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Sample records for alegre rio grande

  1. [Mental illness in women in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil (1870-1910)].

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Cristiane Teresinha de Deus Virgili; Vasconcellos, Silvio José Lemos

    2007-05-01

    The relationship between female gender and mental illness is complex, remaining largely a product of women's social situation as daughters, wives, and mothers. The main objective of this article is to discuss the historical aspects related to mental illness in women in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, from 1870 to 1910. The authors consulted records from several so-called insane asylums as well as periodical articles published during the period. These documents provide good insight into how psychiatrists and lay society interpreted mental disorders in women. The research contributes to an understanding of the historical issues related to diagnosis of mental illness and the implications for current practice.

  2. [Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in elderly individuals treated under the Family Health Strategy, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Engroff, Paula; Ely, Luísa Scheer; Guiselli, Samilla Roversi; Goularte, Fabiana Henriques; Gomes, Irenio; Viegas, Karin; Carli, Geraldo Attilio De

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and relate it to the socioeconomic, hygienic, sanitary and health conditions of the elderly of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The research involved a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire with epidemiologic questions was applied and blood samples were taken. The assessment of IgG and IgM anti-T. gondii was performed using the ELISA technique. Seroprevalence was evaluated among 599 elderly individuals with 88% for IgG anti-T. gondii and with 0.8% for IgM. In the multivariate analysis, the variables that associated themselves independently with positive IgG were age range, personal income and wearing spectacles. Those associated with positive IgM were age, self-rated health and wearing spectacles. The results call attention to the high prevalence of IgG anti-T. gondii in elderly individuals in the FHS in Porto Alegre, generating concern in the event that the reactivation of toxoplasmosis and the development of more severe symptoms of this infection occur. PMID:25119078

  3. [Women caring for women: a study at the "Viva Maria" shelter, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Meneghel, S N; Camargo, M; Fasolo, L R; Mattiello, D A; da Silva, R C; Santos, T C; Dagord, A L; Reck, A; Zanetti, L; Sottili, M; Teixeira, M A

    2000-01-01

    This research was conducted in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, with a sample of battered women selected from a government shelter called the "Casa Viva Maria". We analyzed data on 110 women staying at the shelter during the previous two years (January 1996-June 1998). The profile of the women was as follows: abused women were young (mean age 29 years), all had low socioeconomic status, 12% were illiterate, 21% were black, 80% reported frequent abuse by their partners, and 18% had returned to violent homes. The researchers visited 34 former lodgers from the shelter and invited them to participate in a series of evaluation workshops. A total of 118 persons, including mothers and children, attended three evaluation meetings. During this process, researchers encouraged participants to express opinions, perceptions, and feelings about their past experience in the shelter and their own concept of violence. Finally, a focal group was organized with the "Viva Maria" staff members. Female workers reported how their job had been helpful for their personal development and had helped change their own lives.

  4. Homicides among teenagers in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil: vulnerability, susceptibility, and gender cultures.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Ana Rosária; Lopes, Marta Julia Marques

    2002-01-01

    The authors present a quantitative and qualitative study on homicides among teenagers in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, based on a historical series during the 1990s and the life and death histories in this group, with a special focus on 1997. In that year there were 68 homicides in which the victims were from 10 to 19 years old. Of the 68, 62 were males and only 6 females, or a ratio of 10:1, showing that young males are more vulnerable and susceptible to being murdered. The data indicate that cause of death is influenced by gender culture and that homicides are based on power and status symbols characterizing a kind of virility. This expression of virility in the shaping of violence also appears in the domination of the female body observed in homicides with young women as the victims. The life and death histories of these teenagers highlight the pertinence of the gender-based analysis as a theoretical-analytical category, in addition to analyses considering socioeconomic aspects and social inequity. PMID:12488876

  5. The Hemiptera type-material housed in the "Museu de Ciências Naturais, Fundação Zoobotânica do Rio Grande do Sul" of Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Tatiana Petersen; Guidoti, Marcus; Barcellos, Aline

    2013-01-01

    We provide a commented and referenced list on the type material deposited in the "Museu de Ciencias Naturais, Fundação Zoobotânica do Rio Grande do Sul", Porto Alegre, Brazil. Geographic coordinates are available on a digital repository for free access. High-resolution images of the specimens are available under request.

  6. [Critical trajectories of female victims of gender violence: discourse analysis of women and staff professionals in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Stela Nazareth; Bairros, Fernanda; Mueller, Betânia; Monteiro, Débora; Oliveira, Lidiane Pellenz de; Collaziol, Marceli Emer

    2011-04-01

    This qualitative study aims to describe the trajectories of female victims of gender violence in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The methodology included in-depth interviews with women and staff, attempting to map the critical paths of women when they made the decision to seek professional help. We interviewed 21 women victims of gender violence and 25 professionals, including law enforcement officials, health and social workers, and nongovernmental organizations. The women's trajectories in the services were mapped, identifying facilitating factors and obstacles in the process of breaking with gender violence. The victims reported: pressure by professional staff to return to their marriages and police inefficiency in providing protection. The discourse of law enforcement officials and health and social workers showed a range of different concepts regarding violence, medicalization of violence, and network fragmentation.

  7. [Maternity during adolescence: negative emotional indicators and associated factors in 14 to 16-year-old mothers from Porto Alegre in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Micheli Scolari; Schermann, Lígia Braun; Béria, Jorge Umberto

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of negative emotional indicators and associated factors in 430 adolescent mothers between 14 to 16 years of age in Porto Alegre in the State of Rio Grande do Sul was detected. Socio-demographic variables, social and family relationships, reproductive aspects, abuse and violence were studied. The prevalence rate (PR) was obtained by Poisson regression using hierarchical analyses. The prevalence of intense psychological distress was 32.6%, and it was associated with low social class, grade repetition, bad relationship with the mother, lack of acceptance of the pregnancy by the father, and lack of family support during pregnancy. The prevalence of negative self-esteem was 15.4%, and it was associated with the bad relationship with the mother and not having a person to confide in. Little or no expectation for the future was found in 7.5% of the adolescents and was associated with grade repetition, nurturing by the biological mother, early sexual initiation, and the occurrence of physical abuse. The high prevalence of psychological distress found in the adolescent mothers of this study deserves special attention from the public policies in health in order to include qualified professionals to manage the emotional aspects of early motherhood. PMID:25272132

  8. [Consumption of nutrients among the elderly living in Porto Alegre in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: a population-based study].

    PubMed

    Venturini, Carina Duarte; Engroff, Paula; Sgnaolin, Vanessa; El Kik, Raquel Milani; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; da Silva Filho, Irenio Gomes; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio

    2015-12-01

    A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted on a random sample of 427 elderly individuals living in Porto Alegre, Brazil, to establish the nutrient consumption profile and verify its association with sociodemographic and health variables. Dietary intake was assessed using the 24-hour Food Recall Survey and the Dietetic Research Investigation technique. Seventy percent of the elderly respondents were women: 48.5% were between 60 and 69 years old; 68.8% had less than 8 years of schooling; 39% had a family income of between 2 and 5 minimum wages and 58.4% took no physical exercise. Hypertension was the most prevalent disease among the elderly and 54.9% were underweight. Men consumed more calories, protein, fiber, minerals and vitamins than women. Carbohydrate and calcium intake increases with advancing age, while zinc intake decreases. Physical exercise increased the intake of calories, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus. The higher the schooling the greater the intake of vitamins B6 and B12; the higher the family income, the greater the consumption of vitamin B6 and folic acid. The results show that there are nutritional deficiencies in the daily diet of the Brazilian elderly population, especially among women and individuals over 80 years of age. PMID:26691795

  9. [Consumption of nutrients among the elderly living in Porto Alegre in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: a population-based study].

    PubMed

    Venturini, Carina Duarte; Engroff, Paula; Sgnaolin, Vanessa; El Kik, Raquel Milani; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; da Silva Filho, Irenio Gomes; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio

    2015-12-01

    A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted on a random sample of 427 elderly individuals living in Porto Alegre, Brazil, to establish the nutrient consumption profile and verify its association with sociodemographic and health variables. Dietary intake was assessed using the 24-hour Food Recall Survey and the Dietetic Research Investigation technique. Seventy percent of the elderly respondents were women: 48.5% were between 60 and 69 years old; 68.8% had less than 8 years of schooling; 39% had a family income of between 2 and 5 minimum wages and 58.4% took no physical exercise. Hypertension was the most prevalent disease among the elderly and 54.9% were underweight. Men consumed more calories, protein, fiber, minerals and vitamins than women. Carbohydrate and calcium intake increases with advancing age, while zinc intake decreases. Physical exercise increased the intake of calories, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus. The higher the schooling the greater the intake of vitamins B6 and B12; the higher the family income, the greater the consumption of vitamin B6 and folic acid. The results show that there are nutritional deficiencies in the daily diet of the Brazilian elderly population, especially among women and individuals over 80 years of age.

  10. Hyacinths Choke the Rio Grande

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, demonstrate the potential of satellite-based remote sensors to monitor infestations of non-native plant species. These images show the vigorous growth of water hyacinths along a stretch of the Rio Grande River in Texas. The infestation had grown so dense in some places it was impeding the flow of water and rendered the river impassible for boats. The hyacinth is an aquatic weed native to South America. The plant is exotic looking and, when it blooms, the hyacinth produces a pretty purple flower, which is why it was introduced into North America. However, it has the capacity to grow and spread at astonishing rates so that in the wild it can completely clog the flow of rivers and waterways in a matter of days or weeks. The top image was acquired on March 30, 2002, and the bottom image on May 9, 2002. In the near-infrared region of the spectrum, photosynthetically-active vegetation is highly reflective. Consequently, vegetation appears bright to the near-infrared sensors aboard ASTER; and water, which absorbs near-infrared radiation, appears dark. In these false-color images produced from the sensor data, healthy vegetation is shown as bright red while water is blue or black. Notice a water hyacinth infestation is already apparent on March 30 near the center of the image. By May 9, the hyacinth population has exploded to cover more than half the river in the scene. Satellite-based remote sensors can enable scientists to monitor large areas of infestation like this one rather quickly and efficiently, which is particularly useful for regions that are difficult to reach from on the ground. (For more details, click to read Showdown in the Rio Grande.) Images courtesy Terrametrics; Data provided by the ASTER Science Team

  11. Rhipicephalus sanguineus (ACARI: IXODIDAE) BITING A HUMAN BEING IN PORTOALEGRE CITY, RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    MENTZ, Márcia Bohrer; TROMBKA, Marcelo; da SILVA, Guilherme Liberato; SILVA, Carlos Eugênio

    2016-01-01

    We report the finding of a female brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) on the scalp of a male patient in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Human parasitism by this tick is rare and has seldomly been reported in the literature, despite its recognized importance since it can act as a vector of Rickettsia rickettsii, the agent of spotted fever. PMID:27074329

  12. Rio Grande sediment study -- Supply and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, E.; Eidson, D.; Bourgeois, M.

    1995-12-31

    The 1992 New Mexico State Legislature directed the Interstate Stream Commission (ISC) to study the feasibility of clearing and deepening the channel of the Rio Grande between Albuquerque and Elephant Butte to improve water conveyance and water conservation. The ISC requested the US Army Corps of Engineers-Albuquerque District (COE) to undertake this study under the Planning Assistance to States Program. The study was divided into two phases. Phase 1 consisted of an analysis of the sediment contribution to the Rio grande from the tributaries and an evaluation of the existing US Geological Survey (USGS) sediment gage data. Phase 2 will be an analysis, through the use of an HEC-6, Scour and Deposition in Rivers and Reservoirs, computer model, to determine the long-term performance of any Rio Grande channel improvements. This narrative presents the Phase 1 methods and results.

  13. Rio Grande rift: problems and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Baldridge, W.S.; Olsen, K.H.; Callender, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Topics and ideas addressed include: (1) the regional extent of the Rio Grande rift; (2) the structure of the crust and upper mantle; (3) whether the evidence for an axile dike in the lower crust is compelling; (4) the nature of faulting and extension in the crust; and (5) the structural and magmatic development of the rift. 88 references, 5 figures.

  14. Substance Abuse in the Rio Grande Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavaleta, Anthony N.

    1979-01-01

    In the Mexican American barrios of Texas' Lower Rio Grande Valley, existence is complicated by the interactive forces of culture, society, and economy. These three factors act in unison to create an etiology of alcohol and drug use and abuse which is poorly understood by persons outside the barrio's grasp. (Author/NQ)

  15. Middle Rio Grande Cooperative Water Model

    2005-11-01

    This is computer simulation model built in a commercial modeling product Called Studio Expert, developed by Powersim, Inc. The simulation model is built in a system dynamics environment, allowing the simulation of the interaction among multiple systems that are all changing over time. The model focuses on hydrology, ecology, demography, and economy of the Middle Rio Grande, with Water as the unifying feature.

  16. 27 CFR 9.119 - Middle Rio Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Middle Rio Grande Valley... Middle Rio Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Middle Rio Grande Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundaries of...

  17. 27 CFR 9.119 - Middle Rio Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Middle Rio Grande Valley... Middle Rio Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Middle Rio Grande Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundaries of...

  18. Hematozoan parasites of Rio Grande wild turkeys from southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Castle, M D; Christensen, B M; Rocke, T E

    1988-01-01

    One hundred twenty-three of 300 blood samples (41%) taken from Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) from three locations in southern Texas (Welder Wildlife Refuge, Chaparrosa Ranch, and Campo Alegre Ranch) and subinoculated into domestic broad-breasted white turkey poults were positive for a Plasmodium (Novyella) sp. Analysis of blood films from 350 turkeys revealed Haemoproteus meleagridis in 76% of the birds. A significantly greater mean parasite intensity was observed in birds from Welder Wildlife Refuge. Birds from the Campo Alegre Ranch exhibited a significantly higher prevalence of H. meleagridis than birds from Chaparrosa. The Plasmodium sp. was infective for canaries (Serinus canaria), bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), but would not produce infection in white leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus) or Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix). Attempts to infect Culex tarsalis and C. pipiens were unsuccessful. Asexual erythrocytic synchrony was not observed when blood-induced infections were monitored in two domestic turkey poults every 4 hr for 72 hr. Exoerythrocytic stages were not found upon examination of impression smears and tissue samples taken from brain, liver, spleen, kidney, lung, and bone marrow. The Plasmodium sp. is most similar morphologically to three species in the subgenus Novyella, P. hexamerium, P. vaughani, and P. kempi. The most striking similarities are to P. hexamerium, and involve mean merozoite number, erythrocytic schizont location, and vertebrate host susceptibility. It differs from P. vaughani in being able to infect turkeys and in type of parasitized erythrocytes. Differences to P. kempi include mean merozoite number, and ability to infect pheasants, and its inability to develop in C. pipiens and C. tarsalis.

  19. Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Jesse; & Tidwell, Vincent

    2010-08-05

    URGSIM estimates the location of surface water and groundwater resources in the upper Rio Grande Basin between the Colorado-New Mexico state line, and Caballo Reservoir from 1975 - 2045. It is a mass balance hydrology model of the Upper Rio Grande surface water, groundwater, and water demand systems which runs at a monthly timestep from 1975-1999 in calibration mode, 2000 – 2004 in validation mode, and 2005 – 2045 in scenario analysis mode.

  20. Functional capacity of elder elderly: comparative study in three regions of Rio Grande do Sul.

    PubMed

    Aires, Marinês; Paskulin, Lisiane Manganelli Girardi; de Morais, Eliane Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    Study conducted with secondary data from cross-sectional population-based studies developed in three regions of the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), which aimed to compare the level of dependency for activities of daily living (ADL) of 155 older persons aged 80 years and over. Demographic data and the ADL scale from the 3 studies were used and a multinomial multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out. The older persons from the urban region of Porto Alegre/RS and from the Northern region of this state presented significantly higher severe dependency than people from the countryside. The results illustrate the heterogeneity of the aging process. Health policies and actions should be planned for the elder elderly in this state. PMID:20428691

  1. Raptor Use of the Rio Grande Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Ponton, David A.

    2015-03-20

    The Rio Grande Gorge is a 115 km long river canyon located in Southern Colorado (15 km) and Northern New Mexico (100 km). The majority of the canyon is under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management {BLM), and 77 km of the canyon south of the Colorado/New Mexico border are designated Wild River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Visits I have made to the Rio Grande Gorge over the past 15 .years disclosed some raptor utilization. As the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area gained publicity, its similarity to the Rio Grande Gorge became obvious, and I was intrigued by the possibility of a high raptor nesting density in the Gorge. A survey in 1979 of 20 km of the northern end of the canyon revealed a moderately high density of red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons. With the encouragement of that partial survey, and a need to assess the impact of river-running on nesting birds of prey, I made a more comprehensive survey in 1980. The results of my surveys, along with those of a 1978 helicopter survey by the BLM, are presented in this report, as well as general characterization of the area, winter use by raptors, and an assessment of factors influencing the raptor population.

  2. Extension in the Rio Grande rift.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordell, L.

    1982-01-01

    A positive gravity anomaly along the axis of the Rio Grande rift reflects a volume of anomalous mass added at the base of the crust and intruded into the crust. Part of this volume can be associated with vertical uplift of the crust. The remainder of this anomalous volume, plus the volume of surficial graben fill, can be associated with horizontal crustal extension. The volume of crustal uplift in the Rio Grande rift is unknown, but this term can be eliminated by means of an independent equation provided by assumption of generalized isostatic equilibrium. The volume and mass equations combined provide a solution for extension of the crust in terms of the following parameters: total anomalous mass deficiency in the mantle lithosphere, total anomalous mass excess in the crust and its density contrast, total anomalous mass deficiency of surficial graben fill and its density contrast, and the volume of material eroded from the uplift. Using standard density estimates and masses determined by equivalent-source modeling of gravity profiles, I obtained 1-km extension at 37oN (Colorado-New Mexico border), 13- km extension at 35oN (Albuquerque, New Mexico), and 24-km extension at 33oN in S New Mexico.-Author

  3. 27 CFR 9.119 - Middle Rio Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.119 Middle Rio Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is... “Middle Rio Grande Valley” viticultural area are 24 U.S.G.S. Quadrangle (7.5 Minute Series) maps and 1...

  4. 27 CFR 9.119 - Middle Rio Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.119 Middle Rio Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is... “Middle Rio Grande Valley” viticultural area are 24 U.S.G.S. Quadrangle (7.5 Minute Series) maps and 1...

  5. 27 CFR 9.119 - Middle Rio Grande Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.119 Middle Rio Grande Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is... “Middle Rio Grande Valley” viticultural area are 24 U.S.G.S. Quadrangle (7.5 Minute Series) maps and 1...

  6. 76 FR 44302 - Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Monte...

  7. 77 FR 12108 - Denver & Rio Grande Railway Historical Foundation d/b/a Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Surface Transportation Board Denver & Rio Grande Railway Historical Foundation d/b/a Denver & Rio Grande... of declaratory order proceeding. SUMMARY: In response to a petition filed by the Denver & Rio Grande.... Shank, Denver & Rio Grande Railway Historical ] Foundation, 20 North Broadway Street, Monte Vista,...

  8. [History of genetics in Brazil: a view from the Museu da Genética at the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul].

    PubMed

    Souza, Vanderlei Sebastiao de; Dornelles, Rodrigo Ciconet; Coimbra Junior, Carlos E A; Santos, Ricardo Ventura

    2013-06-01

    This work addresses the context of the creation, as well as the structure and contents, of the Museum of Genetics (Museu da Genética), created in 2011 and located in the Department of Genetics of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul), in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The materials available at the Museum of Genetics are a rich resource for research on the history of genetics in Brazil (and especially the genetics of human populations) beginning with the second half of the twentieth century. Despite the prominence of the field of genetics in Brazil, little research has been done on this topic.

  9. 77 FR 51967 - Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Saguache Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Saguache, Colorado....

  10. 77 FR 8275 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural...

  11. 78 FR 9729 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as indicated below.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural...

  12. 77 FR 21584 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural...

  13. Thermomechanical models of the Rio Grande rift

    SciTech Connect

    Bridwell, R.J.; Anderson, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional, coupled thermochemical solutions of a continental rift and platform are used to model the crust and mantle structure of a hot, buoyant mantle diapir beneath the Rio Grande rift. The thermomechanical model includes both linear and nonlinear laws of the Weertman type relating shear stress and creep strain rate, viscosity which depends on temperature and pressure, and activation energy, temperature-dependent thermal conductivity, temperature-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, the Boussinesq approximation for thermal bouyancy, material convection using a stress rate that is invariant to rigid rotations, an elastically deformable crust, and a free surface. The model determines the free surface velocities, solid state flow field in the mantle, and viscosity structure of lithosphere and asthenosphere. Regional topography and crustal heat flow are simulated. A suite of symmetric models, assumes continental geotherms on the right and the successively increasing rift geotherms on the left. These models predict an asthenospheric flow field which transfers cold material laterally toward the rift at > 300 km, hot, buoyant material approx. 200 km wide which ascends vertically at rates of 1 km/my between 175 to 325 km, and spreads laterally away from the rift at the base of the lithosphere. Crustal spreading rates are similar to uplift rates. The lithosphere acts as stiff, elastic cap, damping upward motion through decreased velocities of 1 km/10 my and spreading uplift laterally. A parameter study varying material coefficients for the Weertman flow law suggests asthenospheric viscosities of approx. 10/sup 22/ to 10/sup 23/ poise. Similar studies predict crustal viscosities of approx. 10/sup 25/ poise. The buoyant process of mantle flow narrows and concentrates heat transport beneath the rift, increases upward velocity, and broadly arches the lithosphere. 10 figures, 1 table.

  14. Vigilando la Calidad del Agua de los Grandes Rios de la Nacion: El Programa NASQAN del Rio Grande (Rio Bravo del Norte)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.; Reutter, David C.; Wells, Frank C.; Rivera, M.C.; Munoz, A.

    1998-01-01

    La Oficina del Estudio Geologico de los Estados Unidos (U.S. Geological Survey, 0 USGS) ha monitoreado la calidad del agua de la cuenca del Rio Grande (Rio Bravo del Norte) desde 1995 como parte de la rediseiiada Red Nacional para Contabilizar la Calidad del Agua de los Rios (National Stream Quality Accounting Network, o NASOAN) (Hooper and others, 1997). EI programa NASOAN fue diseiiado para caracterizar las concentraciones y el transporte de sedimento y constituyentes quimicos seleccionados, encontrados en los grandes rios de los Estados Unidos - incluyendo el Misisipi, el Colorado y el Columbia, ademas del Rio Grande. En estas cuatro cuencas, el USGS opera actualmente (1998) una red de 40 puntos de muestreo pertenecientes a NASOAN, con un enfasis en cuantificar el flujo en masa (la cantidad de material que pasa por la estacion, expresado en toneladas por dial para cada constituyente. Aplicacando un enfoque consistente, basado en la cuantificacion de flujos en la cuenca del Rio Grande, el programa NASOAN esta generando la informacion necesaria para identificar fuentes regionales de diversos contaminantes, incluyendo sustancias qui micas agricolas y trazas elementos en la cuenca. EI efecto de las grandes reservas en el Rio Grande se puede observar segun los flujos de constituyentes discurren a 10 largo del rio. EI analisis de los flujos de constituyentes a escala de la cuenca proveera los medios para evaluar la influencia de la actividad humana sobre las condiciones de calidad del agua del Rio Grande.

  15. Chemical Contamination of the Lower Rio Grande near Laredo, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, B.; Ren, J.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Belzer, W.

    2006-12-01

    The Rio Grande River stretches over 2000 miles from the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado to the tip of Texas where the Rio Grande meets the Gulf of Mexico. It is the natural boundary between U.S. and Mexico from El Paso, TX, to Brownsville, TX. The communities along the border heavily rely upon the Rio Grande as a primary source of water for consumption, agricultural uses, supporting wildlife and recreation. For many years the Rio Grande has been polluted with municipal, industrial, agricultural and farming contaminants from both sides of the border. This pollution has led to the extinction or reduction of certain wildlife species as well as affecting the health of the residences along the border. Even though great strides have been made in monitoring the Rio Grande, there has been a lack of intense monitoring data collection for pollutants such as pesticides. Three sampling sites including Manadas Creek, the Rio Grande River at International Bridge I, and USGS monitoring site 08459200 off of Highway 83 were chosen. The water quality parameters focused include temperature, pH, conductivity, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total dissolved solids, nutrients, metals and pesticides. Preliminary results have shown elevated concentration of total phosphorus and ortho-phosphorus in the Manadas Creek site. Organochlorinated pesticides such as heptachlor and 4, 4 DDE were detected at various concentrations at all sites and endrin aldehyde was found at Manadas Creek site. This research has provided more information on the current chemical contamination level of the Rio Grande in the Laredo area.

  16. Traveltime of the Rio Grande in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico, Water Years 2003-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langman, Jeff B.

    2008-01-01

    The quality of water in the Rio Grande is becoming increasingly important as more surface water is proposed for diversion from the river for potable and nonpotable uses. In cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, the U.S. Geological Survey examined traveltime of the Rio Grande in the Middle Rio Grande Basin to evaluate the potential travel of a conservative solute entrained in the river's streamflow. A flow-pulse analysis was performed to determine traveltimes of a wide range of streamflows in the Rio Grande, to develop traveltime curves for estimating the possible traveltime of a conservative solute in the Rio Grande between Cochiti Dam and Albuquerque, and to evaluate streamflow velocities and dispersion and storage characteristics of the Rio Grande in the entire Middle Rio Grande Basin. A flow-pulse analysis was applied to 12 pulse events recorded during the 2003-05 water years for streamflow-gaging stations between Cochiti Dam and the city of San Acacia. Pulse streamflows ranged from 495 to 5,190 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Three points of each pulse were tracked as the pulse passed a station - rising-limb leading edge, plateau leading edge, and plateau trailing edge. Most pulses indicated longer traveltimes for each successive point in the pulse. Dispersion and spreading of the pulses decreased with increased streamflow. Decreasing traveltimes were not always consistent with increasing streamflow, particularly for flows less than 1,750 ft3/s, and the relation of traveltime and original pulse streamflow at Cochiti indicated a nonlinear component. Average streamflow velocities decreased by greater than 30 percent from San Felipe to San Acacia. The expected trend of increasing dispersion with downstream travel was not always visible because of other influences on streamflow. With downstream flow, distributions of the pulses became more skewed to the descending limbs, indicating possible short-term storage of a part of the

  17. Biology of the Rio Grande border region : a bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Lynne E.; Jacobs, Linda J.; Papoulias, Diana

    1997-01-01

    This bibliography includes 1,913 references to the literature of the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo del Norte). The specific geographic area covered extends 100 km on either side of the river from Elephant Butte Dam in New Mexico to the Gulf of Mexico. The bibliography focuses on the biological literature, divided into major subject areas, and also includes supporting literature from the physical and environmental sciences.

  18. ASSESSING TRANSBOUNDARY INFLUENCES IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley Transboundary Air Pollution Project (TAPP) was a U.S.-Mexico Border XXI Program project to assess transboundary air pollution in and near Brownsville, Texas. The study used a three-site air monitoring network very close to the border to capture the d...

  19. 77 FR 51966 - Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... of meeting. SUMMARY: The Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee will meet in South Fork... will begin at 10:00 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the South Fork Community Building, 0254 Highway 149, South Fork, Colorado. Written comments should be sent to Mike Blakeman, San Luis...

  20. Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis after swimming in the Rio Grande.

    PubMed

    DeNapoli, T S; Rutman, J Y; Robinson, J R; Rhodes, M M

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) with Naegleria fowleri in a 13-year-old male, and review the clinical course and diagnostic autopsy findings. The boy developed the infection after swimming with relatives in the Rio Grande and in a holding tank containing water pumped from the river. The clinical and neuropathologic features of PAM are presented. The microscopic features of motile unicellular organisms with pathognomonic broad, lobate pseudopodia are diagnostic and, if recognized before death, allow for timely treatment. A public health investigation into this case implicated river water from the Rio Grande polluted with sewage as the infection source. Exposure to polluted river water from some areas of the Rio Grande may represent a risk factor for infection with Naegleria fowerli, because the high levels of coliform bacteria found in sewage and the warm, sluggish water of the river are favorable growth conditions for the amoebae. Because the Rio Grande is an international border, this case illustrates the importance of international cooperation in pollution control in the prevention of a potentially fatal infectious disease.

  1. Society and Health in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, William

    Shedding light on problems of mental health and illness that have baffled public health workers attempting to improve the health and welfare of Mexican Americans living in the lower Rio Grande Valley, this document reports the folk customs, social organization, medical practices, and beliefs of the Mexican American of this area. Chapters describe…

  2. 75 FR 32359 - Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... of meeting. SUMMARY: The Upper Rio Grande Resource Advisory Committee will meet in South Fork... to hold the first meeting of the newly formed committee. DATES: The meeting will be held on June 22, 2010, and will begin at 1 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the South Fork Community...

  3. 75 FR 54085 - Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, Rio Grande National Forest, USDA. ACTION: Corrected Notice...

  4. 76 FR 6517 - San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Petition for a Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... Surface Transportation Board San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad--Petition for a Declaratory Order AGENCY... INFORMATION: In response to a petition filed by San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad (SLRG), the Board instituted a.... See San Luis & Rio Grande R.R.--Petition for a Declaratory Order, FD 35380 (STB served Aug. 12,...

  5. 40 CFR 81.239 - Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.239 Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) consists of...

  6. 76 FR 55416 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as... of the Rio Grande, 333 Santa Fe Avenue, Alamosa, CO 81101. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  7. 77 FR 66479 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as... hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the...

  8. 40 CFR 81.83 - Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.83 Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) is revised...

  9. 78 FR 57411 - Second Call for Nominations for the Rio Grande Natural Area Commission, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Second Call for Nominations for the Rio Grande Natural Area Commission, CO... request public nominations for a vacancy on the Rio Grande Natural Area Commission (Commission). The nine... respect to the Rio Grande Natural ] Area (Natural Area) and on matters concerning the preparation...

  10. 40 CFR 81.83 - Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.83 Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) is revised...

  11. 77 FR 41798 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as... hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the...

  12. 40 CFR 81.239 - Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.239 Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) consists of...

  13. Hematozoan parasites of Rio Grande wild turkeys from southern Texas (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, Marc D.; Christensen, Beth A.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    1988-01-01

    One hundred twenty-three of 300 blood samples (41%) taken from Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) from three locations in southern Texas (Welder Wildlife Refuge, Chaparrosa Ranch, and Campo Alegre Ranch) and subinoculated into domestic broad-breasted white turkey poults were positive for a Plasmodium (Novyella) sp. Analysis of blood films from 350 turkeys revealed Haemoproteus meleagridis in 76% of the birds. A significantly greater mean parasite intensity was observed in birds from Welder Wildlife Refuge. Birds from the Campo Alegre Ranch exhibited a significantly higher prevalence of H. meleagridis than birds from Chaparrosa. The Plasmodium sp. was infective for canaries (Serinus canaria), bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), but would not produce infection in white leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus) or Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix). Attempts to infect Culex tarsalis and C. pipiens pipiens were unsuccessful. Asexual erythrocytic synchrony was not observed when blood-induced infections were monitored in two domestic turkey poults every 4 hr for 72 hr. Exoerythrocytic stages were not found upon examination of impression smears and tissue samples taken from brain, liver, spleen, kidney, lung, and bone marrow. The Plasmodium sp. is most similar morphologically to three species in the subgenus Novyella, P. hexamerium, P. vaughani, and P. kempi. The most striking similarities are to P. hexamerium, and involve mean merozoite number, erythrocytic schizont location, and vertebrate host susceptibility. It differs from P. vaughani in being able to infect turkeys and in type of parasitized erythrocytes. Differences to P. kempi include mean merozoite number, and ability to infect pheasants, and its inability to develop inC. pipiens and C. tarsalis.

  14. Late archaic settlement systems in the northern Rio Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Vierra, Bradley J.

    2003-01-01

    Last year at these meetings I proposed a possible seasonal transhumance pattern for the Late Archaic in the northern Rio Grande region. This pattern involved the movement of groups from the lowland juniper-savanna grasslands in the early summer, to the upland ponderosa pindmixed conifer forests in the mid to late summer, and then back down to the piiion-juniper woodlands during the fall. The Rio Grande Valley was also used for winter habitation sites. Following on this research, I take the next step by studying the inter-assemblage variability represented in a sample of open-air sites located within each of these vegetation communities. The results indicate that there are significant differences in reduction tactics represented between valley habitation vs., upland campsites, and that these site sites are linked together by obsidian procurement patterns.

  15. Migrant Worker: A Boy from the Rio Grande Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt-Goldsmith, Diane

    Ricky is an 11-year-old migrant worker. During the summer, he travels with his family from their home in Rio Grande City, Texas, to farms farther north. There they spend 10-12 hours a day in the hot sun picking fruit and vegetables and packing the harvest for market. Ricky is not protected by the federal laws that govern the hours, wages, and…

  16. Structure of the southern Rio Grande rift from gravity interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, P. H.; Keller, G. R.; Wen, C.-L.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    Regional Bouguer gravity anomalies in southern New Mexico have been analyzed by two-dimensional wave number filtering and poly-nomial trend surface analysis of the observed gravity field. A prominent, regional oval-shaped positive gravity anomaly was found to be associated with the southern Rio Grande rift. Computer modeling of three regional gravity profiles suggests that this anomaly is due to crustal thinning beneath the southern Rio Grande rift. These models indicate a 25 to 26-km minimum crustal thickness within the rift and suggest that the rift is underlain by a broad zone of anomalously low-density upper mantle. The southern terminus of the anomalous zone is approximately 50 km southwest of El Paso, Texas. A thinning of the rifted crust of 2-3 km relative to the adjacent Basin and Range province indicates an extension of about 9 percent during the formation of the modern southern Rio Grande rift. This extension estimate is consistent with estimates from other data sources. The crustal thinning and anomalous mantle is thought to result from magmatic activity related to surface volcanism and high heat flow in this area.

  17. Field Studies of Geothermal Reservoirs Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    James C Witcher

    2002-07-30

    The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent field laboratory to study the nature of geothermal systems in an extensional environment. Much of the geologic complexity that is found in the Basin and Range is absent because the rift is located on cratonic crust with a thin and well-characterized Phanerozoic stratigraphy and tectonic history. On the other hand, the Neogene thermo-tectonic history of the rift has many parallels with the Basin and Range to the west. The geology of the southern Rio Grande rift is among the best characterized of any rift system in the world. Also, most geologic maps for the region are rather unique in that detailed analyses of Quaternary stratigraphic and surficial unit are added in concert with the details of bedrock geology. Pleistocene to Holocene entrenchment of the Rio Grande and tributaries unroofs the alteration signatures and permeability attributes of paleo outflow plumes and upflow zones, associated with present-day, but hidden or ''blind,'' hydrothermal systems at Rincon and San Diego Mountain.

  18. 78 FR 52783 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as indicated below. DATES: The meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on September 19, 2013. ADDRESSES: Rio...

  19. 78 FR 69127 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as indicated below. DATES: The meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on December 17, 2013. ADDRESSES: Rio...

  20. Seismic investigation of the southern Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lennox E.

    Competing models exist to explain what caused the Earth's crust to spread apart 29 million years ago to create a region known today as the Rio Grande Rift (RGR). The RGR extends from central Colorado through New Mexico to northern Mexico, near El Paso. The RGR has different geologic features that distinguish it from most other valleys (e.g., the RGR was not cut by a river nor does a river branch upstream). A growing body of evidence shows that geologic activity still occurs in the RGR, with a continuation of faulting, seismicity and widening at a small rate of about 0.3 mm/yr (Woodward , 1977). We map of the seismic velocity structure and crustal thickness using data from the Rio Grande Rift Seismic TRAnsect (RISTRA) experiment and the EarthScope Transportable Array (USArray) dataset. In addition to the data we collected from the RISTRA experiment and USArray dataset, we also acquired receiver functions from the EarthScope Automatic Receiver Survey (EARS) website (http://www.earthscope.org/data) and waveform data from the Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). We requested seismograms from the IRIS DMC database where we acquired teleseismic events from Jan 2000 to Dec 2009. This includes 7,259 seismic events with a minimum magnitude of 5.5 and 106,389 continuous waveforms. This data was preprocessed (merged, rotated) using a program called Standing Order of Data (SOD). The RISTRA experiment and the USArray were designed to image crust and mantle structures by computing receiver functions for all data in the Southern Rio Grande Rift (SRGR). We map the crustal thickness, seismic velocity, and mantle structure for the sole purpose to better determine the nature of tectonic activity that is presently taking place and further investigate the regional extension of the Southern Rio Grande Rift (SRGR). Here we present preliminary results of the crustal and velocity structure using the kriging interpolation scheme seem stable

  1. 46 CFR 7.105 - Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the seaward limits of the territorial sea (as defined in 33 CFR 2.22(a)(1)) to Rio Grande, Texas at... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. 7.105 Section 7... LINES Gulf Coast § 7.105 Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. A line drawn from Marquesas Keys,...

  2. 46 CFR 7.105 - Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the seaward limits of the territorial sea (as defined in 33 CFR 2.22(a)(1)) to Rio Grande, Texas at... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. 7.105 Section 7... LINES Gulf Coast § 7.105 Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. A line drawn from Marquesas Keys,...

  3. Geomorphology of plutonium in the Northern Rio Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, W.L.

    1993-03-01

    Nearly all of the plutonium in the natural environment of the Northern Rio Grande is associated with soils and sediment, and river processes account for most of the mobility of these materials. A composite regional budget for plutonium based on multi-decadal averages for sediment and plutonium movement shows that 90 percent of the plutonium moving into the system is from atmospheric fallout. The remaining 10 percent is from releases at Los Alamos. Annual variation in plutonium flux and storage exceeds 100 percent. The contribution to the plutonium budget from Los Alamos is associated with relatively coarse sediment which often behaves as bedload in the Rio Grande. Infusion of these materials into the main stream were largest in 1951, 1952, 1957, and 1968. Because of the schedule of delivery of plutonium to Los Alamos for experimentation and weapons manufacturing, the latter two years are probably the most important. Although the Los Alamos contribution to the entire plutonium budget was relatively small, in these four critical years it constituted 71--86 percent of the plutonium in bedload immediately downstream from Otowi.

  4. Female homicide in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Leites, Gabriela Tomedi; Meneghel, Stela Nazareth; Hirakata, Vania Noemi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the female homicide rate due to aggression in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, using this as a "proxy" of femicide. This was an ecological study which correlated the female homicide rate due to aggression in Rio Grande do Sul, according to the 35 microregions defined by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), with socioeconomic and demographic variables access and health indicators. Pearson's correlation test was performed with the selected variables. After this, multiple linear regressions were performed with variables with p < 0.20. The standardized average of female homicide rate due to aggression in the period from 2003 to 2007 was 3.1 obits per 100 thousand. After multiple regression analysis, the final model included male mortality due to aggression (p = 0.016), the percentage of hospital admissions for alcohol (p = 0.005) and the proportion of ill-defined deaths (p = 0.015). The model have an explanatory power of 39% (adjusted r2 = 0.391). The results are consistent with other studies and indicate a strong relationship between structural violence in society and violence against women, in addition to a higher incidence of female deaths in places with high alcohol hospitalization.

  5. Intracontinental rift comparisons: Baikal and Rio Grande Rift Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipman, P. W.; Logatchev, N. A.; Zorin, Y. A.; Chapman, C. E.; Kovalenko, V.; Morgan, P.

    Both the Baikal rift in Siberia and the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico, Colorado and Texas are major intracontinental extensional structures of Cenozoic age that affect regions about 1500 km long and several hundred km wide (Figures 1, 2). In the summer of 1988 these rifts were visited by study groups of U.S. and Soviet geoscientists during cooperative field workshops sponsored by the Soviet Academy of Sciences, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and U.S. Geological Survey.In the Rio Grande region, we spent 2 weeks examining rift features between El Paso, Tex., and Denver, Colo. Particular emphasis was on the sedimentary record of rift evolution, widespread volcanic activity from inception of rifting to the present, geophysical expression of rift features, and relations between rifting and the larger-scale evolution of the North American Cordillera. In the Baikal region, which presents formidable logistic problems for a workshop, we travelled by bus, truck, helicopter, and ship to examine young seismotectonic features, rift-related basalt, and bounding structures of the Siberian craton that influenced rift development (Figure 3).

  6. 75 FR 7625 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (Hybognathus amarus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... Rio Grande silvery minnow was listed as federally endangered in 1994 (July 20, 1994; 59 FR 36988) and critical habitat was designated in 2003 (February 19, 2003; 68 FR 8087). The species was extirpated from... (mi)) reach of the Rio Grande River in New Mexico, downstream of Cochiti Dam to the headwaters...

  7. Basic Education in the Lower Rio Grande Valley: Human Capital Development or a Colonial System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Patrick D.

    This report describes economic, social, and political characteristics of the lower Rio Grande Valley with implications for the educational system, and presents preliminary findings on how south Texas schools are integrating new immigrant Mexican students. The lower Rio Grande Valley comprises four Texas counties and northern Tamaulipas, Mexico.…

  8. 33 CFR 80.850 - Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX. 80.850 Section 80.850 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to the Rio Grande, TX. (a) Except as otherwise described in this section lines drawn continuing...

  9. 33 CFR 80.850 - Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX. 80.850 Section 80.850 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to the Rio Grande, TX. (a) Except as otherwise described in this section lines drawn continuing...

  10. 76 FR 39120 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    .../co/frrac/co_fr.htm . Dated: June 28, 2011. Anna Marie Burden, Acting State Director. BILLING CODE... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet...

  11. The Rio Grande Valley: Border Crossing, Diversity within Diversity, and Rethinking Categorical Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jupp, James C.

    2001-01-01

    Highlights the Rio Grande Valley in order to combat stereotypical North American folkloric representations of Latin America, discussing border crossings, developing a typology of the Rio Grande Valley that emphasizes diversity within diversity, articulating an example of diversity within diversity, and arguing that multiculturalism's categorical…

  12. Bryozoans from rio grande do sul continental shelf, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Laís V; Calliari, Lauro

    2015-05-06

    The continental shelf of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) is predominantly composed of unconsolidated sediments with a few hard substrates represented principally by beachrock. In this area there are elongate deposits of shell gravel material which are interpreted as indicators of the palaeo-shorelines. These Pleistocene deposits are overlapped by Holocene sediments (Recent), but are exposed during erosive events caused by extra-tropical cyclones, which provide the mixture of both sediments mainly during autumn and winter. The few studies on bryozoans made in this area previously recorded seven species, one fossil and the other six from Recent fluvial and marine environments. The aim of the present study was to describe the eight most abundant bryozoan species that occur in the inner RS shelf. Of these, four are new records for RS State (Arachnopusia aff. pusae, Hippomonavella brasiliensis, Turbicellepora pourtalesi, and Lifuella gorgonensis), and the other four are new to science (Chaperia taylori, Micropora nodimagna, Cellaria riograndensis, and Exochella moyani).

  13. A groundwater convection model for Rio Grande rift geothermal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Harder, V.; Daggett, P. H.; Swanberg, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    It has been proposed that forced convection, driven by normal groundwater flow through the interconnected basins of the Rio Grande rift is the primary source mechanism for the numerous geothermal anomalies along the rift. A test of this concept using an analytical model indicates that significant forced convection must occur in the basins even if permeabilities are as low as 50-200 millidarcies at a depth of 2 km. Where groundwater flow is constricted at the discharge areas of the basins forced convection can locally increase the gradient to a level where free convection also occurs, generating surface heat flow anomalies 5-15 times background. A compilation of groundwater data for the rift basins shows a strong correlation between constrictions in groundwater flow and hot springs and geothermal anomalies, giving strong circumstantial support to the convection model.

  14. STEM education for teachers in the Rio Grande Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Judit Gyorgyey; Baguio, Margaret R.

    2015-11-01

    We have worked with elementary and middle school teachers in the Rio Grande Valley for the last 10 years bringing Earth and Space Science themed workshops to underserved areas of Texas. The Texas curriculum was also changed to include Astronomy and Space Science requirement in the tests students need to take to prove their academic preparedness. The teachers worked through a variety of inquiry-based, hands-on activities after a short presentation on the background science. In order to evaluate our effectiveness, we have asked the teachers to take pre- and post-workshop tests, and we asked them to fill out a self-reflective survey. We will report on our experiences, what works best with the teachers, and in what areas we still have a long way to go.This work was supported by various NASA education grants and Cooperative agreements, as well as grants provided by the Texas Space Grant Consortium.

  15. Unusual Recharge Processes near Arroyos of the Rio Grande Aquifer, El Paso/Juarez Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, M.; Hibbs, B. J.; Hogan, J.; Eastoe, C. J.; Druhan, J.

    2005-12-01

    The twin-cities of El Paso and Juarez share the water resources of the Hueco Bolson aquifer and overlying Rio Grande aquifer. Both aquifers span the international border between Mexico and the United States. Salinity in the Rio Grande aquifer varies widely, some parts of the shallow aquifer containing less than 1,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS), other parts of the aquifer exceeding 5,000 mg/L TDS. One sizable part of the "Lower Valley" area, approximately 45 km below El Paso contains very dilute water near the outer edge of the floodplain. Historically it had been thought that the dilute waters in this location were derived from recharge from arroyos that drained proximal parts of the Hueco Bolson. Instead, our hydrogen and oxygen isotope data and carbon-14 data indicate that these dilute waters were derived from pre-dam infiltration of the Rio Grande. Relatively light and slightly evaporated pre-dam waters (-11.5 del O18) at the arroyos are also relatively young (60 to 90 percent modern carbon), tagging them as runoff waters from pre-dam snowmelt in Colorado. These isotopically light waters are found up to 110 meters beneath land surface. Prior to Rio Grande rectification and channelization of the mid-1930's, the Rio Grande flowed near the outer edge of the floodplain where these pre-dam, dilute waters are found at depth. Review of predevelopment drill stem tests indicated a permeable zone about 150 to 230 meters deep that had a lower hydraulic head than the overlying Rio Grande aquifer. The permeable zone acted as a predevelopment sink for flow that induced recharge from the Rio Grande and Rio Grande aquifer. Thus, we can account for local predevelopment recharge of the Rio Grande aquifer from infiltration of dilute water from the Rio Grande prior to the historic era of channel rectification, and not from recharge from flanking arroyos as had been postulated by previous researchers.

  16. 75 FR 33326 - Notice of Intent To Establish and Call for Nominations for the Rio Grande Natural Area Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Establish and Call for Nominations for the Rio Grande... the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) is establishing the Rio Grande Natural Area Commission.... The Commission will advise the Secretary with respect to the Rio Grande Natural Area (Natural...

  17. Mesohabitats, fish assemblage composition, and mesohabitat use of the Rio Grande silvery minnow over a range of seasonal flow regimes in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo del Norte, in and near Big Bend National Park, Texas, 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce; Braun, Christopher L.; Pearson, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    There were no statistically significant differences between the stream velocities associated with seine hauls of the Rio Grande silvery minnow and Tamaulipas shiner. Stream velocities associated with the seine hauls that included Rio Grande silvery minnow indicate that this species is predominantly found in low-velocity mesohabitats. Velocities associated with seine hauls that included the Tamaulipas shiner represented a much broader overall range of velocities than those associated with Rio Grande silvery minnow collections. No statistically significant differences were found between the depths for seine hauls that included Rio Grande silvery minnow or Tamaulipas shiner. The Rio Grande silvery minnow was more commonly collected in seine hauls from mesohabitats dominated by cobble substrates and less frequently collected in mesohabitats with substrates dominated by fine-sized silt and clay particles, gravels, and sands, in that order. In contrast, the Tamaulipas shiner was broadly distributed among mesohabitats characterized as having gravel, cobble, and silt and clay.

  18. Hydrological and Meteorological Disturbances in Rio Grande Riparian Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, J. R.; Cleverly, J. R.; Dahm, C.

    2012-12-01

    Invasive species and ecohydrological disturbances are imperiling native riparian ecosystems. Adaptable, resilient exotic competitors including tamarisk have colonized many waterways in the western US. Alteration of the natural flow regime due to water diversions is expected to be exacerbated by climate change in this region, confounding restoration efforts. Climate change may also increase the likelihood of other disturbances, including extreme weather events (drought, floods, temperatures). We investigate how hydrological and meteorological variability impact water use by tamarisk communities that have overtaken native riparian vegetation. We have collected more than a decade of complete growing season eddy covariance evapotranspiration (ET) and water table (WT) elevation data at two sites along the Rio Grande corridor of central New Mexico, USA. Conditions have ranged from extreme drought to exceedingly wet years with extensive overbank flooding, and from record setting warm to cold temperatures. Severe to extreme droughts persisted throughout 2002 and 2003. Abundant snowpacks and wetter conditions led to extensive flooding early in the 2005 and 2008 growing seasons. Along with a return to intense drought conditions, extreme temperatures struck New Mexico in 2011. A deep freeze in early February followed by an extraordinarily late, extended hard freeze at the onset of the growing season was then succeeded by the warmest summer in the state's 117 year record. We present how water use by the replacement communities responds to droughts, flooding, and extreme temperatures, all of which are expected to increase in frequency, and speculate how these disturbances will affect native riparian ecosystems.

  19. Upwarp of anomalous asthenosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, E.C.; Davis, P.M.; Evans, J.R.; Iyer, H.M.; Olsen, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    Continental rifts are possible analogues of mid-ocean ridges, although major plate tectonic features are less clearly observed1. Current thermal models of mid-ocean ridges2-4 consist of solid lithospheric plates overlying the hotter, less viscous asthenosphere, with plate thickness increasing away from the ridge axis. The lithospheric lower boundary lies at or near the melting point isotherm, so that at greater depths higher temperatures account for lower viscosity, lower seismic velocities and possibly partial melting. Upwarp of this boundary at the ridge axis concentrates heat there, thus lowering densities by expansion and raising the sea floor to the level of thermal isostatic equilibrium. At slow spreading ridges, a major central graben forms owing to the mechanics of magma injection into the crust5. Topography, heat flow, gravity and seismic studies support these models. On the continents, a low-velocity channel has been observed, although it is poorly developed beneath ancient cratons6-9. Plate tectonic models have been applied to continental basins and margins10-12, but further similarities to the oceanic models remain elusive. Topographic uplift is often ascribed to Airy type isostatic compensation caused by crustal thickening, rather than thermal compensation in the asthenosphere. Here we discuss the Rio Grande rift, in southwestern United States. Teleseismic P-wave residuals show that regional uplift is explained by asthenosphere uplift rather than crustal thickening. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. Geographic distribution of genetic diversity in populations of Rio Grande Chub Gila pandora

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galindo, Rene; Wilson, Wade; Caldwell, Colleen A.

    2016-01-01

    In the southwestern United States (US), the Rio Grande chub (Gila pandora) is state-listed as a fish species of greatest conservation need and federally listed as sensitive due to habitat alterations and competition with non-native fishes. Characterizing genetic diversity, genetic population structure, and effective number of breeders will assist with conservation efforts by providing a baseline of genetic metrics. Genetic relatedness within and among G. pandora populations throughout New Mexico was characterized using 11 microsatellite loci among 15 populations in three drainage basins (Rio Grande, Pecos, Canadian). Observed heterozygosity (HO) ranged from 0.71–0.87 and was similar to expected heterozygosity (0.75–0.87). Rio Ojo Caliente (Rio Grande) had the highest allelic richness (AR = 15.09), while Upper Rio Bonito (Pecos) had the lowest allelic richness (AR = 6.75). Genetic differentiation existed among all populations with the lowest genetic variation occurring within the Pecos drainage. STRUCTURE analysis revealed seven genetic clusters. Populations of G. pandora within the upper Rio Grande drainage (Rio Ojo Caliente, Rio Vallecitos, Rio Pueblo de Taos) had high levels of admixture with Q-values ranging from 0.30–0.50. In contrast, populations within the Pecos drainage (Pecos River and Upper Rio Bonito) had low levels of admixture (Q = 0.94 and 0.87, respectively). Estimates of effective number of breeders (N b ) varied from 6.1 (Pecos: Upper Rio Bonito) to 109.7 (Rio Grande: Rio Peñasco) indicating that populations in the Pecos drainage are at risk of extirpation. In the event that management actions are deemed necessary to preserve or increase genetic diversity of G. pandora, consideration must be given as to which populations are selected for translocation.

  1. 78 FR 25097 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    .... DATES: The meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on May 29, 2013. ADDRESSES: Rio Grande Water Conservation District, 10900 East U.S. Highway 160, Alamosa, CO 81101. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  2. 78 FR 42543 - Call for Nominations for the Rio Grande Natural Area Commission, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Parks and Wildlife division; b. One member shall represent the Colorado Division of Water Resources; and c. One member shall represent the Rio Grande Water Conservation District. 4. Four members shall:...

  3. Workshop on The Rio Grande Rift: Crustal Modeling and Applications of Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, D. P. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The elements of a program that could address significant earth science problems by combining remote sensing and traditional geological, geophysical, and geochemical approaches were addressed. Specific areas and tasks related to the Rio Grande Rift are discussed.

  4. 76 FR 73657 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... land in the Rio Grande Natural Area, as directed by law. Planned agenda topics include: Discussing... area, and how internal and external communications will be addressed. In addition, the BLM will give...

  5. LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY TRANSBOUNDARY AIR POLLUTION PROJECT (TAPP) (MAIN REPORT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Lower Rio Grande Valley Transboundary Air Pollution Project (TAPP) was to obtain air quality data for a full year at three border monitoring sites to assess anthropogenic and biogenic emission impacts and transboundary air pollution transport in the Lower Rio...

