    The lamprey, an anguilliform swimmer, propels itself by undulating most of its body. This type of swimming produces flow patterns that are highly three-dimensional in nature and not very well understood. However, substantial previous work has been done to understand two-dimensional unsteady propulsion, the possible wake structures and thrust performance. Limited studies of three-dimensional propulsors with simple geometries have displayed the importance of the third dimension in designing unsteady swimmers. Some of the results of those studies, primarily the ways in which vorticity is organized in the wake region, are seen in lamprey swimming as well. In the current work, the third dimension is not the only important factor, but complex geometry and body undulations also contribute to the hydrodynamics. Through dye flow visualization, particle induced velocimetry and pressure measurements, the hydrodynamics of anguilliform swimming are studied using a custom built robotic lamprey. These studies all indicate that the undulations of the body are not producing thrust. Instead, it is the tail which acts to propel the animal. This conclusion led to further investigation of the tail, specifically the role of varying tail flexibility on hydrodymnamics. It is found that by making the tail more flexible, one decreases the coherence of the vorticity in the lamprey's wake. Additional flexibility also yields less thrust.

  1. Fluctuating Hydrodynamics of Electrolytes Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraud, Jean-Philippe; Nonaka, Andy; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B.; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a numerical method for multicomponent solutions featuring electrolytes, in the context of fluctuating hydrodynamics as modeled by the Landau-Lifshitz Navier Stokes equations. Starting from a previously developed numerical scheme for multicomponent low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics, we study the effect of the additional forcing terms induced by charged species. We validate our numerical approach with additional theoretical considerations and with examples involving sodium-chloride solutions, with length scales close to Debye length. In particular, we show how charged species modify the structure factors of the fluctuations, both in equilibrium and non-equilibrium (giant fluctuations) systems, and show that the former is consistent with Debye-Huckel theory. We also discuss the consistency of this approach with the electroneutral approximation in regimes where characteristic length scales are significantly larger than the Debye length. Finally, we use this method to explore a type of electrokinetic instability. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research,.

  2. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher-frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  3. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davit, Y.; Byrne, H.; Osborne, J.; Pitt-Francis, J.; Gavaghan, D.; Quintard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport.

  4. Application of CHAD hydrodynamics to shock-wave problems

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, H.E.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Sahota, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    CHAD is the latest in a sequence of continually evolving computer codes written to effectively utilize massively parallel computer architectures and the latest grid generators for unstructured meshes. Its applications range from automotive design issues such as in-cylinder and manifold flows of internal combustion engines, vehicle aerodynamics, underhood cooling and passenger compartment heating, ventilation, and air conditioning to shock hydrodynamics and materials modeling. CHAD solves the full unsteady Navier-Stoke equations with the k-epsilon turbulence model in three space dimensions. The code has four major features that distinguish it from the earlier KIVA code, also developed at Los Alamos. First, it is based on a node-centered, finite-volume method in which, like finite element methods, all fluid variables are located at computational nodes. The computational mesh efficiently and accurately handles all element shapes ranging from tetrahedra to hexahedra. Second, it is written in standard Fortran 90 and relies on automatic domain decomposition and a universal communication library written in standard C and MPI for unstructured grids to effectively exploit distributed-memory parallel architectures. Thus the code is fully portable to a variety of computing platforms such as uniprocessor workstations, symmetric multiprocessors, clusters of workstations, and massively parallel platforms. Third, CHAD utilizes a variable explicit/implicit upwind method for convection that improves computational efficiency in flows that have large velocity Courant number variations due to velocity of mesh size variations. Fourth, CHAD is designed to also simulate shock hydrodynamics involving multimaterial anisotropic behavior under high shear. The authors will discuss CHAD capabilities and show several sample calculations showing the strengths and weaknesses of CHAD.

  5. Identifying neural correlates of visual consciousness with ALE meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Bisenius, Sandrine; Trapp, Sabrina; Neumann, Jane; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2015-11-15

    Neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) have been a topic of study for nearly two decades. In functional imaging studies, several regions have been proposed to constitute possible candidates for NCC, but as of yet, no quantitative summary of the literature on NCC has been done. The question whether single (striate or extrastriate) regions or a network consisting of extrastriate areas that project directly to fronto-parietal regions are necessary and sufficient neural correlates for visual consciousness is still highly debated [e.g., Rees et al., 2002, Nat Rev. Neurosci 3, 261-270; Tong, 2003, Nat Rev. Neurosci 4, 219-229]. The aim of this work was to elucidate this issue and give a synopsis of the present state of the art by conducting systematic and quantitative meta-analyses across functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using several standard paradigms for conscious visual perception. In these paradigms, consciousness is operationalized via perceptual changes, while the visual stimulus remains invariant. An activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was performed, representing the best approach for voxel-wise meta-analyses to date. In addition to computing a meta-analysis across all paradigms, separate meta-analyses on bistable perception and masking paradigms were conducted to assess whether these paradigms show common or different NCC. For the overall meta-analysis, we found significant clusters of activation in inferior and middle occipital gyrus; fusiform gyrus; inferior temporal gyrus; caudate nucleus; insula; inferior, middle, and superior frontal gyri; precuneus; as well as in inferior and superior parietal lobules. These results suggest a subcortical-extrastriate-fronto-parietal network rather than a single region that constitutes the necessary NCC. The results of our exploratory paradigm-specific meta-analyses suggest that this subcortical-extrastriate-fronto-parietal network might be differentially activated as a function of the

  6. An ALE Meta-Analysis on the Audiovisual Integration of Speech Signals

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Laura C.; Heeg, Elizabeth; Rauschecker, Josef P.; Turkeltaub, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The brain improves speech processing through the integration of audiovisual (AV) signals. Situations involving AV speech integration may be crudely dichotomized into those where auditory and visual inputs contain 1) equivalent, complementary signals (validating AV speech), or 2) inconsistent, different signals (conflicting AV speech). This simple framework may allow for the systematic examination of broad commonalities and differences between AV neural processes engaged by various experimental paradigms frequently used to study AV speech integration. We conducted an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of 22 functional imaging studies comprising 33 experiments, 311 subjects, and 347 foci examining “conflicting” versus “validating” AV speech. Experimental paradigms included content congruency, timing synchrony, and perceptual measures, such as the McGurk effect or synchrony judgments, across AV speech stimulus types (sub-lexical to sentence). Co-localization of conflicting AV speech experiments revealed consistency across at least two contrast types (e.g., synchrony and congruency) in a network of dorsal-stream regions in the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes. There was consistency across all contrast types (synchrony, congruency, and percept) in the bilateral posterior superior/middle temporal cortex. Although fewer studies were available, validating AV speech experiments were localized to other regions, such as ventral-stream visual areas in the occipital and inferior temporal cortex. These results suggest that while equivalent, complementary AV speech signals may evoke activity in regions related to the corroboration of sensory input, conflicting AV speech signals recruit widespread dorsal-stream areas likely involved in the resolution of conflicting sensory signals. PMID:24996043

  7. A moving frame algorithm for high Mach number hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trac, Hy; Pen, Ue-Li

    2004-07-01

    We present a new approach to Eulerian computational fluid dynamics that is designed to work at high Mach numbers encountered in astrophysical hydrodynamic simulations. Standard Eulerian schemes that strictly conserve total energy suffer from the high Mach number problem and proposed solutions to additionally solve the entropy or thermal energy still have their limitations. In our approach, the Eulerian conservation equations are solved in an adaptive frame moving with the fluid where Mach numbers are minimized. The moving frame approach uses a velocity decomposition technique to define local kinetic variables while storing the bulk kinetic components in a smoothed background velocity field that is associated with the grid velocity. Gravitationally induced accelerations are added to the grid, thereby minimizing the spurious heating problem encountered in cold gas flows. Separately tracking local and bulk flow components allows thermodynamic variables to be accurately calculated in both subsonic and supersonic regions. A main feature of the algorithm, that is not possible in previous Eulerian implementations, is the ability to resolve shocks and prevent spurious heating where both the pre-shock and post-shock fluid are supersonic. The hybrid algorithm combines the high-resolution shock capturing ability of the second-order accurate Eulerian TVD scheme with a low-diffusion Lagrangian advection scheme. We have implemented a cosmological code where the hydrodynamic evolution of the baryons is captured using the moving frame algorithm while the gravitational evolution of the collisionless dark matter is tracked using a particle-mesh N-body algorithm. Hydrodynamic and cosmological tests are described and results presented. The current code is fast, memory-friendly, and parallelized for shared-memory machines.

  8. Particle Hydrodynamics with Material Strength for Multi-Layer Orbital Debris Shield Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1999-01-01

    Three dimensional simulation of oblique hypervelocity impact on orbital debris shielding places extreme demands on computer resources. Research to date has shown that particle models provide the most accurate and efficient means for computer simulation of shield design problems. In order to employ a particle based modeling approach to the wall plate impact portion of the shield design problem, it is essential that particle codes be augmented to represent strength effects. This report describes augmentation of a Lagrangian particle hydrodynamics code developed by the principal investigator, to include strength effects, allowing for the entire shield impact problem to be represented using a single computer code.

  9. Convection in pulsating stars. I - Nonlinear hydrodynamics. II - RR Lyrae convection and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellingwerf, R. F.

    1982-11-01

    A nonlinear, nonlocal, time-dependent treatment of convection suitable for use in models of cool giant stars is presented. Local conservation equations plus a diffusive transport equation are used to derive the convective hydrodynamic equations for the case in which turbulent pressure, energy, and viscosity cannot be ignored. The effects of convective overshooting, superadiabatic gradients, convection/pulsation interaction, and time dependence enter this treatment in a natural way. Methods of treating turbulent viscosity and acoustic losses are discussed. Also, an efficient computational scheme for computing the derivatives needed for an implicit hydrodynamic code is outlined. Application to RR Lyrae star envelopes will be presented in a companion paper.

  10. Hydrodynamics, Fungal Physiology, and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Carreón, L; Galindo, E; Rocha-Valadéz, J A; Holguín-Salas, A; Corkidi, G

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous cultures, such as fungi and actinomycetes, contribute substantially to the pharmaceutical industry and to enzyme production, with an annual market of about 6 billion dollars. In mechanically stirred reactors, most frequently used in fermentation industry, microbial growth and metabolite productivity depend on complex interactions between hydrodynamics, oxygen transfer, and mycelial morphology. The dissipation of energy through mechanically stirring devices, either flasks or tanks, impacts both microbial growth through shearing forces on the cells and the transfer of mass and energy, improving the contact between phases (i.e., air bubbles and microorganisms) but also causing damage to the cells at high energy dissipation rates. Mechanical-induced signaling in the cells triggers the molecular responses to shear stress; however, the complete mechanism is not known. Volumetric power input and, more importantly, the energy dissipation/circulation function are the main parameters determining mycelial size, a phenomenon that can be explained by the interaction of mycelial aggregates and Kolmogorov eddies. The use of microparticles in fungal cultures is also a strategy to increase process productivity and reproducibility by controlling fungal morphology. In order to rigorously study the effects of hydrodynamics on the physiology of fungal microorganisms, it is necessary to rule out the possible associated effects of dissolved oxygen, something which has been reported scarcely. At the other hand, the processes of phase dispersion (including the suspended solid that is the filamentous biomass) are crucial in order to get an integral knowledge about biological and physicochemical interactions within the bioreactor. Digital image analysis is a powerful tool for getting relevant information in order to establish the mechanisms of mass transfer as well as to evaluate the viability of the mycelia. This review focuses on (a) the main characteristics of the two most

  11. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  12. Hydrodynamic description for ballistic annihilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Soria, Maria Isabel; Trizac, Emmanuel; Maynar, Pablo; Schehr, Gregory; Barrat, Alain

    2009-01-21

    The problem of the validity of a hydrodynamic description for a system in which there are no collisional invariants is addressed. Hydrodynamic equations have been derived and successfully tested against simulation data for a system where particles annihilate with a probability p, or collide elastically otherwise. The response of the system to a linear perturbation is analyzed as well.

  13. Non-boost-invariant dissipative hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael; Tinti, Leonardo

    2016-12-01

    The one-dimensional non-boost-invariant evolution of the quark-gluon plasma, presumably produced during the early stages of heavy-ion collisions, is analyzed within the frameworks of viscous and anisotropic hydrodynamics. We neglect transverse dynamics and assume homogeneous conditions in the transverse plane but, differently from Bjorken expansion, we relax longitudinal boost invariance in order to study the rapidity dependence of various hydrodynamical observables. We compare the results obtained using several formulations of second-order viscous hydrodynamics with a recent approach to anisotropic hydrodynamics, which treats the large initial pressure anisotropy in a nonperturbative fashion. The results obtained with second-order viscous hydrodynamics depend on the particular choice of the second-order terms included, which suggests that the latter should be included in the most complete way. The results of anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics agree for the central hot part of the system, however, they differ at the edges where the approach of anisotropic hydrodynamics helps to control the undesirable growth of viscous corrections observed in standard frameworks.

  14. The hydrodynamic theory of detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langweiler, Heinz

    1939-01-01

    This report derives equations containing only directly measurable constants for the quantities involved in the hydrodynamic theory of detonation. The stable detonation speed, D, is revealed as having the lowest possible value in the case of positive material velocity, by finding the minimum of the Du curve (u denotes the speed of the gases of combustion). A study of the conditions of energy and impulse in freely suspended detonating systems leads to the disclosure of a rarefaction front traveling at a lower speed behind the detonation front; its velocity is computed. The latent energy of the explosive passes into the steadily growing detonation zone - the region between the detonation front and the rarefaction front. The conclusions lead to a new definition of the concept of shattering power. The calculations are based on the behavior of trinitrotoluene.

  15. Nonstandard Gaits in Unsteady Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, Michael; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    Marine biology has long inspired the design and engineering of underwater vehicles. The literature examining the kinematics and dynamics of fishes, ranging from undulatory anguilliform swimmers to oscillatory ostraciiform ones, is vast. Past numerical studies of these organisms have principally focused on gaits characterized by sinusoidal pitching and heaving motions. It is conceivable that more sophisticated gaits could perform better in some respects, for example as measured by thrust generation or by cost of transport. This work uses an unsteady boundary-element method to numerically investigate the hydrodynamics and propulsive efficiency of high-Reynolds-number swimmers whose gaits are encoded by Fourier series or by Jacobi elliptic functions. Numerical results are presented with an emphasis on identifying particular wake structures and modes of motion that are associated with optimal swimming. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research through MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  16. Hydrodynamics and phases of flocks

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, John; Tu Yuhai . E-mail: yuhai@us.ibm.com; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2005-07-01

    We review the past decade's theoretical and experimental studies of flocking: the collective, coherent motion of large numbers of self-propelled 'particles' (usually, but not always, living organisms). Like equilibrium condensed matter systems, flocks exhibit distinct 'phases' which can be classified by their symmetries. Indeed, the phases that have been theoretically studied to date each have exactly the same symmetry as some equilibrium phase (e.g., ferromagnets, liquid crystals). This analogy with equilibrium phases of matter continues in that all flocks in the same phase, regardless of their constituents, have the same 'hydrodynamic'-that is, long-length scale and long-time behavior, just as, e.g., all equilibrium fluids are described by the Navier-Stokes equations. Flocks are nonetheless very different from equilibrium systems, due to the intrinsically nonequilibrium self-propulsion of the constituent 'organisms'. This difference between flocks and equilibrium systems is most dramatically manifested in the ability of the simplest phase of a flock, in which all the organisms are, on average moving in the same direction (we call this a 'ferromagnetic' flock; we also use the terms 'vector-ordered' and 'polar-ordered' for this situation) to exist even in two dimensions (i.e., creatures moving on a plane), in defiance of the well-known Mermin-Wagner theorem of equilibrium statistical mechanics, which states that a continuous symmetry (in this case, rotation invariance, or the ability of the flock to fly in any direction) can not be spontaneously broken in a two-dimensional system with only short-ranged interactions. The 'nematic' phase of flocks, in which all the creatures move preferentially, or are simply oriented preferentially, along the same axis, but with equal probability of moving in either direction, also differs dramatically from its equilibrium counterpart (in this case, nematic liquid crystals). Specifically, it shows enormous number fluctuations, which

  17. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  18. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  19. The hydrodynamics of dolphin drafting

    PubMed Central

    Weihs, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Background Drafting in cetaceans is defined as the transfer of forces between individuals without actual physical contact between them. This behavior has long been surmised to explain how young dolphin calves keep up with their rapidly moving mothers. It has recently been observed that a significant number of calves become permanently separated from their mothers during chases by tuna vessels. A study of the hydrodynamics of drafting, initiated in the hope of understanding the mechanisms causing the separation of mothers and calves during fishing-related activities, is reported here. Results Quantitative results are shown for the forces and moments around a pair of unequally sized dolphin-like slender bodies. These include two major effects. First, the so-called Bernoulli suction, which stems from the fact that the local pressure drops in areas of high speed, results in an attractive force between mother and calf. Second is the displacement effect, in which the motion of the mother causes the water in front to move forwards and radially outwards, and water behind the body to move forwards to replace the animal's mass. Thus, the calf can gain a 'free ride' in the forward-moving areas. Utilizing these effects, the neonate can gain up to 90% of the thrust needed to move alongside the mother at speeds of up to 2.4 m/sec. A comparison with observations of eastern spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) is presented, showing savings of up to 60% in the thrust that calves require if they are to keep up with their mothers. Conclusions A theoretical analysis, backed by observations of free-swimming dolphin schools, indicates that hydrodynamic interactions with mothers play an important role in enabling dolphin calves to keep up with rapidly moving adult school members. PMID:15132740

  20. An ALE formulation of embedded boundary methods for tracking boundary layers in turbulent fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K.

    2014-04-01

    Embedded Boundary Methods (EBMs) for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are usually constructed in the Eulerian setting. They are particularly attractive for complex Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems characterized by large structural motions and deformations. They are also critical for flow problems with topological changes and FSI problems with cracking. For all of these problems, the alternative Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods are often unfeasible because of the issue of mesh crossovers. However for viscous flows, Eulerian EBMs for CFD do not track the boundary layers around dynamic rigid or flexible bodies. Consequently, the application of these methods to viscous FSI problems requires either a high mesh resolution in a large part of the computational fluid domain, or adaptive mesh refinement. Unfortunately, the first option is computationally inefficient, and the second one is labor intensive. For these reasons, an alternative approach is proposed in this paper for maintaining all moving boundary layers resolved during the simulation of a turbulent FSI problem using an EBM for CFD. In this approach, which is simple and computationally reasonable, the underlying non-body-fitted mesh is rigidly translated and/or rotated in order to track the rigid component of the motion of the dynamic obstacle. Then, the flow computations away from the embedded surface are performed using the ALE framework, and the wall boundary conditions are treated by the chosen Eulerian EBM for CFD. Hence, the solution of the boundary layer tracking problem proposed in this paper can be described as an ALE implementation of a given EBM for CFD. Its basic features are illustrated with the Large Eddy Simulation using a non-body-fitted mesh of a turbulent flow past an airfoil in heaving motion. Its strong potential for the solution of challenging FSI problems at reasonable computational costs is also demonstrated with the simulation of turbulent flows past a family of

  1. Maestro and Castro: Simulation Codes for Astrophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann; Beckner, Vince; Bell, John; Friesen, Brian; Jacobs, Adam; Katz, Maximilian P.; Malone, Christopher; Nonaka, Andrew; Zhang, Weiqun

    2017-01-01

    Stellar explosions are multiphysics problems—modeling them requires the coordinated input of gravity solvers, reaction networks, radiation transport, and hydrodynamics together with microphysics recipes to describe the physics of matter under extreme conditions. Furthermore, these models involve following a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, which puts tough demands on simulation codes. We developed the codes Maestro and Castro to meet the computational challenges of these problems. Maestro uses a low Mach number formulation of the hydrodynamics to efficiently model convection. Castro solves the fully compressible radiation hydrodynamics equations to capture the explosive phases of stellar phenomena. Both codes are built upon the BoxLib adaptive mesh refinement library, which prepares them for next-generation exascale computers. Common microphysics shared between the codes allows us to transfer a problem from the low Mach number regime in Maestro to the explosive regime in Castro. Importantly, both codes are freely available (https://github.com/BoxLib-Codes). We will describe the design of the codes and some of their science applications, as well as future development directions.Support for development was provided by NSF award AST-1211563 and DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics grant DE-FG02-87ER40317 to Stony Brook and by the Applied Mathematics Program of the DOE Office of Advance Scientific Computing Research under US DOE contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 to LBNL.

