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Sample records for ale hydrodynamics code

  1. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A; Eder, E; Liu, W; Barnard, J; Friedman, A; Logan, G; Fisher, A; Masers, N; Bertozzi, A

    2011-11-04

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related

  2. A variational multiscale finite element method for monolithic ALE computations of shock hydrodynamics using nodal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Scovazzi, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present a monolithic arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method for computing highly transient flows with strong shocks. We use a variational multiscale (VMS) approach to stabilize a piecewise-linear Galerkin formulation of the equations of compressible flows, and an entropy artificial viscosity to capture strong solution discontinuities. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of VMS methods for highly transient shock flows, an area of research for which the VMS literature is extremely scarce. In addition, the proposed monolithic ALE method is an alternative to the more commonly used Lagrangian+remap methods, in which, at each time step, a Lagrangian computation is followed by mesh smoothing and remap (conservative solution interpolation). Lagrangian+remap methods are the methods of choice in shock hydrodynamics computations because they provide nearly optimal mesh resolution in proximity of shock fronts. However, Lagrangian+remap methods are not well suited for imposing inflow and outflow boundary conditions. These issues offer an additional motivation for the proposed approach, in which we first perform the mesh motion, and then the flow computations using the monolithic ALE framework. The proposed method is second-order accurate and stable, as demonstrated by extensive numerical examples in two and three space dimensions.

  3. SULEC: Benchmarking a new ALE finite-element code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.; Ellis, S.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a 2-D/3-D arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian (ALE) finite-element code, SULEC, based on known techniques from literature. SULEC is successful in tackling many of the problems faced by numerical models of lithosphere and mantle processes, such as the combination of viscous, elastic, and plastic rheologies, the presence of a free surface, the contrast in viscosity between lithosphere and the underlying asthenosphere, and the occurrence of large deformations including viscous flow and offset on shear zones. The aim of our presentation is (1) to describe SULEC, and (2) to present a set of analytical and numerical benchmarks that we use to continuously test our code. SULEC solves the incompressible momentum equation coupled with the energy equation. It uses a structured mesh that is built of quadrilateral or brick elements that can vary in size in all dimensions, allowing to achieve high resolutions where required. The elements are either linear in velocity with constant pressure, or quadratic in velocity with linear pressure. An accurate pressure field is obtained through an iterative penalty (Uzawa) formulation. Material properties are carried on tracer particles that are advected through the Eulerian mesh. Shear elasticity is implemented following the approach of Moresi et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 184, 2003], brittle materials deform following a Drucker-Prager criterion, and viscous flow is by temperature- and pressure-dependent power-law creep. The top boundary of our models is a true free surface (with free surface stabilisation) on which simple surface processes models may be imposed. We use a set of benchmarks that test viscous, viscoelastic, elastic and plastic deformation, temperature advection and conduction, free surface behaviour, and pressure computation. Part of our benchmark set is automated allowing easy testing of new code versions. Examples include Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, Stokes flow, relaxation of viscous topography, viscous pure shear

  4. Improvements to SOIL: An Eulerian hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.G.

    1988-04-01

    Possible improvements to SOIL, an Eulerian hydrodynamics code that can do coupled radiation diffusion and strength of materials, are presented in this report. Our research is based on the inspection of other Eulerian codes and theoretical reports on hydrodynamics. Several conclusions from the present study suggest that some improvements are in order, such as second-order advection, adaptive meshes, and speedup of the code by vectorization and/or multitasking. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Shadowfax: Moving mesh hydrodynamical integration code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert

    2016-05-01

    Shadowfax simulates galaxy evolution. Written in object-oriented modular C++, it evolves a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. For the hydrodynamical integration, it makes use of a (co-) moving Lagrangian mesh. The code has a 2D and 3D version, contains utility programs to generate initial conditions and visualize simulation snapshots, and its input/output is compatible with a number of other simulation codes, e.g. Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) and GIZMO (ascl:1410.003).

  6. An implicit Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Knapp

    2000-04-01

    An implicit version of the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code SPHINX has been written and is working. In conjunction with the SPHINX code the new implicit code models fluids and solids under a wide range of conditions. SPH codes are Lagrangian, meshless and use particles to model the fluids and solids. The implicit code makes use of the Krylov iterative techniques for solving large linear-systems and a Newton-Raphson method for non-linear corrections. It uses numerical derivatives to construct the Jacobian matrix. It uses sparse techniques to save on memory storage and to reduce the amount of computation. It is believed that this is the first implicit SPH code to use Newton-Krylov techniques, and is also the first implicit SPH code to model solids. A description of SPH and the techniques used in the implicit code are presented. Then, the results of a number of tests cases are discussed, which include a shock tube problem, a Rayleigh-Taylor problem, a breaking dam problem, and a single jet of gas problem. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with analytic solutions, experimental results, and the explicit SPHINX code. In the case of the single jet of gas case it has been demonstrated that the implicit code can do a problem in much shorter time than the explicit code. The problem was, however, very unphysical, but it does demonstrate the potential of the implicit code. It is a first step toward a useful implicit SPH code.

  7. VH-1: Multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, John; Blondin, John; Lindahl, Greg; Lufkin, Eric

    2012-04-01

    VH-1 is a multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code written in FORTRAN for use on any computing platform, from desktop workstations to supercomputers. It uses a Lagrangian remap version of the Piecewise Parabolic Method developed by Paul Woodward and Phil Colella in their 1984 paper. VH-1 comes in a variety of versions, from a simple one-dimensional serial variant to a multi-dimensional version scalable to thousands of processors.

  8. Code Differentiation for Hydrodynamic Model Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1999-06-27

    Use of a hydrodynamics code for experimental data fitting purposes (an optimization problem) requires information about how a computed result changes when the model parameters change. These so-called sensitivities provide the gradient that determines the search direction for modifying the parameters to find an optimal result. Here, the authors apply code-based automatic differentiation (AD) techniques applied in the forward and adjoint modes to two problems with 12 parameters to obtain these gradients and compare the computational efficiency and accuracy of the various methods. They fit the pressure trace from a one-dimensional flyer-plate experiment and examine the accuracy for a two-dimensional jet-formation problem. For the flyer-plate experiment, the adjoint mode requires similar or less computer time than the forward methods. Additional parameters will not change the adjoint mode run time appreciably, which is a distinct advantage for this method. Obtaining ''accurate'' sensitivities for the j et problem parameters remains problematic.

  9. A new three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, L.; Hawke, I.; Montero, P. J.; Rezzolla, L.

    We present a new three-dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamics code, the Whisky code. This code incorporates the expertise developed over the past years in the numerical solution of Einstein equations and of the hydrodynamics equations in a curved spacetime, and is the result of a collaboration of several European Institutes. We here discuss the ability of the code to carry out long-term accurate evolutions of the linear and nonlinear dynamics of isolated relativistic stars.

  10. Coupling Magnetic Fields and ALE Hydrodynamics for 3D Simulations of MFCG's

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Rieben, R; Wallin, B

    2006-09-20

    We review the development of a full 3D multiphysics code for the simulation of explosively driven Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG) and related pulse power devices. In a typical MFCG the device is seeded with an initial electric current and the device is then detonated. The detonation compresses the magnetic field and amplifies the current. This is a multiphysics problem in that detonation kinetics, electromagnetic diffusion and induction, material deformation, and thermal effects are all important. This is a tightly coupled problem in that the different physical quantities have comparable spatial and temporal variation, and hence should be solved simultaneously on the same computational mesh.

  11. Verification Test Suite (VERTS) For Rail Gun Applications using ALE3D: 2-D Hydrodynamics & Thermal Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, F M; Solberg, J; White, D

    2008-04-17

    A verification test suite has been assessed with primary focus on low reynolds number flow of liquid metals. This is representative of the interface between the armature and rail in gun applications. The computational multiphysics framework, ALE3D, is used. The main objective of the current study is to provide guidance and gain confidence in the results obtained with ALE3D. A verification test suite based on 2-D cases is proposed and includes the lid-driven cavity and the Couette flow are investigated. The hydro and thermal fields are assumed to be steady and laminar in nature. Results are compared with analytical solutions and previously published data. Mesh resolution studies are performed along with various models for the equation of state.

  12. Comparison of the LLNL ALE3D and AKTS Thermal Safety Computer Codes for Calculating Times to Explosion in ODTX and STEX Thermal Cookoff Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Burnham, A K

    2006-04-05

    Cross-comparison of the results of two computer codes for the same problem provides a mutual validation of their computational methods. This cross-validation exercise was performed for LLNL's ALE3D code and AKTS's Thermal Safety code, using the thermal ignition of HMX in two standard LLNL cookoff experiments: the One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) test and the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) test. The chemical kinetics model used in both codes was the extended Prout-Tompkins model, a relatively new addition to ALE3D. This model was applied using ALE3D's new pseudospecies feature. In addition, an advanced isoconversional kinetic approach was used in the AKTS code. The mathematical constants in the Prout-Tompkins code were calibrated using DSC data from hermetically sealed vessels and the LLNL optimization code Kinetics05. The isoconversional kinetic parameters were optimized using the AKTS Thermokinetics code. We found that the Prout-Tompkins model calculations agree fairly well between the two codes, and the isoconversional kinetic model gives very similar results as the Prout-Tompkins model. We also found that an autocatalytic approach in the beta-delta phase transition model does affect the times to explosion for some conditions, especially STEX-like simulations at ramp rates above 100 C/hr, and further exploration of that effect is warranted.

  13. AMRA: An Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamic code for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, T.; Müller, E.

    2001-08-01

    Implementation details and test cases of a newly developed hydrodynamic code, amra, are presented. The numerical scheme exploits the adaptive mesh refinement technique coupled to modern high-resolution schemes which are suitable for relativistic and non-relativistic flows. Various physical processes are incorporated using the operator splitting approach, and include self-gravity, nuclear burning, physical viscosity, implicit and explicit schemes for conductive transport, simplified photoionization, and radiative losses from an optically thin plasma. Several aspects related to the accuracy and stability of the scheme are discussed in the context of hydrodynamic and astrophysical flows.

  14. A new hydrodynamics code for Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, S.-C.; Chu, M.-C.; Lin, L.-M.

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional hydrodynamics code for Type Ia supernova (SNIa) simulations is presented. The code includes a fifth-order shock-capturing scheme WENO, detailed nuclear reaction network, flame-capturing scheme and sub-grid turbulence. For post-processing, we have developed a tracer particle scheme to record the thermodynamical history of the fluid elements. We also present a one-dimensional radiative transfer code for computing observational signals. The code solves the Lagrangian hydrodynamics and moment-integrated radiative transfer equations. A local ionization scheme and composition dependent opacity are included. Various verification tests are presented, including standard benchmark tests in one and two dimensions. SNIa models using the pure turbulent deflagration model and the delayed-detonation transition model are studied. The results are consistent with those in the literature. We compute the detailed chemical evolution using the tracer particles' histories, and we construct corresponding bolometric light curves from the hydrodynamics results. We also use a GPU to speed up the computation of some highly repetitive subroutines. We achieve an acceleration of 50 times for some subroutines and a factor of 6 in the global run time.

  15. Extending ALE3D, an Arbitrarily Connected hexahedral 3D Code, to Very Large Problem Size (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L

    2010-12-15

    As the number of compute units increases on the ASC computers, the prospect of running previously unimaginably large problems is becoming a reality. In an arbitrarily connected 3D finite element code, like ALE3D, one must provide a unique identification number for every node, element, face, and edge. This is required for a number of reasons, including defining the global connectivity array required for domain decomposition, identifying appropriate communication patterns after domain decomposition, and determining the appropriate load locations for implicit solvers, for example. In most codes, the unique identification number is defined as a 32-bit integer. Thus the maximum value available is 231, or roughly 2.1 billion. For a 3D geometry consisting of arbitrarily connected hexahedral elements, there are approximately 3 faces for every element, and 3 edges for every node. Since the nodes and faces need id numbers, using 32-bit integers puts a hard limit on the number of elements in a problem at roughly 700 million. The first solution to this problem would be to replace 32-bit signed integers with 32-bit unsigned integers. This would increase the maximum size of a problem by a factor of 2. This provides some head room, but almost certainly not one that will last long. Another solution would be to replace all 32-bit int declarations with 64-bit long long declarations. (long is either a 32-bit or a 64-bit integer, depending on the OS). The problem with this approach is that there are only a few arrays that actually need to extended size, and thus this would increase the size of the problem unnecessarily. In a future computing environment where CPUs are abundant but memory relatively scarce, this is probably the wrong approach. Based on these considerations, we have chosen to replace only the global identifiers with the appropriate 64-bit integer. The problem with this approach is finding all the places where data that is specified as a 32-bit integer needs to be

  16. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  17. Adding kinetics and hydrodynamics to the CHEETAH thermochemical code

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E., Howard, W.M., Souers, P.C.

    1997-01-15

    In FY96 we released CHEETAH 1.40, which made extensive improvements on the stability and user friendliness of the code. CHEETAH now has over 175 users in government, academia, and industry. Efforts have also been focused on adding new advanced features to CHEETAH 2.0, which is scheduled for release in FY97. We have added a new chemical kinetics capability to CHEETAH. In the past, CHEETAH assumed complete thermodynamic equilibrium and independence of time. The addition of a chemical kinetic framework will allow for modeling of time-dependent phenomena, such as partial combustion and detonation in composite explosives with large reaction zones. We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood detonation framework in CHEETAH, which allows for the treatment of nonideal detonations and explosive failure. A second major effort in the project this year has been linking CHEETAH to hydrodynamic codes to yield an improved HE product equation of state. We have linked CHEETAH to 1- and 2-D hydrodynamic codes, and have compared the code to experimental data. 15 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Developing a Multi-Dimensional Hydrodynamics Code with Astrochemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Yang, Seungwon

    2015-08-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) revealed high resolution molecular lines some of which are still unidentified yet. Because formation of these astrochemical molecules has been seldom studied in traditional chemistry, observations of new molecular lines drew a lot of attention from not only astronomers but also chemists both experimental and theoretical. Theoretical calculations for the formation of these astrochemical molecules have been carried out providing reaction rates for some important molecules, and some of theoretical predictions have been measured in laboratories. The reaction rates for the astronomically important molecules are now collected to form databases some of which are publically available. By utilizing these databases, we develop a multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code that includes the reaction rates of astrochemical molecules. Because this type of hydrodynamics code is able to trace the molecular formation in a non-equilibrium fashion, it is useful to study the formation history of these molecules that affects the spatial distribution of some specific molecules. We present the development procedure of this code and some test problems in order to verify and validate the developed code.

  19. CHOLLA: A NEW MASSIVELY PARALLEL HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2015-04-15

    We present Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures (Cholla ), a new three-dimensional hydrodynamics code that harnesses the power of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate astrophysical simulations. Cholla models the Euler equations on a static mesh using state-of-the-art techniques, including the unsplit Corner Transport Upwind algorithm, a variety of exact and approximate Riemann solvers, and multiple spatial reconstruction techniques including the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). Using GPUs, Cholla evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously and can update over 10 million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction. Owing to the massively parallel architecture of GPUs and the design of the Cholla code, astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (≳256{sup 3}) can easily be computed on a single device. We use the Message Passing Interface library to extend calculations onto multiple devices and demonstrate nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs. A suite of test problems highlights the physical accuracy of our modeling and provides a useful comparison to other codes. We then use Cholla to simulate the interaction of a shock wave with a gas cloud in the interstellar medium, showing that the evolution of the cloud is highly dependent on its density structure. We reconcile the computed mixing time of a turbulent cloud with a realistic density distribution destroyed by a strong shock with the existing analytic theory for spherical cloud destruction by describing the system in terms of its median gas density.

  20. RAM: a Relativistic Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2005-06-06

    The authors have developed a new computer code, RAM, to solve the conservative equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on parallel computers. They have implemented a characteristic-wise, finite difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme using the full characteristic decomposition of the SRHD equations to achieve fifth-order accuracy in space. For time integration they use the method of lines with a third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme. They have also implemented fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta time integration schemes for comparison. The implementation of AMR and parallelization is based on the FLASH code. RAM is modular and includes the capability to easily swap hydrodynamics solvers, reconstruction methods and physics modules. In addition to WENO they have implemented a finite volume module with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) for reconstruction and the modified Marquina approximate Riemann solver to work with TVD Runge-Kutta time integration. They examine the difficulty of accurately simulating shear flows in numerical relativistic hydrodynamics codes. They show that under-resolved simulations of simple test problems with transverse velocity components produce incorrect results and demonstrate the ability of RAM to correctly solve these problems. RAM has been tested in one, two and three dimensions and in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. they have demonstrated fifth-order accuracy for WENO in one and two dimensions and performed detailed comparison with other schemes for which they show significantly lower convergence rates. Extensive testing is presented demonstrating the ability of RAM to address challenging open questions in relativistic astrophysics.

  1. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  2. A cosmological hydrodynamic code based on the piecewise parabolic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheller, Claudio; Pantano, Ornella; Moscardini, Lauro

    1998-04-01

    We present a hydrodynamical code for cosmological simulations which uses the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) to follow the dynamics of the gas component and an N-body particle-mesh algorithm for the evolution of the collisionless component. The gravitational interaction between the two components is regulated by the Poisson equation, which is solved by a standard fast Fourier transform (FFT) procedure. In order to simulate cosmological flows, we have introduced several modifications to the original PPM scheme, which we describe in detail. Various tests of the code are presented, including adiabatic expansion, single and multiple pancake formation, and three-dimensional cosmological simulations with initial conditions based on the cold dark matter scenario.

  3. CASTRO: Multi-dimensional Eulerian AMR Radiation-hydrodynamics Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CenterComputational Sciences; Engineering (Berkeley); Howell, Louis; Singer, Mike

    2011-05-01

    CASTRO is a multi-dimensional Eulerian AMR radiation-hydrodynamics code that includes stellar equations of state, nuclear reaction networks, and self-gravity. Initial target applications for CASTRO include Type Ia and Type II supernovae. CASTRO supports calculations in 1-d, 2-d and 3-d Cartesian coordinates, as well as 1-d spherical and 2-d cylindrical (r-z) coordinate systems. Time integration of the hydrodynamics equations is based on an unsplit version of the the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) with new limiters that avoid reducing the accuracy of the scheme at smooth extrema. CASTRO can follow an arbitrary number of isotopes or elements. The atomic weights and amounts of these elements are used to calculate the mean molecular weight of the gas required by the equation of state. CASTRO supports several different approaches to solving for self-gravity. The most general is a full Poisson solve for the gravitational potential. CASTRO also supports a monopole approximation for gravity, and a constant gravity option is also available. The CASTRO software is written in C++ and Fortran, and is based on the BoxLib software framework developed by CCSE.

  4. An Invariant-Preserving ALE Method for Solids under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Christon, Mark A

    2012-07-17

    We are proposing a fundamentally new approach to ALE methods for solids undergoing large deformation due to extreme loading conditions. Our approach is based on a physically-motivated and mathematically rigorous construction of the underlying Lagrangian method, vector/tensor reconstruction, remapping, and interface reconstruction. It is transformational because it deviates dramatically from traditionally accepted ALE methods and provides the following set of unique attributes: (1) a three-dimensional, finite volume, cell-centered ALE framework with advanced hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories for solids; (2) a new physically and mathematically consistent reconstruction method for vector/tensor fields; (3) advanced invariant-preserving remapping algorithm for vector/tensor quantities; (4) moment-of-fluid (MoF) interface reconstruction technique for multi-material problems with solids undergoing large deformations. This work brings together many new concepts, that in combination with emergent cell-centered Lagrangian hydrodynamics methods will produce a cutting-edge ALE capability and define a new state-of-the-art. Many ideas in this work are new, completely unexplored, and hence high risk. The proposed research and the resulting algorithms will be of immediate use in Eulerian, Lagrangian and ALE codes under the ASC program at the lab. In addition, the research on invariant preserving reconstruction/remap of tensor quantities is of direct interest to ongoing CASL and climate modeling efforts at LANL. The application space impacted by this work includes Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), Z-pinch, munition-target interactions, geological impact dynamics, shock processing of powders and shaped charges. The ALE framework will also provide a suitable test-bed for rapid development and assessment of hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories. Today, there are no invariant-preserving ALE algorithms for treating solids with large deformations. Therefore

  5. Radiative Transport for a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Bernd; Kessel-Deynet, Olaf; Burkert, Andreas

    One crude approximation to describe the effect of Radiative Transport in SPH simulations is to introduce a density dependent polytropic index in the equation of state (Matthew R. Bate 1998), which is larger than one if the medium becomes optically thick. By doing this one fixes the system to a special density-temperature dependence. But in principle the system should have the possibility to realize a variety of different density-temperature dependencies if radiative transport is involved and arbitrary heating and cooling functions can be used. We combine the advantages of the SPH Code with an algorithm describing a flux limited diffusive radiative transport to develop a RHD-Code. Flux limited diffusion involves the Rosseland-means of the absorption and scattering coefficients. To calculate this coefficients we use the model from Preibisch et al. 1993. This will restrict our simulations to low temperatures (T <= 1000 K) and high densities (ρ >= 103 cm-3) but on the other hand keeps the code as simple and as fast as possible. For a given energy-density distribution, the radiation field evolves towards the equilibrium solution on a time-scale much smaller than the typical dynamical time-step for the hydrodynamic equations. So the RT equations have to be solved implicit. To do this we use the nice convergence features of the Successive Over-Relaxing (SOR) method. The focus of the simulations than will be on the prestellar phase where molecular cloud cores become optically thick. The central temperature is still low (T = 10 dots 500 K) and thus the ionization and dissociation degree is low and nearly constant.

  6. Modeling Fluid Instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion Hydrodynamics Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesak, Steven

    2004-11-01

    When attempting to numerically model a physical phenomenon of any kind, we typically formulate the numerical requirements in terms of the range of spatial and temporal scales of interest. We then construct numerical software that adequately resolves those scales in each of the spatial and temporal dimensions. This software may use adaptive mesh refinement or other techniques to adequately resolve those scales of interest, and may use front-capturing algorithms or other techniques to avoid having to resolve scales that are not of interest to us. Knowing what constitutes the scales of interest is sometimes a difficult question. Harder still is knowing what constitutes adequate resolution. For many physical phenomena, adequate resolution may be obtained, for example, by simply demanding that the spatial and temporal derivatives of all scales of interest have errors less than some specified tolerance. But for other phenomena, in particular those in which physical instabilities are active, one must be much more precise in the specification of adequate resolution. In such situations one must ask detailed questions about the nature of the numerical errors, not just their size. The problem we have in mind is that of accurately modeling the evolution of small amplitude perturbations to a time-dependent flow, where the unperturbed flow itself exhibits large amplitude temporal and spatial variations. Any errors that we make in numerically modeling the unperturbed flow, if they have a projection onto the space of the perturbations of interest, can easily compromise the accuracy of those perturbations, even if the errors are small in terms of the unperturbed solution. Here we will discuss the progress that we have made over the past year in attempting to improve the ability of our radiation hydrodynamics code FASTRAD3D to accurately model the evolution of small-amplitude perturbations to an imploding ICF pellet, which is subject to both Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh

  7. THEHYCO-3DT: Thermal hydrodynamic code for the 3 dimensional transient calculation of advanced LMFBR core

    SciTech Connect

    Vitruk, S.G.; Korsun, A.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The multilevel mathematical model of neutron thermal hydrodynamic processes in a passive safety core without assemblies duct walls and appropriate computer code SKETCH, consisted of thermal hydrodynamic module THEHYCO-3DT and neutron one, are described. A new effective discretization technique for energy, momentum and mass conservation equations is applied in hexagonal - z geometry. The model adequacy and applicability are presented. The results of the calculations show that the model and the computer code could be used in conceptual design of advanced reactors.

  8. GPUPEGAS: A NEW GPU-ACCELERATED HYDRODYNAMIC CODE FOR NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF INTERACTING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikov, Igor

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a new scalable hydrodynamic code, GPUPEGAS (GPU-accelerated Performance Gas Astrophysical Simulation), for the simulation of interacting galaxies is proposed. The details of a parallel numerical method co-design are described. A speed-up of 55 times was obtained within a single GPU accelerator. The use of 60 GPU accelerators resulted in 96% parallel efficiency. A collisionless hydrodynamic approach has been used for modeling of stars and dark matter. The scalability of the GPUPEGAS code is shown.

  9. Neptune: An astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics code for massively parallel computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandalski, Stou

    Smooth particle hydrodynamics is an efficient method for modeling the dynamics of fluids. It is commonly used to simulate astrophysical processes such as binary mergers. We present a newly developed GPU accelerated smooth particle hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulations. The code is named neptune after the Roman god of water. It is written in OpenMP parallelized C++ and OpenCL and includes octree based hydrodynamic and gravitational acceleration. The design relies on object-oriented methodologies in order to provide a flexible and modular framework that can be easily extended and modified by the user. Several pre-built scenarios for simulating collisions of polytropes and black-hole accretion are provided. The code is released under the MIT Open Source license and publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/neptune-sph/.

  10. CoCoNuT: General relativistic hydrodynamics code with dynamical space-time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmelmeier, Harald; Novak, Jérôme; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo

    2012-02-01

    CoCoNuT is a general relativistic hydrodynamics code with dynamical space-time evolution. The main aim of this numerical code is the study of several astrophysical scenarios in which general relativity can play an important role, namely the collapse of rapidly rotating stellar cores and the evolution of isolated neutron stars. The code has two flavors: CoCoA, the axisymmetric (2D) magnetized version, and CoCoNuT, the 3D non-magnetized version.

  11. Introduction and guide to LLNL's relativistic 3-D nuclear hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Zingman, J.A.; McAbee, T.L.; Alonso, C.T.; Wilson, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    We have constructed a relativistic hydrodynamic model to investigate Bevalac and higher energy, heavy-ion collisions. The basis of the model is a finite-difference solution to covariant hydrodynamics, which will be described in the rest of this paper. This paper also contains: a brief review of the equations and numerical methods we have employed in the solution to the hydrodynamic equations, a detailed description of several of the most important subroutines, and a numerical test on the code. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Modeling Three-Dimensional Shock Initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-08

    A recent SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate and study code predictions. These SMIS tests used a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments into a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. This SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because (1) SMIS tests facilitate the investigation of 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) within the context of a considerable suite of diagnostics, and (2) many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. A particular goal of these model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the ALE3D implementation of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth reactive flow model [2] within a fully 3-dimensional regime of SDT. The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations reproduce observed 'Go/No-Go' 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  13. Development of three-dimensional hydrodynamical and MHD codes using Adaptive Mesh Refinement scheme with TVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den, M.; Yamashita, K.; Ogawa, T.

    A three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical (HD) and magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulation codes using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme are developed. This method places fine grids over areas of interest such as shock waves in order to obtain high resolution and places uniform grids with lower resolution in other area. Thus AMR scheme can provide a combination of high solution accuracy and computational robustness. We demonstrate numerical results for a simplified model of a shock propagation, which strongly indicate that the AMR techniques have the ability to resolve disturbances in an interplanetary space. We also present simulation results for MHD code.

  14. Reliable estimation of shock position in shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    The displacement method for estimating shock position in a shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics code is introduced. Common estimates use simulation data within the captured shock, but the displacement method uses data behind the shock, making the estimate consistent with and as reliable as estimates of material parameters obtained from averages or fits behind the shock. The displacement method is described in the context of a steady shock in a one-dimensional lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and demonstrated on a piston problem and a spherical blast wave.The displacement method's estimates of shock position are much better than common estimates in such applications.

  15. Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2010-03-10

    We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

  16. CRASH: A BLOCK-ADAPTIVE-MESH CODE FOR RADIATIVE SHOCK HYDRODYNAMICS-IMPLEMENTATION AND VERIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Holst, B.; Toth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Myra, E. S.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P.; Powell, K. G.; Holloway, J. P.; Stout, Q.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.; Karni, S.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code, a block-adaptive-mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with a gray or multi-group method and uses a flux-limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. Electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include flux-limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite-volume discretization in either one-, two-, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator-split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) an explicit step of a shock-capturing hydrodynamic solver; (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space; and (3) an implicit solution of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. The applications are for astrophysics and laboratory astrophysics. The CRASH code is an extension of the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a new radiation transfer and heat conduction library and equation-of-state and multi-group opacity solvers. Both CRASH and BATS-R-US are part of the publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework.

  17. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (ID & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  18. Modified-Gravity-GADGET: a new code for cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchwein, Ewald; Baldi, Marco; Springel, Volker

    2013-11-01

    We present a new massively parallel code for N-body and cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models. The code employs a multigrid-accelerated Newton-Gauss-Seidel relaxation solver on an adaptive mesh to efficiently solve for perturbations in the scalar degree of freedom of the modified gravity model. As this new algorithm is implemented as a module for the P-GADGET3 code, it can at the same time follow the baryonic physics included in P-GADGET3, such as hydrodynamics, radiative cooling and star formation. We demonstrate that the code works reliably by applying it to simple test problems that can be solved analytically, as well as by comparing cosmological simulations to results from the literature. Using the new code, we perform the first non-radiative and radiative cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of an f (R)-gravity model. We also discuss the impact of active galactic nucleus feedback on the matter power spectrum, as well as degeneracies between the influence of baryonic processes and modifications of gravity.

  19. PEGAS: Hydrodynamical code for numerical simulation of the gas components of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Igor

    A new hydrodynamical code for numerical simulation of the gravitational gas dynamics is described in the paper. The code is based on the Fluid-in-Cell method with a Godunov-type scheme at the Eulerian stage. The numerical method was adapted for GPU-based supercomputers. The performance of the code is shown by the simulation of the collision of the gas components of two similar disc galaxies in the course of the central collision of the galaxies in the polar direction.

  20. EvoL: the new Padova Tree-SPH parallel code for cosmological simulations. I. Basic code: gravity and hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Buonomo, U.; Grassi, T.; Piovan, L.; Chiosi, C.

    2010-04-01

    Context. We present the new release of the Padova N-body code for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation and evolution, EvoL. The basic Tree + SPH code is presented and analysed, together with an overview of the software architectures. Aims: EvoL is a flexible parallel Fortran95 code, specifically designed for simulations of cosmological structure formations on cluster, galactic and sub-galactic scales. Methods: EvoL is a fully Lagrangian self-adaptive code, based on the classical oct-tree by Barnes & Hut (1986, Nature, 324, 446) and on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics algorithm (SPH, Lucy 1977, AJ, 82, 1013). It includes special features like adaptive softening lengths with correcting extra-terms, and modern formulations of SPH and artificial viscosity. It is designed to be run in parallel on multiple CPUs to optimise the performance and save computational time. Results: We describe the code in detail, and present the results of a number of standard hydrodynamical tests.

  1. Simulating hypervelocity impact effects on structures using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code MAGI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libersky, Larry; Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of interaction occurring between space debris and orbiting structures is of great interest to the planning and survivability of space assets. Computer simulation of the impact events using hydrodynamic codes can provide some understanding of the processes but the problems involved with this fundamental approach are formidable. First, any realistic simulation is necessarily three-dimensional, e.g., the impact and breakup of a satellite. Second, the thickness of important components such as satellite skins or bumper shields are small with respect to the dimension of the structure as a whole, presenting severe zoning problems for codes. Thirdly, the debris cloud produced by the primary impact will yield many secondary impacts which will contribute to the damage and possible breakup of the structure. The problem was approached by choosing a relatively new computational technique that has virtues peculiar to space impacts. The method is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

  2. Simulations of implosions with a 3D, parallel, unstructured-grid, radiation-hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, T B; Milovich, J L; Prasad, M K; Rathkopf, J; Shestakov, A I

    1998-12-28

    An unstructured-grid, radiation-hydrodynamics code is used to simulate implosions. Although most of the problems are spherically symmetric, they are run on 3D, unstructured grids in order to test the code's ability to maintain spherical symmetry of the converging waves. Three problems, of increasing complexity, are presented. In the first, a cold, spherical, ideal gas bubble is imploded by an enclosing high pressure source. For the second, we add non-linear heat conduction and drive the implosion with twelve laser beams centered on the vertices of an icosahedron. In the third problem, a NIF capsule is driven with a Planckian radiation source.

  3. Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

  4. ALE3D Statistical Hot Spot Model Results for LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L III; Tarver, C M; McGuire, E M

    2003-07-11

    The Statistical Hot Spot shock initiation and detonation reactive flow model for solid explosives in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code provides physically realistic descriptions of: hot spot formation; ignition (or failure to ignite); growth of reaction (or failure to grow) into surrounding particles; coalescence of reacting hot spots; transition to detonation; and self-sustaining detonation. The model has already successfully modeled several processes in HMX-based explosives, such as shock desensitization, that can not predicted by other reactive flow models. In this paper, the Statistical Hot Spot model is applied to experimental embedded gauge data on the insensitive triaminotrintrobenzene (TATB) based explosive LX-17.

  5. A 3+1 dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Huovinen, P.; Bleicher, M.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the details of 3+1 dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code for the simulations of quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The code solves the equations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics in the Israel-Stewart framework. With the help of ideal-viscous splitting, we keep the ability to solve the equations of ideal hydrodynamics in the limit of zero viscosities using a Godunov-type algorithm. Milne coordinates are used to treat the predominant expansion in longitudinal (beam) direction effectively. The results are successfully tested against known analytical relativistic inviscid and viscous solutions, as well as against existing 2+1D relativistic viscous code. Catalogue identifier: AETZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 825 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 92 750 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: any with a C++ compiler and the CERN ROOT libraries. Operating system: tested on GNU/Linux Ubuntu 12.04 x64 (gcc 4.6.3), GNU/Linux Ubuntu 13.10 (gcc 4.8.2), Red Hat Linux 6 (gcc 4.4.7). RAM: scales with the number of cells in hydrodynamic grid; 1900 Mbytes for 3D 160×160×100 grid. Classification: 1.5, 4.3, 12. External routines: CERN ROOT (http://root.cern.ch), Gnuplot (http://www.gnuplot.info/) for plotting the results. Nature of problem: relativistic hydrodynamical description of the 3-dimensional quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Solution method: finite volume Godunov-type method. Running time: scales with the number of hydrodynamic cells; typical running times on Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz, single thread mode, 160

  6. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  7. Testing astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes with hypervelocity jet experiments on the nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K; Farley, D; Glendinning, S G; Remington, B A; Stone, J; Turner, N

    1999-09-22

    Recent shock tube experiments using the Nova laser facility have demonstrated that strong shocks and highly supersonic flows similar to those encountered in astrophysical jets can be studied in detail through carefully controlled experiment. We propose the use of high power lasers such as Nova, Omega, and NIF to perform experiments on radiation hydrodynamic problems such as jets involving the multidimensional dynamics of strong shocks. High power lasers are the only experimental facilities that can reach the very high Mach number regime. The experiments will serve both as diagnostics of astrophysically interesting gas dynamic problems, and could also form the basis of test problems for numerical algorithms for astrophysical radiation hydrodynamic codes, The potential for experimentally achieving a strongly radiative jet seems very good.

  8. Investigating the Magnetorotational Instability with Dedalus, and Open-Souce Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Keaton J; /UC, Berkeley, aff SLAC

    2012-08-31

    The magnetorotational instability is a fluid instability that causes the onset of turbulence in discs with poloidal magnetic fields. It is believed to be an important mechanism in the physics of accretion discs, namely in its ability to transport angular momentum outward. A similar instability arising in systems with a helical magnetic field may be easier to produce in laboratory experiments using liquid sodium, but the applicability of this phenomenon to astrophysical discs is unclear. To explore and compare the properties of these standard and helical magnetorotational instabilities (MRI and HRMI, respectively), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities were added to Dedalus, an open-source hydrodynamics simulator. Dedalus is a Python-based pseudospectral code that uses external libraries and parallelization with the goal of achieving speeds competitive with codes implemented in lower-level languages. This paper will outline the MHD equations as implemented in Dedalus, the steps taken to improve the performance of the code, and the status of MRI investigations using Dedalus.

  9. Simulation of a ceramic impact experiment using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPHINX. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPHINX, and we discuss how the model differs from others. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we simulate an experiment in which a tungsten rod strikes a target of heavily confined ceramic. Simulations in 3D at relatively coarse resolution yield poor results. However, 2D plane-strain approximations to the test produce crack patterns that are strikingly similar to the data, although the fracture model needs further refinement to match some of the finer details. We conclude with an outline of plans for continuing research and development.

  10. Prediction of material strength and fracture of glass using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The design of many military devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics, that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in truck and jeep windshields and in helicopters; and rock and concrete that are used in underground bunkers. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass, and data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, the authors did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  11. Prediction of material strength and fracture of brittle materials using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwwerf, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The design of many devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in windshields; and rock and concrete that are used in oil wells. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, they did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  12. Comparison among five hydrodynamic codes with a diverging-converging nozzle experiment

    SciTech Connect

    L. E. Thode; M. C. Cline; B. G. DeVolder; M. S. Sahota; D. K. Zerkle

    1999-09-01

    A realistic open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket simulation model must be capable of a self-consistent nozzle calculation in conjunction with coupled radiation and neutron transport in three spatial dimensions. As part of the development effort for such a model, five hydrodynamic codes were used to compare with a converging-diverging nozzle experiment. The codes used in the comparison are CHAD, FLUENT, KIVA2, RAMPANT, and VNAP2. Solution accuracy as a function of mesh size is important because, in the near term, a practical three-dimensional simulation model will require rather coarse zoning across the nozzle throat. In the study, four different grids were considered. (1) coarse, radially uniform grid, (2) coarse, radially nonuniform grid, (3) fine, radially uniform grid, and (4) fine, radially nonuniform grid. The study involves code verification, not prediction. In other words, the authors know the solution they want to match, so they can change methods and/or modify an algorithm to best match this class of problem. In this context, it was necessary to use the higher-order methods in both FLUENT and RAMPANT. In addition, KIVA2 required a modification that allows significantly more accurate solutions for a converging-diverging nozzle. From a predictive point of view, code accuracy with no tuning is an important result. The most accurate codes on a coarse grid, CHAD and VNAP2, did not require any tuning. Their main comparison among the codes was the radial dependence of the Mach number across the nozzle throat. All five codes yielded a very similar solution with fine, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. However, the codes yielded significantly different solutions with coarse, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. For all the codes, radially nonuniform zoning across the throat significantly increased solution accuracy with a coarse mesh. None of the codes agrees in detail with the weak shock located downstream of the nozzle throat, but all the

  13. Evaluation of a Cray performance tool using a large hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, K.M.; Simmons, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    This paper will discuss one of these automatic tools that has been developed recently by Cray Research, Inc. for use on its parallel supercomputer. The tool is called ATEXPERT; when used in conjunction with the Cray Fortran compiling system, CF77, it produces a parallelized version of a code based on loop-level parallelism, plus information to enable the programmer to optimize the parallelized code and improve performance. The information obtained through the use of the tool is presented in an easy-to-read graphical format, making the digestion of such a large quantity of data relatively easy and thus, improving programmer productivity. In this paper we address the issues that we found when the took a large Los Alamos hydrodynamics code, PUEBLO, that was highly vectorizable, but not parallelized, and using ATEXPERT proceeded to parallelize it. We show that through the advice of ATEXPERT, bottlenecks in the code can be found, leading to improved performance. We also show the dependence of performance on problem size, and finally, we contrast the speedup predicted by ATEXPERT with that measured on a dedicated eight-processor Y-MP.

  14. Modeling The Shock Initiation of PBX-9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate the code predictions. The SMIS tests use a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments at a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model [2] in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT). The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations accurately reproduce the 'Go/No-Go' threshold of the Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied in a predictive fashion for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  15. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    Simulation of radiation hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions is developed, having in mind, in particular, target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement energy (IFE) and the interpretation of related experiments. Intense radiation pulses by laser or particle beams heat high-Z target configurations of different geometries and lead to a regime which is optically thick in some regions and optically thin in others. A diffusion description is inadequate in this situation. A new numerical code has been developed which describes hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions (cylindrical R-Z geometry) and radiation transport along rays in three dimensions with the 4 π solid angle discretized in direction. Matter moves on a non-structured mesh composed of trilateral and quadrilateral elements. Radiation flux of a given direction enters on two (one) sides of a triangle and leaves on the opposite side(s) in proportion to the viewing angles depending on the geometry. This scheme allows to propagate sharply edged beams without ray tracing, though at the price of some lateral diffusion. The algorithm treats correctly both the optically thin and optically thick regimes. A symmetric semi-implicit (SSI) method is used to guarantee numerical stability. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI2D Catalogue identifier: AECV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 151 098 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 889 622 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC (32 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 2 Mbytes Word size: 32 bits Classification: 19.7 External routines: X-window standard library (libX11.so) and corresponding heading files (X11/*.h) are

  16. Experiences and results multitasking a hydrodynamics code on global and local memory machines

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.

    1987-01-01

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent Lagrangian hydrodynamics code using a Godunov solution method has been multitasked for the Cray X-MP/48, the Intel iPSC hypercube, the Alliant FX series and the IBM RP3 computers. Actual multitasking results have been obtained for the Cray, Intel and Alliant computers and simulated results were obtained for the Cray and RP3 machines. The differences in the methods required to multitask on each of the machines is discussed. Results are presented for a sample problem involving a shock wave moving down a channel. Comparisons are made between theoretical speedups, predicted by Amdahl's law, and the actual speedups obtained. The problems of debugging on the different machines are also described.

  17. AN OPEN-SOURCE NEUTRINO RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    O’Connor, Evan

    2015-08-15

    We present an open-source update to the spherically symmetric, general-relativistic hydrodynamics, core-collapse supernova (CCSN) code GR1D. The source code is available at http://www.GR1Dcode.org. We extend its capabilities to include a general-relativistic treatment of neutrino transport based on the moment formalisms of Shibata et al. and Cardall et al. We pay special attention to implementing and testing numerical methods and approximations that lessen the computational demand of the transport scheme by removing the need to invert large matrices. This is especially important for the implementation and development of moment-like transport methods in two and three dimensions. A critical component of neutrino transport calculations is the neutrino–matter interaction coefficients that describe the production, absorption, scattering, and annihilation of neutrinos. In this article we also describe our open-source neutrino interaction library NuLib (available at http://www.nulib.org). We believe that an open-source approach to describing these interactions is one of the major steps needed to progress toward robust models of CCSNe and robust predictions of the neutrino signal. We show, via comparisons to full Boltzmann neutrino-transport simulations of CCSNe, that our neutrino transport code performs remarkably well. Furthermore, we show that the methods and approximations we employ to increase efficiency do not decrease the fidelity of our results. We also test the ability of our general-relativistic transport code to model failed CCSNe by evolving a 40-solar-mass progenitor to the onset of collapse to a black hole.

  18. Measuring Extinction with ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Roberts, D.; Stewart, J.; Smith, J.; Fitch, J.

    2007-12-01

    ALE (Astronomical LIDAR for Extinction) is deployed at the University of New Mexico's (UNM) Campus Observatory in Albuquerque, NM. It has begun a year-long testing phase prior deployment at McDonald Observatory in support of the CCD/Transit Instrument II (CTI-II). ALE is designed to produce a high-precision measurement of atmospheric absorption and scattering above the observatory site every ten minutes of every moderately clear night. LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is the VIS/UV/IR analog of radar, using a laser, telescope and time-gated photodetector instead of a radio transmitter, dish and receiver. In the case of ALE -- an elastic backscatter LIDAR -- 20ns-long, eye-safe laser pulses are launched 2500 times per second from a 0.32m transmitting telescope co-mounted with a 50mm short-range receiver on an alt-az mounted 0.67m long-range receiver. Photons from the laser pulse are scattered and absorbed as the pulse propagates through the atmosphere, a portion of which are scattered into the field of view of the short- and long-range receiver telescopes and detected by a photomultiplier. The properties of a given volume of atmosphere along the LIDAR path are inferred from both the altitude-resolved backscatter signal as well as the attenuation of backscatter signal from altitudes above it. We present ALE profiles from the commissioning phase and demonstrate some of the astronomically interesting atmospheric information that can be gleaned from these data, including, but not limited to, total line-of-sight extinction. This project is funded by NSF Grant 0421087.

  19. FORCE2: A state-of-the-art two-phase code for hydrodynamic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jianmin; Lyczkowski, R. W.; Burge, S. W.

    1993-02-01

    A three-dimensional computer code for two-phase flow named FORCE2 has been developed by Babcock and Wilcox (B & W) in close collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). FORCE2 is capable of both transient as well as steady-state simulations. This Cartesian coordinates computer program is a finite control volume, industrial grade and quality embodiment of the pilot-scale FLUFIX/MOD2 code and contains features such as three-dimensional blockages, volume and surface porosities to account for various obstructions in the flow field, and distributed resistance modeling to account for pressure drops caused by baffles, distributor plates and large tube banks. Recently computed results demonstrated the significance of and necessity for three-dimensional models of hydrodynamics and erosion. This paper describes the process whereby ANL's pilot-scale FLUFIX/MOD2 models and numerics were implemented into FORCE2. A description of the quality control to assess the accuracy of the new code and the validation using some of the measured data from Illinois Institute of Technology (UT) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) are given. It is envisioned that one day, FORCE2 with additional modules such as radiation heat transfer, combustion kinetics and multi-solids together with user-friendly pre- and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale and biomass as energy sources, to retain energy security, and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  20. FORCE2: A state-of-the-art two-phase code for hydrodynamic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jianmin; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burge, S.W.

    1993-02-01

    A three-dimensional computer code for two-phase flow named FORCE2 has been developed by Babcock and Wilcox (B & W) in close collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). FORCE2 is capable of both transient as well as steady-state simulations. This Cartesian coordinates computer program is a finite control volume, industrial grade and quality embodiment of the pilot-scale FLUFIX/MOD2 code and contains features such as three-dimensional blockages, volume and surface porosities to account for various obstructions in the flow field, and distributed resistance modeling to account for pressure drops caused by baffles, distributor plates and large tube banks. Recently computed results demonstrated the significance of and necessity for three-dimensional models of hydrodynamics and erosion. This paper describes the process whereby ANL`s pilot-scale FLUFIX/MOD2 models and numerics were implemented into FORCE2. A description of the quality control to assess the accuracy of the new code and the validation using some of the measured data from Illinois Institute of Technology (UT) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) are given. It is envisioned that one day, FORCE2 with additional modules such as radiation heat transfer, combustion kinetics and multi-solids together with user-friendly pre- and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale and biomass as energy sources, to retain energy security, and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  1. FORCE2: A state-of-the-art two-phase code for hydrodynamic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jianmin; Lyczkowski, R.W. ); Burge, S.W. . Research Center)

    1993-02-01

    A three-dimensional computer code for two-phase flow named FORCE2 has been developed by Babcock and Wilcox (B W) in close collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). FORCE2 is capable of both transient as well as steady-state simulations. This Cartesian coordinates computer program is a finite control volume, industrial grade and quality embodiment of the pilot-scale FLUFIX/MOD2 code and contains features such as three-dimensional blockages, volume and surface porosities to account for various obstructions in the flow field, and distributed resistance modeling to account for pressure drops caused by baffles, distributor plates and large tube banks. Recently computed results demonstrated the significance of and necessity for three-dimensional models of hydrodynamics and erosion. This paper describes the process whereby ANL's pilot-scale FLUFIX/MOD2 models and numerics were implemented into FORCE2. A description of the quality control to assess the accuracy of the new code and the validation using some of the measured data from Illinois Institute of Technology (UT) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) are given. It is envisioned that one day, FORCE2 with additional modules such as radiation heat transfer, combustion kinetics and multi-solids together with user-friendly pre- and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale and biomass as energy sources, to retain energy security, and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  2. Kull ALE: II. Grid Motion on Unstructured Arbitrary Polyhedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-02-11

    Several classes of mesh motion algorithms are presented for the remap phase of unstructured mesh ALE codes. The methods range from local shape optimization procedures to more complex variational minimization methods applied to arbitrary unstructured polyhedral meshes necessary for the Kull code.