  6. A Confluence of Community: Gathering the Waters of the Rio Grande.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Craig

    2001-01-01

    A Gathering of Waters is a community-based art and activism project to raise awareness that the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo is a desperately endangered river, connect communities dependent on the river, and galvanize those communities into action. Activities provided actual and symbolic experiences of river water for American Indian, Hispanic, Anglo, and…

  7. U and Sr Isotope Tracers of Agricultural Salinity Sources to the Lower Rio Grande River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyachoti, S. K.; Ma, L.; Szynkiewicz, A.; Jin, L.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated salinity of the lower Rio Grande River deteriorates water quality and limits domestic and agricultural water use. Both natural and anthropogenic processes contribute salts in the Rio Grande. Previous studies have focused on natural salt contributions with less emphasis on anthropogenic sources of salinity in the Rio Grande. Using (234U/238U) activity ratios (UAR), 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios, and major element concentrations, we aim to trace and quantify the salt loads in the Lower Rio Grande watershed which is greatly impacted by agricultural activities. Between 2009 and 2010, we sampled the Rio Grande stretch and irrigation return flows between the Elephant Butte Reservoir, New Mexico and El Paso, Texas. Furthermore, we monitored in monthly intervals the temporal changes of chemical and isotopic compositions of the Rio Grande at Canutillo, Tx. Our results show higher U and Sr fluxes in the Rio Grande during the irrigation season as compared to the non-irrigation season. The UAR (1.62 to 2.13) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7099 to 0.7138) were higher in the non-irrigation season compared to the irrigation season (UAR: 1.69 to 1.77; 87Sr/86Sr: 0.7100 to 0.7106). These variations of UAR and 87Sr/86Sr ratios imply multiple sources of U and Sr in the Rio Grande. In contrast, the agricultural return flows show a narrow range of UAR (1.31 to 1.37) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7091 to 0.7099) in the studied seasons. This is consistent with salinity contributions from agricultural sources. Rio Grande at Canutillo shows low UAR (1.62 to 1.77) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7104 to 0.7105) during the irrigation season as compared to the non-irrigation season (UAR: 2.04 to 2.24; 87Sr/86Sr: 0.7105 to 0.7109). The low U and Sr signature at Canutillo during the irrigation season is close to that of the agricultural return flows, indicative of agricultural salinity sources. These results provide useful elemental and isotopic constraints for future mass balance calculations of salinity

  8. Trace elements and organic compounds associated with riverbed sediments in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo basin, Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.; Wilson, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    In 1991, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) was mandated by the Texas Clean Rivers Act (Senate Bill 818) to assess water quality of rivers in Texas. Recent efforts to collect information for the assessment of water quality in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin have involved Federal agencies on both sides of the 1,248-mile U.S.-Mexico border?U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Secretaria de Desarollo Social (Secretary for Social Development, Mexico), National Water Commission of Mexico, and International Boundary and Water Commission?as well as State and local agencies in a spirit of international cooperation. Substantial efforts have been made to gather data needed to determine the quality of water and ecological status of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo, especially at sites along the border (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to assess selected historical data of trace elements and organic compounds in riverbed sediments of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo, and of the Pecos River and the Arroyo Colorado in Texas.

  9. Evaluation of canoe surveys for anurans along the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jung, R.E.; Bonine, K.E.; Rosenshield, M.L.; de la Reza, A.; Raimondo, S.; Droege, S.

    2002-01-01

    Surveys for amphibians along large rivers pose monitoring and sampling problems. We used canoes at night to spotlight and listen for anurans along four stretches of the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, Texas, in 1998 and 1999. We explored temporal and spatial variation in amphibian counts and species richness and assessed relationships between amphibian counts and environmental variables, as well as amphibian-habitat associations along the banks of the Rio Grande. We documented seven anuran species, but Rio Grande leopard frogs (Rana berlandieri) accounted for 96% of the visual counts. Chorus surveys along the river detected similar or fewer numbers of species, but orders of magnitude fewer individuals compared to visual surveys. The number of species varied on average by 37% across monthly and nightly surveys. We found similar average coefficients of variation in counts of Rio Grande leopard frogs on monthly and nightly bases (CVs = 42-44%), suggesting that canoe surveys are a fairly precise technique for counts of this species. Numbers of Rio Grande leopard frogs observed were influenced by river gage levels and air and water temperatures, suggesting that surveys should be conducted under certain environmental conditions to maximize counts and maintain consistency. We found significant differences in species richness and bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) counts among the four river stretches. Four rare anuran species were found along certain stretches but not others, which could represent either sampling error or unmeasured environmental or habitat differences among the river stretches. We found a greater association of Rio Grande leopard frogs with mud banks compared to rock or cliff (canyon) areas and with seepwillow and open areas compared to giant reed and other vegetation types. Canoe surveys appear to be a useful survey technique for anurans along the Rio Grande and may work for other large river systems as well.

  10. Quantifying Nitrogen Sources and Cycling Along the Upper Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelsner, G.; Brooks, P.; Hogan, J.; Lacey, H.; McDonnell, D.; Zeglin, L.; Mills, S.; Villinski, J.

    2005-05-01

    Synoptic sampling of a 1200km reach of the Upper Rio Grande has been performed in January and August from 2000 to present. The objective of this sampling has been to develop seasonal relationships between discharge, land use, and major water quality parameters including salinity and nutrients. In general, water quality, both salinity and nutrient concentrations, degrades with distance downstream. Increased salinity is explained largely by gradual downstream increase due to evapoconcentration punctuated by localized inputs of saline groundwater. Both total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) concentrations gradually increase with distance downstream, however for TDN this trend is punctuated by large, localized inputs primarily from urban areas. Somewhat surprisingly, surface water draining from areas of intensive, irrigated agriculture during the growing season often had lower nutrient and DOC concentrations than the river. Increased spatial and temporal sampling of the 250km reach between Cochiti Dam and Elephant Butte Reservoir was conducted in June, July and August of 2004 to quantify the relationships between agricultural and urban land use and nutrient loading as well as nutrient sinks within the surface water, hyporheic and riparian systems. Summer 2004 data indicate that wastewater treatment plants are the largest and most consistent sources of inorganic nitrogen to the river. In both June and July there was a net removal of nitrogen from the reach as discharge decreased 26%, concentrations decreased 39%, and TDN loads decreased 56%. Interestingly, the diversion of river water for irrigated agriculture reduced discharge 25%, TDN loads 60% and concentrations 47% along the same reach before draining back to the main stem of the river suggesting that agricultural diversions were serving as a sink for nitrogen. However in August, TDN loads were higher in returning drains suggesting that agricultural systems had switched to a net source of

  11. Creating a standardized watersheds database for the lower Rio Grande/Rio Bravo, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Julie R.; Ulery, Randy L.; Parcher, Jean W.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the creation of a large-scale watershed database for the lower Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin in Texas. The watershed database includes watersheds delineated to all 1:24,000-scale mapped stream confluences and other hydrologically significant points, selected watershed characteristics, and hydrologic derivative datasets. Computer technology allows generation of preliminary watershed boundaries in a fraction of the time needed for manual methods. This automated process reduces development time and results in quality improvements in watershed boundaries and characteristics. These data can then be compiled in a permanent database, eliminating the time-consuming step of data creation at the beginning of a project and providing a stable base dataset that can give users greater confidence when further subdividing watersheds. A standardized dataset of watershed characteristics is a valuable contribution to the understanding and management of natural resources. Vertical integration of the input datasets used to automatically generate watershed boundaries is crucial to the success of such an effort. The optimum situation would be to use the digital orthophoto quadrangles as the source of all the input datasets. While the hydrographic data from the digital line graphs can be revised to match the digital orthophoto quadrangles, hypsography data cannot be revised to match the digital orthophoto quadrangles. Revised hydrography from the digital orthophoto quadrangle should be used to create an updated digital elevation model that incorporates the stream channels as revised from the digital orthophoto quadrangle. Computer-generated, standardized watersheds that are vertically integrated with existing digital line graph hydrographic data will continue to be difficult to create until revisions can be made to existing source datasets. Until such time, manual editing will be necessary to make adjustments for man-made features and changes in the natural landscape

  12. Paleohydraulic interpretation and morphologic reconstruction of the northern Rio Grande River, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Muriceak, D.R. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    A flight of unpaired late Quaternary terraces comprised of fluvio-glacial deposits flanks the northern Rio Grande River for nearly ten miles along the upper Rio Grande valley. These terraces, which occur at decreasing heights due to progressive valley incision, are comprised of sediments that represent aggradation by braided streams flowing from the terminus of valley glaciers that flowed down the upper Rio Grande at least twice during late Quaternary time. Terminal moraines that are equivalent to Pinedale and Bull Lake stages of ice advance occur at the upstream origin of the terraces. Incision of the Rio Grande river since Pinedale time has resulted in at least three cut terraces that converge downstream. The purpose of this report is to reconstruct the Quaternary history of the Rio Grande river valley during its transition from full glacial to interglacial conditions. A total geodetic station provided coordinate and elevation data to correlate the terraces, extrapolate channel geometry through cross sections, and construct longitudinal profiles of the individual terrace surfaces. Measurements of the B-axis length of boulders on both terrace tread surfaces and surfaces within the terrace deposits were used to reconstruct paleoflow hydrology. The coarsest channel morphological features, too large to be deposited by normal glacial outwash, were deposited during a catastrophic outburst flood (after the failure of an ice dammed lake) that produced high discharge.

  13. Investigation of rifting processes in the Rio Grande Rift using data from unusually large earthquake swarms

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, A.; Balch, R.; House, L.; Hartse, H.

    1995-12-01

    San Acacia Swarm in the Rio Grande Rift. Because the Rio Grande rift is one of the best seismically instrumented rift zones in the world, studying its seismicity provides an exceptional opportunity to explore the active tectonic processes within continental rifts. We have been studying earthquake swarms recorded near Socorro in an effort to link seismicity directly to the rifting process. For FY94, our research has focused on the San Acacia swarm, which occurred 25 km north of Socorro, New Mexico, along the accommodation zone between the Albuquerque-Belen and Socorro basins of the central Rio Grande rift. The swarm commenced on 25 February 1983, had a magnitude 4.2 main shock on 2 March and ended on 17 March, 1983.

  14. DDE mercury, and selenium in Biota, sediments, and water of the Rio Grande-Rio Bravo Basin, 1965-1995.

    PubMed

    Mora, M A; Wainwright, S E

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of contaminant stressors on biota of the Rio Grande was conducted to identify relevant contaminant issues, assess exposure and ecological effects, identify data gaps, and determine potential risks. Most contaminant data were from studies conducted during 1965-1995 in the Lower Rio Grande, on the Texas side of the river, within a 100-km boundary from Falcon Dam to the mouth. Contaminants most frequently reported were organochlorine compounds (OCs) and trace elements. The number of records for OCs and trace elements was at least twofold greater for fish than for birds, mammals, or reptiles. Of the OCs, p,p'-DDE was the most commonly reported. Among the trace elements, Hg was one of the most frequently reported; however, Se, As, Pb, Cu, and Zn were also common. The highest concentrations of OCs and trace elements were reported predominantly from Lower Rio Grande Valley locations, with approximately 68% of the highest values detected from Falcon Dam to the mouth of the river. Twenty-six (20%) of the locations with maximum concentrations corresponded to portions of Llano Grande Lake and the Arroyo Colorado. Recent analyses of birds and fish indicate that levels of DDE are currently much lower than in the 1970s or 1980s in Rio Grande wildlife. This apparent decline does not apply to Hg and Se levels in birds and fish, which have remained more or less constant, but may have increased over the years in some locations. Hg was of particular concern because of high levels found recently in addled eggs of aplomado falcons and in their potential prey. Hg was elevated in fish from the Big Bend area. Also, Se in fish sampled in 1993 and 1994 was near or above the threshold for potential effects in fish-eating wildlife. Future investigations should evaluate the potential impacts of Hg and Se on aquatic and terrestrial species from selected sites of concern. PMID:9751032

  15. Water Management for Competing Uses: Environmental Flows in the Transboundary Rio Grande/Rio Bravo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Solis, S.; McKinney, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction Due to high water demand, the scarcity of water, and the complexity of water allocation, environmental flows have not been considered as an integral part of the water management in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo transboundary basin. The Big Bend reach is located between the cities of Presidio/Ojinaga to Amistad international reservoir, along the main stream (Fig. 1). Important environmental habitats such as the Big Bend National and State Park in the U.S., the Maderas del Carmen, Cañon de Santa Elena and Ocampo natural reserved areas in Mexico are ecologically threatened because of the lack of environmental water management policies. Several efforts have been undertaken by scientists, government agencies and NGOs to determine the environmental flows for this reach and water management policies that can provide these flows. Objective The objective of this research is to describe a water management policy that can conciliate environmental and human water uses in the Big Bend region. In other words, define a policy that can provide environmental flows without harming water supply for stakeholders or increasing flood risk, within legal and physical constraints of the system. Methodology First, the system was characterized identifying water users, hydraulic infrastructure, and water allocation according to state, federal and international regulations. Second, a hydrograph for environmental flows was proposed that mimics the hydrologic characteristics of the prior dam alteration. Third, a water planning model was constructed to evaluate alternative policies. Fourth, the water management is proposed to provide environmental restoration flows from Luis L. Leon reservoir. This policy considers mechanisms that reduce flooding and drought risks, while meting national and international water regulations. Results Three types of natural flow regimes are considered: (1) median flows aimed to provide the base flow in the region, (2) high flows to provide transversal

  16. Frequency of dermatophytes in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mezzari, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the distribution of dermatophytes in Porto Alegre, the capital of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, they were isolated from the skin, hairs and nails samples and retrospectively analyzed from June 1981 to June 1995, in two different institutions in the city of Porto Alegre: (i) the Serviço de Micologia do Instituto de Pesquisas Biológicas Jandyr Maya Faillace, da Secretaria de Saúde e Meio Ambiente do Rio Grande do Sul which attends the low income population (low and middle classes) and, (ii) Laboratório Weinmann, a clinical pathology laboratory which attends predominantly the higher income population (middle and upper classes), both which attend in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre. The dermatophyte predominance of Trichophyton rubrum was confirmed (55.33%) followed by T. mentagrophytes (21.46%). The data obtained were compared with the existing prevalence data which were collected in the interior of the state over a period of 32 years (1960-1992). T. verrucosum, T. simii, Microsporum persicolor, T. schöenleinii, M. nanum and M. cookei were isolated in the interior and have not been found in the capital so far. On the other side, T. violaceum was, isolated in the capital and has not been found in the interior so far.

  17. Water-quality trends in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin using sediment cores from reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Mahler, B.J.; Callender, Edward C.

    1997-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began full implementation of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program (Leahy and others, 1990). Also in 1991, the State of Texas established the Clean Rivers Program (CRP) administered by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC). The coring study reported here was a collaborative effort between the NAWQA Program and the CRP Rio Grande Border Environmental Assessment Team, with additional funding support from the El Paso County Water Improvement District No. 1.

  18. Economic implications for the biological control of Arundo donax: Rio Grande Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giant reed, Arundo donax L., is a large bamboo-like plant native to the Mediterranean region. It has invaded several thousand hectares of the Rio Grande riparian habitat in Texas and Mexico. The United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) is investigating four ...

  19. Mapping giant reed along the Rio Grande using airborne and satellite imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giant reed (Arundo donax L.) is a perennial invasive weed that presents a severe threat to agroecosystems and riparian areas in the Texas and Mexican portions of the Rio Grande Basin. The objective of this presentation is to give an overview on the use of aerial photography, airborne multispectral a...

  20. Constraints and opportunities for ecological restoration in the Rio Grande Valley, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few areas in the United States that have experienced a more precipitous growth than the Lower Rio Grande Valley (RGV) in south Texas, where human populations have almost doubled in the last 20 years. This growth is matched with a rapid proliferation of built environments that is often asso...

  1. Environmental Degradation in a Dependent Region: The Rio Grande Valley of Mexico and Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    Traces the interrelationships among dependence, environmental degradation, and human health in the Rio Grande Valley of Mexico and Texas. Presents a case study on environmental factors threatening family health in households located on both sides of the border; the health problems can be overcome by addressing restrictive zoning, health services,…

  2. Quantification and Characterization of Chloride Sources in the Rio Grande, Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, H. F.; Phillips, F. M.; Tidwell, V.; Hogan, J.; Bastien, E.; Oelsner, G.

    2005-12-01

    Salinization of rivers is a problem in the southwestern United States as well as in other semiarid and arid regions of the world. Arid and semiarid rivers including the Rio Grande often exhibit increasing salinity with distance downstream, which is commonly attributed to irrigated agriculture. Increased river salinity causes economic losses by reducing crop productivity, rendering the water unsuitable for many municipal and industrial uses, and corroding or plugging pipes. Although most salinization of the Rio Grande takes place in the United States, many of the effects are felt in Mexico. Recent studies have found that salinization of the Rio Grande is geologically controlled by the addition of deep saline brines at several distinct locations. However, these additions of deep brine have not been well quantified. We have designed a model using a system dynamics software program to analyze Rio Grande chloride data. The model uses historical chloride and gaging station data and high-resolution synoptic chloride samples collected between 2000 and 2005 to characterize and quantify additions of deep brine to the river. The model has also been used to evaluate the effect of the construction of Elephant Butte Reservoir on the chloride balance of the river using chloride concentration data from 1905-1907. The model can also be used to evaluate future climatic and management scenarios in order to plan for the future water needs of the basin.

  3. A survey of bee species found pollinating watermelons in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a combination of flower traps and visual observations, we surveyed three watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] fields in the Lower Rio Grande Valley to determine what bees inhabit this crop in this region. No managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) hives were in any of the fie...

  4. Isolation of bacteria from cotton bolls in the Texas Coastal Bend and Rio Grande Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boll rots have caused a reduction in yield, lint quality, and increased contaminated seed. During 2011 and 2012 field surveys were conducted throughout the Texas Coastal Bend and Rio Grande Valley to determine incidence of cotton boll rot. A variety trial was conducted using the top five varieties...

  5. Poverty in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas: Historical and Contemporary Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael V.; Maril, Robert Lee

    Relative to other urbanized areas, the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas consistently ranks at the bottom in regard to almost every objective indicator of socioeconomic welfare: per capita income, educational attainment, employment, and health and housing conditions. The 1970 census discovered that approximately one-half of its population,…

  6. Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Rio Grande Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) in Southern Utah, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Frame, David D; Kelly, E Jane; Van Wettere, Arnaud

    2015-07-01

    A male Rio Grande Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) living in semidomestication was submitted for necropsy. Emaciation, a greatly enlarged heart, and chronic passive congestion of the liver were present. Dilated cardiomyopathy occurs in domestic turkey flocks but has not been reported in Wild Turkeys.

  7. The Role of Farm Labor Market Institutions in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Paul B.

    The objectives of this pilot study were to study the operation of the farm labor market in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, to analyze the functions of the labor market institutions in the Valley, and to formulate a series of policy recommendations to assist in relieving the short and long run problems of both farm workers and employers.…

  8. Urban Impact of Dissolved Metals in the Paso del Norte Segment of the Rio Grande

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freiwan, Sumayeh Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The Paso del Norte segment of the Rio Grande experiences two seasons per year; the (wet) irrigation season and the (dry) non-irrigation season. The goal of this study was to improve the understanding of occurrence and contribution of dissolved metals in this region during the non-irrigation season. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate…

  9. 78 FR 45495 - Conejos Peak Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Cumbres Vegetation Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ..., 2013. Andrea Jones, District Ranger. [FR Doc. 2013-17968 Filed 07/26/2013 at 8:45 a.m.; Publication... Forest Service Conejos Peak Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Cumbres Vegetation... Cumbres Vegetation Management Project. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Diana McGinn at 719-852-6241...

  10. STS-65 Earth observation of dust plumes from Rio Grande in Southern Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, is of dust plumes from the Rio Grande in Southern Bolivia. A series of dust plumes can be seen rising from sand banks in the Rio Grande of southern Bolivia, bottom right of this northeast-looking view. The Rio Grande brings sediment from the Andes (foothills visible in the foreground, bottom left) and flows across the flat country of the northern Chaco plain. During the low-flow season, sand banks of this sediment are exposed to northerly winds which often blow dust into the surrounding forest. One of the significances of the dust plumes is that dust acts as a source of nutrient for the local soils. This is the most impressive example of dust ever recorded on Shuttle photography from this river. Such plumes have been seen on photographs from four previous missions (STS-31, STS-47, STS-48, STS-51I) emanating from the Rio Grande. The plumes are regularly space because the sand is blown only from those reaches of th

  11. Magnetic Investigation of Ancestral Puebloan Rio Grande (New Mexico) Glaze Wares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, J. B.; Geissman, J. W.; Ramenofsky, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    In geologically heterogeneous regions, such as the Rio Grande, archaeologists typically rely on petrographic analyses to determine ceramic provenance and reconstruct prehistoric trade patterns. Even in these regions, other methods are useful for elucidating trade patterns and/or resolving ambiguities from the petrographic data. Magnetic properties of Ancestral central Rio Grande Puebloan ceramics are being acquired to assess their use in identifying provenance, trade patterns, composition, manufacturing techniques, and firing conditions of ceramics, before and during the early European contact period (ca. A.D. 1325-1700) in New Mexico. Similar to the study of Moskowitz et al. (1987), we use a combination of bulk susceptibility, NRM, ARM, and SIRM intensity, AF response by NRM, ARM, and SIRM, thermal demagnetization of NRM and SIRM, and coercivity of remanence, to study temporal change in Rio Grande glaze wares from four archaeological sites in the northern Rio Grande (approximately 90 sherds per site). Rio Grande glaze wares were widely traded among Ancestral Puebloan groups before and during the European contact period. The ceramics are from the two earliest Spanish administrative centers in New Mexico, San Gabriel del Yungue and Palace of the Governors, and two mission pueblos, Pecos Pueblo and San Marcos Pueblo. Magnetic property data are being compared with petrographic observations to test the effectiveness of several magnetic measurements to identify, among other things, ceramic provenance. A tentative observation in our study is that bulk susceptibility values correlate with different ceramic provenances. The mean bulk susceptibility values for Galisteo Basin ceramics, tempered with augite monzonite and hornblende latite, are significantly higher (5.56E-04 and 4.91E-04 SI mass, respectively) than those for Pajarito Plateau ceramics, tempered with glassy tuff, tuff rocks, and andesite, (1.79E-04, 2.53E-04, and 2.58E-04 SI mass, respectively). This study is

  12. Social, political, and institutional setting: Water management problems of the Rio Grande

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses various water management issues facing federal, state, and local agencies charged with managing the water resources of the Rio Grande River Basin and its major tributaries. The Rio Grande - 3,058 km (=1,900 mi) long - is the fourth longest river in the United States. The river's basin is 870,236 km2 (=336,000 mi2) and for roughly two-thirds of its length it forms the United States-Mexican border. It is a major recreational resource providing world class trout fishing near its headwaters in Colorado's San Juan Mountains and shoreline, angling, and boating opportunities near the Colorado-New Mexico border. The Rio Grande is the principal tourist attraction of Big Bend National Park and flows through downtown Albuquerque and El Paso. Many reaches are wide and broad, but almost all are relatively shallow and not navigable by commercial ships. Nevertheless, it is one of the most important renewable water resources of the southwestern United States and North America. The issue of the "manageability" of the river in the face of social forces and disparate administrative jurisdictions that adversely impact Rio Grande flows is a thread linking various sections of the paper together. The length of the river; the fact that major reaches lie in Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas; and its unique role as an international boundary pose complex management problems. The allocation status quo formed by the complex nexus of existing river laws make it difficult to reshape Rio Grande management. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  13. Economic impacts of federal policy responses to drought in the Rio Grande Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Frank A.; Hurd, Brian H.; Rahmani, Tarik; Gollehon, Noel

    2006-03-01

    Significant growth in the Rio Grande Basin's demand for water has stressed the region's scarce water supply. This paper presents an analysis of the impacts of severe and sustained drought and of minimum in-stream flow requirements to support endangered species in the Rio Grande watershed. These impacts are investigated by modeling the physical and institutional constraints within the Rio Grande Basin and by identifying the hydrologic and economic responses of all major water users. Water supplies, which include all major tributaries, interbasin transfers, and hydrologically connected groundwater, are represented in a yearly time step. A nonlinear programming model is developed to maximize economic benefits subject to hydrologic and institutional constraints. Results indicate that drought produces considerable impacts on both agriculture and municipal and industrial (MI) uses in the Rio Grande watershed. In-stream flow requirements to support endangered species' habitat produce the largest impacts on agricultural water users in New Mexico and Texas. Hydrologic and economic impacts are more pronounced when in-stream flow requirements dictate larger quantities of water for endangered species' habitat. Higher in-stream flow requirements for endangered species in central New Mexico cause considerable losses to New Mexico agriculture above Elephant Butte Reservoir and to MI users in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Those same in-stream flow requirements reduce drought damages to New Mexico agriculture below Elephant Butte Reservoir and reduce the severity of drought damages to MI users in El Paso, Texas. Results provide a framework for formulating federal policy responses to drought in the Rio Grande Basin.

  14. On-site evaluation of the suitability of a wetted instream habitat in the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico, for the Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2011-01-01

    Two in-situ exposure studies were conducted with the federally-listed endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus). One-year-old adults were exposed in cages deployed at three sites in the Middle Rio Grande, N. Mex., for 4 days to assess survival and for 26 days to evaluate survival, growth, overall health, and whole-body elemental composition. The test sites were located on the Pueblo of Isleta in the (1) main channel of the Middle Rio Grande, (2) 240-Wasteway irrigation return drain, and (3) wetted instream habitat created below the outfall of the 240-Wasteway irrigation return drain. During the cage exposures, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, and turbidity were monitored continuously (15-minute intervals) and common constituents, nutrients, carbons, metals, and pesticides were measured at discrete intervals. In both studies, there were statistical differences in several water-quality parameters among sites; and except for turbidity, these differences were small and were not considered to be biologically significant. The cages used in the 4-day exposure study were ineffective at preventing access to the fish by predators, and survival was highly variable (20 percent to 90 percent) across sites. In the 26-day chronic exposure study, weight and condition factor of caged-exposed fish at all sites were significantly lower than those at test initiation. After 26 days of exposure, there were no significant differences in survival, total length, weight, or condition factor of fish across sites, but absolute weight loss and relative reduction in condition factor were significantly greater in fish at the wetted instream habitat site compared to those at the Middle Rio Grande site. There were no statistical differences in health assessment indices, mesenteric fat indices, or prevalence of abnormalities in cage-exposed fish among sites. Cage-exposed fish had higher health assessment indices and prevalence of fin anomalies and a lower mesenteric

  15. Tectonic rotations within the Rio Grande rift - Evidence from paleomagnetic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. L.; Golombek, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Paleomagnetic studies on Miocene Pliocene volcanic rocks from the Espanola basin of the Rio Grande rift, New Mexico, reveal directions discordant form the expected mean direction for North America. The Paliza Canyon Formation, Tschicoma Formation, and Lobato Basalt, all sampled in the Jemez Mountains west of the Pajarito fault zone, have mean declinations east of the expected mean. The Cerros del Rio volcanics, lying east of the Pajarito fault zone, have a westerly declination. Combined with published data on the Santa Fe Group sediments east of the fault zone, and the Valles Rhyolite, west of the fault zone, distinct rotations of the two areas are evident. The western block has rotated clockwise 12 deg, while the eastern block shows 16 deg of conter-clockwise motion. Differential rotations of 25-30 deg are calculated between the two blocks; 4 deg/m.y. is the minimum differential rotation for the past 5 m.y. Geologic explanations for these rotations include the opening of the Rio Grande rift in response to clockwise rotation of the Colorado Plateau and significant left slip along the Rio Grande rift.

  16. Cenozoic thermal, mechanical and tectonic evolution of the Rio Grande rift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Seager, W. R.; Golombek, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    Two areas of New Mexico which exhibit complex but similar Cenozoic histories of extensional tectonism are analyzed. The first study area is the Basin and Range province and southern Rio Gande rift in southern New Mexico; the second study area is the central Rio Grande rift in central and northern New Mexico, the southern San Luis basin, the Espanola basin, and the Albuquerque basin. Two phases of extension were identified: the first phase which began in mid-Oligocene was characterized by local high-strain extension events, low-angle faulting, and the development of broad, shallow basins, all indicating an approximately NE-SW + or - 25 deg extension direction; the later phase which occurred primarily in the late Miocene, was characterized by synchronous, high-angle faulting, resulting in large vertical strains which produced the modern Rio Grande rift morphology. Extension direction was approximately E-W. Geotherms were estimated and lithospheric strength curves were calculated for these two phases of extension. A high geotherm was deduced for the early phase resulting in a shallow crustal brittle transition, and insignificant mantle strength. The lithosphere subsequently cooled, resulting in a significant zone of mantle strength beneath the Moho. It is concluded that the interrelationship among regional and local prerifting, synrifting, and postrifting events in the Rio Grande rift attests to the fact that the rifting (in the region studied) should be considered in the context of other geologic events.

  17. Quantifying Ichthyofaunal Zonation and Species Richness along a 2800 km Reach of the Rio Chama and Rio Grande (U.S.A.)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ichthyofaunal zonation occurs when lotic fishes are partitioned into distinct assemblages, usually in response to longitudinally distributed habitats. Several studies have documented zonation within the Rio Grande, but this is the first to quantitatively test the zonation hypothe...

  18. Mesohabitats, fish assemblage composition, and mesohabitat use of the Rio Grande silvery minnow over a range of seasonal flow regimes in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo del Norte, in and near Big Bend National Park, Texas, 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce; Braun, Christopher L.; Pearson, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    The total number and number of types of mesohabitats were larger during low flows compared to intermediate flows, and larger during intermediate flows compared to high flows. Decreases in streamflow typically led to increases in channel complexity in terms of the number of different types and total number of mesohabitats present. The total wetted area increased and the number of mesohabitat types generally decreased as streamflow increased. At all four sites, the smallest depths and velocities were generally measured during low flow and the largest depths and velocities at high flow. Specific conductance was relatively consistent between the Contrabando and Santa Elena sites, the two most upstream sites. Specific conductance decreased appreciably between the Santa Elena site and the Rio Grande Village, and decreased slightly between the Rio Grande Village site and the Stillwell Crossing site. Specific-conductance values within and among mesohabitat types at a given site were relatively consistent. The pH values measured within and among mesohabitat types also were relatively consistent at all four sites. Median dissolved oxygen concentrations were relatively consistent between the Contrabando and Santa Elena sites (8.34 and 8.54 milligrams per liter [mg/L], respectively) but decreased along the stretch of river between the Santa Elena and Rio Grande Village sites to 7.31 mg/L, possibly because of small dissolved oxygen concentrations associated with contributions from springs between the Santa Elena and Rio Grande Village sites. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased substantially between the Rio Grande Village and Stillwell Crossing sites to 10.06 mg/L. Mesohabitat water temperatures were generally highest in mesohabitats co

  19. Geohydrology of White Rock Canyon of the Rio Grande from Otowi to Frijoles Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Peters, R.J.; Owens, J.W.

    1980-12-01

    Twenty-seven springs discharge from the Totavi Lentil and Tesuque Formation in White Rock Canyon. Water generally acquires its chemical characteristics from rock units that comprise the spring aquifer. Twenty-two of the springs are separated into three groups of similar aquifer-related chemical quality. The five remaining springs make up a fourth group with a chemical quality that differs due to localized conditions in the aquifer. Localized conditions may be related to recharge or discharge in or near basalt intrusion or through faults. Streams from Pajarito, Ancho, and Frijoles Canyons discharge into the Rio Grande in White Rock Canyon. The base flow in the streams is from springs. Sanitary effluent in Mortandad Canyon from the treatment plant at White Rock also reaches the Rio Grande.

  20. RiSA: A Science Festival for the Bilingual and Bicultural Rio Grande Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Joey Shapiro; Torres, Cristina; Stone, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The Rio Grande Science and Arts (RiSA) Festival organized by the Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) will use a wide variety of artforms to bring physics and science topics to the bilingual and bicultural population of the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. The science and art faculty at UTB will partner with art and education professionals to create an annual community event celebrating science though art. Music, dance, poetry, and visual arts will headline the festival activities. Festival events and products will be produced in both English and Spanish to attract and inform the bilingual local community. The RiSA Festival is supported by the Science Festival Alliance and the Sloan Foundation. Supported by the Science Festival Alliance and the Sloan Foundation.

  1. Synopsis of Dorstenia (Moraceae) in Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boeni, Bruna De Oliveira; Singer, Rodrigo Bustos

    2015-01-01

    A taxonomic synopsis of Dorstenia (Moraceae) in Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Southern Brazil, is presented. Three species were recorded: D. brasiliensis, D. carautae, a new record for the state of RS, and D. tenuis. All species are described and illustrated through detailed photos of living specimens. A taxonomic key to separate the species, as well as details on distribution, overall phenology, habitat, conservation status and ecology are presented.

  2. Infectious disease survey of Rio Grande wild turkeys in the Edwards Plateau of Texas.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Markus J; Aguirre, Raymond; Ferro, Pamela J; Jones, Dustin A; Lawyer, Tim A; Peterson, M Nils; Silvy, Nova J

    2002-10-01

    State wildlife agencies have translocated thousands of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) since the 1930s to reestablish this species. Because of threats to the domestic poultry industry and wild birds, screening for selected infectious agents has become routine since the early 1980s. One of the principal sources for Rio Grande wild turkeys (M. gallopavo intermedia) for translocation purposes was the Edwards Plateau of Texas (USA). Unfortunately, turkey abundance has declined in the southern Edwards Plateau since the late 1970s. Surprisingly few studies have addressed wild turkeys in this region, perhaps reflecting its status as the heart of Rio Grande turkey range. We surveyed 70 free-living Rio Grande wild turkeys from Bandera and Kerr counties, Texas, for evidence of exposure to Salmonella typhimurium, S. pullorum, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, M. meleagridis, M. synoviae, Chlamydophila psittaci, and the avian influenza, Newcastle disease, turkey corona, and reticuloendotheliosis viruses. Of these, 80% (56) were seropositive for both M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae on the serum plate antigen test. Ten of these individuals (14% of total) were positive for M. synoviae by hemagglutination inhibition testing. All other serologic tests were negative. Two adult females sampled in Kerr County, whose body mass was significantly less than that of other adult females trapped in the area, tested positive for reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) proviral DNA on polymerase chain reaction. Reticuloendotheliosis virus was isolated from one of these individuals. The pathogenesis, transmission, and/or population-level influences of M. gallisepticum, M. synoviae, and REV in Rio Grande wild turkeys deserves further study.

  3. Poverty and Problems of Development in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael V.

    Bounded on the west and south by Mexico and to the east by the Gulf, the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas is separated from the nearest U.S. urban center of any size by miles of flat and arid brushland. Its total population of approximately 335,000 is essentially composed of 2 groups--Mexican Americans and Anglos. Although the region is one of the…

  4. Geothermal resources of rifts: A comparison of the rio grande rift and the salton trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanberg, Chandler A.

    1983-05-01

    The Rio Grande Rift and the Salton Trough are the best developed rift systems in the United States and both share many features common to rifts in general, including geothermal resources. These two rifts have different tectonic and magmatic histories, however, and these differences are reflected in the nature of their geothermal resources. The Salton Trough is a well developed and successful rift. It is the landward extension of the Gulf of California spreading center, which has separated Baja, California, from the remainder of Mexico. Quaternary silicic magmatization has occurred and several of the geothermal resources are associated with recent rhyolitic intrusions. Such resources tend to be high temperature (> 200°C). Greenschist facies metamorphism has been observed in several of the geothermal wells. Localized upper crustal melting is a distinct possibility and there is increasing speculation that very high temperature (> 300°C) geothermal fluids may underlie a large portion of the central trough at depths in excess of 4 km. Low temperature geothermal resources associated with shallow hydrothermal convection are less common and tend to be located on the flanks of the trough or in the Coachella Valley to the north of the zone of active rifting. In contrast, the Rio Grande Rift is less well developed. Recent volcanism consists primarily of mantle-derived basalts, which have not had sufficient residence time within the crust to generate significant crustal melting. The geothermal resources within the Rio Grande Rift do not correlate well with these young basalts. Rather, the quantity of geothermal resources are low temperature (< 100°C) and result from forced hydrothermal convection which discharges at constrictions within or at the end of the major sedimentary basins. High temperature resources are less common and the only discovered example is the Valles Caldera of northern New Mexico ( T = 250-300°C). The deep interiors of the sedimentary basins of the Rio

  5. Wild animals as sentinels of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albano, A P N; Klafke, G B; Brandolt, T M; Da Hora, V P; Minello, L F; Jorge, S; Santos, E O; Behling, G M; Camargo, Z P; Xavier, M O; Meireles, M C A

    2014-04-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a dimorphic pathogenic fungus, causes the principal form of systemic mycosis in Brazil. The literature furnishes only limited data on the ecology of this fungus in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost state of Brazil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of fungal infection in wild animals, using serological tests and using the animals as sentinels of the presence of P. brasiliensis in three specified mesoregions of Rio Grande do Sul. A total of 128 wild animals from the three mesoregions were included in the study. The serum samples were evaluated by immunodiffusion and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique to detect anti-gp43 antibodies from P. brasiliensis. Two conjugates were tested and compared with the ELISA technique. Although no positive samples were detected by immunodiffusion, 26 animals (20%), belonging to 13 distinct species, were found to be seropositive by the ELISA technique. The seropositive animals were from two mesoregions of the state. The results were similar according to the gender, age, and family of the animals, but differed significantly according to the conjugate used (p < 0.001), showing more sensitivity to protein A-peroxidase than to protein G-peroxidase. The finding that wild animals from the state of Rio Grande do Sul are exposed to P. brasiliensis suggests that the fungus can be found in this region despite the often-rigorous winters, which frequently include below-freezing temperatures.

  6. Finite element analysis of the I-40 bridge over the Rio Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, P.A.; Jauregui, D.V.; Vigil, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s numerous bridges were built in the US with a design similar to those on Interstate 40 (I-40) over the Rio Grande in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have provided funds to New Mexico State University (NMSU) through the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department (NMSH and TD) and The Alliance For Transportation Research (ATR) for evaluation and testing of the existing fracture-critical bridges over the Rio Grande. Because the I-40 Bridges over the Rio Grande were to be razed during the summer of 1993, the investigators were able to introduce damage into the structure in order to test various damage identification methods and to observe the changes in load paths through the structure caused by the cracking. To support this research effort, NMSU contracted Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform experimental modal analyses, and to develop experimentally verified numerical models of the bridge. A previous report (LA-12767-MS) summarizes the results of the experimental modal analyses. This report summarizes the numerical analyses of the bridges and compares the results of these analyses to the experimental results.

  7. Wild animals as sentinels of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albano, A P N; Klafke, G B; Brandolt, T M; Da Hora, V P; Minello, L F; Jorge, S; Santos, E O; Behling, G M; Camargo, Z P; Xavier, M O; Meireles, M C A

    2014-04-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a dimorphic pathogenic fungus, causes the principal form of systemic mycosis in Brazil. The literature furnishes only limited data on the ecology of this fungus in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost state of Brazil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of fungal infection in wild animals, using serological tests and using the animals as sentinels of the presence of P. brasiliensis in three specified mesoregions of Rio Grande do Sul. A total of 128 wild animals from the three mesoregions were included in the study. The serum samples were evaluated by immunodiffusion and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique to detect anti-gp43 antibodies from P. brasiliensis. Two conjugates were tested and compared with the ELISA technique. Although no positive samples were detected by immunodiffusion, 26 animals (20%), belonging to 13 distinct species, were found to be seropositive by the ELISA technique. The seropositive animals were from two mesoregions of the state. The results were similar according to the gender, age, and family of the animals, but differed significantly according to the conjugate used (p < 0.001), showing more sensitivity to protein A-peroxidase than to protein G-peroxidase. The finding that wild animals from the state of Rio Grande do Sul are exposed to P. brasiliensis suggests that the fungus can be found in this region despite the often-rigorous winters, which frequently include below-freezing temperatures. PMID:24570039

  8. DIETARY CHARACTERIZATIONS IN A STUDY OF HUMAN EXPOSURES IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY: I. FOODS AND BEVERAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley Environmental Study (LRGVES), a cooperative effort between various federal and state agencies, responded to concerns of the local community about possible adverse health effects related to environmental conditions. The LRGVES pilot project, conducted d...

  9. 77 FR 12818 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Rio Grande...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Statement for the Proposed Rio Grande Floodway, San Acacia to Bosque del Apache, Socorro County, NM, Project... from San Acacia downstream to San Marcial in Socorro County, New Mexico. The purpose of the study is...

  10. Residues of toxaphene in insectivorous birds (Petrochelidon spp.) from the Rio Grande, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maruya, K.A.; Smalling, K.L.; Mora, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Although it has been documented that wildlife in the Rio Grande Valley (RGV) contain increased concentrations of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, particularly DDE, little has been published on residues of toxaphene throughout this major North American watershed. In this study, 28 liver composites from adult swallows (Petrochelidon spp.) collected along the Rio Grande from 1999 through 2000 were analyzed for toxaphene residues using congener-specific gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionization-mass spectrometry. Estimated total toxaphene concentrations ranged from 12 to 260 ng/g wet wt and were highest in samples from the lower RGV near Llano Grande Lake in Hidalgo and Cameron counties (Texas). Toxaphene congener profiles were relatively invariant throughout the watershed and were dominated by 2,2,5-endo,6-exo,8,8,9,10- octachlorobornane (P-42a or B8-806) with lesser amounts of several other Cl 7-Cl9 compounds, many of which remain unidentified. Petrochelidon spp. liver profiles appear to be intermediate in complexity between those in invertebrates and fish (more complex) and mammals (less complex) and differs somewhat from those reported for other avian species. In addition to other legacy OC contaminants, toxaphene residues were most concentrated in the lower RGV and accumulated at up to hundreds of parts per billion in these insect-eating birds, underscoring their utility as avian bioindicators of persistent organic pollutants. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  11. The potential to improve water quality in the middle Rio Grande through effective wetland restoration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ruth; Lougheed, Vanessa L

    2010-01-01

    The Rio Grande, which forms the United States-Mexico border for much of its course, receives diverse pollutants from both urban and agricultural areas, most notably in the sister cities of El Paso (TX, USA)-Ciudad Juárez (CHI, Mexico). This study aimed to describe regional trends in water quality in waters near the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez metroplex and to examine the potential for water quality improvement through the use of a created wetland. Very few differences in nutrient chemistry were found among drains, canals and the Rio Grande, with the exception of elevated chloride and lower phosphorus levels found in the drains. Overall, chloride concentrations increased with distance downstream, likely due to concentration of salts via evaporation from irrigated agriculture. A wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) contributed substantially to total phosphorus and nitrate levels, which, together with ammonia, tended to exceed state criteria for water quality downstream of the WWTP outflow. The created Rio Bosque wetlands reduced nitrate concentrations in the water, possibly via denitrification enhanced by algae; algae increased in biomass as water flowed through the wetlands. However, the diversion of water for irrigated agriculture, resulting in the absence of water, and thus aquatic plants, in the wetland in the summer has limited the ability of this wetland to improve regional water quality. PMID:20705996

  12. The potential to improve water quality in the middle Rio Grande through effective wetland restoration.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ruth; Lougheed, Vanessa L

    2010-01-01

    The Rio Grande, which forms the United States-Mexico border for much of its course, receives diverse pollutants from both urban and agricultural areas, most notably in the sister cities of El Paso (TX, USA)-Ciudad Juárez (CHI, Mexico). This study aimed to describe regional trends in water quality in waters near the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez metroplex and to examine the potential for water quality improvement through the use of a created wetland. Very few differences in nutrient chemistry were found among drains, canals and the Rio Grande, with the exception of elevated chloride and lower phosphorus levels found in the drains. Overall, chloride concentrations increased with distance downstream, likely due to concentration of salts via evaporation from irrigated agriculture. A wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) contributed substantially to total phosphorus and nitrate levels, which, together with ammonia, tended to exceed state criteria for water quality downstream of the WWTP outflow. The created Rio Bosque wetlands reduced nitrate concentrations in the water, possibly via denitrification enhanced by algae; algae increased in biomass as water flowed through the wetlands. However, the diversion of water for irrigated agriculture, resulting in the absence of water, and thus aquatic plants, in the wetland in the summer has limited the ability of this wetland to improve regional water quality.

  13. Channel Narrowing and Channel Reset: Effects of a Large Flood on the Vegetated, Narrowing Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In September 2008, heavy precipitation from a tropical storm in the Sierra Madre Occidental, MX, produced large amounts of stream flow to the Rio Conchos and lower Rio Grande. This flood was well publicized in the media due to the widespread flooding in Ojinaga, Chih., and Presidio, TX. Gage records indicate that this flood had an approximate recurrence of 15 years as measured on the Rio Grande near Presidio. Nevertheless, flood stages were the highest ever recorded and resulted from a significant loss of channel capacity due to channel narrowing that had occurred during the previous 18 years. Measurements from aerial photographs indicate that channel width had decreased between 35 and 50% between 1990 and 2008 during regional drought. During this period of low stream flow, invasion by non-native riparian vegetation (Tamarix spp., Arundo donax) helped trap sediment and promote floodplain accretion. Our resurveys of the channel indicate that the 2008 flood was a reset event and that the channel was re-widened by 32 to 48%. Repeated, oblique photographs showed significant channel migration and large scale floodplain stripping during this flood. These results show that although riparian vegetation may actively promote channel narrowing and floodplain accretion, moderately large floods may cause large scale bank erosion, floodplain stripping, and vegetation removal in alluvial valleys subject to large-scale invasion by nonnative plants.

  14. Ground-Water Resource Assessment in the Rio Grande de Manati Alluvial Plain, Rio Arriba Saliente Area, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres-Gonzalez, Sigfredo; Gómez-Gómez, Fernando; Warne, Andrew G.

    2002-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer within a 160-acre area of the Rio Grande de Manati alluvial plain was investigated to evaluate its potential as a water-supply source for the Barrios Rio Arriba Saliente and Pugnado Afuera, municipio of Manati, Puerto Rico. Analysis of well boring samples and the results of electric resistivity surveys indicate that the average thickness of the unconsolidated alluvial deposits in the study area is about 100 to 110 feet. The alluvium is a mixture of sand and gravel, which generally has a porosity of 0.2 to 0.35. Short-duration pump tests in small-diameter piezometers indicate that the alluvial aquifer has a hydraulic conductivity of about 200 feet per day and a transmissivity of about 7,900 feet squared per day. Analyses of water levels in piezometers, combined with stage measurements at a series of surveyed reference points along the Rio Grande de Manati channel, indicate that the water-table gradient in the alluvial aquifer is about 0.001, and that ground-water flow is generally from south to north, in the general direction of river flow. The water-table data indicate that the Rio Grande de Manati is the principal source of ground-water recharge to the alluvial aquifer in the study area. Because base flow for the Rio Grande de Manati is usually greater than 44 cubic feet per second, a continuous withdrawal rate of 0.5 to 1.0 cubic foot per second (225 to 450 gallons per minute) from a production well is possible. Chemical analysis of a ground-water sample indicates that the alluvial aquifer water meets U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary standards for selected constituents. Bacteriological analysis of ground-water samples indicates that the ground water contains little or no fecal coliform or fecal streptococcus bacteria. Although long-term data from upstream of the study area indicate high levels of fecal coliform and fecal streptococcus prior to 1996, bacteriological analyses of Rio Grande de Manati water samples obtained during

  15. Streamflow and Endangered Species Habitat in the Lower Isleta Reach of the Middle Rio Grande

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bovee, Ken D.; Waddle, Terry J.; Spears, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    San Acacia Dam is located in a reach of the Rio Grande that has been designated as critical habitat for two endangered species, the Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) and the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). Under present operations, the Rio Grande upstream from the dam is used to convey irrigation water to the Socorro main canal at San Acacia Dam. In order to increase operational flexibility and improve irrigation delivery efficiency, the 'Bernardo Siphon' has been proposed to intercept up to 150 cubic feet per second from the Lower San Juan Riverside Drain on the east side of the Rio Grande and transport it under the river into a drainage canal on the west side. Irrigation deliveries to the Socorro main canal would be conveyed by way of the drainage canal rather than the Rio Grande. The objective of this study was to provide the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and other stakeholders with a tool to evaluate the effects of different operational modes of the Bernardo siphon on habitat for H. amarus and E. t. extimus in this section of river. We used a two-dimensional hydraulic simulation model to simulate hydraulic conditions for a range of discharges at three study sites in the Rio Grande between the proposed siphon location and San Acacia Dam. Suitable habitat characteristics were defined for H. amarus by consensus of a panel of experts and for E. t. extimus on the basis of a study conducted in 2003 by BOR. Habitat suitability maps for each targeted life stage and simulated discharge were constructed using a Geographic Information System (ArcGIS) and the results compiled into tables relating discharge to areas of suitable habitat. A separate analysis was conducted to calculate an index of connectivity among habitat patches at low flows. A hydrologic model was constructed to synthesize flows, by reach, without the siphon, which was used as a baseline for comparison with similarly-synthesized discharges with the siphon under

  16. HOSPITALIZATIONS FOR CHOLECYSTITIS AND CHOLELITHIASIS IN THE STATE OF RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    NUNES, Emeline Caldana; ROSA, Roger dos Santos; BORDIN, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The cholelithiasis is disease of surgical resolution with about 60,000 hospitalizations per year in the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS - Brazilian National Health System) of the Rio Grande do Sul state. Aim: To describe the profile of hospitalizations for cholecystitis and cholelithiasis performed by the SUS of Rio Grande do Sul state, 2011-2013. Methods: Hospital Information System data from the National Health System through morbidity list for cholelithiasis and cholecystitis (ICD-10 K80-K81). Variables studied were sex, age, number of hospitalizations and approved Hospitalization Authorizations (AIH), total amount and value of hospital services generated, days and average length of stay, mortality, mortality and case fatality ratio, from health regions of the Rio Grande do Sul. Results: During 2011-2013 there were 60,517 hospitalizations for cholecystitis and cholelithiasis, representing 18.86 hospitalizations per 10,000 inhabitants/year, most often in the age group from 60 to 69 years (41.34 admissions per 10,000 inhabitants/year) and female (27.72 hospitalizations per 10,000 inhabitants/year). The fatality rate presented an inverse characteristic: 13.52 deaths per 1,000 admissions/year for males, compared with 7.12 deaths per 1,000 admissions/year in females. The state had an average total amount spent and value of hospital services of R$ 16,244,050.60 and R$ 10,890,461.31, respectively. The health region "Capital/Gravataí Valley" exhibit the highest total expenditure and hospital services, and the largest number of deaths, and average length of stay. Conclusion: The hospitalization and lethality coefficients, the deaths, the length of stay and spending related to admissions increased from 50 years old. Females had a higher frequency and higher values ​​spent on hospitalization, while the male higher coefficient of mortality and mean hospital stay. PMID:27438030

  17. Late Pleistocene landslide-dammed lakes along the Rio Grande, White Rock Canyon, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Reneau, S.L.; Dethier, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    Massive slump complexes composed of Pliocene basaltic rocks and underlying Miocene and Pliocene sediments flank the Rio Grande along 16 km of northern White Rock Canyon, New Mexico. The toe area of at least one slump complex was active in the late Pleistocene, damming the Rio Grande at least four times during the period from 18 to 12 {sup 14}C ka and impounding lakes that extended 10-20 km upriver. Stratigraphic relationships and radiocarbon age constraints indicate that three separate lakes formed between 13.7 and 12.4 {sup 14}C ka. The age and dimensions of the ca. 12.4 ka lake are best constrained; it had an estimated maximum depth of {approx}30 m, a length of {approx}13 km, a surface area of {approx}2.7 km{sup 2}, and an initial volume of {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}. The youngest landslide-dammed lakes formed during a period of significantly wetter regional climate, strongly suggesting that climate changes were responsible for reactivation of the slump complexes. We are not certain about the exact triggering mechanisms for these landslides, but they probably involved removal of lateral support due to erosion of the slope base by the Rio Grande during periods of exceptionally high flood discharge or rapid incision; increased pore pressures associated with higher water tables; higher seepage forces at sites of ground-water discharge; or some combination of these processes. Seismic shaking could also have contributed to triggering of some of the landslides, particularly if aided by wet antecedent conditions. 54 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Distribution and habitat associations of juvenile Common Snook in the lower Rio Grande, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Caleb G.; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Patino, Reynaldo; Pope, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Common Snook Centropomus undecimalis were once abundant off the Texas coast, but these populations are now characterized by low abundance and erratic recruitment. Most research concerning Common Snook in North America has been conducted in Florida and very little is known about the specific biology and habitat needs of Common Snook in Texas. The primary objective of this study was to describe the habitat use patterns of juvenile Common Snook and their role in the fish assemblage in the lower portion of the Rio Grande, Texas. Secondarily, we documented the relationship between age and juvenile reproductive development. Fish were collected during January–March 2006 from the lower 51.5 km of the Rio Grande using a bottom trawl and boat-mounted electrofisher. Measurements of water quality and other habitat traits were recorded at each sampling site. We captured 225 Common Snook exclusively in freshwater habitats above river kilometer 12.9. The distribution of juvenile Common Snook was not random, but influenced primarily by turbidity and dissolved oxygen. Sex differentiation and gonadal development based on histological examination of gonads established that age-1 and age-2 Common Snook were juvenile, prepubertal males. There was no difference between the age groups in their overall distribution in the river. However, age-2 Common Snook were associated with deeper areas with faster currents, higher conductivity, and steeper banks. Overall, Common Snook in the lower Rio Grande show substantial differences in habitat use than their counterparts in other parts of the range of the species, but it is unclear whether this is due to differences in habitat availability, behavioral plasticity, or some combination thereof.

  19. Dynamic characterization and damage detection in the I-40 bridge over the Rio Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Baker, W.E.; Bell, T.M.; Cone, K.M.; Darling, T.W.; Duffey, T.A.; Eklund, A.; Migliori, A.

    1994-06-01

    In the 1960`s and 1970`s over 2500 bridges were built in the U.S. with a design similar to those on Interstate 40 over the Rio Grande in Albuquerque, New Mexico. These bridges were built without structural redundancy and typically have only two plate girders carrying the entire dead and live loads. Failure of either girder is assumed to produce catastrophic failure of the bridge, hence these bridges are referred to as fracture-critical bridges. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have provided funds to New Mexico State University (NMSU) through the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department (NMSH&TD) and The Alliance For Transportation Research (ATR) for evaluation and testing of the existing fracture critical bridges over the Rio Grande. Because the 1-40 bridges over the Rio Grande were to be razed during the summer of 1993, the investigators were able to introduce simulated fatigue cracks, similar to those observed in the field, into the structure in order to test various damage identification methods and to observe the changes in load paths through the structure caused by the cracking. To support this research effort, NMSU contracted Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform experimental modal analyses, and to develop experimentally verified numerical models of the bridge. Scientists from the LANL`s Condensed Matter and Thermal Physics Group (P-10) applied state-of-the-art sensors and data acquisition software to the modal tests. Engineers from the LANL`s Advanced Engineering Technology Group (MEE-13) conducted ambient and forced vibration tests to verify detailed and simplified finite element models of the bridge. Forced vibration testing was done in conjunction with engineers from Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) who provided and operated a hydraulic shaker.

  20. Effects of reservoir installation, San Juan-Chama Project water, and reservoir operations on streamflow and water quality in the Rio Chama and Rio Grande, northern and central New Mexico, 1938-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langman, Jeff B.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2004-01-01

    The coordinated operation of Heron, El Vado, and Abiquiu Dams on the Rio Chama and Cochiti Dam on the Rio Grande and the importation of Colorado River Basin water by the San Juan-Chama Project have altered streamflow and water quality of the Rio Chama and Rio Grande in northern and central New Mexico. The coordinated retention of streamflow in the four reservoirs increased median streamflows, decreased extreme flows, and decreased periods of small streamflow; inflow of San Juan-Chama Project water increased overall streamflow in the Rio Chama and Rio Grande. These changes to streamflow decreased specific conductance and suspended-sediment concentration and increased pH in the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande. Following construction of Heron and Cochiti Dams and integration of reservoir operations on the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande, the inflow of San Juan-Chama Project water and retention of snowmelt runoff influenced water quality. These influences varied by season because reservoir releases fluctuated according to downstream user needs and annual streamflow variation. The influences of San Juan-Chama Project water and retained snowmelt on water quality diminished with downstream flow as the Rio Grande was subjected to various natural and anthropogenic inflows. Because of the variability and type of seasonal influences, streamflow did not have a strong annual correlation with water quality in the Rio Chama or the Rio Grande.