  2. Final Report for "Verification and Validation of Radiation Hydrodynamics for Astrophysical Applications"

    SciTech Connect

    Zingale, M; Howell, L H

    2010-03-17

    The motivation for this work is to gain experience in the methodology of verification and validation (V&V) of astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes. In the first period of this work, we focused on building the infrastructure to test a single astrophysical application code, Castro, developed in collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). We delivered several hydrodynamic test problems, in the form of coded initial conditions and documentation for verification, routines to perform data analysis, and a generalized regression test suite to allow for continued automated testing. Astrophysical simulation codes aim to model phenomena that elude direct experimentation. Our only direct information about these systems comes from what we observe, and may be transient. Simulation can help further our understanding by allowing virtual experimentation of these systems. However, to have confidence in our simulations requires us to have confidence in the tools we use. Verification and Validation is a process by which we work to build confidence that a simulation code is accurately representing reality. V&V is a multistep process, and is never really complete. Once a single test problem is working as desired (i.e. that problem is verified), one wants to ensure that subsequent code changes do not break that test. At the same time, one must also search for new verification problems that test the code in a new way. It can be rather tedious to manually retest each of the problems, so before going too far with V&V, it is desirable to have an automated test suite. Our project aims to provide these basic tools for astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes.

  3. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  4. HEMP. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.; Levatin, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  5. Survey of Multi-Material Closure Models in 1D Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Maeng, Jungyeoul Brad; Hyde, David Andrew Bulloch

    2015-07-28

    Accurately treating the coupled sub-cell thermodynamics of computational cells containing multiple materials is an inevitable problem in hydrodynamics simulations, whether due to initial configurations or evolutions of the materials and computational mesh. When solving the hydrodynamics equations within a multi-material cell, we make the assumption of a single velocity field for the entire computational domain, which necessitates the addition of a closure model to attempt to resolve the behavior of the multi-material cells’ constituents. In conjunction with a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, we present a variety of both the popular as well as more recently proposed multi-material closure models and survey their performances across a spectrum of examples. We consider standard verification tests as well as practical examples using combinations of fluid, solid, and composite constituents within multi-material mixtures. Our survey provides insights into the advantages and disadvantages of various multi-material closure models in different problem configurations.

  6. Mass flux in extended and classical hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Grmela, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    In classical hydrodynamics, the mass flux is universally chosen to be the momentum field. In extended hydrodynamics, the mass flux acquires different terms. The extended hydrodynamics introduced and investigated in this paper uses a one-particle distribution function as the extra state variable chosen to characterize the microstructure. We prove that the extended hydrodynamics is fully autonomous in the sense that it is compatible with thermodynamics (i.e., the entropy does not decrease during the time evolution) and with mechanics (i.e., the part of the time evolution that leaves the entropy unchanged is Hamiltonian). Subsequently, we investigate its possible reductions. In some situations the emerging reduced dynamical theory is the classical hydrodynamics that is fully autonomous (i.e., all the structure that makes the extended theory fully autonomous is kept in the reduced theory). In other situations (for example, when the fluids under investigation have large density gradients) the reduced theories are not fully autonomous. In such a case the reduced theories constitute a family of mutually related dynamical theories (each of them involving a different amount of detail) that we consider to be a mathematical formulation of multiscale (or multilevel) hydrodynamics. It is in the reduced theories belonging to the multiscale hydrodynamics where the terms that emerge in the mass flux take the form of self-diffusion.

  7. Simulating hydrodynamics on tidal mudflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycling in estuaries is governed by fluxes from both riverine sources and through estuarine sediment deposits. Although estimates from river sources are relatively common and easily sampled, estimates of nutrient fluxes through the fluid-sediment interface are less common and limited to deeper portions of the bays away from intertidal areas. Lack of quantifiable shear stress estimates over intertidal areas limits our overall understanding of nutrient budgets in estuaries. Unfortunately, observation of intertidal hydrodynamics and nutrient fluxes over tidal flats and near the water's edge is difficult owing to the temporally varying and spatially extensive region where the tides inundate, and thus numerical modeling is often employed. In this work, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), a three dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model was used to investigate the shear stresses over intertidal mudflats in the Great Bay, a tidally-dominated New England estuary cut by several tidal channels and with over 50% of the estuary exposed at low tide. The ROMS wetting and drying scheme was used to simulate the rising and falling tide on the flats, a successful approach adapted in other regions of the world but not always inclusive of tidal channels. Bathymetric data obtained in 2009 and 2013 was used to define the model grid. Predicted tides are forced at Adam's Pt., a natural constriction in the estuary about 20 km upstream of the mouth and at the entrance to the Great Bay. Of particular interest are fluxes of material on-to and off-of the tidal flats which contribute to water quality conditions in the estuary, and are largely governed by shear stresses that drive nutrient fluxes at the fluid-sediment interface. Basin wide estimates of near-bottom shear stresses can be used to estimate first order nutrient fluxes over a tidal cycle and hence describe general biogeochemical dynamics of the estuary. Future work will include enhanced forcing of currents by

  8. A Displayer of Stellar Hydrodynamics Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigo, José Antonio Escartín; Senz, Domingo García

    The graphics display tool that we present here was originally developed to meet the needs of the Astronomy and Astrophysics group at the UPC (GAA). At present, it is used to display the plots obtained from hydrodynamic simulations using the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) method. It is, however, a generic program that can be used for other multidimensional hydrodynamic methods. The application combines the most widely used features of other programs (most of them commercial) such as GnuPlot, Surfer, Grapher, IDL, Voxler, etc.

  9. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  10. Atrésie intestinale iléale: diagnostic anténatale et prise en charge

    PubMed Central

    Dhibou, Hanane; Bassir, Ahlam; Sami, Nadia; Boukhanni, Lahcen; Fakhir, Bouchra; Asmouki, Hamid; Soummani, Abderraouf

    2016-01-01

    L’atrésie iléale est une malformation congénitale rare, elle constitue une faible part avec une incidence de 1 pour 5000 cas. Elle peut être suspectée et diagnostiqué échographiquement à la fin du deuxième et troisième trimestre. La concertation obstétrico-chirurgicale constitue ici la clé du succès. Eliminer une maladie générale à mauvais pronostic, lutter contre la prématurité et confier l’enfant immédiatement au chirurgien sont les objectifs principaux à réaliser. L'intervention chirurgicale va préciser le type de l'atrésie, son siège, son caractère unique ou multiple et sa longueur dont l’acte chirurgical dépend de l’étiologie. Il nous a paru intéressant de vous documenter un cas clinique d’atrésie iléale de diagnostic anténatal. PMID:27800095

  11. A Contemporary Study in Gauge Theory and Mathematical Physics: Holomorphic Anomaly in Gauge Theory on ALE Space & Freudenthal Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Sheng-Yu Darren

    This thesis covers two distinct parts: Holomorphic Anomaly in Gauge Theory on ALE Space and Freudenthal Gauge Theory. In part I, I presented a concise review of the Seiberg-Witten curve, Nekrasov's background, geometric engineering and the holomorphic anomaly equation followed by my published work: Holomorphic Anomaly in Gauge Theory on ALE Space, where an deformed N = 2 SU(2) gauge theory on A1 space and its five dimension lift is studied. We find that the partition functions can be reproduced via special geometry and the holomorphic anomaly equation. Schwinger type integral expressions for the boundary conditions at the monopole/dyon point in moduli space are inferred. The interpretation of the five dimensional partition function as the partition function of a refined topological string on A1x(local P1 x P1) is suggested. In part II, I give a comprehensive review of the Freudenthal Triple System, including Freudenthal's orginal construction from Jordan Triple Systems and its relation to Lie algebra, Yang-Baxter equation, and 4d N = 2 BPS black holes, where the novel Freudenthal-dual was discovered. I also present my published work on the Freudenthal Gauge Theory, where we construct the most generic gauge theory admitting F-dual, and prove a no-go theorem that forbids coupling of a F-dual invariant gauge theory to supersymmetry.

  12. Simulation of a prescribed fruitfly flapping motion by the ALE-GFD method on a hybrid Cartesian-meshfree grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trong, N. T.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2011-11-01

    The flapping-wing aerodynamics of insects has been a subject of immense interest for many years. The Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian - Generalized Finite Difference (ALE-GFD) computational scheme on hybrid convecting Cartesian-meshfree grid systems represents a viable alternative to existing mesh-based and immersed boundary approaches for simulating the highly complex and unsteady flows generated by the flapping wings of insects. The three-dimensional flapping-wing flows of a fruitfly (Drosophila) are simulated in the present study. As the forces generated are very sensitive to the acceleration of the wings, a smoothing process was applied on the flapping kinematics to suppress non-physical fluctuations and spikes from the force outcome. The resulting lift and drag forces are then validated with the experimental results, obtained from a parallel experimental study conducted by the research group, measured on a fruitfly-like wing profile executing the identical motion. The excellent agreement between the results demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of the ALE-GFD numerical approach.

  13. Parsing the neural correlates of moral cognition: ALE meta-analysis on morality, theory of mind, and empathy.

    PubMed

    Bzdok, Danilo; Schilbach, Leonhard; Vogeley, Kai; Schneider, Karla; Laird, Angela R; Langner, Robert; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-10-01

    Morally judicious behavior forms the fabric of human sociality. Here, we sought to investigate neural activity associated with different facets of moral thought. Previous research suggests that the cognitive and emotional sources of moral decisions might be closely related to theory of mind, an abstract-cognitive skill, and empathy, a rapid-emotional skill. That is, moral decisions are thought to crucially refer to other persons' representation of intentions and behavioral outcomes as well as (vicariously experienced) emotional states. We thus hypothesized that moral decisions might be implemented in brain areas engaged in 'theory of mind' and empathy. This assumption was tested by conducting a large-scale activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies, which assessed 2,607 peak coordinates from 247 experiments in 1,790 participants. The brain areas that were consistently involved in moral decisions showed more convergence with the ALE analysis targeting theory of mind versus empathy. More specifically, the neurotopographical overlap between morality and empathy disfavors a role of affective sharing during moral decisions. Ultimately, our results provide evidence that the neural network underlying moral decisions is probably domain-global and might be dissociable into cognitive and affective sub-systems.

  14. Detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cissoko, M. )

    1992-02-15

    This paper is concerned with an algebraic study of the equations of detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics taking into account the pressure and the energy of thermal radiation. A new approach to shock and detonation wavefronts is outlined. The fluid under consideration is assumed to be perfect (nonviscous and nonconducting) and to obey the following equation of state: {ital p}=({gamma}{minus}1){rho} where {ital p}, {rho}, and {gamma} are the pressure, the total energy density, and the adiabatic index, respectively. The solutions of the equations of detonation waves are reduced to the problem of finding physically acceptable roots of a quadratic polynomial {Pi}({ital X}) where {ital X} is the ratio {tau}/{tau}{sub 0} of dynamical volumes behind and ahead of the detonation wave. The existence and the locations of zeros of this polynomial allow it to be shown that if the equation of state of the burnt fluid is known then the variables characterizing the unburnt fluid obey well-defined physical relations.

  15. Hydrodynamic aspects of fish olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan P.L

    2008-01-01

    Flow into and around the olfactory chamber of a fish determines how odorant from the fish's immediate environment is transported to the sensory surface (olfactory epithelium) lining the chamber. Diffusion times in water are long, even over comparatively short distances (millimetres). Therefore, transport from the external environment to the olfactory epithelium must be controlled by processes that rely on convection (i.e. the bulk flow of fluid). These include the beating of cilia lining the olfactory chamber and the relatively inexpensive pumping action of accessory sacs. Flow through the chamber may also be induced by an external flow. Flow over the olfactory epithelium appears to be laminar. Odorant transfer to the olfactory epithelium may be facilitated in several ways: if the olfactory organs are mounted on stalks that penetrate the boundary layer; by the steep velocity gradients generated by beating cilia; by devices that deflect flow into the olfactory chamber; by parallel arrays of olfactory lamellae; by mechanical agitation of the chamber (or olfactory stalks); and by vortices. Overall, however, our knowledge of the hydrodynamics of fish olfaction is far from complete. Several areas of future research are outlined. PMID:18184629

  16. Hydrodynamic Instabilities Produced by Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo-Cruz, Julio Cesar Ruben; Hernandez-Zapata, Sergio; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gerardo

    2012-11-01

    When a liquid layer (alcohol in the present work) is in an environment where its relative humidity is less than 100 percent evaporation appears. When RH is above a certain threshold the liquid is at rest. If RH decreases below this threshold the flow becomes unstable, and hydrodynamic cells develop. The aim of this work is to understand the formation of those cells and its main features. Firstly, we investigate how the cell size depends on the layer width. We also study how temperature depends on the vertical coordinate when the cells are present. An inverse temperature gradient is found, that is, the bottom of liquid layer is colder than the free surface. This shows that the intuitive idea that the cells are due to a direct temperature gradient, following a Marangoni-like process, does not work. We propose the hypothesis that the evaporation produce a pressure gradient that is responsible of the cell development. On the other hand, using a Schlieren technique we study the topography of the free surface when cells are present. Finally the alcohol vapor layer adjacent to the liquid surface is explored using scattering experiments, giving some insight on the plausibility of the hypothesis described previously. Authors acknowledge support by DGAPA-UNAM under project IN116312 ``Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos.''

  17. Hydrodynamically enforced entropic Brownian pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-quan; He, Ya-feng; Li, Feng-guo; Zhong, Wei-rong

    2013-04-01

    Transport of overdamped Brownian particles in a finite hydrodynamical channel is investigated in the presence of the ac driving force and the pressure-driven flow. The system is bounded by two particle reservoirs. With the help of the Fick-Jacobs method, we obtain the directed current of Brownian particles and the pumping capacity of the system. The directed transport is determined by the competitions among the asymmetry of the channel, the ac driving force, the pressure-driven flow, and the concentration difference. Their interplays can exhibit the peculiar properties. Remarkably, the particles can be pumped through the channel from the lower concentration reservoir to the higher concentration one, or from the lower pressure side to the higher pressure one. In addition, due to the existence of the pressure drop, ac driving force still plays the significant role on directed transport even in a completely symmetric channel. Our results could be implemented in constrained structures with narrow channels or pores where the particles are suspended in a solvent.

  18. The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Powers, Thomas R.

    2009-09-01

    Cell motility in viscous fluids is ubiquitous and affects many biological processes, including reproduction, infection and the marine life ecosystem. Here we review the biophysical and mechanical principles of locomotion at the small scales relevant to cell swimming, tens of micrometers and below. At this scale, inertia is unimportant and the Reynolds number is small. Our emphasis is on the simple physical picture and fundamental flow physics phenomena in this regime. We first give a brief overview of the mechanisms for swimming motility, and of the basic properties of flows at low Reynolds number, paying special attention to aspects most relevant for swimming such as resistance matrices for solid bodies, flow singularities and kinematic requirements for net translation. Then we review classical theoretical work on cell motility, in particular early calculations of swimming kinematics with prescribed stroke and the application of resistive force theory and slender-body theory to flagellar locomotion. After examining the physical means by which flagella are actuated, we outline areas of active research, including hydrodynamic interactions, biological locomotion in complex fluids, the design of small-scale artificial swimmers and the optimization of locomotion strategies.

  19. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Wickham, Logan; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau-Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids.

  20. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  1. Kinetic regime of hydrodynamic fluctuations and long time tails for a Bjorken expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Mazeliauskas, Aleksas; Teaney, Derek

    2017-01-01

    We develop a set of kinetic equations for hydrodynamic fluctuations which are equivalent to nonlinear hydrodynamics with noise. The hydrokinetic equations can be coupled to existing second-order hydrodynamic codes to incorporate the physics of these fluctuations. We first show that the kinetic response precisely reproduces the renormalization of the shear viscosity and the fractional power (∝ω3 /2) which characterizes equilibrium correlators of energy and momentum for a static fluid. Then we use the hydrokinetic equations to analyze thermal fluctuations for a Bjorken expansion, evaluating the contribution of thermal noise from the earliest moments and at late times. In the Bjorken case, the solution to the kinetic equations determines the coefficient of the first fractional power of the gradient expansion (∝1 /(τT ) 3 /2) for the expanding system. Numerically, we find that the contribution to the longitudinal pressure from hydrodynamic fluctuations is larger than second-order hydrodynamics for typical medium parameters used to simulate heavy ion collisions.

  2. Prediction of hydrodynamic performance of an FLNG system in side-by-side offloading operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenhua; Yang, Jianmin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Tao, Longbin

    2014-04-01

    Floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) is a type of liquefied natural gas (LNG) production system that shows prospects in exploitation of stranded offshore gas fields. The dynamic performance of an FLNG system in side-by-side configuration with a LNG carrier under the combined actions of wave, current and wind can be quite complex. This paper presents a comprehensive study on the hydrodynamics of an FLNG system with a focus on the nonlinear coupling effects of vessels and connection systems based on the concept FLNG prototype recently designed for South China Sea. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the two floating vessels connected through hawsers and fenders are investigated using a state-of-the-art time-domain simulation code SIMO, considering their mechanical and hydrodynamic coupling effects. The simulation model consisting of FLNG and LNG carrier is developed and calibrated by a series of model tests including a tuned damping and viscous levels. The hydrodynamic performances of the two floating vessels under an extreme sea state during side-by-side offloading operation are obtained, and their relative motions and the force responses of the connection hawsers and fenders are analyzed. Sensitivity studies are conducted to clarify contributions from the pretension and the stiffness of the connection hawsers. The effects on the hydrodynamic performance of the vessels and on the loads of the connection system are also investigated.