  3. Multi-Material ALE with AMR for Modeling Hot Plasmas and Cold Fragmenting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alice, Koniges; Nathan, Masters; Aaron, Fisher; David, Eder; Wangyi, Liu; Robert, Anderson; David, Benson; Andrea, Bertozzi

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new 3D multi-physics multi-material code, ALE-AMR, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to the microstructural regimes. The code is unique in its ability to model hot radiating plasmas and cold fragmenting solids. New numerical techniques were developed for many of the physics packages to work efficiently on a dynamically moving and adapting mesh. We use interface reconstruction based on volume fractions of the material components within mixed zones and reconstruct interfaces as needed. This interface reconstruction model is also used for void coalescence and fragmentation. A flexible strength/failure framework allows for pluggable material models, which may require material history arrays to determine the level of accumulated damage or the evolving yield stress in J2 plasticity models. For some applications laser rays are propagating through a virtual composite mesh consisting of the finest resolution representation of the modeled space. A new 2nd order accurate diffusion solver has been implemented for the thermal conduction and radiation transport packages. One application area is the modeling of laser/target effects including debris/shrapnel generation. Other application areas include warm dense matter, EUV lithography, and material wall interactions for fusion devices.

  4. Global Time Dependent Solutions of Stochastically Driven Standard Accretion Disks: Development of Hydrodynamical Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Naveel; Maqbool, Bari; Iqbal, Naseer; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-07-01

    X-ray binaries and AGNs are powered by accretion discs around compact objects, where the x-rays are emitted from the inner regions and uv emission arise from the relatively cooler outer parts. There has been an increasing evidence that the variability of the x-rays in different timescales is caused by stochastic fluctuations in the accretion disc at different radii. These fluctuations although arise in the outer parts of the disc but propagate inwards to give rise to x-ray variability and hence provides a natural connection between the x-ray and uv variability. There are analytical expressions to qualitatively understand the effect of these stochastic variabilities, but quantitative predictions are only possible by a detailed hydrodynamical study of the global time dependent solution of standard accretion disc. We have developed numerical efficient code (to incorporate all these effects), which considers gas pressure dominated solutions and stochastic fluctuations with the inclusion of boundary effect of the last stable orbit.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Imploding Plasma liners Using the 1D Radiation-Hydrodynamics Code HELIOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. S.; Hanna, D. S.; Awe, T. J.; Hsu, S. C.; Stanic, M.; Cassibry, J. T.; Macfarlane, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is attempting to form imploding plasma liners to reach 0.1 Mbar upon stagnation, via 30--60 spherically convergent plasma jets. PLX is partly motivated by the desire to develop a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion. The liner density, atomic makeup, and implosion velocity will help determine the maximum pressure that can be achieved. This work focuses on exploring the effects of atomic physics and radiation on the 1D liner implosion and stagnation dynamics. For this reason, we are using Prism Computational Science's 1D Lagrangian rad-hydro code HELIOS, which has both equation of state (EOS) table-lookup and detailed configuration accounting (DCA) atomic physics modeling. By comparing a series of PLX-relevant cases proceeding from ideal gas, to EOS tables, to DCA treatments, we aim to identify how and when atomic physics effects are important for determining the peak achievable stagnation pressures. In addition, we present verification test results as well as brief comparisons to results obtained with RAVEN (1D radiation-MHD) and SPHC (smoothed particle hydrodynamics).

  6. Implementation of a simple model for linear and nonlinear mixing at unstable fluid interfaces in hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J D

    2000-10-01

    A simple model was recently described for predicting the time evolution of the width of the mixing layer at an unstable fluid interface [J. D. Ramshaw, Phys. Rev. E 58, 5834 (1998); ibid. 61, 5339 (2000)]. The ordinary differential equations of this model have been heuristically generalized into partial differential equations suitable for implementation in multicomponent hydrodynamics codes. The central ingredient in this generalization is a nun-diffusional expression for the species mass fluxes. These fluxes describe the relative motion of the species, and thereby determine the local mixing rate and spatial distribution of mixed fluid as a function of time. The generalized model has been implemented in a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code. The model equations and implementation procedure are summarized, and comparisons with experimental mixing data are presented.

  7. ALE3D Simulations of Gap Closure and Surface Ignition for Cookoff Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; McClelland, M A; Nichols, A L

    2006-06-22

    We are developing ALE3D models to describe the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior during the heating, ignition and explosive phases of various cookoff phenomena. The candidate models and numerical strategies are being evaluated using benchmark cookoff experiments. ALE3D is a three-dimensional computer code capable of solving the model equations in a coupled fashion through all the phases of the cookoff in a single calculation. For the cookoff experiments, we are interested in representing behavior on widely varying timescales. We have used an implicit hydrodynamics option during the heating phase and an explicit solution method during the explosive phase. To complicate the modeling problem, high heat fluxes cause rapid temperature increases in boundary layers and lead to the formation of gaps between energetic and structural materials and ignition on surfaces. The initially solid energetic and structural materials react to produce gases, which fill the gaps. These materials can also melt and flow. Since an implicit solution method is used, simple no-strength materials models can no longer be used for liquids and gases. In this paper, we discuss and demonstrate choices of materials models for solid/liquid/gas mixtures to be used in conjunction with the implicit solution method. In addition, results are given for mesh movement strategies applied to the opening, closing, and surface ignition within gaps.

  8. APSARA: A multi-dimensional unsplit fourth-order explicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code for arbitrary curvilinear grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwathanarat, A.; Grimm-Strele, H.; Müller, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new fourth-order, finite-volume hydrodynamics code named Apsara. The code employs a high-order, finite-volume method for mapped coordinates with extensions for nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. Apsara can handle arbitrary structured curvilinear meshes in three spatial dimensions. The code has successfully passed several hydrodynamic test problems, including the advection of a Gaussian density profile and a nonlinear vortex and the propagation of linear acoustic waves. For these test problems, Apsara produces fourth-order accurate results in case of smooth grid mappings. The order of accuracy is reduced to first-order when using the nonsmooth circular grid mapping. When applying the high-order method to simulations of low-Mach number flows, for example, the Gresho vortex and the Taylor-Green vortex, we discover that Apsara delivers superior results to codes based on the dimensionally split, piecewise parabolic method (PPM) widely used in astrophysics. Hence, Apsara is a suitable tool for simulating highly subsonic flows in astrophysics. In the first astrophysical application, we perform implicit large eddy simulations (ILES) of anisotropic turbulence in the context of core collapse supernova (CCSN) and obtain results similar to those previously reported.

  9. Combining node-centered parallel radiation transport and higher-order multi-material cell-centered hydrodynamics methods in three-temperature radiation hydrodynamics code TRHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-06-01

    Higher-order cell-centered multi-material hydrodynamics (HD) and parallel node-centered radiation transport (RT) schemes are combined self-consistently in three-temperature (3T) radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) code TRHD (Sijoy and Chaturvedi, 2015) developed for the simulation of intense thermal radiation or high-power laser driven RHD. For RT, a node-centered gray model implemented in a popular RHD code MULTI2D (Ramis et al., 2009) is used. This scheme, in principle, can handle RT in both optically thick and thin materials. The RT module has been parallelized using message passing interface (MPI) for parallel computation. Presently, for multi-material HD, we have used a simple and robust closure model in which common strain rates to all materials in a mixed cell is assumed. The closure model has been further generalized to allow different temperatures for the electrons and ions. In addition to this, electron and radiation temperatures are assumed to be in non-equilibrium. Therefore, the thermal relaxation between the electrons and ions and the coupling between the radiation and matter energies are required to be computed self-consistently. This has been achieved by using a node-centered symmetric-semi-implicit (SSI) integration scheme. The electron thermal conduction is calculated using a cell-centered, monotonic, non-linear finite volume scheme (NLFV) suitable for unstructured meshes. In this paper, we have described the details of the 2D, 3T, non-equilibrium, multi-material RHD code developed with a special attention to the coupling of various cell-centered and node-centered formulations along with a suite of validation test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. We also report the parallel performance of RT module. Finally, in order to demonstrate the full capability of the code implementation, we have presented the simulation of laser driven shock propagation in a layered thin foil. The simulation results are found to be in good

  10. One-Dimensional Lagrangian Code for Plasma Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Fusion Pellet Driven by Ion Beams.

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 The MEDUSA-IB code performs implosion and thermonuclear burn calculations of an ion beam driven ICF target, based on one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and transport theory. It can calculate the following values in spherical geometry through the progress of implosion and fuel burnup of a multi-layered target. (1) Hydrodynamic velocities, density, ion, electron and radiation temperature, radiation energy density, Rs and burn rate of target as a function of coordinates and time, (2) Fusion gainmore » as a function of time, (3) Ionization degree, (4) Temperature dependent ion beam energy deposition, (5) Radiation, -particle and neutron spectra as a function of time.« less

  11. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  12. Recent Hydrodynamics Improvements to the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard.R. Schultz

    2009-07-01

    The hydrodynamics section of the RELAP5-3D computer program has been recently improved. Changes were made as follows: (1) improved turbine model, (2) spray model for the pressurizer model, (3) feedwater heater model, (4) radiological transport model, (5) improved pump model, and (6) compressor model.

  13. Cholla: 3D GPU-based hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2016-07-01

    Cholla (Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures) models the Euler equations on a static mesh and evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously using GPUs. It can update over ten million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction, allowing computation of astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (>256^3) on a single device; calculations can be extended onto multiple devices with nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs.

  14. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamic Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. I. Method and Code Tests in Spherical Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald

    2010-07-01

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the "ray-by-ray plus" approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  15. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMIC CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. I. METHOD AND CODE TESTS IN SPHERICAL SYMMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.d

    2010-07-15

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the 'ray-by-ray plus' approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  16. User's manual for DYNA2D: an explicit two-dimensional hydrodynamic finite-element code with interactive rezoning

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    This revised report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane strain finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 4-node solid elements, and the equations-of motion are integrated by the central difference method. An interactive rezoner eliminates the need to terminate the calculation when the mesh becomes too distorted. Rather, the mesh can be rezoned and the calculation continued. The command structure for the rezoner is described and illustrated by an example.

  17. Protostellar binary fragmentation: a comparison of results from two distinct second-order hydrodynamic codes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, L. Di G.; Klapp, J.

    1997-03-01

    A new second-order Eulerian code is compared with a version of the TREESPH code formulated by Hernquist and Katz (1989) for the standard isothermal collapse test. The results indicate that both codes produce a very similar evolution ending with the formation of a protostellar binary system. Contrary to previous first-order calculations, the binary forms by direct fragmentation, i.e. without the occurrence of an intermediate bar configuration. A similar trend was also found in second-order Eulerian calculations (Myhill and Boss 1993), suggesting that it is a result of the decreased numerical diffusion associated with the new second-order schemes. The results have also implications on the differences between the finite difference methods and the particle method SPH, raised by Monaghan and Lattanzio (1986) for this problem. In particular, the Eulerian calculation does not result in a run-away collapse of the fragments, and as found in the TREESPH evolution, they also show a clear tendency to get closer together. In agreement with previous SPH calculations (Monaghan and Lattanzio 1986), the results of the long term evolution with code TREESPH show that the gravitational interaction between the two fragments may become important, and eventually induce the binary to coalesce. However, SPH calculations by Bate, Bonnell and Price (1995) indicate that the two fragments, after having reached a minimum separation distance, do not merge but continue to orbit each other.

  18. Protostellar binary fragmentation: a comparison of results from two distinct second-order hydrodynamic codes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di G. Sigalotti, L.; Klapp, J.

    1997-03-01

    A new second-order Eulerian code is compared with a version of the TREESPH code formulated by Hernquist & Katz (1989ApJS...70..419H) for the standard isothermal collapse test. The results indicate that both codes produce a very similar evolution ending with the formation of a protostellar binary system. Contrary to previous first-order calculations, the binary forms by direct fragmentation, i.e., without the occurrence of an intermediate bar configuration. A similar trend was also found in recent second-order Eulerian calculations (Myhill & Boss 1993ApJS...89..345M), suggesting that it is a result of the decreased numerical diffusion associated with the new second-order schemes. The results have also implications on the differences between the finite difference methods and the particle method SPH, raised by Monaghan & Lattanzio (1986A&A...158..207M) for this problem. In particular, the Eulerian calculation does not result in a run-away collapse of the fragments, and as found in the TREESPH evolution, they also show a clear tendency to get closer together. In agreement with previous SPH calculations (Monaghan & Lattanzio 1986A&A...158..207M), the results of the long term evolution with code TREESPH show that the gravitational interaction between the two fragments may become important, and eventually induce the binary to coalesce. However, most recent SPH calculations (Bate, Bonnell & Price 1995MNRAS.277..362B ) indicate that the two fragments, after having reached a minimum separation distance, do not merge but continue to orbit each other.

  19. A historical perspective of developments in hydrodynamic instabilities, integrated codes and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2004-12-01

    The author reviews fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first is the ablative stabilization of a Rayleigh Taylor instability at an ablation front and its dispersion relation, the so-called Takabe formula. This formula gives a principal guideline for stable target design and is also applied to studying the turbulent combustion wave in Type Ia supernova explosions. The second is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The physics of an integrated code, ILESTA (one- and two-dimensional), and analyses and design of laser produced plasmas including the implosion dynamics and stability are reviewed. There are two areas on its applications to implosion analysis: one is an evaluation of mixing layers in one-dimensional implosions by coupling with one- and two-dimensional ILESTA and the other is an extension to include the k ɛ type turbulent mixing model, where the details of the formulation are given. The third topic is laboratory astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts: one is a review of its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasmas to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes of promoting such research. The fourth topic is on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in fast ignition laser fusion and its relation to self-organization of magnetic field generation in gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distances. Finally, recent activity related to the application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics is briefly explained.

  20. RAyMOND: an N-body and hydrodynamics code for MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.; Smith, R.; Fellhauer, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) concordance cosmological model is supported by a wealth of observational evidence, particularly on large scales. At galactic scales, however, the model is poorly constrained and recent observations suggest a more complex behaviour in the dark sector than may be accommodated by a single CDM component. Furthermore, a modification of the gravitational force in the very weak field regime may account for at least some of the phenomenology of dark matter. A well-known example of such an approach is MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). While this idea has proven remarkably successful in the context of stellar dynamics in individual galaxies, the effects of such a modification of gravity on galaxy interactions and environmental processes deserve further study. To explore this arena, we modify the parallel adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES to use two formulations of MOND. We implement both the fully non-linear aquadratic Lagrangian formulation and the simpler quasi-linear formulation. The relevant modifications necessary for the Poisson solver in RAMSES are discussed in detail. Using idealized tests, in both serial and parallel runs, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the code.

  1. Using Hydrodynamic Codes in Modeling of Multi-Interface Diverging Experiments for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Meakin, C.; Arnett, D.; Miles, A. R.; Robey, H. F.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2008-04-01

    Using the Omega Laser, researchers studying supernova dynamics have observed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in a high energy density system. The NIF laser hopes to generate the energy needed to expand these experiments to a diverging system. We report scaling simulations to model the interface dynamics of a multilayered, diverging Rayleigh-Taylor experiment for NIF using CALE, a hybrid adaptive Lagrangian-Eulerian code developed at LLNL. Specifically, we looked both qualitatively and quantitatively at the Rayleigh-Taylor growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled systems using different materials. The simulations will assist in the target design process and help choose diagnostics to maximize the information we receive in a particular shot. Simulations are critical for experimental planning, especially for experiments on large-scale facilities.

  2. Giant impacts during planet formation: Parallel tree code simulations using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Randi L.

    There is both theoretical and observational evidence that giant planets collided with objects ≥ Mearth during their evolution. These impacts may play a key role in giant planet formation. This paper describes impacts of a ˜ Earth-mass object onto a suite of proto-giant-planets, as simulated using an SPH parallel tree code. We run 6 simulations, varying the impact angle and evolutionary stage of the proto-Jupiter. We find that it is possible for an impactor to free some mass from the core of the proto-planet it impacts through direct collision, as well as to make physical contact with the core yet escape partially, or even completely, intact. None of the 6 cases we consider produced a solid disk or resulted in a net decrease in the core mass of the pinto-planet (since the mass decrease due to disruption was outweighed by the increase due to the addition of the impactor's mass to the core). However, we suggest parameters which may have these effects, and thus decrease core mass and formation time in protoplanetary models and/or create satellite systems. We find that giant impacts can remove significant envelope mass from forming giant planets, leaving only 2 MEarth of gas, similar to Uranus and Neptune. They can also create compositional inhomogeneities in planetary cores, which creates differences in planetary thermal emission characteristics.

  3. Giant Impacts During Planet Formation: Parallel Tree Code Simulations Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R.; Bodenheimer, P.; Asphaug, E.

    2000-12-01

    There is both theoretical and observational evidence that giant planets collided with objects with mass >= Mearth during their evolution. These impacts may help shorten planetary formation timescales by changing the opacity of the planetary atmosphere to allow quicker cooling. They may also redistribute heavy metals within giant planets, affect the core/envelope mass ratio, and help determine the ratio of emitted to absorbed energy within giant planets. Thus, the researchers propose to simulate the impact of a ~ Earth-mass object onto a proto-giant-planet with SPH. Results of the SPH collision models will be input into a steady-state planetary evolution code and the effect of impacts on formation timescales, core/envelope mass ratios, density profiles, and thermal emissions of giant planets will be quantified. The collision will be modelled using a modified version of an SPH routine which simulates the collision of two polytropes. The Saumon-Chabrier and Tillotson equations of state will replace the polytropic equation of state. The parallel tree algorithm of Olson & Packer will be used for the domain decomposition and neighbor search necessary to calculate pressure and self-gravity efficiently. This work is funded by the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program.

  4. ALES: An Innovative Argument-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, Safia; Sawamura, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an Argument-Learning System (ALES). The idea is based on the AIF (argumentation interchange format) ontology using "Walton theory". ALES uses different mining techniques to manage a highly structured arguments repository. This repository was designed, developed and implemented by the authors. The aim is to…

  5. Binary neutron-star mergers with Whisky and SACRA: First quantitative comparison of results from independent general-relativistic hydrodynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Shibata, Masaru; Yamamoto, Tetsuro

    2010-09-01

    We present the first quantitative comparison of two independent general-relativistic hydrodynamics codes, the whisky code and the sacra code. We compare the output of simulations starting from the same initial data and carried out with the configuration (numerical methods, grid setup, resolution, gauges) which for each code has been found to give consistent and sufficiently accurate results, in particular, in terms of cleanness of gravitational waveforms. We focus on the quantities that should be conserved during the evolution (rest mass, total mass energy, and total angular momentum) and on the gravitational-wave amplitude and frequency. We find that the results produced by the two codes agree at a reasonable level, with variations in the different quantities but always at better than about 10%.

  6. Advanced life events (ALEs) that impede aging-in-place among seniors.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Lee A; Ramirez-Zohfeld, Vanessa; Sunkara, Priya; Forcucci, Chris; Campbell, Dianne; Mitzen, Phyllis; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the wishes of many seniors to age-in-place in their own homes, critical events occur that impede their ability to do so. A gap exists as to what these advanced life events (ALEs) entail and the planning that older adults perceive is necessary. The purpose of this study was to identify seniors' perceptions and planning toward ALEs that may impact their ability to remain in their own home. We conducted focus groups with 68 seniors, age ≥65 years (mean age 73.8 years), living in the community (rural, urban, and suburban), using open-ended questions about perceptions of future heath events, needs, and planning. Three investigators coded transcriptions using constant comparative analysis to identify emerging themes, with disagreements resolved via consensus. Subjects identified five ALEs that impacted their ability to remain at home: (1) Hospitalizations, (2) Falls, (3) Dementia, (4) Spousal Loss, and (5) Home Upkeep Issues. While recognizing that ALEs frequently occur, many subjects reported a lack of planning for ALEs and perceived that these ALEs would not happen to them. Themes for the rationale behind the lack of planning emerged as: uncertainty in future, being too healthy/too sick, offspring influences, denial/procrastination, pride, feeling overwhelmed, and financial concerns. Subjects expressed reliance on offspring for navigating future ALEs, although many had not communicated their needs with their offspring. Overcoming the reasons for not planning for ALEs is crucial, as being prepared for future home needs provides seniors a voice in their care while engaging key supporters (e.g., offspring). PMID:26952382

  7. A general higher-order remap algorithm for ALE calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, Vincent P

    2011-01-05

    A numerical technique for solving the equations of fluid dynamics with arbitrary mesh motion is presented. The three phases of the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methodology are outlined: the Lagrangian phase, grid relaxation phase and remap phase. The Lagrangian phase follows a well known approach from the HEMP code; in addition the strain rate andflow divergence are calculated in a consistent manner according to Margolin. A donor cell method from the SALE code forms the basis of the remap step, but unlike SALE a higher order correction based on monotone gradients is also added to the remap. Four test problems were explored to evaluate the fidelity of these numerical techniques, as implemented in a simple test code, written in the C programming language, called Cercion. Novel cell-centered data structures are used in Cercion to reduce the complexity of the programming and maximize the efficiency of memory usage. The locations of the shock and contact discontinuity in the Riemann shock tube problem are well captured. Cercion demonstrates a high degree of symmetry when calculating the Sedov blast wave solution, with a peak density at the shock front that is similar to the value determined by the RAGE code. For a flyer plate test problem both Cercion and FLAG give virtually the same velocity temporal profile at the target-vacuum interface. When calculating a cylindrical implosion of a steel shell, Cercion and FLAG agree well and the Cercion results are insensitive to the use of ALE.

  8. Cookoff response of PBXN-109: material characterization and ALE3D model

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Tran, T D; Cunningham, B J; Weese, R K; Maienschein, J L

    2000-10-24

    Materials properties measurements are made for the RDX-based explosive, PBXN-109, and an initial ALE3D model for cookoff is discussed. A significant effort is underway in the U.S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to understand the thermal explosion behavior of this material. Benchmark cookoff experiments are being performed by the U.S. Navy to validate DOE materials models and computer codes. The ALE3D computer code can model the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of heating and ignition in cookoff tests. In order to provide a predictive capability, materials characterization measurements are being performed to specify parameters in these models. We report on progress in the development of these ALE3D materials models and present measurements as a function of temperature for thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX).

  9. AN INCOMPRESSIBLE ALE METHOD FOR FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T A

    2004-12-01

    Multi-disciplinary analysis is becoming more and more important to tackle todays complex engineering problems. Therefore, computational tools must be able to handle the complex multi-physics requirements of these problems. A computer code may need to handle the physics associated with fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, heat transfer, chemistry, electro-magnetics, or a variety of other disciplines--all coupled in a highly non-linear system. The objective of this project was to couple an incompressible fluid dynamics package to a solid mechanics code. The code uses finite-element methods and is useful for three-dimensional transient problems with fluid-structure interaction. The code is designed for efficient performance on large multi-processor machines. An ALE finite element method was developed to investigate fluid-structure interaction. The write-up contains information about the method, the problem formulation, and some results from example test problems.

  10. Dynamic fission instabilities in rapidly rotating n = 3/2 polytropes - A comparison of results from finite-difference and smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Durisen, R.H.; Gingold, R.A.; Tohline, J.E.; Boss, A.P.

    1986-06-01

    The effectiveness of three different hydrodynamics models is evaluated for the analysis of the effects of fission instabilities in rapidly rotating, equilibrium flows. The instabilities arise in nonaxisymmetric Kelvin modes as rotational energy in the flow increases, which may occur in the formation of close binary stars and planets when the fluid proto-object contracts quasi-isostatically. Two finite-difference, donor-cell methods and a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code are examined, using a polytropic index of 3/2 and ratios of total rotational kinetic energy to gravitational energy of 0.33 and 0.38. The models show that dynamic bar instabilities with the 3/2 polytropic index do not yield detached binaries and multiple systems. Ejected mass and angular momentum form two trailing spiral arms that become a disk or ring around the central remnant. The SPH code yields the same data as the finite difference codes but with less computational effort and without acceptable fluid constraints in low density regions. Methods for improving both types of codes are discussed. 68 references.

  11. Gurson's Model: ALE Formulation and Strain Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cunda, Luiz A. B.; Creus, Guillermo J.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a brief review of Gurson's damage model, employed to describes the strength degradation in ductile metals submitted to large plastic deformations. The damage model is applied using finite elements and an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE), to ensure a better quality to the finite elements mesh. The study of the combined application of ALE and Gurson approach to damage modeling and strain localization is the object of this paper.

  12. Gurson's Model: ALE Formulation and Strain Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Cunda, Luiz A. B. da; Creus, Guillermo J.

    2007-05-17

    This paper presents a brief review of Gurson's damage model, employed to describes the strength degradation in ductile metals submitted to large plastic deformations. The damage model is applied using finite elements and an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE), to ensure a better quality to the finite elements mesh. The study of the combined application of ALE and Gurson approach to damage modeling and strain localization is the object of this paper.

  13. A multigroup diffusion solver using pseudo transient continuation for a radiation-hydrodynamic code with patch-based AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, Aleksei I. Offner, Stella S.R.

    2008-01-10

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichlet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates

  14. A Multigroup diffusion Solver Using Pseudo Transient Continuation for a Radiaiton-Hydrodynamic Code with Patch-Based AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Offner, S R

    2007-03-02

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({Psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {Psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {Psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates

  15. A Multigroup diffusion solver using pseudo transient continuation for a radiation-hydrodynamic code with patch-based AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A I; Offner, S R

    2006-09-21

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({Psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {Psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {Psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates

  16. A multigroup diffusion solver using pseudo transient continuation for a radiation-hydrodynamic code with patch-based AMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, Aleksei I.; Offner, Stella S. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate "level-solve" packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation (Ψtc). We analyze the magnitude of the Ψtc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichlet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the "partial temperature" scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of Ψtc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates the

  17. R5FORCE/MOD3s: A program to compute fluid induced forces using hydrodynamic output from the RELAP5/MOD3 code

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes an update of a computer program which operates on hydrodynamic output from the RELAPS/MOD3 program and computes piping hydrodynamic force/time histories for input into various structural analysis codes. This version of the program is compatible with RELAPS/MOD3 and the Micro Vax computing environment whereas an earlier version of the program was compatible with RELAPS/MOD1. The report describes the force calculation theory, showing the development of a general force equation and the solution of this equation within the RELAPS output structure. To illustrate the calculational method and provide results for discussion, a sample problem is presented. A detailed user manual for the computer program is included as an appendix. 10 refs., 17 figs.

  18. A New Multi-energy Neutrino Radiation-Hydrodynamics Code in Full General Relativity and Its Application to the Gravitational Collapse of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2016-02-01

    We present a new multi-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code for massive stellar core-collapse in full general relativity (GR). Employing an M1 analytical closure scheme, we solve spectral neutrino transport of the radiation energy and momentum based on a truncated moment formalism. Regarding neutrino opacities, we take into account a baseline set in state-of-the-art simulations, in which inelastic neutrino-electron scattering, thermal neutrino production via pair annihilation, and nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung are included. While the Einstein field equations and the spatial advection terms in the radiation-hydrodynamics equations are evolved explicitly, the source terms due to neutrino-matter interactions and energy shift in the radiation moment equations are integrated implicitly by an iteration method. To verify our code, we first perform a series of standard radiation tests with analytical solutions that include the check of gravitational redshift and Doppler shift. A good agreement in these tests supports the reliability of the GR multi-energy neutrino transport scheme. We then conduct several test simulations of core-collapse, bounce, and shock stall of a 15{M}⊙ star in the Cartesian coordinates and make a detailed comparison with published results. Our code performs quite well to reproduce the results of full Boltzmann neutrino transport especially before bounce. In the postbounce phase, our code basically performs well, however, there are several differences that are most likely to come from the insufficient spatial resolution in our current 3D-GR models. For clarifying the resolution dependence and extending the code comparison in the late postbounce phase, we discuss that next-generation Exaflops class supercomputers are needed at least.

  19. Evaluation of ALE processes for patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalia, J. M.; Marchack, N.; Bruce, R. L.; Miyazoe, H.; Engelmann, S. U.; Joseph, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The need for continued device scaling along with the increasing demand for high precision have lead to the development of atomic layer etch processes in semiconductor manufacturing. We have tested this new methodology with regard to patterning applications. While these new plasma-enhanced atomic layer etch (PE-ALE) processes show encouraging results, most patterning applications are best realized by optimizations through discharge chemistry and/or plasma parameters. While PE-ALE approaches seem to have limited success for trilayer patterning applications, significant improvements were obtained when applying them to small pitch. In particular the increased selectivity to OPL seems to offer a potential benefit for patterning high aspect ratio features.

  20. Exploring a Code's Material Properties Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Ann

    2011-06-01

    LANL is moving its simulation workload to the laboratory's 2- and 3-D ASC hydrodynamic codes. Aggressive validation of these material simulation capabilities against experimental data is underway. Choosing appropriate material properties models and parameter values for a simulation is an area of particular concern. To address this issue, each material and experiment combination should be systematically examined through a set of code simulations. In addition to comparing competing materials models, the effect of simulation choices such as mesh size and ALE schemes for mesh untangling needs to be explored. Thoroughly understanding how such choices affect the calculated results of single physics simulations provides a user with a well-informed basis from which to ascertain how accurately a more complicated simulation portrays physical reality. Results for Lagrangian/ALE simulations of some experiments which are typically used for validation of strength and damage models will be presented. These material processes are the result of significant localization of strain and stress, which can be difficult to capture adequately on a finite-size mesh. Modeled strength experiments may include the lower strain rate (~104 s-1) gas gun driven Taylor impacts, the higher strain rate (~105 - 106 s-1) HE products driven perturbed plates, and the high shear tophats. Modeled damage experiments may include gas-gun driven flyer plates and electro-magnetically-driven cylindrical configurations.

  1. Modeling Heat Conduction and Radiation Transport with the Diffusion Equation in NIF ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; Bailey, D S; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B N; Masters, N D; Koniges, A E; Eder, D C; Anderson, R W

    2009-10-06

    The ALE-AMR code developed for NIF is a multi-material hydro-code that models target assembly fragmentation in the aftermath of a shot. The combination of ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) hydro with AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) allows the code to model a wide range of physical conditions and spatial scales. The large range of temperatures encountered in the NIF target chamber can lead to significant fluxes of energy due to thermal conduction and radiative transport. These physical effects can be modeled approximately with the aid of the diffusion equation. We present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite mesh in order to capture these physical effects.

  2. Comparison of ALE and SPH Simulations of Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section into Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of multi-terrain impact has been identified as an important research area for improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program on Rotorcraft Crashworthiness. As part of this effort, two vertical drop tests were conducted of a 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section into water. For the first test, the fuselage section was impacted in a baseline configuration without energy absorbers. For the second test, the fuselage section was retrofitted with a composite honeycomb energy absorber. Both tests were conducted at a nominal velocity of 25-ft/s. A detailed finite element model was developed to represent each test article and water impact was simulated using both Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) approaches in LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Analytical predictions were correlated with experimental data for both test configurations. In addition, studies were performed to evaluate the influence of mesh density on test-analysis correlation.

  3. STEALTH: a Lagrange explicit finite difference code for solids, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 7: implicit hydrodynamics. Computer code manual. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that solve the equations of motion for a general continuum. These codes can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The versions of STEALTH described in this volume were designed for the calculation of problems involving low-speed fluid flow. They employ an implicit finite difference technique to solve the one- and two-dimensional equations of motion, written for an arbitrary coordinate system, for both incompressible and compressible fluids. The solution technique involves an iterative solution of the implicit, Lagrangian finite difference equations. Convection terms that result from the use of an arbitrarily-moving coordinate system are calculated separately. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite difference equations, and the input instructions for the one- and two-dimensional codes; a discussion of several sample problems; and a listing of the input decks required to run those problems.

  4. Dietary ALEs are a risk to human health--NOT!

    PubMed

    Baynes, John W

    2007-09-01

    Advanced lipoxidation end-products (ALEs) are formed by reaction of protein with lipid-derived reactive peroxyl and carbonyl compounds produced during food processing and cooking. There is concern that ALEs may induce damage in the gastrointestinal tract, affecting gut health, or enter the body and promote vascular inflammation and tissue damage. However, there is no direct evidence that ALE-proteins are a source of damage in the intestines or that they are transported into the circulation and cause pathology. Modification of proteins by ALEs impedes their digestion, and reactive ALEs released by gastrointestinal proteases would react with proteins or peptides in the gut, limiting their absorption. There are also potent enzymatic mechanisms for detoxifying ALEs or their precursors prior to their entry into the circulation. If ALEs gain access to the circulation, a battery of protective enzymes in tissue provides a second level of defense. These enzymes may be induced in intestinal epithelia and liver by low doses of ALEs, and adaptive responses would provide enhanced protection against future exposure to ALEs. Overall, except in persons with compromised organ function, e. g., vascular, hepatic, or renal diseases, there is little evidence that food ALEs will have any significant pathological effects.

  5. SIMULATING THE COMMON ENVELOPE PHASE OF A RED GIANT USING SMOOTHED-PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS AND UNIFORM-GRID CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola; Fryer, Chris L.; Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Herwig, Falk; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to study the rapid infall phase of the common envelope (CE) interaction of a red giant branch star of mass equal to 0.88 M{sub Sun} and a companion star of mass ranging from 0.9 down to 0.1 M{sub Sun }. We first compare the results obtained using two different numerical techniques with different resolutions, and find very good agreement overall. We then compare the outcomes of those simulations with observed systems thought to have gone through a CE. The simulations fail to reproduce those systems in the sense that most of the envelope of the donor remains bound at the end of the simulations and the final orbital separations between the donor's remnant and the companion, ranging from 26.8 down to 5.9 R{sub Sun }, are larger than the ones observed. We suggest that this discrepancy vouches for recombination playing an essential role in the ejection of the envelope and/or significant shrinkage of the orbit happening in the subsequent phase.

  6. Recent Advances in the Modeling of the Transport of Two-Plasmon-Decay Electrons in the 1-D Hydrodynamic Code LILAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Yaakobi, B.

    2015-11-01

    The modeling of the fast-electron transport in the 1-D hydrodynamic code LILAC was modified because of the addition of cross-beam-energy-transfer (CBET) in implosion simulations. Using the old fast-electron with source model CBET results in a shift of the peak of the hard x-ray (HXR) production from the end of the laser pulse, as observed in experiments, to earlier in the pulse. This is caused by a drop in the laser intensity of the quarter-critical surface from CBET interaction at lower densities. Data from simulations with the laser plasma simulation environment (LPSE) code will be used to modify the source algorithm in LILAC. In addition, the transport model in LILAC has been modified to include deviations from the straight-line algorithm and non-specular reflection at the sheath to take into account the scattering from collisions and magnetic fields in the corona. Simulation results will be compared with HXR emissions from both room-temperature plastic and cryogenic target experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. IV. The Neutrino Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M ⊙, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, langErang, of \\bar{\

  8. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  9. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  10. Algebraic Flux Correction and Geometric Conservation in ALE Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scovazzi, Guglielmo; López Ortega, Alejandro

    In this chapter, we describe the important role played by the so-called Geometric Conservation Law (GCL) in the design of Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) methods for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) applications. We propose a conservative synchronized remap algorithm applicable to arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian computations with nodal finite elements. Unique to the proposed method is the direct incorporation of the geometric conservation law (GCL) in the resulting numerical scheme. We show how the geometric conservation law allows the proposed method to inherit the positivity preserving and local extrema diminishing (LED) properties typical of FCT schemes for pure transport problems. The extension to systems of equations which typically arise in meteorological and compressible flow computations is performed by means of a synchronized strategy. The proposed approach also complements and extends the work of the first author on nodal-based methods for shock hydrodynamics, delivering a fully integrated suite of Lagrangian/remap algorithms for computations of compressible materials under extreme load conditions. Numerical tests in multiple dimensions show that the method is robust and accurate in typical computational scenarios.

  11. Measurement and ALE3D Simulation of Violence in a Deflagration Experiment With LX-10 and Aermet-100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; Nichols, A L; deHaven, M R; Strand, O T

    2006-06-22

    We describe the results of a Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) for LX-10 (94.7 % HMX, 5.3 % Viton A) confined in an AerMet 100 (iron-cobalt-nickel alloy) tube with reinforced end caps. The experimental measurements are compared with predictions of an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE3D) computer model. ALE3D is a three-dimensional multi-physics computer code capable of solving coupled equations describing thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of materials. In particular, we focus on the processes linked to fracture and fragmentation of the AerMet tube driven by the LX-10 deflagration.

  12. A new multi-dimensional general relativistic neutrino hydrodynamics code for core-collapse supernovae. IV. The neutrino signal

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2014-06-10

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M {sub ☉}, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, (E), of ν-bar {sub e} and heavy-lepton neutrinos and even their crossing during the accretion phase for stars with M ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} as observed in previous 1D and 2D simulations with state-of-the-art neutrino transport. We establish a roughly linear scaling of 〈E{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉 with the proto-neutron star (PNS) mass, which holds in time as well as for different progenitors. Convection inside the PNS affects the neutrino emission on the 10%-20% level, and accretion continuing beyond the onset of the explosion prevents the abrupt drop of the neutrino luminosities seen in artificially exploded 1D models. We demonstrate that a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis of SN neutrino signals in IceCube will offer sensitive diagnostics for the SN core dynamics up to at least ∼10 kpc distance. Strong, narrow-band signal modulations indicate quasi-periodic shock sloshing motions due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and the frequency evolution of such 'SASI neutrino chirps' reveals shock expansion or contraction. The onset of the explosion is accompanied by a shift of the modulation frequency below 40-50 Hz, and post-explosion, episodic accretion downflows will be signaled by activity intervals stretching over an extended frequency range in the wavelet spectrogram.

  13. How to Build a Time Machine: Interfacing Hydrodynamics, Ionization Calculations and X-ray Spectral Codes for Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Thanks to Chandra and XMM-Newton, spatially resolved spectroscopy of SNRsin the X-ray band has become a reality. Several impressive data sets forejecta-dominated SNRs can now be found in the archives, the Cas A VLP justbeing one (albeit probably the most spectacular) example. However, it isoften hard to establish quantitative, unambiguous connections between theX-ray observations of SNRs and the dramatic events involved in a corecollapse or thermonuclear SN explosion. The reason for this is that thevery high quality of the data sets generated by Chandra and XMM for thelikes of Cas A, SNR 292.0+1.8, Tycho, and SN 1006 has surpassed our abilityto analyze them. The core of the problem is in the transient nature of theplasmas in SNRs, which results in anintimate relationship between the structure of the ejecta and AM, the SNRdynamics arising from their interaction, and the ensuing X-rayemission. Thus, the ONLY way to understand the X-ray observations ofejecta-dominated SNRs at all levels, from the spatially integrated spectrato the subarcsecond scales that can be resolved by Chandra, is to couplehydrodynamic simulations to nonequilibrium ionization (NEI) calculationsand X-ray spectral codes. I will review the basic ingredients that enterthis kind of calculations, and what are the prospects for using them tounderstand the X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in young SNRs. Thisunderstanding (when it is possible), can turn SNRs into veritable timemachines, revealing the secrets of the titanic explosions that generatedthem hundreds of years ago.

  14. Cookoff Response of PBXN-109: Material Characterization and ALE3D Thermal Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Tran, T D; Cunningham, B J; Weese, R K; Maienschein, J L

    2001-05-29

    Materials properties measurements are made for the RDX-based explosive, PBXN-109, and initial ALE3D model predictions are given for the cookoff temperature in a U.S. Navy test. This work is part of an effort in the U.S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to understand the thermal explosion behavior of this material. Benchmark cookoff experiments are being performed by the U.S. Navy to validate DOE materials models and computer codes. The ALE3D computer code can model the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of heating, ignition, and explosion in cookoff tests. In our application, a standard three-step step model is selected for the chemical kinetics. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. Materials characterization measurements are given for thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX). These measurements and those of the other project participants are used to determine parameters in the ALE3D chemical, mechanical, and thermal models. Time-dependent, two-dimensional results are given for the temperature and material expansion. The results show predicted cookoff temperatures slightly higher than the measured values.

  15. Modeling Explosive/Rock Interaction During Presplitting Using ALE Computational Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Richard P.; Preece, Dale S.

    1999-04-27

    Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) computational techniques allow treatment of gases, liq- uids, and solids in the same simulation. ALE methods include the ability to treat shockwaves in gases, liquids, and solids and the interaction of shockwaves with each other and with media from one of the other categories. ALE codes can also treat explosive detonation and the expansion of the explosive gases and their interaction with air and solids. ALEGRA is a 3-DALE code that has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the past few years. ALEGRA has been applied to a 2-D simulation of presplitting using decoupled explosives in rock blasting with very interesting results. The detonation of the explosive at the bottom of the hole sends a shock wave up the borehole driven by the explosive gas expanding into air. The explosive gas compresses the air against the stemming column where it rebounds and recompresses at the bottom of the borehole. This type of ringing takes several cycles to damp out. The explosively induced expansion of the borehole is also treated by ALEGRA as well as the shock wave imparted to the rock. The presentation of this paper will include sev- eral computer animations to aid in understanding this complex phenomenon.

  16. Cookoff Response of PBXN-109: Material Characterization and ALE3D Thermal Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Tran, T D; Cunningham, B J; Weese, R K; Maienschein, J L

    2001-08-21

    Materials properties measurements are made for the RDX-based explosive, PBXN-109, and initial ALE3D model predictions are given for the cookoff temperature in a U.S. Navy test. This work is part of an effort in the U.S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to understand the thermal explosion behavior of this material. Benchmark cookoff experiments are being performed by the U.S. Navy to validate DOE materials models and computer codes. The ALE3D computer code can model the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of heating, ignition, and explosion in cookoff tests. In our application, a standard three-step step model is selected for the chemical kinetics. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. Materials characterization measurements are given for thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX). These measurements and those of the other project participants are used to determine parameters in the ALE3D chemical, mechanical, and thermal models. Time-dependent, two-dimensional results are given for the temperature and material expansion. The results show predicted cookoff temperatures slightly higher than the measured values.

  17. Laser-driven Implosion Simulations with the Kull Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas B.; Owen, J. Michael; Madsen, Niel K.

    1999-11-01

    We present results of two- and three-dimensional simulations of implosion of a gamma-law gas driven by absorption of energy from an external laser source. Laser light propagation and power deposition were modeled with a recently-developed package(T. B. Kaiser, J. L. Milovich, A. I. Shestakov, M. K. Prasad, Bulletin of the A.P.S. 43), paper R8Q 26 (1998). that uses geometrical optics and inverse-bremsstrahlung to model the relevant physical processes, while the hydrodynamics calculations used a finite-volume, staggered-grid ALE scheme, and electron heat transport was treated diffusively. The simulations were performed with Kull, an ASCI code currently being developed at LLNL to model ICF experiments and astrophysical phenomena.

  18. SALE: a simplified ALE computer program for fluid flow at all speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Ruppel, H.M.; Hirt, C.W.

    1980-06-01

    A simplified numerical fluid-dynamics computing technique is presented for calculating two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds. It combines an implicit treatment of the pressure equation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique with the grid rezoning philosophy of the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. As a result, it can handle flow speeds from supersonic to the incompressible limit in a grid that may be moved with the fluid in typical Lagrangian fashion, or held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or moved in some arbitrary way to give a continuous rezoning capability. The report describes the combined (ICEd-ALE) technique in the framework of the SALE (Simplified ALE) computer program, for which a general flow diagram and complete FORTRAN listing are included. A set of sample problems show how to use or modify the basic code for a variety of applications. Numerical listings are provided for a sample problem run with the SALE program.

  19. ALE3D Model Predictions and Materials Characterization for the Cookoff Response of PBXN-109

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Nichols, A L; Wardell, J F; Atwood, A I; Curran, P O

    2002-03-19

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of PBXN-109 (RDX, AI, HTPB, DOA) in support of an effort by the U. S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) to validate computational models. The U.S. Navy is performing benchmark tests for the slow cookoff of PBXN-109 in a sealed tube. Candidate models are being tested using the ALE3D code, which can simulate the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. A void model is employed to represent the air in gaps. ALE3D model 'parameters are specified using measurements of thermal and mechanical properties including thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, and bulk modulus. A standard three-step chemical kinetics model is used during the thermal ramp, and a pressure-dependent burn front model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate of pristine and thermally damaged material are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. Results are given for calculations in which heating, ignition, and explosion are modeled in a single simulation. We compare model results to measurements for the cookoff temperature and tube wall strain.

  20. An AMR capable finite element diffusion solver for ALE hydrocodes [An AMR capable diffusion solver for ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A. C.; Bailey, D. S.; Kaiser, T. B.; Eder, D. C.; Gunney, B. T. N.; Masters, N. D.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, R. W.

    2015-02-01

    Here, we present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite AMR mesh. This approach is suitable for including diffusion based physics modules to hydrocodes that support ALE and AMR capabilities. To illustrate, we proffer our implementations of diffusion based radiation transport and heat conduction in a hydrocode called ALE-AMR. Numerical experiments conducted with the diffusion solver and associated physics packages yield 2nd order convergence in the L2 norm.

  1. Quantum cohomology and quantum hydrodynamics from supersymmetric quiver gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Sciarappa, Antonio; Tanzini, Alessandro; Vasko, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We study the connection between N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories, quantum cohomology and quantum integrable systems of hydrodynamic type. We consider gauge theories on ALE spaces of A and D-type and discuss how they describe the quantum cohomology of the corresponding Nakajima's quiver varieties. We also discuss how the exact evaluation of local BPS observables in the gauge theory can be used to calculate the spectrum of quantum Hamiltonians of spin Calogero integrable systems and spin Intermediate Long Wave hydrodynamics. This is explicitly obtained by a Bethe Ansatz Equation provided by the quiver gauge theory in terms of its adjacency matrix.

  2. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical modeling of energetic materials in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.L.; Couch, R.; Maltby, J.D.; McCallen, R.C.; Otero, I.; Sharp, R.