  1. Stigmaeid mites (Acari: Stigmaeidae) from vineyards in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Johann, Liana; Carvalho, Gervasio Silva; Majolo, Fernanda; Ferla, Noeli Juarez

    2013-01-01

    The fauna of the family Stigmaeidae Oudemans on grapevines and weed plants associated with vineyard agroecosystem in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) was studied. Five recognized species were reported: Agistemus brasiliensis Matioli et al., 2002, Agistemus floridanus Gonzales, 1965, Agistemus mendozensis Simons, 1967, Zetzellia agistzellia Hernandes and Feres, 2005, and Zetzellia malvinae Matioli et al., 2002. Two new species were described: Agistemus riograndensis sp. nov. and Zetzellia ampelae sp. nov. A pictorial key was compiled to aid in the recognition of these stigmaeids.

  2. The topographic distribution of annual incoming solar radiation in the Rio Grande River basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubayah, R.; Van Katwijk, V.

    1992-01-01

    We model the annual incoming solar radiation topoclimatology for the Rio Grande River basin in Colorado, U.S.A. Hourly pyranometer measurements are combined with satellite reflectance data and 30-m digital elevation models within a topographic solar radiation algorithm. Our results show that there is large spatial variability within the basin, even at an annual integration length, but the annual, basin-wide mean is close to that measured by the pyranometers. The variance within 16 sq km and 100 sq km regions is a linear function of the average slope in the region, suggesting a possible parameterization for sub-grid-cell variability.

  3. [Violence and social distress among transgender persons in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Souza, Martha Helena Teixeira de; Malvasi, Paulo; Signorelli, Marcos Claudio; Pereira, Pedro Paulo Gomes

    2015-04-01

    The authors conducted an ethnographic research with transgender persons in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, in 2012, using participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and following their everyday lives. These individuals invariably experienced physical and symbolic violence and the resulting distress, a condition they had to deal with in their careers and daily practices and tasks. The article discusses the violence experienced by transvestites (in the family, school, police precincts, and health services), specifically seeking to understand how such violence relates to their experiences with health services and how the latter respond.

  4. Radionuclide concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue within the Rio Grande drainage basin

    SciTech Connect

    Booher, J.L.; Fresquez, P.R.; Carter, L.F.; Gallaher, B.M.; Mullen, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    In 1992-93, Los Alamos National Laboratory collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey in an effort to characterize radionuclide concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue within the Rio Grande drainage basin from Colorado to Texas. Bed sediment was sampled from 18 locations for cesium ({sup 137}Cs), tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu), americium ({sup 241}Am), total uranium ({sup tot}U) and alpha, beta, and gamma activity. Fish tissue was sampled from 12 locations for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu and {sup tot}U.

  5. Water resources simulation in the Rio Grande basin using coupled models

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, E.P.; Winter, C.L.; Bossert, J.E.

    1999-04-01

    Regional assessments of water resources under global climate change require models that can resolve management, land use, and climate effects. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a coupled model of water resources that places a river basin in its global context. The upper Rio Grande basin above El Paso, Texas is the testbed for this model. The model structure and computational approach are emphasize and issues such as nonlinear feedback between components and spatial and temporal scaling of processes are discussed. Using simulations of regional meteorology, the effects of high spatial resolution simulations on the distribution of precipitation are demonstrated.

  6. Historic interrelationships of humans and the ecosystems of the Middle Rio Grande Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, D.

    1995-12-31

    An ongoing study of the environmental history of the Middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico, is revealing major impacts on and changes to ecosystems over the past 455 years. Various land uses, such as grazing, irrigation farming, logging, and constructing flood control features, combined with climatic fluctuations have adversely produced changes in stream flow-morphology, ground water levels, topsoils, biotic communities, and individual species. Indigenous human populations have been adversely impacted by these modifications as well. Continued land-water use-impacts from a rapidly increasing regional population portend continuing changes and major challenges for natural and human resource management agencies and organizations.

  7. Historical changes in streamflows, channel morphology, and riparian vegetation of the Rio Grande downstream of Brownsville, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce; Setser, Rita

    2000-01-01

    The Rio GrandefRio Bravo drains an area of more than 440,300 square kilometers of Mexico and southwestern United States (Bartlett. 1984). The Rio Grande flows for 3,000 kilometers from its headwaters in the San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado to the Gulf of Mexico downstream of Brownsville, Texas. The "Rio," as it is often called, drains the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado and northern New Mexico; the vast Chihuahuan Desert of southern New Mexico, northern Mexico, and southwestern Texas; ami the subtropical lower valley of southern Texas (fig. I).

  8. Changes on the fine sediment dynamics after the Port of Rio Grande expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. D.; Lisboa, P. V.; Fernandes, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Patos Lagoon estuary is a reservoir of fine sediments derived from the continental basin, which is exported to the coastal area through a narrow channel with average discharge of 2000 m3 s-1. The Port of Rio Grande is located in this connection channel between the Patos Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean, and recently received investments from the Brazilian Government to expand its draft and modify the configuration of the breakwaters located at the mouth. The objective of this study is to investigate changes in the fine sediment dynamics in the estuarine and coastal region, after the modernization work carried out at the Port of Rio Grande. The study was conducted using a three-dimensional numerical model (TELEMAC-3D) coupled with a sediment in suspension and morphological model (SediMorph). Results were analyzed in a comparative way in relation to the deposition pattern observed in these regions before and after the construction work. Results indicate that there was a change in the deposition pattern and redistribution of sediment at the bottom due to hydrodynamic changes resulting from the new configuration of the breakwaters and progressive deepening of the access channel.

  9. Influence of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation on hydrochemistry of the Rio Grande, USA, and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fasong; Miyamoto, Seiichi

    2004-12-01

    The hydrochemistry has been examined using the major element composition of river water at 12 gauging stations along the Rio Grande. As the Rio Grande Basin consists of two watersheds that have different hydrologic and climatic regimes, two chloride concentration records from the El Paso and Falcon Dam gauging stations have been extracted to reflect long-term variability in river chemistry of the upper and lower basins over the last 50-70 years. Both records contain decadal variability in chloride concentration but are different in nature. The chloride concentration record from the upper basin displays a distinct pattern of decadal variability similar to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). This indicates the chloride concentration at El Paso is largely determined by the amount of stream discharge of the upper basin that is associated with the PDO. Conversely, there is no such pattern of decadal variability in the chloride concentration record from the lower basin though several of the chloride concentration maxima coincide with minima in the PDO index. Instead, the chloride concentration record from the lower basin contains a progressively increasing trend of chloride concentration from 1970 to 1990, suggesting that anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., dam constructions and increased irrigation demands) may also play a role in intervening long-term changes in river chemistry.

  10. Seroepidemiology of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection in horses from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Ana Paula Neuschrank; Klafke, Gabriel Baracy; Brandolt, Tchana Martinez; Da Hora, Vanusa Pousada; Nogueira, Carlos Eduardo Wayne; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiological agent of the major systemic mycosis in Brazil, called paracoccidioidomycosis. Although the Rio Grande do Sul is considered an endemic area of the disease, there are few studies on the ecology of P. brasiliensis in the state. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the infection of P. brasiliensis in horses from the mesoregion of Southwest Riograndense, using these animals as sentinels. Serological techniques, such as double immunodiffusion in agar gel (AGID) and indirect ELISA, were performed to detect the anti-gp43 P. brasiliensis antibody in horses from five different farms in the region of Bagé, RS, Brazil. Serology was performed in 200 Pure Blood English horses up to two years of age that were born and raised exclusively at the farms. Of these horses, 12% had anti-gp43 antibodies according to the ELISA results, with rates ranging from 0 to 30% according to the farm of origin (p < 0.001). Based on the immunodiffusion results, all equine serum samples were negative. These results indicate the presence of the fungus P. brasiliensis in the middle region of the southwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. PMID:26273267

  11. Paracoccidioidomycosis in southern Rio Grande do Sul: A retrospective study of histopathologically diagnosed cases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Silvana Pereira; Jorge, Valéria Magalhães; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski

    2014-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and is endemic to Brazil. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective analysis of the PCM cases in the countryside south of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The files from four histopathology laboratories located in the city of Pelotas were obtained, and all of the epidemiological and clinical data from the PCM diagnosed cases were collected for analysis. A total of 123 PCM cases diagnosed between 1966 and 2009 were selected. Of these patients, 104 (84.5%) were male, and 17 were female. The patients ranged from 02 to 92 years of age. Fifty-two cases (41.9%) were obtained from the oral pathology laboratory, and the remaining 71 cases (58.1%) were obtained from the three general pathology laboratories. Of all of the patients studied, 65.2% lived in rural zones and worked in agriculture or other related fields. Data on the evolution of this disease was available for 43 cases, and the time frame ranged from 20 to 2920 days (mean = 572.3 days). An accurate diagnosis performed in less than 30 days only occurred in 21% of the cases. PCM is endemic to the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. Therefore, it is recommended that PCM be included as a differential diagnosis, mainly for individuals between 30 and 60 years of age, living in rural zones and who have respiratory signs and associated-oropharyngeal lesions. PMID:24948940

  12. A Coupled Modeling System to Simulate Water Resources in the Rio Grande Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.E.; Breshears, D.D.; Campbell, K.; Costigan, K.R.; Greene, R.K.; Keating, E.H.; Kleifgen, L.M.; Langley, D.L.; Martens, S.N.; Sanderson, J.G.; Springer, E.P.; Stalker, J.R.; Tartakovsky, D.M.; Winter, C.L.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1999-01-11

    Limited availability of fresh water in arid and semi-arid regions of the world requires prudent management strategies from accurate, science-based assessments. These assessments demand a thorough understanding of the hydrologic cycle over long time periods within the individual water-sheds that comprise large river basins. Measurement and simulation of the hydrologic cycle is a tremendous challenge, involving a coupling between global to regional-scale atmospheric precipitation processes with regional to local-scale land surface and subsurface water transport. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a detailed modeling system of the hydrologic cycle and applying this tool at high resolution to assess the water balance within the upper Rio Grande river basin. The Rio Grande is a prime example of a river system in a semiarid environment, with a high demand from agricultural, industrial, recreational, and municipal interests for its water supply. Within this river basin, groundwater supplies often augment surface water. With increasing growth projected throughout the river basin, however, these multiple water users have the potential to significantly deplete groundwater resources, thereby increasing the dependence on surface water resources.

  13. [Faunistic analysis of leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) species in vineyards of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ringenberg, Rudiney; Lopes, João R S; Botton, Marcos; Azevedo-Filho, Wilson S De; Cavichioli, Rodney R

    2010-01-01

    In some American countries, grapevines are affected by Pierce's disease (PD), which is caused by a particular strain of Xylella fastidiosa not yet reported in Brazil. In order to investigate the potential for PD spread in Brazil in case of pathogen introduction, we conducted a faunistic analysis of leafhoppers (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) associated to vineyards in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, with emphasis in the subfamily Cicadellinae (sharpshooters), which includes the main potential vectors of X. fastidiosa. Leafhopper samplings were carried out fortnightly during two years (9/2004-9/2006) in four Vitis vinifera vineyards in the municipalities of Bento Gonçalves and Farroupilha (RS). Thirtyfour leafhopper and six spittlebug species were collected, but most (98.4%) of the 3,893 specimens trapped were leafhoppers, distributed in the subfamilies Cicadellinae (60.2%), Gyponinae (34.1%), Deltocephalinae (3.8%) and Coelidinae (0.3%). The sharpshooter specimens were divided in the tribes Cicadellini (68.5%; 12 species) and Proconiini (31.5%; 11 species). Based on the faunistic indices, five species of Cicadellini, Bucephalogonia xanthophis (Berg), Dilobopterus dispar (Germar), Macugonalia cavifrons Stal, Sibovia sagata (Signoret) and Spinagonalia rubrovittata Cavichioli, and three of Proconiini, Molomea consolida (Schöder), Oncometopia facialis (Signoret) and Oncometopia fusca Melichar were prevalent in the vineyards. The high diversity of native sharpshooters in Rio Grande do Sul indicates the existence of a high risk of PD spread if the pathogen is introduced in grapevines.

  14. Crustal structure of the Southern Rio Grande rift determined from seismic refraction profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinno, Y. A.; Keller, G. R.; Harder, S. H.; Daggett, P. H.; Morgan, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of a major cooperative seismic experiment, a series of seismic refraction profiles have been recorded in south-central New Mexico with the goal of determining the crustal structure in the southern Rio Grande rift. The data gathered greatly expand the seismic data base in the area, and consist of three interlocking regional profiles: a reversed E-W line across the rift, an unreversed N-S axial line, and an unreversed SW-SE line. The reversed E-W line shows no significant dip along the Moho (32 km thick crust) and a 7.7 km/s Pn velocity. Results from the N-S axial line and the NW-SE line indicate an apparent Pn velocity of 7.95 km/s and significant dip along the Moho with crustal thinning toward the south and southeast. When interpreted together, these data indicate a crustal thinning in the southern rift of 4-6 km with respect to the northern rift and the adjacent Basin and Range province, and establish the regional Pn velocity to be approximately 7.7 km/s. These results suggest that the Rio Grande rift can be identified as a crustal feature separate and distinct from the Basin and Range province.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi strains from triatomine collected in Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aline Rimoldi; Mendonça, Vagner José; Alves, Renata Tomé; Martinez, Isabel; de Araújo, Renato Freitas; Mello, Fernanda; da Rosa, João Aristeu

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Collection of triatomines in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments in states of Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Northeastern and Southern Brazil respectively, and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi strains. METHODS First, the captured triatomines were identified using insect identification keys, then their intestinal content was examined by abdominal compression, and the samples containing trypanosomatid forms were inoculated in LIT medium and Swiss mice. RESULTS Six triatomine species were collected in cities in Bahia, namely Panstrongylus geniculatus (01), Triatoma melanocephala (11), T. lenti (94), T. pseudomaculata (02), T. sherlocki (26) and T. sordida (460), and two in cities in Rio Grande do Sul, namely T. circummaculata (11) and T. rubrovaria (115). Out of the specimens examined, T. cruzi was isolated from 28 triatomine divided into four different species: T. melanocephala (one), T. lenti (one), T. rubrovaria (16) and T. sordida (10). Their index of natural infection by T. cruzi was 6.4%. CONCLUSIONS The isolation of T. cruzi strains from triatomines found in domestic and peridomestic areas shows the potential risk of transmission of Chagas disease in the studied cities. The maintenance of those T. cruzi strains in laboratory is intended to promote studies that facilitate the understanding of the parasite-vector-host relationship. PMID:24897051

  16. Summary of Flow Loss between Selected Cross Sections on the Rio Grande in and near Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veenhuis, Jack E.

    2002-01-01

    The upper middle Rio Grande Basin, as defined by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, extends from the headwaters of the Rio Grande in southwestern Colorado to Fort Quitman, Texas. Most of the basin has a semiarid climate typical of the southwestern United States. This climate drives a highly variable streamflow regime that contributes to the complexity of water management in the basin. Currently, rapid population growth in the basin has resulted in increasing demands on the hydrologic system. Water management decisions have become increasingly complex because of the broad range of interests and issues. For these reasons, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico, conducted paired flow measurements at two cross sections to determine cross-sectional loss in the Albuquerque reach of the Rio Grande. This report statistically summarizes flow losses in the Albuquerque reach of the Rio Grande during the winter nonirrigation season from December 1996 to February 2000. The two previous flow-loss investigations are statistically summarized. Daily mean flow losses are calculated for the winter nonirrigation season using daily mean flows at three selected Rio Grande streamflow-gaging stations.For the winter nonirrigation season cross-sectional measurements (1996-2000), an average of 210 cubic feet per second was returned to the river between the measurement sites, of which 165 cubic feet per second was intercepted by riverside drains along the 21.9-mile reach from the Rio Grande near Bernalillo to the Rio Grande at Rio Bravo Bridge streamflow-gaging stations. Total cross-sectional losses in this reach averaged about 90 cubic feet per second. Regression equations were determined for estimating downstream total outflow from upstream total inflow for all three paired measurement studies. Regression equations relating the three daily mean flow recording stations also were determined. In each succeeding study, additional outside variables

  17. Simulation of a long-term aquifer test conducted near the Rio Grande, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, Douglas P.

    2001-01-01

    A long-term aquifer test was conducted near the Rio Grande in Albuquerque during January and February 1995 using 22 wells and piezometers at nine sites, with the City of Albuquerque Griegos 1 production well as the pumped well. Griegos 1 discharge averaged about 2,330 gallons per minute for 54.4 days. A three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow model was used to estimate aquifer properties in the vicinity of the Griegos well field and the amount of infiltration induced into the aquifer system from the Rio Grande and riverside drains as a result of pumping during the test. The model was initially calibrated by trial-and-error adjustments of the aquifer properties. The model was recalibrated using a nonlinear least-squares regression technique. The aquifer system in the area includes the middle Tertiary to Quaternary Santa Fe Group and post-Santa Fe Group valley- and basin-fill deposits of the Albuquerque Basin. The Rio Grande and adjacent riverside drains are in hydraulic connection with the aquifer system. The hydraulic-conductivity values of the upper part of the Santa Fe Group resulting from the model calibrated by trial and error varied by zone in the model and ranged from 12 to 33 feet per day. The hydraulic conductivity of the inner-valley alluvium was 45 feet per day. The vertical to horizontal anisotropy ratio was 1:140. Specific storage was 4 x 10-6 per foot of aquifer thickness, and specific yield was 0.15 (dimensionless). The sum of squared errors between the observed and simulated drawdowns was 130 feet squared. Not all aquifer properties could be estimated using nonlinear regression because of model insensitivity to some aquifer properties at observation locations. Hydraulic conductivity of the inner-valley alluvium, middle part of the Santa Fe Group, and riverbed and riverside-drain bed and specific yield had low sensitivity values and therefore could not be estimated. Of the properties estimated, hydraulic conductivity of the upper part of

  18. Seepage investigation on the Rio Grande from below Caballo Reservoir, New Mexico, to El Paso, Texas, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunn, Mark A.; Roark, D. Michael

    2014-01-01

    A seepage investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, along an approximately 106-mile reach of the Rio Grande from below Caballo Reservoir, New Mexico, to El Paso, Texas, during June 26–28, 2012, to determine gain or loss of streamflow due to seepage to or from the river channel. Discharge measurements were made during the irrigation season at high flow including 5 sites along the Rio Grande, 5 diversions, and 63 inflows. The net gain or loss of flow in the river channel was computed for four reaches within the 106-mile reach of the Rio Grande. The normalized percentage difference was computed for each reach to determine the difference between discharge measured at upstream and downstream sites, and the normalized percentage uncertainty was computed to determine if a computed gain or loss exceeded cumulative uncertainty associated with measurement of discharge.

  19. Streamflow and water-quality trends of the Rio Chama and Rio Grande, northern and central New Mexico, water years 1985 to 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langman, Jeff B.; Nolan, Emma O.

    2005-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque plans to divert San Juan-Chama Project water from the Rio Grande for potable water use. This report examines streamflow and water-quality trends in the Rio Chama and the Rio Grande for water years 1985 to 2002 following the implementation of reservoir storage agreements in northern and central New Mexico. Streamflow/water-quality stations used for this study include the Rio Grande stations of Taos, Otowi, San Felipe, and Albuquerque and the Rio Chama station of Chamita. Water years 1985 to 2002 were a period of larger than average precipitation and streamflow compared to the stations. historical averages. Annual precipitation and streamflow trended downward during the study period because of a drought during 1999 to 2002. Streamflow in the Rio Chama and Rio Grande was divided into three distinct seasonal periods that corresponded to natural and anthropogenic influences: fall/winter baseflow (November through February), snowmelt runoff (March through June), and the irrigation/monsoon (July through October) seasons. A calcium bicarbonate water type was evident at all study area stations on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande. Specific conductance increased downstream, but alkalinity and pH did not substantially change in the downstream direction. Nearly all nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations were less than 1 milligram per liter for all stations. Median trace-element concentrations and maximum radionuclide concentrations did not exceed drinking-water standards. Anthropogenic compounds were infrequently detected in the Rio Chama and Rio Grande, and concentrations did not exceed drinking-water standards. Water quality in the Rio Chama and Rio Grande varied spatially and temporally during water years 1985 to 2002. Specific conductance increased downstream in the Rio Grande during the fall/winter baseflow and snowmelt runoff seasons but was similar at the Taos, Otowi, and San Felipe stations during the irrigation/monsoon season. This similarity was a

  20. Quantifying Salinization of the Upper-Middle Rio Grande Using a Basin-Scale Water and Chloride Mass Balance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S. K.; Phillips, F. M.; Hogan, J. F.; Hendrickx, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    The Rio Grande is clearly undergoing salinization, manifested by a 50-fold increase in total dissolved solids content between its headwaters in Colorado and the U.S.-Mexico border. To elucidate the causes of this salinization, we conducted an eight-day synoptic sampling campaign in August 2001. This sampling included the river, its major tributaries, and major irrigation drain inflows. Along 1200 km between the river headwaters in Colorado and Fort Quitman, Texas, we collected 110 water samples with an average interval of ~10 km between sampling locales. In the laboratory, samples were analyzed for major constituents including chloride, as well as for bromide and the 36Cl/Cl ratio. Isotopic fingerprinting using the 36Cl/Cl ratio indicates that meteoric waters and deep sedimentary brines respectively account for most of the water and most of the salt inflow to the Rio Grande. The meteoric end member has a 36Cl/Cl ratio of 1100 and a Cl/Br ratio of 30; the brine end member has a 36Cl/Cl ratio of 35 and a Cl/Br ratio of 1150. Using these end member chemistries with USGS stream flow gauging data, we constructed a water- and salt- instantaneous mass balance model of the Rio Grande for the eight-day sampling interval. This model indicates that most water losses from the Rio Grande are due to evaporation from Elephant Butte reservoir, open water evaporation from irrigation ditches, and evapotranspiration of riparian and ditch-bank vegetation. The model also emphasizes the significance of salt input due to deep brine discharge to the river, particularly at the downstream ends of local sedimentary basins of the Rio Grande rift. The Rio Grande receives a smaller amount of salt from saline drains near El Paso, which may be acquiring salt from deep brine discharge as they cross over faults or other structural fluid conduits.

  1. Determining Environmental Factors Controlling Nitrogen Cycling in the Semi-Arid Rio Grande Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, D. A.; Szynkiewicz, A.; Faiia, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Grande is a semi-arid river in the American Southwest supporting agriculture and large populous centers in New Mexico and west Texas. In addition to increasing salinity, considerable increases of nitrate (NO3), up to ~50 mg/L, have been previously observed in the Rio Grande between Las Cruces, New Mexico and El Paso, Texas. This is particularly a problem during non-irrigation season when little surface water is released from upstream reservoirs, substantially reducing stream flows in the Rio Grande. While both irrigation runoff and municipal waste effluents are likely important NO3 contributors, there are no quantitative studies assessing NO3 fluxes to the Rio Grande from these two sources. Therefore, in this study we used 𝛿15N and 𝛿18O values of NO3 as environmental tracers to characterize major NO3 sources in the Rio Grande and its agricultural drains between Las Cruces and El Paso. Surface water of the semi-arid Rio Grande, drains and major wastewater treatment plants were collected in October 2014 (non-irrigation season) and August 2015 (irrigation season). The water samples from the 2014 sampling campaign showed that the 𝛿15N and 𝛿18O values of NO3 in the Rio Grande and two agricultural drains located south of El Paso varied in relatively narrow range from +9.8 to +15.7‰ and -5.9 to -0.2‰, respectively. These ranges were similar to 𝛿15N and 𝛿18O values of local wastewater treatment plants in Las Cruces and El Paso, from +8.2 to +10.2‰ and -9.7 to -2.5‰ respectively. Municipal wastewater effluents are important tributaries to the semi-arid Rio Grande in the studied area, particularly during non-irrigation season. Furthermore, irrigation of agricultural fields south of El Paso is to a large extent supported by reclaimed municipal wastewater. Consequently, these explain the observed higher contributions of NO3 from urban sources in the investigated area.

  2. Lithospheric structure of the eastern flank of the Rio Grande Rift via receiver function velocity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, M.; Pulliam, J.; Sen, M. K.; Grand, S.

    2015-12-01

    To better delineate a seismic anomaly beneath the eastern flank of the Rio Grande Rift identified by seismic tomography, we depth-migrated Ps and Sp receiver functions using data from the SIEDCAR (Seismic Investigation of Edge Driven Convection Association with Rio Grande Rift) and USArray Transportable Array (TA) deployments. We performed Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking to improve the S/N ratio of receiver functions. Using an incorrect velocity model for depth migration of a stacked CCP image may generate an inaccurate picture of the subsurface. To find sufficiently accurate P- and S-velocity models for migration, we optimize the average correlation value of common receiver gathers for target features - in this case the Moho and the LAB - while perturbing the shear wave velocities in a process driven by simulated annealing. The technique simultaneously finds depths to major discontinuities (in this case the Moho and LAB) and S and P velocity profiles beneath each seismic station in a manner that is similar to velocity analysis in reflection seismology. An application to data acquired in southeastern New Mexico and west Texas, at an average station spacing of 35 km, reveals an abrupt increase in lithospheric thickness from west to east, from the Rio Grande Rift to the Great Plains craton. Previous studies found an elongated high velocity anomaly that extends to depths approaching 500 km in southeastern New Mexico and west Texas that is distinct from the thick Great Plains lithosphere. Our stacked 3-D image confirms the anomaly's existence and shows that it is more laterally extensive than was previously indicated. Recent numerical modeling suggests that an abrupt change in lithospheric thickness, which creates a step change in densities, may produce a gravitational instability that leads to thicker mantle lithosphere dripping off into the lower density asthenosphere. As the mantle deforms it alternately thickens and thins the crust, producing topographic

  3. Floodplain construction of the Rio Grande at El Paso, Texas, USA: response to Holocene climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Stephen A.; Peterson, John A.

    2013-04-01

    The Rio Grande is one of the larger rivers in North America, and the development of its floodplain is related to Holocene climate and climate change. The late Pleistocene through early Holocene channel is characterized by a meander or braided system with lateral cutting and backfilling, resulting in the valley-wide deposition of massive to cross-bedded, fine-to-medium textured sand. The late Pleistocene-early Holocene floodplain is also the sand source for the adjacent Bolson sand sheet. The sand sheet stopped accumulating new sand 5000 yrs ago, an event directly related to the shutting off of the sand supply caused by the deposition of overbank muds that covered and sealed the floodplain surface. During the middle Holocene, the river may have dried intermittently with the floodplain becoming deflated and local sand dunes forming on the floodplain. After 5000 yrs the climate was less arid and the river shifted to a regime of increased flooding and overbank deposition of silt and clay. By 2500 yrs, a late Holocene period of wet climate resulted in further overbank deposition and the formation of a cumulic Mollisol across the floodplain, the Socorro paleosol. The period of wet climate corresponds to the Audubon Neoglacial and active rock glaciers in the southern Rocky Mountains, speleothem growth in nearby caves, and other evidence for wet-cool conditions in the region. After 1000 yrs, the climate became drier, and the deposition and accumulation of overbank muds by the flooding Rio Grande came to a halt. Even though the river has flooded often in historic times, and presumably during late prehistoric times as well, there is little evidence for deposition of overbank sediments on the floodplain since A.D. 1000. Accordingly, the present-day surface of the Lower Valley is ten centuries old. Three channels occur on the US side of the Lower Valley floodplain, and during the past 2500 yrs stream flow has shifted from one to the other by the avulsion process of channel

  4. Lithospheric Structure of the Rio-Grande Rift and the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekic, V.; Fischer, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    Upper mantle and crustal velocity interfaces, such as those corresponding to the base of the crust and the base of the lithosphere, produce detectable conversions of seismic energy that can be analyzed using a receiver function approach. Unlike compressional-to-shear (Ps) receiver functions, in which signals from mantle discontinuities are often overprinted by crustal reverberations, shear-to-compressional (Sp) receiver functions allow identification of signals associated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) without reverberation interference. We use three-component broadband seismic data from permanent stations, the USArray Transportable Array and other temporary deployments to systematically map lithospheric thickness variations across the Colorado Plateau and the Rio Grande Rift. More than 30,000 individual Sp receiver functions are combined into a three-dimensional image of upper mantle discontinuities using common conversion point stacking. We observe thick (>100 km) lithosphere beneath most of the Colorado Plateau, although its thickness varies by ~40 km within the Plateau. In contrast, lithospheric thicknesses in the southern Basin and Range are typically 60-80 km. The thickness of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere is consistent with the relative lack of internal deformation within the Plateau even as surrounding regions underwent widespread extension. Variations in lithospheric thickness may offer clues to what caused uplift of the Plateau in the Pliocene, and how low-angle subduction and its cessation may have affected continental lithosphere. We quantitatively explore the relationship between recent volcanism along the margins of the Plateau and topography and strength of the LAB beneath those regions. Unlike the rifted regions of Southern California, where ~30 km of lithospheric thinning has recently been imaged (Lekic et al., 2011), the Rio Grande Rift is not underlain by an anomalously shallow LAB. This observation appears to rule out

  5. Leishmaniasis transmission in an ecotourism area: potential vectors in Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The south coast of Rio de Janeiro State, in Brazil, is endemic for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniases and is frequently visited by tourists from different parts of the world. Since the complex epidemiology of leishmaniases demands local studies, the goal of this study was to investigate the phlebotomine sand fly fauna and leishmaniases transmission in Ilha Grande, an ecotourism area of Angra dos Reis municipality. Methods Sand fly fauna was sampled in three monitoring stations using HP light traps in domiciles, peridomiciles and forests. Species abundance was evaluated by the Index of Species Abundance. A Leishmania natural infection survey was done using multiplex PCR and dot blot hybridization. Results During 15 consecutive months of sand fly monitoring, 1093 specimens from 16 species were captured. The potential leishmaniases vectors found were Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia, L. migonei, L. (N.) flaviscutellata, L. (Psychodopygus) ayrozai and L. (Lutzomyia) longipalpis. Five species were new records in Ilha Grande: L. (Sciopemyia) microps, L. termitophila, L. firmatoi, L. rupicola and L. (P.) ayrozai. Higher species richness was found inside forest areas, although potential leishmaniases vectors were present in deforested areas, peridomiciles and inside houses. Lutzomyia (N.) intermedia and L. migonei were the most abundant species. Females of L. migonei showed a high rate (10.3%) of natural infection by Leishmania (Viannia) sp., probably Leishmania (V.) braziliensis. Conclusions The detection of leishmaniases transmission and potential vectors in Ilha Grande is of public health concern, especially because tourists are frequently visiting the island. Besides reinforcing the epidemiological importance of L. (N.) intermedia in Rio de Janeiro State, the role of L. migonei in cutaneous leishmaniasis transmission is highlighted with its high rate of Leishmania natural infection. The finding of L. (L.) longipalpis confirmed the human autochthonous case

  6. Engaging Teachers and Students in the Rio Grande Valley in Earth and Space Science: Chapter II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, J. G.; Baguio, M.; Ramirez, S.

    2012-08-01

    In the summer of 2010, we received a NASA Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education Cooperative Agreement Notice to prepare teachers in the Rio Grande Valley to become certified to teach the new fourth year capstone courses in astronomy and earth and space science. During the 2010 ASP conference, we reported on the earth and space science resources provided, guidance in curriculum development, and training in classroom activities. This two-year project began with the two 2010 summer workshops that concentrated on earth and space sciences, and were then followed up with two weekend training sessions, on-line training, and a Family Science Night during the school year. An important requirement of the new fourth year courses is a field investigation conducted by students. We offered mini-grants for proposing teachers to support a field investigation. Here we highlight the outcomes of these follow-up programs and the two weeklong astronomy workshops in June 2011 in Edinburg, Texas.

  7. Geodetic measurement of horizontal deformation across the Rio Grande rift near Socorro, New Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.; Sanford, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    Trilateration surveys of a geodetic network across the Rio Grande rift near Socorro, New Mexico, in 1972, 73, 76 and 79 have failed to detect any significant strain accumulation. The surveys place an upper bound (95% confidence limit) of 1 mm/a (a = years) on EW spreading across the rift in 1972-79. There is marginal evidence from triangulation for an episode of EW spreading across the rift within the interval 1954-72. The trilateration network lies on the S flank of an uplift caused by magma intrusion into a midcrustal sill during this century according to Reilinger and Oliver. The horizontal deformation induced by sill inflation is sufficiently small that continued uplift during 1972-79 cannot be excluded by the observed absence of significant horizontal deformation.-Authors

  8. Independent Life Skills among psychosocial care network users of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Cândida Garcia Sinott Silveira; Jardim, Vanda Maria da Rosa; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Coimbra, Valeria Cristina Christello; Treichel, Carlos Alberto Dos Santos; Francchini, Beatriz; Bretanha, Andreia Ferreira; Neutzling, Aline Dos Santos

    2016-08-01

    This is a cross-sectional study that aims to identify the prevalence of lower independent living skills and their associations in 390 users of psychiatric community-based services in the state Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. For tracing the outcome it was used the "scale Independent Living Skills Survey", adopting a cut-off value lower than 2. The crude and adjusted analyses were conducted on binary logistic regressions and they considered a hierarchical model developed through a systematic literature review. In adjusted analysis the level of the same variables were adjusted to each other and to previous levels. The statistical significance remained as a < 0.05 p-value. The prevalence of smaller independent living skills was 33% and their associations were: younger age; no partner; lower education; resident at SRT; diagnosis of schizophrenia and younger diagnosis. PMID:27557029

  9. A toxic cyanobacterial bloom in an urban coastal lake, Rio Grande do Sul state, Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Luciana Retz; Pipole, Fernando; Werner, Vera Regina; Laughinghouse IV, Haywood Dail; de Camargo, Antonio Carlos M.; Rangel, Marisa; Konno, Katsuhiro; Sant’ Anna, Célia Leite

    2008-01-01

    Reports of cyanobacterial blooms developing worldwide have considerably increased, and, in most cases, the predominant toxins are microcystins. The present study reports a cyanobacterial bloom in Lake Violão, Torres, Rio Grande do Sul State, in January 2005. Samples collected on January 13, 2005, were submitted to taxonomical, toxicological, and chemical studies. The taxonomical analysis showed many different species of cyanobacteria, and that Microcystis protocystis and Sphaerocavum cf. brasiliense were dominant. Besides these, Microcystis panniformis, Anabaena oumiana, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, and Anabaenopsis elenkinii f. circularis were also present. The toxicity of the bloom was confirmed through intraperitoneal tests in mice, and chemical analyses of bloom extracts showed that the major substance was anabaenopeptin F, followed by anabaenopeptin B, microcystin-LR, and microcystin-RR. PMID:24031304

  10. Introduction in New perspectives on Rio Grande rift basins: from tectonics to groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Mark R.; Grauch, V.J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Basins of the Rio Grande rift have long been studied both for their record of rift development and for their potential as host of natural resources. Early workers described the basin geomorphology and the character of infilling sediments (e.g. Siebenthal, 1910; Bryan, 1938; Speigel and Baldwin, 1963), and subsequent research compilations provided general stratigraphic and tectonic overviews of rift basins and described their geophysical characteristics within the crust (Hawley, 1978; Riecker, 1979; Baldridge et al., 1984; Keller, 1986). Subsurface knowledge gained from hydrocarbon exploration activities coupled with detailed surface studies of basins and their flanking uplifts were presented in Geological Society of America (GSA) Special Paper 291, edited by Keller and Cather (1994a).

  11. Solute Sources and Budget for the Rio Grande above El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, J. F.; Phillips, F. M.; Hendrickx, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    Issues of water quality, especially salinity, limit the use of water resources from the Rio Grande. Identification and quantification of salinity sources is critical for improved river management. In the headwater region salts are typically derived from atmospheric deposition and chemical weathering reactions. Salinity increases during transit may result from both natural (saline groundwater, hydrothermal springs and dissolution of evaporite deposits) and anthropogenic (agricultural return flow and wastewater from sewage treatment plants) sources. These increases are magnified by evapotranspiration (this includes evaporation from open water, transpiration from irrigated agriculture and transpiration from natural riparian areas). With multiple salinity sources and evapotranspiration acting simultaneously, understanding the solute balance for the Rio Grande at a level needed for improved river management is difficult. We have conducted synoptic sampling of the Rio Grande from the headwaters in Colorado to south of El Paso, Texas. Sampling was conducted in January and August of 2000 and 2001. The total dissolved solids content (TDS) of the Rio Grande increases from < 50 mg/L in headwater regions of Colorado to > 2000 mg/L south of El Paso, Texas. The Cl/Br (wt/wt) ratio for river water increases from ~50 in the headwaters (typical for atmospheric deposition) to ~700 in the lower basin. This increase in Cl/Br ratio demonstrates the importance of additional salinity sources. Three end-members are recognized using Cl/Br mixing plots for winter samples: atmospheric deposition, a hydrothermal end-member localized around Truth of Consequences, NM, and a third end-member that may represent groundwater. Samples collected during the summer months are shifted off the winter mixing lines indicating concentration through ET. Increases in salinity were not a simple function of distance downriver, but rather occurred in a series of steps. Some of these steps are correlated with

  12. An international borderland of concern: Conservation of biodiversity in the Lower Rio Grande Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leslie,, David M., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of southern Texas is located on the United States-Mexico borderland and represents a 240-kilometer (150-mile) linear stretch that ends at the Gulf of Mexico. The LRGV represents a unique transition between temperate and tropical conditions and, as such, sustains an exceptionally high diversity of plants and animals—some of them found in few, or no other, places in the United States. Examples include Leopardus pardalis albescens (northern ocelot) and Falco femoralis septentrionalis (northern aplomado falcon)—both endangered in the United States and emblematic of the LRGV. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) manages three national wildlife refuges (Santa Ana, Lower Rio Grande Valley, and Laguna Atascosa) that together make up the South Texas Refuge Complex, which actively conserves biodiversity in about 76,006 hectares (187,815.5 acres) of native riparian and upland habitats in the LRGV. These diminished habitats harbor many rare, threatened, and endangered species. This report updates the widely used 1988 USFWS biological report titled “Tamaulipan Brushland of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of South Texas: Description, Human Impacts, and Management Options” by synthesizing nearly 400 peer-reviewed scientific publications that have resulted from biological and sociological research conducted specifically in the four Texas counties of the LRGV in the past nearly 30 years. This report has three goals: (1) synthesize scientific insights gained since 1988 related to the biology and management of the LRGV and its unique biota, focusing on flora and fauna of greatest conservation concern; (2) update ongoing challenges facing Federal and State agencies and organizations that focus on conservation or key natural resources in the LRGV; and (3) redefine conservation opportunities and land-acquisition strategies that are feasible and appropriate today, given the many new and expanding constraints that challenge conservation

  13. [Social representations of generic drugs by consumers from Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Cleide Ribeiro Dantas de; Accioly Júnior, Horácio; Raffin, Fernanda Nervo

    2006-03-01

    This paper aimed to determine the central and peripheral roles of consumers' social representations concerning generic drugs, establishing mechanisms that could be used to improve policies for this type of medication in Brazil. The research was done from April 2002 to February 2003 in the city of Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, with 400 consumers. The study employed the word association test with the words "generic drug" as the inductive stimulus. Evocation of three words was requested, according to the access strategy to Vergès' Central Nucleus. Data analysis used the EVOC 2000 software and the content analysis proposed by Bardin. The results demonstrated that the central nucleus consisted of the categories price, quality, and pharmaceutical equivalence, while the peripheral system was represented by the categories option, effectiveness, government, social benefit, and accessibility.

  14. Utilization of LANDSAT orbital imagery in the soil survey processes at Rio Grande do Norte state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formaggio, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Pedologic photointerpretative criteria adapted to LANDSAT orbital imagery were used: drainage (pattern, integration degree, density and uniformity degree); relief (pattern, dissection degree and crest lines); photographic texture, photographic tonnality, and the land use (type, glebas size and intensity of use). The performance of the imagery as an auxiliar tool in the soil survey processes, at Rio Grande do Norte State was evaluated. The drainage and relief elements were easily extracted from the imagery and also ones that provided the greatest deductive possibility about pedologic boundaries. Other analyzed criteria were considered only auxiliaries, corroborating some soil limits in the evidences convergence phase. The principal pedologic dominions of the 30,000 sq km are covered by the same LANDSAT image (WRS 359/16) were delimited with good precision: (1) fluvial plains, beaches, dunes and coastal mangroves; (2) North Coast line Plateau; (3) Acu Sandstone Zone; (4) residual plateaus of the Tertiary; and (6) plains of the embasement.

  15. Correlates of mammography screening among Hispanic women living in lower Rio Grande Valley farmworker communities.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Richard C; Fernandez, Maria E; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Gonzales, Alicia; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2005-08-01

    Factors contributing to the underuse of mammography screening by female Hispanic farmworkers aged 50 years and older in the Lower Rio Grande Valley were determined through home-based, Spanish-language personal interviews (N = 200). Questions covered adherence to screening mammography guidelines (mammogram within 2 years), healthcare access, sociodemographic characteristics, and theoretical constructs related to breast cancer screening in the literature. Multivariate findings indicated that adherent women were 3.6 times more likely to have health insurance. Self-efficacy for obtaining a mammogram and decisional balance were also significantly related to adherence; age, income, and education variables were not associated, perhaps because of restricted variation. Results indicate continuing efforts are needed to ensure that medically underserved migrant farmworker women have access to health care services. In addition, efforts to increase their self-efficacy in obtaining a mammogram and to counter negative attitudes and opinions by stressing the positive prognosis associated with early detection are warranted.

  16. Case study Middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico, USA: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic patterns in groundwater can record characteristics of water sources, flow directions, and groundwater-age information. This hydrochemical information can be useful in refining conceptualization of groundwater flow, in calibration of numerical models of groundwater flow, and in estimation of paleo and modern recharge rates. This case study shows how chemical and isotopic data were used to characterize sources and flow of groundwater in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB) of New Mexico, USA. The 14C model ages of the groundwater samples are on the tens of thousands of year timescale. These data changed some of the prevailing ideas about flow in the MRGB, and were used to improve a numerical model of the aquifer system.

  17. Dengue epidemic in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, in 1997.

    PubMed

    Cunha, R V; Schatzmayr, H G; Miagostovich, M P; Barbosa, A M; Paiva, F G; Miranda, R M; Ramos, C C; Coelho, J C; dos Santos, F B; Nogueira, R M

    1999-01-01

    During 1997 a large dengue epidemic occurred in Rio Grande do Norte, a State in north-east Brazil. The co-circulation of dengue virus type 1 and dengue virus type 2 was demonstrated by virus isolation in Aedes albopictus clone C6/36 cell-line and by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). IgM capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed 52.3% of the 8105 studied cases and dengue antigen was demonstrated by immunohistochemical reaction on hepatocytes from 2 out of 5 fatal cases studied. Individual risk factors for development of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus and bronchial asthma, are discussed.

  18. Earth resources evaluation for New Mexico by LANDSAT-2. [Rio Grande

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. V. (Principal Investigator); Feldman, S. C.; Inglis, M. H.; Kottlowski, F. E.; Tabet, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Middle Rio Grande project has not yet progressed to the point where mineral exploration sites can be chosen; however, there does appear to be some correlation between the known structure and mineral deposits and the LANDSAT lineament map. A circular feature identified in the southern Magdalena Mountains on LANDSAT-1 imagery agrees well with the location of a newly proposed caldron complex. Several recognized and unrecognized circular features were identified on imagery of the Mogollon-Datil volcanic field. A check of aeromagnetic maps for New Mexico found that the circular features on the LANDSAT imagery showed up as areas of generally high magnetic intensity.

  19. An international borderland of concern: Conservation of biodiversity in the Lower Rio Grande Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leslie,, David M.

    2016-07-20

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of southern Texas is located on the United States-Mexico borderland and represents a 240-kilometer (150-mile) linear stretch that ends at the Gulf of Mexico. The LRGV represents a unique transition between temperate and tropical conditions and, as such, sustains an exceptionally high diversity of plants and animals—some of them found in few, or no other, places in the United States. Examples include Leopardus pardalis albescens (northern ocelot) and Falco femoralis septentrionalis (northern aplomado falcon)—both endangered in the United States and emblematic of the LRGV. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) manages three national wildlife refuges (Santa Ana, Lower Rio Grande Valley, and Laguna Atascosa) that together make up the South Texas Refuge Complex, which actively conserves biodiversity in about 76,006 hectares (187,815.5 acres) of native riparian and upland habitats in the LRGV. These diminished habitats harbor many rare, threatened, and endangered species. This report updates the widely used 1988 USFWS biological report titled “Tamaulipan Brushland of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of South Texas: Description, Human Impacts, and Management Options” by synthesizing nearly 400 peer-reviewed scientific publications that have resulted from biological and sociological research conducted specifically in the four Texas counties of the LRGV in the past nearly 30 years. This report has three goals: (1) synthesize scientific insights gained since 1988 related to the biology and management of the LRGV and its unique biota, focusing on flora and fauna of greatest conservation concern; (2) update ongoing challenges facing Federal and State agencies and organizations that focus on conservation or key natural resources in the LRGV; and (3) redefine conservation opportunities and land-acquisition strategies that are feasible and appropriate today, given the many new and expanding constraints that challenge conservation

  20. Oligocene basaltic volcanism of the northern Rio Grande Rift: San Luis Hills, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.A.; Johnson, C.M.; Mehnert, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    The inception of the Rio Grande Rift in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado was accompanied by voluminous mafic volcanism preserved in part as erosional remnants on an intrarift horst within the current axial rift graben of the San Luis Valley. Major and trace element constraints support a petrogenetic model of fractionation plus lower crustal assimilation for petrologic suites within the San Luis Hills rocks, although the model cannot relate lavas for the entire series to a common parent. Most mafic lavas of the San Luis Hills were evolved (Mg # <60) and contaminated by LREE-enriched silicic partial melts of granulitic lower crust depleted in Rb, Th, and U. However, relatively noncontaminated lavas can be identified and indicate at least two mantle source regions were involved. -from Authors

  1. Pathogenic Landscape of Transboundary Zoonotic Diseases in the Mexico-US Border Along the Rio Grande.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria Dolores; Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Romero-Salas, Dora; Feria-Arroyo, Teresa P; Patino, Ramiro; Castro-Arellano, Ivan; Gordillo-Pérez, Guadalupe; Auclair, Allan; Goolsby, John; Rodriguez-Vivas, Roger Ivan; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Transboundary zoonotic diseases, several of which are vector borne, can maintain a dynamic focus and have pathogens circulating in geographic regions encircling multiple geopolitical boundaries. Global change is intensifying transboundary problems, including the spatial variation of the risk and incidence of zoonotic diseases. The complexity of these challenges can be greater in areas where rivers delineate international boundaries and encompass transitions between ecozones. The Rio Grande serves as a natural border between the US State of Texas and the Mexican States of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas. Not only do millions of people live in this transboundary region, but also a substantial amount of goods and people pass through it everyday. Moreover, it occurs over a region that functions as a corridor for animal migrations, and thus links the Neotropic and Nearctic biogeographic zones, with the latter being a known foci of zoonotic diseases. However, the pathogenic landscape of important zoonotic diseases in the south Texas-Mexico transboundary region remains to be fully understood. An international perspective on the interplay between disease systems, ecosystem processes, land use, and human behaviors is applied here to analyze landscape and spatial features of Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Hantavirus disease, Lyme Borreliosis, Leptospirosis, Bartonellosis, Chagas disease, human Babesiosis, and Leishmaniasis. Surveillance systems following the One Health approach with a regional perspective will help identifying opportunities to mitigate the health burden of those diseases on human and animal populations. It is proposed that the Mexico-US border along the Rio Grande region be viewed as a continuum landscape where zoonotic pathogens circulate regardless of national borders. PMID:25453027

  2. The decompensative gravity anomaly and deep structure of the region of the Rio Grande rift

    SciTech Connect

    Cordell, L. ); Zorin, Y.A. ); Keller, G.R. )

    1991-04-10

    An isostatic correction is commonly made to Bouguer anomaly gravity data to remove the gravity effect of isostatic compensation of topographic loads. In the USSR a decompensative correction has then been made to the isostatic gravity anomaly to remove the gravity effect of isostatic compensation of geologic loads as well. The authors employ here calculations in the wave number domain, leading to an efficient and exact solution. In a 1,200 {times} 1,200 km region centered on the Rio Grande rift the decompensative correction ranges from about {minus}35 to +25 mGal. The decompensative anomaly, highlights an arcuate gravity low and a system of gravity highs inferred to reflect prerift welts of mass concentration which have indirectly influenced the position of the rift and its segmentation and zones of accommodation. Under the assumptions made, if the decompensative anomaly is subtracted from the Bouguer anomaly, then the residual is the gravity anomaly field of deep structure, without gravity effects of shallow sources in the upper crust. Using available seismic data to (weakly) constrain the Moho surface, they invert the residual gravity field for topography of the base of the lithosphere. Lithosphere is found to be 200 km thick in the High Plains; 40-50 km in the eastern Great Basin; 75-100 km in the Colorado Plateau, and as thin as 40 km in the southern Rio Grande rift. In the area studied, the thickness of the lithospere is everwhere greater than that of the crust. The separation of gravity effects made possible by the decompensative correction shows how the rift is fundamentally controlled by thinning of the lithosphere, yet in detail is deflected by long-lived tectonic welts in the shallow, brittle crust.

  3. Water quality and amphibian health in the Big Bend region of the Rio Grande Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Bibek; Hu, F.; Carr, J.A.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2011-01-01

    Male and female Rio Grande leopard frogs (Rana berlandieri) were collected in May 2005 from the main stem and tributaries of the Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas. Frogs were examined for (1) incidence of testicular ovarian follicles in males; (2) thyroid epithelial cell height, a potential index of exposure to thyroid-disrupting contaminants; and (3) incidence of liver melanomacrophage aggregates, a general index of exposure to contaminants. Standard parameters of surface water quality and concentrations of selected elements, including heavy metals, were determined at each frog collection site. Heavy metals also were measured in whole-frog composite extracts. Water cadmium concentrations in most sites and chloride concentrations in the main stem exceeded federal criteria for freshwater aquatic life. Mercury was detected in frogs from the two collection sites in Terlingua Creek. There was a seventeen percent incidence of testicular ovarian follicles in male frogs. Mean thyroid epithelial cell height was greater in frogs from one of the Terlingua Creek sites (Terlingua Abajo). No differences were observed in the incidence of hepatic macrophage aggregates among sites. In conclusion, although potential cause-effect relationships between indices of habitat quality and amphibian health could not be established, the results of this study raise concerns about the general quality of the aquatic habitat and the potential long-term consequences to the aquatic biota of the Big Bend region. The presence of ovarian follicles in male frogs is noteworthy but further study is necessary to determine whether this phenomenon is natural or anthropogenically induced.

  4. SAGE 2010 Magnetotelluric Soundings Provide New Constraints on Rio Grande Rift Mid-Crustal Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, A. E.; Martin, C. L.; Thomas, T.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Pellerin, L.; Jiracek, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    Since the inception of the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program in 1983, long-period magnetotelluric (MT) soundings have imaged a pronounced mid-crustal conductor at 10-20 km depth within the central Rio Grande rift. Wideband MT soundings (0.01 to over 1000 s period) collected in 2010 extended the detection of this feature to nearly 100 km length along the rift axis in the vicinity of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The conductive anomaly is clearly defined in the longest periods of the mode identified as the transverse electric (TE) in the recently acquired MT data. The spatially-limited 2010 soundings in the Santo Domingo Basin do not allow two-dimensional (2-D) inversions; however, one-dimensional (1-D) inversion of TE mode measurements in conductive rift basins can yield good depth estimates of deep conductive layers as has been shown by 2-D rift MT modeling. Such 1-D inversions of the 2010 MT soundings yield ~20 km depth to the top of the mid-crustal conductor, 5-10 km deeper than 90 km to the north if 3-D effects are negligible. Estimated conductance of the Santo Domingo basin conductor is 2000 S with resistivities in the range of 2-10 ohm-m. An interpretation of the ubiquitous, mid-crustal conductor in the Rio Grande rift is interconnected, saline, aqueous fluid trapped in the ductile crust below the ~10 km-deep seismogenic zone after fluid release and upward ascent from an upwarped mantle.

  5. Pathogenic Landscape of Transboundary Zoonotic Diseases in the Mexico–US Border Along the Rio Grande

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria Dolores; Pérez de León, Adalberto A.; Romero-Salas, Dora; Feria-Arroyo, Teresa P.; Patino, Ramiro; Castro-Arellano, Ivan; Gordillo-Pérez, Guadalupe; Auclair, Allan; Goolsby, John; Rodriguez-Vivas, Roger Ivan; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Transboundary zoonotic diseases, several of which are vector borne, can maintain a dynamic focus and have pathogens circulating in geographic regions encircling multiple geopolitical boundaries. Global change is intensifying transboundary problems, including the spatial variation of the risk and incidence of zoonotic diseases. The complexity of these challenges can be greater in areas where rivers delineate international boundaries and encompass transitions between ecozones. The Rio Grande serves as a natural border between the US State of Texas and the Mexican States of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas. Not only do millions of people live in this transboundary region, but also a substantial amount of goods and people pass through it everyday. Moreover, it occurs over a region that functions as a corridor for animal migrations, and thus links the Neotropic and Nearctic biogeographic zones, with the latter being a known foci of zoonotic diseases. However, the pathogenic landscape of important zoonotic diseases in the south Texas–Mexico transboundary region remains to be fully understood. An international perspective on the interplay between disease systems, ecosystem processes, land use, and human behaviors is applied here to analyze landscape and spatial features of Venezuelan equine encephalitis, Hantavirus disease, Lyme Borreliosis, Leptospirosis, Bartonellosis, Chagas disease, human Babesiosis, and Leishmaniasis. Surveillance systems following the One Health approach with a regional perspective will help identifying opportunities to mitigate the health burden of those diseases on human and animal populations. It is proposed that the Mexico–US border along the Rio Grande region be viewed as a continuum landscape where zoonotic pathogens circulate regardless of national borders. PMID:25453027

  6. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect

    Meixner, Tom; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen; Brooks, Paul; Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  7. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of Kincaid Formation, Midway Group (Paleocene), Upper Rio Grande Embayment, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, E.C. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Sedimentary rocks of the Kincaid Formation crop out along the northern and western edges of the Rio Grande Embayment. Siltstones are exposed at the type locality of the Kincaid Formation along the Frio River in Uvalde County, Texas. On the east and south, the Kincaid Formation changes facies to richly fossiliferous carbonate rocks; however, basinward, it grades into a shale facies that contains interbedded units of fine-grained sandstone. At the type locality of the Kincaid Formation, approximately 30 ft (9 m) of massive siltstone grades upward into a very silty limestone unit. Bedding is poorly defined throughout the section, largely the result of intensive bioturbation. The grain size of the siltstone increases upward, ranging from medium to coarse. Clay content in the siltstone decreases upward as the amount of calcareous material increases. The upper 4-6 ft (1.2-1.8 m) may actually be considered a silty limestone. A dramatic facies change is present along the outcrop both east and south of the type section. To the east, the Kincaid Formation is composed of glauconitic and highly fossiliferous limestone. The siltstone present at the type locality thins eastward and is absent less than 20 mi (32 km) away. Eighty miles (130 km) to the south, along the Rio Grande River, approximately 45 ft (14 m) of limestone and shale comprise the Kincaid Formation. These early Paleocene sediments are interpreted to be shallow marine in origin. The siltstone represents a shallow sublittoral shoreface environment whereas the limestones on the east and south were deposited in shallow nearshore environments beyond the reach of clastic deposition.