  3. Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Vaytet, N.; Commerçon, B.; Masson, J.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Radiative transfer plays a crucial role in the star formation process. Because of the high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multifrequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to be developed in an attempt to better account for the large variations in opacities as a function of frequency. Aims: We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Methods: Because of the prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilized bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. Results: We present a series of tests that demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a 3D proto-stellar collapse using 20 frequency groups. Differences between grey and multigroup results are briefly discussed, and the large amount of information this new method brings us is also illustrated. Conclusions: We have implemented a multigroup flux-limited diffusion algorithm in the RAMSES code. The method performed well against standard radiation-hydrodynamics tests, and was also shown to be ripe for exploitation in the computational star formation context.

  4. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  5. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  6. ALEGRA -- code validation: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Konrad, C.H.; Mosher, D.A.; Reinhart, W.D; Duggins, B.D.; Rodeman, R.; Trucano, T.G.; Summers, R.M.; Peery, J.S.

    1998-03-16

    In this study, the authors are providing an experimental test bed for validating features of the ALEGRA code over a broad range of strain rates with overlapping diagnostics that encompass the multiple responses. A unique feature of the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Grid for Research Applications (ALEGRA) code is that it allows simultaneous computational treatment, within one code, of a wide range of strain-rates varying from hydrodynamic to structural conditions. This range encompasses strain rates characteristic of shock-wave propagation (10{sup 7}/s) and those characteristic of structural response (10{sup 2}/s). Most previous code validation experimental studies, however, have been restricted to simulating or investigating a single strain-rate regime. What is new and different in this investigation is that the authors have performed well-instrumented experiments which capture features relevant to both hydrodynamic and structural response in a single experiment. Aluminum was chosen for use in this study because it is a well characterized material--its EOS and constitutive material properties are well defined over a wide range of loading rates. The current experiments span strain rate regimes of over 10{sup 7}/s to less than 10{sup 2}/s in a single experiment. The input conditions are extremely well defined. Velocity interferometers are used to record the high strain-rate response, while low strain rate data were collected using strain gauges.

  7. Low Reynolds number hydrodynamics and mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Roland G.

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamics and hydrodynamic interactions are fundamental for the motility of microswimmers. This includes the propulsion mechanism itself, the synchronized motion of flagella in flagellar bundles and beating cilia of cilia arrays, and even extends to collective behaviors. The general importance of hydrodynamics has stimulated the development of mesoscale simulation approaches to efficiently study dynamical properties of objects embedded in a fluid. In this minireview, the properties of flows at low Reynolds numbers are discussed, thereby the unsteady acceleration term is typically taken into account (Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes equations). Specifically, the synchronization of microrotors by time-dependent hydrodynamic interactions is discussed and the propulsion of a rotating helix. Moreover, the multiparticle collisions dynamics method (MPC), a mesoscale simulation approach for fluids, is outlined. Simulation results for the flow field of a model E. Coli bacterium and its swimming behavior next to a surface are presented.

  8. 78 FR 9907 - Hydrodynamics, Inc.; Notice Denying Late Intervention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Hydrodynamics, Inc.; Notice Denying Late Intervention On June 24, 2010, Commission staff issued a three-year preliminary permit to Hydrodynamics, Inc. (Hydrodynamics) to study the... Rosebud) filed a late motion to intervene in the proceeding. \\1\\ Hydrodynamics, Inc., 131 FERC ]...

  9. Validation of Hydrodynamic Load Models Using CFD for the OC4-DeepCwind Semisubmersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2015-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out on the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible to obtain a better understanding of how to set hydrodynamic coefficients for the structure when using an engineering tool such as FAST to model the system. The focus here was on the drag behavior and the effects of the free-surface, free-ends and multi-member arrangement of the semi-submersible structure. These effects are investigated through code-to-code comparisons and flow visualizations. The implications on mean load predictions from engineering tools are addressed. The work presented here suggests that selection of drag coefficients should take into consideration a variety of geometric factors. Furthermore, CFD simulations demonstrate large time-varying loads due to vortex shedding, which FAST's hydrodynamic module, HydroDyn, does not model. The implications of these oscillatory loads on the fatigue life needs to be addressed.

  10. Hydrodynamic models of a cepheid atmosphere. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., College Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    A method for including the solution of the transfer equation in a standard Henyey type hydrodynamic code was developed. This modified Henyey method was used in an implicit hydrodynamic code to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12(d) including radiative transfer effects in the optically thin zones. It was found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere are not responsible for the large microturbulent velocities observed in Cepheids but may be responsible for the occurrence of supersonic microturbulence. It was found that the splitting of the cores of the strong lines is due to shock induced temperature inversions in the line forming region. The adopted light, color, and velocity curves were used to study three methods frequently used to determine the mean radii of Cepheids. It is concluded that an accuracy of 10% is possible only if high quality observations are used.

  11. RICH: Numerical simulation of compressible hydrodynamics on a moving Voronoi mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re'em

    2014-10-01

    RICH (Racah Institute Computational Hydrodynamics) is a 2D hydrodynamic code based on Godunov's method. The code, largely based on AREPO, acts on an unstructured moving mesh. It differs from AREPO in the interpolation and time advancement scheme as well as a novel parallelization scheme based on Voronoi tessellation. Though not universally true, in many cases a moving mesh gives better results than a static mesh: where matter moves one way and a sound wave is traveling in the other way (such that relative to the grid the wave is not moving), a static mesh gives better results than a moving mesh. RICH is designed in an object oriented, user friendly way that facilitates incorporation of new algorithms and physical processes.

  12. Quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Nopoush, Mohammad; Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    We use quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics to study an azimuthally symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma including the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. In quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics, a single finite-temperature quasiparticle mass is introduced and fit to the lattice data in order to implement a realistic equation of state (EoS). We compare results obtained by using the quasiparticle method with the standard method of imposing the EoS in anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics. Using these three methods, we extract the primordial particle spectra, total number of charged particles, and average transverse momentum for various values of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η /s . We find that the three methods agree well for small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η /s , but differ at large η /s , with the standard anisotropic EoS method showing suppressed production at low transverse-momentum compared with the other two methods considered. Finally, we demonstrate explicitly that, when using standard viscous hydrodynamics, the bulk-viscous correction can drive the primordial particle spectra negative at large pT. Such behavior is not seen in either anisotropic hydrodynamics approach, irrespective of the value of η /s .

  13. Error-correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, Erold W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made towards the completion of a specific task on error-correcting coding. The proposed research consisted of investigating the use of modulation block codes as the inner code of a concatenated coding system in order to improve the overall space link communications performance. The study proposed to identify and analyze candidate codes that will complement the performance of the overall coding system which uses the interleaved RS (255,223) code as the outer code.

  14. Gas-driven lava lake fluctuations at Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) revealed by MODIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergniolle, Sylvie; Bouche, Emmanuella

    2016-09-01

    The long-lived lava lake of Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) is remotely monitored by moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometers (MODIS) installed on satellites. The Normalised Thermal Index (NTI) (Wright et al. Remote Sens Environ 82:135-155 2002) is shown to be proportional to the volume of the lava lake based on visual observations. The lava lake's variable level can be plausibly related to a stable foam, i.e. a mixture composed of densely packed non-coalescing bubbles in suspension within a liquid. This foam is trapped at the top of the magma reservoir, and its thickness changes in response to the gas flux feeding the foam being successively turned on and off. The temporal evolution of the foam thickness, and the resulting variation of the volume of the lava lake, is calculated numerically by assuming that the gas flux feeding the foam, initially constant and homogeneous since December 9, 2002, is suddenly stopped on December 13, 2002 and not restarted before May 2003. The best fit between the theoretical foam thickness and the level of the lava lake deduced from the NTI provides an estimate of both the reservoir radius, 155-170 m, and the gas flux feeding the foam, 5.5×10-3-7.2×10-3 m 3 s -1 when existing. This is in agreement with previous estimates from acoustic measurements (Bouche et al. Earth Planet Sci Lett 295:37-48 2010). The very good agreement between the theoretical foam thickness and that deduced from MODIS data shows for the first time the existence of a regime based on the behaviour of a stable foam, whose spreading towards the conduit ("wide" conduit condition), can explain the long-lived activity. Our predictive model, which links the gas flux at the vent to the foam spreading, could potentially be used on any volcano with a long-lived activity. The underlying gas flux and the horizontal surface area of the magma reservoir can then be deduced by combining modelling to continuous measurements of gas flux. The lava lake, when high, often shows

  15. Multi-phase SPH modelling of violent hydrodynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Athanasios; Rogers, Benedict D.; Stansby, Peter K.; Domínguez, José M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the acceleration of multi-phase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using a graphics processing unit (GPU) enabling large numbers of particles (10-20 million) to be simulated on just a single GPU card. With novel hardware architectures such as a GPU, the optimum approach to implement a multi-phase scheme presents some new challenges. Many more particles must be included in the calculation and there are very different speeds of sound in each phase with the largest speed of sound determining the time step. This requires efficient computation. To take full advantage of the hardware acceleration provided by a single GPU for a multi-phase simulation, four different algorithms are investigated: conditional statements, binary operators, separate particle lists and an intermediate global function. Runtime results show that the optimum approach needs to employ separate cell and neighbour lists for each phase. The profiler shows that this approach leads to a reduction in both memory transactions and arithmetic operations giving significant runtime gains. The four different algorithms are compared to the efficiency of the optimised single-phase GPU code, DualSPHysics, for 2-D and 3-D simulations which indicate that the multi-phase functionality has a significant computational overhead. A comparison with an optimised CPU code shows a speed up of an order of magnitude over an OpenMP simulation with 8 threads and two orders of magnitude over a single thread simulation. A demonstration of the multi-phase SPH GPU code is provided by a 3-D dam break case impacting an obstacle. This shows better agreement with experimental results than an equivalent single-phase code. The multi-phase GPU code enables a convergence study to be undertaken on a single GPU with a large number of particles that otherwise would have required large high performance computing resources.

  16. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, B. E.; Robey, H. F.; Glendinning, S. G.; Bono, M. J.; Burkhart, S. C.; Celeste, J. R.; Coker, R. F.; Costa, R. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Foster, J. M.; Hansen, J. F.; Haynam, C. A.; Hermann, M. R.; Holder, J. P.; Hsing, W. W.; Kalantar, D. H.; Lanier, N. E.; Latray, D. A.; Louis, H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Maggelssen, G. R.; Marshall, C. D.; Moses, E. I.; Nikitin, A. J.; O'Brien, D. W.; Perry, T. S.; Poole, M. W.; Rekow, V. V.; Rosen, P. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Stry, P. E.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Wallace, R.; Weber, S. V.; Wilde, B. H.; Woods, D. T.; Young, B. K.

    2005-05-01

    The production of supersonic jets of material via the interaction of a strong shock wave with a spatially localized density perturbation is a common feature of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) supersonic jets has previously been investigated in detail [J. M. Foster, B. H. Wilde, P. A. Rosen, T. S. Perry, M. Fell, M. J. Edwards, B. F. Lasinski, R. E. Turner, and M. L. Gittings, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2251 (2002)]. In three dimensions (3D), however, there are new aspects to the behavior of supersonic jets in compressible media. In this paper, the commissioning activities on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, W. H. Lowdermilk, and M. Sorem, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] to enable hydrodynamic experiments will be presented as well as the results from the first series of hydrodynamic experiments. In these experiments, two of the first four beams of NIF are used to drive a 40Mbar shock wave into millimeter scale aluminum targets backed by 100mg/cc carbon aerogel foam. The remaining beams are delayed in time and are used to provide a point-projection x-ray backlighter source for diagnosing the three-dimensional structure of the jet evolution resulting from a variety of 2D and 3D features. Comparisons between data and simulations using several codes will be presented.

  17. Pulsations and Hydrodynamics of Luminous Blue Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Lovekin, Catherine C.

    2012-07-01

    The Luminous Blue Variable stars exhibit behavior ranging from light curve 'microvariations' on timescales of tens of days, to 'outbursts' accompanied by mass loss of ~10-3 Msun occurring decades apart, to 'giant eruptions' such as seen in Eta Carinae, ejecting one or more solar masses and recurring on timescales of centuries. Here we review the work of the Los Alamos group since 1993, to investigate pulsations and instabilities in massive stars using linear pulsation models and non-linear hydrodynamic models. The models predict pulsational variability that may be associated with the microvariations. We show using a nonlinear pulsation hydrodynamics code with a time-dependent convection treatment, that in some circumstances the Eddington limit is exceeded periodically in the pulsation driving region of the stellar envelope, accelerating the outer layers, and perhaps initiating mass loss or the LBV outbursts. We discuss how pulsations and mass loss may be responsible for the location of the Humphreys- Davidson Limit in the H-R diagram. The 'giant eruptions', however, must involve much deeper regions in the stellar core to cause such large amounts of mass to be ejected. We review and suggest some possible explanations, including mixing from gravity modes, secular instabilities, the epsilon mechanism, or the SASI instability as proposed for Type II supernovae. We outline future work and required stellar modeling capabilities to investigate these possibilities.

  18. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Colliding Jets: Modeling 3C 75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Schive, H.-Y.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiueh, T.; Musoke, G.; Young, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Radio observations suggest that 3C 75, located in the dumbbell shaped galaxy NGC 1128 at the center of Abell 400, hosts two colliding jets. Motivated by this source, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations using a modified version of the GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement hydrodynamical parallel code (GAMER) to study colliding extragalactic jets. We find that colliding jets can be cast into two categories: (1) bouncing jets, in which case the jets bounce off each other keeping their identities, and (2) merging jets, when only one jet emerges from the collision. Under some conditions the interaction causes the jets to break up into oscillating filaments of opposite helicity, with consequences for their downstream stability. When one jet is significantly faster than the other and the impact parameter is small, the jets merge; the faster jet takes over the slower one. In the case of merging jets, the oscillations of the filaments, in projection, may show a feature that resembles a double helix, similar to the radio image of 3C 75. Thus we interpret the morphology of 3C 75 as a consequence of the collision of two jets with distinctly different speeds at a small impact parameter, with the faster jet breaking up into two oscillating filaments.

  19. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamics Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, B E; Weber, S V; Glendinning, S; Lanier, N; Woods, D; Bono, M; Dixit, S; Haynam, C; Holder, J; Kalantar, D; MacGowan, B; Moses, E; Nikitin, A; Rekow, V; Wallace, R; Van Wonterghem, B; Rosen, P; Foster, J; Stry, P; Wilde, B; Hsing, W; Robey, H

    2004-11-12

    The production of supersonic jets of material via the interaction of a strong shock wave with a spatially localized density perturbation is a common feature of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) supersonic jets has previously been investigated in detail [J. M. Foster et. al, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2251 (2002)]. In three-dimensions (3D), however, there are new aspects to the behavior of supersonic jets in compressible media. In this paper, the commissioning activities on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] to enable hydrodynamic experiments will be presented as well as the results from the first series of hydrodynamic experiments. In these experiments, two of the first four beams of NIF are used to drive a 40 Mbar shock wave into millimeter scale aluminum targets backed by 100 mg/cc carbon aerogel foam. The remaining beams are delayed in time and are used to provide a point-projection x-ray backlighter source for diagnosing the three-dimensional structure of the jet evolution resulting from a variety of 2D and 3D features. Comparisons between data and simulations using several codes will be presented.

  20. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, B E; Robey, H F; Glendinning, S G; Bono, M J; Dixit, S N; Foster, J M; Haynam, C A; Holder, J P; Hsing, W W; Kalantar, D H; Lanier, N E; MacGowan, B J; Moses, E I; Nikitin, A J; Perry, T S; Rekow, V V; Rosen, P A; Stry, P E; Van Wonterghem, B M; Wallace, R; Weber, S V; Wilde, B H; Woods, D T

    2005-02-09

    The production of supersonic jets of material via the interaction of a strong shock wave with a spatially localized density perturbation is a common feature of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) supersonic jets has previously been investigated in detail [J. M. Foster et. al, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2251 (2002)]. In three-dimensions (3D), however, there are new aspects to the behavior of supersonic jets in compressible media. In this paper, the commissioning activities on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] to enable hydrodynamic experiments will be presented as well as the results from the first series of hydrodynamic experiments. In these experiments, two of the first four beams of NIF are used to drive a 40 Mbar shock wave into millimeter scale aluminum targets backed by 100 mg/cc carbon aerogel foam. The remaining beams are delayed in time and are used to provide a point-projection x-ray backlighter source for diagnosing the three-dimensional structure of the jet evolution resulting from a variety of 2D and 3D features. Comparisons between data and simulations using several codes will be presented.

  1. Hydrodynamic interactions suppress deformation of suspension drops in Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Sadlej, Krzysztof; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria L

    2010-08-07

    Evolution of a suspension drop entrained by Poiseuille flow is studied numerically at a low Reynolds number. A suspension drop is modeled by a cloud of many nontouching particles, initially randomly distributed inside a spherical volume of a viscous fluid which is identical to the host fluid outside the drop. Evolution of particle positions and velocities is evaluated by the accurate multipole method corrected for lubrication, implemented in the HYDROMULTIPOLE numerical code. Deformation of the drop is shown to be smaller for a larger volume fraction. At high concentrations, hydrodynamic interactions between close particles significantly decrease elongation of the suspension drop along the flow in comparison to the corresponding elongation of the pure-fluid drop. Owing to hydrodynamic interactions, the particles inside a dense-suspension drop tend to stay for a long time together in the central part of the drop; later on, small clusters occasionally separate out from the drop, and are stabilized by quasiperiodic orbits of the constituent nontouching particles. Both effects significantly reduce the drop spreading along the flow. At large volume fractions, suspension drops destabilize by fragmentation, and at low volume fractions, by dispersing into single particles.

  2. Hydrodynamics of soft active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. C.; Joanny, J. F.; Ramaswamy, S.; Liverpool, T. B.; Prost, J.; Rao, Madan; Simha, R. Aditi

    2013-07-01

    This review summarizes theoretical progress in the field of active matter, placing it in the context of recent experiments. This approach offers a unified framework for the mechanical and statistical properties of living matter: biofilaments and molecular motors in vitro or in vivo, collections of motile microorganisms, animal flocks, and chemical or mechanical imitations. A major goal of this review is to integrate several approaches proposed in the literature, from semimicroscopic to phenomenological. In particular, first considered are “dry” systems, defined as those where momentum is not conserved due to friction with a substrate or an embedding porous medium. The differences and similarities between two types of orientationally ordered states, the nematic and the polar, are clarified. Next, the active hydrodynamics of suspensions or “wet” systems is discussed and the relation with and difference from the dry case, as well as various large-scale instabilities of these nonequilibrium states of matter, are highlighted. Further highlighted are various large-scale instabilities of these nonequilibrium states of matter. Various semimicroscopic derivations of the continuum theory are discussed and connected, highlighting the unifying and generic nature of the continuum model. Throughout the review, the experimental relevance of these theories for describing bacterial swarms and suspensions, the cytoskeleton of living cells, and vibrated granular material is discussed. Promising extensions toward greater realism in specific contexts from cell biology to animal behavior are suggested, and remarks are given on some exotic active-matter analogs. Last, the outlook for a quantitative understanding of active matter, through the interplay of detailed theory with controlled experiments on simplified systems, with living or artificial constituents, is summarized.