    1996-10-01

    We must improve our ability to model the response of energetic ma@ to thmnal stimuli and the processes involved m the energetic response. Traditionally, the analyses of energeuc have mvolved coupled thermal chemical reaction codes. This provides only a reasonable estimate of the dw and location of ensuing rapid reaction. To predict the violence of the reaction, the m cal motion must be included in the wide range of time scales as with the th@ hazard. Ile ALE3D code has been modified to the hazards associated with heaung energetic ma@ in weapons. We have merged the thermal models from TOPAZ3D and the chemistry models &vel@ in Chemical TOPAZ into ALE3D. We have developed and use an impMt time step option to efficiently and accurately compute the hours that the energetic material can take to react. Since on these longer fim scales materials can be expected to have signifimt motion, it is even more important to provide high- ordcr advection for all components, including the chemical species. We will show an example cook-off problem to illustrate these capabilities.

  3. An analysis of options available for developing a common laser ray tracing package for Ares and Kull code frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Weeratunga, S K

    2008-11-06

    Ares and Kull are mature code frameworks that support ALE hydrodynamics for a variety of HEDP applications at LLNL, using two widely different meshing approaches. While Ares is based on a 2-D/3-D block-structured mesh data base, Kull is designed to support unstructured, arbitrary polygonal/polyhedral meshes. In addition, both frameworks are capable of running applications on large, distributed-memory parallel machines. Currently, both these frameworks separately support assorted collections of physics packages related to HEDP, including one for the energy deposition by laser/ion-beam ray tracing. This study analyzes the options available for developing a common laser/ion-beam ray tracing package that can be easily shared between these two code frameworks and concludes with a set of recommendations for its development.

  4. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  5. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  6. ALE3D Model Predictions and Experimental Analysis of the Cookoff Response of Comp B*

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; McClelland, M A; Wardell, J F; Reaugh, J E; Nichols, A L; Tran, T D

    2003-11-24

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of Comp B (RDX,TNT) in a Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX). Candidate models and numerical strategies are being tested using the ALE3D code which simulates the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The mechanical behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the equation of state of the solid and gas species, respectively. A gamma-law model is employed for the air in gaps, and a mixed material model is used for the interface between air and explosive. A three-step chemical kinetics model is used for each of the RDX and TNT reaction sequences during the heating and ignition phases, and a pressure-dependent deflagration model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. We compare model predictions to measurements for temperature fields, ignition temperature, and tube wall strain during the heating, ignition, and explosive phases.

  7. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  8. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  9. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Instead of computing a large number of coarsely zoned hydrodynamic models covering the entire atmospheric instability strip, the author computed a single model as well as computer limitations allow. The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks was modified to include radiative transfer effects in optically thin zones.

  10. Second order multidimensional sign-preserving remapping for ALE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Ryan N; Szmelter, J.

    2010-12-15

    A second-order conservative sign-preserving remapping scheme for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods is developed utilising concepts of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The algorithm is inherently multidimensional, and so does not introduce splitting errors. The remapping is implemented in a two-dimensional, finite element ALE solver employing staggered quadrilateral meshes. The MPDATA remapping uses a finite volume discretization developed for volume coordinates. It is applied for the remapping of density and internal energy arranged as cell centered, and velocity as nodal, dependent variables. In the paper, the advection of scalar fields is examined first for test cases with prescribed mesh movement. A direct comparison of MPDATA with the performance of the van Leer MUSCL scheme indicates advantages of a multidimensional approach. Furthermore, distinctly different performance between basic MPDATA and the infinite gauge option is illustrated using benchmarks involving transport of a sign changing velocity field. Further development extends the application of MPDATA remapping to the full ALE solver with a staggered mesh arrangement for density, internal energy and momentum using volume coordinates. At present, two options of the algorithm - basic and infinite gauge - are implemented. To ensure a meaningful assessment, an identical Lagrangian solver and computational mesh update routines are used with either MPDATA or van Leer MUSCL remapping. The evaluation places particular focus on the abilities of both schemes to accurately model multidimensional problems. Theoretical considerations are supported with numerical examples. In addition to the prescribed mesh movement cases for advection of scalars, the demonstrations include two-dimensional Eulerian and ALE flow simulations on quadrilateral meshes with both fixed and variable timestep control. The key comparisons include the standard test cases of Sod and Noh

  11. Mesh size and code option effects of strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-12-10

    Modern Lagrangian hydrodynamics codes include numerical methods which allow calculations to proceed past the point obtainable by a purely Lagrangian scheme. These options can be employed as the user deems necessary to 'complete' a calculation. While one could argue that any calculation is better than none, to truly understand the calculated results and their relationship to physical reality, the user needs to understand how their runtime choices affect the calculated results. One step toward this goal is to understand the effect of each runtime choice on particular pieces of the code physics. This paper will present simulation results for some experiments typically used for strength model validation. Topics to be covered include effect of mesh size, use of various ALE schemes for mesh detangling, and use of anti-hour-glassing schemes. Experiments to be modeled include the lower strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) gas gun driven Taylor impact experiments and the higher strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) HE products driven perturbed plate experiments. The necessary mesh resolution and the effect of the code runtime options are highly dependent on the amount of localization of strain and stress in each experiment. In turn, this localization is dependent on the geometry of the experimental setup and the drive conditions.

  12. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the

  13. Gauged linear sigma model with F-term for A-type ALE space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Yata, Masaya

    2014-07-01

    We construct yet another N=(4,4) gauged linear sigma model for the A_N-type ALE space. In our construction the toric data of the ALE space are manifest. Due to the SU(2)_R symmetry, the F-term is automatically determined. The toric data, which govern the Kähler structures of the ALE space, are embedded into U(1) charges of charged hypermultiplets. The F-term is also necessary to determine the complex structures of the ALE space. In the IR limit, we obtain the Kähler potential of the A_N-type ALE space. We also find the origin of the Z_{N+1} orbifold symmetry in the singular limit of the A_N-type ALE space. In a special case, we reproduce an explicit form of the Kähler potential of the A_1-type ALE space, i.e., the Eguchi-Hanson space.

  14. Hydrodynamic test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B

    2005-06-02

    We present test problems that can be used to check the hydrodynamic implementation in computer codes designed to model the implosion of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule. The problems are simplified, yet one of them is three-dimensional. It consists of a nearly-spherical incompressible imploding shell subjected to an exponentially decaying pressure on its outer surface. We present a semi-analytic solution for the time-evolution of that shell with arbitrary small three-dimensional perturbations on its inner and outer surfaces. The perturbations on the shell surfaces are intended to model the imperfections that are created during capsule manufacturing.

  15. AnaLysis of Expression on human chromosome 21, ALE-HSA21: a pilot integrated web resource

    PubMed Central

    Scarpato, Margherita; Esposito, Roberta; Evangelista, Daniela; Aprile, Marianna; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Angelini, Claudia; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Costa, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome studies have shown the pervasive nature of transcription, demonstrating almost all the genes undergo alternative splicing. Accurately annotating all transcripts of a gene is crucial. It is needed to understand the impact of mutations on phenotypes, to shed light on genetic and epigenetic regulation of mRNAs and more generally to widen our knowledge about cell functionality and tissue diversity. RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), and the other applications of the next-generation sequencing, provides precious data to improve annotations' accuracy, simultaneously creating issues related to the variety, complexity and the size of produced data. In this ‘scenario’, the lack of user-friendly resources, easily accessible to researchers with low skills in bioinformatics, makes difficult to retrieve complete information about one or few genes without browsing a jungle of databases. Concordantly, the increasing amount of data from ‘omics’ technologies imposes to develop integrated databases merging different data formats coming from distinct but complementary sources. In light of these considerations, and given the wide interest in studying Down syndrome—a genetic condition due to the trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21)—we developed an integrated relational database and a web interface, named ALE-HSA21 (AnaLysis of Expression on HSA21), accessible at http://bioinfo.na.iac.cnr.it/ALE-HSA21. This comprehensive and user-friendly web resource integrates—for all coding and noncoding transcripts of chromosome 21—existing gene annotations and transcripts identified de novo through RNA-Seq analysis with predictive computational analysis of regulatory sequences. Given the role of noncoding RNAs and untranslated regions of coding genes in key regulatory mechanisms, ALE-HSA21 is also an interesting web-based platform to investigate such processes. The ‘transcript-centric’ and easily-accessible nature of ALE-HSA21 makes this resource a valuable tool to

  16. Isolation of an osmotolerant ale strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pironcheva, G

    1998-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ale strain) grown in batch culture to stationary phase was tested for its tolerance to heat (50 degrees C for 5 min), hydrogen peroxide (0.3 M) and salt (growth in 1.5 M sodium chloride/YPD medium). Yeast cells which have been exposed previously to heat shock are more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide and high salt concentrations (1.5 M NaCl) than the controls. Their fermentative activity as judged by glucose consumption and their viability, as judged by cell number and density have higher levels when compared with cells not previously exposed to heat shock. Experimental conditions facilitated the isolation of S. cerevisiae ale strain, which was tolerant to heat, and other agents such as hydrogen peroxide and sodium chloride.

  17. ALE shock calculations using a stabilized serendipity rezoning scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Budge, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    A rezone stencil for ALE shock calculations has been developed based on a stabilized variant of the serendipity element. This rezone stencil is compared to the Winslow rezone stencil. Unlike the Winslow stencil, which equalizes element volumes as well as node angles, the serendipity stencil equalizes node angles only. This may be advantageous for calculations involving strong density gradients such as those associated with shock compression. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Supernova hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1981-11-01

    The physics as well as astrophysics of the supernova (SN) phenomenon are illustrated with the appropriate numbers. The explosion of a star, a supernova, occurs at the end of its evolution when the nuclear fuel in its core is almost, or completely, consumed. The star may explode due to a small residual thermonuclear detonation, type I SN, or it may collapse, type I and type II SN, leaving a neutron star remnant. The type I progenitor is thought to be an old accreting white dwarf, 1.4 interior mass, with a close companion star. A type II SN is thought to be a massive young star, 6 to 10 interior mass. The mechanism of explosion is still a challenge to model, being the most extreme conditions of matter and hydrodynamics that occur presently and excessively in the universe.

  19. Don't Panic! Closed String Tachyons in ALE Spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Eva M

    2001-08-20

    We consider closed string tachyons localized at the fixed points of noncompact nonsupersymmetric orbifolds. We argue that tachyon condensation drives these orbifolds to flat space or supersymmetric ALE spaces. The decay proceeds via an expanding shell of dilaton gradients and curvature which interpolates between two regions of distinct angular geometry. The string coupling remains weak throughout. For small tachyon VEVs, evidence comes from quiver theories on D-branes probes, in which deformations by twisted couplings smoothly connect non-supersymmetric orbifolds to supersymmetric orbifolds of reduced order. For large tachyon VEVs, evidence comes from worldsheet RG flow and spacetime gravity. For C{sup 2}/Z{sub n}, we exhibit infinite sequences of transitions producing SUSY ALE spaces via twisted closed string condensation from non-supersymmetric ALE spaces. In a T-dual description this provides a mechanism for creating NS5-branes via closed string tachyon condensation similar to the creation of D-branes via open string tachyon condensation. We also apply our results to recent duality conjectures involving fluxbranes and the type 0 string.

  20. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. III. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS FROM SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-20

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: a quasi-periodic modulation by prompt post-shock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic effects in combination with detailed neutrino transport are shown to be essential for quantitative predictions of the GW frequency evolution and energy spectrum, because they determine the structure of the PNS surface layer and its characteristic g-mode frequency. Burst-like high-frequency activity phases, correlated with sudden luminosity increase and spectral hardening of electron (anti-)neutrino emission for some 10 ms, are discovered as new features after the onset of the explosion. They correspond to intermittent episodes of anisotropic accretion by the PNS in the case of fallback SNe. We find stronger signals for more massive progenitors with large accretion rates. The typical frequencies are higher for massive PNSs, though the time-integrated spectrum also strongly depends on the model dynamics.

  1. SPH accuracy improvement through the combination of a quasi-Lagrangian shifting transport velocity and consistent ALE formalisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oger, G.; Marrone, S.; Le Touzé, D.; de Leffe, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses the accuracy of the weakly-compressible SPH method. Interpolation defects due to the presence of anisotropic particle structures inherent to the Lagrangian character of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method are highlighted. To avoid the appearance of these structures which are detrimental to the quality of the simulations, a specific transport velocity is introduced and its inclusion within an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formalism is described. Unlike most of existing particle disordering/shifting methods, this formalism avoids the formation of these anisotropic structures while a full consistency with the original Euler or Navier-Stokes equations is maintained. The gain in accuracy, convergence and numerical diffusion of this formalism is shown and discussed through its application to various challenging test cases.

  2. Simulations of the Formation and Hydrodynamic Penetration of Micro-Shaped Charge Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Najjar, Fady M.; Szuck, Matthew; Glumac, Nick

    2011-11-01

    An explosively formed shape charge jet can be generated by the action of a detonation in explosive charge that surrounds a hollow cone of metal, embedded in the explosive, that collapses the cone on the central axis in order to form a forward-going jet of metal. We discuss the results of a series of multi-material simulations for very small charges and cones, for which the thickness of the metal (copper) cone is less than 1/100th of an inch. We look at the ability of these micro-shaped charge jets ability to penetrate aluminum target blocks and compare against experiment. We examine the effects of shape defects in the cone liner and how they affect the penetration depth. The LLNL multi-physics hydrodynamic code ALE3D is used to carry out the simulations. DSS, MS and NG were supported by AFRL/RW AF FA8651-10-1-0004. FMN's work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-491793.

  3. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  4. A hydrodynamic approach to cosmology - Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue

    1992-01-01

    The present study describes an accurate and efficient hydrodynamic code for evolving self-gravitating cosmological systems. The hydrodynamic code is a flux-based mesh code originally designed for engineering hydrodynamical applications. A variety of checks were performed which indicate that the resolution of the code is a few cells, providing accuracy for integral energy quantities in the present simulations of 1-3 percent over the whole runs. Six species (H I, H II, He I, He II, He III) are tracked separately, and relevant ionization and recombination processes, as well as line and continuum heating and cooling, are computed. The background radiation field is simultaneously determined in the range 1 eV to 100 keV, allowing for absorption, emission, and cosmological effects. It is shown how the inevitable numerical inaccuracies can be estimated and to some extent overcome.

  5. Grid and Zone Selection for AMR and ALE Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, L; Johnson, J; Bihari, B; Eliason, D; Peyser, T

    2002-09-11

    Numerical algorithms are based fundamentally on polynomial interpolation. In regions of the computational domain where a low order polynomial fits the data well one will find small errors in the computed quantities. Therefore, in order to design robust methods for grid selection for AMR schemes or zone selection for ALE schemes, one needs some information on the local polynomial structure of the fields being computed. We provide here algorithms and software for selecting zones based on local estimates of polynomial interpolation error. The algorithms are based on multiresolution and wavelet analysis.

  6. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Description of Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K.

    2012-06-15

    The quantum hydrodynamic approach is based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting fluid-like equations of motion describe the flow of probability and an accurate solution to these equations is equivalent to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic approach provides new insight into the mechanisms as well as an alternative computational approach for treating tunneling phenomena. New concepts include well-defined 'quantum trajectories', 'quantum potential', and 'quantum force' all of which have classical analogues. The quantum potential and its associated force give rise to all quantum mechanical effects such as zero point energy, tunneling, and interference. A new numerical approach called the Iterative Finite Difference Method (IFDM) will be discussed. The IFDM is used to solve the set of non-linear coupled hydrodynamic equations. It is 2nd-order accurate in both space and time and exhibits exponential convergence with respect to the iteration count. The stability and computational efficiency of the IFDM is significantly improved by using a 'smart' Eulerian grid which has the same computational advantages as a Lagrangian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) grid. The IFDM is also capable of treating anharmonic potentials. Example calculations using the IFDM will be presented which include: a one-dimensional Gaussian wave packet tunneling through an Eckart barrier, a one-dimensional bound-state Morse oscillator, and a two-dimensional (2D) model collinear reaction using an anharmonic potential energy surface. Approximate treatments of the quantum hydrodynamic equations will also be discussed which could allow scaling of the calculations to hundreds of degrees of freedom which is important for treating tunneling phenomena in condensed phase systems.

  7. Developing an Argument Learning Environment Using Agent-Based ITS (ALES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, Safia; Sawamura, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an agent-based educational environment to teach argument analysis (ALES). The idea is based on the Argumentation Interchange Format Ontology (AIF)using "Walton Theory". ALES uses different mining techniques to manage a highly structured arguments repertoire. This repertoire was designed, developed and implemented by us. Our aim…

  8. Analysing Interlanguage Stages ALEs Pass through in the Acquisition of the Simple Past Tense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourssi, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Building on previous studies of cross-linguistic influence (CLI) on SLA, and principled criteria for confirming its existence in L2 data, an empirical study was run on 74 Arab learners of English (ALEs). A detailed analysis was made of interlanguage stages of the simple past tense forms in 222 written texts produced by ALEs in the classroom…

  9. Modeling thermally driven energetic response of high explosives in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C.; McCallen, R.C.; Neely, R.; Nichols, A.L. III; Sharp, R.

    1998-10-01

    The authors have improved their ability to model the response of energetic materials to thermal stimuli and the processes involved in the energetic response. Traditionally, the analyses of energetic materials have involved coupled thermal transport/chemical reaction codes. This provides only a reasonable estimate of the time and location of ensuing rapid reaction. To predict the violence of the reaction, the mechanical motion must be included in the wide range of time scales associated with the thermal hazard. The ALE3D code has been modified to assess the hazards associated with heating energetic materials in weapons by coupling to thermal transport model and chemistry models. They have developed an implicit time step option to efficiently and accurately compute the hours of heating to reaction of the energetic material. Since, on these longer time scales materials can be expected to have significant motion, it is even more important to provide high-order advection for all components, including the chemical species. They show two examples of coupled thermal/mechanical/chemical models of energetic materials in thermal environments.

  10. ALE-Phase-field simulations of floating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Pengtao

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we will present a hybrid Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian(ALE)-Phase-Field method for the direct numerical simulation of multiphase flows where fluid interfaces, moving rigid particles, and moving contact lines coexist. Practical applications include Pickering emulsions, froth flotation, and biolocomotion at fluid interface. An ALE algorithm based on the finite element method and an adaptive moving mesh is used to track the moving boundaries of rigid particles. A phase-field method based on the same moving mesh is used to capture the fluid interfaces; meanwhile, the Cahn-Hilliard diffusion automatically takes care of the stress singularity at the moving contact line when a fluid interface intersects a solid surface. To fully resolve the diffuse interface, mesh is locally refined at the fluid interface. All the governing equations, i.e., equations for fluids, interfaces, and particles, are solved implicitly in a unified variational framework. In the end we will present some recent results on the water entry problem and the capillary interaction between floating particles (a.k.a. the Cheerios effect), with a focus on the effect of contact-line dynamics.

  11. Deposition of CdSe by EC-ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Mkhulu K.; Cox, Stephen M.; Flowers, Billy H.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Pham, Long; Srisook, Nattapong; Happek, Uwe; Stickney, John L.

    2004-10-01

    The optimization of a program for CdSe thin film deposition using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE uses surface limited reactions, underpotential deposition, to form compound thin film deposits one atomic layer at a time on Au substrates. Cyclic voltammograms showing deposition of Cd and Se on the Au substrate were first performed to identify cycle potentials. CdSe thin films were formed using an automated flow deposition system, by alternately depositing Se and Cd atomic layers, forming a compound monolayer each cycle. In total, 200 cycle deposits were formed using a series of different potentials, to better optimize the deposition conditions. Electron probe microanalysis of the deposits showed Cd/Se ratio between 1.01 and 1.13. X-ray diffraction indicated the deposits were zinc blende, with a (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The thickness of the deposits were determined using ellipsometry, and found to be around 70 nm. AFM studies of the morphology of substrates and deposits indicated that conformal films were formed. The band gaps of the deposits was determined using UV-VIS absorption measurements, photoconductivity and reflection adsorption FTIR, and all suggested a value of 1.74 eV, consistent with literature values.

  12. A Cell-Centered Multiphase ALE Scheme With Structural Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Timothy Alan

    2012-04-16

    A novel computational scheme has been developed for simulating compressible multiphase flows interacting with solid structures. The multiphase fluid is computed using a Godunov-type finite-volume method. This has been extended to allow computations on moving meshes using a direct arbitrary-Eulerian- Lagrangian (ALE) scheme. The method has been implemented within a Lagrangian hydrocode, which allows modeling the interaction with Lagrangian structural regions. Although the above scheme is general enough for use on many applications, the ultimate goal of the research is the simulation of heterogeneous energetic material, such as explosives or propellants. The method is powerful enough for application to all stages of the problem, including the initial burning of the material, the propagation of blast waves, and interaction with surrounding structures. The method has been tested on a number of canonical multiphase tests as well as fluid-structure interaction problems.

  13. The Montana ALE (Autonomous Lunar Excavator) Systems Engineering Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    On May 2 1-26, 20 12, the third annual NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition will be held at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This event brings together student teams from universities around the world to compete in an engineering challenge. Each team must design, build and operate a robotic excavator that can collect artificial lunar soil and deposit it at a target location. Montana State University, Bozeman, is one of the institutions selected to field a team this year. This paper will summarize the goals of MSU's lunar excavator project, known as the Autonomous Lunar Explorer (ALE), along with the engineering process that the MSU team is using to fulfill these goals, according to NASA's systems engineering guidelines.

  14. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  15. Testing hydrodynamics schemes in galaxy disc simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, C. G.; Dobbs, C.; Pettitt, A.; Konstandin, L.

    2016-08-01

    We examine how three fundamentally different numerical hydrodynamics codes follow the evolution of an isothermal galactic disc with an external spiral potential. We compare an adaptive mesh refinement code (RAMSES), a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHNG), and a volume-discretized mesh-less code (GIZMO). Using standard refinement criteria, we find that RAMSES produces a disc that is less vertically concentrated and does not reach such high densities as the SPHNG or GIZMO runs. The gas surface density in the spiral arms increases at a lower rate for the RAMSES simulations compared to the other codes. There is also a greater degree of substructure in the SPHNG and GIZMO runs and secondary spiral arms are more pronounced. By resolving the Jeans length with a greater number of grid cells, we achieve more similar results to the Lagrangian codes used in this study. Other alterations to the refinement scheme (adding extra levels of refinement and refining based on local density gradients) are less successful in reducing the disparity between RAMSES and SPHNG/GIZMO. Although more similar, SPHNG displays different density distributions and vertical mass profiles to all modes of GIZMO (including the smoothed particle hydrodynamics version). This suggests differences also arise which are not intrinsic to the particular method but rather due to its implementation. The discrepancies between codes (in particular, the densities reached in the spiral arms) could potentially result in differences in the locations and time-scales for gravitational collapse, and therefore impact star formation activity in more complex galaxy disc simulations.

  16. Hierarchical Material Models for Fragmentation Modeling in NIF-ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A; Masters, N; Koniges, A; Anderson, R; Gunney, B; Wang, P; Becker, R; Benson, D; Dixit, P

    2007-08-28

    Fragmentation is a fundamental process that naturally spans micro to macroscopic scales. Recent advances in algorithms, computer simulations, and hardware enable us to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes in a real simulation through a heterogeneous multiscale mathematical model. We apply this model to the problem of predicting how targets in the NIF chamber dismantle, so that optics and diagnostics can be protected from damage. The mechanics of the initial material fracture depend on the microscopic grain structure. In order to effectively simulate the fragmentation, this process must be modeled at the subgrain level with computationally expensive crystal plasticity models. However, there are not enough computational resources to model the entire NIF target at this microscopic scale. In order to accomplish these calculations, a hierarchical material model (HMM) is being developed. The HMM will allow fine-scale modeling of the initial fragmentation using computationally expensive crystal plasticity, while the elements at the mesoscale can use polycrystal models, and the macroscopic elements use analytical flow stress models. The HMM framework is built upon an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability. We present progress in implementing the HMM in the NIF-ALE-AMR code. Additionally, we present test simulations relevant to NIF targets.

  17. Hierarchical Material Models for Fragmentation Modeling in NIF-ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; Masters, N D; Dixit, P; Benson, D J; Koniges, A E; Anderson, R W; Gunney, B N; Wang, P; Becker, R

    2008-01-10

    Fragmentation is a fundamental process that naturally spans micro to macroscopic scales. Recent advances in algorithms, computer simulations, and hardware enable us to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes in a real simulation through a heterogeneous multiscale mathematical model. We apply this model to the problem of predicting how targets in the NIF chamber dismantle, so that optics and diagnostics can be protected from damage. The mechanics of the initial material fracture depend on the microscopic grain structure. In order to effectively simulate the fragmentation, this process must be modeled at the subgrain level with computationally expensive crystal plasticity models. However, there are not enough computational resources to model the entire NIF target at this microscopic scale. In order to accomplish these calculations, a hierarchical material model (HMM) is being developed. The HMM will allow fine-scale modeling of the initial fragmentation using computationally expensive crystal plasticity, while the elements at the mesoscale can use polycrystal models, and the macroscopic elements use analytical flow stress models. The HMM framework is built upon an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability. We present progress in implementing the HMM in the NIF-ALE-AMR code. Additionally, we present test simulations relevant to NIF targets.

  18. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  19. Hydrodynamics of micropipette aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Drury, J L; Dembo, M

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of human neutrophils during micropipette aspiration are frequently analyzed by approximating these cells as simple slippery droplets of viscous fluid. Here, we present computations that reveal the detailed predictions of the simplest and most idealized case of such a scheme; namely, the case where the fluid of the droplet is homogeneous and Newtonian, and the surface tension of the droplet is constant. We have investigated the behavior of this model as a function of surface tension, droplet radius, viscosity, aspiration pressure, and pipette radius. In addition, we have tabulated a dimensionless factor, M, which can be utilized to calculate the apparent viscosity of the slippery droplet. Computations were carried out using a low Reynolds number hydrodynamics transport code based on the finite-element method. Although idealized and simplistic, we find that the slippery droplet model predicts many observed features of neutrophil aspiration. However, there are certain features that are not observed in neutrophils. In particular, the model predicts dilation of the membrane past the point of being continuous, as well as a reentrant jet at high aspiration pressures. PMID:9876128

  20. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Remington, B A; Arnett, D; Fryxell, B A; Drake, R P

    1998-11-10

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, they are attempting to rigorously scale the physics of the laboratory in supernova. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to hydrodynamics on the SN-size scales is presented and requirements established. Initial results were reported in [1]. Next the appropriate conditions are generated on the NOVA laser. 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates is generated. This scales the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D vs. 3D difference in growth at the He-H interface of Sn 1987A.

  1. Field temperature measurements at Erta'Ale Lava Lake, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, Pierre-Yves; Caillet, Marc; Haefeli, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The shield volcano Erta'Ale, situated in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia, is known for its active lava lake. In February 2001, our team visited this lake, located inside an 80-m-deep pit, to perform field temperature measurements. The distribution and variation of temperature inside the lake were obtained on the basis of infrared radiation measurements performed from the rim of the pit and from the lake shores. The crust temperature was also determined from the lake shores with a thermocouple to calibrate the pyrometer. We estimated an emissivity of the basalt of 0.74 from this experiment. Through the application of the Stefan-Boltzmann law, we then obtained an estimate of the total radiative heat flux, constrained by pyrometer measurements of the pit, and visual observations of the lake activity. Taking into account the atmospheric convective heat flux, the convected magma mass flux needed to balance the energy budget was subsequently derived and found to represent between 510 and 580 kg s-1. The surface circulation of this mass flux was also analyzed through motion processing techniques applied to video images of the lake. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00445-002-0224-3.

  2. ICEd-ALE Treatment of 3-D Fluid Flow.

    1999-09-13

    Version: 00 SALE3D calculates three-dimensional fluid flow at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitudemore » results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a three-dimensional network of arbitrarily shaped, six-sided deformable cells, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.« less

  3. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics for water wave propagation in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvar, Pourya; Norouzi, Hossein; Zarghami, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to simulate the propagation of waves in an intermediate depth water channel. The major advantage of using SPH is that no special treatment of the free surface is required, which is advantageous for simulating highly nonlinear flows with possible wave breaking. The SPH method has an option of different formulations with their own advantages and drawbacks to be implemented. Here, we apply the classical and Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) formulation for wave propagation in a water channel. The classical SPH should come with an artificial viscosity which stabilizes the numerical algorithm and increases the accuracy. Here, we will show that the use of classical SPH with an artificial viscosity may cause the waves in the channel to decay. On the other hand, we will show that using the ALE-SPH algorithm with a Riemann solver is more stable, and in addition to producing the pressure fields with much less numerical noise, the waves propagate in the channel without dissipation.

  4. Hydrodynamic simulations with the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murante, G.; Borgani, S.; Brunino, R.; Cha, S.-H.

    2011-10-01

    We present results based on an implementation of the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics (GSPH), originally developed by Inutsuka, in the GADGET-3 hydrodynamic code. We first review the derivation of the GSPH discretization of the equations of moment and energy conservation, starting from the convolution of these equations with the interpolating kernel. The two most important aspects of the numerical implementation of these equations are (a) the appearance of fluid velocity and pressure obtained from the solution of the Riemann problem between each pair of particles, and (b) the absence of an artificial viscosity term. We carry out three different controlled hydrodynamical three-dimensional tests, namely the Sod shock tube, the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a shear-flow test and the 'blob' test describing the evolution of a cold cloud moving against a hot wind. The results of our tests confirm and extend in a number of aspects those recently obtained by Cha, Inutsuka & Nayakshin: (i) GSPH provides a much improved description of contact discontinuities, with respect to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), thus avoiding the appearance of spurious pressure forces; (ii) GSPH is able to follow the development of gas-dynamical instabilities, such as the Kevin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor ones; (iii) as a result, GSPH describes the development of curl structures in the shear-flow test and the dissolution of the cold cloud in the 'blob' test. Besides comparing the results of GSPH with those from standard SPH implementations, we also discuss in detail the effect on the performances of GSPH of changing different aspects of its implementation: choice of the number of neighbours, accuracy of the interpolation procedure to locate the interface between two fluid elements (particles) for the solution of the Riemann problem, order of the reconstruction for the assignment of variables at the interface, choice of the limiter to prevent oscillations of

  5. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiment on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Castor, J.; Rubenchik, A.; Berning, M.

    1996-02-12

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. On quite a separate front, the detrimental effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has long been known. Tools from both areas are being tested on a common project. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using hydrodynamics codes at the Laboratory, and astrophysical codes successfully used to model the hydrodynamics of supernovae. A two-layer package composed of Cu and CH{sub 2} with a single mode sinusoidal 1D perturbation at the interface, shocked by indirect laser drive from the Cu side of the package, produced significant Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in the nonlinear regime. The scale and gross structure of the growth was successfully modeled, by mapping an early-time simulation done with 1D HYADES, a radiation transport code, into 2D CALE, a LLNL hydrodynamics code. The HYADES result was also mapped in 2D into the supernova code PROMETHEUS, which was also able to reproduce the scale and gross structure of the growth.

  6. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; Charest, Marc R.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved at the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.

  7. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; Charest, Marc R.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved atmore » the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.« less

  8. Identification of variable convective regimes at Erta Ale Lava Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Carniel, Roberto; Jones, Josh

    2005-04-01

    During February 17-19, 2002, we collected a combined thermal and seismic data set for persistent lava lake activity at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia. These data indicate that the lake cycled between periods characterized by low (0.01-0.08 m s -1) and high (0.1-0.4 m s -1) surface velocities, typically lasting tens to hundreds of minutes. These periods of high and low velocity motion define periods of vigorous and sluggish convection, respectively. Spectral analysis revealed that vigorous convection periods were characterized by high frequencies and energies in the thermal data and an increased presence of high-frequency energy in the seismic data. The data show that vigorous periods were characterized by formation of hot, short-lived, plastic crusts, and sluggish periods by cooler, longer lived, brittle crusts. Here, the higher transit velocity across the lake surface from upwelling zones of crust formation to downwelling zones of crust destruction during the vigorous periods decreases the crust lifetime. This in turn decreases the total cooling and thickening experienced by a plate of crust moving across the lake surface. Two scenarios can be envisaged to explain such convection cycles. The first relates variable convection rates to changes in the volume flux and rheology of magma entering the lake. In the second, cyclic convection is set up by the generation of convective instabilities within the lake. In this case, cooling of a surface layer generates a slow moving, viscous, increasingly dense convection layer at the lake surface which is consumed and replaced during overturn.

  9. Calculation of Chemical Detonation Waves With Hydrodynamics and Thermochemical Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Souers, P C; Vitello, P A

    2001-08-01

    We model detonation waves for solid explosives, using 2-D Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics, with an equation of state (EOS) based on thermochemical equilibrium, coupled with simple kinetic rate laws for a few reactants. The EOS for the product species is based on either a BKWC EOS or on an exponential-6 potential model, whose parameters are fitted to a wide range of shock Hugoniot and static compression data. We show some results for the non ideal explosive, urea nitrate. Such a model is a powerful tool for studying such processes as initiation, detonation wave propagation and detonation wave propagation as a function of cylindrical radius.

  10. Staggered grid lagrangian method with local structured adaptive mesh refinement for modeling shock hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliot, N S

    2000-09-26

    A new method for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations has been developed. The method combines staggered grid Lagrangian techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This method is a precursor to a more general adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE-AMR) algorithm under development, which will facilitate the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a Lagrange step, which is the focus of the work described here. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. These new algorithmic components are first developed in one dimension and are then generalized to two dimensions. Solutions of several model problems involving shock hydrodynamics are presented and discussed.

  11. Circumstellar Hydrodynamics and Spectral Radiation in ALGOLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Dirk Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Algols are the remnants of binary systems that have undergone large scale mass transfer. This dissertation presents the results of the coupling of a hydrodynamical model and a radiative model of the flow of gas from the inner Lagrangian point. The hydrodynamical model is a fully Lagrangian, three-dimensional scheme with a novel treatment of viscosity and an implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method to compute pressure gradients. Viscosity is implemented by allowing particles within a specified interaction length to share momentum. The hydrodynamical model includes a provision for computing the self-gravity of the disk material, although it is not used in the present application to Algols. Hydrogen line profiles and equivalent widths computed with a code by Drake and Ulrich are compared with observations of both short and long period Algols. More sophisticated radiative transfer computations are done with the escape probability code of Ko and Kallman which includes the spectral lines of thirteen elements. The locations and velocities of the gas particles, and the viscous heating from the hydro program are supplied to the radiative transfer program, which computes the equilibrium temperature of the gas and generates its emission spectrum. Intrinsic line profiles are assumed to be delta functions and are properly Doppler shifted and summed for gas particles that are not eclipsed by either star. Polarization curves are computed by combining the hydro program with the Wilson-Liou polarization program. Although the results are preliminary, they show that polarization observations show great promise for studying circumstellar matter.

  12. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production. PMID:25361168

  13. Investigating flavour characteristics of British ale yeasts: techniques, resources and opportunities for innovation

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Neva; James, Steve; Dicks, Jo; Bond, Chris; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; White, Chris; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-01-01

    Five British ale yeast strains were subjected to flavour profiling under brewery fermentation conditions in which all other brewing parameters were kept constant. Significant variation was observed in the timing and quantity of flavour-related chemicals produced. Genetic tests showed no evidence of hybrid origins in any of the strains, including one strain previously reported as a possible hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Variation maintained in historical S. cerevisiae ale yeast collections is highlighted as a potential source of novelty in innovative strain improvement for bioflavour production. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25361168

  14. First light with ALES: A 2-5 micron adaptive optics Integral Field Spectrograph for the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip; Montoya, Manny; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Leisenring, Jarron; Durney, Oli; Woodward, Charles E.; Wilson, John; Nelson, Matt; Bailey, Vanessa; Defrere, Denis; Stone, Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Integral field spectrographs are an important technology for exoplanet imaging, due to their ability to take spectra in a high-contrast environment, and improve planet detection sensitivity through spectral differential imaging. ALES is the first integral field spectrograph capable of imaging exoplanets from 3-5 μm, and will extend our ability to characterize self-luminous exoplanets into a wavelength range where they peak in brightness. ALES is installed inside LBTI/LMIRcam on the Large Binocular Telescope, taking advantage of existing AO systems, camera optics, and a HAWAII-2RG detector. The new optics that comprise ALES are a Keplerian magnifier, a silicon lenslet array with diffraction suppressing pinholes, a direct vision prism, and calibration optics. All of these components are installed in filter wheels making ALES a completely modular design. ALES saw first light at the LBT in June 2015.

  15. Relativistic viscous hydrodynamics for high energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vredevoogd, Joshua Aaron

    It has been over a decade since the first experimental data from gold nuclei collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggested hydrodynamic behavior. Early ideal hydrodynamical models ignored the large longitudinal gradients that imply viscosity playing an important role in the dynamics. In addition, at that time, much less was known about the equation of state predicted by lattice calculations of quantum chromodynamics and the effects of late (dilute) stage rescattering were handled within the hydrodynamic framework. This dissertation presents a three-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics code with a realistic equation of state coupled consistently to a hadron resonance gas calculation. This code is capable of making significant comparisons to experimental data as part of an effort to learn about the structure of experimental constraints on the microscopic interactions of dense, hot quark matter.

  16. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  17. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.O.

    1999-06-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al., Astrophys. J.478, L75 (1997) The Nova laser is used to shock two-layer targets, producing Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the interfaces between the layers, analogous to instabilities seen at the interfaces of SN 1987A. Because the hydrodynamics in the laser experiments at intermediate times (3-40 ns) and in SN 1987A at intermediate times (5 s-10{sup 4} s) are well described by the Euler equations, the hydrodynamics scale between the two regimes. The experiments are modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS, thus serving as a benchmark for PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike and bubble velocities in the experiment using potential flow theory and a modified Ott thin shell theory is presented. A numerical study of 2D vs. 3D differences in instability growth at the O-He and He-H interface of SN 1987A, and the design for analogous laser experiments are presented. We discuss further work to incorporate more features of the SN in the experiments, including spherical geometry, multiple layers and density gradients. Past and ongoing work in laboratory and laser astrophysics is reviewed, including experimental work on supernova remnants (SNRs). A numerical study of RM instability in SNRs is presented.

  18. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R.P.; Fryxell, B.A.; Teyssier, R.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane {ital et al.} [Astrophys. J. {bold 478}, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 4}, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer{endash}Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. {bold 51}, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, {ital Numerical Astrophysics} (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482{endash}497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. {bold 54}, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  19. Resurgence in extended hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Inês; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been understood that the hydrodynamic series generated by the Müller-Israel-Stewart theory is divergent and that this large-order behavior is consistent with the theory of resurgence. Furthermore, it was observed that the physical origin of this is the presence of a purely damped nonhydrodynamic mode. It is very interesting to ask whether this picture persists in cases where the spectrum of nonhydrodynamic modes is richer. We take the first step in this direction by considering the simplest hydrodynamic theory which, instead of the purely damped mode, contains a pair of nonhydrodynamic modes of complex conjugate frequencies. This mimics the pattern of black brane quasinormal modes which appear on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT description of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. We find that the resulting hydrodynamic series is divergent in a way consistent with resurgence and precisely encodes information about the nonhydrodynamic modes of the theory.

  20. Dispersive hydrodynamics: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, G.; El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.; Miller, P. D.

    2016-10-01

    This Special Issue on Dispersive Hydrodynamics is dedicated to the memory and work of G.B. Whitham who was one of the pioneers in this field of physical applied mathematics. Some of the papers appearing here are related to work reported on at the workshop "Dispersive Hydrodynamics: The Mathematics of Dispersive Shock Waves and Applications" held in May 2015 at the Banff International Research Station. This Preface provides a broad overview of the field and summaries of the various contributions to the Special Issue, placing them in a unified context.

  1. Synchronization via Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendelbacher, Franziska; Stark, Holger

    2013-12-01

    An object moving in a viscous fluid creates a flow field that influences the motion of neighboring objects. We review examples from nature in the microscopic world where such hydrodynamic interactions synchronize beating or rotating filaments. Bacteria propel themselves using a bundle of rotating helical filaments called flagella which have to be synchronized in phase. Other micro-organisms are covered with a carpet of smaller filaments called cilia on their surfaces. They beat highly synchronized so that metachronal waves propagate along the cell surfaces. We explore both examples with the help of simple model systems and identify generic properties for observing synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions.

  2. Simple Waves in Ideal Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M

    2008-09-03

    In the dynamic diffusion limit of radiation hydrodynamics, advection dominates diffusion; the latter primarily affects small scales and has negligible impact on the large scale flow. The radiation can thus be accurately regarded as an ideal fluid, i.e., radiative diffusion can be neglected along with other forms of dissipation. This viewpoint is applied here to an analysis of simple waves in an ideal radiating fluid. It is shown that much of the hydrodynamic analysis carries over by simply replacing the material sound speed, pressure and index with the values appropriate for a radiating fluid. A complete analysis is performed for a centered rarefaction wave, and expressions are provided for the Riemann invariants and characteristic curves of the one-dimensional system of equations. The analytical solution is checked for consistency against a finite difference numerical integration, and the validity of neglecting the diffusion operator is demonstrated. An interesting physical result is that for a material component with a large number of internal degrees of freedom and an internal energy greater than that of the radiation, the sound speed increases as the fluid is rarefied. These solutions are an excellent test for radiation hydrodynamic codes operating in the dynamic diffusion regime. The general approach may be useful in the development of Godunov numerical schemes for radiation hydrodynamics.

  3. Skew resisting hydrodynamic seal

    DOEpatents

    Conroy, William T.; Dietle, Lannie L.; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.

    2001-01-01

    A novel hydrodynamically lubricated compression type rotary seal that is suitable for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion. Particularly, the seal geometry ensures constraint of a hydrodynamic seal in a manner preventing skew-induced wear and provides adequate room within the seal gland to accommodate thermal expansion. The seal accommodates large as-manufactured variations in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the sealing material, provides a relatively stiff integral spring effect to minimize pressure-induced shuttling of the seal within the gland, and also maintains interfacial contact pressure within the dynamic sealing interface in an optimum range for efficient hydrodynamic lubrication and environment exclusion. The seal geometry also provides for complete support about the circumference of the seal to receive environmental pressure, as compared the interrupted character of seal support set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,873,576 and 6,036,192 and provides a hydrodynamic seal which is suitable for use with non-Newtonian lubricants.

  4. New TVD Hydro Code for Modeling Disk-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudryk, Lawrence; Murray, Norman

    2004-06-01

    We present test simulations of a TVD hydrodynamical code designed with very few calculations per time step. The code is to be used to preform simulations of proto-planet interactions within gas disks in early solar systems.

  5. SPHGR: Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    SPHGR (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction) is a python based open-source framework for analyzing smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations. Its basic form can run a baryonic group finder to identify galaxies and a halo finder to identify dark matter halos; it can also assign said galaxies to their respective halos, calculate halo & galaxy global properties, and iterate through previous time steps to identify the most-massive progenitors of each halo and galaxy. Data about each individual halo and galaxy is collated and easy to access. SPHGR supports a wide range of simulations types including N-body, full cosmological volumes, and zoom-in runs. Support for multiple SPH code outputs is provided by pyGadgetReader (ascl:1411.001), mainly Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015).

  6. Protostellar Collapse Using Multigroup Radiation Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaytet, N.; Chabrier, G.; Audit, E.; Commerçon, B.; Masson, J.; González, M.; Ferguson, J.; Delahaye, F.

    2015-10-01

    Many simulations of protostellar collapse make use of a grey treatment of radiative transfer coupled to the hydrodynamics. However, interstellar gas and dust opacities present large variations as a function of frequency. In this paper, we present multigroup radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of a spherically symmetric cloud and the formation of the first and second Larson cores. We have used a non-ideal gas equation of state as well as an extensive set of spectral opacities. Small differences between grey and multigroup simulations were observed. The first and second core accretion shocks were found to be super- and sub-critical, respectively. Varying the initial size and mass of the parent cloud had little impact on the core properties (especially for the second core). We finally present early results from 3D simulations that were performed using the RAMSES code.

  7. Computational brittle fracture using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPBM. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPBM. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we have simulated a number of experiments. We discuss three of these simulations in this paper. The first experiment consists of a brittle steel sphere impacting a plate. The experimental sphere fragment patterns are compared to the calculations. The second experiment is a steel flyer plate in which the recovered steel target crack patterns are compared to the calculated crack patterns. We also briefly describe a simulation of a tungsten rod impacting a heavily confined alumina target, which has been recently reported on in detail.

  8. A further study of the anaerobic biotreatment of malt whisky distillery pot ale using an UASB system.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J A; Finlayson, J M; Low, E W

    2001-06-01

    Pot ale from a pilot-scale malt whisky distillery was treated using a mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) digester. Stable operation was observed at organic loading rates (OLRs) of 5.46 kg COD/m3 day or less when the pot ale was diluted with tap water. Digester failure occurred when undiluted pot ale was used, even though OLR was less than 5 kg COD/m3 day. Overall performance was worse than that observed previously when UASB digesters were used to treat pot ale from a different source supplemented with trace elements. A substantial proportion of effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was present as volatile fatty acids (VFA), particularly during periods of reactor stress, indicating that overall performance was limited by the rate of VFA conversion. Wastewater alkalinity rose during digestion. The sludge which developed in the reactor was flocculent but did not form compact granules.

  9. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  10. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks. PMID:26722945

  11. Fluctuations in relativistic causal hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Mishra, Ananta P.

    2014-05-01

    Formalism to calculate the hydrodynamic fluctuations by applying the Onsager theory to the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation is already known. In this work, we calculate hydrodynamic fluctuations within the framework of the second order hydrodynamics of Müller, Israel and Stewart and its generalization to the third order. We have also calculated the fluctuations for several other causal hydrodynamical equations. We show that the form for the Onsager-coefficients and form of the correlation functions remain the same as those obtained by the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation and do not depend on any specific model of hydrodynamics. Further we numerically investigate evolution of the correlation function using the one dimensional boost-invariant (Bjorken) flow. We compare the correlation functions obtained using the causal hydrodynamics with the correlation function for the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation. We find that the qualitative behavior of the correlation functions remains the same for all the models of the causal hydrodynamics.

  12. Combining Hydrodynamic and Evolution Calculations of Rotating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deupree, R. G.

    1996-12-01

    Rotation has two primary effects on stellar evolutionary models: the direct influence on the model structure produced by the rotational terms, and the indirect influence produced by rotational instabilities which redistribute angular momentum and composition inside the model. Using a two dimensional, fully implicit finite difference code, I can follow events on both evolutionary and hydrodynamic timescales, thus allowing the simulation of both effects. However, there are several issues concerning how to integrate the results from hydrodynamic runs into evolutionary runs that must be examined. The schemes I have devised for the integration of the hydrodynamic simulations into evolutionary calculations are outlined, and the positive and negative features summarized. The practical differences among the various schemes are small, and a successful marriage between hydrodynamic and evolution calculations is possible.