  8. Forest Cover Change and Soil Erosion in Toledo's Rio Grande Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicas, S.; Omine, K.

    2015-04-01

    Toledo, the southernmost district, is the hub of Belize's Mayan population, descendants of the ancient Mayan civilization. The Toledo District is primarily inhibited by Kekchi and Mopan Mayans whose subsistence needs are met by the Milpa slash-and-burn agricultural system and the extraction of forest resources. The poverty assessment in the country indicates that Toledo is the district with the highest percentage of household an individual indigence of 37.5 % and 49.7 % respectively. Forest cover change in the area can be attributed to rapid population growth among the Maya, together with increase in immigration from neighboring countries, logging, oil exploration and improvement and construction of roads. The forest cover change analysis show that from 2001 to 2011 there was a decrease of Lowland broad-leaved wet forest of 7.53 km sq, Shrubland of 4.66 km sq, and Wetland of 0.08 km sq. Forest cover change has resulted in soil erosion which is causing the deterioration of soils. The land cover types that are contributing the most to total erosion in the Rio Grande watershed are no-forest, lowland broad-leaved wet forest and submontane broad-leaved wet forest. In this study the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was employed in a GIS platform to quantify and assess forest cover change and soil erosion. Soil erosion vulnerability maps in Toledo's Rio Grande watershed were also created. This study provides scientifically sound information in order to understand and respond effectively to the impacts of soil erosion in the study site.

  9. Seismic Anisotropy Beneath the Eastern Flank of the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, N. W.; Pulliam, J.

    2015-12-01

    Shear wave splitting was measured across the eastern flank of the Rio Grande Rift (RGR) to investigate mechanisms of upper mantle anisotropy. Earthquakes recorded at epicentral distances of 90°-130° from EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) and SIEDCAR (SC) broadband seismic stations were examined comprehensively, via the Matlab program "Splitlab", to determine whether SKS and SKKS phases indicated anisotropic properties. Splitlab allows waveforms to be rotated, filtered, and windowed interactively and splitting measurements are made on a user-specified waveform segment via three independent methods simultaneously. To improve signal-to-noise and improve reliability, we stacked the error surfaces that resulted from grid searches in the measurements for each station location. Fast polarization directions near the Rio Grande Rift tend to be sub-parallel to the RGR but then change to angles that are consistent with North America's average plate motion, to the east. The surface erosional depression of the Pecos Valley coincides with fast polarization directions that are aligned in a more northerly direction than their neighbors, whereas the topographic high to the east coincides with an easterly change of the fast axis.The area above a mantle high velocity anomaly discovered separately via seismic tomography which may indicate thickened lithosphere, corresponds to unusually large delay times and fast polarization directions that are more closely aligned to a north-south orientation. The area of southeastern New Mexico that falls between the mantle fast anomaly and the Great Plains craton displays dramatically smaller delay times, as well as changes in fast axis directions toward the northeast. Changes in fast axis directions may indicate flow around the mantle anomaly; small delay times could indicate vertical or attenuated flow.

  10. Ages of Quaternary Rio Grande terrace-fill deposits, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Mahan, Shannon; Stone, Byron D.; Shroba, Ralph R.

    2007-01-01

    Results from luminescence dating on 13 samples from the Albuquerque area show that major-drainage fluvial deposits represent significant periods of aggradation that formed paired, correlatable terraces on the east and west margins of the Rio Grande valley . The youngest terrace fills (Primero Alto) formed during late Pleistocene as a result of streamflow variations with climate cooling during Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 3; our ages suggest aggradation of the upper part of the fill occurred at about 47–40 ka . Deposits of the second (Segundo Alto) terraces reached maximum height during climate cooling in the early part of Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 5 as late as 90–98 ka (based on dated basalt flows) . Our luminescence ages show considerable scatter and tend to be younger (range from 63 ka to 162 ka) . The third (Tercero Alto) and fourth (Cuarto Alto) terraces are dated on the basis of included volcanic tephra. Tercero Alto terrace-fill deposits contain the Lava Creek B tephra (639 ka), and Cuarto Alto terrace-fill deposits contain tephra of the younger Bandelier Tuff eruption (1 .22 Ma), the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite (1 .47 Ma), and the older Bandelier Tuff eruption (1 .61 Ma). These periods of aggradation culminated in fluvial terraces that are preserved at maximum heights of 360 ft (Cuarto Alto), 300 ft. (Tercero Alto), 140 ft (Segundo Alto), and 60 ft. (Primero Alto) above the modern floodplain. Despite lithologic differences related to local source-area contributions, these terracefill deposits can be correlated across the Rio Grande and up- and down-valley for tens of miles based on maximum height of the terrace above the modern floodplain.

  11. Ages of Quaternary Rio Grande terrace-fill deposits, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.C.; Mahan, S.A.; Stone, B.D.; Shroba, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    Results from luminescence dating on 13 samples from the Albuquerque area show that major-drainage fluvial deposits represent significant periods of aggradation that formed paired, correlatable terraces on the east and west margins of the Rio Grande valley. The youngest terrace fills (Primero Alto) formed during late Pleistocene as a result of streamflow variations with climate cooling during Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 3; our ages suggest aggradation of the upper part of the fill occurred at about 47-40 ka. Deposits of the second (Segundo Alto) terraces reached maximum height during climate cooling in the early part of Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 5 as late as 90-98 ka (based on dated basalt flows). Our luminescence ages show considerable scatter and tend to be younger (range from 63 ka to 162 ka). The third (Tercero Alto) and fourth (Cuarto Alto) terraces are dated on the basis of included volcanic tephra. Tercero Alto terrace-fill deposits contain the Lava Creek B tephra (639 ka), and Cuarto Alto terrace-fill deposits contain tephra of the younger Bandelier Tuff eruption (1.22 Ma), the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite (1.47 Ma), and the older Bandelier Tuff eruption (1.61 Ma). These periods of aggradation culminated in fluvial terraces that are preserved at maximum heights of 360 ft (Cuarto Alto), 300 ft (Tercero Alto), 140 ft (Segundo Alto), and 60 ft (Primero Alto) above the modern flood-plain. Despite lithologic differences related to local source-area contributions, these terracefill deposits can be correlated across the Rio Grande and up- and down-valley for tens of miles based on maximum height of the terrace above the modern floodplain.

  12. Mexican Migrations to the U.S., 1900-1920, with a Focus on the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Hubert J.

    Migrations from 1900-1920 were analyzed, focusing on the overall pattern of Mexican migrations to the United States during the two decades; migrations to Texas, the major recipient of migrants during the period; and migrations into the lower Rio Grande Valley. Data were based on official registrations either entering the United States or leaving…

  13. Mapping giant reed (Arundo donax) infestations along the Texas-Mexico portion of the Rio Grande using aerial photography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giant reed is an invasive weed throughout the southern half of the United States with the densest stands growing along the coastal rivers of southern California and the Rio Grande in Texas. The objective of this study was to use aerial photography to map giant reed infestations and estimate infested...

  14. DIETARY CHARACTERIZATIONS IN A STUDY OF HUMAN EXPOSURES IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY:II. HOUSEHOLD WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley Environmental Study (LRGVES) was designed to evaluate multiple forms of exposure to Valley residents because of community concerns of possible adverse health effects from environmental conditions. This is the second of two papers that describe the diet...

  15. 78 FR 16569 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC, Permian Basin Railways, and San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Corporate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Holdings, LLC (IPH), its wholly owned subsidiaries Permian Basin Railways (PBR) and San Luis & Rio Grande..., IPH is a noncarrier that wholly owns PBR, which directly controls seven Class III railroads.\\1\\ PBR... (Saratoga). In addition, PBR controls 80% of Cape Rail, Inc. (Cape Rail), a noncarrier railroad...

  16. School and Public Youth Librarians as Health Information Gatekeepers: Research from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukenbill, Bill; Immroth, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated how school and public librarians can become better disseminators of health information and improve health information literacy in small and rural communities in a selected research area. We used the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as our study area, composed of the economically depressed Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and…

  17. Binational Dilemmas: the Contrasting Challenges for Environmental Management and Restoration of the Colorado River and Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. C.; Wilcock, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    The United States and Mexico share waters of the Colorado River and Rio Grande. The two countries have signed joint declarations and begun talks focused on rehabilitating parts of these rivers affected by upstream dams and diversions. These areas include the Colorado River Delta and the Rio Grande downstream from Fort Quitman, TX. Other parts of these river systems are the focus on single country restoration efforts, such as the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program and the effort to recover the Rio Grande silvery minnow. Regional and international coordination and collaboration are needed to focus limited restoration funds toward their most beneficial use. Analysis of historical records, published studies of channel change, and computation of sediment mass balance conditions demonstrates that the challenges and difficulties of rehabilitating different parts of the Colorado River and Rio Grande vary greatly. There is little accordance between the importance and tractability of restoration opportunities and the magnitude and location of investment in these opportunities. In some cases, large river management problems are focused on relatively intractable problems, while elsewhere relatively modest and solvable problems are ignored. We demonstrate how watershed scale analysis of the magnitude of hydrologic and geomorphic perturbations and the costs of addressing these perturbations can help guide the allocation of limited public resources to best meet the challenges faced by Mexico and the United States in rehabilitating its shared rivers.

  18. Susceptibility of redbanded and conchuela stink bugs from the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley to organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the susceptibility of 2 stink bug species, red banded stink bug (RBSB), Piezodorus guildinii, (Westwood) and conchuela stinkbug, Chlorochroa ligata (Say) collected in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley to selected pyrethroid and organophosphate technical grade insecticides. The adult glass ...

  19. 76 FR 21855 - Rio Grande National Forest, Divide Ranger District; Mineral County, CO; Village at Wolf Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Forest Service Rio Grande National Forest, Divide Ranger District; Mineral County, CO; Village at Wolf... totaling approximately 204 acres. The non-Federal parcel is located in T37N., R2E., NMPM, Mineral County..., Mineral County, CO, Sections 3, 4, 5, and 9. DATES: Formal scoping on this project begins on April...

  20. Molecular analysis of the iap gene of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from cheeses in rio grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Jozi Fagundes; Einsfeldt, Karen; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes; da Costa, Marisa; Frazzon, Jeverson

    2008-01-01

    The polymorphic region sequences in the iap gene were analyzed in 25 strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from cheeses in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, and compared with reference strains. This investigation distinguished two clusters of L. monocytogenes: I (20 strains) and II (5 strains). PMID:24031198

  1. Herpetofauna of Núcleo Experimental de Iguaba Grande, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, A R; Bruno, S F; Navegantes, A Q

    2012-08-01

    The Atlantic Rain forest, which is considered the second largest pluvial forest in the American continent, has had an estimated 93% of its original area destroyed. Although studies concerning the herpetofaunal diversity in this biome have been intensified in the past years, its diversity is still underestimated. The Nucleo Experimental de Iguaba Grande (NEIG) is included in an Environmental Protection Area (APA de Sapeatiba) in the Iguaba Grande municipality, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil (22º 51' S and 42º 10' W). The goal of this study was to conduct an inventory of the reptile and amphibian species that occur in this area between July 2008 and December 2009. We recorded 19 species of amphibians (18 anurans and one caecilian) and 15 species of reptiles (three lizards, 11 snakes and one amphisbaenian). Leptodactylus latrans and L. mystacinus had the highest capture rates among amphibians captured, and among reptiles, Ameiva ameiva, Hemidactylus mabouia and Mabuya agilis had the highest capture rates. Rarefaction curves for both amphibians and reptiles did not reach the asymptote, indicating that the species richness in the NEIG is still underestimated. PMID:22990826

  2. Population data of 17 Y-STR loci from Rio Grande do Sul state (South Brazil).

    PubMed

    Schwengber, Solange P; Kommers, Trícia; Matte, Cecília H F; Raimann, Paulo E; Carvalho, Bianca A; Leite, Fabio P N; Medeiros, Marcelo A; Souza, Luis F; Castro, Cibele S; Chassot, Fernanda G C; Bonatto, Sandro L

    2009-12-01

    A sample of 255 Brazilian males from Rio Grande do Sul (RS), the Brazilian southernmost state, was typed for 17 Y-STR loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA_H4.1 and DYS385ab). A total of 247 haplotypes were identified, of which 239 were unique and eight were found in two individuals each. The haplotype diversity (99.98%) and discrimination capacity (96.86%) were calculated. Pairwise haplotype distances showed that the RS population is not significantly different from Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, and Argentina, is different from São Paulo, Italy, and North Portugal, and is very distant from Spain, the Amazon region, Germany, and South Amerindians. When the RS data was separated in the seven geopolitical regions, some pairs of regions were significantly different; however no region was different from the whole Brazilian sample. PMID:19948319

  3. Quantifying Saline Groundwater Discharge to the Rio Grande using 87Sr/86Sr and [Ca]/[Sr] Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, J. F.; Phillips, F. M.; Mills, S. K.; Ruiz, J.; Chesley, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Issues of water quality, especially salinity, limit the use of water resources from the Rio Grande. Identification and quantification of salinity sources is critical for improved river management. We have conducted winter and summer synoptic sampling of the Rio Grande from the headwaters in Colorado to south of El Paso, Texas. The total dissolved solids content (TDS) of the Rio Grande increases from less than 50 mg/L in headwater regions of Colorado to greater than 2000 mg/L south of El Paso, Texas. Increases in salinity are not a simple function of distance downriver, but rather occur in a series of steps. Many of these increases are located at the lower end of sedimentary basins leading to the hypothesis that they are the result of discharge of deep, saline, groundwaters. Of particular interest is the Albuquerque and Socorro basins where, in three distinct steps, the TDS of the river doubles from ~ 150 mg/L to ~ 300 mg/L. With little change in river discharge for this reach, this represents a significant increase in the solute burden of the river. We have used 87Sr/86Sr and [Ca]/[Sr] ratios to "fingerprint" and quantify saline groundwater discharge. The Rio Grande entering the Albuquerque basin has an 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7096and a [Ca]/[Sr] ratio of 80. These values are consistent with a mixture of atmospheric deposition and weathering of basalt rock found upstream. Traveling through the Albuquerque and Socorro basin the Rio Grande shifts to a 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7102 and a [Ca]/[Sr] ratio of 30, values which are consistent with saline groundwater discharge. Mixing relationships indicate only two solute sources are required, and that a total saline groundwater discharge rate of ~ 50 cfs is sufficient to explain the observed salinity increases.

  4. Decreasing flood risk perception in Porto Alegre - Brazil and its influence on water resource management decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allasia, D. G.; Tassi, R.; Bemfica, D.; Goldenfum, J. A.

    2015-06-01

    Porto Alegre is the capital and largest city in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul in Southern Brazil with approximately 1.5 million inhabitants. The city lies on the eastern bank of the Guaiba Lake, formed by the convergence of five rivers and leading to the Lagoa dos Patos, a giant freshwater lagoon navigable by even the largest of ships. This river junction has become an important alluvial port as well as a chief industrial and commercial centre. However, this strategic location resulted in severe damage because of its exposure to flooding from the river system, affecting the city in the years 1873, 1928, 1936, 1941 and 1967. In order to reduce flood risk, a complex system of levees and pump stations was implemented during 1960s and 1970s. Since its construction, not a single large flood event occurred. However, in recent years, the levees in the downtown region of Porto Alegre were severally criticized by city planners and population. Several projects have been proposed to demolish the Mauá Wall due to the false perception of lack of flood risk. Similar opinions and reactions against flood infrastructure have been observed in other cities in Brazil, such as Itajaí and Blumenau, with disastrous consequences. This paper illustrates how the perception of flood risk in Porto Alegre has changed over recent years as a result of flood infrastructure, and how such changes in perceptions can influence water management decisions.

  5. Reconnaissance for uranium in the coal of Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haynes, Donald D.; Pierson, Charles T.; White, Max G.

    1958-01-01

    Uranium-bearing coal and carbonaceous shale of the Rio Bonito formation of Pennsylvanian age have been found in the States of Sao Paulo, Santa Catarlna and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The uranium oxide content of the samples collected in the State of Sao Paulo ranges from 0.001 percent to 0.082 percent. The samples collected in Santa Catarina averaged about 0.002 percent uranium oxide; those collected in Rio Grande do Sul, about 0.003 percent uranium oxide. Since the field and laboratory investigations are still in their initial stages, only raw data on the radioactivity and uranium content of Brazilian coals are given in this report.

  6. Hydrochemical tracers in the middle Rio Grande Basin, USA: 1. Conceptualization of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, L. Niel; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.; Sanford, Ward E.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    Chemical and isotopic data for groundwater from throughout the Middle Rio Grande Basin, central New Mexico, USA, were used to identify and map groundwater flow from 12 sources of water to the basin, evaluate radiocarbon ages, and refine the conceptual model of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Hydrochemical zones, representing groundwater flow over thousands to tens of thousands of years, can be traced over large distances through the primarily siliciclastic aquifer system. The locations of the hydrochemical zones mostly reflect the ``modern'' predevelopment hydraulic-head distribution, but are inconsistent with a trough in predevelopment water levels in the west-central part of the basin, indicating that this trough is a transient rather than a long-term feature of the aquifer system. Radiocarbon ages adjusted for geochemical reactions, mixing, and evapotranspiration/dilution processes in the aquifer system were nearly identical to the unadjusted radiocarbon ages, and ranged from modern to more than 30 ka. Age gradients from piezometer nests ranged from 0.1 to 2 year cm-1 and indicate a recharge rate of about 3 cm year-1 for recharge along the eastern mountain front and infiltration from the Rio Grande near Albuquerque. There has been appreciably less recharge along the eastern mountain front north and south of Albuquerque. Des données sur les éléments chimiques et les isotopes présents dans l'eau souterraine prélevée à divers endroits dans le bassin moyen du Rio Grande, au centre du Nouveau-Mexique (É-U), ont permis de déterminer l'existence et l'étendue de douze sources d'eau régionales dans le bassin, d'évaluer les âges radiocarbones et de raffiner le modèle conceptuel du système aquifère du groupe de Santa Fe. Des zones hydro-chimiques qui représentent l'écoulement de l'eau souterraine depuis des dizaines de milliers d'années peuvent être suivies sur de longues distances à travers l'aquifère principalement siliclastique. La position des

  7. Mantle water contents beneath the Rio Grande Rift (NM, USA): FTIR analysis of Rio Puerco and Kilbourne Hole peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, L. A.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Selverstone, J.

    2015-12-01

    Peridotite xenoliths from the Rio Grande Rift (RGR) are being analyzed for H2O contents by FTIR as well as for major and trace element compositions. Nine samples are from the Rio Puerco Volcanic Field (RP) which overlaps the central RGR and southeastern Colorado Plateau; seventeen samples are from Kilbourne Hole (KH) in the southern RGR. Spinel Cr# (Cr/(Cr+Al) = 0.08-0.46) and olivine Mg# (Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.883-0.911) of samples fall within the olivine-spinel mantle array from [1], an indicator that these are residues of partial melting. Pyroxene H2O contents in KH correlate with bulk rock and pyroxene Al2O3 contents. The KH clinopyroxene rare earth element (REE) variations fit models of 0-13% fractional melting of a primitive upper mantle. Most KH peridotites have bulk-rock light REE depleted patterns, but five are enriched in light REEs consistent with metasomatism. Variation in H2O content seems unrelated to REE enrichment. Metasomatism is seen in RP pyroxenite xenoliths [2] and will be examined in the peridotites studied here. Olivine H2O contents are low (≤20 ppm), and decrease from core to rim within grains. This is likely due to H loss during xenolith transport by the host magma [3]. Diffusion models of H suggest that mantle H2O contents are still preserved in cores of KH olivine, but not those of RP olivine. The average H2O content of Colorado Plateau clinopyroxene (670 ppm) [4] is ~300 ppm higher than RGR clinopyroxene (350 ppm). This upholds the hypothesis that hydration-induced lithospheric melting occurred during flat-slab subduction of the Farallon plate [5]. Numerical models indicate hydration via slab fluids is possible beneath the plateau, ~600 km from the paleo-trench, but less likely ~850 km away beneath the rift [6]. [1]Arai, 1994 CG 113, 191-204.[2]Porreca et al., 2006 Geosp 2, 333-351.[3]Peslier and Luhr, 2006 EPSL 242, 302-319.[4]Li et al., 2008 JGR 113, 1978-2012.[5]Humphreys et al., 2003 Int Geol Rev 45, 575-595.[6]English et al., 2003 EPSL

  8. Mantle Water Contents Beneath the Rio Grande Rift (NM, USA): FTIR Analysis of Rio Puerco and Kilbourne Hole Peridotite Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, L. A.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A.; Selverstone, J.

    2015-01-01

    Peridotite xenoliths from the Rio Grande Rift (RGR) are being analyzed for H (sub 2) O contents by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) as well as for major and trace element compositions. Nine samples are from the Rio Puerco Volcanic Field (RP) which overlaps the central RGR and southeastern Colorado Plateau; seventeen samples are from Kilbourne Hole (KH) in the southern RGR. Spinel Cr# (Cr/(Cr+Al)) (0.08-0.46) and olivine Mg# (Mg/(Mg plus Fe)) (0.883-0.911) of all RGR samples fall within the olivine-spinel mantle array from [1], an indicator that peridotites are residues of partial melting. Pyroxene H (sub 2) O in KH correlate with bulk rock and pyroxene Al (sub 2) O (sub 3).The KH clinopyroxene rare earth element (REE) variations fit models of 0-13 percent fractional melting of a primitive upper mantle. Most KH peridotites have bulk-rock light REE depleted patterns, but five are enriched in light REEs consistent with metasomatism. Variation in H (sub 2) O content is unrelated to REE enrichment. Metasomatism is seen in RP pyroxenite xenoliths [2] and will be examined in the peridotites studied here. Olivine H (sub 2) O contents are low (less than or equal to 15 parts per million), and decrease from core to rim within grains. This is likely due to H loss during xenolith transport by the host magma [3]. Diffusion models of H suggest that mantle H (sub 2) O contents are still preserved in cores of KH olivine, but not RP olivine. The average H (sub 2) O content of Colorado Plateau clinopyroxene (670 parts per million) [4] is approximately 300 parts per million higher than RGR clinopyroxene (350 parts per million). This upholds the hypothesis that hydration-induced lithospheric melting occurred during flat-slab subduction of the Farallon plate [5]. Numerical models indicate hydration via slab fluids is possible beneath the plateau, approximately 600 kilometers from the paleo-trench, but less likely approximately 850 kilometers away beneath the rift [6].

  9. Biomarkers of exposure and effects of environmental contaminants on swallows nesting along the Rio Grande, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mora, M.A.; Musquiz, D.; Bickham, J.W.; MacKenzie, D.S.; Hooper, M.J.; Szabo, J.K.; Matson, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    We collected adult cave swallows (Petrochelidon fulva) and cliff swallows (P. pyrrhonota) during the breeding seasons in 1999 and 2000 from eight locations along the Rio Grande from Brownsville to El Paso (unless otherwise specified, all locations are Texas, USA) and an out-of-basin reference location. Body mass, spleen mass, hepatosomatic index (HSI), gonadosomatic index (GSI), thyroxine (T4) in plasma, DNA damage measured as the half-peak coefficient of variation of DNA content (HPCV) in blood cells, as well as acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in brain were compared with concentrations of organochlorines, metals, and metalloids in carcasses to determine potential effects of contaminants on swallows during the breeding season. Concentrations of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p???-DDE) were significantly greater in swallows from El Paso than in those from most locations, except for Pharr and Llano Grande. All swallows from these three locations had p,p???-DDE concentrations of 3 ??g/g wet weight or greater. Swallows from El Paso either had or shared the highest concentrations of p,p???-DDE, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 13 inorganic elements. Swallows from El Paso exhibited greater spleen mass and HPCV values as well as lower T4 values compared with those from other locations. Thyroxine was a potential biomarker of contaminant exposure in swallows of the Rio Grande, because it was negatively correlated with p,p???-DDE and Se. Spleen mass was positively correlated with selenium and HSI and negatively correlated with body mass, GSI, Mn, and Ni. Overall, the present study suggests that insectivorous birds living in areas of high agricultural and industrial activity along the Rio Grande bioaccumulate environmental contaminants. These contaminants, particularly p,p???-DDE, may be among multiple factors that impact endocrine and hematopoietic function in Rio Grande swallows. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  10. Species richness, relative abundance, and habitat associations of nocturnal birds along the rio grande in Southern texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skoruppa, M.K.; Woodin, M.C.; Blacklock, G.

    2009-01-01

    The segment of the Rio Grande between International Falcon Reservoir and Del Rio, Texas (distance ca. 350 km), remains largely unexplored ornithologically. We surveyed nocturnal birds monthly during February-June 1998 at 19 stations along the Rio Grande (n = 6) and at upland stock ponds (n = 13) in Webb County, Texas. We conducted 10-min point counts (n = 89) after sunset and before moonset. Four species of owls and five species of nightjars were detected. Nightjars, as a group, were nearly five limes more abundant (mean number/count = 2.63) than owls (mean number = 0.55). The most, common owl, the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus), had a mean number of 0.25/point count. The mean for elf owls (Micrathene whitneyi) was 0.16/point count. The most common nightjars were the common poorwill (Phalaenoptilus nuttallii; 1.21/point count) and lesser nighthawk (Chordeiles acutipennir, 1.16/point count). Survey sites on the river supported more species (mean = 2.2) than did upland stock ponds (mean = 1.4). However, only one species (common pauraque, Nyctidromus albicollis) showed a preference for the river sites. Our results establish this segment of the Rio Grande in southern Texas as an area of high diversity of nightjars in the United States, matched (in numbers of species) only by southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico.

  11. An Integrated Model for a Water Leasing System on the Middle Rio Grand, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookshire, D. S.; Coursey, D. L.; Tidwell, V. C.; Broadbent, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    Since 1950 demand for water has more than doubled in the United States. Virtually all water supplies are allocated, leading to the question, where will water come from? The concept of water leasing has gained considerable attention as a volunteer, market-mediated system for transferring water between competing uses. For a water leasing system to be truly effective, detailed knowledge of the available water supply and the factors that affect water demand is critical. Improving understating of the factors that determine residential, industrial, and agricultural demand for water using experimental economics and then integrating with a hydrological model will allow for better understanding of market-based mechanisms potential to allocate water resources effectively. Currently we have three case studies underway, a generalized water leasing system on the Middle Rio Grande, a sophisticated farmer decision process and a study in the Mimbres basin in southern New Mexico. The developed market model utilizes an open market trading system known as a double auction, where buyers and sellers declare their bids and offers to the market. The developed hydrological model utilizes the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) system structure and data for the generalized water leasing system and the farmer decision process, with a different hydrological model being developed for the Mimbres basin. A key coupling between the hydrologic and market models involves tracking the difference in river losses for trades that move water up or down the river. In the experiments the hydrological model runs before the market-trading period to establish water rights, the trading period occurs and the hydrological model then runs a second time to report flows to each reach of the river. Participants in the experiment represent the interests of specific users, including farmers, Native American interests, urban interests and environmental interests. Participants in the experiments are

  12. [Culicidae (Diptera) in the dam area bordering the states of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Almério C; Paula, Marcia B; Vitor Neto, João B; Borsari, Rodrigo; Ferraudo, Antonio S

    2009-01-01

    The Culicidae composition of the Barra Grande Lake situated between the municipalities of Esmeralda (Rio Grande do Sul State) and Anita Garibaldi (Santa Catarina State) was assessed by monthly samplings. Twenty-four species were identified from a total of 1,185 specimens (74.7% as adults and 25.3% as immatures), with Aedes fluviatilis Lutz as the most frequent species. Several species are new records, and some of them are of public health interest. It is suggested that local environmental changes may alter the relationship between humans and vector mosquitoes.

  13. Data collection for cooperative water resources modeling in the Lower Rio Grande Basin, Fort Quitman to the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Pallachula, Kiran; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Villalobos, Joshua; Piccinni, Giovanni; Brainard, James Robert; Gerik, Thomas; Morrison, Wendy; Serrat-Capdevila, Aleix; Valdes, Juan; Sheng, Zhuping; Lovato, Rene; Guitron, Alberto; Ennis, Martha Lee; Aparicio, Javier; Newman, Gretchen Carr; Michelsen, Ari M.

    2004-10-01

    Water resource scarcity around the world is driving the need for the development of simulation models that can assist in water resources management. Transboundary water resources are receiving special attention because of the potential for conflict over scarce shared water resources. The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo along the U.S./Mexican border is an example of a scarce, transboundary water resource over which conflict has already begun. The data collection and modeling effort described in this report aims at developing methods for international collaboration, data collection, data integration and modeling for simulating geographically large and diverse international watersheds, with a special focus on the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo. This report describes the basin, and the data collected. This data collection effort was spatially aggregated across five reaches consisting of Fort Quitman to Presidio, the Rio Conchos, Presidio to Amistad Dam, Amistad Dam to Falcon Dam, and Falcon Dam to the Gulf of Mexico. This report represents a nine-month effort made in FY04, during which time the model was not completed.

  14. Prevalence of acanthamoeba from tap water in rio grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Winck, Mari Aline Todero; Caumo, Karin; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2011-11-01

    A total of 136 samples of tap water were collected from state and municipal schools between March and November 2009. The samples were filtered through cellulose nitrate membranes that were seeded at non-nutrient agar 1.5% containing an overlayer of Escherichia coli suspension. Thirty-one (22.79%) tap water samples investigated were found positive for free-living amoebae (FLA). From these, 13 presented as FLA that seems to belong to the genus Acanthamoeba. All samples of FLA were cloned and identified as belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba by the morphology of cysts and trophozoites and by PCR using genus-specific primers that amplify the ASA.S1 region of 18S rDNA gene. Physiological tests of thermotolerance and osmotolerance were used to evaluate the pathogenicity of the isolates. The sequencing analysis by comparing the sequences submitted to GenBank, showed genotype distribution into groups T2, T2/T6, T6, and T4. In tests of thermotolerance and osmotolerance, 50% of the isolates had a low pathogenic potential. The results indicated the presence of Acanthamoeba in tap water in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, revealing its importance and the need for more epidemiological studies to determine their distribution in the environment and its pathogenic potential.

  15. Potential incremental seepage losses in an alluvial channel in the Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional, digital, cross-sectional model was used to simulate seepage of water from an alluvial channel, which had the general characteristic of the Rio Grande channel, into the underlying alluvium within the reach from Cochiti Dam to Elephant Butte Reservoir. Seepage rates were determined for losing and gaining reaches, and reaches affected by pumping of ground water. The seepage rates were computed for stream surcharges (height of additional water applied on top of base flow) ranging from 0.5 foot to 3 feet and for application periods ranging from 1 to 100 days. The net seepage rates, which were nearly identical for each type of reach, ranged from 0.0 cubic foot per second per mile of channel length for a 0.5 foot surcharge applied for 1 day to 0.37 cubic foot per second per mile of channel length for a 3 feet surcharge applied for 100 days, followed by a 180 day seepage return flow from the aquifer. (USGS)

  16. The role of community health workers in combating type 2 diabetes in the rio grande valley.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Igor; Richardson, Chad

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the use of community health workers (CHWs, aka promotoras de salud in Spanish) in the control of type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus) in the Rio Grande Valley (RGV). Known from the literature as "a disease of the 21st century" and being the third leading cause of death in the United States, type 2 diabetes is a very common disease in the RGV because of its predominantly Mexican American population, a group genetically vulnerable to the disease. Unlike prior studies that examined the overall effectiveness of the CHW model, the authors used registered CHWs as primary diabetes educators. Another innovation of this study was the authors monitored a wide range of biologic (HbA1c and body mass index [BMI]) and behavioral (diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, self-management activities scores) outcomes. The research hypothesis was that the educational service provided by CHWs to the diabetic patients would assist them in controlling their disease. The design of the study was experimental. The target population consisted of Mexican American adults from RGV diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and willing to participate. The intervention group received monthly visits from CHWs. The results showed a significant improvement after one year of intervention in all outcomes, except BMI, in the experimental group. PMID:23804658

  17. Synoptic Sampling of Dissolved Nitrogen Species and Organic Carbon in the Rio Grande Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villinski, J. E.; Hogan, J. F.; Brooks, P. D.; Haas, P. A.; Mills, S. K.

    2002-12-01

    Synoptic sampling has been performed along the Rio Grande from the headwaters in Colorado to Fort Quitman, Texas, south of El Paso. Samples from August 2001 and January 2002 were analyzed for nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH_{4}$+), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). DOC concentrations increase slowly between Colorado and southern New Mexico and then approximately double in Texas. Large sources of N during both sampling periods were the urban areas around Albuquerque and El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and agricultural regions in the Rincon and Mesilla valleys of southern New Mexico. Nitrate-N concentrations remained high south of Albuquerque to Elephant Butte reservoir in the summer, presumably due to lack of primary production. Inorganic N concentrations generally are higher in the winter than in the summer. During the summer, ammonium concentrations were greater than 100 mg N/l only at the outlet of Elephant Butte Reservoir, and in Texas. However, winter concentrations were on average an order of magnitude greater, again with the largest ammonium values (5000 \\mug N/l) in Texas. These patterns are consistent with a reduction in biological nutrient demand during the non-growing season.

  18. Dust-on-snow and the Timing of Peak Streamflow in the Upper Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, C. M.; Elias, E.; Moffitt, A.; Beltran, I.; Rango, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust radiative forcing on high elevation snowpack is well-documented in the southern Rockies. Various field studies show that dust deposits decrease snow albedo and increase absorption of solar radiation, leading to earlier snowmelt and peak stream flows. These findings have implications for the use of temperature-index snow runoff models (such as the Snowmelt Runoff Model [SRM]) for predicting streamflow. In previous work, we have used SRM to simulate historical streamflow from 26 Upper Rio Grande sub-basins. Because dust radiative forcing can alter the relation between temperature and snowmelt, we wanted to find out if there is evidence of dust radiative forcing and earlier snowmelt in our study basins, particularly for those years where SRM was less successful in simulating streamflow. To accomplish this we have used openly-available data such as EPA air quality station measurements of particulate matter up to 10 micrometers (PM10); streamflow data from the USGS National Water Information System and Colorado Division of Water Resources; temperature, precipitation and snow water equivalent (SWE) from NRCS SNOTEL stations and remotely sensed data products from the MODIS sensor. Initial analyses indicate that a connection between seasonal dust concentration and streamflow timing (date of onset of warm-season snowmelt, date of streamflow center-of-volume) can be detected. This is further supported by time series analysis of MODIS-derived estimates of snow albedo and dust radiative-forcing in alpine and open subalpine snow fields.

  19. Synthesis of benthic flux components in the Patos Lagooncoastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this work is to synthesize components of benthic flux in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Specifically, the component of benthic discharge flux forced by the terrestrial hydraulic gradient is 0.8 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux associated with the groundwater tidal prism are both 2.1 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity wave setup are both 6.3 m3 d-1; the component of benthic discharge flux that transports radium-228 is 350 m3 d-1; and components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity waves propagating over a porous medium are both 1400 m3 d-1. (All models are normalized per meter shoreline.) Benthic flux is a function of components forced by individual mechanisms and nonlinear interactions that exist between components. Constructive and destructive interference may enhance or diminish the contribution of benthic flux components. It may not be possible to model benthic flux by summing component magnitudes. Geochemical tracer techniques may not accurately model benthic discharge flux or submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). A conceptual model provides a framework on which to quantitatively characterize benthic discharge flux and SGD with a multifaceted approach.

  20. Modeling The Water Table In The Middle Rio Grande River Riparian Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasheh, O. Z.; Neale, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Middle Rio Grande River (MRGR) is the main source of fresh water for the state of New Mexico. An arid area with low water resources created a situation where water is extensively diverted or stored to supply the high demand for municipalities and agricultural activities. The extensive water diversions over the last few decades has affected the composition of the native riparian vegetation such as cottonwood and coyote willow and enhanced the spread of invasive species harmful to the river system such as Tamarisk and Russian Olives. The river aquatic system has also been badly affected. The need to study the river hydrological processes and their relation with its health is important to preserve the river ecosystem. The water table within the riparian zone is intrinsically connected to the flows in the river. Large withdrawals of water by Tamarisk affect the surface flows, which coupled with the large diversions for irrigation result in a complicated river management problem. In this paper we describe the methodology used to spatially model the water table depth between the river and the adjacent drains parallel to the river. Water table readings are used to check the model. Evapotranspiration by the riparian vegetation is estimated and included in the soil moisture balance. The model runs as an application in ArcGIS. Spatial layers include soils and riparian vegetation maps obtained from the classification of airborne high resolution multispectral imagery.

  1. Significant cenozoic faulting, east margin of the Espanola basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, J.H. ); Riecker, R.E.

    1989-03-01

    Tectonic interpretation of the east margin of the Espanola Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico, has been controversial. Previous authors have disagreed as to whether significant faulting defines the boundary between the basin and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. A more recent geophysical basin transect that suggests no significant faulting and field observation of faceted spurs along the western Sangre de Cristo Mountain front indicating a faulted margin motivate our study. The east margin of the Espanola Basin for about 37 km north of Santa Fe, New Mexico, is marked by a complex array of significant, late Cenozoic high-angle faults. Locally, three parallel, north-trending, high-angle faults cut Precambrian basement and Tertiary basin-full rocks along the basin margin. Elsewhere along the margin, tilted fault blocks and intersecting faults occur. Fault area, fault attitude with depth, magnitude of fault motion, and timing of fault motion remain uncertain. However, faults studied in detail are 1-2 km long, have minimum dip-slip motion of 33-100 m, and underwent movement during the late Cenozoic. Potentially significant tectonic and seismic hazard implications arise from the possibility of post-150 ka fault motion.

  2. Exposure to insecticides of brushland wildlife within the lower Rio Grande valley Texas USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Mitchell, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Brushland wildlife within the Lower Rio Grande Valley of south Texas were studied following applications of eleven insecticides to nearby sugarcane or cotton fields. During the study no wildlife were found dead. Mean brain acetycholinesterase (AChE) activity of great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus) and mourning doves (Zenaida microura) was significantly lower than controls following application of some organophosphorus insecticides. Brain AChE activity varied significantly among chemicals, days after exposure and lactin rates. Mean brain AChE activity of white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) and three small mammals species was not significantly different than their respective control following application of the insecticides. Mean brain AChE activity of grackles was inhibited significantly more than white-winged doves after application of Bolstar, EPN-methyl parathion, and Azodrin and significantly more than that of mourning doves after applications of Bolstar and EPN-methyl parathion. Our data indicate that there were no adverse effects on most brushland wildlife. Exposure was probably dependent upon use of the agricultural fields as feeding or resting site and only grackles and mourning doves were regularly present in the fields.

  3. Exposure to insecticides of brushland wildlife within the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Mitchell, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Brushland wildlife within the Lower Rio Grande Valley of south Texas were studied following applications of eleven insecticides to nearby sugarcane or cotton fields. During the study no wildlife were found dead. Mean brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus) and mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) was significantly lower than controls following application of some organophosphorous insecticides. Brain AChE activity varied significantly among chemicals, days after exposure and application rates. Mean brain AChE activity of white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) and three small mammal species was not significantly different than their respective controls following application of insecticides. Mean brain AChE activity of grackles was inhibited significantly more than white-winged doves after application of Bolstar, EPN-methyl parathion, and Azodrin and significantly more than that of mourning doves after applications of Bolstar and EPN-methyl parathion. Our data indicate that there were no adverse effects on most brushland wildlife. Exposure was probably dependent upon use of the agricultural fields as feeding or resting sites and only grackles and mourning doves were regularly present in the fields.

  4. Serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys to experimental infections of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    The serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) was determined. Free-ranging turkeys were caught in southern Texas, shipped to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and housed in isolation facilities. Fourteen birds were exposed to MG, by intratracheal and intranasal inoculation. Eight birds received sterile broth only. Two wk prior to the end of the experiment, MG exposed turkeys were stressed by challenge with a serologically unrelated mycoplasma. Serum from all exposed birds reacted positively for MG antibody by the rapid plate agglutination (RPA) procedure within 2 mo postexposure (PE) and all but one remained positive for 14 mo PE. Less than one half of the exposed birds developed positive MG antibody titers detectable by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test within 2 mo PE, and by 10 mo PE, none had positive titers. Antibody was detected by the HI test in two of 11 infected turkeys, 14 mo PE, and titers increased significantly within 2 wk. MG was isolated from tracheal swabs from two infected birds 2 mo PE, but attempts thereafter failed. However, at the termination of the experiment 15 mo later, MG was isolated from lung tissue of three of 11 exposed turkeys and from a blood clot found in the lower trachea of one bird.

  5. Serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys to experimental infections of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Rocke, T E; Yuill, T M

    1988-10-01

    The serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) was determined. Free-ranging turkeys were caught in southern Texas, shipped to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and housed in isolation facilities. Fourteen birds were exposed to MG, by intratracheal and intranasal inoculation. Eight birds received sterile broth only. Two wk prior to the end of the experiment, MG exposed turkeys were stressed by challenge with a serologically unrelated mycoplasma. Serum from all exposed birds reacted positively for MG antibody by the rapid plate agglutination (RPA) procedure within 2 mo postexposure (PE) and all but one remained positive for 14 mo PE. Less than one half of the exposed birds developed positive MG antibody titers detectable by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test within 2 mo PE, and by 10 mo PE, none had positive titers. Antibody was detected by the HI test in two of 11 infected turkeys, 14 mo PE, and titers increased significantly within 2 wk. MG was isolated from tracheal swabs from two infected birds 2 mo PE, but attempts thereafter failed. However, at the termination of the experiment 15 mo later, MG was isolated from lung tissue of three of 11 exposed turkeys and from a blood clot found in the lower trachea of one bird.

  6. The western margin of the Rio Grande rift in northern New Mexico: An aborted boundary?

    SciTech Connect

    Baldridge, W.S. Ferguson, J.F.; Barile, L.W.; Wang, Bin

    1994-12-01

    The northwestern margin of the Espanola basin, part of the Rio Grande rift in northern New Mexico, is characterized by a zone >17 km wide of oblique-slip faults that off-set upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata of the eastern Colorado Plateau from Eocene and younger sedimentary rocks of the rift. Along this margin, a reasonably complete section of pre- and synrift Tertiary sediments is exposed. Combined interpretations of seismic reflection, seismic refraction, gravity, and geologic data acquired along a profile perpendicular to this boundary define the geometry of faulting, possible rotation of sedimentary units, and stratigraphy of rift fill. Vertical separation on the westernmost major fault, assumed to be the bounding fault between the rift and the Colorado Plateau, is <500 m; separation on other faults in the zone is <200 m. Thus the northwestern part of the Espanola basin ({open_quotes}Abiquiu embayment{close_quotes}) is a shallow platform rather than a deep rift basin. The embayment is separated from the main Espanola basin by the east-northeast-striking Embudo transfer fault, which appears to act as the northern bounding fault of the main basin. 42 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Access to treatment for phenylketonuria by judicial means in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Luciano Mangueira; Nalin, Tatiele; Tonon, Tassia; Veiga, Lauren Monteiro; Vargas, Paula; Krug, Bárbara Corrêa; Leivas, Paulo Gilberto Cogo; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa Doederlein

    2015-05-01

    Treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) includes the use of a metabolic formula which should be provided free of charge by the Unified Health System (SUS). This retrospective, observational study sought to characterize judicial channels to obtain PKU treatment in Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil. Lawsuits filed between 2001- 2010 and having as beneficiaries PKU patients requesting treatment for the disease were included. Of 20 lawsuits filed, corresponding to 16.8% of RS patients with PKU, 19 were retrieved for analysis. Of these, only two sought to obtain therapies other than metabolic formula. In all the other 17 cases, prior treatment requests had been granted by the State Department of Health. Defendants included the State (n = 19), the Union (n = 1), and municipalities (n = 4). In 18/19 cases, the courts ruled in favor of the plaintiffs. Violation of the right to health and discontinuation of State-provided treatment were the main reasons for judicial recourse. Unlike other genetic diseases, patients with PKU seek legal remedy to obtain a product already covered by the national pharmaceutical assistance policy, suggesting that management failures are a driving factor for judicialization in Brazil.

  8. Nutrient and organic carbon trends and patterns in the upper Rio Grande, 1975-1999.

    PubMed

    Passell, Howard D; Dahm, Clifford N; Bedrick, Edward J

    2005-06-01

    Nutrient patterns and trends were analyzed using USGS water quality data collected from 1975 to 1999 along the uppermost 600 km of the Rio Grande in Colorado and New Mexico. Data on discharge, pH, organic carbon (total), N-NH(4+)+organic N (total), NH4+ (dissolved), N-NO(2-)+N-NO3- (dissolved), phosphorus (total), and P-orthophosphate (dissolved) came from six USGS stations--Lobatos, Taos Junction, Otowi, San Felipe, Isleta and Bernardo--ranging from the Colorado-New Mexico border to about 80 km below Albuquerque, NM. Kendall's S and Seasonal Kendall's S' were used to measure trend, and ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test were used to analyze spatial differences between stations. Temporal trend analyses show widespread decreases in N and P concentrations at most stations, likely due to improvements in sewage treatment and dilution from increasing discharge. N-NO(2-)+N-NO3- (dissolved) and total nitrate load increases at Isleta and Bernardo, likely due to improved nitrification in sewage treatment and to increasing human population. Spatial analyses show large increases for most parameters at Isleta. All parameters show decreases again at Bernardo, about 50 km downstream from Isleta, except for N-NO(2-)+N-NO3- (dissolved), which continues to increase. Urbanization in the Albuquerque area significantly impacts downstream river nutrient levels.

  9. Anticholinesterase exposure of white-winged doves breeding in lower Rio Grande valley, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tacha, T.C.; Schacht, S.J.; George, R.R.; Hill, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    We studied exposure of breeding white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) to anticholinesterase compounds (organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides) in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), Texas. Widespread use of organophosphorus pesticides and dove population declines prompted the study. We collected breeding adult doves in May and July 1991 (n = 28) and July 1992 (n = 33) at 6 locations. We used depression of whole-brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity (2 SD below control mean) to detect exposure; values from 4 hand-reared doves fed commercial pigeon chow served as the control. Mean brain ChE activity was lower (P lt 0.027) than the control sample at all 6 locations in 1991; 79% of the birds were diagnostic of exposure ( gt 16.1% ChE depression). Pooled 1992 field samples also were lower (P lt 0.036) than were control samples; doves from 4 of the 6 locations had brain ChE activity below (P lt 0.088) controls. Overall, 39% of 1992 doves were diagnostic of exposure to anticholinesterase compounds. Higher exposure rates in 1991 were probably due to increased use of organophosphorus pesticides. Research is needed documenting effects of sublethal exposure on white-winged dove productivity.

  10. Synthesis of benthic flux components in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    The primary objective of this work is to synthesize components of benthic flux in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Specifically, the component of benthic discharge flux forced by the terrestrial hydraulic gradient is 0.8 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux associated with the groundwater tidal prism are both 2.1 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity wave setup are both 6.3 m3 d-1; the component of benthic discharge flux that transports radium-228 is 350 m3 d-1; and components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity waves propagating over a porous medium are both 1400 m3 d-1. (All models are normalized per meter shoreline.) Benthic flux is a function of components forced by individual mechanisms and nonlinear interactions that exist between components. Constructive and destructive interference may enhance or diminish the contribution of benthic flux components. It may not be possible to model benthic flux by summing component magnitudes. Geochemical tracer techniques may not accurately model benthic discharge flux or submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). A conceptual model provides a framework on which to quantitatively characterize benthic discharge flux and SGD with a multifaceted approach.

  11. Irrigated rice area estimation using remote sensing techniques: Project's proposal and preliminary results. [Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Deassuncao, G. V.; Moreira, M. A.; Novaes, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a methodology for annual estimates of irrigated rice crop in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, using remote sensing techniques is proposed. The project involves interpretation, digital analysis, and sampling techniques of LANDSAT imagery. Results are discussed from a preliminary phase for identifying and evaluating irrigated rice crop areas in four counties of the State, for the crop year 1982/1983. This first phase involved just visual interpretation techniques of MSS/LANDSAT images.

  12. An application of cluster analysis for determining homogeneous subregions: The agroclimatological point of view. [Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Cappelletti, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A stratification oriented to crop area and yield estimation problems was performed using an algorithm of clustering. The variables used were a set of agroclimatological characteristics measured in each one of the 232 municipalities of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A nonhierarchical cluster analysis was used and the pseudo F-statistics criterion was implemented for determining the "cut point" in the number of strata.

  13. Llano Grande Center's Oral History Project Sparks Cultural and Economic Renewal in Texas's Rio Grande Valley. Rural Trust Featured Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Elizabeth Higgins

    The Llano Grande Center for Research and Development started as an oral history experiment in two of Texas's poorest school districts. Since the 1920s, when this arid region in the southernmost tip of Texas was first transformed into the orchards and farmlands of the "Magic Valley," workers of Mexican descent have worked the land. Over time,…

  14. Assessment of organochlorine pesticide levels in Manadas Creek, an urban tributary of the Rio Grande in Laredo, Texas.

    PubMed

    Flores, Brianna; Camarena, Celina; Ren, Jianhong; Krishnamurthy, Sushma; Belzer, Wayne

    2009-07-01

    The Rio Grande is the natural boundary between the United States and Mexico from El Paso, Texas, to Brownsville, Texas. It supports about 12 million people on both sides of the border for municipal, agricultural, industrial, and recreational uses. The rapid population and economic growth along the border region has led to increased pollution in the Rio Grande, which has been linked to several border health issues associated with pesticide contamination. This project was initiated to assess the organochlorine pesticide levels in the water and sediments in Manadas Creek, an urban tributary of the Rio Grande located in north Laredo, Texas. Water and sediment samples were collected monthly during a 6-month period from July to December of 2006 and analyzed using gas chromatography with an electron capture detector after extraction via a solid-phase microextraction technique. Among the water and sediment samples collected, several organochlorine pesticides including alpha-, beta-, and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor epoxide, endrin, and 4,4'-DDT were found in either the creek water or sediments. Analysis of variance results indicated that only gamma-HCH had significant variation in the creek water among the sampling periods. Comparison of results with previous findings showed the presence of higher levels of HCH isomers and much lower DDT concentrations in the present study.

  15. Electromagnetic surveys to detect clay-rich sediment in the Rio Grande inner valley, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Sterling, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the presence of clay-rich layers in the inner-valley alluvium is essential for quantifying the amount of water transmitted between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. This report describes a study that used electromagnetic surveys to provide this information. In the first phase of the study, electromagnetic soundings were made using time-domain and frequency-domain electro- magnetic methods. On the basis of these initial results, the time- domain method was judged ineffective because of cultural noise in the study area, so subsequent surveys were made using the frequency-domain method. For the second phase of the study, 31 frequency-domain electromagnetic surveys were conducted along the inner valley and parallel to the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area in the spring and summer of 1997 to determine the presence of hydrologically significant clay-rich layers buried in the inner-valley alluvium. For this report, the 31 survey sections were combined into 10 composite sections for ease of interpretation. Terrain-conductivity data from the surveys were modeled using interpretation software to produce geoelectric cross sections along the survey lines. This modeling used lithologic logs from two wells installed near the survey lines: the Bosque South and Rio Bravo 5 wells. Because of cultural interference, location of the wells and soundings, complex stratigraphy, and difficulty interpreting lithology, such interpretation was inconclusive. Instead, a decision process based on modeling results was developed using vertical and horizontal dipole 40-meter intercoil spacing terrain-conductivity values. Values larger than or equal to 20 millisiemens per meter were interpreted to contain a hydrologically significant thickness of clay-rich sediment. Thus, clay-rich sediment was interpreted to underlie seven segments of the 10 composited survey lines, totaling at least 2,660 meters of the Rio Grande inner valley. The longest of these clay

  16. The occurrence and distribution of selected trace elements in the upper Rio Grande and tributaries in Colorado and Northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, H.E.; Antweiler, R.C.; Roth, D.A.; Brinton, T.I.; Peart, D.B.; Healy, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    Two sampling trips were undertaken in 1994 to determine the distribution of trace elements in the Upper Rio Grande and several of its tributaries. Water discharges decreased in the main stem of the Rio Grande from June to September, whereas dissolved concentrations of trace elements generally increased. This is attributed to dilution of base flow from snowmelt runoff in the June samples. Of the three major mining districts (Creede, Summitville, and Red River) in the Upper Rio Grande drainage basin, only the Creede District appears to impact the Rio Grande in a significant manner, with both waters and sediments having elevated concentrations of some trace elements considerably downriver. For example, dissolved zinc concentrations upriver of Willow Creek, which primarily drains the Creede District, were about 2-3 ??g/L; immediately downstream of the Willow Creek confluence, concentrations were above 20 ??g/L; and elevated concentrations occurred in the Rio Grande for the next 100 km. The Red River District does not significantly impact the Upper Rio Grande for most trace elements. Because of current water management practices, it is difficult to assess the impact of the Summitville District on the Upper Rio Grande. There are, however, large increases in many dissolved trace element concentrations as the Rio Grande passes through the San Luis Valley, coincident with elevated concentrations of those same trace elements in tributaries. Among these elements are As, B, Cr, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sr, U, and V. None of the trace elements exceeded U.S. EPA primary drinking water standards in either survey, with the exception of cadmium in Willow Creek. Secondary drinking water standards were frequently violated, especially in tributaries draining areas where mining has occurred. Dissolved zinc (in Willow Creek in both June and September) was the only element that exceeded the EPA Water Quality Criteria for aquatic life of 120 ??g/L.