  3. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. I. HYDRODYNAMICS AND SELF-GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, A. S.; Beckner, V. E.; Bell, J. B.; Day, M. S.; Lijewski, M. J.; Nonaka, A.; Howell, L. H.; Singer, M.; Joggerst, C. C.; Zingale, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present a new code, CASTRO, that solves the multicomponent compressible hydrodynamic equations for astrophysical flows including self-gravity, nuclear reactions, and radiation. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid and incorporates adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Our approach to AMR uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The radiation component of CASTRO will be described in detail in the next paper, Part II, of this series.

  4. An explicit-implicit solution of the hydrodynamic and radiation equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahota, Manjit S.

    A solution of the coupled radiation-hydrodynamic equations on a median mesh is presented for a transient, three-dimensional, compressible, multimaterial, free-Lagrangian code. The code uses fixed-mass particles surrounded by median Lagrangian cells. These cells are free to change connectivity, which ensures accuracy in the differencing of equations and allows the code to handle extreme distortions. All calculations are done on a median Lagrangian mesh that is constructed from the Delaunay tetrahedral mesh using the Voronoi connection algorithm. Because each tetrahedron volume is shared equally by the four mass points (computational cells) located at the tetrahedron vertices, calculations are done at a tetrahedron level for enhanced computational efficiency, and the rate-of-change data are subsequently accumulated at mass points from these tetrahedral contributions. The hydrodynamic part of the calculations is done using an explicit time-advancement technique, and the radiation calculations are done using a hybrid explicit-implicit time-advancement scheme in the equilibrium-diffusion limit. An explicit solution of the radiation-diffusion equation is obtained for cells that meet the current time-step criterion imposed by the hydrodynamic solution, and a fully implicit point-relaxation solution is obtained elsewhere without defining an inversion matrix. The approach has a distinct advantage over the conventional matrix-inversion approaches, because defining such a matrix for an unstructured grid is both cumbersome and computationally intensive. The new algorithm runs >20 times faster than a matrix-solver approach using the conjugate-gradient technique, and is easily parallelizable on the Cray family of supercomputers. With the new algorithm, the radiation-diffusion part of the calculation runs about twice as fast as the hydrodynamic part of the calculation. The code conserves mass, momentum, and energy exactly, except in some pathological situations.

  5. Protostellar hydrodynamics: Constructing and testing a spacially and temporally second-order accurate method. 2: Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhill, Elizabeth A.; Boss, Alan P.

    1993-01-01

    In Boss & Myhill (1992) we described the derivation and testing of a spherical coordinate-based scheme for solving the hydrodynamic equations governing the gravitational collapse of nonisothermal, nonmagnetic, inviscid, radiative, three-dimensional protostellar clouds. Here we discuss a Cartesian coordinate-based scheme based on the same set of hydrodynamic equations. As with the spherical coorrdinate-based code, the Cartesian coordinate-based scheme employs explicit Eulerian methods which are both spatially and temporally second-order accurate. We begin by describing the hydrodynamic equations in Cartesian coordinates and the numerical methods used in this particular code. Following Finn & Hawley (1989), we pay special attention to the proper implementations of high-order accuracy, finite difference methods. We evaluate the ability of the Cartesian scheme to handle shock propagation problems, and through convergence testing, we show that the code is indeed second-order accurate. To compare the Cartesian scheme discussed here with the spherical coordinate-based scheme discussed in Boss & Myhill (1992), the two codes are used to calculate the standard isothermal collapse test case described by Bodenheimer & Boss (1981). We find that with the improved codes, the intermediate bar-configuration found previously disappears, and the cloud fragments directly into a binary protostellar system. Finally, we present the results from both codes of a new test for nonisothermal protostellar collapse.

  6. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. II. GRAY RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of a flux-limited gray radiation solver for the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The gray radiation solver is based on a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics. In our approach, the system is split into two parts, one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, and another parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem is solved explicitly with a high-order Godunov scheme, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method.

  7. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  8. Topology Studies of Hydrodynamics Using Two-Particle Correlation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, J.; Tavares, B. M.; Qian, W. L.; Andrade, R.; Grassi, F.; Hama, Y.; Kodama, T.; Xu, N.

    2009-12-01

    The effects of fluctuating initial conditions are studied in the context of relativistic heavy ion collisions where a rapidly evolving system is formed. Two-particle correlation analysis is applied to events generated with the NEXSPHERIO hydrodynamic code, starting with fluctuating nonsmooth initial conditions (IC). The results show that the nonsmoothness in the IC survives the hydroevolution and can be seen as topological features of the angular correlation function of the particles emerging from the evolving system. A long range correlation is observed in the longitudinal direction and in the azimuthal direction a double peak structure is observed in the opposite direction to the trigger particle. This analysis provides clear evidence that these are signatures of the combined effect of tubular structures present in the IC and the proceeding collective dynamics of the hot and dense medium.

  9. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850 km /h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka) and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2) iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the "hydrodynamic tunneling." These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  10. Collisionless stellar hydrodynamics as an efficient alternative to N-body methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Nigel L.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Hensler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The dominant constituents of the Universe's matter are believed to be collisionless in nature and thus their modelling in any self-consistent simulation is extremely important. For simulations that deal only with dark matter or stellar systems, the conventional N-body technique is fast, memory efficient and relatively simple to implement. However when extending simulations to include the effects of gas physics, mesh codes are at a distinct disadvantage compared to Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) codes. Whereas implementing the N-body approach into SPH codes is fairly trivial, the particle-mesh technique used in mesh codes to couple collisionless stars and dark matter to the gas on the mesh has a series of significant scientific and technical limitations. These include spurious entropy generation resulting from discreteness effects, poor load balancing and increased communication overhead which spoil the excellent scaling in massively parallel grid codes. In this paper we propose the use of the collisionless Boltzmann moment equations as a means to model the collisionless material as a fluid on the mesh, implementing it into the massively parallel FLASH Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) code. This approach which we term `collisionless stellar hydrodynamics' enables us to do away with the particle-mesh approach and since the parallelization scheme is identical to that used for the hydrodynamics, it preserves the excellent scaling of the FLASH code already demonstrated on peta-flop machines. We find that the classic hydrodynamic equations and the Boltzmann moment equations can be reconciled under specific conditions, allowing us to generate analytic solutions for collisionless systems using conventional test problems. We confirm the validity of our approach using a suite of demanding test problems, including the use of a modified Sod shock test. By deriving the relevant eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Boltzmann moment equations, we are able to use high order

  11. Explicit 3D continuum fracture modeling with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.

    1993-01-01

    Impact phenomena shaped our solar system. As usual for most solar system processes, the scales are far different than we can address directly in the laboratory. Impact velocities are often much higher than we can achieve, sizes are often vastly larger, and most impacts take place in an environment where the only gravitational force is the mutual pull of the impactors. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique has been applied in the past to the simulations of giant impacts. In these simulations, the colliding objects were so massive (at least a sizeable fraction of the Earth's mass) that material strength was negligible compared to gravity. This assumption can no longer be made when the bodies are much smaller. To this end, we have developed a 3D SPH code that includes a strength model to which we have added a von Mises yielding relation for stresses beyond the Hugoniot Elastic Limit. At the lower stresses associated with brittle failure, we use a rate-dependent strength based on the nucleation of incipient flaws whose number density is given by a Weibull distribution. Following Grady and Kipp and Melosh et al., we introduce a state variable D ('damage'), 0 less than D less than 1, which expresses the local reduction in strength due to crack growth under tensile loading. Unfortunately for the hydrodynamics, Grady and Kipp's model predicts which fragments are the most probable ones and not the ones that are really formed. This means, for example, that if a given laboratory experiment is modeled, the fragment distribution obtained from the Grady-Kipp theory would be equivalent to a ensemble average over many realizations of the experiment. On the other hand, the hydrodynamics itself is explicit and evolves not an ensemble average but very specific fragments. Hence, there is a clear incompatibility with the deterministic nature of the hydrodynamics equations and the statistical approach of the Grady-Kipp dynamical fracture model. We remedy these shortcomings

  12. Frontal-subcortical circuitry in social attachment and relationships: A cross-sectional fMRI ALE meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu-Hui; Walker, Zachary M; Hale, James B; Chen, S H Annabel

    2017-02-22

    Researchers have explored the concept of attachment in multiple ways, from animal studies examining imprinting to abnormal attachment in psychopathology. However, until recently, few have considered how neural circuitry develops the effective social bonds that are subsequently replicated in relationships across the lifespan. This current cross-sectional study undertook a fMRI Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analyses to examine the neurocircuitry that governs emotional and behavioural functions critical for building effective social relationships in children and adults. Results suggest that dissociable dorsal cognitive ("cool") and ventral - affective ("hot") frontal-subcortical circuits (FSC) work together to govern social relationships, with repeated social consequences leading to potentially adaptive - or maladaptive - relationships that can become routinized in the cerebellum. Implications for forming stable, functional, social bonds are considered, followed by recommendations for those who struggle with cool and hot FSC functioning that can hinder the development of adaptive prosocial relationships.

  13. Simulations of supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-11-01

    The critical roles of hydrodynamic instabilities in SN 1987A and in ICF are well known; 2D-3D differences are important in both areas. In a continuing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using LLNL hydro codes, and astrophysics codes used to model supernovae. Initial investigations with two-layer planar packages having 2D sinusoidal interface perturbations are described in Ap.J. 478, L75 (1997). Early-time simulations done with the LLNL 1D radiation transport code HYADES are mapped into the 2D LLNL code CALE and into the multi-D supernova code PROMETHEUS. Work is underway on experiments comparing interface instability growth produced by 2D sinusoidal versus 3D cross-hatch and axisymmetric cylindrical perturbations. Results of the simulations will be presented and compared with experiment. Implications for interpreting supernova observations and for supernova modelling will be discussed. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  14. The role of the right temporoparietal junction in attention and social interaction as revealed by ALE meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rottschy, C.; Oberwelland, E.; Bzdok, D.; Fox, P. T.; Eickhoff, S. B.; Fink, G. R.; Konrad, K.

    2016-01-01

    The right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) is frequently associated with different capacities that to shift attention to unexpected stimuli (reorienting of attention) and to understand others’ (false) mental state [theory of mind (ToM), typically represented by false belief tasks]. Competing hypotheses either suggest the rTPJ representing a unitary region involved in separate cognitive functions or consisting of subregions subserving distinct processes. We conducted activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses to test these hypotheses. A conjunction analysis across ALE meta-analyses delineating regions consistently recruited by reorienting of attention and false belief studies revealed the anterior rTPJ, suggesting an overarching role of this specific region. Moreover, the anatomical difference analysis unravelled the posterior rTPJ as higher converging in false belief compared with reorienting of attention tasks. This supports the concept of an exclusive role of the posterior rTPJ in the social domain. These results were complemented by meta-analytic connectivity mapping (MACM) and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) analysis to investigate whole-brain connectivity patterns in task-constrained and task-free brain states. This allowed for detailing the functional separation of the anterior and posterior rTPJ. The combination of MACM and RSFC mapping showed that the posterior rTPJ has connectivity patterns with typical ToM regions, whereas the anterior part of rTPJ co-activates with the attentional network. Taken together, our data suggest that rTPJ contains two functionally fractionated subregions: while posterior rTPJ seems exclusively involved in the social domain, anterior rTPJ is involved in both, attention and ToM, conceivably indicating an attentional shifting role of this region. PMID:24915964

  15. The haemoglobin glycation index as predictor of diabetes-related complications in the AleCardio trial.

    PubMed

    van Steen, Sigrid Cj; Schrieks, Ilse C; Hoekstra, Joost Bl; Lincoff, A Michael; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Mellbin, Linda G; Rydén, Lars; Grobbee, Diederick E; DeVries, J Hans

    2017-01-01

    The haemoglobin glycation index (HGI) quantifies the interindividual variation in the propensity for glycation and is a predictor of diabetes complications and adverse effects of intensive glucose lowering. We investigated the relevance of HGI as independent predictor of complications by using data of the AleCardio trial. The AleCardio trial randomized 7226 type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary syndrome to aleglitazar or placebo. From 6458 patients with baseline glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), a linear regression equation, HbA1c (%) = 5.45 + 0.0158 * FPG (mg/dl), was used to calculate predicted HbA1c and derive HGI (= observed - predicted HbA1c). With multivariate Cox regression we examined the association with major adverse cardiac events, cardiovascular mortality, total mortality and hypoglycaemia, irrespective of treatment allocation, using HGI subgroups (low, intermediate and high) and HGI as continuous variable. Patients with high HGI were younger, more often non-Caucasian, had a longer duration of diabetes, showed more retinopathy and used insulin more often. Hypoglycaemia occurred less often in the low HGI subgroup, but this difference disappeared after adjustment for duration of diabetes, insulin and sulphonylurea use. Low HGI patients were at lower risk for cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.44-0.93, p = 0.020) and total mortality (hazard ratio 0.69; 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.95, p = 0.025), as compared with high HGI patients. Every percentage increase in HGI was associated with a 16% increase in the risk for cardiovascular mortality ( p = 0.005). The association between HGI and mortality disappeared with additional adjustment for HbA1c. HGI predicts mortality in diabetes patients with acute coronary syndromes, but no better than HbA1c.

  16. The role of the right temporoparietal junction in attention and social interaction as revealed by ALE meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Krall, S C; Rottschy, C; Oberwelland, E; Bzdok, D; Fox, P T; Eickhoff, S B; Fink, G R; Konrad, K

    2015-03-01

    The right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) is frequently associated with different capacities that to shift attention to unexpected stimuli (reorienting of attention) and to understand others' (false) mental state [theory of mind (ToM), typically represented by false belief tasks]. Competing hypotheses either suggest the rTPJ representing a unitary region involved in separate cognitive functions or consisting of subregions subserving distinct processes. We conducted activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses to test these hypotheses. A conjunction analysis across ALE meta-analyses delineating regions consistently recruited by reorienting of attention and false belief studies revealed the anterior rTPJ, suggesting an overarching role of this specific region. Moreover, the anatomical difference analysis unravelled the posterior rTPJ as higher converging in false belief compared with reorienting of attention tasks. This supports the concept of an exclusive role of the posterior rTPJ in the social domain. These results were complemented by meta-analytic connectivity mapping (MACM) and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) analysis to investigate whole-brain connectivity patterns in task-constrained and task-free brain states. This allowed for detailing the functional separation of the anterior and posterior rTPJ. The combination of MACM and RSFC mapping showed that the posterior rTPJ has connectivity patterns with typical ToM regions, whereas the anterior part of rTPJ co-activates with the attentional network. Taken together, our data suggest that rTPJ contains two functionally fractionated subregions: while posterior rTPJ seems exclusively involved in the social domain, anterior rTPJ is involved in both, attention and ToM, conceivably indicating an attentional shifting role of this region.

  17. On the definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-10-28

    The Green-Kubo formula for discrete hydrodynamic variables involves information about not only the fluid transport coefficients but also about discrete versions of the differential operators that govern the evolution of the discrete variables. This gives an intimate connection between discretization procedures in fluid dynamics and coarse-graining procedures used to obtain hydrodynamic behavior of molecular fluids. We observed that a natural definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables in terms of Voronoi cells leads to a Green-Kubo formula which is divergent, rendering the full coarse-graining strategy useless. In order to understand this subtle issue, in the present paper we consider the coarse graining of noninteracting Brownian particles. The discrete hydrodynamic variable for this problem is the number of particles within Voronoi cells. Thanks to the simplicity of the model we spot the origin of the singular behavior of the correlation functions. We offer an alternative definition, based on the concept of a Delaunay cell that behaves properly, suggesting the use of the Delaunay construction for the coarse graining of molecular fluids at the discrete hydrodynamic level.

  18. Anisotropic hydrodynamics for conformal Gubser flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Michael; Nopoush, Mohammad; Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2016-12-01

    In this proceedings contribution, we review the exact solution of the anisotropic hydrodynamics equations for a system subject to Gubser flow. For this purpose, we use the leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics equations which assume that the distribution function is ellipsoidally symmetric in local-rest-frame momentum. We then prove that the SO(3)q symmetry in de Sitter space constrains the anisotropy tensor to be of spheroidal form with only one independent anisotropy parameter remaining. As a consequence, the exact solution reduces to the problem of solving two coupled non-linear differential equations. We show that, in the limit that the relaxation time goes to zero, one obtains Gubser's ideal hydrodynamic solution and, in the limit that the relaxation time goes to infinity, one obtains the exact free streaming solution obtained originally by Denicol et al. For finite relaxation time, we solve the equations numerically and compare to the exact solution of the relaxation-time-approximation Boltzmann equation subject to Gubser flow. Using this as our standard, we find that anisotropic hydrodynamics describes the spatio-temporal evolution of the system better than all currently known dissipative hydrodynamics approaches.

  19. New formulation of leading order anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-05-01

    Anisotropic hydrodynamics is a reorganization of the relativistic hydrodynamics expansion, with the leading order already containing substantial momentum-space anisotropies. The latter are a cause of concern in the traditional viscous hydrodynamics, since large momentum anisotropies generated in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are not consistent with the hypothesis of small deviations from an isotropic background, i.e., from the local equilibrium distribution. We discuss the leading order of the expansion, presenting a new formulation for the (1+1)- dimensional case, namely, for the longitudinally boost invariant and cylindrically symmetric flow. This new approach is consistent with the well established framework of Israel and Stewart in the close to equilibrium limit (where we expect viscous hydrodynamics to work well). If we consider the (0+1)-dimensional case, that is, transversally homogeneous and longitudinally boost invariant flow, the new form of anisotropic hydrodynamics leads to better agreement with known solutions of the Boltzmann equation than the previous formulations, especially when we consider massive particles.

  20. Hydrodynamic approaches in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derradi de Souza, R.; Koide, T.; Kodama, T.

    2016-01-01

    We review several facets of the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic heavy ion collisions, starting from the historical motivation to the present understandings of the observed collective aspects of experimental data, especially those of the most recent RHIC and LHC results. In this report, we particularly focus on the conceptual questions and the physical foundations of the validity of the hydrodynamic approach itself. We also discuss recent efforts to clarify some of the points in this direction, such as the various forms of derivations of relativistic hydrodynamics together with the limitations intrinsic to the traditional approaches, variational approaches, known analytic solutions for special cases, and several new theoretical developments. Throughout this review, we stress the role of course-graining procedure in the hydrodynamic description and discuss its relation to the physical observables through the analysis of a hydrodynamic mapping of a microscopic transport model. Several questions to be answered to clarify the physics of collective phenomena in the relativistic heavy ion collisions are pointed out.

  1. Development of hydrodynamic micro-bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Zhang, J.; Spikes, H. A.; Reddyhoff, T.; Holmes, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the modelling and testing of mm-scale hydrodynamic bearings which are being developed to improve the efficiency of a cm-scale turbine energy harvester, whose efficiency was previously limited by poorly lubricated commercial jewel-bearings. The bearings were fabricated using DRIE and their performance was assessed using a custom built MEMS tribometer. Results demonstrate that acceptably low friction is achieved when low viscosity liquid lubricants are used in combination with an appropriate choice of friction modifier additive. Further reduction in friction is demonstrated when the step height of bearing is adjusted in accordance with hydrodynamic theory. In parallel with the experiments, hydrodynamic lubricant modelling has been carried out to predict and further optimize film thickness and friction performance. Modelling results are presented and validated against experimental friction data.