  13. Hydrodynamic blade guide

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Davis, Pete J.; Landram, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    A saw having a self-pumped hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing for retaining the saw blade in a centered position in the saw kerf (width of cut made by the saw). The hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing utilizes pockets or grooves incorporated into the sides of the blade. The saw kerf in the workpiece provides the guide or bearing stator surface. Both sides of the blade entrain cutting fluid as the blade enters the kerf in the workpiece, and the trapped fluid provides pressure between the blade and the workpiece as an inverse function of the gap between the blade surface and the workpiece surface. If the blade wanders from the center of the kerf, then one gap will increase and one gap will decrease and the consequent pressure difference between the two sides of the blade will cause the blade to re-center itself in the kerf. Saws using the hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing have particular application in slicing slabs from boules of single crystal materials, for example, as well as for cutting other difficult to saw materials such as ceramics, glass, and brittle composite materials.

  14. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms. PMID:24943377

  15. Hydrodynamics of insect spermatozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, On Shun; Lauga, Eric

    2010-11-01

    Microorganism motility plays important roles in many biological processes including reproduction. Many microorganisms propel themselves by propagating traveling waves along their flagella. Depending on the species, propagation of planar waves (e.g. Ceratium) and helical waves (e.g. Trichomonas) were observed in eukaryotic flagellar motion, and hydrodynamic models for both were proposed in the past. However, the motility of insect spermatozoa remains largely unexplored. An interesting morphological feature of such cells, first observed in Tenebrio molitor and Bacillus rossius, is the double helical deformation pattern along the flagella, which is characterized by the presence of two superimposed helical flagellar waves (one with a large amplitude and low frequency, and the other with a small amplitude and high frequency). Here we present the first hydrodynamic investigation of the locomotion of insect spermatozoa. The swimming kinematics, trajectories and hydrodynamic efficiency of the swimmer are computed based on the prescribed double helical deformation pattern. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental measurements, and explore the dependence of the swimming performance on the geometric and dynamical parameters.

  16. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-08-01

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms. PMID:24943377

  17. Characterizing cerebellar activity during autobiographical memory retrieval: ALE and functional connectivity investigations.

    PubMed

    Addis, Donna Rose; Moloney, Eleanor E J; Tippett, Lynette J; P Roberts, Reece; Hach, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Previous neuroimaging research has shown that the cerebellum is often activated during autobiographical memory (AM) retrieval. However, the reliability of that activation, its localization within the cerebellum, and its relationship to other areas of the AM network remains unknown. The current study used Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis (ALE) as well as resting-state and task-related functional connectivity analyses to better characterize cerebellar activation in relation to AM. The ALE meta-analysis was run on 32 neuroimaging studies of AM retrieval. The results revealed a cluster of reliable AM-related activity within the Crus I lobule of the right posterior cerebellum. Using the peak ALE coordinate within Crus I as a seed region, both task-related and resting state functional connectivity analyses were run on fMRI data from 38 healthy participants. To determine the specificity of connectivity patterns to Crus I, we also included a cerebellar seed region in right Lobule VI previously identified in an ALE meta-analysis as associated with working memory. Resting-state functional connectivity analyses indicated that Crus I was intrinsically connected with other areas of the AM network as well as surrounding and contralateral cerebellar regions. In contrast, the Lobule VI seed was functionally connected with cerebral and cerebellar regions typically associated with working memory. The task-related connectivity analyses revealed a similar pattern, where the Crus I seed exhibited significant connectivity with key nodes of the AM network while the Lobule IV seed did not. During a semantic control task, both Crus I and Lobule VI showed significant correlations with a network of regions that was largely distinct from the AM network. Together these results indicate that right Crus I lobule is reliably engaged during AM retrieval and is functionally connected to the AM network both during rest, and more importantly, during AM retrieval. PMID:27235570

  18. Performance evaluation of a mobile satellite system modem using an ALE method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsawa, Tomoki; Iwasaki, Motoya

    1990-01-01

    Experimental performance of a newly designed demodulation concept is presented. This concept applies an Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE) to a carrier recovery circuit, which makes pull-in time significantly shorter in noisy and large carrier offset conditions. This new demodulation concept was actually developed as an INMARSAT standard-C modem, and was evaluated. On a performance evaluation, 50 symbol pull-in time is confirmed under 4 dB Eb/No condition.

  19. Coupling GSM/ALE with ES-FEM-T3 for fluid-deformable structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Khoo, B. C.; Liu, G. R.; Xu, G. X.; Chen, L.

    2014-11-01

    In light of the effectiveness of the edge-based smoothed finite element method (ES-FEM-T3) and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian gradient smoothing method (GSM/ALE) in, respectively, solving the pure solid and fluid flow problems using three-node triangular elements, they are coupled together in the present study to solve the more challenging fluid-deformable structure interaction (FSI) problems based on the weak coupling algorithm. Specifically, the fluid flow is tracked over the moving mesh with the well developed GSM/ALE and the transient response of the solid part is solved by the newly developed explicit ES-FEM-T3. The solutions from these two parts are “linked” together by the carefully formulated FSI coupling conditions on the FSI interface. Detailed procedures are summarized to illustrate the implementations of the GSM/ALE with ES-FEM-T3 in an FSI analysis. Three benchmarks are employed to validate the proposed coupled smoothed method in solving both transient and steady-state FSI problems. The mesh sensitivity analysis is further carried out showing that the results of an FSI system appear more sensitive to the change in the solid mesh as compared to the fluid mesh, thus suggesting a more refined mesh for the solid part. Another significant finding is that the present method can still produce reliable results even on the extremely distorted mesh near the FSI interface. The successful coupling GSM/ALE with ES-FEM-T3 for solving FSI problems serves as a good start for further implementing the family of smoothed methods in solving more complex cross-area problems.

  20. RHALE: A 3-D MMALE code for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Peery, J.S.; Budge, K.G.; Wong, M.K.W.; Trucano, T.G.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes RHALE, a multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (MMALE) shock physics code. RHALE is the successor to CTH, Sandia`s 3-D Eulerian shock physics code, and will be capable of solving problems that CTH cannot adequately address. We discuss the Lagrangian solid mechanics capabilities of RHALE, which include arbitrary mesh connectivity, superior artificial viscosity, and improved material models. We discuss the MMALE algorithms that have been extended for arbitrary grids in both two- and three-dimensions. The MMALE addition to RHALE provides the accuracy of a Lagrangian code while allowing a calculation to proceed under very large material distortions. Coupling an arbitrary quadrilateral or hexahedral grid to the MMALE solution facilitates modeling of complex shapes with a greatly reduced number of computational cells. RHALE allows regions of a problem to be modeled with Lagrangian, Eulerian or ALE meshes. In addition, regions can switch from Lagrangian to ALE to Eulerian based on user input or mesh distortion. For ALE meshes, new node locations are determined with a variety of element based equipotential schemes. Element quantities are advected with donor, van Leer, or Super-B algorithms. Nodal quantities are advected with the second order SHALE or HIS algorithms. Material interfaces are determined with a modified Young`s high resolution interface tracker or the SLIC algorithm. RHALE has been used to model many problems of interest to the mechanics, hypervelocity impact, and shock physics communities. Results of a sampling of these problems are presented in this paper.

  1. Mapping anhedonia-specific dysfunction in a transdiagnostic approach: an ALE meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Lin, Pan; Shi, Huqing; Öngür, Dost; Auerbach, Randy P.; Wang, Xiaosheng; Yao, Shuqiao

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia is a prominent symptom in neuropsychiatric disorders, most markedly in major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Emerging evidence indicates an overlap in the neural substrates of anhedonia between MDD and SZ, which supported a transdiagnostic approach. Therefore, we used activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in MDD and SZ to examine the neural bases of three subdomains of anhedonia: consummatory anhedonia, anticipatory anhedonia and emotional processing. ALE analysis focused specifically on MDD or SZ was used later to dissociate specific anhedonia-related neurobiological impairments from potential disease general impairments. ALE results revealed that consummatory anhedonia was associated with decreased activation in ventral basal ganglia areas, while anticipatory anhedonia was associated with more substrates in frontal-striatal networks except the ventral striatum, which included the dorsal anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus and medial frontal gyrus. MDD and SZ patients showed similar neurobiological impairments in anticipatory and consummatory anhedonia, but differences in the emotional experience task, which may also involve affective/mood general processing. These results support that anhedonia is characterized by alterations in reward processing and relies on frontal-striatal brain circuitry. The transdiagnostic approach is a promising way to reveal the overall neurobiological framework that contributes to anhedonia and could help to improve targeted treatment strategies. PMID:26487590

  2. The role lipid aldehydes and ALEs in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common causes of blindness in people of working age in developed countries. The retinal vasculature is central to the development of diabetic retinopathy, but there is accumulating evidence that neuroretinal dysfunction and degeneration also contributes to the aetiology and progression of this disease. The precise mechanisms through which diabetes causes neuroretinal dysfunction and degeneration remain to be fully established, but recent evidence from our own group has suggested that lipid aldehyde generation and the formation of advanced lipoxidation end-products (ALEs) plays a key contributory role. In the present talk, I will outline our recent data suggesting that the progressive and selective accumulation of the acrolein-derived ALE, FDP-lysine, in retinal Müller glial cells during diabetes is involved in the pathogenesis of neuroretinal dysfunction during diabetic retinopathy. More recent unpublished data will also be presented suggesting that FDP-lysine accumulation in the diabetic retina may occur primarily through a mechanism involving the downregulation of aldehyde detoxification enzymes. Current studies examining potential therapeutic strategies for preventing ALE accumulation in the diabetic retina will also be briefly discussed.

  3. Microbial diversity and metabolite composition of Belgian red-brown acidic ales.

    PubMed

    Snauwaert, Isabel; Roels, Sanne P; Van Nieuwerburg, Filip; Van Landschoot, Anita; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-03-16

    Belgian red-brown acidic ales are sour and alcoholic fermented beers, which are produced by mixed-culture fermentation and blending. The brews are aged in oak barrels for about two years, after which mature beer is blended with young, non-aged beer to obtain the end-products. The present study evaluated the microbial community diversity of Belgian red-brown acidic ales at the end of the maturation phase of three subsequent brews of three different breweries. The microbial diversity was compared with the metabolite composition of the brews at the end of the maturation phase. Therefore, mature brew samples were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria) and the internal transcribed spacer region (yeasts) and a broad range of metabolites was quantified. The most important microbial species present in the Belgian red-brown acidic ales investigated were Pediococcus damnosus, Dekkera bruxellensis, and Acetobacter pasteurianus. In addition, this culture-independent analysis revealed operational taxonomic units that were assigned to an unclassified fungal community member, Candida, and Lactobacillus. The main metabolites present in the brew samples were L-lactic acid, D-lactic acid, and ethanol, whereas acetic acid was produced in lower quantities. The most prevailing aroma compounds were ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate, which might be of impact on the aroma of the end-products. PMID:26802571

  4. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Nonlinear hydrodynamics of cosmological sheets. 1: Numerical techniques and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Wenbo Y.; Norman, Michael J.

    1994-07-01

    We present the numerical techniques and tests used to construct and validate a computer code designed to study the multidimensional nonlinear hydrodynamics of large-scale sheet structures in the universe, especially the fragmentation of such structures under various instabilities. This code is composed of two codes, the hydrodynamical code ZEUS-2D and a particle-mesh code. The ZEUS-2D code solves the hydrodynamical equations in two dimensions using explicit Eulerian finite-difference techniques, with modifications made to incorporate the expansion of the universe and the gas cooling due to Compton scattering, bremsstrahlung, and hydrogen and helium cooling. The particle-mesh code solves the equation of motion for the collisionless dark matter. The code uses two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates with a nonuniform grid in one direction to provide high resolution for the sheet structures. A series of one-dimensional and two-dimensional linear perturbation tests are presented which are designed to test the hydro solver and the Poisson solver with and without the expansion of the universe. We also present a radiative shock wave test which is designed to ensure the code's capability to handle radiative cooling properly. And finally a series of one-dimensional Zel'dovich pancake tests used to test the dark matter code and the hydro solver in the nonlinear regime are discussed and compared with the results of Bond et al. (1984) and Shapiro & Struck-Marcell (1985). Overall, the code is shown to produce accurate and stable results, which provide us a powerful tool to further our studies.

  6. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  7. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Contact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Frank, Juhan; Marcello, Dominic; Motl, Patrick M.; Staff, Jan E.

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for our project is the peculiar case of the 'red nova" V1309 Sco which erupted in September 2008. The progenitor was, in fact, a contact binary system. We are developing a simulation of contact binaries, so that their formation, structural, and merger properties could be studied using hydrodynamics codes. The observed transient event was the disruption of the secondary star by the primary, and their subsequent merger into one star; hence to replicate this behavior, we need a core-envelope structure for both the stars. We achieve this using a combination of Self Consistant Field (SCF) technique and composite polytropes, also known as bipolytropes. So far we have been able to generate close binaries with various mass ratios. Another consequence of using bipolytropes is that according to theoretical calculations, the radius of a star should expand when the core mass fraction exceeds a critical value, resulting in interesting consequences in a binary system. We present some initial results of these simulations.

  8. Identification of regulatory elements in the AGT1 promoter of ale and lager strains of brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Kankainen, Matti; Londesborough, John; Ruohonen, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Agt1 is an interesting α-glucoside transporter for the brewing industry, as it efficiently transports maltotriose, a sugar often remaining partly unused during beer fermentation. It has been shown that on maltose the expression level of AGT1 is much higher in ale strains than in lager strains, and that glucose represses the expression, particularly in the ale strains. In the present study the regulatory elements of the AGT1 promoter of one ale and two lager strains were identified by computational methods. Promoter regions up to 1.9 kbp upstream of the AGT1 gene were sequenced from the three brewer's yeast strains and the laboratory yeast strain CEN.PK-1D. The promoter sequence of the laboratory strain was identical to the AGT1 promoter of strain S288c of the Saccharomyces Genome Database, whereas the promoter sequences of the industrial strains diverged markedly from the S288c strain. The AGT1 promoter regions of the ale and lager strains were for the most part identical to each other, except for one 22 bp deletion and two 94 and 95 bp insertions in the ale strain. Computational analyses of promoter elements revealed that the promoter sequences contained several Mig1- and MAL-activator binding sites, as was expected. However, some of the Mig1 and MAL-activator binding sites were located on the two insertions of the ale strain, and thus offered a plausible explanation for the different expression pattern of the AGT1 gene in the ale strains. Accordingly, functional analysis of A60 ale and A15 lager strain AGT1 promoters fused to GFP (encoding the green fluorescent protein) showed a significant difference in the ability of these two promoters to drive GFP expression. Under the control of the AGT1 promoter of the ale strain the emergence of GFP was strongly induced by maltose, whereas only a low level of GFP was detected with the construct carrying the AGT1 promoter of the lager strain. Thus, the extra MAL-activator binding element, present in the AGT1 promoter of

  9. The moving mesh code SHADOWFAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the moving mesh code SHADOWFAX, which can be used to evolve a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. The code is written in C++ and its source code is made available to the scientific community under the GNU Affero General Public Licence. We outline the algorithm and the design of our implementation, and demonstrate its validity through the results of a set of basic test problems, which are also part of the public version. We also compare SHADOWFAX with a number of other publicly available codes using different hydrodynamical integration schemes, illustrating the advantages and disadvantages of the moving mesh technique.

  10. MUFASA: galaxy formation simulations with meshless hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davé, Romeel; Thompson, Robert; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-11-01

    We present the MUFASA suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, which employs the GIZMO meshless finite mass (MFM) code including H2-based star formation, nine-element chemical evolution, two-phase kinetic outflows following scalings from the Feedback in Realistic Environments zoom simulations, and evolving halo mass-based quenching. Our fiducial (50 h-1 Mpc)3 volume is evolved to z = 0 with a quarter billion elements. The predicted galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) reproduces observations from z = 4 → 0 to ≲ 1.2σ in cosmic variance, providing an unprecedented match to this key diagnostic. The cosmic star formation history and stellar mass growth show general agreement with data, with a strong archaeological downsizing trend such that dwarf galaxies form the majority of their stars after z ˜ 1. We run 25 and 12.5 h-1 Mpc volumes to z = 2 with identical feedback prescriptions, the latter resolving all hydrogen-cooling haloes, and the three runs display fair resolution convergence. The specific star formation rates broadly agree with data at z = 0, but are underpredicted at z ˜ 2 by a factor of 3, re-emphasizing a longstanding puzzle in galaxy evolution models. We compare runs using MFM and two flavours of smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and show that the GSMF is sensitive to hydrodynamics methodology at the ˜×2 level, which is sub-dominant to choices for parametrizing feedback.

  11. Molecular Hydrodynamics from Memory Kernels.

    PubMed

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as t^{-3/2}. We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, which is at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. Lastly, we discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales, and the crossover between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius. PMID:27104730

  12. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  13. Hydrodynamics of pronuclear migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule (MT) filaments play a key role in many processes involved in cell devision including spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and pronuclear positioning. We present a direct numerical technique to simulate MT dynamics in such processes. Our method includes hydrodynamically mediated interactions between MTs and other cytoskeletal objects, using singularity methods for Stokes flow. Long-ranged many-body hydrodynamic interactions are computed using a highly efficient and scalable fast multipole method, enabling the simulation of thousands of MTs. Our simulation method also takes into account the flexibility of MTs using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory as well as their dynamic instability. Using this technique, we simulate pronuclear migration in single-celled Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Two different positioning mechanisms, based on the interactions of MTs with the motor proteins and the cell cortex, are explored: cytoplasmic pulling and cortical pushing. We find that although the pronuclear complex migrates towards the center of the cell in both models, the generated cytoplasmic flows are fundamentally different. This suggest that cytoplasmic flow visualization during pronuclear migration can be utilized to differentiate between the two mechanisms.

  14. Hydrodynamics of Bacterial Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Libchaber, A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of the last several decades, the study of microbial communities has identified countless examples of cooperation between microorganisms. Generally—as in the case of quorum sensing—cooperation is coordinated by a chemical signal that diffuses through the community. Less well understood is a second class of cooperation that is mediated through physical interactions between individuals. To better understand how the bacteria use hydrodynamics to manipulate their environment and coordinate their actions, we study the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus. These bacteria live in the diffusive boundary layer just above the muddy bottoms of ponds. As buried organic material decays, sulfide diffuses out of the mud. Oxygen from the pond diffuses into the boundary layer from above. These bacteria form communities—called veils— which are able to transport nutrients through the boundary layer faster than diffusion, thereby increasing their metabolic rate. In these communities, bacteria attach to surfaces and swim in place. As millions of bacteria beat their flagella, the community induces a macroscopic fluid flow, which mix the boundary layer. Here we present experimental observations and mathematical models that elucidate the hydrodynamics linking the behavior of an individual bacterium to the collective dynamics of the community. We begin by characterizing the flow of water around an individual bacterium swimming in place. We then discuss the flow of water and nutrients around a small number of individuals. Finally, we present observations and models detailing the macroscopic dynamics of a Thiovulum veil.

  15. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-05-01

    The design of offshore floating wind turbines uses design codes that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At the present, most codes include only first-order hydrodynamics, which induce forces and motions varying with the same frequency as the incident waves. Effects due to second- and higher-order hydrodynamics are often ignored in the offshore industry, because the forces induced typically are smaller than the first-order forces. In this report, first- and second-order hydrodynamic analysis used in the offshore oil and gas industry is applied to two different wind turbine concepts--a spar and a tension leg platform.

  16. General formulation of transverse hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-06-15

    General formulation of hydrodynamics describing transversally thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing transversally thermalized matter is emphasized.

  17. MONTE CARLO RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMICS WITH IMPLICIT METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    We explore the application of Monte Carlo transport methods to solving coupled radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD) problems. We use a time-dependent, frequency-dependent, three-dimensional radiation transport code that is special relativistic and includes some detailed microphysical interactions such as resonant line scattering. We couple the transport code to two different one-dimensional (non-relativistic) hydrodynamics solvers: a spherical Lagrangian scheme and a Eulerian Godunov solver. The gas–radiation energy coupling is treated implicitly, allowing us to take hydrodynamical time-steps that are much longer than the radiative cooling time. We validate the code and assess its performance using a suite of radiation hydrodynamical test problems, including ones in the radiation energy dominated regime. We also develop techniques that reduce the noise of the Monte Carlo estimated radiation force by using the spatial divergence of the radiation pressure tensor. The results suggest that Monte Carlo techniques hold promise for simulating the multi-dimensional RHD of astrophysical systems.

  18. Prototype Mixed Finite Element Hydrodynamics Capability in ARES

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N

    2008-07-10

    This document describes work on a prototype Mixed Finite Element Method (MFEM) hydrodynamics algorithm in the ARES code, and its application to a set of standard test problems. This work is motivated by the need for improvements to the algorithms used in the Lagrange hydrodynamics step to make them more robust. We begin by identifying the outstanding issues with traditional numerical hydrodynamics algorithms followed by a description of the proposed method and how it may address several of these longstanding issues. We give a theoretical overview of the proposed MFEM algorithm as well as a summary of the coding additions and modifications that were made to add this capability to the ARES code. We present results obtained with the new method on a set of canonical hydrodynamics test problems and demonstrate significant improvement in comparison to results obtained with traditional methods. We conclude with a summary of the issues still at hand and motivate the need for continued research to develop the proposed method into maturity.

  19. Hydrodynamics of Peristaltic Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios; Hart, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    A curious class of animals called salps live in marine environments and self-propel by ejecting vortex rings much like jellyfish and squid. However, unlike other jetting creatures that siphon and eject water from one side of their body, salps produce vortex rings by pumping water through siphons on opposite ends of their hollow cylindrical bodies. In the simplest cases, it seems like some species of salp can successfully move by contracting just two siphons connected by an elastic body. When thought of as a chain of timed contractions, salp propulsion is reminiscent of peristaltic pumping applied to marine locomotion. Inspired by salps, we investigate the hydrodynamics of peristaltic propulsion, focusing on the scaling relationships that determine flow rate, thrust production, and energy usage in a model system. We discuss possible actuation methods for a model peristaltic vehicle, considering both the material and geometrical requirements for such a system.

  20. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  1. Hydrodynamics, resurgence, and transasymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2015-12-01

    The second order hydrodynamical description of a homogeneous conformal plasma that undergoes a boost-invariant expansion is given by a single nonlinear ordinary differential equation, whose resurgent asymptotic properties we study, developing further the recent work of Heller and Spalinski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 072501 (2015)]. Resurgence clearly identifies the nonhydrodynamic modes that are exponentially suppressed at late times, analogous to the quasinormal modes in gravitational language, organizing these modes in terms of a trans-series expansion. These modes are analogs of instantons in semiclassical expansions, where the damping rate plays the role of the instanton action. We show that this system displays the generic features of resurgence, with explicit quantitative relations between the fluctuations about different orders of these nonhydrodynamic modes. The imaginary part of the trans-series parameter is identified with the Stokes constant, and the real part with the freedom associated with initial conditions.

  2. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael; Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  3. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  4. A Secret Decoder Ring for Volcanic Tremor: Method and Application to Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Carniel, R.; Malone, S. D.

    2009-12-01

    A new method of analyzing volcanic tremor is presented, which uses properties of undecimated wavelet packet transforms to filter, decompose, and recover signals from continuous multichannel data. The method preserves many standard properties that are used to characterize tremor, such as wavefield polarization and seismic energy. In this way, we can better understand the (potentially many) seismic sources that combine to form continuous volcanic tremor, and we can specifically address the problem of what causes changing tremor spectral content. Using example data from two experiments at Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia, this method suggests that continuous volcanic tremor generally has multiple, simultaneously active seismic sources, not all of which are persistent. Our analysis suggests that continuous tremor was simultaneously generated at Erta 'Ale by magma flow in a conduit, degassing at a system of fumaroles, gas bubbles coalescing in the shallow, active lava lake, and degassing in a crater that formerly held a lava lake. Evidence for these diverse seismic sources can be seen in both the 2002 and 2003 data. Energy-based location of recovered signals from 2003 strongly supports this interpretation. The spectral transitions seen at Erta 'Ale in 2002 are resolved using this method, and result from secondary signals introduced during rapid convection. The signal which we interpret as being generated by magma flow in a conduit did not change between the two convective regimes. Thus, the recovered signals from the 2002 data argue strongly that changes in the rate of lava lake convection (and corresponding spectral changes) were driven entirely by shallow processes in the lava lake, rather than changing properties of the magma supply. This example demonstrates that using wavelet-based methods to understand the sources of continuous volcanic tremor can prove useful in understanding volcanic behavior, as well as detecting signals that relate to unrest.

  5. Migration trachéale d'une canule de trachéotomie: complication exceptionnelle

    PubMed Central

    Chouikh, Chakib; El Moqaddem, Amine; Benmakhlouf, Anas; Naanaa, Saad; El Koraichi, Alae; El Kettani, Salma; Jahidi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    La trachéotomie est un geste chirurgical de survie largement pratiqué dans les services des urgences et de réanimation. En fonction de l'indication de sa réalisation, elle peut être transitoire ou définitive. Dans ce dernier cas le port d'une canule de trachéotomie de manière prolongée peut exposer à certaines complications qui peuvent s'avérer graves. Nous présentons un cas très rare d'un enfant présentant un syndrome de Guillain Barré, trachéotomisé depuis 4 ans suite à une sténose trachéale par intubation prolongée et portant une canule de trachéotomie métallique de type KRISHABER qui s'est présenté aux urgences dans un tableau de détresse respiratoire suite à la migration trachéale de sa canule. La trachéotomie est l'ouverture à la peau de la trachée cervicale, et à la mise d'une canule qui a pour but de permettre la respiration en court-circuitant les voies aériennes supérieures. De réalisation simple et codifiée le plus souvent, elle présente des risques de complications post opératoires notamment tardives. Les plus décrites sont les granulomes, les sténoses trachéales, les infections, et les fistules. La migration trachéale de la canule de trachéotomie reste exceptionnelle. Elle résulte d'un mauvais entretien qui fragilise la canule et doit être prise en charge en urgence. La trachéotomie définitive nécessite une surveillance régulière, un entretien et des soins de canules rigoureux pour éviter la survenue de complications qui peuvent être graves. Chez l'enfant, l'utilisation de canules souples en PVC ou en silicone doit être préférée aux canules métalliques. PMID:25368730

  6. The ALE Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Simulatio of Air Flow Through Pulsating Human Vocal Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistauer, Miloslav; Kučera, Václav; Prokopová, Jaroslav; Horáček, Jaromír

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this work is the simulation of viscous compressible flows in human vocal folds during phonation. The computational domain is a bounded subset of IR2, whose geometry mimics the shape of the human larynx. During phonation, parts of the solid impermeable walls are moving in a prescribed manner, thus simulating the opening and closing of the vocal chords. As the governing equations we take the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in ALE form. Space semidiscretization is carried out by the discontinuous Galerkin method combined with a linearized semi-implicit approach. Numerical experiments are performed with the resulting scheme.

  7. Volvulus grêlique sur hydatidose péritonéale: une cause rare d'occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Bouassria, Abdesslam; Mazine, Khalid; Elbouhaddouti, Hicham; Mouaqit, Ouadii; Ousadden, Abdelmalek; Mazaz, Khalid; Benjelloun, Elbachir; Taleb, Khalid Ait

    2014-01-01

    L'hydatidose péritonéale peut être primitive, hématogène ou hétérotopique, comme elle peut être secondaire et résulte de la fissuration d'un kyste hydatique, le plus souvent hépatique. Cliniquement polymorphe, elle peut se révéler par des douleurs abdominales ou par la palpation d'une masse abdominale. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente chez qui l'hydatidose péritonéale était révélée par un accident occlusif: un volvulus grêlique dû à un volumineux kyste hydatique mésentérique. Le traitement de l'hydatidose péritonéale est chirurgical, couplé à un traitement médical à base d'albendazole. PMID:25400846

  8. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  9. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  10. Hydrodynamic body shape analysis and their impact on swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Zeng; Zhan, Jie-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the hydrodynamic characteristics of different adult male swimmer's body shape using computational fluid dynamics method. This simulation strategy is carried out by CFD fluent code with solving the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the RNG k-ε turbulence closure. The water free surface is captured by the volume of fluid (VOF) method. A set of full body models, which is based on the anthropometrical characteristics of the most common male swimmers, is created by Computer Aided Industrial Design (CAID) software, Rhinoceros. The analysis of CFD results revealed that swimmer's body shape has a noticeable effect on the hydrodynamics performances. This explains why male swimmer with an inverted triangle body shape has good hydrodynamic characteristics for competitive swimming. PMID:26898107

  11. Hydrodynamic body shape analysis and their impact on swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Zeng; Zhan, Jie-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the hydrodynamic characteristics of different adult male swimmer's body shape using computational fluid dynamics method. This simulation strategy is carried out by CFD fluent code with solving the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the RNG k-ε turbulence closure. The water free surface is captured by the volume of fluid (VOF) method. A set of full body models, which is based on the anthropometrical characteristics of the most common male swimmers, is created by Computer Aided Industrial Design (CAID) software, Rhinoceros. The analysis of CFD results revealed that swimmer's body shape has a noticeable effect on the hydrodynamics performances. This explains why male swimmer with an inverted triangle body shape has good hydrodynamic characteristics for competitive swimming.

  12. Constraining relativistic viscous hydrodynamical evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2009-04-15

    We show that by requiring positivity of the longitudinal pressure it is possible to constrain the initial conditions one can use in second-order viscous hydrodynamical simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We demonstrate this explicitly for (0+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics and discuss how the constraint extends to higher dimensions. Additionally, we present an analytic approximation to the solution of (0+1)-dimensional second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution equations appropriate to describe the evolution of matter in an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision.

  13. The Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment and the Global Atmospheric Gas Experiment (ALE/GAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. Aslam K.

    1995-01-01

    The ALE/GAGE project was designed to determine the global atmospheric lifetimes of the chlorofluorocarbons CCl3F and CCl2F2 (F-11 and F-12), which had been identified as the main gases that cause stratospheric ozone depletion. The experimental procedures also provided the concentrations of CH3CCl3, CCl4 and N2O. The extended role of the project was to evaluate the mass balances of these gases as well. Methylchloroform (CH3CCl3) serves as a tracer of average atmospheric OH concentrations and hence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and can also deplete the ozone layer. Measurements of these gases were taken with optimized instruments in the field at a frequency of about 1 sample/hr. Toward the end of the present project methane measurements were added to the program. The final report deals with the research of the Oregon Graduate Institute (OGI) as part of the ALE/GAGE program between 4/1/1988 and 1/31/1991. The report defines the scope of the OGI project, the approach, and the results.

  14. Validation of Air-Backed Underwater Explosion Experiments with ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L D

    2005-02-04

    This paper summarizes an exercise carried out to validate the process of implementing LLNL's ALE3D to predict the permanent deformation and rupture of an air-backed steel plate subjected to underwater shock. Experiments were performed in a shock tank at the Naval Science and Technology Laboratory in Visakhapatnam India, and the results are documented in reference. A consistent set of air-backed plates is subjected to shocks from increasing weights of explosives ranging from 10g-80g. At 40g and above, rupture is recorded in the experiment and, without fracture mechanics implemented in ALE3D, only the cases of 10g, 20g, and 30g are presented here. This methodology applies the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) Equation of State (EOS) to predict the pressure of the expanding detonation products, the Gruneisein EOS for water under highly dynamic compressible flow - both on 1-point integrated 3-d continuum elements. The steel plates apply a bilinear elastic-plastic response with failure and are simulated with 3-point integrated shell elements. The failure for this exercise is based on effective (or equivalent) plastic strain.

  15. ALE3D Simulation of Heating and Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment with LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; Nichols, A L; deHaven, M R; Strand, O T

    2006-06-26

    We performed a computational and experimental analysis of fast cookoff of LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 2 kbar steel tube with reinforced end caps. A Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) was completed in which three radiant heaters were used to heat the vessel until ignition, resulting in a moderately violent explosion after 20.4 minutes. Thermocouple measurements showed tube temperatures as high as 340 C at ignition and LX-10 surface temperatures as high as 279 C, which is near the melting point of HMX. Three micro-power radar systems were used to measure mean fragment velocities of 840 m/s. Photonics Doppler Velocimeters (PDVs) showed a rapid acceleration of fragments over 80 {micro}s. A one-dimensional ALE3D cookoff model at the vessel midplane was used to simulate the heating, thermal expansion, LX-10 decomposition composition, and closing of the gap between the HE (High Explosive) and vessel wall. Although the ALE3D simulation terminated before ignition, the model provided a good representation of heat transfer through the case and across the dynamic gap to the explosive.

  16. ALE3D Simulation and Measurement of Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment with LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; deHaven, M R

    2006-11-22

    We performed a computational and experimental analysis of fast cookoff of LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 2 kbar steel tube with reinforced end caps. A Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) was completed in which three radiant heaters were used to heat the vessel until ignition, resulting in a moderately violent explosion after 20.4 minutes. Thermocouple measurements showed tube temperatures as high as 340 C at ignition and LX-10 surface temperatures as high as 279 C, which is near the melting point of HMX. Three micro-power radar systems were used to measure mean fragment velocities of 840 m/s. Photonics Doppler Velocimeters (PDVs) showed a rapid acceleration of fragments over 80 {micro}s. A one-dimensional ALE3D cookoff model at the vessel midplane was used to simulate the heating, thermal expansion, LX-10 decomposition composition, and closing of the gap between the HE (High Explosive) and vessel wall. Although the ALE3D simulation terminated before ignition, the model provided a good representation of heat transfer through the case and across the dynamic gap to the explosive.

  17. Voxel-Based Morphometry ALE meta-analysis of Bipolar Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magana, Omar; Laird, Robert

    2012-03-01

    A meta-analysis was performed independently to view the changes in gray matter (GM) on patients with Bipolar disorder (BP). The meta-analysis was conducted on a Talairach Space using GingerALE to determine the voxels and their permutation. In order to achieve the data acquisition, published experiments and similar research studies were uploaded onto the online Voxel-Based Morphometry database (VBM). By doing so, coordinates of activation locations were extracted from Bipolar disorder related journals utilizing Sleuth. Once the coordinates of given experiments were selected and imported to GingerALE, a Gaussian was performed on all foci points to create the concentration points of GM on BP patients. The results included volume reductions and variations of GM between Normal Healthy controls and Patients with Bipolar disorder. A significant amount of GM clusters were obtained in Normal Healthy controls over BP patients on the right precentral gyrus, right anterior cingulate, and the left inferior frontal gyrus. In future research, more published journals could be uploaded onto the database and another VBM meta-analysis could be performed including more activation coordinates or a variation of age groups.

  18. Atmospheric emissions and trends of nitrous oxide deduced from 10 years of ALE-GAGE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, R.; Cunnold, D.; Alyea, F.; Rasmussen, R.; Simmonds, P.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) obtained during the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE) and the Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (GAGE) for a period from 1978 to 1988 are presented and interpreted. It is observed that the average concentration in the Northern Hemisphere is 0.75 +/- 0.16 ppbv higher than in the Southern Hemisphere and that the global average linear trend in N2O lies in the range from 0.25 to 0.31 percent/year. The measured trends and latitudinal distributions are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that stratospheric photodissociation is the major atmospheric sink for N2O, while the cause of the N2O trend is suggested to be a combination of a growing tropical source and a growing Northern mid-latitude source. A 10-year average global N2O emission rate of (20.5 +/- 2.4) x 10 to the 12th g N2O/year is deduced from the ALE/GAGE data.

  19. ALE Meta-Analysis of Schizophrenics Performing the N-Back Task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Zachary

    2010-10-01

    MRI/fMRI has already proven itself as a valuable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many illnesses of the brain, including cognitive problems. By exploiting the differences in magnetic susceptibility between oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, fMRI can measure blood flow in various regions of interest within the brain. This can determine the level of brain activity in relation to motor or cognitive functions and provide a metric for tissue damage or illness symptoms. Structural imaging techniques have shown lesions or deficiencies in tissue volumes in schizophrenics corresponding to areas primarily in the frontal and temporal lobes. These areas are currently known to be involved in working memory and attention, which many schizophrenics have trouble with. The ALE (Activation Likelihood Estimation) Meta-Analysis is able to statistically determine the significance of brain area activations based on the post-hoc combination of multiple studies. This process is useful for giving a general model of brain function in relation to a particular task designed to engage the affected areas (such as working memory for the n-back task). The advantages of the ALE Meta-Analysis include elimination of single subject anomalies, elimination of false/extremely weak activations, and verification of function/location hypotheses.

  20. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  1. A HYDROCHEMICAL HYBRID CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICAL PROBLEMS. I. CODE VERIFICATION AND BENCHMARKS FOR A PHOTON-DOMINATED REGION (PDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Kazutaka; Morata, Oscar; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko; Shang, Hsien; Krasnopolsky, Ruben

    2015-07-20

    A two-dimensional hydrochemical hybrid code, KM2, is constructed to deal with astrophysical problems that would require coupled hydrodynamical and chemical evolution. The code assumes axisymmetry in a cylindrical coordinate system and consists of two modules: a hydrodynamics module and a chemistry module. The hydrodynamics module solves hydrodynamics using a Godunov-type finite volume scheme and treats included chemical species as passively advected scalars. The chemistry module implicitly solves nonequilibrium chemistry and change of energy due to thermal processes with transfer of external ultraviolet radiation. Self-shielding effects on photodissociation of CO and H{sub 2} are included. In this introductory paper, the adopted numerical method is presented, along with code verifications using the hydrodynamics module and a benchmark on the chemistry module with reactions specific to a photon-dominated region (PDR). Finally, as an example of the expected capability, the hydrochemical evolution of a PDR is presented based on the PDR benchmark.

  2. Hydrodynamic synchronization of colloidal oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Kotar, Jurij; Leoni, Marco; Bassetti, Bruno; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Cicuta, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Two colloidal spheres are maintained in oscillation by switching the position of an optical trap when a sphere reaches a limit position, leading to oscillations that are bounded in amplitude but free in phase and period. The interaction between the oscillators is only through the hydrodynamic flow induced by their motion. We prove that in the absence of stochastic noise the antiphase dynamical state is stable, and we show how the period depends on coupling strength. Both features are observed experimentally. As the natural frequencies of the oscillators are made progressively different, the coordination is quickly lost. These results help one to understand the origin of hydrodynamic synchronization and how the dynamics can be tuned. Cilia and flagella are biological systems coupled hydrodynamically, exhibiting dramatic collective motions. We propose that weakly correlated phase fluctuations, with one of the oscillators typically precessing the other, are characteristic of hydrodynamically coupled systems in the presence of thermal noise. PMID:20385848

  3. Reciprocal relations in dissipationless hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikovsky, L. A.

    2014-12-15

    Hidden symmetry in dissipationless terms of arbitrary hydrodynamics equations is recognized. We demonstrate that all fluxes are generated by a single function and derive conventional Euler equations using the proposed formalism.

  4. Relativistic hydrodynamics on graphic cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Jochen; Lindenstruth, Volker; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-02-01

    We show how to accelerate relativistic hydrodynamics simulations using graphic cards (graphic processing units, GPUs). These improvements are of highest relevance e.g. to the field of high-energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC where (ideal and dissipative) relativistic hydrodynamics is used to calculate the evolution of hot and dense QCD matter. The results reported here are based on the Sharp And Smooth Transport Algorithm (SHASTA), which is employed in many hydrodynamical models and hybrid simulation packages, e.g. the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (UrQMD). We have redesigned the SHASTA using the OpenCL computing framework to work on accelerators like graphic processing units (GPUs) as well as on multi-core processors. With the redesign of the algorithm the hydrodynamic calculations have been accelerated by a factor 160 allowing for event-by-event calculations and better statistics in hybrid calculations.

  5. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of quasar disk winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, N.

    2015-09-01

    Disk winds are a compelling candidate to provide geometrical unification between Broad Absorption Line QSOs (BALQSOs) and Type1 Quasars. However, the geometry of these winds, and even the driving mech- anism remain largely unknown. Progress has been made through RT simulations and theoretical analysis of simplified wind geometries but there are several outstanding issues including the problem of shielding the low ionization BAL gas from the intense X-ray radiation from the central corona, and also how to produce the strong emission lines which exemplify Type 1 Quasars. A complex, clumpy geometry may provide a solution, and a full hydrodynamic model in which such structure may well spontaneously develop is something we wish to investigate. We have already demonstrated that the previous generation of hydrodynamic models of BALQSOs suffer from the fact that radiation transfer (RT) was necessarily simplified to permit computation, thereby neglecting the effects of multiple scattering and reprocessing of photons within the wind (potentially very important processes). We have therefore embarked upon a project to marry together a RT code with a hydrodynamics code to permit full radiation hydrodynamics simulations to be carried out on QSO disk winds. Here we present details of the project and results to date.

  6. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; wallace, R.; Mangan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-18

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. The target consists of two-layer planar package composed on 85 micron Cu backed by 500 micron CH2, having a single mode sinusoidal perturbation at the interface, with gamma = 200 microns, nuo + 20 microns. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar (10- 15x10{sup 12} dynes/cm2) shock at the interface, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshov instability followed by the Raleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at the intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamic codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. We are designing experiments to test the differences in the growth of 2D vs 3D single mode perturbations; such differences may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented.

  7. A modified Henyey method for computing radiative transfer hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks (1972), which is limited to optically thick regions and employs the diffusion approximation for radiative transfer, is modified to include radiative transfer effects in the optically thin regions of a model star. A modified Henyey method is used to include the solution of the radiative transfer equation in this implicit code, and the convergence properties of this method are proven. A comparison is made between two hydrodynamic models of a classical Cepheid with a 12-day period, one of which was computed with the diffusion approximation and the other with the modified Henyey method. It is found that the two models produce nearly identical light and velocity curves, but differ in the fact that the former never has temperature inversions in the atmosphere while the latter does when sufficiently strong shocks are present.

  8. The Neural Bases of Difficult Speech Comprehension and Speech Production: Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adank, Patti

    2012-01-01

    The role of speech production mechanisms in difficult speech comprehension is the subject of on-going debate in speech science. Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) analyses were conducted on neuroimaging studies investigating difficult speech comprehension or speech production. Meta-analysis 1 included 10 studies contrasting comprehension…

  9. ALES, the multi­mission Adaptive Leading Edge Sub­Waveform Retracker, design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Marcello; Benveniste, Jérôme; Vignudelli, Stefano; Cipollini, Paolo; Quartly, Graham; Snaith, Helen

    Satellite altimetry has revolutionized our understanding of ocean dynamics thanks to high repetition rate and global coverage. Nevertheless, coastal data has been flagged as unreliable due to land and calm water interference in the altimeter and radiometer footprint and high frequency tidal and atmospheric forcing. Our study addresses the first issue, i.e. retracking, presenting ALES, the Adaptive Leading Edge Subwaveform Retracker. ALES is potentially applicable to all the pulse­limited altimetry altimetry missions and its aim is to retrack with the same precision both open ocean and coastal data with the same algorithm. ALES selects part of each returned echo and models it with a classic ‘open ocean’ Brown functional form, by means of least square estimation whose convergence is found through the Nelder­Mead nonlinear optimization technique. By avoiding echoes from bright targets along the trailing edge, it is capable of retrieving the majority of coastal waveform up to 2 to 3 Km from the coasts. By adapting the estimation window to the significant wave height, it aims at preserving the precision of the standard data both in open ocean and in the coastal strip. ALES is validated against tide gauges in the Adriatic Sea and in the Greater Agulhas System for three different missions: Envisat, Jason­1 and Jason­2. Considerations on noise and biases provide a further verification of the strategy.

  10. Hydrodynamic escape from planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng

    Hydrodynamic escape is an important process in the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Due to the existence of a singularity point near the transonic point, it is difficult to find transonic steady state solutions by solving the time-independent hydrodynamic equations. In addition to that, most previous works assume that all energy driving the escape flow is deposited in one narrow layer. This assumption not only results in less accurate solutions to the hydrodynamic escape problem, but also makes it difficult to include other chemical and physical processes in the hydrodynamic escape models. In this work, a numerical model describing the transonic hydrodynamic escape from planetary atmospheres is developed. A robust solution technique is used to solve the time dependent hydrodynamic equations. The method has been validated in an isothermal atmosphere where an analytical solution is available. The hydrodynamic model is applied to 3 cases: hydrogen escape from small orbit extrasolar planets, hydrogen escape from a hydrogen rich early Earth's atmosphere, and nitrogen/methane escape from Pluto's atmosphere. Results of simulations on extrasolar planets are in good agreement with the observations of the transiting extrasolar planet HD209458b. Hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen from other hypothetical close-in extrasolar planets are simulated and the influence of hydrogen escape on the long-term evolution of these extrasolar planets are discussed. Simulations on early Earth suggest that hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen from a hydrogen rich early Earth's atmosphere is about two orders magnitude slower than the diffusion limited escape rate. A hydrogen rich early Earth's atmosphere could have been maintained by the balance between the hydrogen escape and the supply of hydrogen into the atmosphere by volcanic outgassing. Origin of life may have occurred in the organic soup ocean created by the efficient formation of prebiotic molecules in the hydrogen rich early

  11. An analysis of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.W.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Mello, F.J.; Hicks, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine its applicability in the field of solid dynamics. An important result of the work is a rigorous von Neumann stability analysis which provides a simple criterion for the stability or instability of the method in terms of the stress state and the second derivative of the kernel function. Instability, which typically occurs only for solids in tension, results not from the numerical time integration algorithm, but because the SPH algorithm creates an effective stress with a negative modulus. The analysis provides insight into possible methods for removing the instability. Also, SPH has been coupled into the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO, and a weighted residual derivation of the SPH equations has been obtained.

  12. The neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function-an ALE meta-analysis of human functional brain imaging data.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jessica; Kopietz, Rainer; Frasnelli, Johannes; Wiesmann, Martin; Hummel, Thomas; Lundström, Johan N

    2010-03-01

    Almost every odor we encounter in daily life has the capacity to produce a trigeminal sensation. Surprisingly, few functional imaging studies exploring human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function exist, and results are to some degree inconsistent. We utilized activation likelihood estimation (ALE), a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis tool, to analyze functional imaging data (fMRI/PET) following intranasal trigeminal stimulation with carbon dioxide (CO(2)), a stimulus known to exclusively activate the trigeminal system. Meta-analysis tools are able to identify activations common across studies, thereby enabling activation mapping with higher certainty. Activation foci of nine studies utilizing trigeminal stimulation were included in the meta-analysis. We found significant ALE scores, thus indicating consistent activation across studies, in the brainstem, ventrolateral posterior thalamic nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, precentral gyrus, as well as in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices-a network known for the processing of intranasal nociceptive stimuli. Significant ALE values were also observed in the piriform cortex, insula, and the orbitofrontal cortex, areas known to process chemosensory stimuli, and in association cortices. Additionally, the trigeminal ALE statistics were directly compared with ALE statistics originating from olfactory stimulation, demonstrating considerable overlap in activation. In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis map the human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal stimulation with high statistical certainty and demonstrate that the cortical areas recruited during the processing of intranasal CO(2) stimuli include those outside traditional trigeminal areas. Moreover, through illustrations of the considerable overlap between brain areas that process trigeminal and olfactory information; these results demonstrate the interconnectivity of flavor processing.