  17. The occurrence and distribution of selected trace elements in the Upper Rio Grande and tributaries in Colorado and northern New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H E; Antweiler, R C; Roth, D A; Brinton, T I; Peart, D B; Healy, D F

    2001-11-01

    Two sampling trips were undertaken in 1994 to determine the distribution of trace elements in the Upper Rio Grande and several of its tributaries. Water discharges decreased in the main stem of the Rio Grande from June to September, whereas dissolved concentrations of trace elements generally increased. This is attributed to dilution of base flow from snowmelt runoff in the June samples. Of the three major mining districts (Creede, Summitville, and Red River) in the Upper Rio Grande drainage basin, only the Creede District appears to impact the Rio Grande in a significant manner, with both waters and sediments having elevated concentrations of some trace elements considerably downriver. For example, dissolved zinc concentrations upriver of Willow Creek, which primarily drains the Creede District, were about 2-3 microg/L; immediately downstream of the Willow Creek confluence, concentrations were above 20 microg/L; and elevated concentrations occurred in the Rio Grande for the next 100 km. The Red River District does not significantly impact the Upper Rio Grande for most trace elements. Because of current water management practices, it is difficult to assess the impact of the Summitville District on the Upper Rio Grande. There are, however, large increases in many dissolved trace element concentrations as the Rio Grande passes through the San Luis Valley, coincident with elevated concentrations of those same trace elements in tributaries. Among these elements are As, B, Cr, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sr, U, and V. None of the trace elements exceeded U.S. EPA primary drinking water standards in either survey, with the exception of cadmium in Willow Creek. Secondary drinking water standards were frequently violated, especially in tributaries draining areas where mining has occurred. Dissolved zinc (in Willow Creek in both June and September) was the only element that exceeded the EPA Water Quality Criteria for aquatic life of 120 microg/L.

  18. On Ensino de Astronomia nas Cidades de Ribeirão Pires e Rio Grande da Serra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, R. Z.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2007-08-01

    Apesar da astronomia ser um dos temas indicados pelos Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais, observa-se que poucas mudanças ocorreram desde a implementação do mesmo em sala de aula. A presente pesquisa diz respeito sobre como os tópicos de astronomia estão sendo abordados pelos professores no ensino médio. Optou-se por aplicar um questionário com os professores que ministram a disciplina de física. Os mesmos trabalham em escolas estaduais situadas nas cidades de Ribeirão Pires e Rio Grande da Serra, ambas subordinadas a Diretoria de Ensino de Mauá, no Estado de São Paulo. O questionário foi aplicado durante o 2° semestre de 2006. Até o momento os resultados são preliminares. Dos 82,0% dos professores que responderam ao questionário no município de Rio Grande da Serra, 66,7% não aplicaram nenhum tópico de astronomia, 77,8% não utilizaram qualquer tipo de programa computacional, 66,7% não utilizaram laboratório, que 77,8% nunca levaram os alunos a museus e ou planetários e que 66,7% não indicaram qualquer tipo de revista ou livro sobre astronomia aos seus alunos. No município de Ribeirão Pires, 53,3% dos professores responderam ao questionário, destes 75,0% não aplicaram nenhum tópico de astronomia, 93,8% não utilizaram qualquer tipo de programa computacional, 75,0% não utilizaram laboratório, 81,3% nunca levaram os alunos a museus e ou planetário e 56,3% não indicaram qualquer tipo de revista ou livro sobre astronomia ao seus alunos. Apesar da maioria dos professores reconhecerem que o conteúdo de astronomia influi na formação do jovem, os mesmos não incluem o tema em seus planejamentos escolares.

  19. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas; fish communities at selected sites, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Fish communities at 10 sites in the Rio Grande Basin were sampled during low-flow periods between 1993 and 1995 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The ecology of fish communities is one of several lines of evidence used to characterize water-quality conditions. This report describes the fish communities at selected sites in the Rio Grande Basin and relates the structure of these fish communities to the physical and chemical characteristics of the streams. Twenty-nine species of fish representing 10 families were identified in 25 samples collected during this study. Species richness ranged from 1 to 13. Cluster analysis of the 25 samples collected during this study delineated four groups of sites that were based on the similarity of the fish communities. The first two groups were individual sites with low species richness. The third group contained the most samples, and the fourth group consisted of samples from the Rio Grande at Isleta, New Mexico, and the Rio Grande at El Paso, Texas. The shift in community structure of samples from group 3 to group 4 reflects changes from predominantly coldwater fishes to warmwater fishes. Four metrics of biotic integrity (percentages of introduced individuals, omnivores, tolerant individuals, and anomalies) were used in this study to provide a broad overview of the community structure. The relative percentages of introduced species at the Rio Grande near Del Norte, Colorado; Saguache Creek near Saguache, Colorado; Rio Grande below Taos Junction Bridge, near Taos, New Mexico; and Rio Grande at Isleta are indicative of biological stress on the communities at these sites. The dominance of omnivores in samples from the Rio Grande below Taos Junction Bridge, near Taos; Rio Chama near Chamita, New Mexico; Rio Grande at Isleta; and Rio Grande at El Paso is an indication of environmental stress at these sites. In 1995, tolerant species accounted for the entire fish community at the Rio

  20. Configuration and Correlation of Fluvial Terrace Deposits In the Lower Rio Salado Valley: A Record of Magmatic Uplift and Active Normal Faulting in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, B. D.; Axen, G. J.; Phillips, F. M.; Harrison, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Salado is a western tributary of the Rio Grande whose valley is flanked by six major terrace levels. The Rio crosses several active rift-related normal faults and the active, mid-crustal Socorro Magma Body (SMB; a sill at 19 km depth that is actively doming the land surface), providing an unusual opportunity to explore the effects of deep magma emplacement and active faulting on the terraces. Rio Salado terraces were mapped using a high-resolution DEM and digital color stereophotographs and were projected onto a valley-parallel vertical plane to construct longitudinal profiles. Three new soil pits were described to aid terrace correlation. A net incision rate of 0.41 ± 0.06 m/ka was inferred from the correlation of a major fill-cut terrace to the 122 ± 18 ka Airport surface ~25 km south of the Rio Salado. This incision rate is >1.5 times more rapid than estimated rates nearby or in other parts of New Mexico, but yields age estimates for other terraces that are consistent with soil development. Terrace gradients in the Rio Salado have increased through time, indicating either stream response to Rio Grande incision or footwall tilting from the Quaternary Loma Blanca fault (LBF). Two terraces in the LBF hanging wall are back-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts, suggesting a listric geometry for the LBF. However, two others (Qtf and Qtc) are east-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts. Both Qtf and Qtc merge eastward with the next youngest terrace in the flight, and Qtc is arched, consistent with an earlier episode of surface uplift above the SMB. Future work will involve (a) additional terrace mapping over the SMB, (b) cosmogenic 36Cl depth profile dating of the Rio Salado terraces to determine incision rates, allow regional terrace correlations, and constrain fault-slip slip rates and the record of SMB-related surface uplift, and (c) numerical modeling of SMB inflation constrained by uplift signals.

  1. Hydrogeological characterization of a bank filtration experiment site at the Rio Grande, El Paso, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, R.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Pillai, S.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Widmer, K.

    2003-04-01

    An experiment site was constructed along an artificial channel of the Rio Grande in El Paso, Texas. The experiment was funded by the EPA and is designed to measure the effectiveness of bank filtration in an arid environment. Regionally, the experiment is important because of the hundreds of thousands of people drinking water from shallow wells drilled in close proximity to septic systems. A pumping well was drilled 17 meters from the stream bank and screened from 3.5 to 8 m depth. A cruciform array of observation wells with several multilevel completions allows detection of downstream and vertical movement of water as well as flow from the stream to the well. All of the wells were continuously cored during drilling. Analysis of the cores reveals that the site consists of two stacked channels filled with sand deposited from the meandering Rio Grande. A grid of ground-penetrating radar lines provided three-dimensional coverage between wells and showed bedding to 6.5 m depth. Constant head hydraulic conductivities show that the aquifer consists of two more permeable units separated by the less permeable upper fill of the lower channel complex, with vertical hydraulic conductivities of (1x10-6 to 2x10-6 m/s?). The intervals above and below this interval have the highest vertical conductivities (up to 3.5x10-5 m/s). A multiple pumping and tracer test was conducted using the cruciform array of the field site that consisted of a pumping well, 16 observation wells, and a stream sampling point. The average hydraulic conductivity of the geological media at the field site was about 2 x 10-3 m/s based on pumping test analysis. However, the type curve responses revealed significant heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity throughout the field site. For the tracer test, bromide and microspheres were used as tracers. Microspheres were used to mimic the behavior of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. The tracers (bromide and microspheres of different sizes and colors) were injected in one

  2. Prevalence and Correlates of Physical Inactivity among Older Adults in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Adelle M. R.; Fillenbaum, Gerda G.; Blay, Sergio L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current information on the epidemiology of physical inactivity among older adults is lacking, making it difficult to target the inactive and to plan for interventions to ameliorate adverse effects. Objectives To present statewide representative findings on the prevalence of physical inactivity among older community residents, its correlates and associated health service use. Methods A representative non-institutionalized random sample of 6963 individuals in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, aged ≥60 years, was interviewed face-to-face. Information was obtained on demographic characteristics, social resources, health conditions and behaviors, health service use, and physical inactivity. Controlled logistic regression was used to determine the association of physical inactivity with these characteristics. Results Overall, 62% reported no regular physical activity. Physical inactivity was significantly more prevalent among women, older persons, those with lower education and income, Afro-Brazilians (73%; White: 61%; “other”: 64%), those no longer married, and was associated with multiple individual health conditions and impaired activities of daily living (ADL). In adjusted analyses, associations remained for sociodemographic characteristics, social participation, impaired self-rated health, ADL, vision, and depression (odds ratios (OR) 1.2–1.7). Physically inactive respondents were less likely to report outpatient visits (OR 0.81), but more likely to be hospitalized (OR 1.41). Conclusions Physical inactivity is highly prevalent, particularly among Afro -Brazilians. It is associated with adverse sociodemographic characteristics; lack of social interaction; and poor self-rated health, ADL, vision, and depression; although not with other health conditions. Self-care may be neglected, resulting in hospitalization. PMID:25700161

  3. Using Precision Gravity Survey To Locate Faults Within The Southern Mesilla Bolson, Rio Grande Rift.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, S.; Doser, D.; Imana, E.

    2003-12-01

    The southern Mesilla bolson of west Texas and southern New Mexico is a rapidly growing portion of the El Paso-Juarez metropolitan area. Faulting within the bolson is difficult to trace due to intensive urban and agricultural activities. Prior to channelization of the Rio Grande in the 1930's the river also frequently altered its course, rapidly depositing or eroding sediment within the bolson, also making the tracing of faults or offset surfaces difficult. We have used the precision gravity technique (digital precision gravity meter, station spacing of 60 m or less, elevation known to 30 cm or less) as an inexpensive method to map possible locations of faults within the bolson. We analyze the gravity data using 3-D modeling techniques that can account for known geology and topography, which are then subtracted from the observed gravity data. The residual gravity map is then examined for sharp gradients and bends in gravity contours that may indicate the presence of faults. Once suspected faults are identified we have conducted follow-up geophysical surveys (DC resistivity sounding, spectral analysis of surface waves) over the structures to determine if grain size or sediment compaction changes (often indicative of faults) are associated with the gravity anomalies. Water well logs have also aided in our interpretations. Our results suggest there are at least 3 faults within the bolson that parallel the range bounding fault that separates the eastern bolson from the western edge of the Franklin Mountains. If these faults are currently seismogenic, they represent a significant hazard to the urban areas located on the thick (1500 m), water saturated sediments of the bolson. We feel the precision gravity technique could serve as a useful reconnaissance tool to help identify faults in other regions where urbanization or other factors limit surface exposure of recent geologic processes.

  4. Creating a standardized watersheds database for the Lower Rio Grande/Río Bravo, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Ulery, Randy L.; Parcher, Jean W.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the creation of a large-scale watershed database for the lower Rio Grande/Río Bravo Basin in Texas. The watershed database includes watersheds delineated to all 1:24,000-scale mapped stream confluences and other hydrologically significant points, selected watershed characteristics, and hydrologic derivative datasets.Computer technology allows generation of preliminary watershed boundaries in a fraction of the time needed for manual methods. This automated process reduces development time and results in quality improvements in watershed boundaries and characteristics. These data can then be compiled in a permanent database, eliminating the time-consuming step of data creation at the beginning of a project and providing a stable base dataset that can give users greater confidence when further subdividing watersheds.A standardized dataset of watershed characteristics is a valuable contribution to the understanding and management of natural resources. Vertical integration of the input datasets used to automatically generate watershed boundaries is crucial to the success of such an effort. The optimum situation would be to use the digital orthophoto quadrangles as the source of all the input datasets. While the hydrographic data from the digital line graphs can be revised to match the digital orthophoto quadrangles, hypsography data cannot be revised to match the digital orthophoto quadrangles. Revised hydrography from the digital orthophoto quadrangle should be used to create an updated digital elevation model that incorporates the stream channels as revised from the digital orthophoto quadrangle. Computer-generated, standardized watersheds that are vertically integrated with existing digital line graph hydrographic data will continue to be difficult to create until revisions can be made to existing source datasets. Until such time, manual editing will be necessary to make adjustments for man-made features and changes in the natural landscape

  5. Gravity and Seismic Investigations of the Santo Domingo Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Boucher, C.; Novitsky, C. G.; O'Shea, P. M.; Daves, J.; Marzen, R.; Mendoza, K.; Rasmussen, T.; Wei, W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Biehler, S.; Claytor, J. M.; Bischoff, S. H.; Ranasinghe, N. R.; Corredor, A.

    2014-12-01

    The SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) program collected new gravity, seismic, electromagnetic and down-hole temperature data in 2014 in the Santo Domingo Basin and adjacent areas of the Rio Grande Rift (RGR) area of northern New Mexico. The SAGE 2014 data collection was part of an integrated geophysical study of the area initiated in 2010 and adds data and interpretations to a W to E transect of the RGR. The transect includes previous SAGE seismic refraction and CMP reflection profiles recorded in 2010 and 2011, some industry seismic reflection data, and detailed gravity observations. Seismic data consisted of a 4.8 km NW to SE profile (120 three-component stations in four overlapping deployments, 20 m station spacing, using a Vibroseis source - 20 m spacing for reflection VPs; 800 m spacing for refraction VPs) along the Borrego Canyon road with both refraction and CMP reflection coverage. About 50,000 seismograms were recorded. The surface conditions (dry unconsolidated sediments) increased surface wave energy and limited the signal-to-noise level of reflection arrivals although some wide-angle reflections with two-way times as great as 1.8 s were visible. The refraction data were modeled with first arrival travel time methods and mainly helped identify the velocity and minimum thickness of the Tertiary Santa Fe group sedimentary rocks in the Santo Domingo Basin. Interpretation of the seismic and gravity data along the transect was aided by refraction velocities, the existence of a nearby regional seismic reflection profile from industry, and lithologies and well-logs from a deep well. Gravity modeling, with significant control on depths of interfaces and densities from the seismic and drill hole data, indicates that the Santo Domingo sedimentary basin has a total depth of about 6 km.

  6. Characterization of stormwater discharges from Las Flores Industrial Park, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico, 1998-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Jose M.

    2000-01-01

    Stormwater discharges from Las Flores Industrial Park, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico, were characterized from June 1998 to July 1999 by measuring the flow rate at two outfalls, delineating the drainage areas for each outfall, and calculating the volume of the stormwater discharges. Stormwater-discharge samples were collected and analyzed to determine the quality of the discharges. Constituent loads and loads per area were estimated for each drainage area. The studied drainage subareas covered approximately 46 percent of the total area of the Las Flores Industrial Park. Industrial groups represented in the study areas include manufacturers of textile, electronics, paper, fabricated metal, plastic, and chemical products. The concentrations of oil and grease (1 to 6 milligrams per liter), biochemical oxygen demand (4.7 to 16 milligrams per liter), total organic carbon (5.8 to 36 milligrams per liter), total suspended solids (28 to 100 milligrams per liter), and total phosphorous (0.11 to 0.78 milligrams per liter) from all the samples collected were less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency stormwater benchmark concentrations. Concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (15.8 to 157 milligrams per liter) and nitrate and nitrite (0.06 to 1.75 milligrams per liter) exceeded benchmark concentrations at one of the studied drainage areas. Total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations (1.00 to 3.20 milligrams per liter) exceeded the benchmark concentrations at the two studied drainage areas. Maximum concentrations for oil and grease, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, and total phosphorous were detected in an area where electronics, plastics, and chemical products are currently manufactured. The maximum concentration of total suspended solids was detected at an area where textile, paper, plastic, chemical, and fabricated metal products are manufactured.

  7. River management impacts on riparian forest vegetation along the Middle Rio Grande: 1935-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrakis, Roy E.

    Riparian ecosystems of the southwestern United States are highly valuable to both the ecological and human communities which surround them. Over the past century, they have been subject to shifting management practices to maximize human use, control, ecosystem service, and conservation. This creates a complex relationship between water policy, management, and the natural ecosystem necessitating research on spatial and temporal dynamics of riparian vegetation. The San Acacia Reach of the Middle Rio Grande, a 60 mile stretch from the San Acacia Diversion Dam to San Marcial, has experienced multiple management and river flow fluctuations over the past 80 years, resulting in threats to riparian and aquatic ecosystems. This research was completed through the use and analysis of multi-source remote sensing data, GIS, and a review of the on-the-ground management decisions to better understand how the location and composition of the riparian vegetation has been affected by these shifting practices. This research focused on four phases, each highlighting different management practices and river flow patterns during the last 80-years. Each of these periods provides a unique opportunity to observe a direct relationship between river management and riparian land cover response and change. Overall, management practices reduced surface river flows and limited overbank flooding and resulted in changes in the composition, density, and spatial patterns of the vegetation, including increased non-native vegetation growth. Restoration efforts over the past few decades have begun to reduce the presence of non-native species. Despite these changes, this ecosystem was shown to be extremely resilient in maintaining its function/service throughout the entire study time frame.

  8. Oligocene basaltic volcanism of the Northern Rio Grande Rift: San Luis Hills, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ren A.; Johnson, Clark M.; Mehnert, Harald H.

    1991-07-01

    The inception of the Rio Grande rift in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado was accompanied by voluminous mafic volcanism preserved in part as erosional remnants on an intrarift horst within the current axial rift graben of the San Luis Valley. Oligocene (˜26 Ma) volcanic rocks of the Hinsdale Formation at San Luis Hills range from 49 to 57 wt % SiO2 and include nepheline and hypersthene normative lavas. A mildly alkalic series consisting of trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite, and trachyandesite is volumetrically dominant, olivine tholeiites are subordinate, and xenocrystic trachyandesites containing abundant quartz and plagioclase xenocrysts occur only locally. Relative to the San Luis Hills olivine tholeiites which have La/Smn ˜ 2, the more alkaline series are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREE) and have La/Sm ratios that increase in the trachybasalt-basaltic trachyandesite suite (La/Smn ˜ 3) to xenocrystic trachyandesites that are the most LREE enriched (La/Smn ˜ 4). Chondrite-normalized, trace element patterns for the lavas in the San Luis Hills are similar in shape within the mildly alkaline to transitional series; they have characteristic Nb and Ta depletions and high K and Th relative to Ta, Nb, and LREE. Major and trace element constraints support a petrogenetic model of fractionation plus lower crustal assimilation for petrologic suites within the San Luis Hills rocks, although the model cannot relate lavas for the entire series to a common parent. Most mafic lavas of the San Luis Hills were evolved (Mg # <60) and contaminated by LREE-enriched silicic partial melts of granulitic lower crust depleted in Rb, Th, and U. Pb isotopes are the most sensitive indicators of crustal contamination, whereas shifts in Nd and Sr isotope ratios are associated with large amounts of assimilation. However, relatively noncontaminated lavas can be identified and indicate at least two mantle source regions were involved.

  9. Seismic Investigations of an Accommodation zone in the Northern Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, W. S.; Valdes, J.; Nedorub, O.; Phrampus, B.; Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Benage, M. C.; Litherland, M.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in the Rio Grande rift near Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 2009 and 2010 by the SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) program imaged the La Bajada fault (LBF) and strata offset across the associated, perpendicular Budagher fault (BF). The LBF is a major basin-bounding normal fault, offset down to the west; the smaller BF is an extensional fault that breaks the hanging wall ramp of the LBF. We chose this area because it is in a structurally complex region of the rift, comprising a small sub-basin and plunging relay ramps, where north-trending, en echelon basin-bounding faults (including the LBF) transfer crustal extension laterally between the larger Española (to north) and Albuquerque rift basins. Our data help determine the precise location and geometry of the poorly exposed LBF, which, near the survey location, offsets the rift margin vertically about 3,000 m. When integrated with industry reflection data and other SAGE seismic, gravity, and magnetotelluric surveys, we are able to map differences in offset and extension laterally (especially southward) along the fault. We interpret only about 200 m of normal offset across the BF. Our continuing work helps define multiple structural elements, partly buried by syn-rift basin-filling sedimentary rocks, of a complex intra-rift accommodation zone. We are also able to discriminate pre-Eocene (Laramide) from post-Miocene (rift) structures. Our data help determine the amount of vertical offset of pre-rift strata across structural elements of the accommodation zone, and depth and geometry of basin fill. A goal is to infer the kinematic development of this margin of the rift, linkages among faults, growth history, and possible pre-rift structural controls. This information will be potentially useful for evaluation of resources, including oil and/or gas in pre-rift strata and ground water in Late Miocene to Holocene rift-filling units.

  10. A Regional Geothermal Assessment of the Rio Grande Rift: All Data Are Not Created Equal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, D. S.; D'Alfonso, D.; Hardwick, C.; Hollingshaus, B.; Kordy, M. A.; Shurtleff, R.; Smith, K.; Smith, S.

    2011-12-01

    In response to growing interest in geothermal energy, the University of Utah enrolled 22 geoscience and engineering students in a fall semester 2010 course "Geothermal Systems for Geoscientists." Seven of those students continued in a spring semester seminar, sponsored by NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), to create a case study on the geothermal potential of the Rio Grande Rift. The assessment, grounded in informatics, began with a complete inventory of all printed and web resources for the region. ArcMAP was used to create a suitable base map and, through extensive data mining, to spatially correlate relevant demographic, infrastructure, and geothermal datasets. Of the more than 40 spatial data overlays available, we determined the following data to be most useful in making a geothermal assessment: (1) heat flow measurements, (2) geochemistry of spring and well waters, (3) geologic mapping focused on young volcanics and intrusives, and (4) regional and local hydrology. Infrastructure (power plant, power line, population centers, and highway locations) became important only after the geothermal resource was identified. We identified four potential geothermal reservoir sites, two of which were chosen for detailed reservoir quantification and geothermal development plans. Thermal energy in each reservoir was calculated and compared to results computed with the software package GEOFRAT. The Mt. Princeton site is considered as an example of a high temperature reservoir suitable for binary plant power generation. The power potential for a 30-year use is estimated to be 8.5 MWelectric. The second system is more appropriate for direct heat application. Land-use regulations limit access for geothermal development of the Valles Caldera system to an extensive low temperature reservoir in Jemez Springs estimated at 1.1 GWthermal. In developing geothermal case studies, this student driven project has demonstrated the importance of both (a) using geothermal science

  11. Galling arthropod diversity in adjacent swamp forests and restinga vegetation in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Milton De S; Piccardi, Hosana M F; Jahnke, Simone M; Dalbem, Ricardo V

    2010-01-01

    Galling arthropods create plant structures inside which they find shelter. Factors acting on galler diversity are still being discussed, with this fauna considered more diverse in xeric than mesic environments (higrothermic stress hypothesis, HSH), and also in more plant diverse sites. Here we compare galler abundance (N), equitability (E), species richness (S) and composition between adjacent restinga (xeric) and swamp forests (mesic) in Parque Estadual de Itapeva (29°21' S, 49°45' W), Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Five trails, two in swamp forest and three in restingas, were sampled four times each (January/December 2005). After an effort of 60h/person, 621 galled plant individuals belonging to 104 gall morphotypes were recorded. This suggests a high galler diversity for the Park, comparable to the richest places known. No differences were found for N, E or S between restingas and swamp forests. However, faunal composition differs significantly between the vegetation types. The dominant (most abundant) species are different in either vegetation type, and are rare or absent on the other vegetation type. Such species composition analysis is still largely ignored for gallers, and stresses the fact that the HSH cannot explain this pattern, since the latter is based on preferences by the ovipositing galler for xeric sites instead of mesic ones. The two habitats differ in microclimate, but species richness, as would be predicted by the HSH, does not differ. This small scale pattern can perhaps be attributed to biogeographic processes on larger scales, as suggested by the resource synchronisation hypothesis.

  12. The role of feedback mechanisms in historic channel changes of the lower Rio Grande in the Big Bend region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David J.; Schmidt, John C.

    2011-03-01

    Over the last century, large-scale water development of the upper Rio Grande in the U.S. and Mexico, and of the Rio Conchos in Mexico, has resulted in progressive channel narrowing of the lower Rio Grande in the Big Bend region. We used methods operating at multiple spatial and temporal scales to analyze the rate, magnitude, and processes responsible for channel narrowing. These methods included: hydrologic analysis of historic stream gage data, analysis of notes of measured discharges, historic oblique and aerial photograph analysis, and stratigraphic and dendrogeomorphic analysis of inset floodplain deposits. Our analyses indicate that frequent large floods between 1900 and the mid-1940s acted as a negative feedback mechanism and maintained a wide, sandy, multi-threaded river. Declines in mean and peak flow in the mid-1940s resulted in progressive channel narrowing. Channel narrowing has been temporarily interrupted by occasional large floods that widened the channel, however, channel narrowing has always resumed. After large floods in 1990 and 1991, the active channel width of the lower Rio Grande has narrowed by 36-52%. Narrowing has occurred by the vertical accretion of fine-grained deposits on top of sand and gravel bars, inset within natural levees. Channel narrowing by vertical accretion occurred simultaneously with a rapid invasion of non-native riparian vegetation ( Tamarix spp., Arundo donax) which created a positive feedback and exacerbated the processes of channel narrowing and vertical accretion. In two floodplain trenches, we measured 2.75 and 3.5 m of vertical accretion between 1993 and 2008. In some localities, nearly 90% of bare, active channel bars were converted to vegetated floodplain during the same period. Upward shifts of stage-discharge relations occurred resulting in over-bank flooding at lower discharges, and continued vertical accretion despite a progressive reduction in stream flow. Thus, although the magnitude of the average annual

  13. Seasonal changes in 17-ß estradiol of the Rio Grande Chub (Gila pandora) in south-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Colleen A.; Fuller, S. Adam; Gould, William R.; Turner, Paul R.; Hallford, Dennis M.

    2004-01-01

    Timing of gametogensis and thus spawning can be inferred through changes in plasma concentrations of gonadal hormones. In preparation for ovulation and spawning, mean concentrations of 17ß-estradiol in a population of Rio Grande chub (Gila pandora) occupying the Rio Bonito, New Mexico, peaked at 37.6 ng/mL on 16 June and declined to 1.50 ng/mL by 11 August. Similarly, the gonadal somatic index (GSI) increased from 9.02 on 21 May (n = 9) to 11.85 on 16 June (n = 2) and declined to 6.10 on 11 August (n = 2). Peak concentrations of 17ß-estradiol and elevated GSI in June coincided with peak daylength for the year (14 h and 12 min) and average water temperature of 15.1°C. Concentrations of 17ß-estradiol remained low through 3 October indicating no additional spawning events in the Rio Grande chub population. We demonstrated 17ß-estradiol is a nondestructive and thus useful tool in estimating timing of spawning in a wild fish population.

  14. Tracing Anthropogenic Salinity Inputs to the Semi-arid Rio Grande River: A Multi-isotope Tracer (U, S, B and Sr) Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, S.; Nyachoti, S. K.; Ma, L.; Szynkiewicz, A.; McIntosh, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    High salinity in the Rio Grande has led to severe reductions in crop productivity and accumulation of salts in soils. These pressing issues exist for other arid rivers worldwide. Salinity contributions to the Rio Grande have not been adequately quantified, especially from agriculture, urban activities, and geological sources. Here, we use major element concentrations and U, S, B, Sr isotopic signatures to fingerprint the salinity sources. Our study area focuses on a 200 km long stretch of the Rio Grande from Elephant Butte Reservoir, NM to El Paso, TX. River samples were collected monthly from 2014 to 2015. Irrigation drains, groundwater wells, city drains and wastewater effluents were sampled as possible anthropogenic salinity end-members. Major element chemistry, U, S and Sr isotope ratios in the Rio Grande waters suggest multiple salinity inputs from geological, agricultural, and urban sources. Natural upwelling of groundwater is significant for the Rio Grande near Elephant Butte, as suggested by high TDS values and high (234U/238U), 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S ratios. Agricultural activities (e.g. flood irrigation, groundwater pumping, fertilizer use) are extensive in the Mesilla Valley. Rio Grande waters from this region have characteristic lower (234U/238U), 87Sr/86Sr, and δ34S ratios, with possible agricultural sources from use of fertilizers and gypsum. Agricultural practices during flood irrigation also intensify evaporation of Rio Grande surface water and considerably increase water salinity. Shallow groundwater signatures were also identified at several river locations, possibly due to the artificial pumping of local groundwater for irrigation. Impacts of urban activities to river chemistry (high NO3 and B concentrations) were evident for locations downstream to Las Cruces and El Paso wastewater treatment plants, supporting the use of the B isotope as an urban salinity tracer. This study improves our understanding of human impacts on water quality and elemental

  15. Seismic and Gravity Investigations of the Western Espanola Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, L. W.; Coldren, B. G.; Baca, A.; Fontana, J.; Olheiser, M.; Ziff, M.; Keske, A.; Rhode, A.; Martin-Short, R.; Allen, W.; Denton, K. M.; Harper, C.; Baldridge, W.; Biehler, S.; Ferguson, J. F.; McPhee, D.; Snelson, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) program collected new seismic, gravity, electromagnetic and down-hole temperature data in 2013 in the western Espanola basin of the Rio Grande rift area of northern New Mexico. The location, about 25 km NW of Santa Fe, has been identified as a potential geothermal resources area based on relatively high temperature gradients in drill holes. The SAGE 2013 data collection was part of an integrated geophysical study of the area initiated in 2011. Seismic data consisted of a 4.8 km W to E profile (120 three-component stations in four overlapping deployments, 20 m station spacing, using a Vibroseis source - 20 m spacing for reflection VPs; 800 m spacing for refraction VPs) with both refraction and CMP reflection coverage. About 55,000 seismograms were recorded. The surface conditions (dry unconsolidated sediments) increased surface wave energy and limited the signal-to-noise level of the refraction and reflection arrivals. Utilizing longer source-receiver offsets improved the shot-gather record sections by emphasizing wider angle reflections which are very strong and coherent. The refraction data were modeled with first arrival travel time methods. The reflection data were processed to produce a CMP stacked record section. Strong reflectors from basin-filling sedimentary rocks (mostly Tertiary in age) are visible above reflections from a thin section of Paleozoic rocks and the basement. The lower reflections have an apparent dip to the west of about 12 degrees. Eighty-one new gravity measurements (detailed data at 200 m spacing along the seismic profile, and regional stations) were collected and combined with existing regional data for modeling. Interpretation of the seismic and gravity data was aided by refraction velocities, the existence of a nearby regional seismic reflection profile from industry, and lithologies and well-logs from a deep well. The sedimentary basin interpreted from the seismic and gravity data

  16. Cooperation on Climate Services in the Binational Rio Grande/Bravo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfin, G. M.; Shafer, M. A.; Brown, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Rio Grande/Bravo River Basin (RGB) of the United States and México is exposed to tornadoes, severe storms, hurricanes, winter storms, wildfire, and drought. The combination of these weather and climate-related hazards has resulted in impacts, such as wildfire, crop loss, water supply reduction, and flooding, with exceedingly high economic costs ($13 billion in 2011). In order to contribute to increased binational information flow and knowledge exchange in the region, we have developed a prototype quarterly bilingual RGB Climate Outlook, in PDF, supplemented by Twitter messages and Facebook posts. The goal of the project is to improve coordination between institutions in the U.S. and Mexico, increase awareness about climate variations, their impacts and costs to society, and build capacity for enhanced hazard preparedness. The RGB Outlook features a synthesis of climate products, impact data and analysis, is expressed in user-friendly language, and relies substantially on visual communication in contrast to text. The RGB Outlook is co-produced with colleagues in the U.S. and Mexico, in conjunction with the North American Climate Services Partnership (NACSP) and NOAA's regional climate services program. NACSP is a tri-national initiative to develop and deliver drought-based climate services in order to assist water resource managers, agricultural interests, and other constituents as they prepare for future drought events and build capacity to respond to other climate extremes. The RGB Climate Outlook builds on lessons learned from the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) Southwest Climate Outlook (PDF, html), La Niña Drought Tracker (PDF, html), the Southern Climate Impacts Policy Program (SCIPP) Managing Drought in the Southern Plains webinar series, the Border Climate Summary (PDF), and Transborder Climate newsletter (PDF) and webinar series. The latter two have been the only regularly occurring bilingual climate information products in the U

  17. Deformation Along the Rio Grande Rift: Investigating the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Strain Using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. D.; Murray, M. H.; Sheehan, A. F.; Nerem, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Low velocity (<1 mm/yr) extensional environments, such as the Rio Grande rift (RGR) in Colorado and New Mexico, are complex but can provide insights into continental dynamics, tectonic processes, and seismic hazards. We use eight years of measurements from 26 continuous GPS stations across the RGR installed as part of a collaborative EarthScope experiment. We combine this data with regional Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and National Geodetic Survey (NGS) CORS GPS stations, and survey-mode data collected on NGS benchmarks to investigate how deformation is distributed across a broad area from the Great Plains to the Colorado Plateau. The data from over 150 stations are processed using GAMIT/GLOBK, and time series, velocities, strain rates are estimated with respect to realizations of a stable North America reference frame, such as NA12. This study extends our previous analysis, based on 4 years of data, which found an approximately uniform 1.2 nanostrain/yr east-west extensional strain rate across the entire region that was not concentrated on the narrow surface expression of the rift. We expand on this previous work by using a denser network of GPS stations and analyzing longer time series, which reduce horizontal velocity uncertainties to approximately 0.15 mm/yr. We also improve the accuracy of the estimated velocity uncertainties by robustly characterizing time-correlated noise. The noise models indicate that both power-law and flicker noise are present in the time series along with white noise. On average, power law noise constitutes about 90% of the total noise in the vertical component and 60% in the horizontal components for the RGR sites. We use the time series, and velocity and strain-rate estimates to constrain spatial and temporal variations in the deformation field in order to locate possible regions of strain localization and detect transient deformation signals, and to address some of the kinematic and dynamic issues raised by the observation that a

  18. Trace Perchlorate in Background Ground Water and Local Precipitation, Northern Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, M.; Longmire, P.; Granzow, K. P.; Englert, D.; Yanicak, S.; Larson, T.; Rearick, M.; Heikoop, J.; Perkins, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate occurs at detectable concentrations of 0.07 to 0.45 parts per billion (ppb) in ground water of background quality within the northern Rio Grande basin, New Mexico. Ground-water samples were collected from 47 wells and springs near Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Taos, New Mexico. Analytical methods consisted of liquid and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS and IC/MS/MS). An upper tolerance limit (mean plus two standard deviations) of 0.40 ppb was calculated from 184 analytical results for the background samples. Six distinguishable ground-water zones were sampled based on location, age, and hydrochemistry. In the Los Alamos area, ground water within the mountain-front and mountain-block region is mostly young or modern (less than 50 years). The regional aquifer including the White Rock Canyon springs are of sub-modern age (greater than 50 years). Tritium data from springs north of Taos indicate ground water of modern and sub-modern ages. Background perchlorate concentrations within the Los Alamos area were consistently higher than those measured in the Taos area. Ground water from the Taos area contains less perchlorate and has lower δ18O and δ2H values than ground water from the Los Alamos area. The elevation at which precipitation occurs with respect to recharge and/or the amount of evapotranspiration may play a role in perchlorate concentration in ground water. Natural variability, hydrogeology, and atmospheric inputs may also affect perchlorate concentration in ground water. A linear regression through perchlorate and chloride concentrations for all stations resulted in an r2 = 0. However, the r2 value of the Los Alamos regional aquifer for perchlorate versus chloride was 0.66. Thirteen precipitation samples were collected in the Los Alamos area. Results from eleven of these samples showed no perchlorate greater than 0.05 and 0.009 ppb, the method detection limit (MDL). Two precipitation samples analyzed using the IC

  19. Implementation of MAR within the Rio Grande Basin of Central New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Robert; Blandford, T. Neil; Ewing, Amy; Webb, Larry; Yuhas, Katherine

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has identified the Rio Grande basin within Central New Mexico as one of several regions where water supplies are over-allocated and future conflicts over the inadequate resource are highly likely. Local water providers have consistently identified managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as an important tool to provide conjunctive management of surface-water, groundwater, and reclaimed water sources in order to extend the useful life of existing water sources. However, MAR projects have been slow to take root partly due to rigorous demonstration requirements, groundwater quality protection concerns, and ongoing water right uncertainties. At first glance the several thousand meters of unconsolidated basin-fill sediments hosting the regional aquifer appear to provide an ideal environment for the subsurface storage of surplus water. However, the basin has a complex structural and depositional history that impacts the siting and overall effectiveness of MAR systems. Several recharge projects are now in various stages of implementation and are overcoming site specific challenges including source water and ambient groundwater compatibility, low-permeability sediments and compartmentalization of the aquifer by extensive faulting, well clogging, and overall water quality management. This presentation will highlight ongoing efforts of these water providers to develop full-scale recharge facilities. The performance of natural in-channel infiltration, engineered infiltration galleries, and direct injection systems designed to introduce from 500 to 5,000 mega-liters per annum to target intervals present from 150 to 600 meters below ground surface will be described. Source waters for recharge operations include inter-basin transferred surface water and highly treated reclaimed water sources requiring from minor to extensive treatment pre-recharge and post-recovery. Operational complexities have raised concerns related to long-term operation and maintenance

  20. Fluids in mantle xenoliths related to multiple metasomatism from the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Berkesi, M.; Jung, H.; Kil, Y.; Szabo, C.

    2012-12-01

    Mantle-derived volatile-rich fluid inclusions can give important information on chemical features and physical condition on fluid regimes in the upper mantle. These volatiles may also play important role in understanding the fluid/mantle rock interaction in the lithospheric mantle causing mantle metasomatism associated with shallow subduction process. Spinel peridotite xenoliths, hosted in alkali basalts (~15 Ma age), were collected from Adam's Diggings in the Rio Grande Rift (RGR), New Mexico, USA. We selected five representative spinel peridotite xenoliths which are abundant in fluid inclusions (FIs). Based on fluid inclusion petrography, three kinds of orthopyroxene-hosted FIs were identified: Type IA (healed fracture-related, large, negative crystal shape; 10 - 25 μm), Type IB (containing opaque mineral, small, negative crystal shape; 5 - 10 μm), and Type IC (exsolved spinel-related spherical shape; 5 - 10 μm). We studied the FIs system by using heating-freezing stage (microthermometry), high resolution Raman spectroscopy and FIB-SEM (Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy) techniques. These FIs are characterized as CO2-dominated with other minor components (visible melting occurred at -58.0 ~ -56.8 ± 0.2 °C). The calculated CO2 density for Type IC, IB and IA turned out to be 1.05 - 1.12 g/cm3, 0.98 - 1.08 g/cm3, and 0.69 - 0.86 g/cm3, respectively. In addition to the CO2-rich liquid, Type IA, IB and IC FIs contain magnesite as step-daughter phase proved by Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy also provided clear evidence the presence of H2O in Type IA fluid inclusions and of N2 both in Type IB and Type IC FIs. The former FIs have hydrous solid (amphibole?) and the latter ones contain Fe-rich sulfide minerals which were confirmed by FIB-SEM technique. A thin glass film with vesicles on the wall of the FIs generally occurs in Type IA. Furthermore, in Type IA FIs anhydrite as step-daughter mineral were also identified by FIB-SEM technique. Based on

  1. Ramps, Relays, and Rotation: Interbasin Accommodation Structures in the Northern Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Baldridge, W. S.; Ferguson, J. F.; Braile, L. W.; Young, G. R.; Godfrey, K. E.; Polgar, C.; Barber, R.

    2008-12-01

    Structural connections (accommodation zones) between basins in continental rifts control distribution and facies of syntectonic sediments and magmatic rocks, and therefore resources such as groundwater, hydrocarbons, and minerals. These zones are commonly buried beneath rift-filling sediments, thus geophysical methods are of paramount importance in understanding them. In the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program we focus on the small Hagan basin, located in an accommodation zone between the right-stepping Albuquerque and Española basins (respectively AB and EB) near the eastern margin of the Rio Grande rift in northern New Mexico. We integrate existing geological mapping and borehole information with geophysical (mainly seismic) data acquired by industry surveys and by SAGE. The broad accommodation zone comprises several north-trending (basin-parallel), right-stepping faults (E to W: La Bajada, San Francisco, and Rincon) downthrown toward the rift axis. Faults partially overlap with each other, serving to "relay" extension between the main AB and EB. Individual basin-parallel faults are dominantly dip slip with an unknown but small amount of lateral slip. Decreasing offset toward fault tips results in plunging hanging-wall ramps. Thus, ramps underwent horizontal-axis rotation and extension, creating normal faults perpendicular to the major relay faults. Extension from the main EB is transferred to the LB fault along an intrabasin northward plunging ramp. Minor footwall uplift ("Cerrillos uplift") along the LB fault created a shallow synform at the southern end of the EB. Major footwall uplift occurring ~10 Ma on the SF and RC faults (master faults of the northern AB) created a narrow basin (Hagan) within the accommodation zone. From the fact that lower Tertiary sediments in the Hagan basin are deformed parallel to underlying Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks and that uplift of the Sandia Mountains occurred ~10 Ma, we infer that structures in the

  2. Leptospirosis in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: An Ecosystem Approach in the Animal-Human Interface

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Maria Cristina; Najera, Patricia; Pereira, Martha M.; Machado, Gustavo; dos Anjos, Celso B.; Rodrigues, Rogério O.; Cavagni, Gabriela M.; Muñoz-Zanzi, Claudia; Corbellini, Luis G.; Leone, Mariana; Buss, Daniel F.; Aldighieri, Sylvain; Espinal, Marcos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an epidemic-prone neglected disease that affects humans and animals, mostly in vulnerable populations. The One Health approach is a recommended strategy to identify drivers of the disease and plan for its prevention and control. In that context, the aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of human cases of leptospirosis in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and to explore possible drivers. Additionally, it sought to provide further evidence to support interventions and to identify hypotheses for new research at the human-animal-ecosystem interface. Methodology and findings The risk for human infection was described in relation to environmental, socioeconomic, and livestock variables. This ecological study used aggregated data by municipality (all 496). Data were extracted from secondary, publicly available sources. Thematic maps were constructed and univariate analysis performed for all variables. Negative binomial regression was used for multivariable statistical analysis of leptospirosis cases. An annual average of 428 human cases of leptospirosis was reported in the state from 2008 to 2012. The cumulative incidence in rural populations was eight times higher than in urban populations. Variables significantly associated with leptospirosis cases in the final model were: Parana/Paraiba ecoregion (RR: 2.25; CI95%: 2.03–2.49); Neossolo Litolítico soil (RR: 1.93; CI95%: 1.26–2.96); and, to a lesser extent, the production of tobacco (RR: 1.10; CI95%: 1.09–1.11) and rice (RR: 1.003; CI95%: 1.002–1.04). Conclusion Urban cases were concentrated in the capital and rural cases in a specific ecoregion. The major drivers identified in this study were related to environmental and production processes that are permanent features of the state. This study contributes to the basic knowledge on leptospirosis distribution and drivers in the state and encourages a comprehensive approach to address the disease in the animal

  3. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation on Water Resources and Agricultural Diversity of the Upper Rio Grande Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi Rad, M.; Hurd, B. H.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change can alter the balance of the water resources systems. It can both change the amount and the timing of the streamflow available in a basin and the amount of water consumed at the end point due to higher temperatures. These changes in the supply and demand sides can result in a different allocation of water and different price for water in basin scale based on economic principles. In a previous study Hurd and Coonrod (2012) modeled the impacts of climate change on the water related economic activities of the Rio Grande. In their study they assumed an aggregated benefit function for the agricultural sector. In another study on the Rio Grande Brinegar and Ward (2009) modeled the agricultural diversity of the Rio Grande within the framework of a hydro-economic model. This study builds upon and extends the previous studies by developing a model that can more carefully assess the role of adaptation in agriculture. Specially, the current study adds quadratic production functions for each crop. These production functions add a major benefit to the modeling of the hydro-economic system, namely that of adding diversity and expanded resolution to the agricultural sector. Using this production function the model includes both land and water as independent variables in the agricultural sector and, therefore this extension of the model has more flexibility to represent adaptive responses to climatic changes by including the capacity to change the crop mix and acreages as well as the water applied i.e. the capacity to deficit irrigate. The results of this study show that the agricultural sector can lose nearly a third of its water and more than 30% of its net economic benefits as a result of possible climate changes. It also shows as the climate become drier and population grows then economic forces will encourage agriculture to move towards more beneficial crops and reduce total acreage and in some cases applied water.

  4. Response of the Rio Grande and shallow ground water in the Mesilla Bolson to irrigation, climate stress, and pumping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, J.; Ohlmacher, G.; Utz, D.; Kutianawala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The El Paso-Ciudad Juarez metropolitan area obtains its water from the Rio Grande and intermontane-basin aquifers. Shallow ground water in this region is in close communications with the surface water system. A major problem with both systems is salinity. Upstream usage of the water in the Rio Grande for irrigation and municipalities has led to concentration of soluble salts to the point where the surface water commonly exceeds drinking water standards. Shallow ground water is recharged by surface water (primarily irrigation canals and agricultural fields) and discharges to surface water (agricultural drains) and deeper ground water. The source of water entering the Rio Grande varies seasonally. During the irrigation season, water is released from reservoirs and mixes with the return flow from irrigation drains. During the non-irrigation season (winter), flow is from irrigation drains and river water quality is indicative of shallow ground water. The annual cycle can be ascertained from the inverse correlation between ion concentrations and discharge in the river. Water-quality data indicate that the salinity of shallow ground water increases each year during a drought. Water-management strategies in the region can affect water quality. Increasing the pumping rate of water-supply wells will cause shallow ground water to flow into the deeper aquifers and degrade the water quality. Lining the canals in the irrigation system to stop water leakage will lead to water quality degradation in shallow ground water and, eventually, deep ground water by removing a major source of high quality recharge that currently lowers the salinity of the shallow ground water.

  5. Streamflow and sediment dynamics of the Middle Rio Grande Valley, New Mexico, in the context of cottonwood recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.; Wondzell, Mark; Ritter, Amy

    1993-01-01

    The cottonwood gallery forests of the Middle Rio Grande floodplain in New Mexico provide important habitats for birds and other animals. Over the last century, these forests have changed significantly due to invasion of exotics such as salt cedar and Russian olive, which compete with native cottonwoods, and changes in water use both in the valley and upstream. To successfully germinate and establish, cottonwoods require an adequate water supply, abundant sunlight, and bare, litter-free substrate. Native cottonwoods are adapted to a natural snowmelt hydrograph characterized by spring floods in late May or early June and gradually receding streamflows throughout the remainder of the summer. The natural streamflow pattern has been significantly modified by water management in the Rio Grande basin. The modified pattern is less conducive to establishment of cottonwoods than the natural pattern. In addition, exotic species now compete with native cottonwoods, and the modified flow pattern may favor these exotics. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of enhancing cottonwood establishment and recruitment along the Middle Rio Grande through streamflow manipulation and reservoir releases. The work integrates concepts of cottonwood establishment, water resources management, and river morphology, and investigates how water management might be used to preserve and enhance cottonwood gallery forests along the river. Specific objectives of the work reported herein were to: (1) develop a technique to calculate flows that will produce channel characteristics necessary to restore and sustain cottonwood gallery forests; (2) develop a model to determine a flow pattern, or sequence of flows, that will improve the potential for cottonwood establishment and recruitment; and (3) determine if the water resources can be managed to produce the desired channel characteristics and flow pattern identified in (1) and (2).

  6. The Cerrillos Uplift, the La Bajada Constriction, and Hydrogeologic Framework of the Santo Domingo Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    The geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeologic properties of the La Bajada constriction and Santo Domingo Basin, northern New Mexico, result from tectonic and volcanic processes of the late Tertiary and Quaternary Rio Grande rift. An integrated geologic and geophysical assessment in the La Bajada constriction allows development of a geologic framework that can provide input for regional ground-water flow models. These models then can provide better estimates of future water supplies in a region that largely subsists on aquifers in Rio Grande rift basins. The combination of surface geologic investigations (stratigraphic and structural studies; chapters A, B, C, and E), airborne geophysics (aeromagnetic and time-domain electromagnetic surveys; chapters D and F), ground geophysical measurements (gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; chapters D and F), and data from the few wells in the area (chapter G) provides new constraints on the hydrogeologic framework of this area. Summary results of our investigations are synthesized in chapter G. Through-going aquifers consisting of ancestral Rio Grande axial-river sand and gravel and of coarse western-piedmont gravel form the predominant ground-water pathways through the partly buried structural trough defining the La Bajada constriction between Espa?ola and Santo Domingo Basins. Thick, clay-rich Cretaceous marine shales of low hydraulic conductivity form a pervasive regional confining unit within the Cerrillos uplift on the southeast flank of the constriction. Numerous, dominantly north-northwest-striking, intrabasin faults that project part way across the La Bajada constriction create a matrix of laterally and vertically variable hydrogeologic compartments that locally partition and deflect ground-water flow parallel to faults.

  7. Insecticide susceptibility of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sames, W J; Bueno, R; Hayes, J; Olson, J K

    1996-09-01

    In response to a potential dengue fever outbreak in south Texas during 1995, the susceptibilities of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus to commonly used mosquito adulticides were assessed. Larvae collected from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas and Mexico were reared to adults and tested against susceptible laboratory strains at Texas A&M University. Resistance ratios at both the LC50 and LC95 rates were all less than 10, indicating that adult populations of both species are still susceptible to malathion, chlorpyrifos, resmethrin, and permethrin.

  8. [Triatoma delpontei Romaña & Abalos, 1947 (Hemiptera, Tratominae) in the Brazilian State of Rio Grande do Sul].

    PubMed

    Salvatella Agrelo, R; Basmadjian, Y; Rosa, R; Puime, A

    1993-01-01

    Triatoma delpontei (Romaña & Abalos, 1947) (Hemiptera, Triatominae) is an ornithophilic sylvatic with a particular association to the psittacid Myiopsitta monachus (Boaddert, 1783). It is found in the continental biogeographical province of the Chaco, where it inhabits the nests or M. monachus, in subtropical xerophytic forests. The authors report the first finding of T. delpontei in Brasil, in the "campanha" region of the State or Rio Grande do Sul (Barra do Quarai, Uruguaiana), on the right bank of the River Cuareim, not far from de Uruguayan border.

  9. Occurrence of gastrointestinal protozoa in Didelphis albiventris (opossum) in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul state.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Régis A; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Lunardi, Fabiane; Santurio, Janio M; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the parasitism by gastrointestinal protozoa in Didelphis albiventris (opossum) in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul state. Fecal samples from six free living opossums were collected for research of parasites. Samples were analyzed by the centrifugal-flotation method with zinc sulfate and parasites were identified microscopically based on (oo)cyst size and morphology. Cysts of Giardia sp. and oocysts of Cryptosporidium sp. and Eimeria sp. were observed in four of the six opossums. All four infected marsupials showed mild infection by protozoa. This is the first report of Giardia sp. in D. albiventris.

  10. Studies of Brazilian meteorites. XIII - Mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry of the Putinga, Rio Grande do Sul, chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, K.; Lange, D.; Ulbrich, M. N. C.; Gomes, C. B.; Jarosewich, E.; Roisenberg, A.; Souza, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Putinga, Rio Grande do Sul chondrite is described and classified as an L6. The mineral composition and some significant ratios of elements are reported, and the reasons for assignment to the L group and to petrologic type 6 are explained. The analysis suggests that maskelynite of oligoclase composition was formed by solid-state shock transformation of previously existing well-crystallized plagioclase at estimated shock pressures of about 250-350 kbar. This finding indicates that recrystallization (formation of well-crystallized oligoclase) preceded shock transformation formation of the maskelynite.

  11. Concentrations of selected trace elements and other constituents in the Rio Grande and in fish tissue in the vicinity of Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    The State of New Mexico and the Pueblo of Isleta have established surface-water standards for trace elements to control discharges of these contaminants. Before these standards can be meaningfully applied, however, ambient concentrations and loads of trace elements, principally arsenic, need to be determined in the Rio Grande and inflow sources. Arsenic concentrations also need to be determined in the edible portion of fish tissue because the Pueblo of Isleta standard for arsenic is based on fish consumption. Eighteen surface-water sampling sites on a reach of the Rio Grande from the Pueblo of San Felipe to Los Lunas, New Mexico, were sampled quarterly from October 1994 to August 1996. The sites include eight Rio Grande sites, one Jemez River site, five riverside drain sites, and four wastewater- treatment plant outfalls. Trace-element protocol was used to collect and process the samples. Field and laboratory quality-control samples were analyzed, and the results are included in this report. Fish-tissue samples were collected from four of the Rio Grande sites and the Albuquerque Riverside Drain, the Atrisco Riverside Drain, and three lakes at a recreational fishing area on the Isleta Indian Reservation. Arsenic in the Rio Grande is nearly all in the dissolved phase. There was little temporal change in arsenic concentration at the Rio Grande sites. The mean dissolved-arsenic concentration in the Rio Grande increased downstream from 1.8 micrograms per liter at the Pueblo of San Felipe to 3.6 micrograms per liter at Los Lunas. Mean dissolved-arsenic concentrations in the riverside drains were slightly higher (2.8 to 4.5 micrograms per liter) than those in the Rio Grande and were higher still in the wastewater-treatment plant outfalls (7.9 to 16.2 micrograms per liter) and the Jemez River (18.2 micrograms per liter). The mean total-arsenic concentration in fish-tissue samples from the Rio Grande and Albuquerque Riverside Drain was 14.53 micrograms per kilogram.