  2. Nondecaying hydrodynamic interactions along narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiunas, Karolis; Pagliara, Stefano; Lauga, Eric; Lister, John R.; Keyser, Ulrich

    Particle-particle interactions are of paramount importance in every multi-body system as they determine the collective behaviour and coupling strength. Many well-known interactions like electro-static, van der Waals or screened Coulomb, decay exponentially or with negative powers of the particle spacing r. Similarly, hydrodynamic interactions between particles undergoing Brownian motion decay as 1 / r in bulk, and are assumed to decay in small channels. Such interactions are ubiquitous in biological and technological systems. Here we confine two particles undergoing Brownian motion in narrow, microfluidic channels and study their coupling through hydrodynamic interactions. Our experiments show that the hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions are distance-independent in these channels. This finding is of fundamental importance for the interpretation of experiments where dense mixtures of particles or molecules diffuse through finite length, water-filled channels or pore networks.

  3. Relativistic hydrodynamics from the projection operator method.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yuki; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2013-02-01

    We study relativistic hydrodynamics in the linear regime, based on Mori's projection operator method. In relativistic hydrodynamics, it is considered that an ambiguity about the fluid velocity occurs from the choice of a local rest frame: the Landau and Eckart frames. We find that the difference of the frames is not the choice of the local rest frame, but rather that of dynamic variables in the linear regime. We derive hydrodynamic equations in both frames by the projection operator method. We show that the natural derivation gives the linearized Landau equation. Also we find that, even for the Eckart frame, the slow dynamics is actually described by the dynamic variables for the Landau frame.

  4. On the hydrodynamics of swimming enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoyu; Wolynes, Peter G

    2015-10-28

    Several recent experiments suggest that rather generally the diffusion of enzymes may be augmented through their activity. We demonstrate that such swimming motility can emerge from the interplay between the enzyme energy landscape and the hydrodynamic coupling of the enzyme to its environment. Swimming thus occurs during the transit time of a transient allosteric change. We estimate the velocity during the transition. The analysis of such a swimming motion suggests the final stroke size is limited by the hydrodynamic size of the enzyme. This limit is quite a bit smaller than the values that can be inferred from the recent experiments. We also show that one proposed explanation of the experiments based on reaction heat effects can be ruled out using an extended hydrodynamic analysis. These results lead us to propose an alternate explanation of the fluorescence correlation measurements.

  5. Hydrodynamical comparison test of solar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, K.; Kim, Y.-C.

    2012-12-01

    We present three dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations for solar surface convection based on three most recent solar mixtures: Grevesse & Sauval (1998), Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (2005), and Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval & Scott (2009). The outer convection zone of the Sun is an extremely turbulent region composed of partly ionized compressible gases at high temperature. The super-adiabatic layer (SAL) is the transition region where the transport of energy changes drastically from convection to radiation. In order to describe physical processes accurately, a realistic treatment of radiation should be considered as well as convection. However, newly updated solar mixtures that are established from radiation-hydrodynamics do not generate properly internal structures estimated by helioseismology. In order to address this fundamental problem, solar models are constructed consistently based on each mixture and used as initial configurations for radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. From our simulations, we find that the turbulent flows in each model are statistically similar in the SAL.

  6. Dynamo efficiency controlled by hydrodynamic bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Sophie; Hérault, Johann; Fauve, Stephan; Gissinger, Christophe; Pétrélis, François; Daviaud, François; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Boisson, Jean; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Verhille, Gautier; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-François; Plihon, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrodynamic and magnetic behaviors in a modified experimental setup of the von Kármán sodium flow—where one disk has been replaced by a propeller—are investigated. When the rotation frequencies of the disk and the propeller are different, we show that the fully turbulent hydrodynamic flow undergoes a global bifurcation between two configurations. The bistability of these flow configurations is associated with the dynamics of the central shear layer. The bistable flows are shown to have different dynamo efficiencies; thus for a given rotation rate of the soft-iron disk, two distinct magnetic behaviors are observed depending on the flow configuration. The hydrodynamic transition controls the magnetic field behavior, and bifurcations between high and low magnetic field branches are investigated.

  7. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  8. Diagnostic Coding for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Korwyn; Nuwer, Marc R; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    Accurate coding is an important function of neurologic practice. This contribution to Continuum is part of an ongoing series that presents helpful coding information along with examples related to the issue topic. Tips for diagnosis coding, Evaluation and Management coding, procedure coding, or a combination are presented, depending on which is most applicable to the subject area of the issue.

  9. Model Children's Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  10. Phylogeny of genetic codes and punctuation codes within genetic codes.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Punctuation codons (starts, stops) delimit genes, reflect translation apparatus properties. Most codon reassignments involve punctuation. Here two complementary approaches classify natural genetic codes: (A) properties of amino acids assigned to codons (classical phylogeny), coding stops as X (A1, antitermination/suppressor tRNAs insert unknown residues), or as gaps (A2, no translation, classical stop); and (B) considering only punctuation status (start, stop and other codons coded as -1, 0 and 1 (B1); 0, -1 and 1 (B2, reflects ribosomal translational dynamics); and 1, -1, and 0 (B3, starts/stops as opposites)). All methods separate most mitochondrial codes from most nuclear codes; Gracilibacteria consistently cluster with metazoan mitochondria; mitochondria co-hosted with chloroplasts cluster with nuclear codes. Method A1 clusters the euplotid nuclear code with metazoan mitochondria; A2 separates euplotids from mitochondria. Firmicute bacteria Mycoplasma/Spiroplasma and Protozoan (and lower metazoan) mitochondria share codon-amino acid assignments. A1 clusters them with mitochondria, they cluster with the standard genetic code under A2: constraints on amino acid ambiguity versus punctuation-signaling produced the mitochondrial versus bacterial versions of this genetic code. Punctuation analysis B2 converges best with classical phylogenetic analyses, stressing the need for a unified theory of genetic code punctuation accounting for ribosomal constraints.

  11. Determining hydrodynamic boundary conditions from equilibrium fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyu; Wang, Han; Qian, Tiezheng; Sheng, Ping

    2015-10-01

    The lack of a first-principles derivation has made the hydrodynamic boundary condition a classical issue for the past century. The fact that the fluid can have interfacial structures adds additional complications and ambiguities to the problem. Here we report the use of molecular dynamics to identify from equilibrium thermal fluctuations the hydrodynamic modes in a fluid confined by solid walls, thereby extending the application of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to yield not only the accurate location of the hydrodynamic boundary at the molecular scale, but also the relevant parameter value(s) for the description of the macroscopic boundary condition. We present molecular dynamics results on two examples to illustrate the application of this approach—one on the hydrophilic case and one on the hydrophobic case. It is shown that the use of the orthogonality condition of the modes can uniquely locate the hydrodynamic boundary to be inside the fluid in both cases, separated from the molecular solid-liquid interface by a small distance Δ that is a few molecules in size. The eigenvalue equation of the hydrodynamic modes directly yields the slip length, which is about equal to Δ in the hydrophilic case but is larger than Δ in the hydrophobic case. From the decay time we also obtain the bulk viscosity which is in good agreement with the value obtained from dynamic simulations. To complete the picture, we derive the Green-Kubo relation for a finite fluid system and show that the boundary fluctuations decouple from the bulk only in the infinite-fluid-channel limit; and in that limit we recover the interfacial fluctuation-dissipation theorem first presented by Bocquet and Barrat. The coupling between the bulk and the boundary fluctuations provides both the justification and the reason for the effectiveness of the present approach, which promises broad utility for probing the hydrodynamic boundary conditions relevant to structured or elastic interfaces, as well as

  12. Coupling hydrodynamic and wave propagation modeling for waveform modeling of SPE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmat, C. S.; Steedman, D. W.; Rougier, E.; Delorey, A.; Bradley, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to bring empirical and theoretical advances to the problem of detection and identification of underground nuclear explosions. This paper presents effort to improve knowledge of the processes that affect seismic wave propagation from the hydrodynamic/plastic source region to the elastic/anelastic far field thanks to numerical modeling. The challenge is to couple the prompt processes that take place in the near source region to the ones taking place later in time due to wave propagation in complex 3D geologic environments. In this paper, we report on results of first-principles simulations coupling hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus and CASH), with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. Abaqus and CASH model the shocked, hydrodynamic region via equations of state for the explosive, borehole stemming and jointed/weathered granite. LANL has been recently employing a Coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) modeling capability. This has allowed the testing of a new phenomenological model for modeling stored shear energy in jointed material. This unique modeling capability has enabled highfidelity modeling of the explosive, the weak grout-filled borehole, as well as the surrounding jointed rock. SPECFEM3D is based on the Spectral Element Method, a direct numerical method for full waveform modeling with mathematical accuracy (e.g. Komatitsch, 1998, 2002) thanks to its use of the weak formulation of the wave equation and of high-order polynomial functions. The coupling interface is a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated at the edge of the hydrodynamic code domain. Displacement time series at these points are computed from output of CASH or Abaqus (by interpolation if needed) and fed into the time marching scheme of SPECFEM3D. We will present validation tests and waveforms modeled for several SPE tests conducted so far, with a special focus on effect of the local topography.

  13. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Estabrook, K.; Wallace, R.J.; Rubenchik, A.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R.P.; McCray, R.

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): (1) compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  14. CSF hydrodynamics in superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, B; Malm, J; Markgren, P; Ekstedt, J

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics were investigated with a constant pressure infusion method in patients with superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Ten patients were studied with serial examinations up to 15 years after the onset of the disease. A total of 70 CSF hydrodynamic examinations were performed. A clear increase in intracranial pressure due to raised pressure in the major dural sinus was seen in all patients. A striking feature was the persistent intracranial pressure increase that declined only gradually. This had no obvious clinical impact. Change in CSF resorption facility played only a minor role in the intracranial pressure elevation. None of the patients developed hydrocephalus. PMID:1583513

  15. Hydrodynamic interactions between nearby slender filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yi; Koens, Lyndon; Lauga, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Cellular biology abound with filaments interacting through fluids, from intracellular microtubules, to rotating flagella and beating cilia. While previous work has demonstrated the complexity of capturing nonlocal hydrodynamic interactions between moving filaments, the problem remains difficult theoretically. We show here that when filaments are closer to each other than their relevant length scale, the integration of hydrodynamic interactions can be approximately carried out analytically. This leads to a set of simplified local equations, illustrated on a simple model of two interacting filaments, which can be used to tackle theoretically a range of problems in biology and physics.

  16. Integration of hydrodynamic interactions between filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yi; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In many biological situations, slender filaments interact through a viscous fluid, and these hydrodynamic interactions play a crucial cellular role. Examples include the ability of peritrichous bacteria to bundle their flagella or the generation of metachronal waves in cilia arrays. In most cases of interest, three distinct length scales characterize the filaments, their typical thickness a, relative distance h, and length L, which are asymptotically separated as a << h << L . In this talk, we demonstrate how to analytically develop a long-wavelength integration of hydrodynamic singularities in this biologically-relevant limit.

  17. Hydrodynamic trap for single particles and cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Trapping and manipulation of microscale and nanoscale particles is demonstrated using the sole action of hydrodynamic forces. We developed an automated particle trap based on a stagnation point flow generated in a microfluidic device. The hydrodynamic trap enables confinement and manipulation of single particles in low viscosity (1–10 cP) aqueous solution. Using this method, we trapped microscale and nanoscale particles (100 nm–15 μm) for long time scales (minutes to hours). We demonstrate particle confinement to within 1 μm of the trap center, corresponding to a trap stiffness of ∼10−5–10−4 pN∕nm. PMID:20585593

  18. Holography and hydrodynamics in small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesler, Paul M.

    2016-12-01

    Using holographic duality, we present results for the off-center collision of Gaussian wave packets in strongly coupled N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The wave packets are thin along the collision axis and superficially at least resemble Lorentz contracted colliding protons. The collision results in the formation of a droplet of liquid of size R ∼ 1 /Teff where Teff is the effective temperature, which is the characteristic microscopic scale in strongly coupled plasma. These results demonstrate the applicability of hydrodynamics to microscopically small systems and bolster the notion that hydrodynamics can be applied to heavy-light ion collisions as well as proton-proton collisions.

  19. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  20. A hydrodynamic treatment of the cold dark matter cosmological scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of structure in a postrecombination Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe containing both gaseous baryons and cold dark matter (CDM) is studied by means of an Eulerian code coupled with a standard particle-mesh code. Ionization state and radiative opacity are calculated in detail, and the hydrodynamic simulations make it possible to compute properties of gas distribution on scales larger than three cell sizes. The model yields a soft X-ray background consistent with the latest cosmic nucleosynthesis values, and can accurately reproduce the galaxy-galaxy two-point correlation. The rate of galaxy formation peaks at a relatively late epoch. With regard to mass function, the smallest objects are stabilized against collapse by thermal energy: the mass-weighted mass spectrum peaks in the vicinity of m(b) = 10 exp 9.2 solar masses with a reasonable fit to the Schecter luminosity function if the baryon mass to blue light ratio is approximately 4. Overall, the simulations provide strong support for the CMD scenario. Of particular interest is that, while the baryons are not biased on scales greater than 1/h Mpc, the galaxies are, and that the 'galaxies' have a correlation function of the required slope and the correct amplitude.

  1. Numerical magneto-hydrodynamics for relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inghirami, Gabriele; Del Zanna, Luca; Beraudo, Andrea; Moghaddam, Mohsen Haddadi; Becattini, Francesco; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    We present an improved version of the ECHO-QGP numerical code, which self-consistently includes for the first time the effects of electromagnetic fields within the framework of relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD). We discuss results of its application in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity of the plasma. After reviewing the relevant covariant 3+1 formalisms, we illustrate the implementation of the evolution equations in the code and show the results of several tests aimed at assessing the accuracy and robustness of the implementation. After providing some estimates of the magnetic fields arising in non-central high-energy nuclear collisions, we perform full RMHD simulations of the evolution of the quark-gluon plasma in the presence of electromagnetic fields and discuss the results. In our ideal RMHD setup we find that the magnetic field developing in non-central collisions does not significantly modify the elliptic flow of the final hadrons. However, since there are uncertainties in the description of the pre-equilibrium phase and also in the properties of the medium, a more extensive survey of the possible initial conditions as well as the inclusion of dissipative effects are indeed necessary to validate this preliminary result.

  2. A hydrodynamic treatment of the cold dark matter cosmological scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah

    1992-07-01

    The evolution of structure in a postrecombination Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe containing both gaseous baryons and cold dark matter (CDM) is studied by means of an Eulerian code coupled with a standard particle-mesh code. Ionization state and radiative opacity are calculated in detail, and the hydrodynamic simulations make it possible to compute properties of gas distribution on scales larger than three cell sizes. The model yields a soft X-ray background consistent with the latest cosmic nucleosynthesis values, and can accurately reproduce the galaxy-galaxy two-point correlation. The rate of galaxy formation peaks at a relatively late epoch. With regard to mass function, the smallest objects are stabilized against collapse by thermal energy: the mass-weighted mass spectrum peaks in the vicinity of m(b) = 10 exp 9.2 solar masses with a reasonable fit to the Schecter luminosity function if the baryon mass to blue light ratio is approximately 4. Overall, the simulations provide strong support for the CMD scenario. Of particular interest is that, while the baryons are not biased on scales greater than 1/h Mpc, the galaxies are, and that the 'galaxies' have a correlation function of the required slope and the correct amplitude.

  3. Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations of Reionization-Epoch Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Romeel

    2010-09-01

    We propose to use our newly-developed cosmological radiative hydrodynamical galaxy formation code to study the formation and evolution of galaxies at redshifts z>6 as seen with existing and upcoming HST/WFPC3 observations. We focus on the relationship between this galaxy population and the physics of reionizing the IGM. We will investigate four key questions:- Do models yield z>6 galaxies with physical & photometric properties as observed?- Can such early galaxies produce sufficient photons to reionize the universe by z~6?- What is topology and timeline of reionization, in relation to the galaxy population?- How do photoionization and superwind feedback interact to regulate early galaxies?Our code, MARCH, combines moment-based radiative transport with our advanced version of Gadget-2 to self-consistently evolve galaxies and intergalactic gas from the Dark Ages until the end of reionization. By extracting photometric properties and comparing to data using our Bayesian SED fitter SPOC, we can assess with formal statistics how well these simulations can reproduce observations of high-z galaxies. Building on preliminary model successes, we will investigate what such observations imply for how galaxies reionize the IGM, and what feedback processes must be active in order to reproduce the galaxy population and IGM evolution as observed. Our results will impact and support a wide range of HST programs designed to detect and characterize galaxies in the reionization epoch.

  4. Hydrodynamic dispersion of microswimmers in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthieu; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    In our laboratory, we study hydrodynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers. These micro-organisms are unicellular algae Chlamydomonas Rheinhardii which are able to swim by using their flagella. The swimming dynamics of these micro-swimmers can be seen as a random walk, in absence of any kind of interaction. In addition, these algae have the property of being phototactic, i.e. they swim towards the light. Combining this property with a hydrodynamic flow, we were able to reversibly separate algae from the rest of the fluid. But for sufficiently high volume fraction, these active particles interact with each other. We are now interested in how the coupling of hydrodynamic interactions between swimmers and phototaxis can modify the swimming dynamics at the scale of the suspension. To this aim, we conduct experiments in microfluidic devices to study the dispersion of the micro-organisms in a the liquid phase as a function of the volume fraction. We show that the dispersion of an assembly of puller type microswimmers is quantitatively affected by hydrodynamics interactions. Phd student.

  5. Superreflection of waves in hydrodynamic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The amplification mechanism of various type waves in hydrodynamics in analyzed for reflection from planar and cylindrical tangential discontinuities. The problem of wave momentum and energy in a medium is discussed. The amplification is related to the presence of negative energy waves.

  6. Boundary conditions in tunneling via quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1993-01-01

    Via the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics, an approach to the problem of tunneling through sharp-edged potential barriers is developed. Above all, it is shown how more general boundary conditions follow from the continuity of mass, momentum, and energy.

  7. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  8. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-09-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  9. Dilepton production in schematic causal viscous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taesoo; Han, Kyong Chol; Ko, Che Ming

    2011-02-01

    Assuming that in the hot dense matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, the energy density, entropy density, and pressure as well as the azimuthal and space-time rapidity components of the shear tensor are uniform in the direction transversal to the reaction plane, we derive a set of schematic equations from the Isreal-Stewart causal viscous hydrodynamics. These equations are then used to describe the evolution dynamics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions by taking the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of 1/4π for the initial quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase and of 10 times this value for the later hadron-gas (HG) phase. Using the production rate evaluated with particle distributions that take into account the viscous effect, we study dilepton production in central heavy-ion collisions. Compared with results from the ideal hydrodynamics, we find that although the dilepton invariant mass spectra from the two approaches are similar, the transverse momentum spectra are significantly enhanced at high transverse momenta by the viscous effect. We also study the transverse momentum dependence of dileptons produced from QGP for a fixed transverse mass, which is essentially absent in the ideal hydrodynamics, and find that this so-called transverse mass scaling is violated in the viscous hydrodynamics, particularly at high transverse momenta.