  13. Non-Local Damage Modelling of Sheet Metal Forming Processes with ALE Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adetoro, O. B.; Cardoso, Rui P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The modelling of material degradation due to nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids is vital in sheet metal forming process due to the large deformation typically experienced by the part. Nonlocal damage modelling or nonlocal continuum is gaining a lot of interest because it is an effective approach to modelling the strain-softening, whilst avoiding the spurious localization that gives rise to strong mesh sensitivity in numerical computations. However to accurately resolve the evolving narrow bands of highly localised strain, it is necessary to use sufficient computational grids. In this paper an ALE formulation is used for modelling the localization pattern. An approach for relocating the node points is presented and explored.

  14. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  16. ALE meta‐analysis reveals dissociable networks for affective and discriminative aspects of touch

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Emotionally‐laden tactile stimulation—such as a caress on the skin or the feel of velvet—may represent a functionally distinct domain of touch, underpinned by specific cortical pathways. In order to determine whether, and to what extent, cortical functional neuroanatomy supports a distinction between affective and discriminative touch, an activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta‐analysis was performed. This meta‐analysis statistically mapped reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations from 17 published affective touch studies in which tactile stimulation was associated with positive subjective evaluation (n = 291, 34 experimental contrasts). A separate ALE meta‐analysis mapped regions most likely to be activated by tactile stimulation during detection and discrimination tasks (n = 1,075, 91 experimental contrasts). These meta‐analyses revealed dissociable regions for affective and discriminative touch, with posterior insula (PI) more likely to be activated for affective touch, and primary somatosensory cortices (SI) more likely to be activated for discriminative touch. Secondary somatosensory cortex had a high likelihood of engagement by both affective and discriminative touch. Further, meta‐analytic connectivity (MCAM) analyses investigated network‐level co‐activation likelihoods independent of task or stimulus, across a range of domains and paradigms. Affective‐related PI and discriminative‐related SI regions co‐activated with different networks, implicated in dissociable functions, but sharing somatosensory co‐activations. Taken together, these meta‐analytic findings suggest that affective and discriminative touch are dissociable both on the regional and network levels. However, their degree of shared activation likelihood in somatosensory cortices indicates that this dissociation reflects functional biases within tactile processing networks, rather than functionally and anatomically distinct

  17. Black brane entropy and hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Heller, Michal P.; Spalinski, Michal

    2011-03-15

    Recent advances in holography have led to the formulation of fluid-gravity duality, a remarkable connection between the hydrodynamics of certain strongly coupled media and dynamics of higher dimensional black holes. This paper introduces a correspondence between phenomenologically defined entropy currents in relativistic hydrodynamics and 'generalized horizons' of near-equilibrium black objects in a dual gravitational description. A general formula is given, expressing the divergence of the entropy current in terms of geometric objects which appear naturally in the gravity dual geometry. The proposed definition is explicitly covariant with respect to boundary diffeomorphisms and reproduces known results when evaluated for the event horizon.

  18. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  19. Fluctuating Hydrodynamics Confronts the Rapidity Dependence of Transverse Momentum Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, Rajendra; Gavin, Sean; Moschelli, George

    2012-10-01

    Interest in the development of the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics is growing [1]. Early efforts suggested that viscous diffusion broadens the rapidity dependence of transverse momentum correlations [2]. That work stimulated an experimental analysis by STAR [3]. We attack this new data along two fronts. First, we compute STAR's fluctuation observable using the NeXSPheRIO code, which combines fluctuating initial conditions from a string fragmentation model with deterministic viscosity-free hydrodynamic evolution. We find that NeXSPheRIO produces a longitudinal narrowing, in contrast to the data. Second, we study the hydrodynamic evolution using second order causal viscous hydrodynamics including Langevin noise. We obtain a deterministic evolution equation for the transverse momentum density correlation function. We use the latest theoretical equations of state and transport coefficients to compute STAR's observable. The results are in excellent accord with the measured broadening. In addition, we predict features of the distribution that can distinguish 2nd and 1st order diffusion. [4pt] [1] J. Kapusta, B. Mueller, M. Stephanov, arXiv:1112.6405 [nucl-th].[0pt] [2] S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 162302 (2006)[0pt] [3] H. Agakishiev et al., STAR, STAR, Phys. Lett. B704

  20. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  1. Topics in fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, S.T.

    1986-01-01

    Models of fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamics have enjoyed much success in explaining the effect of long-wavelength fluctuations in diverse hydrodynamic systems. This thesis explores two such problems; in both, the body of hydrodynamic assumptions powerfully constrains the predictions of a well-posed theory. The effects of layer fluctuations in smectic-A liquid crystals are first examined. The static theory (introduced by Grinstein and Pelcovits) is reviewed. Ward identities, resulting from the arbitrariness of the layering direction, are derived and exploited. The static results motivate an examination of dynamic fluctuation effects. A new sound-damping experiment is proposed that would probe singular dependence of viscosities on applied stress. A theory of Procaccia and Gitterman that reaction rates of chemically reacting binary mixtures are drastically reduced near their thermodynamic critical points is analyzed. Hydrodynamic arguments and Van Hove theory are applied, concluding that the PG idea is drastically slowed, and spatially varying composition fluctuations are at best slowed down over a narrow range of wavenumbers.

  2. Multi-dimensional computer simulation of MHD combustor hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.F.; Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Rimkus, W.A.

    1991-04-04

    Argonne National Laboratory is investigating the nonreacting jet-gas mixing patterns in an MHD second stage combustor by using a two-dimensional multi-phase hydrodynamics computer program and a three-dimensional single-phase hydrodynamics computer program. The computer simulations are intended to enhance the understanding of flow and mixing patterns in the combustor, which in turn may lead to improvement of the downstream MHD channel performance. A two-dimensional steady state computer model, based on mass and momentum conservation laws for multiple gas species, is used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the combustor in which a jet of oxidizer is injected into an unconfined cross-stream gas flow. A three-dimensional code is used to examine the effects of the side walls and the distributed jet flows on the non-reacting jet-gas mixing patterns. The code solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, and a transport equation of a turbulence parameter and allows permeable surfaces to be specified for any computational cell. 17 refs., 25 figs.

  3. Calibrating an updated smoothed particle hydrodynamics scheme within gcd+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, D.; Okamoto, T.; Gibson, B. K.; Barnes, D. J.; Cen, R.

    2013-01-01

    We adapt a modern scheme of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to our tree N-body/SPH galactic chemodynamics code gcd+. The applied scheme includes implementations of the artificial viscosity switch and artificial thermal conductivity proposed by Morris & Monaghan, Rosswog & Price and Price to model discontinuities and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities more accurately. We first present hydrodynamics test simulations and contrast the results to runs undertaken without artificial viscosity switch or thermal conduction. In addition, we also explore the different levels of smoothing by adopting larger or smaller smoothing lengths, i.e. a larger or smaller number of neighbour particles, Nnb. We demonstrate that the new version of gcd+ is capable of modelling Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities to a similar level as the mesh code, athena. From the Gresho vortex, point-like explosion and self-similar collapse tests, we conclude that setting the smoothing length to keep Nnb as high as ˜58 is preferable to adopting smaller smoothing lengths. We present our optimized parameter sets from the hydrodynamics tests.

  4. Design and analysis of ALE schemes with provable second-order time-accuracy for inviscid and viscous flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geuzaine, Philippe; Grandmont, Céline; Farhat, Charbel

    2003-10-01

    We consider the solution of inviscid as well as viscous unsteady flow problems with moving boundaries by the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. We present two computational approaches for achieving formal second-order time-accuracy on moving grids. The first approach is based on flux time-averaging, and the second one on mesh configuration time-averaging. In both cases, we prove that formally second-order time-accurate ALE schemes can be designed. We illustrate our theoretical findings and highlight their impact on practice with the solution of inviscid as well as viscous, unsteady, nonlinear flow problems associated with the AGARD Wing 445.6 and a complete F-16 configuration.

  5. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, Fabrizio; Hamkins, Jon; Dolinar, Sam; Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews uplink coding. The purpose and goals of the briefing are (1) Show a plan for using uplink coding and describe benefits (2) Define possible solutions and their applicability to different types of uplink, including emergency uplink (3) Concur with our conclusions so we can embark on a plan to use proposed uplink system (4) Identify the need for the development of appropriate technology and infusion in the DSN (5) Gain advocacy to implement uplink coding in flight projects Action Item EMB04-1-14 -- Show a plan for using uplink coding, including showing where it is useful or not (include discussion of emergency uplink coding).

  6. ALE3D Simulation and Measurement of Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment for LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; deHaven, M R

    2006-05-23

    Fast cookoff is of interest in the areas of fire hazard reduction and the development of directed energy systems for defense. During a fast cookoff (thermal explosion), high heat fluxes cause rapid temperature increases and ignition in thin boundary layers. We are developing ALE3D models to describe the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior during the heating, ignition, and explosive phases. The candidate models and numerical strategies are being evaluated using benchmark cookoff experiments. Fast cookoff measurements were made in a Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) for LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 4130 steel tube with reinforced end caps. Gaps were present at the side and top of the explosive charge to allow for thermal expansion. The explosive was heated until explosion using radiant heaters. Temperatures were measured using thermocouples positioned on the tube wall and in the explosive. During the explosion, the tube expansion and fragment velocities were measured with strain gauges, Photonic-Doppler-Velocimeters (PDVs), and micropower radar units. A fragment size distribution was constructed from fragments captured in Lexan panels. ALE3D models for chemical, thermal, and mechanical behavior were developed for the heating and explosive processes. A multi-step chemical kinetics model is employed for the HMX while a one-step model is used for the Viton. A pressure-dependent deflagration model is employed during the expansion. A Steinberg-Guinan model represents the mechanical behavior of the solid constituents while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the equation of state of the solid and gas species, respectively. Parameters for the kinetics model were specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate were employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. The simulations include radiative and conductive transport across the dynamic gaps between the

  7. Erta Ale Lava Lake: Identification and Modelling of Variable Convective Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, R.; Harris, A. J.; Jones, J.

    2002-12-01

    After more than twenty years without access to Erta Ale volcano, field campaigns are once again feasible. Between February 15 and February 20, 2002, a combined thermal and seismic data set was recorded at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to study activity of the persistent lava lake. Analysis of continuous tremor and thermal fluctuations suggests that lava lake activity, as recorded by temperature variations, is related to seismic energy and spectral content. When we compare these parameters at timescales of minutes to hours, we find that correlations range from good to poor. However, these two parameters do not significantly correlate on timescales of a full day. Both thermal and seismic data indicate that the lava lake exhibits cyclical behavior between 20 to 80 minute periods characterized by low (~0.05 ms-1) and high (~0.2 ms-1) rates of convection, respectively. We use our measurements to constrain two models to explain these convection cycles. The first model relates variable convection rates to pulses in the rate at which magma is supplied to the lake. This model requires supply rates to cycle between high convection rate phases fed by a magma volume flux of 0.2 m3s-1 and low convection rate phases fed by a magma volume flux of 0.03 m3s-1. The second model assumes that supply to the lake is steady and that cyclic convection is set up by the generation of convective instabilities within the lake. In this case, cooling of the surface layer generates a slow moving, viscous convection cell at the lake surface overlying a faster moving convection cell of lower viscosity. Recharge of the lower cell increases the buoyancy of the lower layer, and eventually triggers an overturn event. At this point the surface of the low viscosity cell extends to the lake surface and the high viscosity cell sinks to be drained from the lake. We find that the second model, whereby cyclic convection is generated by processes acting within the lake, is more plausible.

  8. Physics and numerics of the tensor code (incomplete preliminary documentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.; Lettis, L.A. Jr.; Bryan, J.B.; Frary, N.R.

    1982-07-15

    The present TENSOR code is a descendant of a code originally conceived by Maenchen and Sack and later adapted by Cherry. Originally, the code was a two-dimensional Lagrangian explicit finite difference code which solved the equations of continuum mechanics. Since then, implicit and arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) algorithms have been added. The code has been used principally to solve problems involving the propagation of stress waves through earth materials, and considerable development of rock and soil constitutive relations has been done. The code has been applied extensively to the containment of underground nuclear tests, nuclear and high explosive surface and subsurface cratering, and energy and resource recovery. TENSOR is supported by a substantial array of ancillary routines. The initial conditions are set up by a generator code TENGEN. ZON is a multipurpose code which can be used for zoning, rezoning, overlaying, and linking from other codes. Linking from some codes is facilitated by another code RADTEN. TENPLT is a fixed time graphics code which provides a wide variety of plotting options and output devices, and which is capable of producing computer movies by postprocessing problem dumps. Time history graphics are provided by the TIMPLT code from temporal dumps produced during production runs. While TENSOR can be run as a stand-alone controllee, a special controller code TCON is available to better interface the code with the LLNL computer system during production jobs. In order to standardize compilation procedures and provide quality control, a special compiler code BC is used. A number of equation of state generators are available among them ROC and PMUGEN.

  9. Hydrodynamic effects in the atmosphere of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. G., Jr.; Bunker, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical models of variable stars are established, using a nonlinear radiative transfer coupled hydrodynamics code. The variable Eddington method of radiative transfer is used. Comparisons are for models of W Virginis, beta Doradus, and eta Aquilae. From these models it appears that shocks are formed in the atmospheres of classical Cepheids as well as W Virginis stars. In classical Cepheids, with periods from 7 to 10 days, the bumps occurring in the light and velocity curves appear as the result of a compression wave that reflects from the star's center. At the head of the outward going compression wave, shocks form in the atmosphere. Comparisons between the hydrodynamic motions in W Virginis and classical Cepheids are made. The strong shocks in W Virginis do not penetrate into the interior as do the compression waves formed in classical Cepheids. The shocks formed in W Virginis stars cause emission lines, while in classical Cepheids the shocks are weaker.

  10. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Close and Contact Binary Systems using Bipolytropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan

    2016-01-01

    I will present the results of hydrodynamic simulations of close and contact bipolytropic binary systems. This project is motivated by the peculiar case of the red nova, V1309 Sco, which is indeed a merger of a contact binary. Both the stars are believed to have evolved off the main sequence by the time of the merger and possess a small helium core. In order to represent the binary accurately, I need a core-envelope structure for both the stars. I have achieved this using bipolytropes or composite polytropes. For the simulations, I use an explicit 3D Eulerian hydrodynamics code in cylindrical coordinates. I will discuss the evolution and merger scenarios of systems with different mass ratios and core mass fractions as well as the effects due to the treatment of the adiabatic exponent.

  11. Development and Implementation of Radiation-Hydrodynamics Verification Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Marcath, Matthew J.; Wang, Matthew Y.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-08-22

    Analytic solutions to the radiation-hydrodynamic equations are useful for verifying any large-scale numerical simulation software that solves the same set of equations. The one-dimensional, spherically symmetric Coggeshall No.9 and No.11 analytic solutions, cell-averaged over a uniform-grid have been developed to analyze the corresponding solutions from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Eulerian Applications Project radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE. These Coggeshall solutions have been shown to be independent of heat conduction, providing a unique opportunity for comparison with xRAGE solutions with and without the heat conduction module. Solution convergence was analyzed based on radial step size. Since no shocks are involved in either problem and the solutions are smooth, second-order convergence was expected for both cases. The global L1 errors were used to estimate the convergence rates with and without the heat conduction module implemented.

  12. Anomalous hydrodynamics of fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegmann, P.

    2013-09-15

    We propose a comprehensive framework for quantum hydrodynamics of the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states. We suggest that the electronic fluid in the FQH regime can be phenomenologically described by the quantized hydrodynamics of vortices in an incompressible rotating liquid. We demonstrate that such hydrodynamics captures all major features of FQH states, including the subtle effect of the Lorentz shear stress. We present a consistent quantization of the hydrodynamics of an incompressible fluid, providing a powerful framework to study the FQH effect and superfluids. We obtain the quantum hydrodynamics of the vortex flow by quantizing the Kirchhoff equations for vortex dynamics.

  13. The neural basis of audiomotor entrainment: an ALE meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, Léa A. S.; Gitau, Kevin M.; Brown, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization of body movement to an acoustic rhythm is a major form of entrainment, such as occurs in dance. This is exemplified in experimental studies of finger tapping. Entrainment to a beat is contrasted with movement that is internally driven and is therefore self-paced. In order to examine brain areas important for entrainment to an acoustic beat, we meta-analyzed the functional neuroimaging literature on finger tapping (43 studies) using activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis with a focus on the contrast between externally-paced and self-paced tapping. The results demonstrated a dissociation between two subcortical systems involved in timing, namely the cerebellum and the basal ganglia. Externally-paced tapping highlighted the importance of the spinocerebellum, most especially the vermis, which was not activated at all by self-paced tapping. In contrast, the basal ganglia, including the putamen and globus pallidus, were active during both types of tapping, but preferentially during self-paced tapping. These results suggest a central role for the spinocerebellum in audiomotor entrainment. We conclude with a theoretical discussion about the various forms of entrainment in humans and other animals. PMID:25324765

  14. Drawing and writing: An ALE meta-analysis of sensorimotor activations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Brown, Steven

    2015-08-01

    Drawing and writing are the two major means of creating what are referred to as "images", namely visual patterns on flat surfaces. They share many sensorimotor processes related to visual guidance of hand movement, resulting in the formation of visual shapes associated with pictures and words. However, while the human capacity to draw is tens of thousands of years old, the capacity for writing is only a few thousand years old, and widespread literacy is quite recent. In order to compare the neural activations for drawing and writing, we conducted two activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses for these two bodies of neuroimaging literature. The results showed strong overlap in the activation profiles, especially in motor areas (motor cortex, frontal eye fields, supplementary motor area, cerebellum, putamen) and several parts of the posterior parietal cortex. A distinction was found in the left posterior parietal cortex, with drawing showing a preference for a ventral region and writing a dorsal region. These results demonstrate that drawing and writing employ the same basic sensorimotor networks but that some differences exist in parietal areas involved in spatial processing.

  15. Natural hazards in the karst areas of the Viñales National Park, Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govea Blanco, Darlenys; Farfan Gonzalez, Hermes; Dias Guanche, Carlos; Parise, Mario; Ramirez, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Cuban karst is subject to several natural hazards, the great majority of which is hydro-meteorological in character: intense rainstorms, tropical cyclones, seawater inundation, etc. A further, serious problem is represented by droughts, that have become very severe during the recent years, due to longer persistence of the dry season. Beside these hazards, seismic shocks in the eastern part of the country, and mass movements in the mountain areas have also to be mentioned. In general, it has to be noted that both casualties and economic losses from natural disasters have slowly decreased during the last decades at Cuba. Viñales National Park, as many other natural landforms in the Cuban karst, has a great potential for development and exploitation in several different fields, from agriculture, to tourism and recreational activities. At these aims, it is necessary to preserve the natural landscape, its beauty and resources, and, at the same time, improve the quality of people living in these environments. In particular, to face the social changes at present occurring in the area is one of the most difficult task for those people that are in charge of land management and development. It has also to be remembered that "Valle de Viñales" has been included by UNESCO in the World Cultural Heritage List. The main scenarios of natural hazards in the Viñales National Park are described in this contribution, and analyzed by means of different methodologies. Flooded areas have been mapped in the field soon after the occurrence of an extreme event as the hurricane Ike, characterized by rainfall higher than 300 mm/day, and preceded only ten days before by hurricane Gustav, that discharged in the area an amount of 120 mm/day of rain. As a consequence of the temporal vicinity of the two events, the terranes were already highly saturated at the time of occurrence of hurricane Ike, which thus resulted to be one of the most extreme floods ever recorded in the area. Electrostatic

  16. Prospects for utilization of air liquefaction and enrichment system (ALES) propulsion in fully reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, W. H.; Yi, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    A concept is shown for a fully reusable, earth to orbit launch vehicle with horizontal takeoff and landing, employing an air-turborocket for low speed and a rocket for high speed acceleration, both using LH2 fuel. The turborocket employs a modified liquid air cycle to supply the oxidizer. The rocket uses 90 percent pure LOX that is collected from the atmosphere, separated, and stored during operation of the turborocket from about Mach 2 to Mach 5 or 6. The takeoff weight and the thrust required at takeoff are markedly reduced by collecting the rocket oxidizer in-flight. The paper shows an approach and the corresponding technology needs for using ALES propulsion in a SSTO vehicle. Reducing the trajectory altitude at the end of collection reduces the wing area and increases payload. The use of state-of-the-art materials, such as graphite polyimide, is critical to meet the structure weight objective for SSTO. Configurations that utilize 'waverider' aerodynamics show great promise to reduce the vehicle weight.

  17. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B. A.

    1997-04-15

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200 {mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20 {mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50% faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations.

  18. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A. Rubenchik, A. Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-01

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200{mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20{mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50{percent} faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  20. Models of Jupiter's growth incorporating thermal and hydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Hubickyj, Olenka; D'Angelo, Gennaro; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2009-02-01

    We model the growth of Jupiter via core nucleated accretion, applying constraints from hydrodynamical processes that result from the disk-planet interaction. We compute the planet's internal structure using a well tested planetary formation code that is based upon a Henyey-type stellar evolution code. The planet's interactions with the protoplanetary disk are calculated using 3-D hydrodynamic simulations. Previous models of Jupiter's growth have taken the radius of the planet to be approximately one Hill sphere radius, R. However, 3-D hydrodynamic simulations show that only gas within ˜0.25R remains bound to the planet, with the more distant gas eventually participating in the shear flow of the protoplanetary disk. Therefore in our new simulations, the planet's outer boundary is placed at the location where gas has the thermal energy to reach the portion of the flow not bound to the planet. We find that the smaller radius increases the time required for planetary growth by ˜5%. Thermal pressure limits the rate at which a planet less than a few dozen times as massive as Earth can accumulate gas from the protoplanetary disk, whereas hydrodynamics regulates the growth rate for more massive planets. Within a moderately viscous disk, the accretion rate peaks when the planet's mass is about equal to the mass of Saturn. In a less viscous disk hydrodynamical limits to accretion are smaller, and the accretion rate peaks at lower mass. Observations suggest that the typical lifetime of massive disks around young stellar objects is ˜3 Myr. To account for the dissipation of such disks, we perform some of our simulations of Jupiter's growth within a disk whose surface gas density decreases on this timescale. In all of the cases that we simulate, the planet's effective radiating temperature rises to well above 1000 K soon after hydrodynamic limits begin to control the rate of gas accretion and the planet's distended envelope begins to contract. According to our simulations

  1. Sharing code.

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Sharing code is becoming increasingly important in the wake of Open Science. In this review I describe and compare two popular code-sharing utilities, GitHub and Open Science Framework (OSF). GitHub is a mature, industry-standard tool but lacks focus towards researchers. In comparison, OSF offers a one-stop solution for researchers but a lot of functionality is still under development. I conclude by listing alternative lesser-known tools for code and materials sharing.

  2. Particle hydrodynamics with tessellation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Steffen; Springel, Volker

    2010-08-01

    Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a well-established approach to model fluids in astrophysical problems, thanks to its geometric flexibility and ability to automatically adjust the spatial resolution to the clumping of matter. However, a number of recent studies have emphasized inaccuracies of SPH in the treatment of fluid instabilities. The origin of these numerical problems can be traced back to spurious surface effects across contact discontinuities, and to SPH's inherent prevention of mixing at the particle level. We here investigate a new fluid particle model where the density estimate is carried out with the help of an auxiliary mesh constructed as the Voronoi tessellation of the simulation particles instead of an adaptive smoothing kernel. This Voronoi-based approach improves the ability of the scheme to represent sharp contact discontinuities. We show that this eliminates spurious surface tension effects present in SPH and that play a role in suppressing certain fluid instabilities. We find that the new `Voronoi Particle Hydrodynamics' (VPH) described here produces comparable results to SPH in shocks, and better ones in turbulent regimes of pure hydrodynamical simulations. We also discuss formulations of the artificial viscosity needed in this scheme and how judiciously chosen correction forces can be derived in order to maintain a high degree of particle order and hence a regular Voronoi mesh. This is especially helpful in simulating self-gravitating fluids with existing gravity solvers used for N-body simulations.

  3. The Gulf of Lions' hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Claude

    1990-09-01

    From an hydrodynamical point of view, the Gulf of Lions can be considered as a very complex region, because several intense and highly variable phenomena compete simultaneously. These processes include the powerful general circulation along the continental slope, the formation of dense water both on the shelf and offshore, a seasonal variation of stratification and the extreme energies associated with meteorological conditions. The cloudless atmospheric conditions encountered generally in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea have enabled us to make use of, over more than 10 years, large use of various satellite imageries. The large space and time variability of the hydrodynamical features, a complex topography and a noticeable fishing activity, represent certain difficulties to the collection of observations in situ. We have obtained, therefore, only a few current time series on the slope; those obtained on the shelf only cover the summer period. Models have been elaborated to help us understand the reasons for the general circulation. Observational programmes to be carried out in the forthcoming years will probably provide us with more definitive results on the Gulf of Lions' hydrodynamics.

  4. A Microfluidic-based Hydrodynamic Trap for Single Particles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to confine and manipulate single particles in free solution is a key enabling technology for fundamental and applied science. Methods for particle trapping based on optical, magnetic, electrokinetic, and acoustic techniques have led to major advancements in physics and biology ranging from the molecular to cellular level. In this article, we introduce a new microfluidic-based technique for particle trapping and manipulation based solely on hydrodynamic fluid flow. Using this method, we demonstrate trapping of micro- and nano-scale particles in aqueous solutions for long time scales. The hydrodynamic trap consists of an integrated microfluidic device with a cross-slot channel geometry where two opposing laminar streams converge, thereby generating a planar extensional flow with a fluid stagnation point (zero-velocity point). In this device, particles are confined at the trap center by active control of the flow field to maintain particle position at the fluid stagnation point. In this manner, particles are effectively trapped in free solution using a feedback control algorithm implemented with a custom-built LabVIEW code. The control algorithm consists of image acquisition for a particle in the microfluidic device, followed by particle tracking, determination of particle centroid position, and active adjustment of fluid flow by regulating the pressure applied to an on-chip pneumatic valve using a pressure regulator. In this way, the on-chip dynamic metering valve functions to regulate the relative flow rates in the outlet channels, thereby enabling fine-scale control of stagnation point position and particle trapping. The microfluidic-based hydrodynamic trap exhibits several advantages as a method for particle trapping. Hydrodynamic trapping is possible for any arbitrary particle without specific requirements on the physical or chemical properties of the trapped object. In addition, hydrodynamic trapping enables confinement of a "single" target object in

  5. DualSPHysics: Open-source parallel CFD solver based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, A. J. C.; Domínguez, J. M.; Rogers, B. D.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Longshaw, S.; Canelas, R.; Vacondio, R.; Barreiro, A.; García-Feal, O.

    2015-02-01

    DualSPHysics is a hardware accelerated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code developed to solve free-surface flow problems. DualSPHysics is an open-source code developed and released under the terms of GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Along with the source code, a complete documentation that makes easy the compilation and execution of the source files is also distributed. The code has been shown to be efficient and reliable. The parallel power computing of Graphics Computing Units (GPUs) is used to accelerate DualSPHysics by up to two orders of magnitude compared to the performance of the serial version.

  6. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Paul R; Dimonte, Guy; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L; Dimonte, Guy; Dai, W; Kares, R. J.

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  7. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2004-01-28

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  8. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2002-10-19

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  9. Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Problems with Linear Velocity Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hendon, Raymond C.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-08-22

    As an extension of the works of Coggeshall and Ramsey, a class of analytic solutions to the radiation hydrodynamics equations is derived for code verification purposes. These solutions are valid under assumptions including diffusive radiation transport, a polytropic gas equation of state, constant conductivity, separable flow velocity proportional to the curvilinear radial coordinate, and divergence-free heat flux. In accordance with these assumptions, the derived solution class is mathematically invariant with respect to the presence of radiative heat conduction, and thus represents a solution to the compressible flow (Euler) equations with or without conduction terms included. With this solution class, a quantitative code verification study (using spatial convergence rates) is performed for the cell-centered, finite volume, Eulerian compressible flow code xRAGE developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Simulation results show near second order spatial convergence in all physical variables when using the hydrodynamics solver only, consistent with that solver's underlying order of accuracy. However, contrary to the mathematical properties of the solution class, when heat conduction algorithms are enabled the calculation does not converge to the analytic solution.

  10. Cosmological Hydrodynamics on a Moving Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernquist, Lars

    We propose to construct a model for the visible Universe using cosmological simulations of structure formation. Our simulations will include both dark matter and baryons, and will employ two entirely different schemes for evolving the gas: smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and a moving mesh approach as incorporated in the new code, AREPO. By performing simulations that are otherwise nearly identical, except for the hydrodynamics solver, we will isolate and understand differences in the properties of galaxies, galaxy groups and clusters, and the intergalactic medium caused by the computational approach that have plagued efforts to understand galaxy formation for nearly two decades. By performing simulations at different levels of resolution and with increasingly complex treatments of the gas physics, we will identify the results that are converged numerically and that are robust with respect to variations in unresolved physical processes, especially those related to star formation, black hole growth, and related feedback effects. In this manner, we aim to undertake a research program that will redefine the state of the art in cosmological hydrodynamics and galaxy formation. In particular, we will focus our scientific efforts on understanding: 1) the formation of galactic disks in a cosmological context; 2) the physical state of diffuse gas in galaxy clusters and groups so that they can be used as high-precision probes of cosmology; 3) the nature of gas inflows into galaxy halos and the subsequent accretion of gas by forming disks; 4) the co-evolution of galaxies and galaxy clusters with their central supermassive black holes and the implications of related feedback for galaxy evolution and the dichotomy between blue and red galaxies; 5) the physical state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the evolution of the metallicity of the IGM; and 6) the reaction of dark matter around galaxies to galaxy formation. Our proposed work will be of immediate significance for

  11. Code Verification Results of an LLNL ASC Code on Some Tri-Lab Verification Test Suite Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S R; Bihari, B L; Salari, K; Woodward, C S

    2006-12-29

    As scientific codes become more complex and involve larger numbers of developers and algorithms, chances for algorithmic implementation mistakes increase. In this environment, code verification becomes essential to building confidence in the code implementation. This paper will present first results of a new code verification effort within LLNL's B Division. In particular, we will show results of code verification of the LLNL ASC ARES code on the test problems: Su Olson non-equilibrium radiation diffusion, Sod shock tube, Sedov point blast modeled with shock hydrodynamics, and Noh implosion.

  12. Moving mesh cosmology: the hydrodynamics of galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora; Vogelsberger, Mark; Kereš, Dušan; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2012-08-01

    We present a detailed comparison between the well-known smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GADGET and the new moving-mesh code AREPO on a number of hydrodynamical test problems. Through a variety of numerical experiments with increasing complexity we establish a clear link between simple test problems with known analytic solutions and systematic numerical effects seen in cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. Our tests demonstrate deficiencies of the SPH method in several sectors. These accuracy problems not only manifest themselves in idealized hydrodynamical tests, but also propagate to more realistic simulation set-ups of galaxy formation, ultimately affecting local and global gas properties in the full cosmological framework, as highlighted in companion papers by Vogelsberger et al. and Keres et al. We find that an inadequate treatment of fluid instabilities in GADGET suppresses entropy generation by mixing, underestimates vorticity generation in curved shocks and prevents efficient gas stripping from infalling substructures. Moreover, in idealized tests of inside-out disc formation, the convergence rate of gas disc sizes is much slower in GADGET due to spurious angular momentum transport. In simulations where we follow the interaction between a forming central disc and orbiting substructures in a massive halo, the final disc morphology is strikingly different in the two codes. In AREPO, gas from infalling substructures is readily depleted and incorporated into the host halo atmosphere, facilitating the formation of an extended central disc. Conversely, gaseous sub-clumps are more coherent in GADGET simulations, morphologically transforming the central disc as they impact it. The numerical artefacts of the SPH solver are particularly severe for poorly resolved flows, and thus inevitably affect cosmological simulations due to their inherently hierarchical nature. Taken together, our numerical experiments clearly demonstrate that AREPO delivers a

  13. Multi-Dimensional Full Boltzmann-Neutrino-Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations and Their Detailed Comparisons with Monte-Carlo Methods in Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakura, H.; Richers, S.; Ott, C. D.; Iwakami, W.; Furusawa, S.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Yamada, S.; Matsufuru, H.; Imakura, A.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a 7-dimensional Full Boltzmann-neutrino-radiation-hydrodynamical code and carried out ab-initio axisymmetric CCSNe simulations. I will talk about main results of our simulations and also discuss current ongoing projects.

  14. Mathematical models for the EPIC code

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, H.L.

    1981-06-03

    EPIC is a fluid/envelope type computer code designed to study the energetics and dynamics of a high energy, high current electron beam passing through a gas. The code is essentially two dimensional (x, r, t) and assumes an axisymmetric beam whose r.m.s. radius is governed by an envelope model. Electromagnetic fields, background gas chemistry, and gas hydrodynamics (density channel evolution) are all calculated self-consistently as functions of r, x, and t. The code is a collection of five major subroutines, each of which is described in some detail in this report.

  15. Modeling hydrodynamics, water quality, and benthic processes to predict ecological effects in Narragansett Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) was used to study the three dimensional (3D) circulation, water quality, and ecology in Narragansett Bay, RI. Predictions of the Bay hydrodynamics included the behavior of the water surface elevation, currents, salinity, and temperatur...

  16. Generating optimal initial conditions for smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    We present a new optimal method to set up initial conditions for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations. This new method is based on weighted Voronoi tesselations (WVTs) and can meet arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements. We conduct a comprehensive review of existing SPH setup methods, and outline their advantages, limitations and drawbacks. A serial version of our WVT setup method is publicly available and we give detailed instruction on how to easily implement the new method on top of an existing parallel SPH code.

  17. A history of chemically and radiatively important gases in air deduced from ALE/GAGE/AGAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.; Fraser, P. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Cunnold, D. M.; Alyea, F. N.; O'Doherty, S.; Salameh, P.; Miller, B. R.; Huang, J.; Wang, R. H. J.; Hartley, D. E.; Harth, C.; Steele, L. P.; Sturrock, G.; Midgley, P. M.; McCulloch, A.

    2000-07-01

    We describe in detail the instrumentation and calibrations used in the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE), the Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (GAGE), and the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and present a history of the majority of the anthropogenic ozone-depleting and climate-forcing gases in air based on these experiments. Beginning in 1978, these three successive automated high-frequency in situ experiments have documented the long-term behavior of the measured concentrations of these gases over the past 20 years, and show both the evolution of latitudinal gradients and the high-frequency variability due to sources and circulation. We provide estimates of the long-term trends in total chlorine contained in long-lived halocarbons involved in ozone depletion. We summarize interpretations of these measurements using inverse methods to determine trace gas lifetimes and emissions. Finally, we provide a combined observational and modeled reconstruction of the evolution of chlorocarbons by latitude in the atmosphere over the past 60 years which can be used as boundary conditions for interpreting trapped air in glaciers and oceanic measurements of chlorocarbon tracers of the deep oceanic circulation. Some specific conclusions are as follows: (1) International compliance with the Montreal Protocol is so far resulting in chlorofluorocarbon and chlorocarbon mole fractions comparable to target levels; (2) mole fractions of total chlorine contained in long-lived halocarbons (CCl2F2, CCl3F, CH3CCl3, CCl4, CHClF2, CCl2FCClF2, CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl2=CCl2) in the lower troposphere reached maximum values of about 3.6 ppb in 1993 and are beginning to slowly decrease in the global lower atmosphere; (3) the chlorofluorocarbons have atmospheric lifetimes consistent with destruction in the stratosphere being their principal removal mechanism; (4) multiannual variations in chlorofluorocarbon and chlorocarbon emissions deduced from ALE/GAGE/AGAGE data are

  18. Discrete Wavelet Packet Transforms and volcanic tremor: method and application to Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Carniel, R.; Malone, S.

    2005-12-01

    The time-varying properties of volcanic tremor demand advanced techniques capable of analyzing changes in both time and frequency domains. Specifically, rapid data preprocessing techniques with the ability to distinguish signal from noise are especially valuable in analyzing the temporal, spatial, and spectral properties of these signals. To this end, we use the Discrete Wavelet Packet Transform and the Best Shift Basis algorithm to select an orthonormal basis for continuous volcanic tremor data, then apply a simple statistical test to eliminate frequency bands that primarily consist of Gaussian white noise. We then use the Maximal Overlap Discrete Wavelet Packet Transform to compute and analyze features in the detail coefficients of each "signal" band. Because MODWPT detail coefficients are equivalent to a time series convolved with a zero phase filter, we apply standard polarization and amplitude-based location techniques to each frequency band's detail coefficients to analyze possible source locations and mechanisms. To demonstrate the usefulness of these techniques, we present a sample analysis of data from Erta 'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, recorded on a temporary network in November 2003. Data were sampled at 100 Hz and the DWPT was computed with the LA(16) wavelet to a maximum level of j = 7. The optimal basis for this data set consists of 54 frequency bands, but only 9 contain meaningful "signal" energy. We identify two frequency bands whose locations suggest a distributed source; three frequency bands whose signals may come from the lava lake itself; three high-frequency bands of scattered energy; and one very high frequency band of non-Gaussian instrument noise. Finally, we discuss optimization efforts, computational efficiency, and the feasibility of using similar wavelet methods to preprocess data in real time or near real time.

  19. Identifying neural correlates of visual consciousness with ALE meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Bisenius, Sandrine; Trapp, Sabrina; Neumann, Jane; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2015-11-15

    Neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) have been a topic of study for nearly two decades. In functional imaging studies, several regions have been proposed to constitute possible candidates for NCC, but as of yet, no quantitative summary of the literature on NCC has been done. The question whether single (striate or extrastriate) regions or a network consisting of extrastriate areas that project directly to fronto-parietal regions are necessary and sufficient neural correlates for visual consciousness is still highly debated [e.g., Rees et al., 2002, Nat Rev. Neurosci 3, 261-270; Tong, 2003, Nat Rev. Neurosci 4, 219-229]. The aim of this work was to elucidate this issue and give a synopsis of the present state of the art by conducting systematic and quantitative meta-analyses across functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using several standard paradigms for conscious visual perception. In these paradigms, consciousness is operationalized via perceptual changes, while the visual stimulus remains invariant. An activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was performed, representing the best approach for voxel-wise meta-analyses to date. In addition to computing a meta-analysis across all paradigms, separate meta-analyses on bistable perception and masking paradigms were conducted to assess whether these paradigms show common or different NCC. For the overall meta-analysis, we found significant clusters of activation in inferior and middle occipital gyrus; fusiform gyrus; inferior temporal gyrus; caudate nucleus; insula; inferior, middle, and superior frontal gyri; precuneus; as well as in inferior and superior parietal lobules. These results suggest a subcortical-extrastriate-fronto-parietal network rather than a single region that constitutes the necessary NCC. The results of our exploratory paradigm-specific meta-analyses suggest that this subcortical-extrastriate-fronto-parietal network might be differentially activated as a function of the

  20. Identifying neural correlates of visual consciousness with ALE meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Bisenius, Sandrine; Trapp, Sabrina; Neumann, Jane; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2015-11-15

    Neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) have been a topic of study for nearly two decades. In functional imaging studies, several regions have been proposed to constitute possible candidates for NCC, but as of yet, no quantitative summary of the literature on NCC has been done. The question whether single (striate or extrastriate) regions or a network consisting of extrastriate areas that project directly to fronto-parietal regions are necessary and sufficient neural correlates for visual consciousness is still highly debated [e.g., Rees et al., 2002, Nat Rev. Neurosci 3, 261-270; Tong, 2003, Nat Rev. Neurosci 4, 219-229]. The aim of this work was to elucidate this issue and give a synopsis of the present state of the art by conducting systematic and quantitative meta-analyses across functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using several standard paradigms for conscious visual perception. In these paradigms, consciousness is operationalized via perceptual changes, while the visual stimulus remains invariant. An activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was performed, representing the best approach for voxel-wise meta-analyses to date. In addition to computing a meta-analysis across all paradigms, separate meta-analyses on bistable perception and masking paradigms were conducted to assess whether these paradigms show common or different NCC. For the overall meta-analysis, we found significant clusters of activation in inferior and middle occipital gyrus; fusiform gyrus; inferior temporal gyrus; caudate nucleus; insula; inferior, middle, and superior frontal gyri; precuneus; as well as in inferior and superior parietal lobules. These results suggest a subcortical-extrastriate-fronto-parietal network rather than a single region that constitutes the necessary NCC. The results of our exploratory paradigm-specific meta-analyses suggest that this subcortical-extrastriate-fronto-parietal network might be differentially activated as a function of the

  1. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  2. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  3. Hydrodynamic Synchronisation of Model Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putz, V. B.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    We define a model microswimmer with a variable cycle time, thus allowing the possibility of phase locking driven by hydrodynamic interactions between swimmers. We find that, for extensile or contractile swimmers, phase locking does occur, with the relative phase of the two swimmers being, in general, close to 0 or π, depending on their relative position and orientation. We show that, as expected on grounds of symmetry, self T-dual swimmers, which are time-reversal covariant, do not phase-lock. We also discuss the phase behaviour of a line of tethered swimmers, or pumps. These show oscillations in their relative phases reminiscent of the metachronal waves of cilia.

  4. Ergoregion instability: The hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2014-06-01

    Four-dimensional, asymptotically flat spacetimes with an ergoregion but no horizon have been shown to be linearly unstable against a superradiant-triggered mechanism. This result has wide implications in the search for astrophysically viable alternatives to black holes, but also in the understanding of black holes and Hawking evaporation. Here we investigate this instability in detail for a particular setup that can be realized in the laboratory: the hydrodynamic vortex, an effective geometry for sound waves, with ergoregion and without an event horizon.

  5. Hydrodynamic instability modeling for ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.W.

    1993-03-31

    The intent of this paper is to review how instability growth is modeled in ICF targets, and to identify the principal issues. Most of the material has been published previously, but is not familiar to a wide audience. Hydrodynamic instabilities are a key issue in ICF. Along with laser-plasma instabilities, they determine the regime in which ignition is possible. At higher laser energies, the same issues determine the achievable gain. Quantitative predictions are therefore of the utmost importance to planning the ICF program, as well as to understanding current Nova results. The key fact that underlies all this work is the stabilization of short wavelengths.

  6. Effective actions for anomalous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehl, Felix M.; Loganayagam, R.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2014-03-01

    We argue that an effective field theory of local fluid elements captures the constraints on hydrodynamic transport stemming from the presence of quantum anomalies in the underlying microscopic theory. Focussing on global current anomalies for an arbitrary flavour group, we derive the anomalous constitutive relations in arbitrary even dimensions. We demonstrate that our results agree with the constraints on anomaly governed transport derived hitherto using a local version of the second law of thermodynamics. The construction crucially uses the anomaly inflow mechanism and involves a novel thermofield double construction. In particular, we show that the anomalous Ward identities necessitate non-trivial interaction between the two parts of the Schwinger-Keldysh contour.

  7. Hydrodynamic loading of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroldsen, Anders S.; Johansen, Vegar; Skelton, Robert E.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces hydrodynamic loads for tensegrity structures, to examine their behavior in marine environments. Wave compliant structures are of general interest when considering large marine structures, and we are motivated by the aquaculture industry where new concepts are investigated in order to make offshore installations for seafood production. This paper adds to the existing models and software simulations of tensegrity structures exposed to environmental loading from waves and current. A number of simulations are run to show behavior of the structure as a function of pretension level and string stiffness for a given loading condition.

  8. Hydrodynamical models of young SNRs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosenko, D. I.; Blinnikov, S. I.; Postnov, K. A.; Sorokina, E. I.

    X-ray observations of the Tycho supernova (SN) remnant by XMM-Newton telescope present radial profiles of the remnant in emission lines from silicon and iron \\citep{decour}. To reproduce observed spectrum and X-ray profiles hydrodynamical modelling of the remnant was performed by \\citet{elka}. Standard computational SN models cannot reproduce observed spacial behavoir of the X-ray profiles of the remnant in the emission lines. We perform analysis of these numerical models and find conditions under which it is possible to reproduce observed profiles.

  9. Microscale hydrodynamics near moving contact lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garoff, Stephen; Chen, Q.; Rame, Enrique; Willson, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrodynamics governing the fluid motions on a microscopic scale near moving contact lines are different from those governing motion far from the contact line. We explore these unique hydrodynamics by detailed measurement of the shape of a fluid meniscus very close to a moving contact line. The validity of present models of the hydrodynamics near moving contact lines as well as the dynamic wetting characteristics of a family of polymer liquids are discussed.

  10. Altimetry in the coastal ocean: regional sea level from CryoSat-2 and ALES-reprocessed Envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Marcello; Benveniste, Jérôme; Cipollini, Paolo; Dinardo, Salvatore; Lucas, Bruno; Quartly, Graham; Snaith, Helen

    2015-04-01

    Satellite altimetry has revolutionized our understanding of ocean dynamics thanks to finer spatial sampling and global coverage. Nevertheless, coastal data have been flagged as unreliable due to land and calm water interference in the altimeter and radiometer footprints and uncertainty about high frequency tidal and atmospheric forcing. Recent developments in processing and the availability of new instruments are now bringing new possibilities to sea level studies in the coastal zone. This contribution presents some of the improvements achievable with 1) enhanced processing ('retracking') of the waveforms from conventional ('pulse-limited') altimeters, and 2) the exploitation of the new generation of SAR altimeters. A dedicated retracking algorithm, ALES the Adaptive Leading Edge Subwaveform retracker, has been designed and validated with the aim of reaching the same precision in the estimate of geophysical parameters from pulse-limited altimetry both over open ocean and in the coastal zone. In this study we provide clear evidence that ALES reprocessing improves quality and quantity of Envisat sea level measurements, by comparing the data with the reference time series of Sea Level provided by the Sea Level Climate Change Initiative (SL_cci) and with in-situ data from tide gauges in the North Sea/Baltic Sea transition zone. In the western Arkona Basin (Baltic Sea) correlation between altimetry and tide gauges within 15 km of the coast almost doubles using ALES. In the eastern Arkona Basin, the annual sea level amplitude derived from ALES and tide gauges differ by ~10 mm, while SL_cci overestimates it by 4 cm. The new generation of altimeters ('SAR', or delay-doppler altimeters) is providing higher precision in the sea level measurements, thanks to their coherent processing of returns with a high Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF) and the resultant reduced footprint. CryoSat-2 (CS-2) carries the first SAR altimeter in space. An experimental ocean product (SARvatore

  11. Type I X-ray burst simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    Fisker, J. L.; Hix, W. R.; Liebendoerfer, M.