  12. Water temperature and baseflow discharge of streams throughout the range of Rio Grande cutthroat trout in Colorado and New Mexico—2010 and 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeigler, Matthew P.; Todd, Andrew S.; Caldwell, Colleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This study characterized the thermal regime in a number of Colorado and New Mexico streams that contain populations of Rio Grande cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii virginalis) and had no previous record of continual temperature records. When compared to Colorado’s water temperature criteria (Cold Tier 1), a portion of these populations appeared to be at risk from elevated stream temperatures, as indicated by exceedance of both acute (17–22 percent) and chronic (2–9 percent) water quality metrics. Summer water temperature profiles recorded at sites within current Rio Grande cutthroat trout habitat indicated that although the majority of currently occupied conservation streams have temperatures that fall well below these biologically based acute and chronic thermal thresholds, several sites may be at or approaching water temperatures considered stressful to cutthroat trout. Further, water temperatures should be considered in decisions regarding the current and future thermal suitability of potential Rio Grande cutthroat trout restoration sites. Additionally, baseflow discharge sampling indicated that a majority of the sampled stream segments containing Rio Grande cutthroat trout have flows less than 1.0 cubic feet per second (cfs) in both 2010 (74 percent) and 2011 (77 percent). The relative drought sensitivity of these low baseflow streams containing Rio Grande cutthroat trout could be further evaluated to assess their probable sustainability under possible future drought conditions.

  13. Ground-water resources of the Acu Valley, Rio Grande Norte, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodis, Harry G.; de Castro Araujo, Jonas Maria.

    1968-01-01

    The Acu Valley is the lower part of the Rio Piranhas valley in the northwestern part of the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. It begins where the Rio Piranhas leaves the crystalline Precambrian rocks to flow across the outcrop of sedimentary rocks. The area considered in this report extends northward for about 45 kilometers; it is terminated arbitrarily where encroachment by sea water has contaminated the aquifer and imparted a disagreeable saline taste to the water in it. The boundary was not determined in the field, however, for lack of special equipment. Part of the extensive uplands on either side of the valley are included. This makes the total area approximately 2,500 square kilometers. The largest town, Acu, had a population of about 8,000 in 1960. The area is considered to be part of the Drought Polygon of northeast Brazil because the precipitation, although averaging 448 millimeters annually at Acu, varies widely from year to year and often is deficient for many months. The precipitation has been supplemented by use of irrigation wells, but irrigated agriculture is not yet far advanced, and the quantities of water used in irrigation are small. Geologically, the area consists of basement crystalline rocks (Precambrian), a wedge of sedimentary rocks thickening northward (Cretaceous), and alluvial sediments constituting a narrow band in the bottom of the valley (Alluvium and terrace deposits). The crystalline rocks contain water mainly in fractures and, in general, are impermeable. The sedimentary rocks of Cretaceous age comprise two units: a thick but fine-grained sandstone grading upward into siltstone and shale (Acu Sandstone), and limestone and dolomite with an included shale zone (Jandaira Limestone). The sandstone especially and the limestone to a lesser degree are ground-water reservoirs of large capacity. The limestone has been tapped at several places, but the sandstone and its contained water are practically untested and, hence, imperfectly

  14. Quaternary history of Red Mountain Creek Valley and its relation to the Rio Grande glacier system near Creede, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Interactions between the Rio Grande glacier system and the Red Mountain Creek glacier are more complex than previously believed. Although both glaciers were fed by the same ice cap along the continental divide, the timing and number of advances are different. Analysis of air photos and field relationships reveal a series of end moraines at the mouth of Red Mountain Creek. The presence of these moraines disproves the hypothesis of Atwood and Mather (1932) that the two were confluent during the last phase of glaciation. The degree of weathering rind development on mafic cobbles was used together with the degree of clay mineral development in the soils to determine relative ages and the number of advances in each system. The less than 2[mu]m material for X-ray diffraction analysis was separated from soil samples collected from pits excavated on the tops of end moraines. Both smectite and kaolinite were found within the soil profile thus indicating weathering of minerals in tills derived from the local biotite-sanadine-hornblende tuffs. The amount of post glacial weathering was estimated based on the relative intensity of the 17[angstrom] smectite peak after ethylene glycol solvation. Both the X-ray and weathering rind analysis show two separate glacial events in Red Mountain Creek valley. However, in the Rio Grande system the weathering rind data suggests two glacial events while the clay mineralogy suggests only one.

  15. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in the western-central region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: multiresistant tick.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fabrício Amadori; Pivoto, Felipe Lamberti; Ferreira, Maiara Sanitá Tafner; Gregorio, Fabiano de Vargas; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores; Sangioni, Luís Antônio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the acaricide resistance of tick populations in the western-central region of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil), which has not previously been reported. Fifty-four cattle farms were visited and specimens of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus were collected and subjected to the adult immersion test, using nine commercial acaricides in the amidine, pyrethroid and organophosphate groups. Climatic data, including monthly precipitation, were recorded. The results from the present study demonstrated that seven of the acaricides analyzed presented mean efficacy values of less than 95%, with large differences among the products tested. Nine of them exhibited satisfactory and unsatisfactory acaricide results on at least one farm. In conclusion, the farms located in the western-central region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, exhibited populations of R. (Boophilus) microplus with variable degrees of susceptibility to different acaricides, thus suggesting that resistance to the active compounds exists. It is suggested that treatment protocols should be implemented at the beginning of winter and summer, using the acaricides that showed efficacy in the adult immersion test. PMID:25271453

  16. Development of Semi-distributed ecohydrological model in the Rio Grande De Manati River Basin, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setegn, S. G.; Ortiz, J.; Melendez, J.; Barreto, M.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Guild, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are limited studies in Puerto Rico that shows the water resources availability and variability with respect to changing climates and land use. The main goal of the HICE-PR (Human Impacts to Coastal Ecosystems in Puerto Rico (HICE-PR): the Río Loco Watershed (southwest coast PR) project which was funded by NASA is to evaluate the impacts of land use/land cover changes on the quality and extent of coastal and marine ecosystems (CMEs) in two priority watersheds in Puerto Rico (Manatí and Guánica).The main objective of this study is to set up a physically based spatially distributed hydrological model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for the analysis of hydrological processes in the Rio Grande de Manati river basin. SWAT (soil and water assessment tool) is a spatially distributed watershed model developed to predict the impact of land management practices on water, sediment and agricultural chemical yields in large complex watersheds. For efficient use of distributed models for hydrological and scenario analysis, it is important that these models pass through a careful calibration and uncertainty analysis. The model was calibrated and validated using Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2) calibration and uncertainty analysis algorithms. The model evaluation statistics for streamflows prediction shows that there is a good agreement between the measured and simulated flows that was verified by coefficients of determination and Nash Sutcliffe efficiency greater than 0.5. Keywords: Hydrological Modeling; SWAT; SUFI-2; Rio Grande De Manati; Puerto Rico

  17. Home range and use of habitat of western yellow-billed cuckoos on the middle Rio Grande, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juddson Sechrist, jschrist@nsbr.gov; Darrell Ahlers, dahlers@usbr.gov; Katherine Potak Zehfuss, kzehfuss@usbr.gov; Robert Doster, rob_doster@fws.gov; Paxton, Eben; Ryan, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    The western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus occidentalis) is a Distinct Population Segment that has been proposed for listing under the Endangered Species Act, yet very little is known about its spatial use on the breeding grounds. We implemented a study, using radio telemetry, of home range and use of habitat for breeding cuckoos along the Middle Rio Grande in central New Mexico in 2007 and 2008. Nine of 13 cuckoos were tracked for sufficient time to generate estimates of home range. Overall size of home ranges for the 2 years was 91 ha for a minimum-convex-polygon estimate and 62 ha for a 95%-kernel-home-range estimate. Home ranges varied considerably among individuals, highlighting variability in spatial use by cuckoos. Additionally, use of habitat differed between core areas and overall home ranges, but the differences were nonsignificant. Home ranges calculated for western yellow-billed cuckoos on the Middle Rio Grande are larger than those in other southwestern riparian areas. Based on calculated home ranges and availability of riparian habitat in the study area, we estimate that the study area is capable of supporting 82-99 nonoverlapping home ranges of cuckoos. Spatial data from this study should contribute to the understanding of the requirements of area and habitat of this species for management of resources and help facilitate recovery if a listing occurs.

  18. [Organization and quality of health care for Kaingáng Indians in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Hökerberg, Y H; Duchiade, M P; Barcellos, C

    2001-01-01

    This study assesses the health care provided to Kaingáng Indians in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Deaths preventable by primary health care among the Indians and occurring from 1985 to 1995 were compared to the same rates for the State of Rio Grande do Sul as a whole. Secondary data on health care services were supplemented by field interviews with indigenous leaders and with employees from participating institutions. A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to correlate distribution of deaths and access to health services. The Kaingáng settlements are connected by paved roads to counties with at least a public health clinic or even a small hospital in some cases. Secondary referrals are treated in Palmeiras das Missões and Frederico Westphallen and tertiary care is provided in Passo Fundo. What distinguishes the Indian settlements from the rest of the State are the high rates of deaths preventable by primary health care and those related to ill-defined conditions, malnutrition, tuberculosis, and cancer of the uterine cervix.

  19. Dengue vectors, human activity, and dengue virus transmission potential in the lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, United States.

    PubMed

    Vitek, Christopher J; Gutierrez, Joann A; Dirrigl, Frank J

    2014-09-01

    Dengue virus is an emerging disease of concern in the Americas. Recent outbreaks in Florida highlight the potential for the virus to return to the United States. The Lower Rio Grande Valley region of Texas directly borders Mexico, and has experienced dengue transmission in the past concurrent with outbreaks in Mexico along the border region. We examined the potential for dengue virus transmission by examining the vectors in the region, as well as assessing human behavior. We further hypothesized that dengue vector abundance would influence human behavior. Two dengue vectors, Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse), were found in the region in high abundance. More mosquitoes were collected in rural sites and sites with high vegetation. Of the two species, only Ae. albopictus showed any significant habitat preferences, being more common in rural site. While there was no correlation between human behavior and mosquito abundance, the results support a significant correlation between knowledge of mosquitoes and dengue virus and behavioral practices that might reduce risk of disease transmission. Dengue risk may be higher in certain regions of the Lower Rio Grande Valley based on socioeconomic conditions, specifically in economically poor regions such as the undeveloped colonias found in the region. Because of the proximity of this region to an area with endemic dengue, continued surveillance and risk assessment is suggested.

  20. Description of piezometers installed in the middle Rio Grande basin area, 1997-99, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, J.R.; Rankin, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1993, the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, and particularly in the Albuquerque area, has been the focus of studies to further define the extent of the most productive parts of the aquifer and to gain a better understanding of how ground- water levels are changing over time. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer, installed nine piezometers during 1998-99 at five sites in and near the margin of the Middle Rio Grande Basin in central New Mexico. In addition, the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer installed another nine piezometers at three sites during 1997. These piezometers allow for collection of ground-water-level data in areas for which little information is available. Most of the piezometers were constructed of 2.5-inch-diameter flush-joint polyvinyl chloride (PVC) schedule 80 casing with 10-foot stainless steel screens; the shallow piezometer at the Tome site has a 40-foot screen, and the single piezometers at the Dome Road and Phoenix Road sites have steel casing with welded joints and a 10- and a 20-foot screen, respectively. Steel casing with a locking lid covers the uppermost 2 feet of the piezometer casing. Drillers' logs and petrophysical logs were collected from the deepest borehole at each site.

  1. Assessing the risk of bovine fasciolosis using linear regression analysis for the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Elisa Pereira; Freitas, Corina da Costa; Dutra, Luciano Vieira; Molento, Marcelo Beltrão

    2016-02-15

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a disease that triggers a chronic inflammatory process in the liver affecting mainly ruminants and other animals including humans. In Brazil, F. hepatica occurs in larger numbers in the most Southern state of Rio Grande do Sul. The objective of this study was to estimate areas at risk using an eight-year (2002-2010) time series of climatic and environmental variables that best relate to the disease using a linear regression method to municipalities in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. The positivity index of the disease, which is the rate of infected animal per slaughtered animal, was divided into three risk classes: low, medium and high. The accuracy of the known sample classification on the confusion matrix for the low, medium and high rates produced by the estimated model presented values between 39 and 88% depending of the year. The regression analysis showed the importance of the time-based data for the construction of the model, considering the two variables of the previous year of the event (positivity index and maximum temperature). The generated data is important for epidemiological and parasite control studies mainly because F. hepatica is an infection that can last from months to years. PMID:26827853

  2. Preliminary Geophysical Characterization of a CO2-Driven Geyser in the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Jensen, K. J.; Kelly, C.; Ryan, J. C.; Ferriz, H.; Kanjorski, N.; Ferguson, J. F.; McPhee, D. K.; Pellerin, L.

    2009-12-01

    As part of the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) a preliminary geophysical investigation was conducted in the vicinity of a cold CO2-driven geyser located at Chimayó, NM, along the eastern margin of the Rio Grand Rift. This geyser is of interest as a possible analog for CO2 leakage from deep saline-aquifer carbon sequestration projects. Observed water chemistry variations can be explained by mixing of a CO2-rich, high salinity brine rising into, and mixing with a shallow freshwater aquifer. Several large, basin bounding faults and numerous smaller normal faults cut the area of the well and may constitute the necessary conduit for the deep water. Geophysical methods were used to characterize the subsurface properties at the Chimayó geyser as well as regional structures that may influence groundwater flow in the area. Shallow transient electromagnetic (TEM) data and capactively-coupled resistivity (CCR) data were acquired in close proximity to the geyser. The CCR shows a near-surface resistive feature, possibly hematite-cemented Tesuque formation sediment, in close proximity to the geyser. A shallow, highly conductive layer delineated through modeling of the TEM data is postulated to be a fluid consistent with high levels of Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) content. The well is located almost directly on the Roberts fault, which is antithetic to the basin bounding Chimayó fault 1.5 km to the east. Previously published hydrogeochemical studies associate this fault with high CO2 and TDS water along its strike. Deeper sounding TEM and audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data were acquired along the Alamo Arroyo, 3 km to the southwest of the well. The Kelley Federal #1 Well located in this arroyo provides deep stratigraphic control to Pennsylvanian carbonate basement at 740 m. Tesuque formation conglomeritic alluvial fan deposits occur between 230 and 708 m and are overlain by finer grained basin floor deposits. The deep, coarse grained unit is thought to be a good

  3. Surface flux processes and evolution of characteristic eddy scales above a young Middle Rio Grande forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleverly, J. R.; Thibault, J. R.; Slusher, M.; Hipps, L.; Prueger, J.; Dahm, C. N.

    2003-12-01

    The extended drought throughout the Southwest has brought water budgets and policy decisions into public purview. It is often presumed that riparian restoration, i.e. removal of non-native species, presents a water salvage panacea. The cost of such operations can be prohibitive, making reliable estimates of phreatophytic ET a crucial piece of information. This study has taken a long-term approach to monitoring ET water flux from a variety of these forests. ET monitoring towers have been established at 5 sites along the Middle Rio Grande -- 2 over mature cottonwood forests, 2 over mature saltcedar forests, and 1 over a young mixed stand of Russian olive and willow. Because there is yet no infallible method for determining ET fluxes, eddy covariance technology provides the best method for evaluating those processes in the surface layer by provided data directly into surface layer similarity relationships. ET, energy, and carbon flux were measured during the 2003 growing season from towers using the 3-dimensional sonic eddy covariance (3SEC) method. Scalar flux sensors included a 3-D sonic anemometer, Krypton hygrometer, 12.7 μ m type E fine wire thermocouple (Campbell Scientific, Inc), and LI-7500 open-path IRGA (Licor, Inc). An averaging period of 30 min was chosen based as a period of low cospectral density. The following corrections were applied to these fluxes: coordinate rotation; correction of frequency-specific signal attenuation due to instrument separation, instrument line averaging, and signal path length (Massman 2000 & 2001); krypton hygrometer calibration as a function of humidity; oxygen contribution to the krypton hygrometer signal; and flux effects on measured densities (Webb et al 1980). These corrections reduced the closure error by 5 percent. Closure was then forced using the measured Bowen Ratio as the weighting factor. Measured ET, along with leaf area index, was reduced as much as 35 percent during the prolonged drought in the southwestern U

  4. Role of Faults in Controlling Hydrothermal Fluid Flow, Salinity, Helium, and CO2 Transport along the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, E. E.; Person, M. A.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater 3He/4He anomalies ( ≤ 0.65 Ra) reported in the Rio Grande Rift are probable indications of complex mixing of mantle, heat, and crustal fluids. A suite of new noble gas and water samples were recently collected across the Albuquerque and Socorro Basins of the Rio Grande Rift including one from the recently completed geothermal slim hole near the NMT campus to help determine the flux of mantle derived fluids through the crust. High CO2 levels measured at the travertine depositing springs at Tierra Amarilla near San Yisidro on the Nacimiento fault provide further indication of mantle degassing. The water discharged at the Tierra Amarilla springs carries mantle volatiles and contains high salinity and elevated trace metals such as arsenic. A better understanding of the hydrologic controls is necessary to assess the degradation of water quality. A series of east-west and north-south basin-scale, cross-sectional hydrologic models were constructed along the Rio Grande Rift in the Albuquerque and Socorro Basins to assess the relative importance of faults as conduits for meteoric and deep endogenic fluids. These models extend to a depth of 15 km to incorporate deeply derived inputs. The north-south cross-section was developed from geologic maps, well bore lithologic logs, as well as gravity and seismic-surveys. Separate east-west models were developed for the lystric and sub-vertical normal faults in the southern Albuquerque Basin to quantify how differently CO2 and helium transport responds in each fault system using the same hydrologic parameters. New and existing groundwater salinity, temperature, 3He/4He, and 14C data provide the ground truth for model calibration. The cross-sectional models used in this study illustrate the importance of deeply penetrating, moderately permeable fault zones (10-14 to 10-16 m2) in advective transport of groundwater and mantle volatiles to shallow crustal levels. Rio Grande surface water increases in salinity from north to

  5. A multi-dimensional analysis of the upper Rio Grande-San Luis Valley social-ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, Ken

    The Upper Rio Grande (URG), located in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado, is the primary contributor to streamflow to the Rio Grande Basin, upstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos at Presidio, TX. The URG-SLV includes a complex irrigation-dependent agricultural social-ecological system (SES), which began development in 1852, and today generates more than 30% of the SLV revenue. The diversions of Rio Grande water for irrigation in the SLV have had a disproportionate impact on the downstream portion of the river. These diversions caused the flow to cease at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico in the late 1880s, creating international conflict. Similarly, low flows in New Mexico and Texas led to interstate conflict. Understanding changes in the URG-SLV that led to this event and the interactions among various drivers of change in the URG-SLV is a difficult task. One reason is that complex social-ecological systems are adaptive, contain feedbacks, emergent properties, cross-scale linkages, large-scale dynamics and non-linearities. Further, most analyses of SES to date have been qualitative, utilizing conceptual models to understand driver interactions. This study utilizes both qualitative and quantitative techniques to develop an innovative approach for analyzing driver interactions in the URG-SLV. Five drivers were identified for the URG-SLV social-ecological system: water (streamflow), water rights, climate, agriculture, and internal and external water policy. The drivers contained several longitudes (data aspect) relevant to the system, except water policy, for which only discreet events were present. Change point and statistical analyses were applied to the longitudes to identify quantifiable changes, to allow detection of cross-scale linkages between drivers, and presence of feedback cycles. Agricultural was identified as the driver signal. Change points for agricultural expansion defined four distinct periods: 1852--1923, 1924--1948, 1949--1978 and 1979

  6. U.S. Geological Survey middle Rio Grande basin study; proceedings of the third annual workshop, Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 24-25, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 40 percent (about 600,000 people) of the total population of New Mexico lives within the Middle Rio Grande Basin, which includes the City of Albuquerque. Ongoing analyses of the central portion of the Middle Rio Grande Basin by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque and other agencies have shown that ground water in the basin is not as readily accessible as earlier studies indicated. A more complete characterization of the ground-water resources of the entire Middle Rio Grande Basin is hampered by a scarcity of data in the northern and southern areas of the basin. The USGS Middle Rio Grande Basin study is a 5-year effort by the USGS and other agencies to improve the understanding of the hydrology, geology, and land-surface characteristics of the Middle Rio Grande Basin. The primary objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the water resources of the basin. Of particular interest is to determine the extent of hydrologic connection between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer. Additionally, ground-water quality affects the availability of water supplies in the basin. Improving the existing USGS-constructed ground-water flow model of the Middle Rio Grande Basin will integrate all the various tasks that improve our knowledge of the various components of the Middle Rio Grande water budget. Part of this improvement will be accompanied by extended knowledge of the aquifer system beyond the Albuquerque area into the northern and southern reaches of the basin. Other improvements will be based on understanding gained through process-oriented research and improved geologic characterization of the deposits. The USGS and cooperating agencies will study the hydrology, geology, and land-surface characteristics of the basin to provide the scientific information needed for water-resources management and for managers to plan for water supplies needed for a growing population. To facilitate exchange of

  7. Fish assemblage composition and mapped mesohabitat features over a range of streamflows in the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico, winter 2011-12, summer 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Daniel K.; Braun, Christopher L.; Moring, J. Bruce

    2016-01-21

    This report documents differences in the mapped spatial extents and physical characteristics of in-channel fish habitat evaluated at the mesohabitat scale during winter 2011–12 (moderate streamflow) and summer 2012 (low streamflow) at 15 sites on the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico starting about 3 kilometers downstream from Cochiti Dam and ending about 40 kilometers upstream from Elephant Butte Reservoir. The results of mesohabitat mapping, physical characterization, and fish assemblage surveys are summarized from the data that were collected. The report also presents general comparisons of physical mesohabitat data, such as wetted area and substrate type, and biological mesohabitat data, which included fish assemblage composition, species richness, Rio Grande silvery minnow relative abundance, and Rio Grande silvery minnow catch per unit effort.

  8. A Physical Assessment of the Opportunities for Improved Management of the Water Resources of the Bi-National Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, J.; McKinney, D.; Valdes, J.; Guitron, A.; Thomas, G.

    2007-05-01

    The hydro-physical opportunities for expanding the beneficial uses of the fixed water supply in the Rio Grande/Bravo Basin to better satisfy an array of water management goals are examined. These include making agriculture more resilient to periodic conditions of drought, improving the reliability of supplies to cities and towns, and restoring lost environmental functions in the river system. This is a comprehensive, outcome-neutral, model- based planning exercise performed by some 20 technical, primarily non-governmental institutions from both countries, aimed at proposing strategies that can reduce future conflicts over water throughout the entire basin. The second track consists in generating a set of future water management scenarios that respond to the needs and objectives of the basin stakeholders in each segment and each country. An array of scenarios for improved water management has been developed for the lower Rio Grande/Rio Bravo basin in Texas and the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. Another set under development will focus on the Rio Conchos and the El Paso/Juarez region. Eventually, scenarios will be generated such that will comprehend the entire basin on both sides of the border. These scenarios are the product of consultations with agricultural water districts, governmental organizations and environmental NGOs. They include strategies for reducing the physical losses of water in the system, conservation transfers, improvements in the operations of the Mexican and international reservoirs, improvements in environmental flow conditions, improvements in reliability of water supplies, and drought coping strategies.These scenarios will be evaluated for hydrologic feasibility by the basin-wide model and the gaming exercises. Modeling is necessary to understand how these options will affect the entire system and how they can be crafted to maximize the benefits and avoid unintended or uncompensated effects. The scenarios that have the potential to provide large

  9. Description of piezometer nests and water levels in the Rio Grande Valley near Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.; Bullard, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four piezometers were installed from mid-October 1984 to mid-January 1985 in two sections of the Rio Grande valley near Albuquerque, New Mexico. Each cross section is comprised of four piezometer nests and each nest is comprised of three piezometers completed at different depths. The purpose of this report is to describe the piezometers nests and present some of the water level data collected from the piezometers. The piezometers were drilled using the hydraulic rotary method. The piezometers were completed with 5 feet of 60-slot wire-wound stainless steel well screen and flush joint PVC well casing. The description of each piezometer nest consists of the location of the particular piezometer nest; a figure showing the location, depth altitude, and station identification number of the piezometers in each nest; and a driller 's log, geophysical logs, and description of the well cuttings from the deepest borehole in each piezometer nest. Water level altitudes generally increased from February until June 1985 in the piezometers in the Rio Bravo section. Water level altitudes in piezometers completed at different depths in a particular nest are about the same in all of the Rio Bravo nests and in the Montano 1 nest. In several of the piezometer nests, especially the Montano nests, water level altitudes decrease with depth. (USGS)

  10. Survey of hydrologic models and hydrologic data needs for tracking flow in the Rio Grande, north-central New Mexico, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillery, Anne; Eggleston, Jack R.

    2012-01-01

    The six Middle Rio Grande Pueblos have prior and paramount rights to deliveries of water from the Rio Grande for their use. When the pueblos or the Bureau of Indian Affairs Designated Engineer identifies a need for additional flow on the Rio Grande, the Designated Engineer is tasked with deciding the timing and amount of releases of prior and paramount water from storage at El Vado Reservoir to meet the needs of the pueblos. Over the last three decades, numerous models have been developed by Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico to simulate, understand, and (or) manage flows in the Middle Rio Grande upstream from Elephant Butte Reservoir. In 2008, the Coalition of Six Middle Rio Grande Basin Pueblos entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a comprehensive survey of these hydrologic models and their capacity to quantify and track various components of flow. The survey of hydrologic models provided in this report will help water-resource managers at the pueblos, as well as the Designated Engineer, make informed water-resource-management decisions that affect the prior and paramount water use. Analysis of 4 publicly available surface-water models and 13 publicly available groundwater models shows that, although elements from many models can be helpful in tracking flow in the Rio Grande, numerous data gaps and modeling needs indicate that accurate, consistent, and timely tracking of flow on the Rio Grande could be improved. Deficient or poorly constrained hydrologic variables are sources of uncertainty in hydrologic models that can be reduced with the acquisition of more refined data. Data gaps need to be filled to allow hydrologic models to be run on a real-time basis and thus ensure predictable water deliveries to meet needs for irrigation, domestic, stock, and other water uses. Timeliness of flow-data reporting is necessary to facilitate real-time model simulation, but even daily data are sometimes difficult to

  11. Investigation of rifting processes in the Rio Grande Rift using data from an unusually large earthquake swarm. Final report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, A.; Balch, R.; Hartse, H.; House, L.

    1995-03-01

    Because the Rio Grande Rift is one of the best seismically instrumented rift zones in the world, studying its seismicity provides an exceptional opportunity to elucidate the active tectonic processes within continental rifts. Beginning on 29 November 1989, a 15 square km region near Bernardo, NM, produced the strongest and longest lasting sequence of earthquakes in the rift in 54 years. Our research focuses on the Bernardo swarm which occurred 40 km north of Socorro, New Mexico in the axial region of the central Rio Grande rift. Important characteristics concerning hypocenters, fault mechanisms, and seismogenic zones are discussed.

  12. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Catfish and Carp Collected from the Rio Grande Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert J. Gonzales Philip R. Fresquez

    2008-05-12

    Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, LANL's Ecology Group began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2002, we electroshocked channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and common carp (Carpiodes carpio) in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL and analyzed fillets for PCB congeners. We also sampled soils along the Rio Chama and Rio Grande drainages to discern whether a background atmospheric source of PCBs that could impact surface water adjacent to LANL might exist. Trace concentrations of PCBs measured in soil (mean = 4.7E-05 {micro}g/g-ww) appear to be from background global atmospheric sources, at least in part, because the bimodal distribution of low-chlorinated PCB congeners and mid-chlorinated PCB congeners in the soil samples is interpreted to be typical of volatilized PCB congeners that are found in the atmosphere and dust from global fallout. Upstream catfish (n = 5) contained statistically (P = 0.047) higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 2.80E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream catfish (n = 10) (mean = 1.50E-02 {micro}g/g-ww). Similarly, upstream carp (n = 4) contained higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 7.98E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream carp (n = 4) (3.07E-02 {micro}g/g-ww); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.42). The dominant PCB homologue in all fish samples was hexachlorobiphenyls. Total PCB concentrations in fish in 2002 are lower than 1997; however, differences in analytical methods and other uncertainties exist. A

  13. Chemical composition and mineralogy of borate from Rio Grande deposit, Uyuni (Bolivia) as raw materials for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen Vargas, Julio; Arancibia, Jony Roger Hans; Alfonso, Pura; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Parcerisa, David; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Bolivia has large tailings as a result of the historic and present-day Sn mining activity developed extensively in that country. Tailings produced in these mining activities have an appropriate composition to reprocess them and make silicate glass and glass-ceramics, obtaining the valorization of wastes and reducing the visual and chemical impact. Reprocessing the wastes to make glass and glass-ceramics prevents the leaching of heavy metals from those wastes because they are retained in the structure of the glass. Furthermore, an option to increase the economic value of these glasses is the introduction of boron and other additives to produce borosilicate glass. In this study a characterization of the Rio Grande borate deposit for its use in the manufacture of borosilicate glass is presented. Mineralogy was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); textures were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Rio Grande borate deposit is located in an area of about 50 km2 close to the south of the Salar of Uyuni, in the Río Grande de Lípez Delta. Borates occur in the contact between fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine sediments from water raising the surface by capillarity. The borates crop out in an extent area but towards the west they are covered by fluvio-deltaic sediments, which can be up to 2 m thick. These borates occur as lenses 50-100 m in diameter and layers up to 1 m thick. They usually form brittle nodules with a cotton-ball texture. Chemical composition of the Rio Grande borates is CaO, 11.82-13.83 wt%; Na2O, 13.50-19.35 wt%; K2O, 0.05- 1.04 wt%; MgO, 0.42-1.46 wt%; B2O3, 36.21-42.60 wt%; SiO2, up to 0.53 wt% and SO2, up to 0.60 wt%. Trace elements are low: Sr content is between 151-786 ppm, Al 12-676 ppm, Mn between 1-17 ppm, As 2-10 ppm and Fe between 9-376 ppm. The most abundant borate mineral in this

  14. Spatial distribution of antimony and arsenic levels in Manadas Creek, an urban tributary of the Rio Grande in Laredo, Texas.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Marcia; Ren, Jianhong; Krishnamurthy, Sushma; Vaughan, Thomas C

    2010-02-01

    The Rio Grande and its tributaries represent a critical water source for both the human population and the ecological resources of the Rio Grande drainage basin. Manadas Creek, an urban tributary of the Rio Grande, is located in an industrialized area of Laredo, Texas, where warehouses, a major railroad, and a decommissioned antimony (Sb) smelter are located. Previous studies have found that the creek water is contaminated with heavy metals such as Sb and arsenic (As). However, data on the metal distribution in this creek are very limited. Herein, water and sediment core samples were collected from six sites along the creek in February, April, and May 2008. Samples were analyzed for dissolved and total metals in water, total metals in sediments, and available (soluble-exchangeable, surface adsorbed, and organically bound) fractions of metals associated with the sediments. Results show that concentrations of Sb in the water and sediment samples were significantly lower at the upstream control site compared to the two sites located near the decommissioned smelter. Decreasing levels of Sb were found at the sites located downstream. The As levels in the sediment remained constant at different depths, whereas Sb varied significantly. A high level, 420 mg/kg, of sediment Sb was found at the maximum sediment depth of 35.0 cm sampled. In addition, 65.7-76.9% Sb and 80.3-85.6% As were in their residual form, 15.0-22.5% Sb and 6.2-11.4% As were bound to organic matter, and the remaining As and Sb were in the soluble and surface adsorbed fractions. Pearson correlation analyses indicated that the distribution of Sb was only moderately correlated to iron and nickel in the sediment and its correlation with the sediment properties measured was insignificant. Cluster analyses only grouped the two Sb isotopes together for the sediments collected in May, indicating that sources other than natural occurrence were associated with Sb. The high level of sediment Sb observed indicates

  15. Annual suspended sediment and trace element fluxes in the Mississippi, Columbia, Colorado, and Rio Grande drainage basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Suspended sediment, sediment-associated, total trace element, phosphorus (P), and total organic carbon (TOC) fluxes were determined for the Mississippi, Columbia, Rio Grande, and Colorado Basins for the study period (the 1996, 1997, and 1998 water years) as part of the US Geological Survey's redesigned National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) programme. The majority (??? 70%) of Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Ba, P, As, Fe, Mn, and Al are transported in association with suspended sediment; Sr transport seems dominated by the dissolved phase, whereas the transport of Li and TOC seems to be divided equally between both phases. Average dissolved trace element levels are markedly lower than reported during the original NASQAN programme; this seems due to the use of 'clean' sampling, processing, and analytical techniques rather than to improvements in water quality. Partitioning between sediment and water for Ag, Pb, Cd, Cr, Co, V, Be, As, Sb, Hg, and Ti could not be estimated due to a lack of detectable dissolved concentrations in most samples. Elevated suspended sediment-associated Zn levels were detected in the Ohio River Basin and elevated Hg levels were detected in the Tennessee River, the former may affect the mainstem Mississippi River, whereas the latter probably do not. Sediment-associated concentrations of Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Co, Ba, Mo, Sb, Hg, and Fe are markedly elevated in the upper Columbia Basin, and appear to be detectable (Zn, Cd) as far downstream as the middle of the basin. These elevated concentrations seem to result from mining and/or mining-related activities. Consistently detectable concentrations of dissolved Se were found only in the Colorado River Basin. Calculated average annual suspended sediment fluxes at the mouths of the Mississippi and Rio Grande Basins were below, whereas those for the Columbia and Colorado Basins were above previously published annual values. Downstream suspended sediment-associated and total trace element fluxes

  16. Geochemical characterization of ground-water flow in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, Middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L. Niel; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.; Sanford, Ward E.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2004-01-01

    and sulfur hexafluoride from 288 wells and springs in parts of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. The surface-water data collected as part of this study include monthly measurements of major- and minor-element chemistry (30 elements), oxygen-18 and deuterium content of water, chlorofluorocarbons, and tritium content at 14 locations throughout the basin. Additional data include stable isotope analyses of precipitation and of ground water from City of Albuquerque production wells collected and archived from the early 1980?s, and other data on the chemical and isotopic composition of air, unsaturated zone air, plants, and carbonate minerals from throughout the basin. The data were used to identify 12 sources of water to the basin, map spatial and vertical extents of ground-water flow, map water chemistry in relation to hydrogeologic, stratigraphic, and structural properties of the basin, determine radiocarbon ages of ground water, and reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions in the basin over the past 30,000 years. The data indicate that concentrations of most elements and isotopes generally parallel the predominant north to south direction of ground-water flow. The radiocarbon ages of dissolved inorganic carbon in ground water range from modern (post-1950) to more than 30,000 years before present, and appear to be particularly well defined in the predominantly siliciclastic aquifer system. Major sources of water to the basin include (1) recharge from mountains along the north, east and southwest margins (median age 5,000-9,000 years); (2) seepage from the Rio Grande and Rio Puerco (median age 4,000-8,000 years), and from Abo and Tijeras Arroyos (median age 3,000-9,000 years); (3) inflow of saline water along the southwestern basin margin (median age 20,000 years); and (4) inflow along the northern basin margin that probably represents recharge from the Jemez Mountains during the last glacial period (median age 20,000 years). Water recharged from the Jemez Mountains

  17. U.S. Geological Survey Middle Rio Grande Basin Study; proceedings of the first annual workshop, Denver, Colorado, November 12-14, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Approximately 40 percent (about 600,000 people) of the total population of New Mexico lives within the Middle Rio Grande Basin, which includes the City of Albuquerque. Ongoing analyses of the central portion of the Middle Rio Grande Basin by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque and other cooperators have shown that ground water in the basin is not as readily accessible as earlier studies indicated. A more complete characterization of the ground-water resources of the entire Middle Rio Grande Basin is hampered by a scarcity of data in the northern and southern areas of the basin. The USGS Middle Rio Grande Basin Study is a 5-year effort by the USGS and other agencies to improve the understanding of the hydrology, geology, and land-surface characteristics of the Middle Rio Grande Basin. The primary objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the water resources of the basin. Of particular interest is to determine the extent of hydrologic connection between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer. Additionally, ground-water quality affects the availability of water supplies in the basin. Improving the existing USGS- constructed ground-water flow model of the Middle Rio Grande Basin will integrate all the various tasks that improve our knowledge of the various components of the Middle Rio Grande water budget. Part of this improvement will be accompanied by extended knowledge of the aquifer system beyond the Albuquerque area into the northern and southern reaches of the basin. Other improvements will be based on understanding gained through process-oriented research and improved geologic characterization of the deposits. The USGS will study the hydrology, geology, and land-surface characteristics of the basin to provide the scientific information needed for water- resources management and for managers to plan for water supplies needed for a growing population. To facilitate exchange of information among the

  18. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part E - The Denver & Rio Grande Western Route

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Marius R.

    1922-01-01

    correctly the basis of its development, and above all to appreciate keenly the real value of the country he looks out upon, not as so many square miles of territory represented on the map in a railroad folder by meaningless spaces, but rather as land - real estate, if you please - varying widely in present appearance because differing largely in its history, and characterized by even greater variation in values because possessing diversified natural resources. One region may be such as to afford a livelihood for only a pastoral people; another may present opportunity for intensive agriculture; still another may contain hidden stores of mineral wealth that may attract large industrial development; and, taken together, these varied resources afford, the promise of long-continued prosperity for this or that State. Items of interest in civic development or references to significant epochs in the record of discovery and settlement may be interspersed. with explanations of mountain and valley or statements of geologic history. In a broad way the story of the West is a unit, and every chapter should be told in order to meet fully the needs of the tourist who aims to understand all that he sees. To such a traveler-reader this series of guidebooks is addressed. To this interpretation of our own country the United States Geological Survey brings the accumulated data of decades of pioneering investigation, and the present contribution is only one type of return to the public which has supported this scientific work under the Federal Government - a by-product of research. In the preparation of the description of the country traversed by the Denver & Rio Grande Western Route the geographic and geologic information already published as well as unpublished material in the possession of the Geological Survey has been utilized, but to supplement this material Mr. Campbell made a field examination of the entire route in 1915-1916. Information has been furnished by others,

  19. Changes in soft-bottom macrobenthic assemblages after a sulphuric acid spill in the Rio Grande Harbor (RS, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Bemvenuti, C E; Rosa-Filho, J S; Elliott, M

    2003-05-01

    The structure of macrobenthic assemblages in Rio Grande Harbor was analyzed during and after a sulphuric acid spill in August 1988. Five stations were sampled four times between September 1988 and March 1999. At each station, three samples were taken using a van Veen grab (0.078 m2). A total of 22 taxa were collected including Crustacea (9 spp.), Polychaeta (7 spp.), Mollusca (3 spp.), Phoronida (1 sp.), Nemertinea (1 sp.), and Plathyelminthea (1 sp.). The macrobenthic assemblages suffered different impacts depending on station location and time: 1) immediate impact, i.e., during acid discharge, as at the station nearest (250 m) the acid spill source; 2) impact some time after the discharge, as at the station 500 m downstream from the acid spill source; and 3) absence of direct impact on the remaining sampling points, on the discharge area outer limit. The macrobenthic assemblage recovered six months after the sulphuric acid spill. PMID:14509840

  20. Competing Interests and Concerns in the Rio Grande Basin: Mountain Hydrology, Desert Ecology, Climate Change, and Population Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.

    2004-12-01

    In the mountainous American Southwest, the Rio Grande basin is a prime example of how conflicts, misconceptions, and competition regarding water can arise in arid and semi-arid catchments. Much of the Rio Grande runoff originates from snow fields in the San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado and the Sangre De Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico, far from population centers. Large and rapidly growing cities, like Albuquerque, Las Cruces, El Paso, and Juarez, are located along the Rio Grande where it flows through the Chihuahuan Desert, the largest desert in North America(two NSF Long Term Ecological Research sites are located in the desert portion of the basin). As a result, the importance of snowmelt, which makes up 50-75% or more of the total streamflow in sub-basins above Elephant Butte Reservoir(in south central New Mexico) is hardly known to the general public. Streamflow below Elephant Butte Reservoir is rainfall driven and very limited, with the lower basin receiving only 170-380 mm of precipitation annually, most of it occurring during the months of July-September. Extreme events, such as drought and flooding, are not unusual in arid basins, and they are of increasing concern with regard to changes in frequency of such events under the impending conditions of climate change. Current water demands in the basin already exceed the water supply by 15% or more, so streamflow forecasts(especially from snowmelt runoff) are extremely valuable for efficient water management as well as for proper apportionment of water between Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas under the Rio Grande Compact of 1938 and between the U.S. and Mexico under the Treaty of 1906. Other demands on the water supply include Indian water rights, flood regulation, irrigated agriculture, municipal and industrial demands, water quality, riverine and riparian habitat protection, endangered and threatened species protection, recreation, and hydropower. To assess snow accumulation and cover and to

  1. Hydrologic budget of the late Oligocene Lake Creede and the evolution of the upper Rio Grande drainage system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Paul B.; Steven, Thomas A.; Hayba, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    The filling history, hydrologic budget, and geomorphic development of ancient Lake Creede and its tributary basin are evaluated to determine the factors that controlled its character. The lake filled the Creede caldera that formed in the late Oligocene as a consequence of the eruption of the Snowshoe Mountain Tuff. The caldera's sedimentary fill accumlated to a depth of about 1.26 km and had a volume of about 89 km3. The highest lake level was ~3300 m (10,800 ft) present altitude before it drained eastward across a broad volcanic plateau as the ancestral Rio Grande. A tributary canyon several hundred meters deep was cut into hard rhyolite in the north wall of the caldera before the lake was more than half full; its presence demonstrates that ancient Lake Creede filled slowly and thus occupied a long-lived, closed basin. The slow filling rate is incompatible with the present water flux through the Creede caldera basin, because such a flow would fill the basin geologically instantaneously. This mismatch, together with the recognition that the Oligocene climate was similar to that of today, forces the reexamination of the hydrologic and geomorphic history of the caldera. That appraisal shows that the caldera cannot have resurged rapidly immediately after caldera collapse, and that ancient watershed must have been lass than half as large as the present upper Rio Grande basin. The ancient lake had a more or less constant surface area of about 200 km2 that approximated a steady-state condition between inflow and evaporation. Although the lake level fluctuated with climatic variations, its surface elevation steadily climbed as sediment accumulated, accelerating as resurgance and dome growth usurped spacewithin the basin. It could have had one playa stage early in its development and another after the basin had nearly filled with sediment, but there is no direct evidence for either. At least the lower half of the sedimentary column (the part sampled by the scientific

  2. Magnetotelluric data collected near geophysically logged boreholes in the Espa?ola and Middle Rio Grande basins, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    The Santa Fe region is growing rapidly. The Santa Fe Group aquifer in the Espa?ola Basin is the main source of municipal water for the region, and water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Tertiary Santa Fe Group. The Santa Fe Group includes the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift and contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the Espa?ola Basin in northern New Mexico. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, electromagnetic surveys, and hydrologic, lithologic, and hydro-geochemical data are being used to better understand the aquifer systems. Magnetotelluric (MT) surveys were completed as part of these studies. The primary purpose of the MT surveys was to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in various rock types that help control the properties of aquifers in the region. Resistivity modeling of the MT data can be used to investigate buried structures related to the basic geologic framework of the study area. The purpose of this report is to release MT sounding data collected near geophysically logged boreholes in the study area, including the nearby Middle Rio Grande Basin. This MT data can be used in subsequent resistivity modeling. No interpretation of the data is included in this report.

  3. Mass movements in the Rio Grande Valley (Quebrada de Humahuaca, Northwestern Argentina): a methodological approach to reduce the risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcato, G.; Pasuto, A.; Rivelli, F. R.

    2009-10-01

    Slope processes such as slides and debris flows, are among the main events that induce effects on the Rio Grande sediment transport capacity. The slides mainly affect the slope of the Rio Grande river basin while debris and mud flows phenomena take place in the tributary valleys. In the past decades several mass movements occurred causing victims and great damages to roads and villages and therefore hazard assessment and risk mitigation is of paramount importance for a correct development of the area. This is also an urgent need since the Quebrada de Humahuaca was recently included in the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage. The growing tourism business may lead to an uncontrolled urbanization of the valley with the consequent enlargement of threatened areas. In this framework mitigation measures have to take into account not only technical aspects related to the physical behaviour of the moving masses but also environmental and sociological factors that could influence the effectiveness of the countermeasures. Mitigation of landslide effects is indeed rather complex because of the large extension of the territory and the particular geological and geomorphological setting. Moreover the necessity to maintain the natural condition of the area as prescribed by UNESCO, make this task even more difficult. Nowadays no in-depth study of the entire area exists, therefore an integrated and multidisciplinary investigation plan is going to be set up including geological and geomorphological investigations as well as archaeological and historical surveys. The better understanding of geomorphological evolution processes of the Quebrada de Humahuaca will bridge the gap between the necessity of preservation and the request of safety keeping of the recommendation by UNESCO.

  4. Distribution and transport of sediment-bound metal contaminants in the rio grande de tarcoles, costa rica (Central America)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.; Cain, D.J.; Lamothe, P.J.; Fries Fernandez, T.L.G.; Vargas, J.A.; Murillo, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    A reconnaissance survey of the extent of metal contamination in the Rio Grande de Tarcoles river system of Costa Rica indicated high levels of chromium (Cr) in the fine-grain bed sediments (83 times Cr background or 3000->5000 ??g/g). In the main channel of the river downstream of the San Jose urban area, Cr contamination in sediments was 4-6 times background and remained relatively constant over 50 km to the mouth of the river. Sediment from a mangrove swamp at the river mouth had Cr levels 2-3 times above background. Similar patterns of dilution were observed for lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) sediment contamination, although the contamination levels were lower. The high affinity of Cr towards particulate phases, probably as Cr(III), allows the use of Cr contamination levels for delineating regions of deposition of fine-grained sediments and dilution of particle associated contaminants during transport and deposition.A reconnaissance survey of the extent of metal contamination in the Rio Grande de Tarcoles river system of Costa Rica indicated high levels of chromium (Cr) in the fine-grain bed sediments (83 times Cr background or 3000->5000 ??g/g). In the main channel of the river downstream of the San Jose urban area, Cr contamination in sediments was 4-6 times background and remained relatively constant over 50 km to the mouth of the river. Sediments from a mangrove swamp at the river mouth had Cr levels 2-3 times above background. Similar patterns of dilution were observed for lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) sediment contamination, although the contamination levels were lower. The high affinity of Cr towards particulate phases, probably as Cr(III), allows the use of Cr contamination levels for delineating regions of deposition of fine-grained sediments and dilution of particle associated contaminants during transport and deposition.

  5. Neogene basins of the northern Rio Grande rift: Partitioning and asymmetry inherited from Laramide and older uplifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    Three asymmetric Neogene basins in the northern Rio Grande rift of New Mexico and Colorado - the San Luis basin, the upper Arkansas River graben, and the Blue River graben - are tilted toward large flanking normal faults and lie astride the similarly asymmetric Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary (Laramide) San Juan-San Luis, Sawatch, and Front Range-Gore Range uplifts, respectively. The steep, thrust-faulted side of each uplift is on the same side as the down-rotated side of each of the Neogene basins. In addition, the direction of stratal tilt changes northward across the Villa Grove accommodation zone from east in the San Luis basin to west in the upper Arkansas River graben. This accommodation zone coincides approximately with the northward change from the east-directed San Juan-San Luis uplift to the west-directed Sawatch uplift. These observations, supported by seismic-reflection studies across the San Luis basin and studies of several other superimposed pairs of rift basins and Laramide uplifts, suggest that the basin-bounding normal faults are listric and merge at depth with the older thrusts, which are also listric and root into the crust at about 15-16 km. The Blue River graben is complicated by lack of basin fill and a thrust history along the west side of the Gore Range that is at least as old as late Paleozoic. Nonetheless, the Neogene valley is demonstrably tilted west and lies astride an overall west-directed thrust system, similar to other thrust-and-basin relationships in the northern Rio Grande rift.

  6. Relative susceptibility and effects on performance of Rio Grande cutthroat trout and rainbow trout challenged with Myxobolus cerebralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuBey, R.J.; Caldwell, C.A.; Gould, W.R.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the susceptibility of Rio Grande cutthroat trout (RGCT) Oncorhynchus clarkii virginalis to infection by Myxobolus cerebralis in a laboratory experiment. In the same experiment, rainbow trout (RBT) O. mykiss were similarly exposed to M. cerebralis as a reference of known sensitivity to the parasite. Treatments consisting of six parasite concentrations (0, 50, 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 triactinomyxons [TAMS] per fish) were randomized within a complete block design using RGCT and RBT fry beginning at 60 d posthatch (600 degree-days at 10??C). The laboratory experiment was terminated at 130 d postexposure (1,900 degree-days at 10??C). Diagnostic metrics included clinical signs (behavioral and black tail), survival, myxospore counts, histology, and a swimming performance challenge. Clinical signs of whirling disease were observed within both species at 500 and 1,000 TAMs/fish by 66 d postexposure to the disease. Rio Grande cutthroat trout exhibited significantly lower survival (50% cumulative mortality at 1,000 TAMs/fish) and a significant concentration response compared with RBT (8% cumulative mortality at 1,000 TAMs/fish). Histological scoring of cranial sections using a 0-5 scale of increasing pathogenic effect revealed greater disease severity in RGCT (3.20) than in RBT (2.43) at 100 TAMs/fish but no difference at 1,000 TAMs/fish (4.15 and 4.12, respectively). Swimming performance revealed detectably lower critical swimming speed in both RGCT and RBT in relation to increased parasite concentrations, the RGCT exhibiting detectably lower critical swimming speeds than the RBT at increased parasite concentration. If M. cerebralis were to spread to areas supporting RGCT, population-level effects may occur. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  7. An assessment of water quality and microbial risk in Rio Grande Basin in the United States-Mexican border region.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Alum, Absar; Alvarez, Maria; Mendoza, Jose; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2005-06-01

    Increased reliance of urban populations on Rio Grande water has necessitated an expanded microbial surveillance of the river to help identify and evaluate sources of human pathogens, which could pose a public health risk. The objectives of this study were to investigate microbial and chemical water quality in Rio Grande water and to perform risk assessment analyses for Cryptosporidium. No oocysts in any of the ten-litre samples were detected. However, the limit of detection in the water samples ranged between 20 and 200 oocysts/100 L. The limits of detection obtained in this study would result in one to two orders of magnitude higher risk of infection for Cryptosporidium than the U.S.EPA annual acceptable risk level of 10(-4). The bacterial data showed the significance of animal farming and raw sewage as sources of fecal pollution. Male specific and somatic coliphages were detected in 52% (11/21) and 62% (24/39) of the samples, respectively. Somatic coliphages were greater by one order of magnitude, and were better correlated with total (r2 = 0.6801; p < or = 0.05) and fecal coliform bacteria (r2 = 0.7366; p < or = 0.05) than male specific coliphages. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values ranged 2.58-5.59mg/L and 1.23-2.29 m(-1) (mg/I)(-1), respectively. Low SUVA values of raw water condition make it difficult to remove DOC during physical and chemical treatment processes. The microbial and chemical data provided from this study can help drinking water utilities to maintain balance between greater microbial inactivation and reduced disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation.

  8. Trace-element accumulation by Hygrohypnum ochraceum in the upper Rio Grande Basin, Colorado and New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.F.; Porter, S.D.

    1997-12-01

    Accumulation of 12 trace elements by transplanted aquatic bryophytes (Hygrohypnum ochraceum) was determined at 13 sites in the Rio Grande and tributary streams in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico as part of the US Geological Survey`s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purposes of the study were to determine the spatial distribution of trace elements in relation to land-use practices in the upper Rio Grande Basin, compare accumulation rates of metals in bryophytes at sites contaminated by trace elements, and evaluate transplanted aquatic bryophytes as a tool for examining the bioavailability of trace elements in relation to concentrations in water and bed sediment. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in bryophytes, water, and bed sediment were significantly higher at sites that receive drainage from mining areas than at sites near agricultural or urban activities. Concentrations of most trace elements were lower in a tributary stream below an urban source than at sites near mining or agricultural use. Concentrations of Cu and Zn in bryophytes correlated with concentrations in water and bed sediment. In addition, bryophyte concentrations of As, Cd, and Pb correlated with concentrations in bed sediment. Transplanted bryophytes can provide an indication of bioavailability. Rates of accumulation were related to the magnitude of ambient trace-element concentrations; maximal uptake occurred during the first 10 d of exposure. Trace-element concentrations in transplanted bryophytes could potentially be used to predict water and sediment concentrations that represent an integration of conditions over short to intermediate lengths of time, rather than instantaneous conditions as measured using water samples.

  9. Trace-element accumulation by Hygrohypnum ochraceum in the upper Rio Grande Basin, Colorado and New Mexico, Usa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.F.; Porter, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Accumulation of 12 trace elements by transplanted aquatic bryophytes (Hygrohypnum ochraceum) was determined at 13 sites in the Rio Grande and tributary streams in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purposes of the study were to determine the spatial distribution of trace elements in relation to land-use practices in the upper Rio Grande Basin, compare accumulation rates of metals in bryophytes at sites contaminated by trace elements, and evaluate transplanted aquatic bryophytes as a tool for examining the bioavailability of trace elements in relation to concentrations in water and bed sediment. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in bryophytes, water, and bed sediment were significantly higher at sites that receive drainage from mining areas than at sites near agricultural or urban activities. Concentrations of most trace elements were lower in a tributary stream below an urban source than at sites near mining or agricultural use. Concentrations of Cu and Zn in bryophytes correlated with concentrations in water and bed sediment. In addition, bryophyte concentrations of As, Cd, and Pb correlated with concentrations in bed sediment. Transplanted bryophytes can provide an indication of bioavailability. Rates of accumulation were related to the magnitude of ambient trace-element concentrations; maximal uptake occurred during the first 10 d of exposure. Trace-element concentrations in transplanted bryophytes could potentially be used to predict water and sediment concentrations that represent an integration of conditions over short to intermediate lengths of time, rather than instantaneous conditions as measured using water samples.