  10. Resonant frequencies of the hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.

    We study the sound perturbation of the hydrodynamic vortex geometry and present an exact expression for the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum) of this geometry. Exact solution for the radial part of the covariant Klein-Gordon equation in this spacetime is obtained, and is given in terms of the double confluent Heun functions. We found that the resonant frequencies are complex number.

  11. Microflow cytometers with integrated hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Theisen, Janko; Kummrow, Andreas; Simon, Peter; Ragusch, Hülya; Bock, Nicole; Schmidt, Martin; Neukammer, Jörg

    2013-04-09

    This study demonstrates the suitability of microfluidic structures for high throughput blood cell analysis. The microfluidic chips exploit fully integrated hydrodynamic focusing based on two different concepts: Two-stage cascade focusing and spin focusing (vortex) principle. The sample--A suspension of micro particles or blood cells--is injected into a sheath fluid streaming at a substantially higher flow rate, which assures positioning of the particles in the center of the flow channel. Particle velocities of a few m/s are achieved as required for high throughput blood cell analysis. The stability of hydrodynamic particle positioning was evaluated by measuring the pulse heights distributions of fluorescence signals from calibration beads. Quantitative assessment based on coefficient of variation for the fluorescence intensity distributions resulted in a value of about 3% determined for the micro-device exploiting cascade hydrodynamic focusing. For the spin focusing approach similar values were achieved for sample flow rates being 1.5 times lower. Our results indicate that the performances of both variants of hydrodynamic focusing suit for blood cell differentiation and counting. The potential of the micro flow cytometer is demonstrated by detecting immunologically labeled CD3 positive and CD4 positive T-lymphocytes in blood.

  12. Hydrodynamic focusing--a versatile tool.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joel P; Justin, Gusphyl A; Nasir, Mansoor; Ligler, Frances S

    2012-01-01

    The control of hydrodynamic focusing in a microchannel has inspired new approaches for microfluidic mixing, separations, sensors, cell analysis, and microfabrication. Achieving a flat interface between the focusing and focused fluids is dependent on Reynolds number and device geometry, and many hydrodynamic focusing systems can benefit from this understanding. For applications where a specific cross-sectional shape is desired for the focused flow, advection generated by grooved structures in the channel walls can be used to define the shape of the focused flow. Relative flow rates of the focused flow and focusing streams can be manipulated to control the cross-sectional area of the focused flows. This paper discusses the principles for defining the shape of the interface between the focused and focusing fluids and provides examples from our lab that use hydrodynamic focusing for impedance-based sensors, flow cytometry, and microfabrication to illustrate the breadth of opportunities for introducing new capabilities into microfluidic systems. We evaluate each example for the advantages and limitations integral to utilization of hydrodynamic focusing for that particular application.

  13. Stabilizing geometry for hydrodynamic rotary seals

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2010-08-10

    A hydrodynamic sealing assembly including a first component having first and second walls and a peripheral wall defining a seal groove, a second component having a rotatable surface relative to said first component, and a hydrodynamic seal comprising a seal body of generally ring-shaped configuration having a circumference. The seal body includes hydrodynamic and static sealing lips each having a cross-sectional area that substantially vary in time with each other about the circumference. In an uninstalled condition, the seal body has a length defined between first and second seal body ends which varies in time with the hydrodynamic sealing lip cross-sectional area. The first and second ends generally face the first and second walls, respectively. In the uninstalled condition, the first end is angulated relative to the first wall and the second end is angulated relative to the second wall. The seal body has a twist-limiting surface adjacent the static sealing lip. In the uninstalled condition, the twist-limiting surface is angulated relative to the peripheral wall and varies along the circumference. A seal body discontinuity and a first component discontinuity mate to prevent rotation of the seal body relative to the first component.

  14. Hydrodynamic coupling between two fluid membranes.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sanoop; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2011-02-23

    The coupled in-plane diffusion dynamics between point-particles embedded in stacked fluid membranes is investigated. We calculate the contributions to the coupling longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients due to particle motion within the different as well as the same membranes. The stacked geometry leads to a hydrodynamic coupling between the two membranes.

  15. Does Suspension Crowding Screen Hydrodynamic Interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu; Zia, Roseanna N.; Swan, James W.

    2015-03-01

    Resistance and mobility functions describe linear couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other particles. For two isolated spheres, these functions are well known and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems for dilute colloidal dispersions. We have devised a new stochastic technique to calculate an analogous set of functions for two spheres immersed in a suspension that are then used to model the near-equilibrium dynamics of concentrated dispersions, including viscoelasticity and long-time diffusion. Of interest is the degree of screening of hydrodynamic interactions by the intervening medium. We find that the mobility is unscreened at the pair level, even in suspensions of high concentration, confirming that hydrodynamic interactions are an essential part of the dynamics of crowded systems and cannot be neglected in favor of simple renormalization schemes. We compare our results for the hydrodynamic interactions between suspended particles to predictions from two-point microrheology. This technique can be used to infer the complex viscosity from long-ranged decay of the pair mobility in viscoelastic materials.

  16. Does Suspension Crowding Screen Hydrodynamic Interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Roseanna; Swan, James; Su, Yu

    2014-11-01

    Resistance and mobility functions describe linear couplings between moments of the hydrodynamic traction on a suspended particle and the motion of that or other suspended particles. For two isolated spheres, these functions are well known and have been applied directly in the solution of many important problems for dilute colloidal dispersions. We have devised a new stochastic technique to calculate an analogous set of functions for two spheres immersed in a suspension that are then used to model the near-equilibrium dynamics of concentrated dispersions, including viscoelasticity and long-time diffusion. Of interest is the degree of screening of hydrodynamic interactions by the intervening medium. We find that the mobility is unscreened at the pair level, even in suspensions of high concentration, confirming that hydrodynamic interactions are an essential part of the dynamics of crowded systems and cannot be neglected in favor of simple renormalization schemes. We compare our results for the hydrodynamic interactions between suspended particles to predictions from two-point microrheology. This technique can be used to infer the complex viscosity from long-ranged decay of the pair mobility in viscoelastic materials. Its validity when not in the continuum limit is addressed.

  17. Hydrodynamics and Roughness of Irregular Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    principle component analysis (PCA) similar to that used by Preston (2009) for ship- mounted multibeam data. Several variables derived from the...complex boundaries as well as characterization of acoustic and optical processes. Turbulent processes at the seabed are at the foundation of littoral...nearshore hydrodynamics, turbulence over rough beds influences optical and acoustic properties. Bed roughness also directly affects acoustic propagation in

  18. Macroscopic liquid-state molecular hydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Keanini, R. G.; Tkacik, Peter T.; Fleischhauer, Eric; Shahinian, Hossein; Sholar, Jodie; Azimi, Farzad; Mullany, Brid

    2017-01-01

    Experimental evidence and theoretical modeling suggest that piles of confined, high-restitution grains, subject to low-amplitude vibration, can serve as experimentally-accessible analogs for studying a range of liquid-state molecular hydrodynamic processes. Experiments expose single-grain and multiple-grain, collective dynamic features that mimic those either observed or predicted in molecular-scale, liquid state systems, including: (i) near-collision-time-scale hydrodynamic organization of single-molecule dynamics, (ii) nonequilibrium, long-time-scale excitation of collective/hydrodynamic modes, and (iii) long-time-scale emergence of continuum, viscous flow. In order to connect directly observable macroscale granular dynamics to inaccessible and/or indirectly measured molecular hydrodynamic processes, we recast traditional microscale equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics for dense, interacting microscale systems into self-consistent, macroscale form. The proposed macroscopic models, which appear to be new with respect to granular physics, and which differ significantly from traditional kinetic-theory-based, macroscale statistical mechanics models, are used to rigorously derive the continuum equations governing viscous, liquid-like granular flow. The models allow physically-consistent interpretation and prediction of observed equilibrium and non-equilibrium, single-grain, and collective, multiple-grain dynamics. PMID:28139711

  19. Simulation of Helical Flow Hydrodynamics in Meanders and Advection-Turbulent Diffusion Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusti, T. P.; Hertanti, D. R.; Bahsan, E.; Soeryantono, H.

    2013-12-01

    Particle-based numerical methods, such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), may be able to simulate some hydrodynamic and morphodynamic behaviors better than grid-based numerical methods. This study simulates hydrodynamics in meanders and advection and turbulent diffusion in straight river channels using Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic. The simulators generate three-dimensional data for hydrodynamics and one-dimensional data for advection-turbulent diffusion. Fluid at rest, sloshing, and helical flow are simulated in the river meanders. Spill loading and step loading are done to simulate concentration patterns associated with advection-turbulent diffusion. Results indicate that helical flow is formed due to disturbance in morphology and particle velocity in the stream and the number of particles does not have a significant effect on the pattern of advection-turbulent diffusion concentration.

  20. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  1. Hydrodynamic Simulations and Tomographic Reconstructions of the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Casey William

    The Intergalactic Medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of matter in the Universe from which the cosmic web and galaxies form. The structure and physical state of the IGM provides insight into the cosmological model of the Universe, the origin and timeline of the reionization of the Universe, as well as being an essential ingredient in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Our primary handle on this information is a signal known as the Lyman-alpha forest (or Ly-alpha forest) -- the collection of absorption features in high-redshift sources due to intervening neutral hydrogen, which scatters HI Ly-alpha photons out of the line of sight. The Ly-alpha forest flux traces density fluctuations at high redshift and at moderate overdensities, making it an excellent tool for mapping large-scale structure and constraining cosmological parameters. Although the computational methodology for simulating the Ly-alpha forest has existed for over a decade, we are just now approaching the scale of computing power required to simultaneously capture large cosmological scales and the scales of the smallest absorption systems. My thesis focuses on using simulations at the edge of modern computing to produce precise predictions of the statistics of the Ly-alpha forest and to better understand the structure of the IGM. In the first part of my thesis, I review the state of hydrodynamic simulations of the IGM, including pitfalls of the existing under-resolved simulations. Our group developed a new cosmological hydrodynamics code to tackle the computational challenge, and I developed a distributed analysis framework to compute flux statistics from our simulations. I present flux statistics derived from a suite of our large hydrodynamic simulations and demonstrate convergence to the per cent level. I also compare flux statistics derived from simulations using different discretizations and hydrodynamic schemes (Eulerian finite volume vs. smoothed particle hydrodynamics) and

  2. Concatenated Coding Using Trellis-Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Michael W.

    1997-01-01

    In the late seventies and early eighties a technique known as Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) was developed for providing spectrally efficient error correction coding. Instead of adding redundant information in the form of parity bits, redundancy is added at the modulation stage thereby increasing bandwidth efficiency. A digital communications system can be designed to use bandwidth-efficient multilevel/phase modulation such as Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK), Phase Shift Keying (PSK), Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK) or Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM). Performance gain can be achieved by increasing the number of signals over the corresponding uncoded system to compensate for the redundancy introduced by the code. A considerable amount of research and development has been devoted toward developing good TCM codes for severely bandlimited applications. More recently, the use of TCM for satellite and deep space communications applications has received increased attention. This report describes the general approach of using a concatenated coding scheme that features TCM and RS coding. Results have indicated that substantial (6-10 dB) performance gains can be achieved with this approach with comparatively little bandwidth expansion. Since all of the bandwidth expansion is due to the RS code we see that TCM based concatenated coding results in roughly 10-50% bandwidth expansion compared to 70-150% expansion for similar concatenated scheme which use convolution code. We stress that combined coding and modulation optimization is important for achieving performance gains while maintaining spectral efficiency.

  3. Coset Codes Viewed as Terminated Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossorier, Marc P. C.; Lin, Shu

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, coset codes are considered as terminated convolutional codes. Based on this approach, three new general results are presented. First, it is shown that the iterative squaring construction can equivalently be defined from a convolutional code whose trellis terminates. This convolutional code determines a simple encoder for the coset code considered, and the state and branch labelings of the associated trellis diagram become straightforward. Also, from the generator matrix of the code in its convolutional code form, much information about the trade-off between the state connectivity and complexity at each section, and the parallel structure of the trellis, is directly available. Based on this generator matrix, it is shown that the parallel branches in the trellis diagram of the convolutional code represent the same coset code C(sub 1), of smaller dimension and shorter length. Utilizing this fact, a two-stage optimum trellis decoding method is devised. The first stage decodes C(sub 1), while the second stage decodes the associated convolutional code, using the branch metrics delivered by stage 1. Finally, a bidirectional decoding of each received block starting at both ends is presented. If about the same number of computations is required, this approach remains very attractive from a practical point of view as it roughly doubles the decoding speed. This fact is particularly interesting whenever the second half of the trellis is the mirror image of the first half, since the same decoder can be implemented for both parts.

  4. Numerical Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics in General Relativity.

    PubMed

    Font, José A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of numerical hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) in general relativity. Some significant additions have been incorporated with respect to the previous two versions of this review (2000, 2003), most notably the coverage of general-relativistic MHD, a field in which remarkable activity and progress has occurred in the last few years. Correspondingly, the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general-relativistic hydrodynamics is enlarged to account for recent relevant advances, while those dealing with general-relativistic MHD are amply covered in this review for the first time. The basic outline of this article is nevertheless similar to its earlier versions, save for the addition of MHD-related issues throughout. Hence, different formulations of both the hydrodynamics and MHD equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of numerical approaches for solving such hyperbolic systems of equations is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. As previously stated, a comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is also presented. These are detailed in three basic sections, namely gravitational collapse, black-hole accretion, and neutron-star evolutions; despite the boundaries, these sections may (and in fact do) overlap throughout the discussion. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances in the formulation of the gravitational field, hydrodynamics and MHD equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them. To keep the length of this article reasonable, an effort has

  5. Mild Cognitive Impairment Is Not “Mild” at All in Altered Activation of Episodic Memory Brain Networks: Evidence from ALE Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengyun; Li, Juan; Li, Hui-Jie; Huo, Lijuan; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The present study conducted a quantitative meta-analysis aiming at assessing consensus across the functional neuroimaging studies of episodic memory in individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and elucidating consistent activation patterns. An activation likelihood estimation (ALE) was conducted on the functional neuroimaging studies of episodic encoding and retrieval in aMCI individuals published up to March 31, 2015. Analyses covered 24 studies, which yielded 770 distinct foci. Compared to healthy controls, aMCI individuals showed statistically significant consistent activation differences in a widespread episodic memory network, not only in the bilateral medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortex, but also in the angular gyrus, precunes, posterior cingulate cortex, and even certain more basic structures. The present ALE meta-analysis revealed that the abnormal patterns of widespread episodic memory network indicated that individuals with aMCI may not be completely “mild” in nature. PMID:27872591

  6. Dynamic Response of a Pulse-Heated, Thick-Walled, Hollow Sphere: Validation of Code Numerics

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    2000-01-19

    Volumetric pulse heating of a thick-walled hollow sphere is numerically investigated. The primary objective is to validate a variety of LLNL 30 hydrocodes for modeling the dynamic behavior of fissile/fissionable metals subject to rapid ''fission-heating'' transients. The 30 codes tested include both DYNA3D and NIKE3D, as well as the ''ASCI'' code, ALE3D. The codes are compared ''head-to-head'' and are benchmarked against a 1D finite difference solution to the problem that is derived from basic principles. Three pulse-heating transients are examined with full-width-half-maximum pulse durations of 41{micro}s, 85{micro}s, and 140{micro}s, respectively. These three transients produce a significant range of dynamic responses in the thermo-elastic regime. We present results for dynamic radial displacements and stresses for each pulse, and also discuss which code features/options worked best for these types of calculations. In general, the code results are in excellent agreement for the simple system considered. Validation of code numerics in simple systems is a key first step toward future application of the codes in more complicated geometries (U).

  7. Delta-f and hydrodynamic methods for semiconductor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Hotchkiss, R.; Gray, M.; Snell, C.; Barnes, D.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The authors have developed a prototype plug-and-play (PCUBED) environment based upon a C++ class called a fragment. A fragment is a universal object that can represent any data type. Fragments provide an excellent intuitive approach to the development of an efficient architecture, as well as providing a common data implementation within and between codes. As a result, the PCUBED environment allows for the generation of many different codes within a common framework. At this time, there are seven major codes implemented within the PCUBED environment. Input, output, restart, setup, and graphics are programmed using a high-level approach to insure human efficiency. In contrast, computationally intensive algorithms are programmed using a low-level approach to insure computational efficiency. Fragments provide a straightforward approach to switch between high-level and low-level programming. PCUBED has been tested on a Macintosh PowerPC; on IBM, SUN, HP, and SGI workstations; and on the CRAY YMP and Cray T3D. Using this environment, the authors have incorporated a drift diffusion, energy balance, hydrodynamic, and Monte Carlo model for metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) into a single architecture. With all the models in a common framework, they have investigated the noise characteristics of hybrid and delta-f models. Although hybrid and delta-f models appear viable in one dimension, the noise level of higher order transport coefficients in two and three dimensions makes the utility of such combined methods questionable.

  8. Lyman α radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman α (Lyα) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Lyα photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Lyα pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Lyα photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Lyα radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-z galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Lyα Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. The initial starburst drives an expanding shell of gas from the centre and in certain cases, Lyα feedback significantly enhances the shell velocity. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the intergalactic medium (IGM) for protogalaxies with a virial mass of Mvir ≲ 108 M⊙. We compare the Lyα signatures of Population III stars with 105 K blackbody emission to that of direct collapse black holes with a non-thermal Compton-thick spectrum and find substantial differences if the Lyα spectra are shaped by gas pushed by Lyα radiation-driven winds. For both sources, the flux emerging from the galaxy is reprocessed by the IGM such that the observed Lyα luminosity is reduced significantly and the time-averaged velocity offset of the Lyα peak is shifted redward.

  9. Applicability of causal dissipative hydrodynamics to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huovinen, Pasi; Molnar, Denes

    2009-01-01

    We utilize nonequilibrium covariant transport theory to determine the region of validity of causal Israel-Stewart (IS) dissipative hydrodynamics and Navier-Stokes (NS) theory for relativistic heavy ion physics applications. A massless ideal gas with 2→2 interactions is considered in a Bjorken scenario in 0 + 1 dimension (D) appropriate for the early longitudinal expansion stage of the collision. In the scale-invariant case of a constant shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s≈const, we find that IS theory is accurate within 10% in calculating dissipative effects if initially the expansion time scale exceeds half the transport mean free path τ0/λtr,0≳2. The same accuracy with NS requires three times larger τ0/λtr,0≳6. For dynamics driven by a constant cross section, on the other hand, about 50% larger τ0/λtr,0≳3 (IS) and 9 (NS) are needed. For typical applications at energies currently available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), i.e., sNN~100-200 GeV, these limits imply that even the IS approach becomes marginal when η/s≳0.15. In addition, we find that the “naive” approximation to IS theory, which neglects products of gradients and dissipative quantities, has an even smaller range of applicability than Navier-Stokes. We also obtain analytic IS and NS solutions in 0 + 1D, and present further tests for numerical dissipative hydrodynamics codes in 1 + 1, 2 + 1, and 3 + 1D based on generalized conservation laws.