    2007-07-01

    dAGILE is an astrophysical code that simulates accretion of matter onto a neutron star and the subsequent x-ray burst. It is a one-dimensional time-dependent spherically symmetric code with generalized nuclear reaction networks, diffusive radiation/conduction, realistic boundary conditions, and general relativistic hydrodynamics. The code is described in more detail in Astrophysical Journal 650(2006)332 and Astrophysical Journal Supplements 174(2008)261.

  12. Thermal transport in a noncommutative hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Geracie, M. Son, D. T.

    2015-03-15

    We find the hydrodynamic equations of a system of particles constrained to be in the lowest Landau level. We interpret the hydrodynamic theory as a Hamiltonian system with the Poisson brackets between the hydrodynamic variables determined from the noncommutativity of space. We argue that the most general hydrodynamic theory can be obtained from this Hamiltonian system by allowing the Righi-Leduc coefficient to be an arbitrary function of thermodynamic variables. We compute the Righi-Leduc coefficient at high temperatures and show that it satisfies the requirements of particle-hole symmetry, which we outline.

  13. An ALE formulation of embedded boundary methods for tracking boundary layers in turbulent fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K.

    2014-04-01

    Embedded Boundary Methods (EBMs) for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are usually constructed in the Eulerian setting. They are particularly attractive for complex Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems characterized by large structural motions and deformations. They are also critical for flow problems with topological changes and FSI problems with cracking. For all of these problems, the alternative Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods are often unfeasible because of the issue of mesh crossovers. However for viscous flows, Eulerian EBMs for CFD do not track the boundary layers around dynamic rigid or flexible bodies. Consequently, the application of these methods to viscous FSI problems requires either a high mesh resolution in a large part of the computational fluid domain, or adaptive mesh refinement. Unfortunately, the first option is computationally inefficient, and the second one is labor intensive. For these reasons, an alternative approach is proposed in this paper for maintaining all moving boundary layers resolved during the simulation of a turbulent FSI problem using an EBM for CFD. In this approach, which is simple and computationally reasonable, the underlying non-body-fitted mesh is rigidly translated and/or rotated in order to track the rigid component of the motion of the dynamic obstacle. Then, the flow computations away from the embedded surface are performed using the ALE framework, and the wall boundary conditions are treated by the chosen Eulerian EBM for CFD. Hence, the solution of the boundary layer tracking problem proposed in this paper can be described as an ALE implementation of a given EBM for CFD. Its basic features are illustrated with the Large Eddy Simulation using a non-body-fitted mesh of a turbulent flow past an airfoil in heaving motion. Its strong potential for the solution of challenging FSI problems at reasonable computational costs is also demonstrated with the simulation of turbulent flows past a family of

  14. Active and driven hydrodynamic crystals.

    PubMed

    Desreumaux, N; Florent, N; Lauga, E; Bartolo, D

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by the experimental ability to produce monodisperse particles in microfluidic devices, we study theoretically the hydrodynamic stability of driven and active crystals. We first recall the theoretical tools allowing to quantify the dynamics of elongated particles in a confined fluid. In this regime hydrodynamic interactions between particles arise from a superposition of potential dipolar singularities. We exploit this feature to derive the equations of motion for the particle positions and orientations. After showing that all five planar Bravais lattices are stationary solutions of the equations of motion, we consider separately the case where the particles are passively driven by an external force, and the situation where they are self-propelling. We first demonstrate that phonon modes propagate in driven crystals, which are always marginally stable. The spatial structures of the eigenmodes depend solely on the symmetries of the lattices, and on the orientation of the driving force. For active crystals, the stability of the particle positions and orientations depends not only on the symmetry of the crystals but also on the perturbation wavelengths and on the crystal density. Unlike unconfined fluids, the stability of active crystals is independent of the nature of the propulsion mechanism at the single-particle level. The square and rectangular lattices are found to be linearly unstable at short wavelengths provided the volume fraction of the crystals is high enough. Differently, hexagonal, oblique, and face-centered crystals are always unstable. Our work provides a theoretical basis for future experimental work on flowing microfluidic crystals. PMID:22864543

  15. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

  16. The hydrodynamics of lamprey locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan C.

    The lamprey, an anguilliform swimmer, propels itself by undulating most of its body. This type of swimming produces flow patterns that are highly three-dimensional in nature and not very well understood. However, substantial previous work has been done to understand two-dimensional unsteady propulsion, the possible wake structures and thrust performance. Limited studies of three-dimensional propulsors with simple geometries have displayed the importance of the third dimension in designing unsteady swimmers. Some of the results of those studies, primarily the ways in which vorticity is organized in the wake region, are seen in lamprey swimming as well. In the current work, the third dimension is not the only important factor, but complex geometry and body undulations also contribute to the hydrodynamics. Through dye flow visualization, particle induced velocimetry and pressure measurements, the hydrodynamics of anguilliform swimming are studied using a custom built robotic lamprey. These studies all indicate that the undulations of the body are not producing thrust. Instead, it is the tail which acts to propel the animal. This conclusion led to further investigation of the tail, specifically the role of varying tail flexibility on hydrodymnamics. It is found that by making the tail more flexible, one decreases the coherence of the vorticity in the lamprey's wake. Additional flexibility also yields less thrust.

  17. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. I - Deep envelope models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks has been modified to include radiative transfer effects. This modified code has been used to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12 days. It is shown that in this particular model the hydrogen ionization region plays only a small role in producing the observed phase lag between the light and velocity curves. The cause of the bumps on the model's light curve is examined, and a mechanism is presented to explain those Cepheids with two secondary features on their light curves. This mechanism is shown to be consistent with the Hertzsprung sequence only if the evolutionary mass-luminosity law is used.

  18. Application of CHAD hydrodynamics to shock-wave problems

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, H.E.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Sahota, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    CHAD is the latest in a sequence of continually evolving computer codes written to effectively utilize massively parallel computer architectures and the latest grid generators for unstructured meshes. Its applications range from automotive design issues such as in-cylinder and manifold flows of internal combustion engines, vehicle aerodynamics, underhood cooling and passenger compartment heating, ventilation, and air conditioning to shock hydrodynamics and materials modeling. CHAD solves the full unsteady Navier-Stoke equations with the k-epsilon turbulence model in three space dimensions. The code has four major features that distinguish it from the earlier KIVA code, also developed at Los Alamos. First, it is based on a node-centered, finite-volume method in which, like finite element methods, all fluid variables are located at computational nodes. The computational mesh efficiently and accurately handles all element shapes ranging from tetrahedra to hexahedra. Second, it is written in standard Fortran 90 and relies on automatic domain decomposition and a universal communication library written in standard C and MPI for unstructured grids to effectively exploit distributed-memory parallel architectures. Thus the code is fully portable to a variety of computing platforms such as uniprocessor workstations, symmetric multiprocessors, clusters of workstations, and massively parallel platforms. Third, CHAD utilizes a variable explicit/implicit upwind method for convection that improves computational efficiency in flows that have large velocity Courant number variations due to velocity of mesh size variations. Fourth, CHAD is designed to also simulate shock hydrodynamics involving multimaterial anisotropic behavior under high shear. The authors will discuss CHAD capabilities and show several sample calculations showing the strengths and weaknesses of CHAD.

  19. Seismic characteristics of variable convection at Erta ´Ale lava lake, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua; Carniel, Roberto; Harris, Andrew J. L.; Malone, Steve

    2006-05-01

    The active summit lava lake of Erta ´Ale volcano, Ethiopia, offers a unique opportunity to study magma convection. In February 2002, we collected a multiparametric set of seismic, thermal and video data. These data indicate that the lake cycled between periods characterized by low (0.01-0.08 m s - 1 ) and high (0.1-0.4 m s - 1 ) convection rates, typically lasting tens to hundreds of minutes. Three seismometers placed around the active crater recorded continuous tremor with a dominant frequency of 2 Hz, and energy at frequencies from 0.8 to 12 Hz. Here, we characterize the seismic signature of each regime by its spectral content, wavefield polarization, and tremor source location. For both regimes, the wavefield is mostly rectilinear. Azimuths and incidence angles are consistent with P waves originating in one of two locations: the north edge of the active lava lake, or a region 100-150 m ENE of the lava lake. Because both regimes are dominated by a low frequency, rectilinearly polarized wavefield, we investigate the source location using a method that solves for location and isotropic source power by a weighted least-squares amplitude-based inversion of seismic data. We find that tremor source regions are unique to each convective regime, although some location overlap exists when tremor is located in short time windows. Wavefield composition suggests that the convective phases may share a common source process, but their differing locations indicate that either the source region is non-stationary, or a second source skews the location during the high convective phase. Tremor polarization and location suggests that the low-frequency tremor is caused by bubble coalescence and bursting in a conduit whose surface is the lava lake. The higher frequency signal associated with the high convective regime is associated with a scattered, more complex wavefield superimposed on the low-frequency background tremor, caused by bubble bursting and cracking of cooled crust at

  20. From the Sound of Erta Ale Lava Lake (Ethiopia) to Eruption Dynamics Into a Magma Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouche, E.; Vergniolle, S.

    2007-12-01

    The basaltic volcano of Erta Ale, located on the East African Rift, has a permanent lava lake whose behaviour presents similarity with a shallow magma reservoir. In March 2003, continuous measurements of acoustic pressure, images from video, temperature, seismicity and wind velocity were perfomed to quantify degassing of the lava lake in order to understand the eruptive behaviour of this volcano. The videos show that two types of gas bubbles break at the lava lake surface. Modelling acoustic pressure gives bubble overpressure and size. Bubbles are either large (radius 2 m) and overpressurised (4.104 Pa) or of intermediate size (radius 1 m) and weakly overpressurised (450 Pa). The large bubbles come from the conduit at the base of the lava lake whereas bubbles of intermediate size are produced by the destabilisation of a foam accumulated below the crust overlying the lava lake. Hence, their overpressure is related to capillary pressure of the rising small bubbles, suggesting that their diameter is 3.6 mm. The formation of bubbles of intermediate size is related to the local foam coalescence because of foam sluggish drainage. However, overpressure of intermediate size bubbles shows sudden peaks every eighteen hours, up to 6000 Pa. Each peak is related to a massive coalescence of a foam having reached its critical thickness. This involves a much larger number of bubbles than foam drainage, hence a much larger overpressure and energy. The rapid and massive coalescence leads to a sudden withdrawal of the foam. The disappearence of the foam suppress the buoyancy that sustained the cold and dense crust at the top of the lava lake, forcing the crust to sink. The average gas flux (6.10-3 m3s-1) is estimated over an eighteen-hour cycle from modelling the frequency of sound waves. Furthermore the diameter of the small bubbles deduced from the overpressure on synthetic waveforms can be combined with gas volume fraction observed on videos to estimate the gas flux between 3

  1. A moving frame algorithm for high Mach number hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trac, Hy; Pen, Ue-Li

    2004-07-01

    We present a new approach to Eulerian computational fluid dynamics that is designed to work at high Mach numbers encountered in astrophysical hydrodynamic simulations. Standard Eulerian schemes that strictly conserve total energy suffer from the high Mach number problem and proposed solutions to additionally solve the entropy or thermal energy still have their limitations. In our approach, the Eulerian conservation equations are solved in an adaptive frame moving with the fluid where Mach numbers are minimized. The moving frame approach uses a velocity decomposition technique to define local kinetic variables while storing the bulk kinetic components in a smoothed background velocity field that is associated with the grid velocity. Gravitationally induced accelerations are added to the grid, thereby minimizing the spurious heating problem encountered in cold gas flows. Separately tracking local and bulk flow components allows thermodynamic variables to be accurately calculated in both subsonic and supersonic regions. A main feature of the algorithm, that is not possible in previous Eulerian implementations, is the ability to resolve shocks and prevent spurious heating where both the pre-shock and post-shock fluid are supersonic. The hybrid algorithm combines the high-resolution shock capturing ability of the second-order accurate Eulerian TVD scheme with a low-diffusion Lagrangian advection scheme. We have implemented a cosmological code where the hydrodynamic evolution of the baryons is captured using the moving frame algorithm while the gravitational evolution of the collisionless dark matter is tracked using a particle-mesh N-body algorithm. Hydrodynamic and cosmological tests are described and results presented. The current code is fast, memory-friendly, and parallelized for shared-memory machines.

  2. Tecolote: An Object-Oriented Framework for Hydrodynamics Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Ankeny, L.A.; Clancy, S.P.; Hall, J.H.; Marshall, J.C.; McNamara, G.R.; Painter, J.W.; Zander, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    Tecolote is an object-oriented framework for both developing and accessing a variety of hydrodynamics models. It is written in C++, and is in turn built on another framework - Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA). The Tecolote framework is meant to provide modules (or building blocks) to put together hydrodynamics applications that can encompass a wide variety of physics models, numerical solution options, and underlying data storage schemes, although with only those modules activated at runtime that are necessary. Tecolote has been designed to separate physics from computer science, as much as humanly possible. The POOMA framework provides fields in C++ to Tecolote that are analogous to Fortran-9O-like arrays in the way that they are used, but that, in addition, have underlying load balancing, message passing, and a special scheme for compact data storage. The POOMA fields can also have unique meshes associated with them that can allow more options than just the normal regularly-spaced Cartesian mesh. They also permit one-, two, and three-dimensions to be immediately accessible to the code developer and code user.

  3. Update on Thermal and Hydrodynamic Simulations on LMJ Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, G.; Charton, S.

    2004-03-15

    The temperature of the cryogenic target inside the hohlraum has been studied with a computational fluid dynamics code (FLUENT). Specific models have been developed and used for both thermal and hydrodynamic calculations.With thermal calculations only, we first have found the optimum heat flux required to counteract the effect of the laser entrance windows. This heat flux is centered on the hohlraum wall along the axis of revolution. With this heat flux, the temperature surface profiles of the capsule and the DT ice layer have been significantly reduced. Second, the sensitivity of the target temperature profiles (capsule and DT layer) relatively to capsule displacement has been determined. Thirdly, the effect of the shield extraction (shield surrounding the cryogenic structure) has been studied and has indicated that the target lifetime before the laser shot is less than 1s. Meanwhile, with hydrodynamic simulations, we have investigated the surface temperature profiles alteration due to He and H{sub 2} mixture convection within the hohlraum.In order to find out the variations between different configurations, results of these studies are given with seven significant digit outputs. Those results only indicate a trend because of the material's properties incertitude and the code approximation.

  4. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  5. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  6. Hydrodynamic description for ballistic annihilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Soria, Maria Isabel; Trizac, Emmanuel; Maynar, Pablo; Schehr, Gregory; Barrat, Alain

    2009-01-21

    The problem of the validity of a hydrodynamic description for a system in which there are no collisional invariants is addressed. Hydrodynamic equations have been derived and successfully tested against simulation data for a system where particles annihilate with a probability p, or collide elastically otherwise. The response of the system to a linear perturbation is analyzed as well.

  7. Comparative Hydrodynamics of Bacterial Polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-02-01

    Most bacteria swim through fluids by rotating helical flagella which can take one of 12 distinct polymorphic shapes, the most common of which is the normal form used during forward swimming runs. To shed light on the prevalence of the normal form in locomotion, we gather all available experimental measurements of the various polymorphic forms and compute their intrinsic hydrodynamic efficiencies. The normal helical form is found to be the most efficient of the 12 polymorphic forms by a significant margin—a conclusion valid for both the peritrichous and polar flagellar families, and robust to a change in the effective flagellum diameter or length. Hence, although energetic costs of locomotion are small for bacteria, fluid mechanical forces may have played a significant role in the evolution of the flagellum.

  8. Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2003-12-09

    Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping carried out by introducing a side stream into the main stream to squeeze the fluid containing particles close to the electrodes producing the dielelectrophoretic forces. The region of most effective or the strongest forces in the manipulating fields of the electrodes producing the dielectrophoretic forces is close to the electrodes, within 100 .mu.m from the electrodes. The particle trapping arrangement uses a series of electrodes with an AC field placed between pairs of electrodes, which causes trapping of particles along the edges of the electrodes. By forcing an incoming flow stream containing cells and DNA, for example, close to the electrodes using another flow stream improves the efficiency of the DNA trapping.

  9. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Integration of quantum hydrodynamical equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanova, Vera G.; Sanin, Andrey L.

    2007-04-01

    Quantum hydrodynamics equations describing the dynamics of quantum fluid are a subject of this report (QFD).These equations can be used to decide the wide class of problem. But there are the calculated difficulties for the equations, which take place for nonlinear hyperbolic systems. In this connection, It is necessary to impose the additional restrictions which assure the existence and unique of solutions. As test sample, we use the free wave packet and study its behavior at the different initial and boundary conditions. The calculations of wave packet propagation cause in numerical algorithm the division. In numerical algorithm at the calculations of wave packet propagation, there arises the problem of division by zero. To overcome this problem we have to sew together discrete numerical and analytical continuous solutions on the boundary. We demonstrate here for the free wave packet that the numerical solution corresponds to the analytical solution.

  11. Hydrodynamic assembly for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabak, Max; Clark, Daniel; Town, Richard; Hatchett, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    We present directly and indirectly driven implosion designs for Fast Ignition. Directly driven designs using various laser illumination wavelengths are described. We compare these designs with simple hydrodynamic efficiency models. Capsules illuminated with less than 1 MJ of light with perfect zooming at low intensity and low contrast ratio in power can assemble 4 mg of fuel to column density in excess of 3 g/cm^2. We contrast these designs with more optimized designs that lead to Guderley-style self similar implosions. Indirectly driven capsules absorbing 75 kJ of xrays can assemble 0.7 mg to column density 2.7 g/cm^2 in 1D simulations. We describe 2-D simulations including both capsules and attached cones driven by radiation. We describe issues in assembling fuel near the cone tip and cone disruption.

  12. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings.

  13. Anomalous hydrodynamics kicks neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Matthias; Uhlemann, Christoph F.; Bleicher, Marcus; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    Observations show that, at the beginning of their existence, neutron stars are accelerated briskly to velocities of up to a thousand kilometers per second. We argue that this remarkable effect can be explained as a manifestation of quantum anomalies on astrophysical scales. To theoretically describe the early stage in the life of neutron stars we use hydrodynamics as a systematic effective-field-theory framework. Within this framework, anomalies of the Standard Model of particle physics as underlying microscopic theory imply the presence of a particular set of transport terms, whose form is completely fixed by theoretical consistency. The resulting chiral transport effects in proto-neutron stars enhance neutrino emission along the internal magnetic field, and the recoil can explain the order of magnitude of the observed kick velocities.

  14. IKT for quantum hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, Massimo; Ellero, Marco; Nicolini, Piero

    2007-11-01

    A striking feature of standard quantum mechanics (SQM) is its analogy with classical fluid dynamics. In fact, it is well-known that the Schr"odinger equation is equivalent to a closed set of partial differential equations for suitable real-valued functions of position and time (denoted as quantum fluid fields) [Madelung, 1928]. In particular, the corresponding quantum hydrodynamic equations (QHE) can be viewed as the equations of a classical compressible and non-viscous fluid, endowed with potential velocity and quantized velocity circulation. In this reference, an interesting theoretical problem, in its own right, is the construction of an inverse kinetic theory (IKT) for such a type of fluids. In this note we intend to investigate consequences of the IKT recently formulated for QHE [M.Tessarotto et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 012105 (2007)]. In particular a basic issue is related to the definition of the quantum fluid fields.

  15. Atrésie intestinale iléale: diagnostic anténatale et prise en charge

    PubMed Central

    Dhibou, Hanane; Bassir, Ahlam; Sami, Nadia; Boukhanni, Lahcen; Fakhir, Bouchra; Asmouki, Hamid; Soummani, Abderraouf

    2016-01-01

    L’atrésie iléale est une malformation congénitale rare, elle constitue une faible part avec une incidence de 1 pour 5000 cas. Elle peut être suspectée et diagnostiqué échographiquement à la fin du deuxième et troisième trimestre. La concertation obstétrico-chirurgicale constitue ici la clé du succès. Eliminer une maladie générale à mauvais pronostic, lutter contre la prématurité et confier l’enfant immédiatement au chirurgien sont les objectifs principaux à réaliser. L'intervention chirurgicale va préciser le type de l'atrésie, son siège, son caractère unique ou multiple et sa longueur dont l’acte chirurgical dépend de l’étiologie. Il nous a paru intéressant de vous documenter un cas clinique d’atrésie iléale de diagnostic anténatal. PMID:27800095

  16. Parsing the neural correlates of moral cognition: ALE meta-analysis on morality, theory of mind, and empathy.

    PubMed

    Bzdok, Danilo; Schilbach, Leonhard; Vogeley, Kai; Schneider, Karla; Laird, Angela R; Langner, Robert; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-10-01

    Morally judicious behavior forms the fabric of human sociality. Here, we sought to investigate neural activity associated with different facets of moral thought. Previous research suggests that the cognitive and emotional sources of moral decisions might be closely related to theory of mind, an abstract-cognitive skill, and empathy, a rapid-emotional skill. That is, moral decisions are thought to crucially refer to other persons' representation of intentions and behavioral outcomes as well as (vicariously experienced) emotional states. We thus hypothesized that moral decisions might be implemented in brain areas engaged in 'theory of mind' and empathy. This assumption was tested by conducting a large-scale activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies, which assessed 2,607 peak coordinates from 247 experiments in 1,790 participants. The brain areas that were consistently involved in moral decisions showed more convergence with the ALE analysis targeting theory of mind versus empathy. More specifically, the neurotopographical overlap between morality and empathy disfavors a role of affective sharing during moral decisions. Ultimately, our results provide evidence that the neural network underlying moral decisions is probably domain-global and might be dissociable into cognitive and affective sub-systems. PMID:22270812

  17. The role of large bubbles detected from acoustic measurements on the dynamics of Erta 'Ale lava lake (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouche, E.; Vergniolle, S.; Staudacher, T.; Nercessian, A.; Delmont, J.-C.; Frogneux, M.; Cartault, F.; Le Pichon, A.

    2010-06-01

    The activity at the surface of the lava lake on Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) shows that large bubbles are regularly breaking at a fixed position on the lava lake. This is also where the small lava fountains are sometimes produced. Since this location is likely to be directly above the volcanic conduit feeding the lava lake, we have done continuous measurements between March 22 and 26, 2003 to understand the degassing of a volcano in permanent activity. The bubble size has been first estimated from videos, which once combined with the acoustic pressure, can constrain the source of the sound. The gas volume and overpressure stayed roughly constant, between 36-700 m3 and 4 × 103-1.8 × 104 Pa, respectively. Simultaneous thermal measurements showed regular peaks, which occurred when the crust was broken by a large bubble, hence gave a direct indication on the typical return time between the bubbles (1 h). These spherical cap bubbles had a high Reynolds number, 4600-20000, therefore a wake, periodically unstable, formed and detached from the bubble bottom. The bubbly wake, if the detachment occurs close to the surface, can explain the duration of lava fountains, measured on the videos. The periodic arrival of bubbly wakes, which mostly detach from the driving spherical cap within the lava lake, could explain the absence of cooling at Erta 'Ale, Erebus (Antartica), Villarica (Chile) and Nyiragongo (Democratic Republic of Congo) without invoking a convective downflow of magma in the conduit, as previously done.

  18. Long-term simulation of large deformation, mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions in ALE and fully Eulerian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, S.; Richter, T.; Wick, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we develop numerical schemes for mechano-chemical fluid-structure interactions with long-term effects. We investigate a model of a growing solid interacting with an incompressible fluid. A typical example for such a situation is the formation and growth of plaque in blood vessels. This application includes two particular difficulties: First, growth may lead to very large deformations, up to full clogging of the fluid domain. We derive a simplified set of equations including a fluid-structure interaction system coupled to an ODE model for plaque growth in Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) coordinates and in Eulerian coordinates. The latter novel technique is capable of handling very large deformations up to contact. The second difficulty stems from the different time scales: while the dynamics of the fluid demand to resolve a scale of seconds, growth typically takes place in a range of months. We propose a temporal two-scale approach using local small-scale problems to compute an effective wall stress that will enter a long-scale problem. Our proposed techniques are substantiated with several numerical tests that include comparisons of the Eulerian and ALE approaches as well as convergence studies.

  19. Particle Hydrodynamics with Material Strength for Multi-Layer Orbital Debris Shield Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1999-01-01

    Three dimensional simulation of oblique hypervelocity impact on orbital debris shielding places extreme demands on computer resources. Research to date has shown that particle models provide the most accurate and efficient means for computer simulation of shield design problems. In order to employ a particle based modeling approach to the wall plate impact portion of the shield design problem, it is essential that particle codes be augmented to represent strength effects. This report describes augmentation of a Lagrangian particle hydrodynamics code developed by the principal investigator, to include strength effects, allowing for the entire shield impact problem to be represented using a single computer code.

  20. Effect of Surface Roughness on Hydrodynamic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis on the performance of hydrodynamic oil bearings is made considering surface roughness effect. The hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact load is found. The contact pressure was calculated with the assumption that the surface height distribution was Gaussian. The average Reynolds equation of partially lubricated surface was used to calculate hydrodynamic load. An analytical expression for average gap was found and was introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting boundary value problem was then solved numerically by finite difference methods using the method of successive over relaxation. The pressure distribution and hydrodynamic load capacity of plane slider and journal bearings were calculated for various design data. The effects of attitude and roughness of surface on the bearing performance were shown. The results are compared with similar available solution of rough surface bearings. It is shown that: (1) the contribution of contact load is not significant; and (2) the hydrodynamic and contact load increase with surface roughness.

  1. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  2. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  3. The hydrodynamics of dolphin drafting

    PubMed Central

    Weihs, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Background Drafting in cetaceans is defined as the transfer of forces between individuals without actual physical contact between them. This behavior has long been surmised to explain how young dolphin calves keep up with their rapidly moving mothers. It has recently been observed that a significant number of calves become permanently separated from their mothers during chases by tuna vessels. A study of the hydrodynamics of drafting, initiated in the hope of understanding the mechanisms causing the separation of mothers and calves during fishing-related activities, is reported here. Results Quantitative results are shown for the forces and moments around a pair of unequally sized dolphin-like slender bodies. These include two major effects. First, the so-called Bernoulli suction, which stems from the fact that the local pressure drops in areas of high speed, results in an attractive force between mother and calf. Second is the displacement effect, in which the motion of the mother causes the water in front to move forwards and radially outwards, and water behind the body to move forwards to replace the animal's mass. Thus, the calf can gain a 'free ride' in the forward-moving areas. Utilizing these effects, the neonate can gain up to 90% of the thrust needed to move alongside the mother at speeds of up to 2.4 m/sec. A comparison with observations of eastern spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) is presented, showing savings of up to 60% in the thrust that calves require if they are to keep up with their mothers. Conclusions A theoretical analysis, backed by observations of free-swimming dolphin schools, indicates that hydrodynamic interactions with mothers play an important role in enabling dolphin calves to keep up with rapidly moving adult school members. PMID:15132740

  4. MCNP code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MCNP code is the major Monte Carlo coupled neutron-photon transport research tool at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and it represents the most extensive Monte Carlo development program in the United States which is available in the public domain. The present code is the direct descendent of the original Monte Carlo work of Fermi, von Neumaum, and Ulam at Los Alamos in the 1940s. Development has continued uninterrupted since that time, and the current version of MCNP (or its predecessors) has always included state-of-the-art methods in the Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, basic cross section data, geometry capability, variance reduction, and estimation procedures. The authors of the present code have oriented its development toward general user application. The documentation, though extensive, is presented in a clear and simple manner with many examples, illustrations, and sample problems. In addition to providing the desired results, the output listings give a a wealth of detailed information (some optional) concerning each state of the calculation. The code system is continually updated to take advantage of advances in computer hardware and software, including interactive modes of operation, diagnostic interrupts and restarts, and a variety of graphical and video aids.

  5. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  6. Final Report for "Verification and Validation of Radiation Hydrodynamics for Astrophysical Applications"

    SciTech Connect

    Zingale, M; Howell, L H

    2010-03-17

    The motivation for this work is to gain experience in the methodology of verification and validation (V&V) of astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes. In the first period of this work, we focused on building the infrastructure to test a single astrophysical application code, Castro, developed in collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). We delivered several hydrodynamic test problems, in the form of coded initial conditions and documentation for verification, routines to perform data analysis, and a generalized regression test suite to allow for continued automated testing. Astrophysical simulation codes aim to model phenomena that elude direct experimentation. Our only direct information about these systems comes from what we observe, and may be transient. Simulation can help further our understanding by allowing virtual experimentation of these systems. However, to have confidence in our simulations requires us to have confidence in the tools we use. Verification and Validation is a process by which we work to build confidence that a simulation code is accurately representing reality. V&V is a multistep process, and is never really complete. Once a single test problem is working as desired (i.e. that problem is verified), one wants to ensure that subsequent code changes do not break that test. At the same time, one must also search for new verification problems that test the code in a new way. It can be rather tedious to manually retest each of the problems, so before going too far with V&V, it is desirable to have an automated test suite. Our project aims to provide these basic tools for astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes.

  7. HEMP. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.; Levatin, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  8. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  9. Gas-driven lava lake fluctuations at Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) revealed by MODIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergniolle, Sylvie; Bouche, Emmanuella

    2016-09-01

    The long-lived lava lake of Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) is remotely monitored by moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometers (MODIS) installed on satellites. The Normalised Thermal Index (NTI) (Wright et al. Remote Sens Environ 82:135-155 2002) is shown to be proportional to the volume of the lava lake based on visual observations. The lava lake's variable level can be plausibly related to a stable foam, i.e. a mixture composed of densely packed non-coalescing bubbles in suspension within a liquid. This foam is trapped at the top of the magma reservoir, and its thickness changes in response to the gas flux feeding the foam being successively turned on and off. The temporal evolution of the foam thickness, and the resulting variation of the volume of the lava lake, is calculated numerically by assuming that the gas flux feeding the foam, initially constant and homogeneous since December 9, 2002, is suddenly stopped on December 13, 2002 and not restarted before May 2003. The best fit between the theoretical foam thickness and the level of the lava lake deduced from the NTI provides an estimate of both the reservoir radius, 155-170 m, and the gas flux feeding the foam, 5.5×10-3-7.2×10-3 m 3 s -1 when existing. This is in agreement with previous estimates from acoustic measurements (Bouche et al. Earth Planet Sci Lett 295:37-48 2010). The very good agreement between the theoretical foam thickness and that deduced from MODIS data shows for the first time the existence of a regime based on the behaviour of a stable foam, whose spreading towards the conduit ("wide" conduit condition), can explain the long-lived activity. Our predictive model, which links the gas flux at the vent to the foam spreading, could potentially be used on any volcano with a long-lived activity. The underlying gas flux and the horizontal surface area of the magma reservoir can then be deduced by combining modelling to continuous measurements of gas flux. The lava lake, when high, often shows

  10. Self-consistent solution of cosmological radiation-hydrodynamics and chemical ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Daniel R. Hayes, John C. Paschos, Pascal Norman, Michael L.

    2009-10-01

    We consider a PDE system comprising compressible hydrodynamics, flux-limited diffusion radiation transport and chemical ionization kinetics in a cosmologically-expanding universe. Under an operator-split framework, the cosmological hydrodynamics equations are solved through the piecewise parabolic method, as implemented in the Enzo community hydrodynamics code. The remainder of the model, including radiation transport, chemical ionization kinetics, and gas energy feedback, form a stiff coupled PDE system, which we solve using a fully-implicit inexact Newton approach, and which forms the crux of this paper. The inner linear Newton systems are solved using a Schur complement formulation, and employ a multigrid-preconditioned conjugate gradient solver for the inner Schur systems. We describe this approach and provide results on a suite of test problems, demonstrating its accuracy, robustness, and scalability to very large problems.

  11. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic instabilities on NOVA of relevance to astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K S; Cherfils, C; Drake, R P; Farley, D; Glendinning, S G; Kalantar, D H; Kane, J; Marinak, M M; Remington, B A; Richard, A; Ryutov, D; Stone, J; Wallace, R J; Weber, S V

    1998-09-11

    Large lasers such as Nova allow the possibility of achieving regimes of high energy densities in plasmas of millimeter spatial scales and nanosecond time scales. In those plasmas where thermal conductivity and viscosity do not play a significant role, the hydrodynamic evolution is suitable for benchmarking hydrodynamics modeling in astrophysical codes. Several experiments on Nova examine hydrodynamically unstable interfaces. A typical Nova experiment uses a gold millimeter-scale hohlraum to convert the laser energy to a 200 eV blackbody source lasting about a nanosecond. The x-rays ablate a planar target, generating a series of shocks and accelerating the target. The evolving area1 density is diagnosed by time-resolved radiography, using a second x-ray source. Data from several experiments are presented and diagnostic techniques are discussed.

  12. Survey of Multi-Material Closure Models in 1D Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Maeng, Jungyeoul Brad; Hyde, David Andrew Bulloch

    2015-07-28

    Accurately treating the coupled sub-cell thermodynamics of computational cells containing multiple materials is an inevitable problem in hydrodynamics simulations, whether due to initial configurations or evolutions of the materials and computational mesh. When solving the hydrodynamics equations within a multi-material cell, we make the assumption of a single velocity field for the entire computational domain, which necessitates the addition of a closure model to attempt to resolve the behavior of the multi-material cells’ constituents. In conjunction with a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, we present a variety of both the popular as well as more recently proposed multi-material closure models and survey their performances across a spectrum of examples. We consider standard verification tests as well as practical examples using combinations of fluid, solid, and composite constituents within multi-material mixtures. Our survey provides insights into the advantages and disadvantages of various multi-material closure models in different problem configurations.

  13. Hydrodynamic modeling of an X-ray flare on Proxima Centauri observed by the Einstein telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Reale, F.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Rosner, R.; Schmitt, J.H.M.M.

    1988-05-01

    Hydrodynamic numerical calculations of a flare which occurred on Proxima Centauri and was observed by the Einstein satellite on August 20, 1980 at 12:50 UT are presented. The highlights of the hydrodynamic code are reviewed, and the physical and geometrical parameters necessary for the calculations are derived and compared with observations. The results are consistent with the stellar flare being caused by the rapid dissipation of 5.9 x 10 to the 31st ergs, within a magnetic loop structure whose semilength is 7 x 10 to the 9th cm and cross-sectional radius is 7.3 x 10 to the 8th cm. The results provide evidence that flares on late-type stars can be described by a hydrodynamic model with a relatively simple geometry, similar to solar compact flares. 39 references.

  14. Simulating hydrodynamics on tidal mudflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycling in estuaries is governed by fluxes from both riverine sources and through estuarine sediment deposits. Although estimates from river sources are relatively common and easily sampled, estimates of nutrient fluxes through the fluid-sediment interface are less common and limited to deeper portions of the bays away from intertidal areas. Lack of quantifiable shear stress estimates over intertidal areas limits our overall understanding of nutrient budgets in estuaries. Unfortunately, observation of intertidal hydrodynamics and nutrient fluxes over tidal flats and near the water's edge is difficult owing to the temporally varying and spatially extensive region where the tides inundate, and thus numerical modeling is often employed. In this work, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), a three dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model was used to investigate the shear stresses over intertidal mudflats in the Great Bay, a tidally-dominated New England estuary cut by several tidal channels and with over 50% of the estuary exposed at low tide. The ROMS wetting and drying scheme was used to simulate the rising and falling tide on the flats, a successful approach adapted in other regions of the world but not always inclusive of tidal channels. Bathymetric data obtained in 2009 and 2013 was used to define the model grid. Predicted tides are forced at Adam's Pt., a natural constriction in the estuary about 20 km upstream of the mouth and at the entrance to the Great Bay. Of particular interest are fluxes of material on-to and off-of the tidal flats which contribute to water quality conditions in the estuary, and are largely governed by shear stresses that drive nutrient fluxes at the fluid-sediment interface. Basin wide estimates of near-bottom shear stresses can be used to estimate first order nutrient fluxes over a tidal cycle and hence describe general biogeochemical dynamics of the estuary. Future work will include enhanced forcing of currents by

  15. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  16. Nonlinear waves in second order conformal hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogaça, D. A.; Marrochio, H.; Navarra, F. S.; Noronha, J.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we study wave propagation in dissipative relativistic fluids described by a simplified set of the 2nd order viscous conformal hydrodynamic equations corresponding to Israel-Stewart theory. Small amplitude waves are studied within the linearization approximation while waves with large amplitude are investigated using the reductive perturbation method, which is generalized to the case of 2nd order relativistic hydrodynamics. Our results indicate the presence of a "soliton-like" wave solution in Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics despite the presence of dissipation and relaxation effects.

  17. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  18. Hydrodynamic Instabilities Produced by Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo-Cruz, Julio Cesar Ruben; Hernandez-Zapata, Sergio; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gerardo

    2012-11-01

    When a liquid layer (alcohol in the present work) is in an environment where its relative humidity is less than 100 percent evaporation appears. When RH is above a certain threshold the liquid is at rest. If RH decreases below this threshold the flow becomes unstable, and hydrodynamic cells develop. The aim of this work is to understand the formation of those cells and its main features. Firstly, we investigate how the cell size depends on the layer width. We also study how temperature depends on the vertical coordinate when the cells are present. An inverse temperature gradient is found, that is, the bottom of liquid layer is colder than the free surface. This shows that the intuitive idea that the cells are due to a direct temperature gradient, following a Marangoni-like process, does not work. We propose the hypothesis that the evaporation produce a pressure gradient that is responsible of the cell development. On the other hand, using a Schlieren technique we study the topography of the free surface when cells are present. Finally the alcohol vapor layer adjacent to the liquid surface is explored using scattering experiments, giving some insight on the plausibility of the hypothesis described previously. Authors acknowledge support by DGAPA-UNAM under project IN116312 ``Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos.''

  19. Hydrodynamic aspects of fish olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan P.L

    2008-01-01

    Flow into and around the olfactory chamber of a fish determines how odorant from the fish's immediate environment is transported to the sensory surface (olfactory epithelium) lining the chamber. Diffusion times in water are long, even over comparatively short distances (millimetres). Therefore, transport from the external environment to the olfactory epithelium must be controlled by processes that rely on convection (i.e. the bulk flow of fluid). These include the beating of cilia lining the olfactory chamber and the relatively inexpensive pumping action of accessory sacs. Flow through the chamber may also be induced by an external flow. Flow over the olfactory epithelium appears to be laminar. Odorant transfer to the olfactory epithelium may be facilitated in several ways: if the olfactory organs are mounted on stalks that penetrate the boundary layer; by the steep velocity gradients generated by beating cilia; by devices that deflect flow into the olfactory chamber; by parallel arrays of olfactory lamellae; by mechanical agitation of the chamber (or olfactory stalks); and by vortices. Overall, however, our knowledge of the hydrodynamics of fish olfaction is far from complete. Several areas of future research are outlined. PMID:18184629

  20. Detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cissoko, M. )

    1992-02-15

    This paper is concerned with an algebraic study of the equations of detonation waves in relativistic hydrodynamics taking into account the pressure and the energy of thermal radiation. A new approach to shock and detonation wavefronts is outlined. The fluid under consideration is assumed to be perfect (nonviscous and nonconducting) and to obey the following equation of state: {ital p}=({gamma}{minus}1){rho} where {ital p}, {rho}, and {gamma} are the pressure, the total energy density, and the adiabatic index, respectively. The solutions of the equations of detonation waves are reduced to the problem of finding physically acceptable roots of a quadratic polynomial {Pi}({ital X}) where {ital X} is the ratio {tau}/{tau}{sub 0} of dynamical volumes behind and ahead of the detonation wave. The existence and the locations of zeros of this polynomial allow it to be shown that if the equation of state of the burnt fluid is known then the variables characterizing the unburnt fluid obey well-defined physical relations.

  1. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  2. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  3. Maximum entropy principle and relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weert, Ch. G.

    1982-04-01

    A relativistic theory of hydrodynamics applicable beyond the hydrodynamic regime is developed on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. This allows the construction of a unique statistical operator representing the state of the system as specified by the values of the hydrodynamical densities. Special attention is paid to the thermodynamic limit and the virial theorem which leads to an expression for the pressure in terms of the field-theoretic energymomentum tensor of Coleman and Jackiw. It is argued that outside the hydrodynamic regime the notion of a local Gibbs relation, as usually postulated, must be abandoned in general. In the nontext of the linear approximation, the memory-retaining and non-local generalizations of the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations are derived from the underlying Heisenberg equations of motion. The formal similarity to the Zwanzig-Mori description of non-relativistic fluids is expounded.

  4. Hydrodynamic trapping of molecules in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Peter; McColl, James; Clarke, Richard W.; Ostanin, Victor P.; Jönsson, Bengt; Klenerman, David

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show how hydrodynamic forces can be used to locally trap molecules in a supported lipid bilayer (SLB). The method uses the hydrodynamic drag forces arising from a flow through a conical pipette with a tip radius of 1–1.5 μm, placed approximately 1 μm above the investigated SLB. This results in a localized forcefield that acts on molecules protruding from the SLB, yielding a hydrodynamic trap with a size approximately given by the size of the pipette tip. We demonstrate this concept by trapping the protein streptavidin, bound to biotin receptors in the SLB. It is also shown how static and kinetic information about the intermolecular interactions in the lipid bilayer can be obtained by relating how the magnitude of the hydrodynamic forces affects the accumulation of protein molecules in the trap. PMID:22699491

  5. A dynamic broadband reflector built from microscopic silica spheres in the ‘disco’ clam Ctenoides ales

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Lindsey F.; Johnsen, Sönke; Caldwell, Roy L.; Marshall, N. Justin

    2014-01-01

    The ‘disco’ or ‘electric’ clam Ctenoides ales (Limidae) is the only species of bivalve known to have a behaviourally mediated photic display. This display is so vivid that it has been repeatedly confused for bioluminescence, but it is actually the result of scattered light. The flashing occurs on the mantle lip, where electron microscopy revealed two distinct tissue sides: one highly scattering side that contains dense aggregations of spheres composed of silica, and one highly absorbing side that does not. High-speed video confirmed that the two sides act in concert to alternate between vivid broadband reflectance and strong absorption in the blue region of the spectrum. Optical modelling suggests that the diameter of the spheres is nearly optimal for scattering visible light, especially at shorter wavelengths which predominate in their environment. This simple mechanism produces a striking optical effect that may function as a signal. PMID:24966236

  6. Prediction of hydrodynamic performance of an FLNG system in side-by-side offloading operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenhua; Yang, Jianmin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Tao, Longbin

    2014-04-01

    Floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) is a type of liquefied natural gas (LNG) production system that shows prospects in exploitation of stranded offshore gas fields. The dynamic performance of an FLNG system in side-by-side configuration with a LNG carrier under the combined actions of wave, current and wind can be quite complex. This paper presents a comprehensive study on the hydrodynamics of an FLNG system with a focus on the nonlinear coupling effects of vessels and connection systems based on the concept FLNG prototype recently designed for South China Sea. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the two floating vessels connected through hawsers and fenders are investigated using a state-of-the-art time-domain simulation code SIMO, considering their mechanical and hydrodynamic coupling effects. The simulation model consisting of FLNG and LNG carrier is developed and calibrated by a series of model tests including a tuned damping and viscous levels. The hydrodynamic performances of the two floating vessels under an extreme sea state during side-by-side offloading operation are obtained, and their relative motions and the force responses of the connection hawsers and fenders are analyzed. Sensitivity studies are conducted to clarify contributions from the pretension and the stiffness of the connection hawsers. The effects on the hydrodynamic performance of the vessels and on the loads of the connection system are also investigated.

  7. Flagellar Synchronization Independent of Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the coordinated beating of the flagellar pair of the green algae Chlamydomonas, we study theoretically a simple, mirror-symmetric swimmer, which propels itself at low Reynolds number by a revolving motion of a pair of spheres. We show that perfect synchronization between these two driven spheres can occur due to the motion of the swimmer and local hydrodynamic friction forces. Hydrodynamic interactions, though crucial for net propulsion, contribute little to synchronization for this free-moving swimmer.

  8. Chemo-hydrodynamic patterns in porous media.

    PubMed

    De Wit, A

    2016-10-13

    Chemical reactions can interplay with hydrodynamic flows to generate chemo-hydrodynamic instabilities affecting the spatio-temporal evolution of the concentration of the chemicals. We review here such instabilities for porous media flows. We describe the influence of chemical reactions on viscous fingering, buoyancy-driven fingering in miscible systems, convective dissolution as well as precipitation patterns. Implications for environmental systems are discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597788

  9. Hydrodynamic calculations of 20-TeV beam interactions with the SSC beam dump

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.C.; Wingate, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Godwin, R.P.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1993-06-01

    The 300{mu}s, 400 MJ SSC proton beam must be contained when extracted to the external beam dump. The current design for the SSC beam dump can tolerate the beat load produced if the beam is deflected into a raster scan over the face of the dump. If the high frequency deflecting magnet were to fail, the beam would scan a single strip across the dump face resulting in higher local energy deposition. This could vaporize some material and lead to high pressures. Since the beam duration is comparable to the characteristic time of expected hydrodynamic motions, we have combined the static energy deposition capability of the MARS computer code with the two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamics of the MBA and SPHINX codes. EOS data suggest an energy deposition threshold of 15 kJ/g, below which hydrodynamic effects are minimal. Above this our 2D calculations show a hole boring rate of 7 cm/{mu}s for the nominal beam, and pressures of a few kbar. Scanning the nominal beam faster than 0.08 cm/{mu}s should minimize hydrodynamic effects. 3D calculations support this.

  10. Hydrodynamic calculations of 20-TeV beam interactions with the SSC beam dump

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.C.; Wingate, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Godwin, R.P. ); Mokhov, N.V. )

    1993-01-01

    The 300[mu]s, 400 MJ SSC proton beam must be contained when extracted to the external beam dump. The current design for the SSC beam dump can tolerate the beat load produced if the beam is deflected into a raster scan over the face of the dump. If the high frequency deflecting magnet were to fail, the beam would scan a single strip across the dump face resulting in higher local energy deposition. This could vaporize some material and lead to high pressures. Since the beam duration is comparable to the characteristic time of expected hydrodynamic motions, we have combined the static energy deposition capability of the MARS computer code with the two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamics of the MBA and SPHINX codes. EOS data suggest an energy deposition threshold of 15 kJ/g, below which hydrodynamic effects are minimal. Above this our 2D calculations show a hole boring rate of 7 cm/[mu]s for the nominal beam, and pressures of a few kbar. Scanning the nominal beam faster than 0.08 cm/[mu]s should minimize hydrodynamic effects. 3D calculations support this.