  10. Stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and dendrogeomorphic analyses of rapid floodplain formation along the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, D.J.; Scott, M.L.; Shafroth, P.B.; Schmidt, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The channel of the lower Rio Grande in the Big Bend region rapidly narrows during years of low mean and peak flow. We conducted stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and dendrogeomorphic analyses within two long floodplain trenches to precisely reconstruct the timing and processes of recent floodplain formation. We show that the channel of the Rio Grande narrowed through the oblique and vertical accretion of inset floodplains following channel-widening floods in 1978 and 1990-1991. Vertical accretion occurred at high rates, ranging from 16 to 35 cm/yr. Dendrogeomorphic analyses show that the onset of channel narrowing occurred during low-flow years when channel bars obliquely and vertically accreted fine sediment. This initial stage of accretion occurred by both bedload and suspended-load deposition within the active channel. Vegetation became established on top of these fine-grained deposits during years of low peak flow and stabilized these developing surfaces. Subsequent deposition by moderate floods (between 1.5 and 7 yr recurrence intervals) caused additional accretion at rapid rates. Suspended-sediment deposition was dominant in the upper deposits, resulting in the formation of natural levees at the channel margins and the deposition of horizontally bedded, fining-upward deposits in the floodplain trough. Overall, channel narrowing and floodplain formation occurred through an evolution from active-channel to floodplain depositional processes. High-resolution dendrogeomorphic analyses provide the ability to specifically correlate the flow record to the onset of narrowing, the establishment of riparian vegetation, the formation of natural levees, and ultimately, the conversion of portions of the active channel to floodplains. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  11. Quantification and molecular characterization of Salmonella isolated from food samples involved in salmonellosis outbreaks in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Mürmann, Lisandra; dos Santos, Maria Cecília; Longaray, Solange Mendes; Both, Jane Mari Corrêa; Cardoso, Marisa

    2008-01-01

    Data concerning the prevalence and populations of Salmonella in foods implicated in outbreaks may be important to the development of quantitative microbial risk assessments of individual food products. In this sense, the objective of the present study was to assess the amount of Salmonella sp. in different foods implicated in foodborne outbreaks in Rio Grande do Sul occurred in 2005 and to characterize the isolated strains using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Nineteen food samples involved in ten foodborne outbreaks occurred in 2005, and positive on Salmonella isolation at the Central Laboratory of the Health Department of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, were included in this study. Food samples were submitted to estimation of Salmonella using the Most Probable Number (MPN) technique. Moreover, one confirmed Salmonella colony of each food sample was serotyped, characterized by its XbaI-macrorestriction profile, and submitted to antimicrobial resistance testing. Foods containing eggs, mayonnaise or chicken were contaminated with Salmonella in eight outbreaks. Higher counts (>107 MPN.g-1) of Salmonella were detected mostly in foods containing mayonnaise. The isolation of Salmonella from multiple food items in five outbreaks probably resulted from the cross-contamination, and the high Salmonella counts detected in almost all analyzed samples probably resulted from storing in inadequate temperature. All strains were identified as S. Enteritidis, and presented a unique macrorestriction profile, demonstrating the predominance of one clonal group in foods involved in the salmonellosis outbreaks. A low frequency of antimicrobial resistant S. Enteritidis strains was observed and nalidixic acid was the only resistance marker detected. PMID:24031261

  12. Simulation of Ground-Water Flow in the Middle Rio Grande Basin Between Cochiti and San Acacia, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, Douglas P.; Barroll, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional, finite difference, ground-water-flow model of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system within the Middle Rio Grande Basin between Cochiti and San Acacia, New Mexico. The aquifer system is composed of the Santa Fe Group of middle Tertiary to Quaternary age and post-Santa Fe Group valley and basin-fill deposits of Quaternary age. Population increases in the basin since the 1940's have caused dramatic increases in ground-water withdrawals from the aquifer system, resulting in large ground-water-level declines. Because the Rio Grande is hydraulically connected to the aquifer system, these ground-water withdrawals have also decreased flow in the Rio Grande. Concern about water resources in the basin led to the development of a research plan for the basin focused on the hydrologic interaction of ground water and surface water (McAda, D.P., 1996, Plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relation between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system near Albuquerque, central New Mexico: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 96-4006, 58 p.). A multiyear research effort followed, funded and conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and other agencies (Bartolino, J.R., and Cole, J.C., 2002, Ground-water resources of the Middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1222, 132 p.). The modeling work described in this report incorporates the results of much of this work and is the culmination of this multiyear study. The purpose of the model is (1) to integrate the components of the ground-water-flow system, including the hydrologic interaction between the surface-water systems in the basin, to better understand the geohydrology of the basin and (2) to provide a tool to help water managers plan for and administer the use of basin water resources. The aquifer system is represented by nine model layers extending from the water table to the pre-Santa Fe Group basement rocks, as much as 9,000 feet

  13. Comparison of organochlorine chemical body burdens of female breast cancer cases with cancer free women in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil--Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, C.A.; Petreas, M.X.; Caleffi, M.; Barbosa, F.S.; Goth-Goldstein, R.

    1999-12-01

    This pilot study collected preliminary data to examine known and suspected breast cancer risk factors among women living in rural and urban areas in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil by questionnaire. In addition, the body burden levels of a panel of organochlorines was measured in a small clinic-based prospective sample.

  14. Spatial information technologies for climate change impact on ecosystems: detecting and mapping invasive weeds in the Rio Grande River system of south Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetlands and aquatic ecosystems are vulnerable to climate change. Exotic invasive weeds are a serious problem in the Rio Grande River system of Texas. The river extends 3,040 km from its source in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado to the mouth at the Gulf of Mexico on the United States-Mexico borde...

  15. Assessment of arsenic and heavy metal concentrations in water and sediments of the Rio Grande at El Paso-Juarez metroplex region.

    PubMed

    Rios-Arana, J V; Walsh, E J; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2004-01-01

    The Rio Grande located along the US-Mexico border is affected by anthropogenic activities along its geographical course. Runoff and wind deposition of smelting residues may contribute to the pollution of the Rio Grande in the El Paso-Ciudad Juarez area. Few studies have addressed the presence or impacts of heavy metals or arsenic in this ecosystem. This study reports a survey of heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and arsenic (As) in water and sediments of the Rio Grande collected from seven sites in the El Paso-Juarez region. Since water quality influences metal content in water, physical (temperature, flow and conductivity), and chemical (pH, dissolved oxygen, nitrates, alkalinity, and water hardness) parameters were measured at each site. Arsenic and heavy metal levels were determined using Inductively Couple Plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy following EPA procedures. Zinc and lead were found as both total and dissolved metals in most of the samples, with concentrations of total recoverable metals reaching up to 105 and 70 microg/l, respectively. Most metals were found in sediment samples collected from four of seven sites. The highest Cu concentration (35 mg/l) was found at the American Dam site. Concentrations of metals found through this survey will be used as a reference for future studies in monitoring arsenic, heavy metals, and their impacts in the Rio Grande.

  16. Impact of the biological control agent, Tetramesa romana (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) on Arundo donax (Poaceae: Arundinoideae) along the Rio Grande River in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five years post release of 1.2 million arundo wasps, Tetramesa romana, into the riparian habitats of the lower Rio Grande River; changes in the health the invasive weed, Arundo donax, giant reed have been documented. These changes in plant attributes are fairly consistent along the 558 river miles b...

  17. Towards a Pedagogy of a New Social Contract: Lessons from the Participatory Budget in the State of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streck, Danilo Romeu

    2004-01-01

    The paper analyses the pedagogical dimension of the process of Participatory Budgeting in the State of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil), taking into consideration the local and regional culture as well as the wider political milieu. The question this paper engages with is whether, in this social movement involving around 400,000 people in 2001, there…

  18. Towards a Pedagogy of a New Social Contract: Lessons from Participatory Budgeting in the State of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streck, Danilo R.

    This paper analyzes the pedagogical dimension within the process of participatory budgeting in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, taking into consideration the local and regional culture, as well as the political milieu. The question is whether, in this social movement which involved around 400,000 people in 2001, signs can be identified that…

  19. Colonias in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of South Texas: A Summary Report. Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, Policy Research Report, Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Kingsley E.; And Others

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley of South Texas consists of three counties: Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy. Poverty pervades in the Valley, especially in the colonias ("a poor, rural unincorporated community with 20 or more dwelling units, where home ownership is the rule"). Colonia residents are almost exclusively Mexican Americans. Contributing to the…

  20. Water-quality data for the Rio Grande between Picacho Bridge near Las Cruces and Calle del Norte Bridge near Mesilla, New Mexico, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    The City of Las Cruces is concerned about water quality in a reach of the Rio Grande that receives outfall from the City of Las Cruces wastewater-treatment plant. Water-quality samples were collected from the Rio Grande at Picacho Bridge near Las Cruces, New Mexico; from the sampling site at the City of Las Cruces wastewater-treatment plant; and from the Rio Grande at Calle del Norte Bridge near Mesilla, New Mexico. The samples were collected on 12 days from August 6, 1996, to February 28, 1997, and were analyzed for a suite of dissolved and total constituents including trace metals. Instantaneous stream discharge was measured concurrently with collection of the Rio Grande samples. At the wastewater- treatment plant, the City of Las Cruces provided instantaneous discharge rates concurrent with sampling. Quality-control measures used in this study to ensure analytical accuracy included replicate sampling, replicate analysis of split samples, ambient blanks, equipment blanks, and analysis of standard reference water samples.

  1. Use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) to assess occurrence and estimate water concentrations of selected organic compounds in the Rio Grande from Presidio to Brownsville, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    1999-01-01

    In Texas, the Rio Grande forms the international boundary between Mexico and the United States and extends about 2,000 kilometers from El Paso to the mouth of the Rio Grande just south of Brownsville, where the river flows into the Gulf of Mexico (fig. 1). The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has resulted in increased industrialization and population growth on both sides of the international boundary, which in turn has focused attention on environmental issues, including water quality and quantity in the Rio Grande. Nonpoint urban and agricultural runoff and wastewater discharges from industrial and municipal facilities are potential sources of organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Historical applications of organochlorine pesticides such as DOT and chlordane in the United States and Mexico have resulted in a continuing source of these environmentally longlived compounds in the Rio Grande Basin. In the United States, all organochlorine pesticides either have been banned entirely or have use restrictions. However, in Mexico, the organochlorine pesticide DOT is still in use, although with some application restrictions.

  2. Immunological Profile of the Yellow Clam Mesodesma mactroides (Mesodesmatidae) from the Southern Coast of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva Santos, Juan Jethro; Carvalho, Yuri Bovi; de Alcantara Lopes, Diogo Luiz; Romano, Luis Alberto

    2016-03-01

    The yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides (Mesodesmatidae) is a sandy beach bivalve that is distributed from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to the south of Buenos Aires province, Argentina. The yellow clam population has been declining in recent decades. To increase our understanding of this species, we evaluated the immunological status of yellow clams collected during different seasons from various areas in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. We characterized the hemocytes, determined the differential hemocyte counts (DHCs), calculated the apoptotic index, and evaluated the incidence of parasites in yellow clams through histological analysis. We identified two types of hemocyte (hyaline and granular) that showed significant variation in DHCs among sampling areas during the summer and winter. The apoptotic index only exhibited significant variation during the summer. Histopathological analysis results did not significantly differ among sampling areas. This work demonstrated that environmental variation (e.g., temperature and salinity) associated with anthropogenic actions may be affecting the immune system of yellow clams. However, more studies are needed to determine the full influence of these factors on the yellow clam's immune system and thus contribute to future management and aquaculture of the species. Received May 10, 2015; accepted October 28, 2015. PMID:26913557

  3. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley study unit, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas; analysis of selected nutrient, suspended-sediment, and pesticide data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.; Radell, M.J.; Richey, S.F.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a summary of data compiled from sources throughout the Rio Grande Valley study unit of the National Water- Quality Assessment program. Information presented includes the sources and types of water-quality data available, the utility of water-quality data for statistical analysis, and a description of recent water-quality conditions and trends and their relation to natural and human factors. Water-quality data are limited to concentrations of selected nutrient species in surface water and ground water, concentrations of suspended sediment and suspended solids in surface water, and pesticides in surface water, ground water, and biota. The Rio Grande Valley study unit includes about 45,900 square miles in Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas upstream from the streamflow-monitoring station Rio Grande at El Paso, Texas. The area also includes the San Luis Closed Basin and the surface-water closed basins east of the Continental Divide and north of the United States-Mexico international border. The Rio Grande drains about 29,300 square miles in these States; the remainder of the study unit area is in closed basins. Concentrations of all nutrients found in surface-water samples collected from the Rio Grande, with the exception of phosphorus, generally remained nearly constant from the northernmost station in the study unit to Rio Grande near Isleta, where concentrations were larger by an order of magnitude. Total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads increased downstream between Lobatos, Colorado, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. Nutrient concentrations remained elevated with slight variations until downstream from Elephant Butte Reservoir, where nutrient concentrations were lower. Nutrient concentrations then increased downstream from the reservoir, as evidenced by elevated concentrations at Rio Grande at El Paso, Texas. Suspended-sediment concentrations were similar at stations upstream from Otowi Bridge near San Ildefonso, New Mexico. The concentration and

  4. Hydrochemical tracers in the middle Rio Grande Basin, USA: 2. Calibration of a groundwater-flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Plummer, L. Niel; McAda, Douglas P.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    The calibration of a groundwater model with the aid of hydrochemical data has demonstrated that low recharge rates in the Middle Rio Grande Basin may be responsible for a groundwater trough in the center of the basin and for a substantial amount of Rio Grande water in the regional flow system. Earlier models of the basin had difficulty reproducing these features without any hydrochemical data to constrain the rates and distribution of recharge. The objective of this study was to use the large quantity of available hydrochemical data to help calibrate the model parameters, including the recharge rates. The model was constructed using the US Geological Survey's software MODFLOW, MODPATH, and UCODE, and calibrated using 14C activities and the positions of certain flow zones defined by the hydrochemical data. Parameter estimation was performed using a combination of nonlinear regression techniques and a manual search for the minimum difference between field and simulated observations. The calibrated recharge values were substantially smaller than those used in previous models. Results from a 30,000-year transient simulation suggest that recharge was at a maximum about 20,000 years ago and at a minimum about 10,000 years ago. Le calibrage d'un modèle hydrogéologique avec l'aide de données hydrochimiques a démontré que la recharge relativement faible dans le Grand Bassin du Middle Rio est vraisemblablement responsable d'une dépression des eaux souterraines dans le centre du bassin et de la présence d'une quantité substantielle d'eau du Rio Grande dans l'aquifère du Groupe de Santa Fe. Les modèles antérieurs avaient des difficultés à reproduire ses conclusions sans l'aide de données hydrochimiques pour contraindre les taux et la distribution de la recharge. L'objectif de cette étude était d'utiliser une grande quantité de données hydrochimiques permettant de calibrer les paramètres du modèle, et notamment les taux de recharge. Le modèle a

  5. Hydrochemical tracers in the middle Rio Grande Basin, USA: 2. Calibration of a groundwater-flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Ward E.; Plummer, L. Niel; McAda, Douglas P.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    The calibration of a groundwater model with the aid of hydrochemical data has demonstrated that low recharge rates in the Middle Rio Grande Basin may be responsible for a groundwater trough in the center of the basin and for a substantial amount of Rio Grande water in the regional flow system. Earlier models of the basin had difficulty reproducing these features without any hydrochemical data to constrain the rates and distribution of recharge. The objective of this study was to use the large quantity of available hydrochemical data to help calibrate the model parameters, including the recharge rates. The model was constructed using the US Geological Survey's software MODFLOW, MODPATH, and UCODE, and calibrated using 14C activities and the positions of certain flow zones defined by the hydrochemical data. Parameter estimation was performed using a combination of nonlinear regression techniques and a manual search for the minimum difference between field and simulated observations. The calibrated recharge values were substantially smaller than those used in previous models. Results from a 30,000-year transient simulation suggest that recharge was at a maximum about 20,000 years ago and at a minimum about 10,000 years ago. Le calibrage d'un modèle hydrogéologique avec l'aide de données hydrochimiques a démontré que la recharge relativement faible dans le Grand Bassin du Middle Rio est vraisemblablement responsable d'une dépression des eaux souterraines dans le centre du bassin et de la présence d'une quantité substantielle d'eau du Rio Grande dans l'aquifère du Groupe de Santa Fe. Les modèles antérieurs avaient des difficultés à reproduire ses conclusions sans l'aide de données hydrochimiques pour contraindre les taux et la distribution de la recharge. L'objectif de cette étude était d'utiliser une grande quantité de données hydrochimiques permettant de calibrer les paramètres du modèle, et notamment les taux de recharge. Le modèle a

  6. Regional variation and relationships between the contaminants dde and selenium and stable isotopes in swallows nesting along the Rio Grande and one reference site, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Mora, M A; Boutton, T w; Musquiz, D

    2005-03-01

    Cave swallows (Petrochelidon fulva) and cliff swallows (P. pyrrhonota) nest in numerous colonies throughout the Texas portion of the Rio Grande along the U.S. border with Mexico. We collected swallows during 1999 and 2000 from eight locations along the Rio Grande to determine if delta15N and delta13C values could be used to predict 1,1-di-(p-chlorophenyl-)2,2-dichloroethene (DDE) and selenium (Se) contaminant burdens in insectivorous birds nesting across a geographic gradient in the Texas-Mexico border and to discern if stable isotopes could help discriminate between local versus nonlocal acquisition of contaminants. We analysed delta15N and delta13C in liver and muscle and DDE and Se in swallow carcasses. Within individuals, delta15N was higher in liver than in muscle of both species by an average of 1.34%, whereas delta13C was 0.145% higher in muscle than in liver. Significant differences occurred among locations in delta15N and delta13C values in liver and muscle of both species. Cave swallows from three locations in the Lower Rio Grande Valley were more enriched in delta15N than swallows from other sites. In general, swallows nesting in more northern latitudes along the Rio Grande had lower delta15N and delta13C values than those nesting farther south. Concentrations of DDE were significantly greater in swallows from El Paso, Llano Grande, and Pharr than in those from Brownsville, Falcon Lake, Laredo, Del Rio, and a reference site outside the Rio Grande. All swallows (n = 21) from El Paso, Llano Grande, and Pharr had DDE concentrations > or = 3 microg g(-1) wet weight (ww), a value three times greater than the estimated threshold in avian prey that could cause potential reproductive failures in raptors. Concentrations of Se also were significantly greater in El Paso and Del Rio than at other locations. Most Se concentrations were not of concern for direct effects on birds or their predators. Principal component analysis indicated some positive correlations

  7. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas; ground-water quality in the Rio Grande flood plain, Cochiti Lake, New Mexico, to El Paso, Texas, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, L.M.; Anderholm, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    From March to May of 1995, water samples were collected from 30 wells located in the flood plain of the Rio Grande between Cochiti Lake, New Mexico, and El Paso, Texas. These samples were analyzed for a broad host of constituents, including field parameters, major constituents, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, radiochemicals, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. The main purpose of this study was to observe the quality of ground water in this part of the Rio Grande Valley study unit of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment program. The sampling effort was limited to the basin- fill aquifer beneath the above-defined reach of the Rio Grande flood plain because of the relative homogeneity of the hydrogeology, the large amount of ground-water use for public supply, and the potential for land-use activities to affect the quality of ground water. Most of the wells sampled for the study are used for domestic purposes, including drinking water. Depths to the tops of the sampling intervals in the 30 wells ranged from 10 to 345 feet below land surface, and the median was 161.5 feet; the sampling intervals in most of the wells spanned about 10 feet or less. Quality-control data were collected at three of the wells. A significant amount of variation was found in the chemical composition of ground water sampled throughout the study area, but the water generally was found to be of suitable chemical quality for use as drinking water, according to current enforceable standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Nutrients generally were measured at concentrations near or below their method reporting limits. The most dominant nutrient species was nitrite plus nitrate, at a maximum concentration of 1.9 milligrams per liter (as N). Only eight of the trace elements analyzed for had median concentrations greater than their respective minimum reporting levels. Water from one well exceeded the lifetime health

  8. Modeling the transfer of land and water from agricultural to urban uses in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Jarratt, Janet; Passell, Howard David; Kelly, Susan; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Chermak, Janie; Van Bloeman Waanders, Paul; McNamara, Laura A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Pallachula, Kiran; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Newman, Gretchen Carr

    2004-11-01

    Social and ecological scientists emphasize that effective natural resource management depends in part on understanding the dynamic relationship between the physical and non-physical process associated with resource consumption. In this case, the physical processes include hydrological, climatological and ecological dynamics, and the non-physical process include social, economic and cultural dynamics among humans who do the resource consumption. This project represents a case study aimed at modeling coupled social and physical processes in a single decision support system. In central New Mexico, individual land use decisions over the past five decades have resulted in the gradual transformation of the Middle Rio Grande Valley from a primarily rural agricultural landscape to a largely urban one. In the arid southwestern U.S., the aggregate impact of individual decisions about land use is uniquely important to understand, because scarce hydrological resources will likely limit the viability of resulting growth and development trajectories. This decision support tool is intended to help planners in the area look forward in their efforts to create a collectively defined 'desired' social landscape in the Middle Rio Grande. Our research question explored the ways in which socio-cultural values impact decisions regarding that landscape and associated land use. Because of the constraints hydrological resources place on land use, we first assumed that water use, as embodied in water rights, was a reasonable surrogate for land use. We thought that modeling the movement of water rights over time and across water source types (surface and ground) would provide planners with insight into the possibilities for certain types of decisions regarding social landscapes, and the impact those same decisions would have on those landscapes. We found that water rights transfer data in New Mexico is too incomplete and inaccurate to use as the basis for the model. Furthermore, because of its

  9. Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) Program: Environmental Contaminants and Their Effects on Fish in the Rio Grande Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; Dethloff, Gail M.; Hinck, Jo Ellen; Bartish, Timothy M.; Blazer, Vicki; Coyle, James J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    We collected, examined, and analyzed 368 fish of seven species from 10 sites in the Rio Grande Basin (RGB) during late 1997 and early 1998. Four sites were National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program (NCBP) stations where organochlorine and elemental contaminants in fish had been monitored from 1969 through 1986. The other six were USGS-National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) stations where water quality is monitored. The objectives were to document temporal and geographic trends in the concentrations of accumulative organic and inorganic contaminants in RGB fish and the effects of contaminants on the fish; to continue testing the feasibility of incorporating biomarkers (that is, biochemical, histopathological, and other biological indicators of contaminant exposure or effects) into a monitoring program for large U.S. rivers; and to evaluate the compatibility of monitoring methods based on the analysis of fish with those used to monitor water by NASQAN. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio; carp) and black basses (Micropterus sp.; bass) were the targeted species; together, they represented 77% of the fish collected. Each fish was examined in the field for externally and internally visible gross lesions, selected organs were weighed to compute various ponderal and organosomatic indices, and samples of tissues and fluids were obtained and preserved for analysis of fish health and reproductive biomarkers. Composite samples of whole fish from each station were grouped by species and gender and analyzed by instrumental methods for persistent organic and inorganic contaminants and for dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ) using H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. Overall, fish from stations in the lower RGB contained greater concentrations of some contaminants and appeared to be less healthy than those from sites in the central and upper parts of the basin, as indicated by general gradient of pesticide concentrations and biomarker responses from upstream to downstream. In the

  10. Hydrologic Windows and the Formation of Low-Temperature Geothermal Anomalies along the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, J.; Person, M. A.; Kelley, S.; Timmons, S.; Owens, L.; Witcher, J. C.; Phillips, F. M.; Gable, C. W.; Coblentz, D. D.; Campbell, A.

    2013-12-01

    Within the Rio Grande Rift in New Mexico, gaps in Mesozoic and Tertiary confining units are common geologic features. They are created as a result of fault block rotation, erosion, lithological variations and emplacement of magmatic intrusions. These hydrologic windows were first proposed by Witcher (1988, Geothermal resources of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona: New Mexico Geological Society 39th Field Conference Guidebook, p. 191-197) as a mechanism to permit relatively hot geothermal fluids to discharge at the surface within the Rio Grande Rift. To explore the role of hydrologic windows in these occurrences, we have developed two-dimensional and three-dimensional hydrothermal models of both the Socorro and the Truth or Consequences geothermal resource areas. These finite-element models simulate groundwater flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and residence times. The 2D cross-sectional models help establish the depth of geothermal fluid circulation and crystalline-basement permeability structure required to account for hot-spring temperature conditions near the surface. The three-dimensional models help to assess the effects of water-table configuration and east-west oriented accommodation zones on shallow heat-flow patterns. We utilized carbon-14 groundwater age dating, salinity, and silica concentrations collected from wells and warm springs to calibrate these models. Apparent carbon-14 ages of groundwater samples collected from the 300-meter deep Woods Tunnel geothermal slim hole near Socorro and a 15-meter deep alluvial well from the Riverbend Spa in Truth or Consequences were 20,000 and 6,000 years old, respectively. Maximum geothermal temperatures based on silica concentrations at these two sites are estimated to range from 60 to 87 degrees Celsius. In order to reproduce observed temperature anomalies and groundwater residence times, groundwater circulation must have been within the crystalline basement, two to six kilometers beneath

  11. O, H and S Isotopes as Tracers of Groundwater Discharge Into the Rio Grande and the Gila River, Southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastoe, C. J.; Hibbs, B. J.; Hogan, J. F.; Harris, R. C.

    2004-05-01

    In the semi-arid Basin-and-Range province, large rivers commonly enter and exit basins through hard-rock barriers impermeable to groundwater. Isotopic contrasts characteristically exist between river water entering a basin and locally-derived groundwater in basin-fill sediment. Basin aquifers must discharge to the river near the river exit point, and may contribute significantly to river water and solute load. O, H and S isotopes can potentially indicate the location of discharge zones. At times of low river flow, the Gila River enters Safford Basin with isotope delta values, here presented as [d18O‰ , dD‰ , d34S‰ ], of [-8.5, -65, +4.5]. Deep basin water has values [-11.5, -85, +11], the d34S reflecting gypsum evaporite. Values in river water change by km 50 to [-7.5, -60, +4.5] and between km 50 and 80 to [-8.5, -65, +7.5]. The increase in d18O and dD from 0-50 km indicates irrigation water discharge; the change from 50-80 km is accompanied by doubling of sulfate content and requires addition of deep basin water. The Rio Grande enters the Hueco Bolson with isotope composition [-6.5 to -8.5, -65 to -75, +2 to +4], the d18O and dD values defining an evaporation line (RGEL) resulting from passage of water through upstream reservoirs. Basin groundwater is sulfate-rich and has variable isotope composition: [-9 to -11, -66 to -76, +5 to +10]; it includes both evaporated and non-evaporated types. Groundwater discharge is generally insufficient to shift water away from the RGEL, but d34S values in river water increase to +5 to +9‰ with increasing sulfate content downstream of Fabens, TX, indicating discharge of high-d34S groundwater. Variable sewage discharge from Ciudad Juàrez limits the possibility of detecting isotope shifts in Rio Grande water.

  12. Central South Atlantic kinematics: a 3D ocean basin-scale model of the Walvis Ridge and Rio Grande Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, D. E.; Hall, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Prior to the breakup of western Gondwana, ca. 130 Ma, the Tristan da Cuhna mantle plume produced the eastern South American Parana, and western African Etendeka, flood basalts. As the South Atlantic basin opened, the ridge-centered plume produced seaward extending hotspot tracks: Rio Grande Rise on the South American Plate, and Walvis Ridge on the African Plate. Several ocean floor edifices on the hotspot trends appear to produce lower than expected amplitude free air gravity anomalies, suggesting that they are composed of lower density material. We have constructed a 3D gravity model of the South Atlantic basin to examine variations in crustal density associated with the hot spot trends. The model, which encompasses a region that extends from 46°S to 10 °S and from 20°E to 60°W, comprises the following layers: water, sediment, crust, and upper mantle. Variable density sediment and upper mantle layers are incorporated to estimate density changes related to sediment thickness and compaction, and upper mantle temperatures, respectively. The initial Moho horizon is estimated from isostatic equilibrium calculations; however the isostatic effect is scaled away from the seafloor spreading center to simulate the active spreading center. Three open-file grids were used to generate the model: satellite-derived free air gravity, global topography, and sediment thickness of the world. Inverting the model for crustal density reveals a distribution of low-density areas: along the coasts, the seafloor spreading axis, and along the Rio Grande Rise and Walvis Ridge hotspot trends. Coastal and spreading axis low density areas are thought to be related to continental crust and high temperature upper mantle. Hotspot track low density areas might be related to variable densities within the volcanic edifices, variations in their crustal thickness, or upper mantle densities beneath them. Detailed 2D models approximate reasonable density and geometry limits along select transects

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Streamflow and Dissolved Solids in the Rio Grande from Del Norte, Colorado, to El Paso, Texas, 1993-95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S. J.; Anderholm, S. K.

    2002-12-01

    Data collected as part of the Rio Grande Valley National Water Quality Assessment Program were used to evaluate spatial and temporal variations in streamflow and the concentration of dissolved solids at selected sites on the Rio Grande from Del Norte, Colorado, to El Paso, Texas, for the period of April 1993 to September 1995. Dissolved solids loads, which were estimated by a multivariate linear regression model (ESTIMATOR2000), are also presented and discussed. Spatial and temporal variations in streamflow, dissolved solids concentrations, and dissolved solids loads were used to evaluate how surface-water and ground-water inflows to and outflows from the Rio Grande affect dissolved solids along the river. Streamflow decreases from Del Norte, Colorado, to the mouth of the Conejos River because of diversions for irrigation. Streamflow increases from the mouth of the Conejos River to Otowi Bridge because of surface-water inflows (from the Conejos River, the Chama River, and other tributaries) and ground-water inflow in northern New Mexico. Streamflow decreases downstream from Otowi Bridge because outflows (due to agricultural use, leakage to ground water, and evapo-transpiration) are greater than inflows. Dissolved solids concentrations generally increase in the downstream direction; however, dissolved solids concentrations decrease between the mouth of the Conejos River and Otowi Bridge due to surface-water inflows from the Conejos and the Chama Rivers and ground-water inflows in northern New Mexico. In several reaches of the Rio Grande, decreasing streamflow and increasing dissolved solids loads indicate the presence of inflows with large dissolved solids concentrations (relative to those of the Rio Grande immediately upstream from that inflow); this occurs (1) between Del Norte, Colorado, and the mouth of Trinchera Creek, near Lasauses, Colorado (2) between Otowi Bridge and San Marcial, New Mexico, and (3) between Leasburg, New Mexico, and El Paso, Texas

  14. The P-wave velocity of the uppermost mantle of the Rio Grande rift region of north central New Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdock, J.N.; Jaksha, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    A network of seismograph stations has operated in north-central New Mexico since 1975. The network is approximately 200 by 300 km in size and encompasses the Rio Grande rift there. Several seismic refraction experiments have been reported in the literature for the region of the network and adjacent areas. Because all of the seismic refraction lines are unreversed, Pn velocities reported were mainly of the inverse travel time slope for the direction of the corresponding line. The values of the inverse slope for those studies range from 7.6 to 8.2 km/s. The purpose of our study is to estimate the P-wave velocity of the uppermost mantle by using the time term method. First, we timed the Pn waves of strong signals from five explosions and eight shallow earthquakes recorded by the network. The main data set, which contains 87 time-distance pairs, was processed by using the time term method. The Pn velocity estimated by this method is 8.0 + or - 0.1 km/s. To corroborate this estimate, we then processed 10 subsets of the main data set in the same way. Almost all of the solutions show velocities of 7.9-8.1 km/s, in agreement with the velocity determined for the main data set. -Authors

  15. Children's eating behavior: comparison between normal and overweight children from a school in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    dos Passos, Darlise Rodrigues; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Maciel, Francine Villela; Matijasevich, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate differences in children's eating behavior in relation to their nutritional status, gender and age. METHODS: Male and female children aged six to ten years were included. They were recruited from a private school in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, in 2012. Children´s Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) subscales were used to assess eating behaviors: Food Responsiveness (FR), Enjoyment of Food (EF), Desire to Drink (DD), Emotional Overeating (EOE), Emotional Undereating (EUE), Satiety Responsiveness (SR), Food Fussiness (FF) and Slowness in Eating (SE). Age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) z-scores were calculated according to the WHO recommendations to assess nutritional status. RESULTS: The study sample comprised 335 children aged 87.9±10.4 months and 49.3% had normal weight (n=163), 26% were overweight (n=86), 15% were obese (n=50) and 9.7% were severely obese (n=32). Children with excess weight showed higher scores at the CEBQ subscales associated with "food approach" (FR, EF, DD, EOE, p<0.001) and lower scores on two "food avoidance" subscales (SR and SE, p<0.001 and p=0.003, respectively) compared to normal weight children. Differences in the eating behavior related to gender and age were not found. CONCLUSIONS: "Food approach" subscales were positively associated to excess weight in children, but no associations with gender and age were found. PMID:25662562

  16. [Seasonal differences in falls and fractures among the elderly in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul].

    PubMed

    Caberlon, Iride Cristofoli; Bós, Ângelo José Gonçalves

    2015-12-01

    Falls and fractures in the elderly represent a significant public health problem, associated with higher rates of morbidity and mortality, reduction of functional capacity, institutionalization of the elderly and early death. The scope of this study was to investigate falls and fractures in the elderly living in the metropolitan and mountainous region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, analyzing the associated factors, seasonality and severity thereof. It is a cross-sectional, retrospective, descriptive, analytical and quantitative study of the elderly attended for falls from January 1 to December 31 of 2010 using secondary data from emergency units of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Data were collected from all health care reports filed in medical departments. The total number of bulletins for the elderly attended for falls was 6,556: 71% were women; 26.8% were in winter; 30% involved fractures (32% women and 28% men) (p < 0.0001). In only 17.2% of the cases the fall site was recorded, and 58% were outside the home. Winter was the season with 34% of confirmed fractures (p = 0.0002) with more severe outcomes (26.3%). Most falls and their consequences can be prevented and avoided. It is paramount to implement programs and multifactorial actions for intervention. PMID:26691799

  17. Characterization of beta-thalassemia mutations in patients from the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Zama Messala Luna; das Vitórias Barbosa, Maria; de Medeiros Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Araújo; Kimura, Elza Miyuki; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; de Fátima Sonati, Maria; Rebecchi, Ivanise Marina Moretti; de Medeiros, Tereza Maria Dantas

    2011-01-01

    35 unrelated individuals were studied for characterization as either heterozygous or homozygous for beta-thalassemia. Molecular analysis was done by PCR/RFLP to detect the mutations most commonly associated with beta-thalassemia (β0IVS-I-1, β+IVS-I-6, and β039). In the patients who showed none of these mutations, the beta-globin genes were sequenced. Of the 31 heterozygous patients, 13 (41.9%) had the β+IVS-I-6 mutation, 15 (48.4%) the β0IVS-I-1 mutation, 2 (6.5%) the β+IVS-I-110 mutation and 1 (3.2%) the β+IVS-I-5 mutation. IVS-I-6 was detected in the four homozygotes. The mutation in codon 39, often found in previous studies in Brazil, was not detected in the present case. This is the first study aiming at identifying mutations that determine beta-thalassemia in the state of Rio Grande do Norte. PMID:21931514

  18. Investigation of Soil Permeability and Hydrological Properties of Flood Plain Deposits of the Rio Grande in EL Paso TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schacht, D.; Jin, L.; Doser, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    The various soil types within the flood plains of Rio Grande in El Paso 's Lower Valley have long been utilized by local farmers. These soils are typically more conducive to farming than the more recent (Pliocene) sandy soils outside of the flood plain region. This project will explore the various properties of these soils types such as their grain size, depths, extent, and hydrological conductivity utilizing various geophysical and geochemical methods. The study site is located in El Paso 's Lower Valley and is situated in an actively farmed area. Soil maps from the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) and variations in vegetation growth will help delineate locations of soil types in the study area. The information that will be collected will produce baseline data to help track expected seasonal variations in the soil's moisture content and in the depth of the local water table. This project represents a collaboration between El Paso Community College's and the University of Texas at El Paso's Departments of Geological Sciences as a means for students majoring in Geological Sciences at El Paso Community College to gain hands on experience in researching geological issues through partnerships with their future institution and faculty.

  19. An integrated geophysical study of basin structure in the Van Horn segment of the Rio Grande rift

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, T.J.; Whitelaw, J.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    The Rio Grande Rift is a major late Cenozoic continental rift which trends north-south from Colorado to West Texas where it takes an abrupt south-west turn. A series of basins then follow the Texas-Mexico border passing through the Big Bend Area into Mexico. This rifting zone produced a series of bolsons: Hueco Bolson, Red Light Bolson, Eagle Flat, Green River Bolson, and Ryan Flat being the most predominant of the area. The target of this study was the area southeast of the Hueco Bolson; the Red Light and Green River Bolson is an intermontane basin being bounded on the west by the Eagle Mountains and on the east by the Van Horn Mountains. The Red Light Bolson is nested between the Quitman and Eagle Mountains. Through the use of gravity data, drill hole information and other related geophysical information, the subsurface structure of this region was investigated. A broad gravity low dominates the region, but does not correlate well with late Cenozoic features. Drilling data suggest that this low is due to thick Cretaceous strata. The Green River Bolson is associated with a north-south trending gravity low suggesting it contains considerable Cenozoic fill.

  20. Elevated DDE and toxaphene residues in fishes and birds reflect local contamination in the lower Rio Grande valley Texas USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Kennedy, H.R.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Ribick, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A potential organochlorine pesticide problem was identified near Mission, Texas, by the National Park Monitoring Program. Fish samples from this site have consistently contained elevated levels of DDE since 1968. Surveys were made in 1976, 1978, and 1979 to determine the extent of organochlorine pesticide contamination in fishes and birds of the area. Freshwater fishes of Arroyo Colorado, a major waterway traversing the lower Rio Grande Valley, were highly contaminated with DDE and toxaphene residues compared to samples from other areas in the Valley; both DDE and toxaphene ranged up to 31.5 ppm wet wt in whole-fish composite samples. Median DDE residues in fish-eating bird carcasses from this area ranged up to 34 ppm wet wt, and 81 ppm in individual specimens. The levels of contaminants detected in fishes and birds were within, or above, the range producing adverse effects in certain species. The major sources of contamination to the Arroyo Colorado system likely stem from past and present use of persistent pesticides on surrounding croplands, and possibly from an abandoned pesticide plant at Mission, Texas.

  1. Tectonic control on the distribution on calcic paleosols in the Plio-Pleistocene Palomas half graben, southern Rio Grande Rift

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, G.H. . Dept. Earth Sciences); James, W.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The number and degree of development of calcic paleosols in the Palomas Formation, which was deposited during Pliocene to middle Pleistocene time in the Palomas half graben of south-central New Mexico, are related to position within the basin and asymmetrical subsidence. Numerous stage 2 morphology calcic paleosols, characterized by an argillic B horizon (Bt) overlying a horizon of distinct calcic nodules and tubules (Bk), developed on intermittently inactive parts of the broad (up to 20 km wide) bajada deposited on the hanging wall dip slope. During periods of movement of the basin-bounding fault, the gradient of the hanging wall dip slope increased resulting in channel incision and transportation of coarse detritus to the toe of the bajada. Stage 3 and 4 morphology calcic paleosols, which consist of Bt-K profiles up to 2 m thick, formed on terraces adjacent to the incised channels. In contrast, only a few stage 2 morphology calcic paleosols are present within footwall-derived alluvial-fan sediment, as the result of relatively rapid lateral shifting of depocenters on the small (less than 3 km[sup 2]) fans. However, some paleosols within footwall-derived by shallow phreatic cementation by coarse calcite. Rapid channel avulsion across the narrow (less than 5 km) axial-fluvial plain of the Ancestral Rio Grande inhibited development of paleosols except for a few rhizolith horizons. The spatial distribution of paleosols in the Palomas half graben may provide a predictive tool in interpreting ancient basin symmetry.

  2. Sex education in the eyes of primary school teachers in Novo Hamburgo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Denise Quaresma; Guerra, Oscar Ulloa; Sperling, Christiane

    2013-05-01

    Sex education has been included in the National Curriculum of the Brazilian Ministry of Education since 1996 as a cross-cutting theme that should be linked to the contents of each school subject in primary and high schools. This paper presents a study of the implementation of this policy in the primary schools of Novo Hamburgo, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, based on interviews between January 2011 and April 2012 with 82 teachers working in those schools. We found that sex education was not being taught as a cross-cutting theme in any of the schools, and that any lessons were mostly dominated by a biomedical discourse focusing primarily on the reproductive organs, fertility, pregnancy, and contraception. Sexual health and relationships and non-heterosexual sex and relationships were being neglected. Sex education was also considered a possible means of correcting or controlling sexual identities and behaviours deemed abnormal or immoral. We recommend far more discussion of how to implement the National Curriculum recommendations. We call for education courses to provide theoretical and methodological training on sex education for teachers, and recommend that the boards of educational institutions take up sex education as a priority subject. Lastly, we suggest that each school studies local sexuality-related problems and based on the findings, each teacher presents a pedagogical proposal of how to integrate sex education into the subjects they teach.

  3. Spatial distribution of dengue disease in municipality of Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte, using the Geographic Information System.

    PubMed

    Bessa Júnior, Francisco Narcísio; Nunes, Renan Flávio de França; de Souza, Marcos Antonio; de Medeiros, Antônio Carlos; Marinho, Maria Jocileide de Medeiros; Pereira, Wogelsanger Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    The dengue viral infection is one of the most relevant vector-borne diseases in the world. The disease can manifest in a variety of forms, from asymptomatic to a condition of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). The last reported cases in Brazil correspond to 80% of the cases reported in the Americas, which emphasizes the magnitude of the problem. This study was conducted using Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques, in order to evaluate the spatial distribution of the disease in the urban area of Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte. In the period between 2001 and 2007, 867 new cases were listed. About 85.7% of the addresses were georeferenced, with a larger number of cases, 14.8%, in the neighborhoods of Santo Antônio and Santa Delmira (north region), and 11.7% in the neighborhoods of Conjunto Vingt-Rosado and Alto de São Manoel (east region). There were 18 confirmed cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever associated with regions with the highest incidence of classic cases of the disease. The use of Geographic Information System (GIS) proved a great benefit for better visualization of the endemic, especially in elucidating the actual distribution of dengue cases in the county and providing an effective tool for planning the monitoring of the disease at a local level.

  4. Biodiversity and spatial distribution of epiphytic ferns on Alsophila setosa Kaulf. (Cyatheaceae) caudices in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J L; Windisch, P G

    2010-08-01

    The extractive exploitation of the tree fern Alsophila setosa Kaulf. alters forest formations and diminishes the availability of micro-habitat for epiphytes. A survey of epiphytic fern communities on A. setosa at 16 study sites in different forest formations in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, documented the occurrence of 31 species representing 16 genera and six families. The greatest richness of species occurred in Polypodiaceae (39%) and in the genus Asplenium L. (22%). Habitual holoepiphyte was the predominant ecological category, representing 61% of the species. Similarity analysis demonstrated heterogeneity in the composition of the epiphytic ferns at the study sites and indicated that the vegetation type is not the main factor for floristic difference. The lowest total specific richness (5) was recorded for the seasonal deciduous forest site. The majority of the sites presented similar averages of phorophyte height and epiphyte richness per caudex. In 25% of the sites the height of the host plants presented significant correlation with specific richness. Considering that the majority of the epiphytes are habitual and that some of them occur exclusively or preferentially on tree ferns, the maintenance of these host plants in the vegetation is essential for the conservation of epiphytic species.

  5. Mental health screening at temporary military health clinics in low income Hispanic communities within the Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    PubMed

    Morecook, Robert; Greenstone, James L; Hays, J Ray

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral and mental health problems are not always considered in temporary medical clinics nor are instruments readily available to provide medical practitioners in these settings with information relevant to mental health conditions. This study provided preliminary data on the utility of the Mini Mental Screen in temporary military medical clinics in the Texas Rio Grande Valley. This instrument was administered to individuals who may have behavioral or mental health problems. In a sample of mostly Hispanic patients (N = 75) seen at a temporary medical clinic, 12% were at significant risk of mental health problems, with an additional 9% at moderate risk using published cut-off scores for the risk of such problems. The results for each patient were provided to a medical practitioner who further evaluated the risk, treated the problem, or made a referral. When asked, three of four medical practitioners found that screening data was helpful in their work with patients. One practitioner was concerned that the screening instrument might have too high a false positive rate to be useful. Cultural issues of openness about mental health and behavioral problems need to be considered in such settings.

  6. Gross alpha- and beta-activities in surface and ground water of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Malanca, A; Repetti, M; de Macêdo, H R

    1998-07-01

    Gross alpha- and beta-activities were determined on 37 fresh water samples collected from 14 artificial basins, 13 deep drilled wells, two dug wells, two lakes, two rivers, one spring, and a tap belonging to 30 locations scattered throughout the eastern and central parts of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Norte. The surveyed area was about 35,000 km2 with a lithology including both crystalline (18 towns) and sedimentary (12 towns) rocks. Concentrations ranging from < 2.8 to 354 Bq m-3 and from 50.5 to 580 Bq m-3 were observed for the gross alpha- and beta-activities, respectively. For the gross beta-activity, which was always higher than the corresponding alpha-activity, the arithmetic mean with its standard deviation was 226 +/- 154 Bq m-3. In order to evaluate the radioactive dose due to the ingestion of these waters, a conservative dosimetric calculation was carried out using the dose conversion factors suggested by the ICRP. An average annual effective dose equivalent of 60 +/- 42 microSv was obtained together with a range of 14-161 microSv y-1.

  7. Determination of βS haplotypes in patients with sickle-cell anemia in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Cynthia Hatsue Kitayama; Serafim, Édvis Santos Soares; de Medeiros, Waleska Rayane Dantas Bezerra; de Medeiros Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Araújo; Kimura, Elza Miyuki; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; de Fátima Sonati, Maria; Rebecchi, Ivanise Marina Moretti; de Medeiros, Tereza Maria Dantas

    2011-01-01

    βS haplotypes were studied in 47 non-related patients with sickle-cell anemia from the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Molecular analysis was conducted by PCR/RFLP using restriction endonucleases XmnI, HindIII, HincII and HinfI to analyze six polymorphic sites from the beta cluster. Twenty-seven patients (57.5%) were identified with genotype CAR/CAR, 9 (19.1%) CAR/BEN, 6 (12.8%) CAR/CAM, 1 (2.1%) BEN/BEN, 2 (4.3%) CAR/Atp, 1 (2.1%) BEN/Atp and 1 (2.1%) with genotype Atp/Atp. The greater frequency of Cameroon haplotypes compared to other Brazilian states suggests the existence of a peculiarity of African origin in the state of Rio Grande do Norte. PMID:21931513

  8. Sediment erosion and transport at the Rio Grande mouth : report for the National Border Technology Program and International Boundary and Water Commission.

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, D. Michael, Jr.; Langford, Richard; Neu, Roene; Buhalts, Randy A.; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Roberts, Jesse Daniel

    2003-11-01

    The mouth of the Rio Grande has become silted up, obstructing its flow into the Gulf of Mexico. This is problematic in that it has created extensive flooding. The purpose of this study was to determine the erosion and transport potential of the sediments obstructing the flow of the Rio Grande by employing a unique Mobile High Shear Stress flume developed by Sandia's Carlsbad Programs Group for the US Army Corps of Engineers. The flume measures in-situ sediment erosion properties at shear stresses ranging from normal flow to flood conditions for a variable depth sediment core. The flume is in a self-contained trailer that can be placed on site in the field. Erosion rates and sediment grain size distributions were determined from sediment samples collected in and around the obstruction and were subsequently used to characterize the erosion potential of the sediments under investigation.

  9. Latest Miocene-earliest Pliocene evolution of the ancestral Rio Grande at the Española-San Luis Basin boundary, northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel J. Koning,; Scott Aby,; Grauch, V. J.; Matthew J. Zimmerer,

    2016-01-01

    We use stratigraphic relations, paleoflow data, and 40Ar/39Ar dating to interpret net aggradation, punctuated by at least two minor incisional events, along part of the upper ancestral Rio Grande fluvial system between 5.5 and 4.5 Ma (in northern New Mexico). The studied fluvial deposits, which we informally call the Sandlin unit of the Santa Fe Group, overlie a structural high between the San Luis and Española Basins. The Sandlin unit was deposited by two merging, west- to southwest-flowing, ancestral Rio Grande tributaries respectively sourced in the central Taos Mountains and southern Taos Mountains-northeastern Picuris Mountains. The river confluence progressively shifted southwestward (downstream) with time, and the integrated river (ancestral Rio Grande) flowed southwards into the Española Basin to merge with the ancestral Rio Chama. Just prior to the end of the Miocene, this fluvial system was incised in the southern part of the study area (resulting in an approximately 4–7 km wide paleovalley), and had sufficient competency to transport cobbles and boulders. Sometime between emplacement of two basalt flows dated at 5.54± 0.38 Ma and 4.82±0.20 Ma (groundmass 40Ar/39Ar ages), this fluvial system deposited 10–12 m of sandier sediment (lower Sandlin subunit) preserved in the northern part of this paleovalley. The fluvial system widened between 4.82±0.20 and 4.50±0.07 Ma, depositing coarse sand and fine gravel up to 14 km north of the present-day Rio Grande. This 10–25 m-thick sediment package (upper Sandlin unit) buried earlier south- to southeast-trending paleovalleys (500–800 m wide) inferred from aeromagnetic data. Two brief incisional events are recognized. The first was caused by the 4.82±0.20 Ma basalt flow impounding south-flowing paleodrainages, and the second occurred shortly after emplacement of a 4.69±0.09 Ma basalt flow in the northern study area. Drivers responsible for Sandlin unit aggradation may include climate

  10. Record of the giant sloth Valgipes bucklandi (Lund, 1839) (Tardigrada, Scelidotheriinae) in Rio Grande do Norte state, Brazil, with notes on taphonomy and paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Isabella Caroline dos Santos; Dantas, Mário André Trindade; Ferreira, Rodrigo Lopes

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the first record of the species Valgipes bucklandi in Rio Grande do Norte state, in the Brazilian Intertropical Region (BIR). This occurrence extends the distribution of this taxon in the BIR. Taphonomic information recovered from this finding indicated that the carcass was probably exposed in a hot and dry environment, whereas carbon isotope data revealed that V. bucklandi had a browser diet (δ13C = -10.17‰), living in more closed environments.

  11. Plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system near Albuquerque, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico covers an area of about 3,060 square miles. Ground water from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system of the Albuquerque Basin is the principal source of water for municipal, domestic, commercial, and industrial uses in the Albuquerque area, an area of about 410 square miles. Ground- water withdrawal in the basin has increased from about 97,000 acre-feet in 1970 to about 171,000 acre-feet in 1994. About 92 percent of the 1994 total was withdrawn in the Albuquerque area. Management of ground water in the Albuquerque Basin is related to the surface water in the Rio Grande. Because the aquifer system is hydraulically connected to the Rio Grande and water in the river is fully appropriated, the ability to reliably estimate the effects of ground-water withdrawals on flow in the river is important. This report describes the components of the Rio Grande/Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area and the data availability and data and interpretation needs relating to those components, and presents a plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. The information needs related to the components of the river/aquifer system are prioritized. Information that is necessary to improve the understanding or quantification of a component in the river/aquifer system is prioritized as essential. Information that could add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, is prioritized as useful. The study elements are prioritized in the same manner as the information needs; study elements designed to provide information considered necessary to improve the quantification of the system are prioritized as essential, and those designed to provide information that would add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, are prioritized as useful.

  12. Numerical simulation of vertical ground-water flux of the Rio Grande from ground-water temperature profiles, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Niswonger, Richard G.

    1999-01-01

    An important gap in the understanding of the hydrology of the Middle Rio Grande Basin, central New Mexico, is the rate at which water from the Rio Grande recharges the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Several methodologies-including use of the Glover-Balmer equation, flood pulses, and channel permeameters- have been applied to this problem in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In the work presented here, ground-water temperature profiles and ground-water levels beneath the Rio Grande were measured and numerically simulated at four sites. The direction and rate of vertical ground-water flux between the river and underlying aquifer was simulated and the effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying the river was estimated through model calibration. Seven sets of nested piezometers were installed during July and August 1996 at four sites along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area, though only four of the piezometer nests were simulated. In downstream order, these four sites are (1) the Bernalillo site, upstream from the New Mexico State Highway 44 bridge in Bernalillo (piezometer nest BRN02); (2) the Corrales site, upstream from the Rio Rancho sewage treatment plant in Rio Rancho (COR01); (3) the Paseo del Norte site, upstream from the Paseo del Norte bridge in Albuquerque (PDN01); and (4) the Rio Bravo site, upstream from the Rio Bravo bridge in Albuquerque (RBR01). All piezometers were completed in the inner-valley alluvium of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Ground-water levels and temperatures were measured in the four piezometer nests a total of seven times in the 24-month period from September 1996 through August 1998. The flux between the surface- and ground-water systems at each of the field sites was quantified by one-dimensional numerical simulation of the water and heat exchange in the subsurface using the heat and water transport model VS2DH. Model calibration was aided by the use of PEST, a model-independent computer program that uses

  13. Explaining streamflow variability of the Gila and Rio Grande rivers : Pacific teleconnections and catchment-scale interaction of the hydrological cycle with vegetation and soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascolini-Campbell, M.; Seager, R.

    2015-12-01

    The streamflows of the Gila River, N.M. and the upper Rio Grande, with headwaters in Colorado are influenced by a range of drivers including the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and, for the Gila, the North American Monsoon. At the catchment scale, runoff to the river is modulated by the interaction of snowmelt, rainfall, evapotranspiration, soil moisture and vegetation. A simple eco-hydological model is used to explain the seasonal cycles of flow of the Gila (strong spring peak, weak summer peak) and upper Rio Grande (single spring peak) in terms of precipitation, snowpack, and evapotranspiration. We then examine the drivers of streamflow variability using USGS gages located upstream of human extraction, precipitation and temperature data from PRISM, and SST data from ERSST. High spring streamflow tends to occur in response to prior winter El Nino but not all high and low streamflow events can be explained by the Pacific teleconnection. Decadal variations, including low flows in the Gila and upper Rio Grande since the mid 1990s, are explained in terms of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean decadal variability.

  14. Aquifer tests in the flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe group at the Rio Grande near Canutillo, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nickerson, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    An aquifer system consisting of the Rio Grande flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe Group underlying the southern Mesilla Valley in Dona Ana County, New Mexico and El Paso County, Texas has become an important source of water for both municipal and agricultural uses. Determination of aquifer properties is essential in order to evaluate groundwater potential for increasing water demand and potential streamflow depletion of the Rio Grande due to groundwater development. The aquifer system at the Canutillo well field hydrologic section was divided into a shallow, intermediate, and deep zone based on geohydrologic characteristics. Aquifer properties of specific zones at the test site were determined from a series of multiple-well aquifer tests conducted from December 3, 1985 through January 20, 1986. The Rio Grande is hydraulically connected to the shallow flood-plain alluvium. Water generally occurs within the shallow zone under unconfined conditions, within the intermediate zone under semiconfined conditions, and within the deep zone under confined conditions. (USGS)

  15. 3-D structure of the Rio Grande Rift from 1-D constrained joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Anibal; Thompson, Lennox; Velasco, Aaron A.; Romero, Rodrigo; Herrmann, Robert B.