  10. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34 and identification of aleB encoding the ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gilis, A; Khan, M A; Cornelis, P; Meyer, J M; Mergeay, M; van der Lelie, D

    1996-01-01

    Siderophore production in response to iron limitation was observed in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, and the corresponding siderophore was named alcaligin E. Alcaligin E was characterized as a phenolate-type siderophore containing neither catecholate nor hydroxamate groups. Alcaligin E promoted the growth of siderophore-deficient A. eutrophus mutants under iron-restricted conditions and promoted 59Fe uptake by iron-limited cells. However, the growth of the Sid- mutant AE1152, which was obtained from CH34 by Tn5-Tc mutagenesis, was completely inhibited by the addition of alcaligin E. AE1152 also showed strongly reduced 59Fe uptake in the presence of alcaligin E. This indicates that a gene, designated aleB, which is involved in transport of ferric iron-alcaligin E across the membrane is inactivated. The aleB gene was cloned, and its putative amino acid sequence showed strong similarity to those of ferric iron-siderophore receptor proteins. Both wild-type strain CH34 and aleB mutant AE1152 were able to use the same heterologous siderophores, indicating that AleB is involved only in ferric iron-alcaligin E uptake. Interestingly, no utilization of pyochelin, which is also a phenolate-type siderophore, was observed for A. eutrophus CH34. Genetic studies of different Sid- mutants, obtained after transposon mutagenesis, showed that the genes involved in alcaligin E and ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor biosynthesis are clustered in a 20-kb region on the A. eutrophus CH34 chromosome in the proximity of the cys-232 locus. PMID:8808942

  11. Thin-Layer Electrochemical Studies in the Development of a Cycle for the Formation of CdInSe2 by Electrochemical ALE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-22

    A thin-layer electrochemical cell (TLEC) was used in the development of a method for the electrodeposition of CuInSe2. Underpotential deposition (UPD...the complexing agent The information obtained in this study is intended to facilitate the development of an Electrochemical ALE cycle for the deposition ...of CuInS2. Future work will involve studies using an automated flow cell deposition system.

  12. Application of the ALE and MBE Methods to the Growth of Layered Hg sub x Cd sub 1-x Te Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-26

    grain - boundary structures. GaAs is an attrac- tive alternative because large-area wafers of high structural _ ALE CdTe (11, perfection [dislocation...single-crystal X-ray diffracto- metry Nomarsky microscopy, Auger and ESCA spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering and Hall mobility measurements...high growth rate observed. dow) position by a rotating part, most of the boundary layer will be sheared off by a fixed plate placed above the rotating

  13. Discussion on LDPC Codes and Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the progress that the workgroup on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) for space link coding. The workgroup is tasked with developing and recommending new error correcting codes for near-Earth, Lunar, and deep space applications. Included in the presentation is a summary of the technical progress of the workgroup. Charts that show the LDPC decoder sensitivity to symbol scaling errors are reviewed, as well as a chart showing the performance of several frame synchronizer algorithms compared to that of some good codes and LDPC decoder tests at ESTL. Also reviewed is a study on Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP), and the recommended codes. A design for the Pseudo-Randomizer with LDPC Decoder and CRC is also reviewed. A chart that summarizes the three proposed coding systems is also presented.

  14. Bar Codes for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahn, Erwin

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of standards for bar codes (series of printed lines and spaces that represent numbers, symbols, and/or letters of alphabet) and describes the two types most frequently adopted by libraries--Code-A-Bar and CODE 39. Format of the codes is illustrated. Six references and definitions of terminology are appended. (EJS)

  15. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  16. A multi-dimensional high-order DG-ALE method based on gas-kinetic theory with application to oscillating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaodong; Xu, Kun; Shyy, Wei

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a multi-dimensional high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation to simulate flows over variable domains with moving and deforming meshes. It is an extension of the gas-kinetic DG method proposed by the authors for static domains (X. Ren et al., 2015 [22]). A moving mesh gas kinetic DG method is proposed for both inviscid and viscous flow computations. A flux integration method across a translating and deforming cell interface has been constructed. Differently from the previous ALE-type gas kinetic method with piecewise constant mesh velocity at each cell interface within each time step, the mesh velocity variation inside a cell and the mesh moving and rotating at a cell interface have been accounted for in the finite element framework. As a result, the current scheme is applicable for any kind of mesh movement, such as translation, rotation, and deformation. The accuracy and robustness of the scheme have been improved significantly in the oscillating airfoil calculations. All computations are conducted in a physical domain rather than in a reference domain, and the basis functions move with the grid movement. Therefore, the numerical scheme can preserve the uniform flow automatically, and satisfy the geometric conservation law (GCL). The numerical accuracy can be maintained even for a largely moving and deforming mesh. Several test cases are presented to demonstrate the performance of the gas-kinetic DG-ALE method.

  17. An efficient approach to unstructured mesh hydrodynamics on the cell broadband engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Unstructured mesh physics for the Cell Broadband Engine (CBE) has received little or no attention to date, largely because the CBE architecture poses particular challenges for unstructured mesh algorithms. The most common SPU memory management strategies cannot be applied to the irregular memory access patterns of unstructured meshes, and the SPU vector instruction set does not support the indirect addressing needed by connectivity arrays. This paper presents an approach to unstructured mesh physics that addresses these challenges, by creating a new mesh data structure and reorganizing code to give efficient CBE performance. The approach is demonstrated on the FLAG production hydrodynamics code using standard test problems, and results show an average speedup of more than 5x over the original code.

  18. An efficient approach to unstructured mesh hydrodynamics on the cell broadband engine (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, Charles R

    2010-12-14

    Unstructured mesh physics for the Cell Broadband Engine (CBE) has received little or no attention to date, largely because the CBE architecture poses particular challenges for unstructured mesh algorithms. SPU memory management strategies such as data preloading cannot be applied to the irregular memory storage patterns of unstructured meshes; and the SPU vector instruction set does not support the indirect addressing needed by connectivity arrays. This paper presents an approach to unstructured mesh physics that addresses these challenges, by creating a new mesh data structure and reorganizing code to give efficient CBE performance. The approach is demonstrated on the FLAG production hydrodynamics code using standard test problems, and results show an average speedup of more than 5x over the original code.

  19. Simulations of laser imprint reduction using underdense foams and its consequences on the hydrodynamic instability growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph; Riazuelo, G.; Grech, M.; Breil, J.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Borisenko, N.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms of laser imprint reduction on a surface of a planar foil performed using an underdense foam are presented. The consequences on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at the ablation front when the foil is accelerated are studied. The analysis is based on numerical simulations using a chain of codes: the electromagnetic paraxial code Parax provides the modifications of the intensity perturbation spectrum while the laser beam is crossing the foam. Two-dimensional axially symmetric simulations with the radiation hydrodynamic code CHIC describe the foam expansion and the foil dynamics. Finally, the perturbed flow calculations and the instability growth are investigated with the two-dimensional CHIC version in the planar geometry by using the initial and smoothed perturbation spectra. The dominant role of temporal laser smoothing during the time of foam crossing by the laser beam is demonstrated. Applications to the direct drive targets for inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  20. Heavy flavor electron RAA and υ2 in event-by-event relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Caio A. G.; Cosentino, Mauro R.; Munhoz, Marcelo G.; Noronha, Jorge; Suaide, Alexandre A. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we investigate how event-by-event hydrodynamics fluctuations affect the nuclear suppression factor and elliptic flow of heavy flavor mesons and non-photonic electrons. We use a 2D+1 Lagrangian ideal hydrodynamic code [1, 2] on an event-by-event basis in order to compute local temperature and flow profiles. Using a strong coupling inspired energy loss parametrization [3] on top of the evolving space-time energy density distributions we are able to propagate the heavy quarks inside the medium until the freeze-out temperature is reached and a Pythia [4] modeling of hadronization takes place. The resulting D0 and heavy-flavor electron yield is compared with recent experimental data for R AA and υ 2 from the STAR and PHENIX collaborations [5-7]. In addition we present preditions for the higher order Fourier harmonic coefficients υ3(pt) of heavy-flavor electrons at Rhic’s collisions.

  1. Examining the Accuracy of Astrophysical Disk Simulations with a Generalized Hydrodynamical Test Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    We discuss a generalization of the classic Keplerian disk test problem allowing for both pressure and rotational support, as a method of testing astrophysical codes incorporating both gravitation and hydrodynamics. We argue for the inclusion of pressure in rotating disk simulations on the grounds that realistic, astrophysical disks exhibit non-negligible pressure support. We then apply this test problem to examine the performance of various smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods incorporating a number of improvements proposed over the years to address problems noted in modeling the classical gravitation-only Keplerian disk. We also apply this test to a newly developed extension of SPH based on reproducing kernels called CRKSPH. Counterintuitively, we find that pressure support worsens the performance of traditional SPH on this problem, causing unphysical collapse away from the steady-state disk solution even more rapidly than the purely gravitational problem, whereas CRKSPH greatly reduces this error.

  2. Lattice-Boltzmann Simulation of Tablet Dissolution in Complex Hydrodynamic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiaolong; Sun, Ning; Park, Taeshin; Ko, Glen H.; Gersappe, Dilip

    2015-03-01

    Using the Lattice-Boltzmann method, we developed a 3D model to study the tablet dissolution process in a complex hydrodynamic environment involving spatially varying velocity and shear forces. The results show that a turbulent flow is formed in the region above the tablet, which has been obtained by visualization experiments. The dissolution profiles were obtained by incorporating detailed kinetics, showing good agreement with case studies from literature. After studying the influence of the paddle speed and the size of the system, we simulated the dissolution process for multicomponent tablets. Our results indicate how the hydrodynamic environment would affect the dissolution process by changing the local concentration of components near the tablet as well as by the particle erosion under high fluid velocity. Since the code was successfully parallelized, the simulation for comparatively large systems is possible now.

  3. A hydrodynamic scheme for two-component winds from hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votruba, V.; Feldmeier, A.; Kubát, J.; Rätzel, D.

    2007-11-01

    Aims:We have developed a time-dependent two-component hydrodynamics code to simulate radiatively-driven stellar winds from hot stars. Methods: We use a time-explicit van Leer scheme to solve the hydrodynamic equations of a two-component stellar wind. Dynamical friction due to Coulomb collisions between the passive bulk plasma and the line-scattering ions is treated by a time-implicit, semi-analytic method using a polynomial fit to the Chandrasekhar function. This gives stable results despite the stiffness of the problem. Results: This method was applied to model stars with winds that are both poorly and well-coupled. While for the former case we reproduce the mCAK solution, for the latter case our solution leads to wind decoupling.

  4. OC5 Project Phase I: Validation of Hydrodynamic Loading on a Fixed Cylinder: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. N.; Wendt, F. F.; Jonkman, J. M.; Popko, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Stansberg, C. T.; Bachynski, E. E.; Bayati, I.; Beyer, F.; de Vaal, J. B.; Harries, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Shin, H.; Kim, B.; van der Zee, T.; Bozonnet, P.; Aguilo, B.; Bergua, R.; Qvist, J.; Qijun, W.; Chen, X.; Guerinel, M.; Tu, Y.; Yutong, H.; Li, R.; Bouy, L.

    2015-04-23

    This paper describes work performed during the first half of Phase I of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation, with Correlation project (OC5). OC5 is a project run under the IEA Wind Research Task 30, and is focused on validating the tools used for modeling offshore wind systems. In this first phase, simulated responses from a variety of offshore wind modeling tools were modeling tools were validated against tank test data of a fixed, suspended cylinder (without a wind turbine) that was tested under regular and irregular wave conditions at MARINTEK. The results from this phase include an examination of different approaches one can use for defining and calibrating hydrodynamic coefficients for a model, and the importance of higher-order wave models in accurately modeling the hydrodynamic loads on offshore substructures.

  5. QR Codes 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  6. ARA type protograph codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus and method for encoding low-density parity check codes. Together with a repeater, an interleaver and an accumulator, the apparatus comprises a precoder, thus forming accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA codes). Protographs representing various types of ARA codes, including AR3A, AR4A and ARJA codes, are described. High performance is obtained when compared to the performance of current repeat-accumulate (RA) or irregular-repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes.

  7. RICH: OPEN-SOURCE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION ON A MOVING VORONOI MESH

    SciTech Connect

    Yalinewich, Almog; Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re’em

    2015-02-01

    We present here RICH, a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on Godunov’s method, on an unstructured moving mesh (the acronym stands for Racah Institute Computational Hydrodynamics). This code is largely based on the code AREPO. It differs from AREPO in the interpolation and time-advancement schemeS as well as a novel parallelization scheme based on Voronoi tessellation. Using our code, we study the pros and cons of a moving mesh (in comparison to a static mesh). We also compare its accuracy to other codes. Specifically, we show that our implementation of external sources and time-advancement scheme is more accurate and robust than is AREPO when the mesh is allowed to move. We performed a parameter study of the cell rounding mechanism (Lloyd iterations) and its effects. We find that in most cases a moving mesh gives better results than a static mesh, but it is not universally true. In the case where matter moves in one way and a sound wave is traveling in the other way (such that relative to the grid the wave is not moving) a static mesh gives better results than a moving mesh. We perform an analytic analysis for finite difference schemes that reveals that a Lagrangian simulation is better than a Eulerian simulation in the case of a highly supersonic flow. Moreover, we show that Voronoi-based moving mesh schemes suffer from an error, which is resolution independent, due to inconsistencies between the flux calculation and the change in the area of a cell. Our code is publicly available as open source and designed in an object-oriented, user-friendly way that facilitates incorporation of new algorithms and physical processes.

  8. RICH: Open-source Hydrodynamic Simulation on a Moving Voronoi Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re'em

    2015-02-01

    We present here RICH, a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on Godunov’s method, on an unstructured moving mesh (the acronym stands for Racah Institute Computational Hydrodynamics). This code is largely based on the code AREPO. It differs from AREPO in the interpolation and time-advancement schemeS as well as a novel parallelization scheme based on Voronoi tessellation. Using our code, we study the pros and cons of a moving mesh (in comparison to a static mesh). We also compare its accuracy to other codes. Specifically, we show that our implementation of external sources and time-advancement scheme is more accurate and robust than is AREPO when the mesh is allowed to move. We performed a parameter study of the cell rounding mechanism (Lloyd iterations) and its effects. We find that in most cases a moving mesh gives better results than a static mesh, but it is not universally true. In the case where matter moves in one way and a sound wave is traveling in the other way (such that relative to the grid the wave is not moving) a static mesh gives better results than a moving mesh. We perform an analytic analysis for finite difference schemes that reveals that a Lagrangian simulation is better than a Eulerian simulation in the case of a highly supersonic flow. Moreover, we show that Voronoi-based moving mesh schemes suffer from an error, which is resolution independent, due to inconsistencies between the flux calculation and the change in the area of a cell. Our code is publicly available as open source and designed in an object-oriented, user-friendly way that facilitates incorporation of new algorithms and physical processes.

  9. General relativistic hydrodynamics with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement (AMR) and modeling of accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    We present a general procedure to solve the General Relativistic Hydrodynamical (GRH) equations with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement (AMR) and model of an accretion disk around a black hole. To do this, the GRH equations are written in a conservative form to exploit their hyperbolic character. The numerical solutions of the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations is done by High Resolution Shock Capturing schemes (HRSC), specifically designed to solve non-linear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. These schemes depend on the characteristic information of the system. We use Marquina fluxes with MUSCL left and right states to solve GRH equations. First, we carry out different test problems with uniform and AMR grids on the special relativistic hydrodynamics equations to verify the second order convergence of the code in 1D, 2 D and 3D. Second, we solve the GRH equations and use the general relativistic test problems to compare the numerical solutions with analytic ones. In order to this, we couple the flux part of general relativistic hydrodynamic equation with a source part using Strang splitting. The coupling of the GRH equations is carried out in a treatment which gives second order accurate solutions in space and time. The test problems examined include shock tubes, geodesic flows, and circular motion of particle around the black hole. Finally, we apply this code to the accretion disk problems around the black hole using the Schwarzschild metric at the background of the computational domain. We find spiral shocks on the accretion disk. They are observationally expected results. We also examine the star-disk interaction near a massive black hole. We find that when stars are grounded down or a hole is punched on the accretion disk, they create shock waves which destroy the accretion disk.

  10. Neural correlates of personal goal processing during episodic future thinking and mind-wandering: An ALE meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, David; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The ability to imagine the future is a complex mental faculty that depends on an ensemble of cognitive processes supported by an extended set of brain regions. Our aim here was to shed light on one key component of future thinking--personal goal processing--and to determine its neural correlates during both directed and spontaneous forms of thoughts. To address this question, we performed separate ALE meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies of episodic future thinking (EFT), mind-wandering, and personal goal processing, and then investigated the commonalities and differences in brain activity between these three domains. The results showed that the three domains activated a common set of brain regions within the default network and, most notably, the medial prefrontal cortex. This finding suggests that the medial prefrontal cortex mediates the processing of personal goals during both EFT and mind-wandering. Differences in activation were also observed, and notably regions supporting cognitive control processes (the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were recruited to a lesser extent during mind-wandering than experimentally directed future thinking, suggesting that different kinds of self-generated thoughts may recruit varying levels of attentional control abilities.

  11. Les fistules œsotrachéales congénitales isolées à propos de 2 cas

    PubMed Central

    El Biache, Imad; Lechqar, Maryem; Rami, Mohammed; Bouabdallah, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent 2 cas de fistules oesotrachéales isolées sans atrésie de l'oesophage, colligés au service de chirurgie pédiatrique au CHU Hassan II de Fès au Maroc entre 2008 et 2013. Il s'agit d'une anomalie rare représentée par un fin canal ascendant entre l'oesophage et la face postérieure de la trachée, à la hauteur du défilé cervico-thoracique. Elle se manifeste cliniquement par une symptomatologie respiratoire parfois digestive. Le diagnostic a été confirmé par le transit oesophagien dans les 2 cas et a permis aussi de déterminer le siège de la fistule. Le traitement était chirurgical, il a permis de supprimer la communication anormale entre l'oesophage et la trachée par un abord cervical avec interposition musculaire dans les 2 cas. Les suites post-opératoires et l’évolution à long terme étaient simples. Le but de ce travail est d'exposer les différents moyens diagnostique et thérapeutique. PMID:25328600

  12. Simulations of Astrophysical Hydrodynamics: Supernova Remnant Evolution and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truelove, John Kelly

    Many problems in astrophysical hydrodynamics are analytically intractable. In such cases, numerical simulation can provide valuable insight into the nature of the solution. We consider two such problems: the interaction of stellar ejecta and ambient gas in an evolving supernova remnant (SNR), and the collapse and fragmentation of molecular clouds to form stars. We first study the dynamics of SNR evolution from the ejecta-dominated stage through the Sedov-Taylor stage, the stages which precede the onset of dynamically significant radiative losses. We emphasize that all nonradiative SNRs of a given power-law structure evolve according to a unified solution, and we discuss this general property in detail. We present 1-D numerical simulations of the flow and use these to aid the development of approximate analytic solutions for the motions of the SNR shocks. We elucidate the dependence of the evolution on the ejecta power-law index n by developing a general trajectory for all n and explaining its relation to the solutions of Chevalier (1982) & Nadyozhin (1985) for n > 5 and Hamilton & Sarazin (1984) for n = 0. These solutions should be valuable in describing relatively young SNRs at intermediate points of nonradiative evolution. We then turn to 3-D simulation of star formation using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We demonstrate that perturbations arising from discretization of the equations of self-gravitational hydrodynamics can grow into artificial fragments. This can be avoided by ensuring the ratio of cell size to Jeans length, which we call the Jeans number, J ≡Δ x/λJ, is kept below 0.25. We refer to the constraint that λJ be resolved as the Jeans condition. We find that it is not possible a priori to have confidence that results of calculations which employ artificial viscosity to halt collapse are relevant to the astrophysical problem. Finally, we describe our new AMR code in detail. This code employs multiple grids at multiple levels of resolution and

  13. Science and code validation program to secure ignition on LMJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, E.; Boniface, C.; Bonnefille, M.; Casner, A.; Esnault, C.; Galmiche, D.; Gauthier, P.; Girard, F.; Gisbert, R.; Leidinger, J.-P.; Loiseau, P.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Mignon, P.; Monteil, M.-C.; Seytor, P.; Tassin, V.