  11. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic spectral energy distributions and intensity maps from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy Monte Carlo radiative transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The sources can be extended and/or embedded, and discrete and/or diffuse. The density is not mapped on to a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Secondly, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  12. The hydrodynamic focusing effect inside rectangular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chang, Chih-Chang; Huang, Sung-Bin; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental investigation into the hydrodynamic focusing effect in rectangular microchannels. Two theoretical models for two-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing are proposed. The first model predicts the width of the focused stream in symmetric hydrodynamic focusing in microchannels of various aspect ratios. The second model predicts the location and the width of the focused stream in asymmetric hydrodynamic focusing in microchannels with a low or high aspect ratio. In both models, the theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Hence, the models provide a useful means of performing a theoretical analysis of flow control in microfluidic devices using hydrodynamic focusing effects. The ability of the proposed models to control the focused stream within a micro flow cytometer is verified in a series of experimental trials performed using polystyrene microparticles with a diameter of 20 µm. The experimental data show that the width of the focused stream can be reduced to the same order of magnitude as that of the particle size. Furthermore, it is shown that the microparticles can be successfully hydrodynamically focused and switched to the desired outlet port of the cytometer. Hence, the models presented in this study provide sufficient control to support cell/particle counting and sorting applications.

  13. GENASIS: General Astrophysical Simulation System. I. Refinable Mesh and Nonrelativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.; Endeve, Eirik; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    GenASiS (General Astrophysical Simulation System) is a new code being developed initially and primarily, though by no means exclusively, for the simulation of core-collapse supernovae on the world's leading capability supercomputers. This paper—the first in a series—demonstrates a centrally refined coordinate patch suitable for gravitational collapse and documents methods for compressible nonrelativistic hydrodynamics. We benchmark the hydrodynamics capabilities of GenASiS against many standard test problems; the results illustrate the basic competence of our implementation, demonstrate the strengths and limitations of the HLLC relative to the HLL Riemann solver in a number of interesting cases, and provide preliminary indications of the code's ability to scale and to function with cell-by-cell fixed-mesh refinement.

  14. Validation of Hydrodynamic Load Models Using CFD for the OC4-DeepCwind Semisubmersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2015-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out on the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible to obtain a better understanding of how to set hydrodynamic coefficients for the structure when using an engineering tool such as FAST to model the system. The focus here was on the drag behavior and the effects of the free-surface, free-ends and multi-member arrangement of the semi-submersible structure. These effects are investigated through code-to-code comparisons and flow visualizations. The implications on mean load predictions from engineering tools are addressed. The work presented here suggests that selection of drag coefficients should take into consideration a variety of geometric factors. Furthermore, CFD simulations demonstrate large time-varying loads due to vortex shedding, which FAST's hydrodynamic module, HydroDyn, does not model. The implications of these oscillatory loads on the fatigue life needs to be addressed.

  15. Hydrodynamic models of a cepheid atmosphere. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., College Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    A method for including the solution of the transfer equation in a standard Henyey type hydrodynamic code was developed. This modified Henyey method was used in an implicit hydrodynamic code to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12(d) including radiative transfer effects in the optically thin zones. It was found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere are not responsible for the large microturbulent velocities observed in Cepheids but may be responsible for the occurrence of supersonic microturbulence. It was found that the splitting of the cores of the strong lines is due to shock induced temperature inversions in the line forming region. The adopted light, color, and velocity curves were used to study three methods frequently used to determine the mean radii of Cepheids. It is concluded that an accuracy of 10% is possible only if high quality observations are used.

  16. 3D Hydrodynamical Simulations of Evolved Stars and Observations of Stellar Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.

    2015-08-01

    Evolved stars are among the largest and brightest stars and they are ideal targets for the new generation of sensitive, high resolution instrumentation that provides spectrophotometric, interferometric, astrometric, and imaging observables. The interpretation of the complex stellar surface images requires numerical simulations of stellar convection that take into account multi-dimensional time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics with realistic input physics. We show how the evolved star simulations are obtained using the radiative hydrodynamics code CO5BOLD and how the accurate observables are computed with the post-processing radiative transfer code OPTIM3D. The synergy between observations and theoretical work is supported by a proper and quantitative analysis using these simulations, and by strong constraints from the observational side.

  17. Multi-phase SPH modelling of violent hydrodynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Athanasios; Rogers, Benedict D.; Stansby, Peter K.; Domínguez, José M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the acceleration of multi-phase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using a graphics processing unit (GPU) enabling large numbers of particles (10-20 million) to be simulated on just a single GPU card. With novel hardware architectures such as a GPU, the optimum approach to implement a multi-phase scheme presents some new challenges. Many more particles must be included in the calculation and there are very different speeds of sound in each phase with the largest speed of sound determining the time step. This requires efficient computation. To take full advantage of the hardware acceleration provided by a single GPU for a multi-phase simulation, four different algorithms are investigated: conditional statements, binary operators, separate particle lists and an intermediate global function. Runtime results show that the optimum approach needs to employ separate cell and neighbour lists for each phase. The profiler shows that this approach leads to a reduction in both memory transactions and arithmetic operations giving significant runtime gains. The four different algorithms are compared to the efficiency of the optimised single-phase GPU code, DualSPHysics, for 2-D and 3-D simulations which indicate that the multi-phase functionality has a significant computational overhead. A comparison with an optimised CPU code shows a speed up of an order of magnitude over an OpenMP simulation with 8 threads and two orders of magnitude over a single thread simulation. A demonstration of the multi-phase SPH GPU code is provided by a 3-D dam break case impacting an obstacle. This shows better agreement with experimental results than an equivalent single-phase code. The multi-phase GPU code enables a convergence study to be undertaken on a single GPU with a large number of particles that otherwise would have required large high performance computing resources.

  18. 3D radiation hydrodynamics: Interacting photo-evaporating clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. J.; Mellema, G.

    2003-07-01

    We present the results of a new radiation hydrodynamics code called Maartje. This code describes the evolution of a flow in three spatial dimensions using an adaptive mesh, and contains a combination of a ray tracer and an atomic physics module to describe the effects of ionizing radiation. The code is parallelized using a custom threadpool library. We present an application in which we follow the ionization of two dense spherical clumps which are exposed to an ionizing radiation field from a 50 000 K black body. We study various configurations in which one of the clumps shields the other from the ionizing photons. We find that relatively long-lived filamentary structures with narrow tails are formed. This raises the possibility that cometary knots (such as are found in the Helix Nebula) may be the result of the interaction of an ionizing radiation field with an ensemble of clumps, as opposed to the identification of a single knot with a single clump. Movies are available at http://www.edpsciences.org

  19. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. I. HYDRODYNAMICS AND SELF-GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, A. S.; Beckner, V. E.; Bell, J. B.; Day, M. S.; Lijewski, M. J.; Nonaka, A.; Howell, L. H.; Singer, M.; Joggerst, C. C.; Zingale, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present a new code, CASTRO, that solves the multicomponent compressible hydrodynamic equations for astrophysical flows including self-gravity, nuclear reactions, and radiation. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid and incorporates adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Our approach to AMR uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The radiation component of CASTRO will be described in detail in the next paper, Part II, of this series.

  20. Hydrodynamics calculations for mini jade gages. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaug, R.N.

    1983-07-29

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations were made with the STEALTH code to determine the response under 10 GPa loading of three designs of the SAI particle velocity gage. The calculations showed which design best measured the free field particle velocity. Two-dimensional calculations were also made for four designs of the SRI cylindrical stress gage. The calculations determined that the internal gage dynamics, particularly shock reflections, were primarily responsible for differences between the gage response and the free field stress. A material parameter study using a one-dimensional model was made to see if the use of other material combinations would improve the gage response. The internal dynamics of the flat pack stress gage were investigated using a one-dimensional model. The calculations indicated the severe early-time ringing seen in the gage response is caused by oscillatory motion of the iron plates.

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of an Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Ryan Foster

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is carried out using the 1-D BUCKY radiation hydrodynamics code for a variety of differing chamber fills, radii, chamber obstructions and first wall materials. Discussion of the first wall temperature rise, x-ray spectrum incident on the wall, shock timing and maximum overpressure are presented. An additional discussion of the impact of different gas opacities and their effect on overall chamber dynamics, including the formation of two shock fronts, is also presented. This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Fusion Technology Institute.

  2. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  3. Topology Studies of Hydrodynamics Using Two-Particle Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, J.; Tavares, B. M.; Qian, W. L.; Andrade, R.; Grassi, F.; Hama, Y.; Kodama, T.; Xu, N.

    2009-12-11

    The effects of fluctuating initial conditions are studied in the context of relativistic heavy ion collisions where a rapidly evolving system is formed. Two-particle correlation analysis is applied to events generated with the NEXSPHERIO hydrodynamic code, starting with fluctuating nonsmooth initial conditions (IC). The results show that the nonsmoothness in the IC survives the hydroevolution and can be seen as topological features of the angular correlation function of the particles emerging from the evolving system. A long range correlation is observed in the longitudinal direction and in the azimuthal direction a double peak structure is observed in the opposite direction to the trigger particle. This analysis provides clear evidence that these are signatures of the combined effect of tubular structures present in the IC and the proceeding collective dynamics of the hot and dense medium.

  4. Radiation Hydrodynamic Parameter Study of Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is performed with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY. Simulation with differing chamber parameters are implemented to study the effect of gas fill, gas mixtures and chamber radii. Xenon and argon gases are of particular interest as shielding for the first wall due to their high opacity values and ready availability. Mixing of the two gases is an attempt to engineer a gas cocktail to provide the maximum amount of shielding with the least amount of cost. A parameter study of different chamber radii shows a consistent relationship with that of first wall temperature (~1/r2) and overpressure (~1/r3). This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  5. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. II. GRAY RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of a flux-limited gray radiation solver for the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The gray radiation solver is based on a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics. In our approach, the system is split into two parts, one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, and another parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem is solved explicitly with a high-order Godunov scheme, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method.

  6. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850 km /h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka) and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2) iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the "hydrodynamic tunneling." These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  7. The Scylla Multi-Code Comparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maller, Ariyeh; Stewart, Kyle; Bullock, James; Oñorbe, Jose; Scylla Team

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations are one of the main techniques used to understand galaxy formation and evolution. However, it is far from clear to what extent different numerical techniques and different implementations of feedback yield different results. The Scylla Multi-Code Comparison Project seeks to address this issue by running idenitical initial condition simulations with different popular hydrodynamic galaxy formation codes. Here we compare simulations of a Milky Way mass halo using the codes enzo, ramses, art, arepo and gizmo-psph. The different runs produce galaxies with a variety of properties. There are many differences, but also many similarities. For example we find that in all runs cold flow disks exist; extended gas structures, far beyond the galactic disk, that show signs of rotation. Also, the angular momentum of warm gas in the halo is much larger than the angular momentum of the dark matter. We also find notable differences between runs. The temperature and density distribution of hot gas can differ by over an order of magnitude between codes and the stellar mass to halo mass relation also varies widely. These results suggest that observations of galaxy gas halos and the stellar mass to halo mass relation can be used to constarin the correct model of feedback.

  8. Collisionless stellar hydrodynamics as an efficient alternative to N-body methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Nigel L.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Hensler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The dominant constituents of the Universe's matter are believed to be collisionless in nature and thus their modelling in any self-consistent simulation is extremely important. For simulations that deal only with dark matter or stellar systems, the conventional N-body technique is fast, memory efficient and relatively simple to implement. However when extending simulations to include the effects of gas physics, mesh codes are at a distinct disadvantage compared to Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) codes. Whereas implementing the N-body approach into SPH codes is fairly trivial, the particle-mesh technique used in mesh codes to couple collisionless stars and dark matter to the gas on the mesh has a series of significant scientific and technical limitations. These include spurious entropy generation resulting from discreteness effects, poor load balancing and increased communication overhead which spoil the excellent scaling in massively parallel grid codes. In this paper we propose the use of the collisionless Boltzmann moment equations as a means to model the collisionless material as a fluid on the mesh, implementing it into the massively parallel FLASH Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) code. This approach which we term `collisionless stellar hydrodynamics' enables us to do away with the particle-mesh approach and since the parallelization scheme is identical to that used for the hydrodynamics, it preserves the excellent scaling of the FLASH code already demonstrated on peta-flop machines. We find that the classic hydrodynamic equations and the Boltzmann moment equations can be reconciled under specific conditions, allowing us to generate analytic solutions for collisionless systems using conventional test problems. We confirm the validity of our approach using a suite of demanding test problems, including the use of a modified Sod shock test. By deriving the relevant eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Boltzmann moment equations, we are able to use high order

  9. Linearized model for the hydrodynamic stability investigation of molten fuel jets into the coolant of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartel, K.

    1986-02-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of liquid jets in a liquid continuum, both characterized by low viscosity was analyzed. A linearized mathematical model was developed. This model enables the length necessary for fragmentation of a vertical, symmetric jet of molten fuel by hydraulic forces in the coolant of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor to be evaluated. On the basis of this model the FRAG code for numerical calculation of the hydrodynamic fragmentation mechanism was developed.

  10. New formulation of leading order anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-05-01

    Anisotropic hydrodynamics is a reorganization of the relativistic hydrodynamics expansion, with the leading order already containing substantial momentum-space anisotropies. The latter are a cause of concern in the traditional viscous hydrodynamics, since large momentum anisotropies generated in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are not consistent with the hypothesis of small deviations from an isotropic background, i.e., from the local equilibrium distribution. We discuss the leading order of the expansion, presenting a new formulation for the (1+1)- dimensional case, namely, for the longitudinally boost invariant and cylindrically symmetric flow. This new approach is consistent with the well established framework of Israel and Stewart in the close to equilibrium limit (where we expect viscous hydrodynamics to work well). If we consider the (0+1)-dimensional case, that is, transversally homogeneous and longitudinally boost invariant flow, the new form of anisotropic hydrodynamics leads to better agreement with known solutions of the Boltzmann equation than the previous formulations, especially when we consider massive particles.

  11. Hydrodynamic modulation of pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Controlled expansion and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) using reproducible, high-throughput methods could accelerate stem cell research for clinical therapies. Hydrodynamic culture systems for PSCs are increasingly being used for high-throughput studies and scale-up purposes; however, hydrodynamic cultures expose PSCs to complex physical and chemical environments that include spatially and temporally modulated fluid shear stresses and heterogeneous mass transport. Furthermore, the effects of fluid flow on PSCs cannot easily be attributed to any single environmental parameter since the cellular processes regulating self-renewal and differentiation are interconnected and the complex physical and chemical parameters associated with fluid flow are thus difficult to independently isolate. Regardless of the challenges posed by characterizing fluid dynamic properties, hydrodynamic culture systems offer several advantages over traditional static culture, including increased mass transfer and reduced cell handling. This article discusses the challenges and opportunities of hydrodynamic culture environments for the expansion and differentiation of PSCs in microfluidic systems and larger-volume suspension bioreactors. Ultimately, an improved understanding of the effects of hydrodynamics on the self-renewal and differentiation of PSCs could yield improved bioprocessing technologies to attain scalable PSC culture strategies that will probably be requisite for the development of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:23168068

  12. On the definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-10-28

    The Green-Kubo formula for discrete hydrodynamic variables involves information about not only the fluid transport coefficients but also about discrete versions of the differential operators that govern the evolution of the discrete variables. This gives an intimate connection between discretization procedures in fluid dynamics and coarse-graining procedures used to obtain hydrodynamic behavior of molecular fluids. We observed that a natural definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables in terms of Voronoi cells leads to a Green-Kubo formula which is divergent, rendering the full coarse-graining strategy useless. In order to understand this subtle issue, in the present paper we consider the coarse graining of noninteracting Brownian particles. The discrete hydrodynamic variable for this problem is the number of particles within Voronoi cells. Thanks to the simplicity of the model we spot the origin of the singular behavior of the correlation functions. We offer an alternative definition, based on the concept of a Delaunay cell that behaves properly, suggesting the use of the Delaunay construction for the coarse graining of molecular fluids at the discrete hydrodynamic level.

  13. Hydrodynamics in Holocene Lake Mega-Chad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchette, Frédéric; Schuster, Mathieu; Ghienne, Jean-François; Denamiel, Cléa; Roquin, Claude; Moussa, Abderamane; Marsaleix, Patrick; Duringer, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    Holocene Lake Mega-Chad (LMC) was the largest late Quaternary water-body in Africa. The development of this giant paleo-lake is related to a northward shift of the isohyetes interpreted as evidence for an enhanced Monsoon (African Humid Period). Numerous preserved coastal features have been described all around the LMC shore. Such features reveal the main paleo-hydrodynamical tendencies. In the context of a closed water-body like LMC, hydrodynamics are forced mainly by winds. We use a three-dimensional numerical model (SYMPHONIE) to simulate the mean hydrodynamics in LMC under both Harmattan-like (northeasterly trade winds) and Monsoon-like (southwesterly winds) forcings. The northern part of LMC displays coastal features, such as sand spits, that are consistent with the simulations forced by Harmattan-like winds. Geomorphic features related to Monsoon-driven hydrodynamics are not clearly expressed. They could have developed during the early stage of LMC but subsequently reworked. At the time of sand-spit building, Harmattan-like driven hydrodynamics prevailed and related coastal features were preferentially preserved in the sedimentary record.

  14. Hydrodynamic approaches in relativistic heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derradi de Souza, R.; Koide, T.; Kodama, T.

    2016-01-01

    We review several facets of the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic heavy ion collisions, starting from the historical motivation to the present understandings of the observed collective aspects of experimental data, especially those of the most recent RHIC and LHC results. In this report, we particularly focus on the conceptual questions and the physical foundations of the validity of the hydrodynamic approach itself. We also discuss recent efforts to clarify some of the points in this direction, such as the various forms of derivations of relativistic hydrodynamics together with the limitations intrinsic to the traditional approaches, variational approaches, known analytic solutions for special cases, and several new theoretical developments. Throughout this review, we stress the role of course-graining procedure in the hydrodynamic description and discuss its relation to the physical observables through the analysis of a hydrodynamic mapping of a microscopic transport model. Several questions to be answered to clarify the physics of collective phenomena in the relativistic heavy ion collisions are pointed out.

  15. Physical viscosity in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker

    2006-09-01

    Most hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation carried out to date have tried to model the cosmic gas as an ideal, inviscid fluid, where only a small amount of (unwanted) numerical viscosity is present, arising from practical limitations of the numerical method employed, and with a strength that depends on numerical resolution. However, the physical viscosity of the gas in hot galaxy clusters may in fact not be negligible, suggesting that a self-consistent treatment that accounts for the internal gas friction would be more appropriate. To allow such simulations using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, we derive a novel SPH formulation of the Navier-Stokes and general heat transfer equations and implement them in the GADGET-2 code. We include both shear and bulk viscosity stress tensors, as well as saturation criteria that limit viscous stress transport where appropriate. Our scheme integrates consistently into the entropy and energy conserving formulation of SPH employed by the code. Using a number of simple hydrodynamical test problems, e.g. the flow of a viscous fluid through a pipe, we demonstrate the validity of our implementation. Adopting Braginskii parametrization for the shear viscosity of hot gaseous plasmas, we then study the influence of viscosity on the interplay between AGN-inflated bubbles and the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM). We find that certain bubble properties like morphology, maximum clustercentric radius reached or survival time depend quite sensitively on the assumed level of viscosity. Interestingly, the sound waves launched into the ICM by the bubble injection are damped by physical viscosity, establishing a non-local heating process. However, we find that the associated heating is rather weak due to the overall small energy content of the sound waves. Finally, we carry out cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation with a viscous ICM. We find that the presence of physical viscosity induces new

  16. VINE: A numerical code for simulating astrophysical systems using particles I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2010-10-01

    VINE is a particle based astrophysical simulation code. It uses a tree structure to efficiently solve the gravitational N-body problem and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate gas dynamical effects. The code has been successfully used for a number of studies on galaxy interactions, galactic dynamics, star formation and planet formation and given the implemented physics, other applications are possible as well.

  17. Hydrodynamics of a unitary Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Jay; Fletcher, Richard; Lopes, Raphael; Navon, Nir; Smith, Rob; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    In general, normal-phase Bose gases are well described by modelling them as ideal gases. In particular, hydrodynamic flow is usually not observed in the expansion dynamics of normal gases, and is more readily observable in Bose-condensed gases. However, by preparing strongly-interacting clouds, we observe hydrodynamic behaviour in normal-phase Bose gases, including the `maximally' hydrodynamic unitary regime. We avoid the atom losses that often hamper experimental access of this regime by using radio-frequency injection, which switches on interactions much faster than trap or loss timescales. At low phase-space densities, we find excellent agreement with a collisional model based on the Boltzmann equation. At higher phase-space densities our results show a deviation from this model in the vicinity of an Efimov resonance, which cannot be accounted for by measured losses.

  18. 17. Local Characteristic Algorithms for Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Jose A.

    Numerical schemes for the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations are discussed. The use of conservative algorithms based upon the characteristic structure of those equations, developed during the last decade building on ideas first applied in Newtonian hydrodynamics, provides a robust methodology to obtain stable and accurate solutions even in the presence of discontinuities. The knowledge of the wave structure of the above system is essential in the construction of the so-called linearized Riemann solvers, a class of numerical schemes specifically designed to solve nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. In the last part of the review some astrophysical applications of such schemes, using the coupled system of the (characteristic) Einstein and hydrodynamic equations, are also briefly presented.

  19. Toward a Fully Consistent Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2009-07-07

    Dimitri Mihalas set the standard for all work in radiation hydrodynamics since 1984. The present contribution builds on 'Foundations of Radiation Hydrodynamics' to explore the relativistic effects that have prevented having a consistent non-relativistic theory. Much of what I have to say is in FRH, but the 3-D development is new. Results are presented for the relativistic radiation transport equation in the frame obtained by a Lorentz boost with the fluid velocity, and the exact momentum-integrated moment equations. The special-relativistic hydrodynamic equations are summarized, including the radiation contributions, and it is shown that exact conservation is obtained, and certain puzzles in the non-relativistic radhydro equations are explained.

  20. On the hydrodynamics of swimming enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaoyu; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2015-10-01

    Several recent experiments suggest that rather generally the diffusion of enzymes may be augmented through their activity. We demonstrate that such swimming motility can emerge from the interplay between the enzyme energy landscape and the hydrodynamic coupling of the enzyme to its environment. Swimming thus occurs during the transit time of a transient allosteric change. We estimate the velocity during the transition. The analysis of such a swimming motion suggests the final stroke size is limited by the hydrodynamic size of the enzyme. This limit is quite a bit smaller than the values that can be inferred from the recent experiments. We also show that one proposed explanation of the experiments based on reaction heat effects can be ruled out using an extended hydrodynamic analysis. These results lead us to propose an alternate explanation of the fluorescence correlation measurements.

  1. Dynamo efficiency controlled by hydrodynamic bistability.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Sophie; Herault, Johann; Herault, Johann; Fauve, Stephan; Gissinger, Christophe; Pétrélis, François; Daviaud, François; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Boisson, Jean; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Verhille, Gautier; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-François; Plihon, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrodynamic and magnetic behaviors in a modified experimental setup of the von Kármán sodium flow-where one disk has been replaced by a propeller-are investigated. When the rotation frequencies of the disk and the propeller are different, we show that the fully turbulent hydrodynamic flow undergoes a global bifurcation between two configurations. The bistability of these flow configurations is associated with the dynamics of the central shear layer. The bistable flows are shown to have different dynamo efficiencies; thus for a given rotation rate of the soft-iron disk, two distinct magnetic behaviors are observed depending on the flow configuration. The hydrodynamic transition controls the magnetic field behavior, and bifurcations between high and low magnetic field branches are investigated. PMID:25019895

  2. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  3. The Discrete Geometric Conservation Law and the Nonlinear Stability of ALE Schemes for the Solution of Flow Problems on Moving Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Geuzaine, Philippe; Grandmont, Céline

    2001-12-01

    Discrete geometric conservation laws (DGCLs) govern the geometric parameters of numerical schemes designed for the solution of unsteady flow problems on moving grids. A DGCL requires that these geometric parameters, which include among others grid positions and velocities, be computed so that the corresponding numerical scheme reproduces exactly a constant solution. Sometimes, this requirement affects the intrinsic design of an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) solution method. In this paper, we show for sample ALE schemes that satisfying the corresponding DGCL is a necessary and sufficient condition for a numerical scheme to preserve the nonlinear stability of its fixed grid counterpart. We also highlight the impact of this theoretical result on practical applications of computational fluid dynamics.

  4. Integration of hydrodynamic interactions between filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yi; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In many biological situations, slender filaments interact through a viscous fluid, and these hydrodynamic interactions play a crucial cellular role. Examples include the ability of peritrichous bacteria to bundle their flagella or the generation of metachronal waves in cilia arrays. In most cases of interest, three distinct length scales characterize the filaments, their typical thickness a, relative distance h, and length L, which are asymptotically separated as a << h << L . In this talk, we demonstrate how to analytically develop a long-wavelength integration of hydrodynamic singularities in this biologically-relevant limit.

  5. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Estabrook, K.; Wallace, R.J.; Rubenchik, A.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R.P.; McCray, R.

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): (1) compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  6. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34 and identification of aleB encoding the ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gilis, A; Khan, M A; Cornelis, P; Meyer, J M; Mergeay, M; van der Lelie, D

    1996-01-01

    Siderophore production in response to iron limitation was observed in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, and the corresponding siderophore was named alcaligin E. Alcaligin E was characterized as a phenolate-type siderophore containing neither catecholate nor hydroxamate groups. Alcaligin E promoted the growth of siderophore-deficient A. eutrophus mutants under iron-restricted conditions and promoted 59Fe uptake by iron-limited cells. However, the growth of the Sid- mutant AE1152, which was obtained from CH34 by Tn5-Tc mutagenesis, was completely inhibited by the addition of alcaligin E. AE1152 also showed strongly reduced 59Fe uptake in the presence of alcaligin E. This indicates that a gene, designated aleB, which is involved in transport of ferric iron-alcaligin E across the membrane is inactivated. The aleB gene was cloned, and its putative amino acid sequence showed strong similarity to those of ferric iron-siderophore receptor proteins. Both wild-type strain CH34 and aleB mutant AE1152 were able to use the same heterologous siderophores, indicating that AleB is involved only in ferric iron-alcaligin E uptake. Interestingly, no utilization of pyochelin, which is also a phenolate-type siderophore, was observed for A. eutrophus CH34. Genetic studies of different Sid- mutants, obtained after transposon mutagenesis, showed that the genes involved in alcaligin E and ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor biosynthesis are clustered in a 20-kb region on the A. eutrophus CH34 chromosome in the proximity of the cys-232 locus. PMID:8808942

  7. A Review and Critique of the 2008 United States "National Report on the Development and State of the Art of Adult Learning and Education" (ALE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert J.; Daigle, Elizabeth Anne; Graybeal, Lesley; Walker, Wayland; Avalon, Christian; Fowler, Nan; Massey, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    This study is a review and a critique of the 2008 U.S. "National Report on the Development and State of the Art of Adult Learning and Education" (ALE) prepared by the U.S. Commission for UNESCO and the U.S. Department of Education as a preparatory document for CONFINTEA VI, the 6th International Conference on Adult Education. The study focuses on…

  8. Coupling hydrodynamic and wave propagation modeling for waveform modeling of SPE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmat, C. S.; Steedman, D. W.; Rougier, E.; Delorey, A.; Bradley, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to bring empirical and theoretical advances to the problem of detection and identification of underground nuclear explosions. This paper presents effort to improve knowledge of the processes that affect seismic wave propagation from the hydrodynamic/plastic source region to the elastic/anelastic far field thanks to numerical modeling. The challenge is to couple the prompt processes that take place in the near source region to the ones taking place later in time due to wave propagation in complex 3D geologic environments. In this paper, we report on results of first-principles simulations coupling hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus and CASH), with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. Abaqus and CASH model the shocked, hydrodynamic region via equations of state for the explosive, borehole stemming and jointed/weathered granite. LANL has been recently employing a Coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) modeling capability. This has allowed the testing of a new phenomenological model for modeling stored shear energy in jointed material. This unique modeling capability has enabled highfidelity modeling of the explosive, the weak grout-filled borehole, as well as the surrounding jointed rock. SPECFEM3D is based on the Spectral Element Method, a direct numerical method for full waveform modeling with mathematical accuracy (e.g. Komatitsch, 1998, 2002) thanks to its use of the weak formulation of the wave equation and of high-order polynomial functions. The coupling interface is a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated at the edge of the hydrodynamic code domain. Displacement time series at these points are computed from output of CASH or Abaqus (by interpolation if needed) and fed into the time marching scheme of SPECFEM3D. We will present validation tests and waveforms modeled for several SPE tests conducted so far, with a special focus on effect of the local topography.

  9. A multi-dimensional high-order DG-ALE method based on gas-kinetic theory with application to oscillating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaodong; Xu, Kun; Shyy, Wei

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a multi-dimensional high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation to simulate flows over variable domains with moving and deforming meshes. It is an extension of the gas-kinetic DG method proposed by the authors for static domains (X. Ren et al., 2015 [22]). A moving mesh gas kinetic DG method is proposed for both inviscid and viscous flow computations. A flux integration method across a translating and deforming cell interface has been constructed. Differently from the previous ALE-type gas kinetic method with piecewise constant mesh velocity at each cell interface within each time step, the mesh velocity variation inside a cell and the mesh moving and rotating at a cell interface have been accounted for in the finite element framework. As a result, the current scheme is applicable for any kind of mesh movement, such as translation, rotation, and deformation. The accuracy and robustness of the scheme have been improved significantly in the oscillating airfoil calculations. All computations are conducted in a physical domain rather than in a reference domain, and the basis functions move with the grid movement. Therefore, the numerical scheme can preserve the uniform flow automatically, and satisfy the geometric conservation law (GCL). The numerical accuracy can be maintained even for a largely moving and deforming mesh. Several test cases are presented to demonstrate the performance of the gas-kinetic DG-ALE method.

  10. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  11. A hydrodynamic treatment of the cold dark matter cosmological scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of structure in a postrecombination Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe containing both gaseous baryons and cold dark matter (CDM) is studied by means of an Eulerian code coupled with a standard particle-mesh code. Ionization state and radiative opacity are calculated in detail, and the hydrodynamic simulations make it possible to compute properties of gas distribution on scales larger than three cell sizes. The model yields a soft X-ray background consistent with the latest cosmic nucleosynthesis values, and can accurately reproduce the galaxy-galaxy two-point correlation. The rate of galaxy formation peaks at a relatively late epoch. With regard to mass function, the smallest objects are stabilized against collapse by thermal energy: the mass-weighted mass spectrum peaks in the vicinity of m(b) = 10 exp 9.2 solar masses with a reasonable fit to the Schecter luminosity function if the baryon mass to blue light ratio is approximately 4. Overall, the simulations provide strong support for the CMD scenario. Of particular interest is that, while the baryons are not biased on scales greater than 1/h Mpc, the galaxies are, and that the 'galaxies' have a correlation function of the required slope and the correct amplitude.

  12. Numeric spectral radiation hydrodynamic calculations of supernova shock breakouts

    SciTech Connect

    Sapir, Nir; Halbertal, Dorri

    2014-12-01

    We present here an efficient numerical scheme for solving the non-relativistic one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics equations including inelastic Compton scattering, which is not included in most codes and is crucial for solving problems such as shock breakout. The devised code is applied to the problems of a steady-state planar radiation mediated shock (RMS) and RMS breakout from a stellar envelope. The results are in agreement with those of a previous work on shock breakout, in which Compton equilibrium between matter and radiation was assumed and the 'effective photon' approximation was used to describe the radiation spectrum. In particular, we show that the luminosity and its temporal dependence, the peak temperature at breakout, and the universal shape of the spectral fluence derived in this earlier work are all accurate. Although there is a discrepancy between the spectral calculations and the effective photon approximation due to the inaccuracy of the effective photon approximation estimate of the effective photon production rate, which grows with lower densities and higher velocities, the difference in peak temperature reaches only 30% for the most discrepant cases of fast shocks in blue supergiants. The presented model is exemplified by calculations for supernova 1987A, showing the detailed evolution of the burst spectrum. The incompatibility of the stellar envelope shock breakout model results with observed properties of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and the discrepancy between the predicted and observed rates of XRFs remain unexplained.

  13. Hydrodynamics simulations of 2 (omega) laser propagation in underdense gasbag plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Divol, L; Marinak, M M; Kerbel, G D; Suter, L J; Stevenson, R M; Slark, G E; Oades, K

    2004-04-05

    Recent 2{omega} laser propagation and stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) experiments performed on the Helen laser have been analyzed using the radiation-hydrodynamics code hydra. These experiments utilized two diagnostics sensitive to the hydrodynamics of gasbag targets: a fast x-ray framing camera (FXI) and an SRS streak spectrometer. With a newly implemented nonlocal thermal transport model, hydra is able to reproduce many features seen in the FXI images and the SRS streak spectra. Experimental and simulated side-on FXI images suggest that propagation can be explained by classical laser absorption and the resulting hydrodynamics. Synthetic SRS spectra generated from the hydra results reproduce the details of the experimental SRS streak spectra. Most features in the synthetic spectra can be explained solely by axial density and temperature gradients. The total SRS backscatter increases with initial gasbag fill density up to {approx} 0.08 times the critical density, then decreases. Images from a near-backscatter camera (NBI) show that severe beam spray is not responsible for the trend in total backscatter. Filamentation does not appear to be a significant factor in gasbag hydrodynamics. The simulation and analysis techniques established here can be used in upcoming experimental campaigns on the Omega laser facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  14. Hydrodynamics simulations of 2{omega} laser propagation in underdense gasbag plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N.B.; Divol, L.; Marinak, M.M.; Kerbel, G.D.; Suter, L.J.; Stevenson, R.M.; Slark, G.E.; Oades, K.

    2004-12-01

    Recent 2{omega} laser propagation and stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) experiments performed on the Helen laser have been analyzed using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak, G. D. Kerbel, N. A. Gentile, O. Jones, D. Munro, S. Pollaine, T. R. Dittrich, and S. W. Haan, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)]. These experiments utilized two diagnostics sensitive to the hydrodynamics of gasbag targets: a fast x-ray framing camera (FXI) and a SRS streak spectrometer. With a newly implemented nonlocal thermal transport model, HYDRA is able to reproduce many features seen in the FXI images and the SRS streak spectra. Experimental and simulated side-on FXI images suggest that propagation can be explained by classical laser absorption and the resulting hydrodynamics. Synthetic SRS spectra generated from the HYDRA results reproduce the details of the experimental SRS streak spectra. Most features in the synthetic spectra can be explained solely by axial density and temperature gradients. The total SRS backscatter increases with initial gasbag fill density up to {approx_equal}0.08 times the critical density, then decreases. Data from a near-backscatter imaging camera show that severe beam spray is not responsible for the trend in total backscatter. Filamentation does not appear to be a significant factor in gasbag hydrodynamics. The simulation and analysis techniques established here can be used in ongoing experimental campaigns on the Omega laser facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  15. Neural correlates of personal goal processing during episodic future thinking and mind-wandering: An ALE meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, David; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The ability to imagine the future is a complex mental faculty that depends on an ensemble of cognitive processes supported by an extended set of brain regions. Our aim here was to shed light on one key component of future thinking--personal goal processing--and to determine its neural correlates during both directed and spontaneous forms of thoughts. To address this question, we performed separate ALE meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies of episodic future thinking (EFT), mind-wandering, and personal goal processing, and then investigated the commonalities and differences in brain activity between these three domains. The results showed that the three domains activated a common set of brain regions within the default network and, most notably, the medial prefrontal cortex. This finding suggests that the medial prefrontal cortex mediates the processing of personal goals during both EFT and mind-wandering. Differences in activation were also observed, and notably regions supporting cognitive control processes (the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were recruited to a lesser extent during mind-wandering than experimentally directed future thinking, suggesting that different kinds of self-generated thoughts may recruit varying levels of attentional control abilities.

  16. Examination of tracer transport in the NCAR CCM2 by comparison of CFCl3 simulations with ALE/GAGE observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Dana E.; Williamson, David L.; Rasch, Philip J.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1994-01-01

    The latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM2) contains a semi-Lagrangian tracer transport scheme for the purpose of advecting water vapor and for including chemistry in the climate model. One way to diagnose the CCM2 transport is to simulate CFCl3 in the CCM2 since it has a well-known industry-based source distribution and a photochemical sink and to compare the model results to Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment/Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment ALE/GAGE observations around the globe. In this paper we focus on this comparison and discuss the synoptic scale issues of tracer transport where appropriate. We compare the model and observations on both 12-hour and monthly timescales. The higher-frequency events allow us to diagnose the synoptic scale transport in the CCM2 associated with the observational sites and to determine uncertainties in our high-resolution source distribution. We find that the CCM2 does simulate many of the key features such as pollution events and some seasonal transports, but there are still some dynamical features of tracer transport such as the storm track dynamics and cross-equatorial flow that merit further study in both the model and the real atmosphere.

  17. Les fistules œsotrachéales congénitales isolées à propos de 2 cas

    PubMed Central

    El Biache, Imad; Lechqar, Maryem; Rami, Mohammed; Bouabdallah, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent 2 cas de fistules oesotrachéales isolées sans atrésie de l'oesophage, colligés au service de chirurgie pédiatrique au CHU Hassan II de Fès au Maroc entre 2008 et 2013. Il s'agit d'une anomalie rare représentée par un fin canal ascendant entre l'oesophage et la face postérieure de la trachée, à la hauteur du défilé cervico-thoracique. Elle se manifeste cliniquement par une symptomatologie respiratoire parfois digestive. Le diagnostic a été confirmé par le transit oesophagien dans les 2 cas et a permis aussi de déterminer le siège de la fistule. Le traitement était chirurgical, il a permis de supprimer la communication anormale entre l'oesophage et la trachée par un abord cervical avec interposition musculaire dans les 2 cas. Les suites post-opératoires et l’évolution à long terme étaient simples. Le but de ce travail est d'exposer les différents moyens diagnostique et thérapeutique. PMID:25328600

  18. Category-specific neural processing for naming pictures of animals and naming pictures of tools: an ALE meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Philippe A; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2010-01-01

    Using activation-likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis, we identified brain areas that are invoked when people name pictures of animals and pictures of tools. We found that naming animals and naming tools invoked separate distributed networks in the brain. Specifically, we found that naming animals invoked greater responses than naming tools in frontal lobe structures that are typically modulated by emotional content and task demands, and in a number of visual areas in the ventral stream. In contrast, naming tools invoked greater responses in a different set of areas in the ventral stream than those invoked by naming animals. Naming tools also invoked greater responses than naming animals in motor areas in the frontal lobe as well as in sensory areas in the parietal lobe. The only overlapping sites of activation that we found for naming these two categories of objects were in the left pars triangularis, the left inferior temporal gyrus, and the left parahippocampal gyrus. Taken together, our meta-analysis reveals that animals and tools are categorically represented in visual areas but show convergence in higher-order associative areas in the temporal and frontal lobes in regions that are typically regarded as being involved in memory and/or semantic processing. Our results also reveal that naming tools not only engages visual areas in the ventral stream but also a fronto-parietal network associated with tool use. Whether or not this network associated with tool use contributes directly to recognition will require further investigation.

  19. Stabilizing geometry for hydrodynamic rotary seals

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2010-08-10

    A hydrodynamic sealing assembly including a first component having first and second walls and a peripheral wall defining a seal groove, a second component having a rotatable surface relative to said first component, and a hydrodynamic seal comprising a seal body of generally ring-shaped configuration having a circumference. The seal body includes hydrodynamic and static sealing lips each having a cross-sectional area that substantially vary in time with each other about the circumference. In an uninstalled condition, the seal body has a length defined between first and second seal body ends which varies in time with the hydrodynamic sealing lip cross-sectional area. The first and second ends generally face the first and second walls, respectively. In the uninstalled condition, the first end is angulated relative to the first wall and the second end is angulated relative to the second wall. The seal body has a twist-limiting surface adjacent the static sealing lip. In the uninstalled condition, the twist-limiting surface is angulated relative to the peripheral wall and varies along the circumference. A seal body discontinuity and a first component discontinuity mate to prevent rotation of the seal body relative to the first component.

  20. Hydrodynamic dispersion of microswimmers in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthieu; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    In our laboratory, we study hydrodynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers. These micro-organisms are unicellular algae Chlamydomonas Rheinhardii which are able to swim by using their flagella. The swimming dynamics of these micro-swimmers can be seen as a random walk, in absence of any kind of interaction. In addition, these algae have the property of being phototactic, i.e. they swim towards the light. Combining this property with a hydrodynamic flow, we were able to reversibly separate algae from the rest of the fluid. But for sufficiently high volume fraction, these active particles interact with each other. We are now interested in how the coupling of hydrodynamic interactions between swimmers and phototaxis can modify the swimming dynamics at the scale of the suspension. To this aim, we conduct experiments in microfluidic devices to study the dispersion of the micro-organisms in a the liquid phase as a function of the volume fraction. We show that the dispersion of an assembly of puller type microswimmers is quantitatively affected by hydrodynamics interactions. Phd student.

  1. Hydrodynamically driven colloidal assembly in dip coating.

    PubMed

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Morris, Jeffrey F; Stone, Howard A

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca(2/3)/sqrt[Bo] < 0.7, where Ca and Bo are the capillary and Bond numbers, respectively. An analytical model and numerical simulations are presented for the case of two-dimensional flow with circular particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  2. Livermore Unstructured Lagrange Explicit Shock Hydrodynamics

    2010-09-21

    LULESH v1.0 is a 3D unstructured Lagrange hydrodynamics simulation written specifically to solve a standard analytical test problem, known as the Sedov problem. In this problem, a quantum of energy is deposited into a gas and propagates through the gas over time.

  3. Boundary conditions in tunneling via quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1993-01-01

    Via the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics, an approach to the problem of tunneling through sharp-edged potential barriers is developed. Above all, it is shown how more general boundary conditions follow from the continuity of mass, momentum, and energy.

  4. Hydrodynamically Driven Colloidal Assembly in Dip Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca2/3/Bo<0.7, where Ca and Bo are the capillary and Bond numbers, respectively. An analytical model and numerical simulations are presented for the case of two-dimensional flow with circular particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  5. Hydrodynamic Issues in PAMS Mandrel Target Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillan, B M; Paguio, R; Subramanian, P; Takagi, M; Zebib, A

    2003-08-27

    Imperfections in PAMS mandrels critically govern the quality of final ICF targets. Imperfections in the mandrels can have a wide range of origins. Here, they present observations of 3 types of imperfections, and data to support the proposal that hydrodynamic factors during the curing of the mandrel are potential causes of these imperfections.

  6. HYDRODYNAMIC ISSUES IN PAMS MANDREL TARGET FABRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    McQUILLAN,B.W; PAGUIO,R; SUBRAMANIAN,P; TAKAGI,M; ZEBIB,A

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Imperfections in PAMS mandrels critically govern the quality of final ICF targets. Imperfections in the mandrels can have a wide range of origins. Here, they present observations of 3 types of imperfections, and data to support the proposal that hydrodynamic factors during the curing of the mandrel are potential causes of these imperfections.

  7. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Hydrodynamic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Valentin I.

    We review derivations of the chiral magnetic effect (ChME) in hydrodynamic approximation. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the basics of the effect. The main challenge now is to account for the strong interactions between the constituents of the fluid. The main result is that the ChME is not renormalized: in the hydrodynamic approximation it remains the same as for non-interacting chiral fermions moving in an external magnetic field. The key ingredients in the proof are general laws of thermodynamics and the Adler-Bardeen theorem for the chiral anomaly in external electromagnetic fields. The chiral magnetic effect in hydrodynamics represents a macroscopic manifestation of a quantum phenomenon (chiral anomaly). Moreover, one can argue that the current induced by the magnetic field is dissipation free and talk about a kind of "chiral superconductivity". More precise description is a quantum ballistic transport along magnetic field taking place in equilibrium and in absence of a driving force. The basic limitation is the exact chiral limit while temperature—excitingly enough—does not seemingly matter. What is still lacking, is a detailed quantum microscopic picture for the ChME in hydrodynamics. Probably, the chiral currents propagate through lower-dimensional defects, like vortices in superfluid. In case of superfluid, the prediction for the chiral magnetic effect remains unmodified although the emerging dynamical picture differs from the standard one.

  8. Testing different formulations of leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech; Strickland, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A recently obtained set of the equations for leading-order (3+1)D anisotropic hydrodynamics is tested against exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation time approximation. In order to perform detailed comparisons, the new anisotropic hydrodynamics equations are reduced to the boost-invariant and transversally homogeneous case. The agreement with the exact solutions found using the new anisotropic hydrodynamics equations is similar to that found using previous, less general formulations of anisotropic hydrodynamics. In addition, we find that, when compared to a state-of-the-art second-order viscous hydrodynamics framework, leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics better reproduces the exact solution for the pressure anisotropy and gives comparable results for the bulk pressure evolution. Finally, we compare the transport coefficients obtained using linearized anisotropic hydrodynamics with results obtained using second-order viscous hydrodynamics.

  9. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  10. Parallel processing a real code: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Trease, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent Free-Lagrange hydrodynamics code has been multitasked and autotasked on a Cray X-MP/416. The multitasking was done by using the Los Alamos Multitasking Control Library, which is a superset of the Cray multitasking library. Autotasking is done by using constructs which are only comment cards if the source code is not run through a preprocessor. The 3-D algorithm has presented a number of problems that simpler algorithms, such as 1-D hydrodynamics, did not exhibit. Problems in converting the serial code, originally written for a Cray 1, to a multitasking code are discussed, Autotasking of a rewritten version of the code is discussed. Timing results for subroutines and hot spots in the serial code are presented and suggestions for additional tools and debugging aids are given. Theoretical speedup results obtained from Amdahl's law and actual speedup results obtained on a dedicated machine are presented. Suggestions for designing large parallel codes are given. 8 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Parallel processing a three-dimensional free-lagrange code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Trease, H.E. )

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent free-Lagrange hydrodynamics code has been multitasked and autotasked on a CRAY X-MP/416. The multitasking was done by using the Los Alamos Multitasking Control Library, which is a superset of the CRAY multitasking library. Autotasking is done by using constructs which are only comment cards if the source code is not run through a preprocessor. The three-dimensional algorithm has presented a number of problems that simpler algorithms, such as those for one-dimensional hydrodynamics, did not exhibit. Problems in converting the serial code, originally written for a CRAY-1, to a multitasking code are discussed. Autotasking of a rewritten version of the code is discussed. Timing results for subroutines and hot spots in the serial code are presented and suggestions for additional tools and debugging aids are given. Theoretical speedup results obtained from Amdahl's law and actual speedup results obtained on a dedicated machine are presented. Suggestions for designing large parallel codes are given.

  12. Coding of Neuroinfectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Accurate coding is an important function of neurologic practice. This contribution to Continuum is part of an ongoing series that presents helpful coding information along with examples related to the issue topic. Tips for diagnosis coding, Evaluation and Management coding, procedure coding, or a combination are presented, depending on which is most applicable to the subject area of the issue. PMID:26633789

  13. Model Children's Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. American Indian Law Center.

    The Model Children's Code was developed to provide a legally correct model code that American Indian tribes can use to enact children's codes that fulfill their legal, cultural and economic needs. Code sections cover the court system, jurisdiction, juvenile offender procedures, minor-in-need-of-care, and termination. Almost every Code section is…

  14. 78 FR 9907 - Hydrodynamics, Inc.; Notice Denying Late Intervention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hydrodynamics, Inc.; Notice Denying Late Intervention On June 24, 2010, Commission staff issued a three-year preliminary permit to Hydrodynamics, Inc. (Hydrodynamics) to study...

  15. Density estimators in particle hydrodynamics. DTFE versus regular SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelupessy, F. I.; Schaap, W. E.; van de Weygaert, R.

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of a study comparing density maps reconstructed by the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) and by regular SPH kernel-based techniques. The density maps are constructed from the outcome of an SPH particle hydrodynamics simulation of a multiphase interstellar medium. The comparison between the two methods clearly demonstrates the superior performance of the DTFE with respect to conventional SPH methods, in particular at locations where SPH appears to fail. Filamentary and sheetlike structures form telling examples. The DTFE is a fully self-adaptive technique for reconstructing continuous density fields from discrete particle distributions, and is based upon the corresponding Delaunay tessellation. Its principal asset is its complete independence of arbitrary smoothing functions and parameters specifying the properties of these. As a result it manages to faithfully reproduce the anisotropies of the local particle distribution and through its adaptive and local nature proves to be optimally suited for uncovering the full structural richness in the density distribution. Through the improvement in local density estimates, calculations invoking the DTFE will yield a much better representation of physical processes which depend on density. This will be crucial in the case of feedback processes, which play a major role in galaxy and star formation. The presented results form an encouraging step towards the application and insertion of the DTFE in astrophysical hydrocodes. We describe an outline for the construction of a particle hydrodynamics code in which the DTFE replaces kernel-based methods. Further discussion addresses the issue and possibilities for a moving grid-based hydrocode invoking the DTFE, and Delaunay tessellations, in an attempt to combine the virtues of the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches.

  16. To Code or Not To Code?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Brian; Sandhu, Parveen; Lacorte, Manel; Gourlay, Lesley

    1998-01-01

    This article considers arguments for and against the use of coding systems in classroom-based language research and touches on some relevant considerations from ethnographic and conversational analysis approaches. The four authors each explain and elaborate on their practical decision to code or not to code events or utterances at a specific point…

  17. Dynamic Response of a Pulse-Heated, Thick-Walled, Hollow Sphere: Validation of Code Numerics

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    2000-01-19

    Volumetric pulse heating of a thick-walled hollow sphere is numerically investigated. The primary objective is to validate a variety of LLNL 30 hydrocodes for modeling the dynamic behavior of fissile/fissionable metals subject to rapid ''fission-heating'' transients. The 30 codes tested include both DYNA3D and NIKE3D, as well as the ''ASCI'' code, ALE3D. The codes are compared ''head-to-head'' and are benchmarked against a 1D finite difference solution to the problem that is derived from basic principles. Three pulse-heating transients are examined with full-width-half-maximum pulse durations of 41{micro}s, 85{micro}s, and 140{micro}s, respectively. These three transients produce a significant range of dynamic responses in the thermo-elastic regime. We present results for dynamic radial displacements and stresses for each pulse, and also discuss which code features/options worked best for these types of calculations. In general, the code results are in excellent agreement for the simple system considered. Validation of code numerics in simple systems is a key first step toward future application of the codes in more complicated geometries (U).

  18. Recent development of three-dimensional piping code SHAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the recent development of the three-dimensional, structural, and hydrodynamic analysis piping code SHAPS. Several new features have been incorporated into the program, including (1) an elbow hydrodynamic model for analyzing the effect of global motion on the pressure-wave propagation, (2) a component hydrodynamic model for treating fluid motion in the vicinity of rigid obstacles and baffle plates, (3) the addition of the implicit time integration scheme in the structural-dynamic analysis, (4) the option of an implicit-implicit fluid-structural linking scheme, and (5) provisions for two constitutive equations for materials under various loading conditions. Sample problems are given to illustrate these features. Their results are discussed in detail. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  19. CTH: A three-dimensional, large deformation, shock wave physics code

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, J.M.; Zeigler, F.J.; Thompson, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    CTH is a code system under development at Sandia National Laboratories to model multidimensional, multi-material, large deformation, strong shock physics. One-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional Eulerian capabilities have been implemented first. Highly accurate analytic and tabular equations of state with solid, liquid, vapor, gas-liquid mixed phase and solid-liquid mixed phase capabilities can be used. The architecture of CTH was designed to accommodate other numerical approaches such as Lagrangian or ALE methods. CTH was carefully structured to run fast on a CRAY XMP. It is highly vectorized and multitasked. We briefly discuss the models used in CTH, techniques used to multitask the code and example calculations.

  20. CTH: A three-dimensional, large deformation, shock wave physics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlaun, J. M.; Zeigler, F. J.; Thompson, S. L.

    1987-06-01

    CTH is a code system under development at Sandia National Laboratories to model multidimensional, multi-material, large deformation, strong shock physics. One-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional Eulerian capabilities have been implemented first. Highly accurate analytic and tabular equations of state with solid, liquid, vapor, gas-liquid mixed phase and solid-liquid mixed phase capabilities can be used. The architecture of CTH was designed to accommodate other numerical approaches such as Lagrangian or ALE methods. CTH was carefully structured to run fast on a CRAY XMP. It is highly vectorized and multitasked. We briefly discuss the models used in CTH, techniques used to multitask the code and example calculations.

  1. Bare Code Reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Jean J.

    1980-05-01

    The Bare code system will be used, in every market and supermarket. The code, which is normalised in US and Europe (code EAN) gives informations on price, storage, nature and allows in real time the gestion of theshop.

  2. Coherent dynamic structure factors of strongly coupled plasmas: A generalized hydrodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Di; Zhao, Bin; Hu, GuangYue; Gong, Tao; Xia, YuQing; Zheng, Jian

    2016-05-01

    A generalized hydrodynamic fluctuation model is proposed to simplify the calculation of the dynamic structure factor S(ω, k) of non-ideal plasmas using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In this model, the kinetic and correlation effects are both included in hydrodynamic coefficients, which are considered as functions of the coupling strength (Γ) and collision parameter (kλei), where λei is the electron-ion mean free path. A particle-particle particle-mesh molecular dynamics simulation code is also developed to simulate the dynamic structure factors, which are used to benchmark the calculation of our model. A good agreement between the two different approaches confirms the reliability of our model.

  3. Modeling of multi-interface, diverging, hydrodynamic experiments for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Hansen, J. F.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Arnett, D.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2009-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will soon provide experiments with far more than ten times the energy than has been previously available on laser facilities. In the context of supernova-relevant hydrodynamics, this will enable experiments in which hydrodynamic instabilities develop from multiple, coupled interfaces in a diverging explosion. This paper discusses the design of such blast-wave-driven explosions in which the relative masses of the layers are scaled to those within the star. It reports scaling simulations with CALE to model the global dynamics of such an experiment. CALE is a hybrid, Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code. The simulations probed the instability growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled systems using different materials. The simulations assist in the target design process and in developing an experiment that can be diagnosed.

  4. Examining the Accuracy of Astrophysical Disk Simulations with a Generalized Hydrodynamical Test Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    We discuss a generalization of the classic Keplerian disk test problem allowing for both pressure and rotational support, as a method of testing astrophysical codes incorporating both gravitation and hydrodynamics. We argue for the inclusion of pressure in rotating disk simulations on the grounds that realistic, astrophysical disks exhibit non-negligible pressure support. We then apply this test problem to examine the performance of various smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods incorporating a number of improvements proposed over the years to address problems noted in modeling the classical gravitation-only Keplerian disk. We also apply this test to a newly developed extension of SPH based on reproducing kernels called CRKSPH. Counterintuitively, we find that pressure support worsens the performance of traditional SPH on this problem, causing unphysical collapse away from the steady-state disk solution even more rapidly than the purely gravitational problem, whereas CRKSPH greatly reduces this error.

  5. OC5 Project Phase I: Validation of Hydrodynamic Loading on a Fixed Cylinder: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. N.; Wendt, F. F.; Jonkman, J. M.; Popko, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Stansberg, C. T.; Bachynski, E. E.; Bayati, I.; Beyer, F.; de Vaal, J. B.; Harries, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Shin, H.; Kim, B.; van der Zee, T.; Bozonnet, P.; Aguilo, B.; Bergua, R.; Qvist, J.; Qijun, W.; Chen, X.; Guerinel, M.; Tu, Y.; Yutong, H.; Li, R.; Bouy, L.

    2015-04-23

    This paper describes work performed during the first half of Phase I of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation, with Correlation project (OC5). OC5 is a project run under the IEA Wind Research Task 30, and is focused on validating the tools used for modeling offshore wind systems. In this first phase, simulated responses from a variety of offshore wind modeling tools were modeling tools were validated against tank test data of a fixed, suspended cylinder (without a wind turbine) that was tested under regular and irregular wave conditions at MARINTEK. The results from this phase include an examination of different approaches one can use for defining and calibrating hydrodynamic coefficients for a model, and the importance of higher-order wave models in accurately modeling the hydrodynamic loads on offshore substructures.

  6. Heavy flavor electron RAA and υ2 in event-by-event relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Caio A. G.; Cosentino, Mauro R.; Munhoz, Marcelo G.; Noronha, Jorge; Suaide, Alexandre A. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we investigate how event-by-event hydrodynamics fluctuations affect the nuclear suppression factor and elliptic flow of heavy flavor mesons and non-photonic electrons. We use a 2D+1 Lagrangian ideal hydrodynamic code [1, 2] on an event-by-event basis in order to compute local temperature and flow profiles. Using a strong coupling inspired energy loss parametrization [3] on top of the evolving space-time energy density distributions we are able to propagate the heavy quarks inside the medium until the freeze-out temperature is reached and a Pythia [4] modeling of hadronization takes place. The resulting D0 and heavy-flavor electron yield is compared with recent experimental data for R AA and υ 2 from the STAR and PHENIX collaborations [5-7]. In addition we present preditions for the higher order Fourier harmonic coefficients υ3(pt) of heavy-flavor electrons at Rhic’s collisions.

  7. An efficient approach to unstructured mesh hydrodynamics on the cell broadband engine (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, Charles R

    2010-12-14

    Unstructured mesh physics for the Cell Broadband Engine (CBE) has received little or no attention to date, largely because the CBE architecture poses particular challenges for unstructured mesh algorithms. SPU memory management strategies such as data preloading cannot be applied to the irregular memory storage patterns of unstructured meshes; and the SPU vector instruction set does not support the indirect addressing needed by connectivity arrays. This paper presents an approach to unstructured mesh physics that addresses these challenges, by creating a new mesh data structure and reorganizing code to give efficient CBE performance. The approach is demonstrated on the FLAG production hydrodynamics code using standard test problems, and results show an average speedup of more than 5x over the original code.

  8. Simulations of laser imprint reduction using underdense foams and its consequences on the hydrodynamic instability growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph; Riazuelo, G.; Grech, M.; Breil, J.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Borisenko, N.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms of laser imprint reduction on a surface of a planar foil performed using an underdense foam are presented. The consequences on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at the ablation front when the foil is accelerated are studied. The analysis is based on numerical simulations using a chain of codes: the electromagnetic paraxial code Parax provides the modifications of the intensity perturbation spectrum while the laser beam is crossing the foam. Two-dimensional axially symmetric simulations with the radiation hydrodynamic code CHIC describe the foam expansion and the foil dynamics. Finally, the perturbed flow calculations and the instability growth are investigated with the two-dimensional CHIC version in the planar geometry by using the initial and smoothed perturbation spectra. The dominant role of temporal laser smoothing during the time of foam crossing by the laser beam is demonstrated. Applications to the direct drive targets for inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  9. An efficient approach to unstructured mesh hydrodynamics on the cell broadband engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Unstructured mesh physics for the Cell Broadband Engine (CBE) has received little or no attention to date, largely because the CBE architecture poses particular challenges for unstructured mesh algorithms. The most common SPU memory management strategies cannot be applied to the irregular memory access patterns of unstructured meshes, and the SPU vector instruction set does not support the indirect addressing needed by connectivity arrays. This paper presents an approach to unstructured mesh physics that addresses these challenges, by creating a new mesh data structure and reorganizing code to give efficient CBE performance. The approach is demonstrated on the FLAG production hydrodynamics code using standard test problems, and results show an average speedup of more than 5x over the original code.

  10. 3D hydrodynamic lift force model for AREVA fuel assembly in EDF PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ekomie, S.; Bigot, J.; Dolleans, Ph.; Vallory, J.

    2007-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of the hydrodynamic lift force acting on a fuel assembly in PWR core is necessary to design the hold-down system of this assembly. This paper presents the model used by AREVA NP and EDF for computing this force. It results from a post-processing of sub-channel thermal-hydraulic codes respectively porous medium approach code THYC (EDF) and sub-channel type code FLICA III-F (AREVA NP). This model is based on the application of the Euler's theorem. Some hypotheses used to simplify the complexity of fuel assembly geometry are supported by CFD calculations. Then the model is compared to some experimental results obtained on a single fuel assembly inserted in the HERMES-T test facility located in CEA - Cadarache. Finally, the model is applied to calculate the lift force for the whole core. Various loading patterns including homogenous and mixed cores have been investigated and compared. (authors)

  11. Direct characterization of hydrodynamic loading on a microelectromechanical systems microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrnezhad, Ali; Bashir, Rashid; Park, Kidong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic loading greatly affects resonant characteristic of microfabricated structures immersed in a viscous fluid. In this letter, we demonstrate a technique to measure hydrodynamic loading on a MEMS resonator in a broad range of actuation frequency. The extracted hydrodynamic loading is in a good agreement with an analytical solution of an oscillating sphere, and a highly accurate model is developed for the hydrodynamic loading of the resonator. The developed technique can directly characterize the hydrodynamic loading of a microstructure with an arbitrary geometry and will facilitate the optimization of MEMS devices and AFM probes operating in a viscous fluid.

  12. Preasymptotic hydrodynamic dispersion as a quantitative probe of permeability.

    PubMed

    Brosten, Tyler R; Vogt, Sarah J; Seymour, Joseph D; Codd, Sarah L; Maier, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    We interpret a generalized short-time expansion of stochastic hydrodynamic dispersion dynamics in the case of small Reynolds number flow through macroscopically homogenous permeable porous media to directly determine hydrodynamic permeability. The approach allows determination of hydrodynamic permeability from pulsed field gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the short-time effective hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient. The analytical expansion of asymptotic dynamics agrees with experimental NMR data and lattice Boltzmann simulation of hydrodynamic dispersion in consolidated random sphere pack media. PMID:22680531

  13. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in Blast-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Mixing from hydrodynamics instabilities such as Richtmyer-Meshkov, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz, occurs in a wide range of engineering applications such as inertial confinement fusion, supernova collapse, and scramjet combustion. The success of these applications depends on an accurate understanding of these phenomena. Following previous work investigating hydrodynamic mixing from the interaction of a perturbed interface with a planar blast wave, we model the perturbation growth by analyzing the different acceleration phases of a blast wave: an instantaneous acceleration (a pressure increase) followed by a gradual, time-dependent deceleration (a pressure decrease). Depending on the characteristics of these phases, the instability will be dominated by Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor growth. We use a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method that prevents pressure errors at interfaces with variable specific heats ratios to simulate these systems and understand the different growth regimes.

  14. Hydrodynamics with spin in bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belovs, M.; CÄ`bers, A.

    2016-06-01

    We describe a kind of self-propelling motion of bacteria based on the cooperative action of rotating flagella on the surface of bacteria. Describing the ensemble of rotating flagella in the framework of the hydrodynamics with spin, the reciprocal theorem of Stokesian hydrodynamics is generalized accordingly. The velocity of the self-propulsion is expressed in terms of the characteristics of the vector field of flagella orientation and it is shown that the unusually high velocities of Thiovulum majus bacteria may be explained by the cooperative action of the rotating flagella. The expressions obtained enable us to estimate the torque created by the rotary motors of the bacterium and show quantitative agreement with the existing experimental data.

  15. A Hydrodynamical Mechanism for Generating Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, X.; Rendón, P. L.; Rodríguez-Mota, R. G.; Capella, A.

    2014-04-01

    Whenever in a classical accretion disk the thin disk approximation fails interior to a certain radius, a transition from Keplerian to radial infalling trajectories should occur. We show that this transition is actually expected to occur interior to a certain critical radius, provided surface density profiles are steeper than Sigma(R) ~ R(-1/2) , and further, that it probably corresponds to the observationally inferred phenomena of thick hot walls internally limiting the extent of many stellar accretion disks. Infalling trajectories will lead to the convergent focusing and concentration of matter towards the very central regions, most of which will simply be swallowed by the central object. We show through a perturbative hydrodynamical analysis, that this will naturally develop a well collimated pair of polar jets. A first analytic treatment of the problem described is given, proving the feasibility of purely hydrodynamical mechanisms for astrophysical jet generation.

  16. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel

    2016-04-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  17. Hydrodynamic approach to boost invariant free streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E.

    2015-08-01

    We consider a family of exact boost invariant solutions of the transport equation for free-streaming massless particles, where the one-particle distribution function is defined in terms of a function of a single variable. The evolution of second and third moments of the one-particle distribution function [the second moment being the energy momentum tensor (EMT) and the third moment the nonequilibrium current (NEC)] depends only on two moments of that function. Given those two moments, we show how to build a nonlinear hydrodynamic theory which reproduces the early time evolution of the EMT and the NEC. The structure of these theories may give insight on nonlinear hydrodynamic phenomena on short time scales.

  18. Pursuit and Synchronization in Hydrodynamic Dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanso, Eva; Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou

    2015-10-01

    We study theoretically the behavior of a class of hydrodynamic dipoles. This study is motivated by recent experiments on synthetic and biological swimmers in microfluidic Hele-Shaw type geometries. Under such confinement, a swimmer's hydrodynamic signature is that of a potential source dipole, and the long-range interactions among swimmers are obtained from the superposition of dipole singularities. Here, we recall the equations governing the positions and orientations of interacting asymmetric swimmers in doubly periodic domains and focus on the dynamics of pairs of swimmers. We obtain two families of "relative equilibria"-type solutions that correspond to pursuit and synchronization of the two swimmers. Interestingly, the pursuit mode is stable for large-tail swimmers, whereas the synchronization mode is stable for large-head swimmers. These results have profound implications on the collective behavior reported in several recent studies on populations of confined microswimmers.

  19. Structure and hydrodynamics of colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayter, John B.

    1986-02-01

    Invited paperColloidal phases (for example, micellar solutions, latex suspensions, ferrofluids and microemulsions) provide excellent model systems with which to test structural and hydrodynamic theories of the liquid state. Interparticle potentials may be attractive or repulsive, and the experimentalist is often free to control the strength, range and symmetry of the interactions. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle neutron spin-echo (SANSE) provide excellent complementary tools for studying the structure and time-dependence of these systems, where correlation lengths typically vary from about one to several tens of nm. Correlation times are usually in the nsec to μsec range, but may be of order minutes in certain systems. This paper will review some of the current theories and their recent experimental tests, using colloidal systems in which the direct interaction potentials may have spherical, dipolar or cylindrical symmetry and the hydrodynamic interactions may be weak or strong.

  20. Structure and hydrodynamics of colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayter, J. B.

    1985-07-01

    Colloidal phases (for example, micellar solutions, latex suspensions, ferrofluids and microemulsions) provide excellent model systems with which to test structural and hydrodynamic theories of the liquid state. Interparticle potentials may be attractive or repulsive, and the experimentalist is often free to control the strength, range and symmetry of the interactions. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle neutron spin-echo (SANSE) provide excellent complementary tools for studying the structure and time-dependence of these systems, where correlation lengths typically vary from about one to several tens of nm. Correlation times are usually in the nsec to (MU) sec range, but may be of order minutes in certain systems. This paper will review some of the current theories and their recent experimental tests, using colloidal systems in which the direct interaction potentials may have spherical, dipolar or cylindrical symmetry and the hydrodynamic interactions may be weak or strong.

  1. Quasinormal modes of the polytropic hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2015-07-01

    Analogue systems are a powerful instrument to investigate and understand in a controlled setting many general-relativistic effects. Here, we focus on superradiant-triggered instabilities and quasinormal modes. We consider a compressible hydrodynamic vortex characterized by a polytropic equation of state, the polytropic hydrodynamic vortex, a purely circulating system with an ergoregion but no event horizon. We compute the quasinormal modes of this system numerically with different methods, finding excellent agreement between them. When the fluid velocity is larger than the speed of sound, an ergoregion appears in the effective spacetime, triggering an "ergoregion instability." We study the details of the instability for the polytropic vortex, and in particular find analytic expressions for the marginally stable configuration.

  2. Electro-hydrodynamic synchronization of piezoelectric flags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yifan; Doaré, Olivier; Michelin, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    Hydrodynamic coupling of flexible flags in axial flows may profoundly influence their flapping dynamics, in particular driving their synchronization. This work investigates the effect of such coupling on the harvesting efficiency of coupled piezoelectric flags, that convert their periodic deformation into an electrical current. Considering two flags connected to a single output circuit, we investigate using numerical simulations the relative importance of hydrodynamic coupling to electrodynamic coupling of the flags through the output circuit due to the inverse piezoelectric effect. It is shown that electrodynamic coupling is dominant beyond a critical distance, and induces a synchronization of the flags' motion resulting in enhanced energy harvesting performance. We further show that this electrodynamic coupling can be strengthened using resonant harvesting circuits.

  3. Hyperbolic metamaterial lens with hydrodynamic nonlocal response.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2013-06-17

    We investigate the effects of hydrodynamic nonlocal response in hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs), focusing on the experimentally realizable parameter regime where unit cells are much smaller than an optical wavelength but much larger than the wavelengths of the longitudinal pressure waves of the free-electron plasma in the metal constituents. We derive the nonlocal corrections to the effective material parameters analytically, and illustrate the noticeable nonlocal effects on the dispersion curves numerically. As an application, we find that the focusing characteristics of a HMM lens in the local-response approximation and in the hydrodynamic Drude model can differ considerably. In particular, the optimal frequency for imaging in the nonlocal theory is blueshifted with respect to that in the local theory. Thus, to detect whether nonlocal response is at work in a hyperbolic metamaterial, we propose to measure the near-field distribution of a hyperbolic metamaterial lens. PMID:23787690

  4. HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranck, Raymond W.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of the upper extent of the Potomac Estuary between Indian Head and Morgantown, Md. , are simulated using a two-dimensional model. The model computes water-surface elevations and depth-averaged velocities by numerically integrating finite-difference forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation using the alternating direction implicit method. The fundamental, non-linear, unsteady-flow equations, upon which the model is formulated, include additional terms to account for Coriolis acceleration and meteorological influences. Preliminary model/prototype data comparisons show agreement to within 9% for tidal flow volumes and phase differences within the measured-data-recording interval. Use of the model to investigate the hydrodynamics and certain aspects of transport within this Potomac Estuary reach is demonstrated. Refs.

  5. Hydrodynamics and electromyography: ergonomics aspects in aquatics.

    PubMed

    Clarys, J P

    1985-03-01

    In a quadruple approach we have suggested the ergonomics links between fundamental hydrodynamics, applied dynamics of swimming, electromyographical aspects and specific training. Fundamental and applied hydrodynamics were investigated in a Dutch Marine Ship model test station allowing for the measurement of passive drag in different positions and of active (swimming) drag. It was found that drag in a prone position under the water surface was greater than at the water surface, but active drag while swimming reached twice the drag values of any passive drag condition. This indicates that body form has no influence on drag and propulsion. Since it is merely the technical execution of the swimming movement that will influence performance, telemetric EMG of the involved musculature has allowed a complete kinesiological picture of the front crawl movements to be made. This knowledge is basic for the study of specific and alternative training systems, such as specific dry land training.

  6. The Radiation Transport Conundrum in Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2005-03-18

    The summary of this paper is: (1) The conundrum in the title is whether to treat radiation in the lab frame or the comoving frame in a radiation-hydrodynamic problem; (2) Several of the difficulties are associated with combining a somewhat relativistic treatment of radiation with a non-relativistic treatment of hydrodynamics; (3) The principal problem is a tradeoff between easily obtaining the correct diffusion limit and describing free-streaming radiation with the correct wave speed; (4) The computational problems of the comoving-frame formulation in more than one dimension, and the difficulty of obtaining both exact conservation and full u/c accuracy argue against this method; (5) As the interest in multi-D increases, as well as the power of computers, the lab-frame method is becoming more attractive; and (6) The Monte Carlo method combines the advantages of both lab-frame and comoving-frame approaches, its only disadvantage being cost.

  7. Structure and hydrodynamics of colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1985-07-01

    Colloidal phases (for example, micellar solutions, latex suspensions, ferrofluids and microemulsions) provide excellent model systems with which to test structural and hydrodynamic theories of the liquid state. Interparticle potentials may be attractive or repulsive, and the experimentalist is often free to control the strength, range and symmetry of the interactions. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle neutron spin-echo (SANSE) provide excellent complementary tools for studying the structure and time-dependence of these systems, where correlation lengths typically vary from about one to several tens of nm. Correlation times are usually in the nsec to ..mu..sec range, but may be of order minutes in certain systems. This paper will review some of the current theories and their recent experimental tests, using colloidal systems in which the direct interaction potentials may have spherical, dipolar or cylindrical symmetry and the hydrodynamic interactions may be weak or strong.

  8. Hydrodynamic Object Recognition: When Multipoles Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichert, Andreas B.; Bamler, Robert; van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2009-02-01

    The lateral-line system is a unique mechanosensory facility of aquatic animals that enables them not only to localize prey, predator, obstacles, and conspecifics, but also to recognize hydrodynamic objects. Here we present an explicit model explaining how aquatic animals such as fish can distinguish differently shaped submerged moving objects. Our model is based on the hydrodynamic multipole expansion and uses the unambiguous set of multipole components to identify the corresponding object. Furthermore, we show that within the natural range of one fish length the velocity field contains far more information than that due to a dipole. Finally, the model we present is easy to implement both neuronally and technically, and agrees well with available neuronal, physiological, and behavioral data on the lateral-line system.

  9. RICH: OPEN-SOURCE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION ON A MOVING VORONOI MESH

    SciTech Connect

    Yalinewich, Almog; Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re’em

    2015-02-01

    We present here RICH, a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on Godunov’s method, on an unstructured moving mesh (the acronym stands for Racah Institute Computational Hydrodynamics). This code is largely based on the code AREPO. It differs from AREPO in the interpolation and time-advancement schemeS as well as a novel parallelization scheme based on Voronoi tessellation. Using our code, we study the pros and cons of a moving mesh (in comparison to a static mesh). We also compare its accuracy to other codes. Specifically, we show that our implementation of external sources and time-advancement scheme is more accurate and robust than is AREPO when the mesh is allowed to move. We performed a parameter study of the cell rounding mechanism (Lloyd iterations) and its effects. We find that in most cases a moving mesh gives better results than a static mesh, but it is not universally true. In the case where matter moves in one way and a sound wave is traveling in the other way (such that relative to the grid the wave is not moving) a static mesh gives better results than a moving mesh. We perform an analytic analysis for finite difference schemes that reveals that a Lagrangian simulation is better than a Eulerian simulation in the case of a highly supersonic flow. Moreover, we show that Voronoi-based moving mesh schemes suffer from an error, which is resolution independent, due to inconsistencies between the flux calculation and the change in the area of a cell. Our code is publicly available as open source and designed in an object-oriented, user-friendly way that facilitates incorporation of new algorithms and physical processes.

  10. RICH: Open-source Hydrodynamic Simulation on a Moving Voronoi Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re'em

    2015-02-01

    We present here RICH, a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on Godunov’s method, on an unstructured moving mesh (the acronym stands for Racah Institute Computational Hydrodynamics). This code is largely based on the code AREPO. It differs from AREPO in the interpolation and time-advancement schemeS as well as a novel parallelization scheme based on Voronoi tessellation. Using our code, we study the pros and cons of a moving mesh (in comparison to a static mesh). We also compare its accuracy to other codes. Specifically, we show that our implementation of external sources and time-advancement scheme is more accurate and robust than is AREPO when the mesh is allowed to move. We performed a parameter study of the cell rounding mechanism (Lloyd iterations) and its effects. We find that in most cases a moving mesh gives better results than a static mesh, but it is not universally true. In the case where matter moves in one way and a sound wave is traveling in the other way (such that relative to the grid the wave is not moving) a static mesh gives better results than a moving mesh. We perform an analytic analysis for finite difference schemes that reveals that a Lagrangian simulation is better than a Eulerian simulation in the case of a highly supersonic flow. Moreover, we show that Voronoi-based moving mesh schemes suffer from an error, which is resolution independent, due to inconsistencies between the flux calculation and the change in the area of a cell. Our code is publicly available as open source and designed in an object-oriented, user-friendly way that facilitates incorporation of new algorithms and physical processes.

  11. Studies on NADPH-cytochrome c reductase. II. Steady-state kinetic properties of the crystalline enzyme from ale yeast.

    PubMed

    Tryon, E; Kuby, S A

    1984-01-01

    From a study of the steady-state kinetics (at pH 7.6, 30 degrees C) of the reduction of cytochrome c, a 'ping-pong' mechanism may be postulated for the crystalline NADPH-cytochrome c reductase from ale yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae [1], a result derivable from a three-substrate ordered system with a rapid equilibrium random sequence in substrates, NADPH and FAD, followed by reactions of the third substrate, Cyt C3+. On this basis, estimates for the kinetic parameters were made together with the inhibitor dissociation constants for NADP+ (competitive with respect to NADPH as variable substrate, but noncompetitive with respect to cytochrome c3+ as the variable substrate). A noncompetitive type of inhibition was also found for cytochrome c2+ with NADPH as variable substrate, in confirmation of the proposed mechanism. With 2,6-dichloroindophenol as the acceptor, in place of cytochrome c3+, a value for KNADPH could be estimated which agreed with that estimated above, with cytochrome c3+ as the acceptor, again, in confirmation of the postulated mechanism. The reactions with molecular O2 catalyzed by the enzyme with NADPH as the reductant have been studied polarographically, and its Km for O2 estimated to be about 0.15 mmol/l at pH 7.6, 25 degrees C. The product of the reaction appears to be H2O2, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor for NADPH (Ki = 0.5 mmol/l), and tentatively an enzyme ternary complex containing oxygen and FADoh (semiquinone of FAD) may be assumed to be the kinetically important intermediate, which may be postulated to be in quasi-equilibrium with an enzyme ternary complex containing Oo2 (superoxide) and FAD.

  12. Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Haan, S.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Goldstein, W.H.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.

    1993-02-17

    An extensive series of experiments has been conducted on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime. Two-mode foils allow a first direct observation of mode coupling. Surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes.

  13. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  14. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment. PMID:25997399

  15. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G P

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems. PMID:26986407

  16. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  17. Hydrodynamic Forces on Microbubbles under Ultrasound Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alicia; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound (US) pressure waves exert a force on microbubbles that can be used to steer them in a flow. To control the motion of microbubbles under ultrasonic excitation, the coupling between the volume oscillations induced by the ultrasound pressure and the hydrodynamic forces needs to be well understood. We present experimental results for the motion of small, coated microbubbles, with similar sizes and physico-chemical properties as clinically-available ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). The size distribution for the bubbles, resulting from the in-house manufacturing process, was characterized by analysis of high magnification microscopic images and determined to be bimodal. More than 99% of the volume is contained in microbubbles less than 10 microns in diameter, the size of a red blood cell. The motion of the microbubbles in a pulsatile flow, at different Reynolds and Womersley numbers, is studied from tracking of high-speed shadowgraphy. The influence of ultrasound forcing, at or near the resonant frequency of the bubbles, on the hydrodynamic forces due to the pulsatile flow is determined from the experimental measurements of the trajectories. Previous evidence of a sign reversal in Saffman lift is the focus of particular attention, as this is frequently the only hydrodynamic force acting in the direction perpendicular to the flow pathlines. Application of the understanding of this physical phenomenon to targeted drug delivery is analyzed in terms of the transport of the microbubbles. NSF GRFP.

  18. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G P

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  19. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-05-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment.

  20. The quantum hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.L. )

    1994-04-01

    The classical hydrodynamic equations can be extended to include quantum effects by incorporating the first quantum corrections. The full three-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model is derived for the first time by a moment expansion of the Wigner-Boltzmann equations. The QHD conservation laws have the same form as the classical hydrodynamic equations, but the energy density and stress tensor have additional quantum terms. These quantum terms allow particles to tunnel through potential barriers and to build up in potential wells. The three-dimensional QHD transport equations are mathematically classified as having two Schroedinger modes, two hyperbolic modes, and one parabolic mode. The one-dimensional steady-state QHD equations are discretized in conservation form using the second upwind method. Simulations of a resonant tunneling diode are presented that show charge buildup in the quantum well and negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage curve. These are the first simulations of the full QHD equations to show NDR in the resonant tunneling diode. The computed current-voltage curve agrees quantitatively with experimental measurements. NDR interpreted in terms of the time spent by electrons in the quantum well.

  1. Computer-assisted hydrodynamic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Suda, Takeshi; Suda, Kieko; Liu, Dexi

    2008-06-01

    The recently developed hydrodynamic delivery method makes it possible to deliver DNA and RNA into parenchyma cells by intravascular injection of nucleic acid-containing solution. While this procedure is effective in rodents, it is difficult to perform in large animals, because manual control while delivering the injection cannot be sufficiently reliable for achieving a just-right hydrodynamic pressure in targeted tissue. In order to overcome this problem, we have developed a computer-controlled injection device that uses real-time intravascular pressure as a regulator. Using the new injection device, and mouse liver as the model organ, we demonstrated continuous injection at a single pressure and different pressures, and also serial (repeated) injections at intervals of 250 ms, by programming the computer according to the need. When assessed by reporter plasmids, the computer-controlled injection device exhibits gene delivery efficiency similar to that of conventional hydrodynamic injection. The device is also effective in gene delivery to kidney and muscle cells in rats, with plasmids or adenoviral vectors as gene carriers. Successful gene delivery to liver and kidney was also demonstrated in pigs, with the computer-controlled injection being combined with image-guided catheterization. These results represent a significant advance in in vivo gene delivery research, with potential for use in gene therapy in humans.

  2. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  3. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R.W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  4. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGAa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R. W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≃ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 107 cm/s, and a laser intensity of ˜1015 W/cm2. These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  5. ASTRORAY: General relativistic polarized radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.

    2014-07-01

    ASTRORAY employs a method of ray tracing and performs polarized radiative transfer of (cyclo-)synchrotron radiation. The radiative transfer is conducted in curved space-time near rotating black holes described by Kerr-Schild metric. Three-dimensional general relativistic magneto hydrodynamic (3D GRMHD) simulations, in particular performed with variations of the HARM code, serve as an input to ASTRORAY. The code has been applied to reproduce the sub-mm synchrotron bump in the spectrum of Sgr A*, and to test the detectability of quasi-periodic oscillations in its light curve. ASTRORAY can be readily applied to model radio/sub-mm polarized spectra of jets and cores of other low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. For example, ASTRORAY is uniquely suitable to self-consistently model Faraday rotation measure and circular polarization fraction in jets.

  6. Magneto-hydrodynamic calculation of magnetic flux compression using imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jibo; Sun, Chengwei; Gu, Zhuowei

    2015-06-01

    Based on the one-dimensional elastic-plastic reactive hydrodynamic code SSS, the one-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics code SSS/MHD is developed successfully, and calculation is carried for cylindrical magneto cumulative generators (MC-1 device). The magnetic field diffusion into liner and sample tuber is analyzed, and the result shows that the maximum value of magnetic induction intensity to cavity 0.2 mm in liner is only sixteen Tesla, while the one in sample tuber is several hundred Tesla, which is caused by balancing of electromagnetism force and imploding one for the different velocity of liner and sample tuber. The curves of magnetic induction intensity on axes of cavity and the velocity history on the wall of sample tuber are calculated, which accord with the experiment results. The works in this paper account for that code SSS/MHD can be applied in experiment configures of detonation, shock and electromagnetism load and improve of parameter successfully. The experiment data can be estimated, analyzed and checked validly, and the physics course of correlative device can be understood deeply, according to SSS/MHD. This work was supported by the special funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant 11176002.

  7. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  8. Time-implicit hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interiors: Application to turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallet, M.

    2012-12-01

    The talk described the first results on turbulent convection in the envelope of a red giant star obtained with the MUSIC code, a new multi-dimensional time-implicit code devoted to stellar interiors (Viallet, Baraffe & Walder, A&A, 2011). Currently, most of our physical understanding of stellar interiors and evolution largely relies on one-dimensional calculations. The description of complex physical processes like time-dependent turbulent convection, rotation or MHD processes mostly relies on simplified, phenomenological approaches, with a predictive power hampered by the use of several free parameters. These approaches have now reached their limits in the understanding of stellar structure and evolution. The development of multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations becomes crucial to progress in the field of stellar physics and to meet the enormous observational efforts aimed at producing data of unprecedented quality (COROT, Kepler GAIA). The MUSIC code solves the hydrodynamical equations in spherical geometry and is based on the finite volume method. The talk presented implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in a cold giant envelope both in 2D and 3D and covering 80% in radius of the stellar structure. The computational domain includes both the convective envelope and a significant fraction of the radiative zone, allowing for convective penetration. These simulations provide valuable insight to improve the description of turbulent convection in 1D models

  9. Discussion on LDPC Codes and Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon; Pollara, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the progress that the workgroup on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) for space link coding. The workgroup is tasked with developing and recommending new error correcting codes for near-Earth, Lunar, and deep space applications. Included in the presentation is a summary of the technical progress of the workgroup. Charts that show the LDPC decoder sensitivity to symbol scaling errors are reviewed, as well as a chart showing the performance of several frame synchronizer algorithms compared to that of some good codes and LDPC decoder tests at ESTL. Also reviewed is a study on Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP), and the recommended codes. A design for the Pseudo-Randomizer with LDPC Decoder and CRC is also reviewed. A chart that summarizes the three proposed coding systems is also presented.

  10. RAMSES-CH: a new chemodynamical code for cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, C. G.; Courty, S.; Gibson, B. K.; Kawata, D.; Calura, F.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present a new chemodynamical code -RAMSES-CH- for use in simulating the self-consistent evolution of chemical and hydrodynamical properties of galaxies within a fully cosmological framework. We build upon the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, which includes a treatment of self-gravity, hydrodynamics, star formation, radiative cooling and supernova feedback, to trace the dominant isotopes of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe. We include the contribution of Type Ia and Type II supernovae, in addition to low- and intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars, relaxing the instantaneous recycling approximation. The new chemical evolution modules are highly flexible and portable, lending themselves to ready exploration of variations in the underpinning stellar and nuclear physics. We apply RAMSES-CH to the cosmological simulation of a typical L★ galaxy, demonstrating the successful recovery of the basic empirical constraints regarding [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] and Type Ia/II supernova rates.

  11. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  12. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  13. Parafermion stabilizer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngördü, Utkan; Nepal, Rabindra; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2014-10-01

    We define and study parafermion stabilizer codes, which can be viewed as generalizations of Kitaev's one-dimensional (1D) model of unpaired Majorana fermions. Parafermion stabilizer codes can protect against low-weight errors acting on a small subset of parafermion modes in analogy to qudit stabilizer codes. Examples of several smallest parafermion stabilizer codes are given. A locality-preserving embedding of qudit operators into parafermion operators is established that allows one to map known qudit stabilizer codes to parafermion codes. We also present a local 2D parafermion construction that combines topological protection of Kitaev's toric code with additional protection relying on parity conservation.

  14. 2D Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Calculations with an Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Gianakon, T. A.; Lipnikov, K. N.; Nelson, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    Single fluid resistive MHD is useful for modeling Z-pinch configurations in cylindrical geometry. One such example is thin walled liners for shock physics or HEDP experiments driven by capacitor banks such as the LANL's PHELIX or Sandia-Z. MHD is also useful for modeling high-explosive-driven flux compression generators (FCGs) and their high-current switches. The resistive MHD in our arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) code operates in one and two dimensions in both Cartesian and cylindrical geometry. It is implemented as a time-step split operator, which consists of, ideal MHD connected to the explicit hydro momentum and energy equations and a second order mimetic discretization solver for implicit solution of the magnetic diffusion equation. In a staggered grid scheme, a single-component of cell-centered magnetic flux is conserved in the Lagrangian frame exactly, while magnetic forces are accumulated at the nodes. Total energy is conserved to round off. Total flux is conserved under the ALE relaxation and remap. The diffusion solver consistently computes Ohmic heating. Both Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions are available with coupling to external circuit models. Example calculations will be shown.

  15. Hydrodynamic Interaction Of Strong Shocks With Inhomogeneous Media:A Discontinuous Galerkin Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Rohit; Shelton, A.

    2011-04-01

    HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTION OF STRONG SHOCKS WITH INHOMOGENEOUS MEDIA: A DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN APPROACH Rohit Kulkarni, Andrew Shelton, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Auburn University, AL 36849 Many astrophysical flows, which have been observed, occur in inhomogeneous (clumpy) media. This numerical experiment comprises a model which will analyze the hydrodynamic interaction of strong shocks with inhomogeneous media neglecting any radiative losses, heat conduction, and gravitational forces. Formulation of this numerical study considers interaction of a steady, planar shock with embedded cylindrical clouds in the two-dimensional computational space. Hydrodynamic system of non-linear hyperbolic conservation equations for single fluid system is considered to govern the underlying physical phenomenon. Emphasis will be on the development of discontinuous Galerkin finite element based code towards discretizing and then solving the physical conservation laws for the defined numerical experiment. This higher-order accurate scheme in spatial and temporal domain uses the discontinuous Galerkin method and this scheme will be compared with the Godunov-type finite volume method for accuracy and computational expense. Then the results will be obtained for the defined numerical model using the discontinuous Galerkin method, to discuss and conduct a comparative study which will provide the insights about the time evolution of a shock wave interacting with a single cloud system studied in a described computational domain. Numerical code developed will use an adaptive mesh refinement tool provided by AMRCLAW code which will allow us to achieve sufficiently high resolution both at small and large scales of simulation. Rohit Kulkarni rak0008@tigermail.auburn.edu Department of Aerospace Engineering, Auburn University .

  16. ARA type protograph codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus and method for encoding low-density parity check codes. Together with a repeater, an interleaver and an accumulator, the apparatus comprises a precoder, thus forming accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA codes). Protographs representing various types of ARA codes, including AR3A, AR4A and ARJA codes, are described. High performance is obtained when compared to the performance of current repeat-accumulate (RA) or irregular-repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes.

  17. QR Codes 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen; LaFrance, Jason; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A QR (quick-response) code is a two-dimensional scannable code, similar in function to a traditional bar code that one might find on a product at the supermarket. The main difference between the two is that, while a traditional bar code can hold a maximum of only 20 digits, a QR code can hold up to 7,089 characters, so it can contain much more…

  18. Science and code validation program to secure ignition on LMJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, E.; Boniface, C.; Bonnefille, M.; Casner, A.; Esnault, C.; Galmiche, D.; Gauthier, P.; Girard, F.; Gisbert, R.; Leidinger, J.-P.; Loiseau, P.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Mignon, P.; Monteil, M.-C.; Seytor, P.; Tassin, V.

    2016-03-01

    The CEA/DAM ICF experimental program is currently conducted on LIL and Omega with the goal of improving our simulation tool, the FCI2 code. In this effort, we focus on typical ICF observables: hohlraum radiation drive history, capsule core shape and neutron emission history, hydrodynamic instability growth. In addition to integrated experiment, specific designs are also helpful to pinpoint a particular phenomenon. In this article, we review our current efforts and status, and our future projects on Omega and LMJ.

  19. Hydrodynamic modeling of petroleum reservoirs using simulator MUFITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    MUFITS is new noncommercial software for numerical modeling of subsurface processes in various applications (www.mufits.imec.msu.ru). To this point, the simulator was used for modeling nonisothermal flows in geothermal reservoirs and for modeling underground carbon dioxide storage. In this work, we present recent extension of the code to petroleum reservoirs. The simulator can be applied in conventional black oil modeling, but it also utilizes a more complicated models for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs as well as for oil rim fields. We give a brief overview of the code by providing the description of internal representation of reservoir models, which are constructed of grid blocks, interfaces, stock tanks as well as of pipe segments and pipe junctions for modeling wells and surface networks. For conventional black oil approach, we present the simulation results for SPE comparative tests. We propose an accelerated compositional modeling method for sub- and supercritical flows subjected to various phase equilibria, particularly to three-phase equilibria of vapour-liquid-liquid type. The method is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic potential of reservoir fluid as a function of pressure, total enthalpy and total composition and storing its values as a spline table, which is used in hydrodynamic simulation for accelerated PVT properties prediction. We provide the description of both the spline calculation procedure and the flashing algorithm. We evaluate the thermodynamic potential for a mixture of two pseudo-components modeling the heavy and light hydrocarbon fractions. We develop a technique for converting black oil PVT tables to the potential, which can be used for in-situ hydrocarbons multiphase equilibria prediction under sub- and supercritical conditions, particularly, in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs. We simulate recovery from a reservoir subject to near-critical initial conditions for hydrocarbon mixture. We acknowledge

  20. Preparing for an explosion: Hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence in presupernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Nathan; Arnett, W. David E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu

    2014-04-20

    Both observations and numerical simulations are discordant with predictions of conventional stellar evolution codes for the latest stages of a massive star's life before core collapse. The most dramatic example of this disconnect is in the eruptive mass loss occurring in the decade preceding Type IIn supernovae. We outline the key empirical evidence that indicates severe pre-supernova instability in massive stars, and we suggest that the chief reason that these outbursts are absent in stellar evolution models may lie in the treatment of turbulent convection in these codes. The mixing length theory that is used ignores (1) finite amplitude fluctuations in velocity and temperature and (2) their nonlinear interaction with nuclear burning. Including these fluctuations is likely to give rise to hydrodynamic instabilities in the latest burning sequences, which prompts us to discuss a number of far-reaching implications for the fates of massive stars. In particular, we explore connections to enhanced pre-supernova mass loss, unsteady nuclear burning and consequent eruptions, swelling of the stellar radius that may trigger violent interactions with a companion star, and potential modifications to the core structure that could dramatically alter calculations of the core-collapse explosion mechanism itself. These modifications may also impact detailed nucleosynthesis and measured isotopic anomalies in meteorites, as well as the interpretation of young core-collapse supernova remnants. Understanding these critical instabilities in the final stages of evolution may make possible the development of an early warning system for impending core collapse, if we can identify their asteroseismological or eruptive signatures.