    2016-03-01

    The CEA/DAM ICF experimental program is currently conducted on LIL and Omega with the goal of improving our simulation tool, the FCI2 code. In this effort, we focus on typical ICF observables: hohlraum radiation drive history, capsule core shape and neutron emission history, hydrodynamic instability growth. In addition to integrated experiment, specific designs are also helpful to pinpoint a particular phenomenon. In this article, we review our current efforts and status, and our future projects on Omega and LMJ.

  14. Scaling Laws for Hydrodynamically Equivalent Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masakatsu

    2001-10-01

    The EPOC (equivalent physics of confinement) scenario for the proof of principle of high gain inertial confinement fusion is presented, where the key concept "hydrodynamically equivalent implosions" plays a crucial role. Scaling laws on the target and confinement parameters are derived by applying the Lie group analysis to the PDE (partially differential equations) chain of the hydrodynamic system. It turns out that the conventional scaling law based on adiabatic approximation significantly differs from one which takes such energy transport effect as electron heat conduction into account. Confinement plasma parameters of the hot spot such as the central temperature and the areal mass density at peak compression are obtained with a self-similar solution for spherical implosions.

  15. HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranck, Raymond W.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of the upper extent of the Potomac Estuary between Indian Head and Morgantown, Md. , are simulated using a two-dimensional model. The model computes water-surface elevations and depth-averaged velocities by numerically integrating finite-difference forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation using the alternating direction implicit method. The fundamental, non-linear, unsteady-flow equations, upon which the model is formulated, include additional terms to account for Coriolis acceleration and meteorological influences. Preliminary model/prototype data comparisons show agreement to within 9% for tidal flow volumes and phase differences within the measured-data-recording interval. Use of the model to investigate the hydrodynamics and certain aspects of transport within this Potomac Estuary reach is demonstrated. Refs.

  16. Anisotropic hydrodynamic turbulence in accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Kley, Wilhelm; Picogna, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    Recently, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an attractive purely hydrodynamic candidate for the anomalous angular momentum transport required for weakly ionized accretion disks. In direct three-dimensional numerical simulations of VSI turbulence in disks, a meridional circulation pattern was observed that is opposite to the usual viscous flow behavior. Here, we investigate whether this feature can possibly be explained by an anisotropy of the VSI turbulence. Using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, we calculate the turbulent Reynolds stresses relevant for angular momentum transport for a representative section of a disk. We find that the vertical stress is significantly stronger than the radial stress. Using our results in viscous disk simulations with different viscosity coefficients for the radial and vertical direction, we find good agreement with the VSI turbulence for the stresses and meridional flow; this provides additional evidence for the anisotropy. The results are important with respect to the transport of small embedded particles in disks.

  17. Filter-less submicron hydrodynamic size sorting.

    PubMed

    Fouet, M; Mader, M-A; Iraïn, S; Yanha, Z; Naillon, A; Cargou, S; Gué, A-M; Joseph, P

    2016-02-21

    We propose a simple microfluidic device able to separate submicron particles (critical size ∼0.1 μm) from a complex sample with no filter (minimum channel dimension being 5 μm) by hydrodynamic filtration. A model taking into account the actual velocity profile and hydrodynamic resistances enables prediction of the chip sorting properties for any geometry. Two design families are studied to obtain (i) small sizes within minutes (low-aspect ratio, two-level chip) and (ii) micron-sized sorting with a μL flow rate (3D architecture based on lamination). We obtain quantitative agreement of sorting performances both with experiments and with numerical solving, and determine the limits of the approach. We therefore demonstrate a passive, filter-less sub-micron size sorting with a simple, robust, and easy to fabricate design.

  18. Structure and hydrodynamics of colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1985-07-01

    Colloidal phases (for example, micellar solutions, latex suspensions, ferrofluids and microemulsions) provide excellent model systems with which to test structural and hydrodynamic theories of the liquid state. Interparticle potentials may be attractive or repulsive, and the experimentalist is often free to control the strength, range and symmetry of the interactions. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle neutron spin-echo (SANSE) provide excellent complementary tools for studying the structure and time-dependence of these systems, where correlation lengths typically vary from about one to several tens of nm. Correlation times are usually in the nsec to ..mu..sec range, but may be of order minutes in certain systems. This paper will review some of the current theories and their recent experimental tests, using colloidal systems in which the direct interaction potentials may have spherical, dipolar or cylindrical symmetry and the hydrodynamic interactions may be weak or strong.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamic studies in children.

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, H K; Sundin, S; Ekstedt, J

    1986-01-01

    CSF-hydrodynamic investigation using the constant pressure infusion method was used in children. The CSF resting pressure was recorded and the CSF formation rate was measured. The conductance of the CSF outflow pathways and the pressure in the sagittal sinus were calculated. The method was used in children with suspicion of disturbed CSF hydrodynamics due to various neurological and other conditions. The method is applicable in paediatric neurological diagnostics and provides information for further understanding of the mechanisms behind cranial hypertension. The following mean values are offered as reference values in clinical work and in further research in this field: CSF-resting pressure 1.3 kPa, sagittal sinus pressure 1.1 kPa, pressure difference across arachnoid villi 0.5 kPa, conductance of CSF outflow pathways 22.6 mm3 kPa-1s-1, CSF formation rate 6.8 m3s-1. PMID:3711916

  20. Hydrodynamic synchronisation of optically driven rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debono, Luke J.; Box, Stuart; Phillips, David B.; Simpson, Stephen H.; Hanna, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamic coupling is thought to play a role in the coordinated beating of cilia and flagella, and may inform the future design of artificial swimmers and pumps. In this study, optical tweezers are used to investigate the hydrodynamic coupling between a pair of driven oscillators. The theoretical model of Lenz and Ryskin [P. Lenz and A. Ryskin, Phys. Biol. 3, 285{294 (2006)] is experimentally recreated, in which each oscillator consists of a sphere driven in a circular trajectory. The optical trap position is maintained ahead of the sphere to provide a tangential driving force. The trap is also moved radially to harmonically constrain the sphere to the circular trajectory. Analytically, it has been shown that two oscillators of this type are able to synchronise or phase-lock under certain conditions. We explore the interplay between synchronisation mechanisms and find good agreement between experiment, theory and Brownian dynamics simulations.

  1. Hydrodynamics with spin in bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belovs, M.; CÄ`bers, A.

    2016-06-01

    We describe a kind of self-propelling motion of bacteria based on the cooperative action of rotating flagella on the surface of bacteria. Describing the ensemble of rotating flagella in the framework of the hydrodynamics with spin, the reciprocal theorem of Stokesian hydrodynamics is generalized accordingly. The velocity of the self-propulsion is expressed in terms of the characteristics of the vector field of flagella orientation and it is shown that the unusually high velocities of Thiovulum majus bacteria may be explained by the cooperative action of the rotating flagella. The expressions obtained enable us to estimate the torque created by the rotary motors of the bacterium and show quantitative agreement with the existing experimental data.

  2. Hydrodynamic interaction of bacterial flagella - flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung

    2013-11-01

    Flagellar bundling is an important aspect of locomotion in bacteria such as Escherichia coli. To study the hydrodynamic behavior of helical flagella, we present a computational model that is based on the geometry of the bacterial flagellar filament at the micrometer scale. We consider two model flagella, each of which has a rotary motor at its base with the rotation rate of the motor set at 100 Hz. Bundling occurs when both flagella are left-handed helices turning counterclockwise (when viewed from the nonmotor end of the flagellum looking back toward the motor) or when both flagella are right-handed helices turning clockwise. Helical flagella of the other combinations of handedness and rotation direction do not bundle. In this work we use the generalized immersed boundary method combined with the unconstrained Kirchhoff rod theory, which allows us to study the complicated hydrodynamics of flagellar behavior. This is a joint work with Charlie Peskin at NYU. NSF

  3. Hyperbolic metamaterial lens with hydrodynamic nonlocal response.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2013-06-17

    We investigate the effects of hydrodynamic nonlocal response in hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs), focusing on the experimentally realizable parameter regime where unit cells are much smaller than an optical wavelength but much larger than the wavelengths of the longitudinal pressure waves of the free-electron plasma in the metal constituents. We derive the nonlocal corrections to the effective material parameters analytically, and illustrate the noticeable nonlocal effects on the dispersion curves numerically. As an application, we find that the focusing characteristics of a HMM lens in the local-response approximation and in the hydrodynamic Drude model can differ considerably. In particular, the optimal frequency for imaging in the nonlocal theory is blueshifted with respect to that in the local theory. Thus, to detect whether nonlocal response is at work in a hyperbolic metamaterial, we propose to measure the near-field distribution of a hyperbolic metamaterial lens.

  4. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Estabrook, K. G.; London, R. A.; Wallace, R. J.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R. P.; Liang, E.; McCray, R.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser [1,2] to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications will be discussed. *Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48. [1] J. Kane et al., in press, Astrophys. J. Lett. (March-April, 1997). [2] B.A. Remington et al., in press, Phys. Plasmas (May, 1997).

  5. The Radiation Transport Conundrum in Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2005-03-18

    The summary of this paper is: (1) The conundrum in the title is whether to treat radiation in the lab frame or the comoving frame in a radiation-hydrodynamic problem; (2) Several of the difficulties are associated with combining a somewhat relativistic treatment of radiation with a non-relativistic treatment of hydrodynamics; (3) The principal problem is a tradeoff between easily obtaining the correct diffusion limit and describing free-streaming radiation with the correct wave speed; (4) The computational problems of the comoving-frame formulation in more than one dimension, and the difficulty of obtaining both exact conservation and full u/c accuracy argue against this method; (5) As the interest in multi-D increases, as well as the power of computers, the lab-frame method is becoming more attractive; and (6) The Monte Carlo method combines the advantages of both lab-frame and comoving-frame approaches, its only disadvantage being cost.

  6. The hydrodynamics of water-walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, David L.; Bush, John W. M.

    2004-11-01

    Legged propulsion on the water surface is accomplished through a variety of means by birds, reptiles and insects. Examples include walking, rowing, hopping and capillary locomotion via deformation of the free surface. We here present experimental observations that yield insight into the scaling of water-walking. Particular attention is given to categorizing water-walking creatures and their modes of propulsion according to the relative magnitudes of the hydrodynamic forces generated by their driving stroke.

  7. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  8. Hydrodynamic Flow Control in Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-06

    Hydrodynamic flow control in marine mammals Frank E. Fish,1,* Laurens E. Howle† and Mark M. Murray§ Department of Biology, West Chester University...the flow of water around the body dictates the performance of marine mammals in the aquatic environment. Morphological specializations of marine mammals ...and maneuverability. The morphological features of marine mammals for flow control can be utilized in the biomimetic design of engineered structures

  9. Hydrodynamic Noise from Flexible Roughness Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-29

    of a sparse distribution of fibers that are hydrodynamically uncoupled, the influences of fiber bending and a background flow on the far field sound ...with companion experiments performed by Dr. William Devenport of Virginia Tech. 15. SUBJECT TERMS vortex sound , flexible rougnness, conformal mapping...aeroacoustic Green’s functions to find the far-field sound due to vortex motion. A separate analysis concerning noise suppression by the presence of

  10. UV Polymerization of Hydrodynamically Shaped Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    parallel.17 One other example of non-round fibers was originally reported in 199518 and was produced by co -extrusion of polymers with different...ordinary as there is a minimum required exposure to initiate polymerization as shown with other polymers .25 It was desirable to maintain the same exposure...UV polymerization of hydrodynamically shaped fibers† Abel L. Thangawng, Peter B. Howell, Jr, Christopher M. Spillmann, Jawad Naciri and Frances S

  11. Efficient entropy coding for scalable video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woong Il; Yang, Jungyoup; Jeon, Byeungwoo

    2005-10-01

    The standardization for the scalable extension of H.264 has called for additional functionality based on H.264 standard to support the combined spatio-temporal and SNR scalability. For the entropy coding of H.264 scalable extension, Context-based Adaptive Binary Arithmetic Coding (CABAC) scheme is considered so far. In this paper, we present a new context modeling scheme by using inter layer correlation between the syntax elements. As a result, it improves coding efficiency of entropy coding in H.264 scalable extension. In simulation results of applying the proposed scheme to encoding the syntax element mb_type, it is shown that improvement in coding efficiency of the proposed method is up to 16% in terms of bit saving due to estimation of more adequate probability model.

  12. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R.W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  13. Chemical evolution during the process of proto-star formation by considering a two dimensional hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-10-01

    Chemical composition of a molecular cloud is highly sensitive to the physical properties of the cloud. In order to obtain the chemical composition around a star forming region, we carry out a two dimensional hydrodynamical simulation of the collapsing phase of a proto-star. A total variation diminishing scheme (TVD) is used to solve the set of equations governing hydrodynamics. This hydrodynamic code is capable of mimicking evolution of the physical properties during the formation of a proto-star. We couple our reasonably large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. To have a realistic estimate of the abundances of bio-molecules in the interstellar medium, we include the recently calculated rate coefficients for the formation of several interstellar bio-molecules into our gas phase network. Chemical evolution is studied in detail by keeping grain at the constant temperature throughout the simulation as well as by using the temperature variation obtained from the hydrodynamical model. By considering a large gas-grain network with the sophisticated hydrodynamic model more realistic abundances are predicted. We find that the chemical composition are highly sensitive to the dynamic behavior of the collapsing cloud, specifically on the density and temperature distribution.

  14. Hydrodynamic Forces on Microbubbles under Ultrasound Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alicia; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound (US) pressure waves exert a force on microbubbles that can be used to steer them in a flow. To control the motion of microbubbles under ultrasonic excitation, the coupling between the volume oscillations induced by the ultrasound pressure and the hydrodynamic forces needs to be well understood. We present experimental results for the motion of small, coated microbubbles, with similar sizes and physico-chemical properties as clinically-available ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). The size distribution for the bubbles, resulting from the in-house manufacturing process, was characterized by analysis of high magnification microscopic images and determined to be bimodal. More than 99% of the volume is contained in microbubbles less than 10 microns in diameter, the size of a red blood cell. The motion of the microbubbles in a pulsatile flow, at different Reynolds and Womersley numbers, is studied from tracking of high-speed shadowgraphy. The influence of ultrasound forcing, at or near the resonant frequency of the bubbles, on the hydrodynamic forces due to the pulsatile flow is determined from the experimental measurements of the trajectories. Previous evidence of a sign reversal in Saffman lift is the focus of particular attention, as this is frequently the only hydrodynamic force acting in the direction perpendicular to the flow pathlines. Application of the understanding of this physical phenomenon to targeted drug delivery is analyzed in terms of the transport of the microbubbles. NSF GRFP.

  15. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment. PMID:25997399

  16. Hydrodynamics of an electrochemical membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-05-22

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment.

  17. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  18. Astrophysically relevant hydrodynamics experiments using intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Budil, K. S.; Estabrook, K.; Glendinning, S. G.; Gold, D.; Ryutov, D.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R. P.; Smith, T.; Carroll, J.; McCray, R.; Liang, E.; Keilty, K.; Rubenchik, A.

    1998-04-01

    In a broad-based collaboration, we are developing a series of astrophysically relevant hydrodynamics experiments on the Nova and PetaWatt lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Issues that we are or planning to investigate are deep nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities in 2D versus 3D, relevant to core-collapse supernova explosions [J. Kane et al., Ap. J. (1997); B.A. Remington et al., Phys. Plasmas (1997).]; strong-shock hydrodynamics relevant to supernova remnant formation [R.P. Drake et al., submitted, Ap. J. (1997).]; radiative blast wave development, of potential interest to gamma-ray burst models [E. Liang et al., 2nd Int. Workshop on LaboratoryAstrophysics using Intense Lasers, Mar. 19-21, 1998, Univ. of AZ.]; and cratering experiments, of possible interest to hypervelocity meteoroid impacts [A. Rubenchik et al., 2nd Int. Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics using Intense Lasers, Mar. 19-21, 1998, Univ. of AZ.]. An overview of this work will be given, and the issue of scaling will be addressed [D. Ryutov et al., in preparation for submittal to Ap. J. (1998).].

  19. Hydrodynamic fluctuations in thermostatted multiparticle collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Híjar, Humberto; Sutmann, Godehard

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the behavior of mesoscopic fluctuations of a fluid simulated by Multiparticle Collision Dynamics when this is applied together with a local thermostatting procedure that constrains the strength of temperature fluctuations. We consider procedures in which the thermostat interacts with the fluid at every simulation step as well as cases in which the thermostat is applied only at regular time intervals. Due to the application of the thermostat temperature fluctuations are forced to relax to equilibrium faster than they do in the nonthermostatted, constant-energy case. Depending on the interval of application of the thermostat, it is demonstrated that the thermodynamic state changes gradually from isothermal to adiabatic conditions. In order to exhibit this effect we compute from simulations diverse correlation functions of the hydrodynamic fluctuating fields. These correlation functions are compared with those predicted by a linearized hydrodynamic theory of a simple fluid in which a thermostat is applied locally. We find a good agreement between the model and the numerical results, which confirms that hydrodynamic fluctuations in Multiparticle Collision Dynamics in the presence of the thermostat have the properties expected for spontaneous fluctuations in fluids in contact with a heat reservoir.

  20. Modeling multiphase flow using fluctuating hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B; Garcia, Alejandro L; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics provides a model for fluids at mesoscopic scales where thermal fluctuations can have a significant impact on the behavior of the system. Here we investigate a model for fluctuating hydrodynamics of a single-component, multiphase flow in the neighborhood of the critical point. The system is modeled using a compressible flow formulation with a van der Waals equation of state, incorporating a Korteweg stress term to treat interfacial tension. We present a numerical algorithm for modeling this system based on an extension of algorithms developed for fluctuating hydrodynamics for ideal fluids. The scheme is validated by comparison of measured structure factors and capillary wave spectra with equilibrium theory. We also present several nonequilibrium examples to illustrate the capability of the algorithm to model multiphase fluid phenomena in a neighborhood of the critical point. These examples include a study of the impact of fluctuations on the spinodal decomposition following a rapid quench, as well as the piston effect in a cavity with supercooled walls. The conclusion in both cases is that thermal fluctuations affect the size and growth of the domains in off-critical quenches.