    2014-09-01

    The Southern terminus of the Rio Grande Rift region has been poorly defined in the geologic record, with few seismic studies that provide information on the deeper Rift structure. In consequence, important questions related to tectonic and lithospheric activity of the Rio Grande Rift remain unresolved. To address some of these geological questions, we collect and analyze seismic data from 147 EarthScope Transportable Array (USArray) and other seismic stations in the region, to develop a 3-D crust and upper mantle velocity model. We apply a constrained optimization approach for joint inversion of surface wave and receiver functions using seismic S wave velocities as a model parameter. In particular, we compute receiver functions stacks based on ray parameter, and invert them jointly with collected surface wave group velocity dispersion observations. The inversions estimate 1-D seismic S-wave velocity profiles to 300 km depth, which are then interpolated to a 3-D velocity model using a Bayesian kriging scheme. Our 3-D models show a thin lower velocity crust anomaly along the southeastern Rio Grande Rift, a persistent low velocity anomaly underneath the Colorado Plateau and Basin and Range province, and another one at depth beneath the Jemez lineament, and the southern RGR.

  16. Web application to access U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works and Restoration Projects information for the Rio Grande Basin, southern Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Eames, Deanna R.

    2009-01-01

    The Rio Grande Civil Works and Restoration Projects Web Application, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Albuquerque District, is designed to provide publicly available information through the Internet about civil works and restoration projects in the Rio Grande Basin. Since 1942, USACE Albuquerque District responsibilities have included building facilities for the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force, providing flood protection, supplying water for power and public recreation, participating in fire remediation, protecting and restoring wetlands and other natural resources, and supporting other government agencies with engineering, contracting, and project management services. In the process of conducting this vast array of engineering work, the need arose for easily tracking the locations of and providing information about projects to stakeholders and the public. This fact sheet introduces a Web application developed to enable users to visualize locations and search for information about USACE (and some other Federal, State, and local) projects in the Rio Grande Basin in southern Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas.

  17. [Incidence of meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae in the state of Rio Grande do Sul 1999-2010: impact of vaccination campaign].

    PubMed

    Schossler, João Guilherme Stadler; Beck, Sandra Trevisan; de Campos, Marli Matiko Anraku; Farinha, Lourdes Boufleur

    2013-05-01

    This article seeks to analyze and update the epidemiological situation of meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b in the past 10 years in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS). It is a retrospective, descriptive study, which used the data notification system of meningitis and vaccination campaign coverage, stored in the Epidemiological TABNET online database, for the period from 1999 to 2010. Cases notified and confirmed were used and the selection criteria were the year when the symptoms were detected, age, diagnosis, and evolution. Nineteen health centers in the state of Rio Grande do Sul were analyzed. The z-test was used to evaluate comparisons between the proportions. In the period studied, 3043 confirmed cases of bacterial meningitis were reported, of which 6.77% were caused by H. influenzae. The incidence and mortality rates of meningitis caused by H. influenzae, without taking age group into consideration, fell significantly (95.6%) after 1999. Children under one year old continue to be the most affected (52%), there being no change in lethality. The results presented revealed a positive impact of Hib vaccination strategies in the state of Rio Grande do Sul over the past ten years.

  18. Streamflow gains and losses and selected water-quality observations in five subreaches of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo del Norte from near Presidio to Langtry, Texas, Big Bend area, United States and Mexico, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, Timothy H.; Turco, Michael J.; Connor, Patrick J.; Bennett, Jeffery B.

    2012-01-01

    Few historical streamflow and water-quality data are available to characterize the segment of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo del Norte (hereinafter Rio Grande) extending from near Presidio to near Langtry, Texas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, collected water-quality and streamflow data from the Rio Grande from near Presidio to near Langtry, Texas, to characterize the streamflow gain and loss and selected constituent concentrations in a 336.3-mile reach of the Rio Grande from near Presidio to near Langtry, Texas. Streamflow was measured at 38 sites and water-quality samples were collected at 20 sites along the Rio Grande in February, March, and June 2006. Streamflow gains and losses over the course of the stream were measured indirectly by computing the differences in measured streamflow between sites along the stream. Water-quality data were collected and analyzed for salinity, dissolved solids, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and stable isotopes. Selected properties and constituents were compared to available Texas Commission on Environmental Quality general use protection criteria or screening levels. Summary statistics of selected water-quality data were computed for each of the five designated subreaches. Streamflow gain and loss and water-quality constituent concentration were compared for each subreach, rather than the entire segment because of the temporal variation in sample collection caused by controlled releases upstream. Subreach A was determined to be a losing reach, and subreaches B, C, D, and E were determined to be gaining reaches. Compared to concentrations measured in upstream subreaches, downstream subreaches exhibited evidence of dilution of selected constituent concentrations. Subreaches A and B had measured total dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate exceeding the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality general use protection criteria

  19. A new species of Pareiorhaphis (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) from the headwaters of the Arroio Garapiá, coastal drainage of Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Edson H L; Lehmann, Pablo A; Schvambach, Lucas J; Reis, Roberto E

    2015-01-01

    Pareiorhaphis garapia, new species, is described based on specimens collected in the headwaters of the Arroio Garapiá, Rio Maquiné basin, a coastal drainage of Rio Grande do Sul State, southern Brazil. The new species is distinguished from all other Pareiorhaphis species in having the nuchal plate covered by thick skin, the exposed posterior process of the cleithrum comparatively narrow, and the last segment of the preopercular ramus of the latero-sensory canal reduced to an ossified tubule. The absence of a dorsal-fin spinelet, the reduced number of plates in the dorsal and mid-dorsal series of lateral plates, and morphometric traits also distinguish the new species from its congeners. The restricted geographic distribution of P. garapia, endemic to a headwater stream of the Rio Maquiné basin, and the syntopic occurrence of P. nudulus are discussed. PMID:26624457

  20. Structural evolution of the Rio Grande rift: Synchronous exhumation of rift flanks from 20-10 Ma, embryonic core complexes, and fluid-enhanced Quaternary extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Jason William

    The Rio Grande rift in Colorado and New Mexico is one of the well-exposed and well-studied continental rifts in the world. Interest in the rift is driven not only by pure scientific intrigue, but also by a desire and a necessity to quantify earthquake hazards in New Mexico as well as to assess various water related issues throughout the state. These motivating topics have thus far led to the publication of two Geological Society of America Special Publication volumes in 1994 and 2013. This dissertation aims at building on the wealth of previous knowledge about the rift, and is composed of three separate chapters that focus on the structural evolution of the Rio Grande rift at several different time and spatial scales. At the largest scale, apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronologic data suggest synchronous extension along the entire length of the Rio Grande rift in Colorado and New Mexico from 20-10 Ma, which is important for understanding and evaluating possible driving mechanisms which are responsible for the rift. Previous tectonic and magmatic events in western North America were highly influential in the formation of the Rio Grande rift, and the new thermochronologic data suggest that its formation may have been closely linked to foundering and removal of the underlying Farallon Plate. A fundamental result of rift development at these scales is a concentration of strain is some regions of the rift. In these regions of maximum extension, fault networks display a geometry involving both high- and low-angle fault networks. These geometries are similar to the early stages in the development of metamorphic core complexes, and thus these regions in the rift link incipient extensional environments to highly extended terranes. At shorter time scales, heterogeneous strain accumulation may be governed in part by fluids in fault zones. As an example, along the western edge of the Albuquerque basin, travertine deposits are cut by extensional veins that record anomalously high

  1. Using a Remote Sensing/GIS Model to Predict Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Habitat along the Rio Grande, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, James R.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter SWFL) is a federally endangered bird (USFWS 1995) that breeds in riparian areas in portions of New Mexico, Arizona, southwestern Colorado, extreme southern Utah and Nevada, and southern California (USFWS 2002). Across this range, it uses a variety of plant species as nesting/breeding habitat, but in all cases prefers sites with dense vegetation, high canopy, and proximity to surface water or saturated soils (Sogge and Marshall 2000). As of 2005, the known rangewide breeding population of SWFLs was roughly 1,214 territories, with approximately 393 territories distributed among 36 sites in New Mexico (Durst et al. 2006), primarily along the Rio Grande. One of the key challenges facing the management and conservation of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher is that riparian areas are dynamic, with individual habitat patches subject to cycles of creation, growth, and loss due to drought, flooding, fire, and other disturbances. Former breeding patches can lose suitability, and new habitat can develop within a matter of only a few years, especially in reservoir drawdown zones. Therefore, measuring and predicting flycatcher habitat - either to discover areas that might support SWFLs, or to identify areas that may develop into appropriate habitat - requires knowledge of recent/current habitat conditions and an understanding of the factors that determine flycatcher use of riparian breeding sites. In the past, much of the determination of whether a riparian site is likely to support breeding flycatchers has been based on qualitative criteria (for example, 'dense vegetation' or 'large patches'). These determinations often require on-the-ground field evaluations by local or regional SWFL experts. While this has proven valuable in locating many of the currently known breeding sites, it is difficult or impossible to apply this approach effectively over large geographic areas (for example, the

  2. "Sour gas" hydrothermal jarosite: Ancient to modern acid-sulfate mineralization in the southern Rio Grande Rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lueth, V.W.; Rye, R.O.; Peters, L.

    2005-01-01

    As many as 29 mining districts along the Rio Grande Rift in southern New Mexico contain Rio Grande Rift-type (RGR) deposits consisting of fluorite-barite??sulfide-jarosite, and additional RGR deposits occur to the south in the Basin and Range province near Chihuahua, Mexico. Jarosite occurs in many of these deposits as a late-stage hydrothermal mineral coprecipitated with fluorite, or in veinlets that crosscut barite. In these deposits, many of which are limestone-hosted, jarosite is followed by natrojarosite and is nested within silicified or argillized wallrock and a sequence of fluorite-barite??sulfide and late hematite-gypsum. These deposits range in age from ???10 to 0.4 Ma on the basis of 40Ar/39Ar dating of jarosite. There is a crude north-south distribution of ages, with older deposits concentrated toward the south. Recent deposits also occur in the south, but are confined to the central axis of the rift and are associated with modern geothermal systems. The duration of hydrothermal jarosite mineralization in one of the deposits was approximately 1.0 my. Most ??18OSO4-OH values indicate that jarosite precipitated between 80 and 240 ??C, which is consistent with the range of filling temperatures of fluid inclusions in late fluorite throughout the rift, and in jarosite (180 ??C) from Pen??a Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico. These temperatures, along with mineral occurrence, require that the jarosite have had a hydrothermal origin in a shallow steam-heated environment wherein the low pH necessary for the precipitation of jarosite was achieved by the oxidation of H2S derived from deeper hydrothermal fluids. The jarosite also has high trace-element contents (notably As and F), and the jarosite parental fluids have calculated isotopic signatures similar to those of modern geothermal waters along the southern rift; isotopic values range from those typical of meteoric water to those of deep brine that has been shown to form from the dissolution of Permian evaporite by

  3. Mountain-front recharge along the eastern side of the Middle Rio Grande Basin, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, Scott K.

    2000-01-01

    Mountain-front recharge, which generally occurs along the margins of alluvial basins, can be a large part of total recharge to the aquifer system in such basins. Mountain-front recharge occurs as the result of infiltration of flow from streams that have headwaters in the mountainous areas adjacent to alluvial basins and ground- water flow from the aquifers in the mountainous areas to the aquifer in the alluvial basin. This report presents estimates of mountain-front recharge to the basin-fill aquifer along the eastern side of the Middle Rio Grande Basin in central New Mexico. The basin is a structural feature that contains a large thickness of basin-fill deposits, which compose the main aquifer in the basin. The basin is bounded along the eastern side by mountains composed of crystalline rocks of Precambrian age and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. Precipitation is much larger in the mountains than in the basin; many stream channels debouch from the mountainous area to the basin. Chloride-balance and water-yield regression methods were used to estimate mountain-front recharge. The chloride-balance method was used to calculate a chloride balance in watersheds in the mountainous areas along the eastern side of the basin (subareas). The source of chloride to these watersheds is bulk precipitation (wet and dry deposition). Chloride leaves these watersheds as mountain-front recharge. The water-yield regression method was used to determine the streamflow from the mountainous watersheds at the mountain front. This streamflow was assumed to be equal to mountain-front recharge because most of this streamflow infiltrates and recharges the basin-fill aquifer. Total mountain-front recharge along the eastern side of the Middle Rio Grande Basin was estimated to be about 11,000 acre- feet per year using the chloride-balance method and about 36,000 and 38,000 acre-feet per year using two water-yield regression equations. There was a large range in the recharge estimates in a

  4. Development of a Hydrologic Model to Assess the Feasibility of Water Leasing in the Middle Rio Grande Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, C. B.; Boyle, D. P.; Lamorey, G. W.; Bassett, S. D.

    2007-12-01

    The demand for water in the southwestern United States has increased in tandem with a rapid growth of population over the past 50 years. With ever increasing demands being placed on available water supplies, improving water management becomes crucial to the sustainability of the region's water resources. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center (STC) for the Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) is interested in the feasibility of water leasing as a method for more efficiently distributing water among competing users. Economists working on the project will run water leasing simulations in an auction-type environment to understand the pros and cons of water leasing in a free market system. To include hydrologic processes in the water leasing simulations, an MMS-PRMS hydrologic model was developed for a portion of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB) near Albuquerque, New Mexico. This portion of the MRGB contains a detailed network of diversions, canals, and drains that transport water through the system. In order to capture the complexity of the system, the model was developed using the highest resolution information available. In the model, each Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) is represented as a trader. To achieve the 15 trader limit desired by economists, the model structure was simplified using two basic constraints; 1) HRUs having a common source and point of return to the river were lumped; and 2) HRUs with less than 20% agricultural land use were omitted from the auction simulations. A new Evapotranspiration (ET) module was implemented in the model to better estimate ET associated with different crops. Modules were also developed so that the end user has the flexibility to manipulate water deliveries based on crop type and land use. The MMS- PRMS model for the MRGB should help economists determine if the incentive to profit by selling or buying water can make more efficient use of the available water supply.

  5. Options and Consequences: Water Banking/Leasing Issues Explored for the Rio Grande in Southern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookshire, D. S.; Coursey, D.; Dimint, A.; Tidwell, V.

    2004-12-01

    Since 1950, the demand for water has more than doubled in the United States. Historically, growing demands have been met by increasing reservoir capacity and through groundwater mining, often at the expense of environmental and cultural concerns. The future is expected to hold much the same. Demand for water will continue to increase particularly in response to the expanding urban sector, while growing concerns over the environment are prompting interest in allocating more water for in-stream uses. So, where will this water come from? Virtually all water supplies are allocated. Providing for new uses requires a reduction in the amount of water dedicated to existing uses. The water banking/leasing model is formulated within a system dynamics context using the object oriented commercial software package, Powersimä Studio 2003. System dynamics provides a unique mathematical framework for integrating the natural and social processes important to managing natural resources and can provide an interactive interface for engaging the public in the decision process. These system level models focus on capturing the broad structure of the system, specifically the feedback and time delays between interacting subsystems. The spatially aggregated models are computationally efficient allowing simulations to be conducted on a PC in a matter of seconds to minutes. By employing interactive interfaces, these models can be taken directly to the public or decision maker. To demonstrate the water banking/leasing model, application has been made to potential markets on the Rio Grande. Specifically, the model spans the reach between Elephant Butte Reservoir (central New Mexico) and the New Mexico/Texas state line. Primary sectors in the model include climate, surface and groundwater, riparian and aquatic habitat, watershed processes, water quality, water demand (residential, commercial, industrial, institution, and agricultural), economics, policy, and legal institutions. Within the model

  6. Use of fission track dates as constraints on the tectonic evolution of the Rio Grande rift. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, S.A.; Duncan, I.J.; Blackwell, D.D.

    1983-03-01

    Apatite fission track dates have been determined for Precambrian and Tertiary granitic rocks collected from four ranges on the eastern margin of the Rio Grande rift. The ages at lower elevation in these areas are, in general, younger than those at higher elevation because of cooling as uplift occurs. Thus apparent uplift rates can be calculated from this relation between elevation and age, assuming that the geothermal gradient remained constant during uplift and erosion. Age dates on samples from the Wheeler Peak area north of Taos and the Sandia Mountains near Albuquerque indicate that the rocks at the higher elevations in these areas cooled to approx. 105/sup 0/C 30 to 35 Ma ago. The dates suggest that Precambrian rocks in the Wheeler Peak area were heated by a thermal event related to the Questa Caldera. Dates for the Tertiary intrusions in this area imply that uplift at an apparent rate of 0.1 mm/a has occurred since the intrusions cooled (20 Ma). The uplift of Sandia block, which does not seem to be directly associated with igneous activity, occurred at an average rate of .055 mm/a. Dates from the Organ batholith in southern New Mexico do not show a clear relation with elevation. The fission track dates (16 to 36 Ma) are consistent with shallow emplacement and subsequent rapid uplift of the batholith followed by formation of small geothermal systems sometime later in the Tertiary. In contrast to the other three areas where Tertiary tectonic activity affects the ages, dates from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains east of Sante Fe are related to Laramide uplift about 65 to 70 Ma ago. The apparent uplift rate is 0.072 mm/a. The data on the rate and timing of uplift imply that the heat sources that have caused the Tertiary tectonic and igneous features observed in the rift are not continuous along the rift's length, but are localized phenomena.

  7. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70-100 calves or more of both genders with ≥ 200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7-10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7-10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups were effective

  8. Assessing the epidemiological data of Staphylococcus aureus food poisoning occurred in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Gustavo Costalunga; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most frequent foodborne illnesses worldwide and it is caused by the ingestion of food contaminated with enterotoxins produced by some strains of Staphylococcus (S.) aureus. In the State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Southern Brazil, S. aureus has been identified as the second most frequent agent of foodborne illnesses in the last two decades. The aim of the present study was to assess and analyse the epidemiological data of S. aureus food poisoning occurred in the State of RS during the years of 2000 to 2002. The official records of epidemiological investigations carried out by the Sanitary Surveillance Services of the State of RS were analysed. Among foodborne outbreaks for which aetiology was determined, S. aureus was identified as the responsible agent of 57 foodborne outbreaks, being 42 (74%) confirmed by microbiological analyses and 15 (26%) confirmed by clinical symptoms and/or epidemiological data. Staphylococcal outbreaks were responsible for the exposition of 5,991 persons, of which 1,940 (32%) were interviewed by the Sanitary Surveillance officers. The most affected age group corresponded to people with 20 to 49 years old (48%), where men (48%) and women (52%) were affected similarly. The main involved food vehicles were meats servings (35%), followed by pastries (25%), cheese (23%), pasta (11%) and potato salad with homemade mayonnaise (11%). The majority of the outbreaks occurred inside private homes (33%) followed by commercial food establishments (28%). Inadequate control of temperature and failures in general hygiene practices were identified as the main factors responsible for the outbreaks. In conclusion, S. aureus was an important food poisoning etiological agent in the State of RS during 2000 to 2002 and its prevention depends on control measures involving different parts of the food chain.

  9. Evidence of recent climate change within the historic range of Rio Grande cutthroat trout: implications for management and future persistence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeigler, Matthew P.; Todd, Andrew S.; Caldwell, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of anthropogenically influenced climate change has motivated natural resource managers to incorporate adaptive measures to minimize risks to sensitive and threatened species. Detecting trends in climate variables (i.e., air temperature and hydrology) can serve as a valuable management tool for protecting vulnerable species by increasing our understanding of localized conditions and trends. The Rio Grande cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii virginalis has suffered a severe decline in its historical distribution, with the majority of current populations persisting in isolated headwater streams. To evaluate recent climate change within the subspecies' historical range, we examined trends in average air temperatures, biologically important hydrological variables (timing of snowmelt and seasonal flows), and the April 1 snow water equivalent over the last 45 years (1963–2007). While rates of change in all three metrics were variable across sites, rangewide patterns were evident. Across the subspecies' historical range, average annual air temperatures increased (0.29°C per decade) and the timing of snowmelt shifted 10.6 d earlier in the year (2.3 d/decade). Flows increased during biologically important periods, including winter (January 1–March 31; 6.6% increase per decade), prespawning (April 1–May 14; 6.9% increase per decade), and spawning (May 15–June 15; 4.2% increase per decade) and decreased in summer (June 16–September 15; 1.9% decrease per decade). Evidence of decreasing April 1 snow water equivalent (5.3% per decade) was also observed. While the impacts of these changes at the population level are equivocal, it is likely that negative effects would influence the subspecies by altering its distribution, decreasing available habitat, and altering the timing of important life history components. Continued monitoring and proactive management will be required to increase the resiliency of remaining populations to ensure long-term persistence and

  10. Assimilation of AATSR, MERIS and MODIS Data in the Snowmelt Runoff Model (SRM) on the Upper Rio Grande (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiweiss, M. P.; Rampini, A.; Pepe, M.; Rango, A.; Steele, C.; Stein, W. L.; Schmugge, T.

    2008-12-01

    Current efforts for simulating or forecasting snowmelt are time-consuming and laborious; the AWARE project (A tool for monitoring and forecasting Available WAter REsource in mountain environments) has been motivated by the urgent need to facilitate the prediction of medium-term flows from snowmelt for an effective and sustainable water resources management. Its main goal is to provide innovative tools for monitoring and predicting water availability and distribution in drainage basins where snowmelt is a major component of the annual water balance. The particular objective of the effort reported here is to compare results obtained from the MODIS sensor on NASA Terra and Aqua satellite and next generation sensors AATSR and MERIS on board ESA Envisat satellite. The vehicle for this comparison is the AWARE Geoportal (http://www.aware- eu.info/eng/home.htm) which is a WWW implementation of the Snowmelt Runoff Model (SRM). The river basin chosen for analysis is the Upper Rio Grande of North America. The time period for analysis encompasses the Water Years 2005, 2006, and 2007 (October 2004 - September 2007). The reason for this is to ensure that data from all three sensors are available for use and to investigate variable climate conditions. A successful comparison between the various sensors will help demonstrate that the AWARE approach will facilitate future processing of several years' worth of snow cover data from a variety of sensors that covers large extremes in climate variability. This will allow greater success in developing forecasts and understanding of longer term climate change impacts.

  11. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70–100 calves or more of both genders with ≥200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7–10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7–10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups

  12. Isotope variations of dissolved Zn in the Rio Grande watershed, USA: The role of adsorption on Zn isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szynkiewicz, Anna; Borrok, David M.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the factors influencing zinc (Zn) isotope composition in hydrological systems, we analyzed the δ66Zn of dissolved Zn in the streams and groundwater of the Upper and Middle Rio Grande watershed in Colorado and New Mexico, United States. The stream water samples have a wider variation of δ66Zn (-0.57 to + 0.41 ‰ relative to the JMC 3-0749-Lyon standard) than groundwater samples (-0.13 to + 0.12 ‰) and than samples from streams that are in close proximity to abandoned mining sites (+0.24 to + 0.40 ‰). Regional changes of bedrock geology, from primarily igneous rocks to primarily sedimentary rocks, have no resolvable effect on the δ66Zn of aqueous samples. Instead, an increase in water pH from 7.5 to 8.5 corresponds to a considerable decrease in the δ66Zn of dissolved Zn (R2 = - 0.37, p = 0.003, n = 22). Consequently, we link the observed Zn isotope variations to the process of adsorption of Zn onto suspended sediment and bedrock minerals (average Δ66Znadsorbed-dissolved = + 0.31 ‰). Our results are in good agreement with previous experimental and empirical studies suggesting that Zn adsorption leads to a residual dissolved pool enriched in light Zn isotopes. Given that anthropogenic Zn sources can also be responsible for lowering of δ66Zn, and may overlap with the pH/adsorption effect on δ66Zn, the latter needs to be carefully considered in future studies to differentiate between natural and anthropogenic factors influencing Zn isotopes in this and other aquatic systems.

  13. An Equitable Approach for Compensating Municipalities of the Rio Grande Watershed for Electricity Generated by the Furnas Hydropower Plant, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, C. A. A. S.; Mounts, D. J.; Menezes, S. C., Jr.; Rocha, R. R. C.; Chaves, M. A.; Castro, N. L. M.; Barros, K. O.; Martins, B. F.; Gleriani, J. M.; Soares, V. P.

    2015-04-01

    In Brazil, ninety percent of total electric power comes from renewable sources, where hydropower represents 2/3 of the national energy matrix. In 2012, the new Federal Forest Code eliminated environmental protection along drainage divides and reduced the mandatory width of riparian zones, allowing for land cover change in these environmentally sensitive areas. The conversion of forestlands to agriculture will subject hydroelectric reservoirs to a growing load of sediments, shortening their useful life. In this study of the Furnas hydropower plant and its contributing basin, in the upper reaches of the Rio Grande, a re-evaluation of factors that determine the distribution of finances accrued from hydroelectric generation is recommended. Under the current policy, royalties are paid by the Furnas facility to states and municipalities in direct relation to the area of land flooded by its reservoir, whereas contributing rainfall precipitating in municipalities upstream of the lake is not considered. Currently, the 31 municipalities with lands flooded by the reservoir receive an average of R 213,107 (US 67,226) annually, while the remaining 172 municipalities in the basin receive no water royalties. In the proposed approach to redistribute these funds, each of the 203 municipalities will receive compensation determined by their contributing catchment area, averaging R32,543 (US 10,266) per year. By considering distribution of rainfall in order to equitably allocate hydroelectric royalties, a system for the payment of environmental services is conceived. Such a system intends to incent stakeholders to protect or replant native forests along drainage divides and riparian zones, in recognition of the value this vegetation has in the reduction of long term costs for hydroelectric facilities.

  14. Remnants of the late Eocene erosion surface in the region between the Kaibab uplift and the Rio Grande rift

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, R.W. )

    1993-04-01

    A widespread low-relief erosion surface is thought to have formed in the Colorado Plateau region during the late Eocene between the end of the Laramide orogeny and the beginning of widespread Oligocene volcanism. The present configuration of the late-Eocene surface (LES) is depicted on east-west cross sections that extend from the Kaibab uplift to the Rio Grande rift. The LES is best preserved underneath the Oligocene Chuska Sandstone on the Defiance uplift at about 8,000 ft. MSL. The Chuska is an aeolian arkose that contains rhyolitic ash beds, and was eroded to hilly surface by 30 my ago prior to eruption of the Navajo volcanic field. To the north, the Paleocene Carrizo Mtns. intrusive appear to have been an isolated upland that stood above surrounding plains during the late Eocene. To the west, the north rim of Black Mesa is close to the elevation of the LES on the Defiance Plateau. Siliceous lag-gravels on the rim of Black Mesa may have been derived from sediments originally deposited on the LES. Farther west the Kaibab uplift rises above 9,000 ft. MSL for 14 miles along its crest. The Kaibab uplift probably was a karst plateau that stood above alluviated late Eocene lowlands to the east, north and west. East of the Defiance Plateau, the early Eocene San Jose Formation of the San Juan basin is preserved at elevations as high as 7,500 ft. under the eastern part of the basin, and as high as 8,450 ft. along the deformed eastern flank of the basin. Several thousand feet of middle Eocene deposits probably were once present in the basin. Several thousand feet of middle Eocene deposits probably were once present in the basin, putting the LES at about 9,000--10,000 ft MSL along the eastern side.

  15. Magnetic Fabric Associated with Faulting of Poorly Consolidated Basin Sediments of the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. R.; Minor, S. A.; Caine, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Permanent strain in sediments associated with shallow fault zones can be difficult to characterize. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data were obtained from 120 samples at 6 sites to assess the nature of fault-related AMS fabrics for 4 faults cutting Miocene-Pliocene basin fill sediments of the Rio Grande rift of north-central New Mexico. The San Ysidro (3 sites), Sand Hill, and West Paradise faults within the northern Albuquerque basin have normal offset whereas an unnamed fault near Buckman in the western Española basin has oblique strike-slip offset. Previous studies have shown that detrital magnetite controls magnetic susceptibility in rift sandstones, and in a 50-m-long hanging wall traverse of the San Ysidro fault, non-gouge samples have typical sedimentary AMS fabrics with Kmax and Kint axes (defining magnetic foliation) scattered within bedding. For the 5 normal-fault sites, samples from fault cores or adjacent mixed zones that lie within 1 m of the principal slip surface developed common deformation fabrics with (1) magnetic foliation inclined in the same azimuth but more shallowly dipping than the fault plane, and (2) magnetic lineation plunging down foliation dip with nearly the same trend as the fault striae, although nearer for sand versus clay gouge samples. These relations suggest that the sampled fault materials deformed by particulate flow with alignment of magnetite grains in the plane of maximum shortening. For a 2-m-long traverse at the Buckman site, horizontal sedimentary AMS foliation persists to < 15 cm to the fault slip surface, wherein foliation in sand and clay gouge rotates toward the steeply dipping fault plane in a sense consistent with sinistral offset. Collectively these data suggest permanent deformation fabrics were localized within < 1 m of fault surfaces and that AMS fabrics from gouge samples can provide kinematic information for faults in unconsolidated sediments which may lack associated slickenlines.

  16. Paleoseismologic studies of the Pajarito fault system, western margin of the Rio Grande rift near Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Kelson, K.I. ); Hemphill-Haley, M.A.; Wong, I.G. ); Gardner, J.N.; Reneau, S.L. )

    1993-04-01

    As in much of the Basin and Range province, low levels of historical seismicity in the Rio Grande rift (RGR) are inconsistent with abundant geologic evidence for large-magnitude, late Pleistocene and Holocene earthquakes. Recent trenching and surficial mapping along the 40-km-long, north-trending Pajarito fault system (PFS) near Los Alamos provide evidence for multiple surface-rupture events during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Near Los Alamos, the Pajarito fault (PAF) exhibits an east-facing scarp up to 120 m high that has had at least four surface-rupture events in the past few hundred thousand years. Four trenches across the base of the highest, easternmost fault scarp show that the most-recent rupture occurred prior to about 9 ka, and possible prior to deposition of the 100- to 150-ka El Cajete Pumice. The long-term (post-1.1 Ma) slip rate on the PAF is about 0.1 mm/yr. The down-to-the-west Rendija Canyon (RCF) and Guaje Mountain (GMF) faults both have had at least two surface ruptures since the middle Pleistocene, including most-recent events at about 7.4 ka along the RCF and about 4 to 6 ka along the GMF. Slickensides and other indirect evidence suggest right-oblique normal slip on the RCF and GMF. Long-term (post-1.1 Ma) slip rates on these two faults are approximately an order of magnitude less than that on the PAF. Based on the observed spatial and temporal variations in activity, the subparallel PAF, RCF, and GMF apparently act as independent seismic sources, although they are located only about 1 to 3 km apart. Nevertheless, the average recurrence interval for faults within the PFS is probably comparable to intervals of 10[sup 4] yr estimated along the eastern rift margin near Taos.

  17. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70-100 calves or more of both genders with ≥ 200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7-10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7-10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups were effective

  18. Characteristics of Triatomine infestation and natural Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Silva, Andressa Noronha; Câmara, Antonia Cláudia Jácome da; Martins, Kiev; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; Oliveira, Pedro Igor Câmara de; Azevedo, Paulo Roberto Medeiros de; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-02-01

    INTRODUCTION Natural and artificial ecotope infestation by the kissing bug triatomines and their colonization and infection by Trypanosoma cruzi , the Chagas disease agent, were evaluated in nine municipalities of the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. METHODS Following identification, triatomine intestinal contents were analyzed by direct microscopic examination, xenoculture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for parasite detection. Trypanosoma cruzi isolates were genotyped using three different markers. RESULTS Of 842 triatomines captured, 65% were Triatoma brasiliensis , 17.8% Triatoma pseudomaculata , 12.5% Panstrongylus lutzi , and 4.7% Rhodnius nasutus . Triatoma brasiliensis and P. lutzi adults were found in the intradomicile. T. brasiliensis, T. pseudomaculata , and R. nasutus nymphs and adults were found in the peridomicile and wild environment. Intradomiciliary and peridomiciliary infestation indexes were 5.6% and 33.7%, respectively. In the peridomicile, chicken coops were the most infested ecotope. The T. cruzi triatomine infection rate was 30.2%, of which PCR detected 29%. P . lutzi (78.1%), T . brasiliensis (24.5%), and T . pseudomaculata (22.7%) were the most infected species. TcII and III genotypes were detected in T. brasiliensis and TcIII in P. lutzi . CONCLUSIONS T. brasiliensis was found in all environments and most ecotopes with high T. cruzi infection rates. High infection rates were also detected in T . pseudomaculata and P. lutzi , suggesting their role in the interchange between the wild and peridomestic transmission cycles. The combination of PCR, microscopic examination, and xenoculture contributed to improving T. cruzi infection evaluation in triatomine bugs. The TcII and TcIII genotypes were predominant in the study area.

  19. Environmental contaminants in blood, hair, and tissues of ocelots from the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, 1986-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mora, M.A.; Laack, L.L.; Clare, Lee M.; Sericano, J.; Presley, R.; Gardinali, P.R.; Gamble, L.R.; Robertson, S.; Frank, D.

    2000-01-01

    The ocelot (Felis pardalis) is an endangered neotropical cat distributed within a small range in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), in Texas, U.S.A. Studies of the impacts of environmental contaminants in wild cats are few. Approximately one fourth of the estimated population (about 100) of ocelots in the LRGV was sampled to evaluate the impacts of chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and trace elements on the population. Hair was collected from 32 ocelots trapped between 1986-1992, and blood was collected from 20 ocelots trapped between 1993-1997. A few blood samples were obtained from individuals recaptured two or three times. Tissue samples from 4 road-killed ocelots were also analyzed. DDE, PCBs, and Hg were some of the most common contaminants detected in hair and blood. Mean Hg levels in hair ranged from 0.5 to 1.25 ??g g-1 dw, Se from 1.5 to 3.48 ??g g-1 dw, and Pb from 0.56 to 26.8 ??g g-1 dw. Mean DDE concentrations in plasma ranged from 0.005 ??g g-1 ww to 0.153 ??g g-1 ww, and PCBs ranged from 0.006 ??g g-1 ww to 0.092 ??g g-1 ww. Mean Hg levels in red blood cells ranged from 0.056 ??g g-1 dw to 0.25 ??g g-1 dw. Concentrations of DDE, PCBs, or Hg, did not increase significantly with age, although the highest concentrations of DDE and Hg were found in older animals. Overall, concentrations of DDE, PCBs, and Hg were low and at levels that currently do not pose any threat to health or survival of the ocelot. This is further supported by good reproduction of the ocelot in the LRGV, where adult females averaged about 1.5 kittens/litter. Thus, it seems that the current major threat to recovery of the ocelot in the LRGV may be habitat loss, although potential impacts of new generation pesticides, such as organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides need further study.The ocelot (Felis pardalis) is an endangered neotropical cat distributed within a small range in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), in Texas, U.S.A. Studies of the impacts of

  20. Birth and evolution of the Rio Grande-Rio Chama fluvial system: The influence of magma-driven dynamic topography on fluvial systems over the last 8 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasch, M. N.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Heizler, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Grande-Rio Chama (RG-RC) fluvial system of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico preserves a record of southern Rocky Mountain erosion and sediment transport over the last 8 Ma. During this time the two rivers have evolved wildly, undergoing channel migrations, drainage capture and integration events, carving and refilling of paleocanyons, lake spill-overs, and reshaping of drainage divides. New 40Ar/39Ar basalt ages coupled with new detrital grain age population data for fluvial sediments are beginning to reconstruct the birth of the RG-RC fluvial system and elucidate the processes that drove its evolution over the last ~8 Ma. Twenty-three detrital grain samples have been collected from RG-RC river deposits ranging in age from ~8 Ma (RC) and 4.5 Ma (RG) to modern fluvial sediment. Detrital zircon age spectra for the RG reveal peaks at 25 Ma, 28 Ma, 30-35 Ma (San Juan volcanic), and 70-90Ma (San Juan Basin) in sediments deposited from 4.5 to 0 Ma. RC spectra are richer in San Juan Basin and San Juan volcanic detritus. A 2.6 Ma Totavi Lentil deposit downstream of today's RG-RC confluence is similar to the ancestral RG, while a 1.6 Ma Totavi Lentil is similar to the combined RG-RC, suggesting northward shift of the RG-RC confluence by 1.6 Ma due to Jemez Mountain volcanism. A 4.5 Ma basalt age from Black Mesa and occurrence of San Juan volcanic detritus in 3 to 5 Ma sediment suggests birth of an ancestral RG as early as 4.5 Ma. There is no record of an ancestral RG north of the Red River confluence for the 3.0 to 0.5 Ma time period, supporting prior work that northern San Luis Basin became integrated after 0.5 Ma spill-over of Lake Alamosa. We plan to add detrital sanidine dating to refine the age spectra and help further delineate drainage patterns. The RG-RC system drains a highly tectonically active region. Changes in the fluvial regime suggest: 1) long-lived source of detritus (some recycled) from the San Juan volcanic field, 2) downstream integration

  1. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2003-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; McCoy, Kurt J.; More, Geoff J.M.; Worthington, Jeffrey A.; Bandy-Baldwin, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    The Albuquerque, New Mexico, area has two principal sources of water: groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system and surface water from the San Juan-Chama Diversion Project. From 1960 to 2002, groundwater withdrawals from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system have caused water levels to decline more than 120 feet in some places within the Albuquerque area, resulting in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a detailed characterization of the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande riparian corridor in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to provide hydrologic data and enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to the riverside drains. A simple conceptual model of flow indicates that the groundwater table gently slopes from the Rio Grande towards riverside drains and the outer boundaries of the inner valley. Water infiltrating from the Rio Grande initially moves vertically below the river, but, as flow spreads farther into the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer, flow becomes primarily horizontal. The slope of the water-table surface may be strongly controlled by the riverside drains and influenced by other more distal hydrologic boundary conditions, such as groundwater withdrawals by wells. Results from 35 slug tests performed in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer during January and February 2009 indicate that hydraulic-conductivity values ranged from 5 feet per day to 160 feet per day with a median hydraulic-conductivity for all transects of 40 feet per day. Median annual horizontal hydraulic gradients in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.011 to 0

  2. Chemical analyses of ground-water samples from the Rio Grande Valley in the vicinity of Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 1993 through January 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, D.W.; Schlottmann, J.L.; Ferree, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate general ground-water- quality conditions and contaminant locations in the Rio Grande Valley in the vicinity of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Water samples from 36 observation wells in 12 well nests were analyzed. The well nests are located along three roads near the Rio Grande--two well nests near Paseo del Norte, five well nests near Monta?o Road, and five well nests near Rio Bravo Boulevard. The water samples were collected from October 19, 1993, through January 18, 1994. Water-quality types by major-ion composition were calcium bicarbonate (found in most samples), sodium sulfate, calcium sulfate, and calcium sulfate chloride. Nutrients were detected in all but one sample. Ammonia was detected in 34 samples, nitrite in 4 samples, and nitrate in 17 samples. Orthophosphate was detected in 31 samples. Organic carbon was detected in all samples collected. The trace elements arsenic and barium were detected in all samples and zinc in 31 samples. Fourteen samples contained detectable copper. Cadmium was detected in one sample, chromium in two samples, lead in four samples, and selenium in two samples. Mercury and silver were not detected.

  3. Environmental contaminants and biomarker responses in fish from the Rio Grande and its U.S. tributaries: spatial and temporal trends.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christopher J; Hinck, Jo Ellen; Blazer, Vicki S; Denslow, Nancy D; Dethloff, Gail M; Bartish, Timothy M; Coyle, James J; Tillitt, Donald E

    2005-11-01

    We collected, examined, and analyzed 368 fish of seven species from 10 sites on rivers of the Rio Grande Basin (RGB) during late 1997 and early 1998 to document temporal and geographic trends in the concentrations of accumulative contaminants and to assess contaminant effects on the fish. Sites were located on the mainstem of the Rio Grande and on the Arroyo Colorado and Pecos River in Texas (TX), New Mexico (NM), and Colorado. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were the targeted species. Fish were examined in the field for internal and external visible gross lesions, selected organs were weighed to compute ponderal and organosomatic indices, and samples of tissues and fluids were obtained and preserved for analysis of fish health and reproductive biomarkers. Whole fish from each station were composited by species and gender and analyzed for organochlorine chemical residues and elemental contaminants using instrumental methods, and for 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ) using the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. Overall, fish from lower RGB stations contained greater concentrations of organochlorine pesticide residues and appeared to be less healthy than those from sites in the central and upper parts of the basin, as indicated by a general gradient of residue concentrations and biomarker responses. A minimal number of altered biomarkers and few or no elevated contaminant concentrations were noted in fish from the upper RGB. The exception was elevated concentrations [up to 0.46 microg/g wet-weight (ww)] of total mercury (Hg) in predatory species from the Rio Grande at Elephant Butte Reservoir, NM, a condition documented in previous studies. Arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) concentrations were greatest in fish from sites in the central RGB; Se concentrations in fish from the Pecos River at Red Bluff Lake, TX and from the Rio Grande at Langtry, TX and Amistad International Reservoir, TX exceeded

  4. Environmental contaminants and biomarker responses in fish from the Rio Grande and its U.S. tributaries: Spatial and temporal trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Hinck, J.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Denslow, N.D.; Dethloff, G.M.; Bartish, T.M.; Coyle, J.J.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We collected, examined, and analyzed 368 fish of seven species from 10 sites on rivers of the Rio Grande Basin (RGB) during late 1997 and early 1998 to document temporal and geographic trends in the concentrations of accumulative contaminants and to assess contaminant effects on the fish. Sites were located on the mainstem of the Rio Grande and on the Arroyo Colorado and Pecos River in Texas (TX), New Mexico (NM), and Colorado. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were the targeted species. Fish were examined in the field for internal and external visible gross lesions, selected organs were weighed to compute ponderal and organosomatic indices, and samples of tissues and fluids were obtained and preserved for analysis of fish health and reproductive biomarkers. Whole fish from each station were composited by species and gender and analyzed for organochlorine chemical residues and elemental contaminants using instrumental methods, and for 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin-like activity (TCDD-EQ) using the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. Overall, fish from lower RGB stations contained greater concentrations of organochlorine pesticide residues and appeared to be less healthy than those from sites in the central and upper parts of the basin, as indicated by a general gradient of residue concentrations and biomarker responses. A minimal number of altered biomarkers and few or no elevated contaminant concentrations were noted in fish from the upper RGB. The exception was elevated concentrations [up to 0.46 ??g/g wet-weight (ww)] of total mercury (Hg) in predatory species from the Rio Grande at Elephant Butte Reservoir, NM, a condition documented in previous studies. Arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) concentrations were greatest in fish from sites in the central RGB; Se concentrations in fish from the Pecos River at Red Bluff Lake, TX and from the Rio Grande at Langtry, TX and Amistad International Reservoir, TX exceeded published

  5. Geology of the Western Part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (TA-3 to TA-16), Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    C.J.Lewis; A.Lavine; S.L.Reneau; J.N.Gardner; R.Channell; C.W.Criswell

    2002-12-01

    We present data that elucidate the stratigraphy, geomorphology, and structure in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory between Technical Areas 3 and 16 (TA-3 and TA-16). Data include those gathered by geologic mapping of surficial, post-Bandelier Tuff strata, conventional and high-precision geologic mapping and geochemical analysis of cooling units within the Bandelier Tuff, logging of boreholes and a gas pipeline trench, and structural analysis using profiles, cross sections, structure contour maps, and stereographic projections. This work contributes to an improved understanding of the paleoseismic and geomorphic history of the area, which will aid in future seismic hazard evaluations and other investigations. The study area lies at the base of the main, 120-m (400-ft) high escarpment formed by the Pajarito fault, an active fault of the Rio Grande rift that bounds Los Alamos National Laboratory on the west. Subsidiary fracturing, faulting, and folding associated with the Pajarito fault zone extends at least 1,500 m (5,000 ft) to the east of the main Pajarito fault escarpment. Stratigraphic units in the study area include upper units of the Tshirege Member of the early Pleistocene Bandelier Tuff, early Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits that predate incision of canyons on this part of the Pajarito Plateau, and younger Pleistocene and Holocene alluvium and colluvium that postdate drainage incision. We discriminate four sets of structures in the area between TA-3 and TA-16: (a) north-striking faults and folds that mark the main zone of deformation, including a graben in the central part of the study area; (b) north-northwest-striking fractures and rare faults that bound the eastern side of the principal zone of deformation and may be the surface expression of deep-seated faulting; (c) rare northeast-striking structures near the northern limit of the area associated with the southern end of the Rendija Canyon fault; and (d) several small east

  6. Rock magnetic characterization of faulted sediments with associated magnetic anomalies in the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Variations in rock magnetic properties are responsible for the many linear, short-wavelength, low-amplitude magnetic anomalies that are spatially associated with faults that cut Neogene basin sediments in the Rio Grande rift, including the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of the Santa Fe Group and prerift Eocene and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks document large variations of magnetic properties juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault. Mean volume magnetic susceptibilities generally increase upsection through eight map units: from 1.7 to 2.2E-4 in the prerift Eocene and Cretaceous rocks to 9.9E-4-1.2E-3 in three members of the Miocene Zia Formation of the Santa Fe Group to 1.5E-3-3.5E-3 in three members of the Miocene-Pleistocene Arroyo Ojito Formation of the Santa Fe Group. Rock magnetic measurements and petrography indicate that the amount of detrital magnetite and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite within the Santa Fe Group sediments are the predominant controls of their magnetic property variations. Magnetic susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size within the members of the Arroyo Ojito Formation (deposited in fluvial environments) but within members of the Zia Formation (deposited in mostly eolian environments) reaches highest values in fine to medium sands. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite is spatially associated with calcite cementation in the Santa Fe Group. Both oxidation and cementation probably reflect past flow of groundwater through permeable zones. Magnetic models for geologic cross sections that incorporate mean magnetic susceptibilities for the different stratigraphic units mimic the aeromagnetic profiles across the San Ysidro fault and demonstrate that the stratigraphic level of dominant magnetic contrast changes with

  7. Riparian ecohydrology: regulation of water flux from the ground to the atmosphere in the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleverly, James R.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Thibault, James R.; McDonnell, Dianne E.; Allred Coonrod, Julie E.

    2006-10-01

    During the previous decade, the south-western United States has faced declining water resources and escalating forest fires due to long-term regional drought. Competing demands for water resources require a careful accounting of the basin water budget. Water lost to the atmosphere through riparian evapotranspiration (ET) is believed to rank in the top third of water budget depletions. To better manage depletions in a large river system, patterns of riparian ET must be better understood. This paper provides a general overview of the ecological, hydrological, and atmospheric issues surrounding riparian ET in the Middle Rio Grande (MRG) of New Mexico. Long-term measurements of ET, water table depth, and micro-meteorological conditions have been made at sites dominated by native cottonwood (Populus deltoides) forests and non-native saltcedar (Tamarix chinensis) thickets along the MRG. Over periods longer than one week, groundwater and leaf area index (LAI) dynamics relate well with ET rates. Evapotranspiration from P. deltoides forests was unaffected by annual drought conditions in much of the MRG where the water table is maintained within 3 m of the surface. Evapotranspiration from a dense Tamarix chinensis thicket did not decline with increasing groundwater depth; instead, ET increased by 50%, from 6 mm/day to 9 mm/day, as the water table receded at nearly 7 cm/day. Leaf area index of the T. chinensis thicket, likewise, increased during groundwater decline. Leaf area index can be manipulated as well following removal of non-native species. When T. chinensis and non-native Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) were removed from a P. deltoides understory, water salvaged through reduced ET was 26 cm/yr in relation to ET measured at reference sites. To investigate correlates to short-term variations in ET, stepwise multiple linear regression was used to evaluate atmospheric conditions under which ET is elevated or depressed. At the P. deltoides-dominated sites, ET

  8. Chlorinated hydrocarbons and biomarkers of exposure in wading birds and fish of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wainwright, S.E.; Mora, M.A.; Sericano, J.L.; Thomas, P.

    2001-01-01

    During 1997 we evaluated reproductive success in colonial water birds nesting in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), Texas, and correlated success with concentrations of contaminants in eggs. We also measured steroid hormones and gonadosomatic index (GSI) as biomarkers of endocrine effects in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Nest and fledging success of green herons (Butorides virescens) and great egrets (Ardea alba) were similar to those found in other parts of North America; however, nesting success of black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) was lower, very likely due to flooding of the nesting area. Except for DDE and toxaphene, all chlorinated pesticides in bird eggs were low and not of concern for negative effects on any of the three species. DDE was highest in green heron eggs and seemed to increase along a geographic gradient from west to east, with eggs from Falcon Reservoir containing low concentrations, and those at Los Indios containing the highest concentrations (approx. 11,000 ng/g WW), near or above the threshold for reproductive impairment. DDE levels in great egrets and black-crowned night-herons were below those that are associated with reproductive impairment. Mean DDE levels in carp at the JAS Farms site were above the threshold level suggested for predator protection. Toxaphene was detected in about 20% of the samples with high levels observed in green heron eggs from Los Indios (mean = 4,402 ng/g WW). These are the highest toxaphene levels reported in bird eggs in the LRGV. Toxaphene levels in fish ranged between 90 and 312 ng/g WW. In general, PCBs in bird eggs and fish tissue were low and at levels not of concern for reproductive effects. The greatest concentrations of testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were detected in fish from the JAS Farms site, which also had the greatest concentrations of DDE. Increased androgen production and gonad development in fish at this site, relative to Pharr, could be possibly associated with

  9. Water Contents of the Mantle Beneath the Rio Grande Rift: FTIR Analysis of Kilbourne Hole Peridotite Xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, Lillian A.; Peslier, Anne; Brandon, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Although nominally anhydrous mantle minerals contain only trace amounts of water, they are the main reservoir of water in the mantle. Added up at the scale of the Earth's mantle, these trace amounts of water represent oceans worth in mass]. Mantle xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole in southern New Mexico are ideal to study mantle water distribution in a rift tectonic setting as they come from a recently-erupted maar in the middle of the Rio Grande Rift. Eleven lherzolites, one harzburgite, and one dunite are being analyzed for water contents by FTIR. The xenoliths will also be analyzed for major and trace element composition, Fe3+/Summation (Fe) ratios, and characterized petrologically. Olivines exhibit variable water contents with less water at the rims compared to the cores. This is probably due to H loss during decompression and xenolith transport by the host magma. Mantle water contents appear to have been primarily preserved in the core of the olivines, based on diffusion modeling of the typically plateau-shaped water content profiles across these grains. Water concentrations are in equilibrium between clino- and orthopyroxene, but olivine concentrations are typically not in equilibrium with those of either pyroxene. Lherzolites analyzed so far have water contents of 2-12 ppm H2O in olivines, 125-165 ppm H2O in orthopyroxenes, and 328-447 ppm H2O in clinopyroxenes. These water contents are similar to, but with a narrower range, than those for the respective minerals in other continental peridotite xenoliths. The lherzolites have bulk-rock (BR) Al2O3 contents that range between 3.17 and 3.78 wt%, indicating similar degrees of partial melting, which could explain the narrow range of their pyroxene water contents. Primitive mantle normalized rare earth element (REE) profiles of the bulk lherzolites vary from light REE depleted to flat, with no significant differences between, nor relation to, their mineral water contents. Consequently, the metasomatic agents that

  10. Seepage investigation of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briody, Alyse C.; Robertson, Andrew J.; Thomas, Nicole

    2016-03-22

    Seepage investigations have been conducted annually by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1988 to 1998 and from 2004 to the present (2014) along a 64-mile reach of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, as part of the Mesilla Basin monitoring program. Results of the investigation conducted in 2014 are presented in this report. The 2014 seepage investigation was conducted on February 11, 2014, during the low-flow conditions of the non-irrigation season. During the 2014 investigation, discharge was measured at 23 sites along the main-stem Rio Grande and 19 inflow sites within the study reach. Because of extended drought conditions affecting the basin, many sites along the Rio Grande (17 main-stem and 9 inflow) were observed to be dry in February 2014. Water-quality samples were collected during the seepage investigation at sites with flowing water as part of a long-term monitoring effort in the region.Net seepage gain or loss was computed for each subreach (the interval between two adjacent measurement locations along the river) by subtracting the discharge measured at the upstream location from the discharge measured at the closest downstream location along the river and then subtracting any inflow to the river within the subreach. An estimated gain or loss was determined to be meaningful when it exceeded the cumulative measurement uncertainty associated with the net seepage computation. The cumulative seepage loss in the 64-mile study reach in 2014 was 16.0 plus or minus 2.9 cubic feet per second.

  11. Late Miocene-Pleistocene evolution of a Rio Grande rift subbasin, Sunshine Valley-Costilla Plain, San Luis Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, C.A.; Thompson, R.A.; Shroba, R.R.; Anderson, M.; Drenth, B.J.; Rotzien, J.; Lyon, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sunshine Valley–Costilla Plain, a structural subbasin of the greater San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift, is bounded to the north and south by the San Luis Hills and the Red River fault zone, respectively. Surficial mapping, neotectonic investigations, geochronology, and geophysics demonstrate that the structural, volcanic, and geomorphic evolution of the basin involves the intermingling of climatic cycles and spatially and temporally varying tectonic activity of the Rio Grande rift system. Tectonic activity has transferred between range-bounding and intrabasin faults creating relict landforms of higher tectonic-activity rates along the mountain-piedmont junction. Pliocene–Pleistocene average long-term slip rates along the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone range between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/year with late Pleistocene slip rates approximately half (0.06 mm/year) of the longer Quaternary slip rate. During the late Pleistocene, climatic influences have been dominant over tectonic influences on mountain-front geomorphic processes. Geomorphic evidence suggests that this once-closed subbasin was integrated into the Rio Grande prior to the integration of the once-closed northern San Luis Basin, north of the San Luis Hills, Colorado; however, deep canyon incision, north of the Red River and south of the San Luis Hills, initiated relatively coeval to the integration of the northern San Luis Basin. Long-term projections of slip rates applied to a 1.6 km basin depth defined from geophysical modeling suggests that rifting initiated within this subbasin between 20 and 10 Ma. Geologic mapping and geophysical interpretations reveal a complex network of northwest-, northeast-, and north-south–trending faults. Northwest- and northeast-trending faults show dual polarity and are crosscut by north-south– trending faults. This structural model possibly provides an analog for how some intracontinental rift structures evolve through time.

  12. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; Oelsner, Gretchen P.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Goeff J.M. Moret,; Jeffery A. Worthington,; Kimberly M. Bandy-Baldwin,

    2016-03-17

    The Albuquerque area of New Mexico has two principal sources of water: (1) groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, and (2) surface water from the Rio Grande. From 1960 to 2002, pumping from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system caused groundwater levels to decline more than 120 feet while water-level declines along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque were generally less than 40 feet. These differences in water-level declines in the Albuquerque area have resulted in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande.In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, acting as fiscal agent for the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer in the Albuquerque area of New Mexico. The study provides hydrologic data in order to enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to riverside drains. The study area extends about 20 miles along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area. Piezometers and surface-water gages were installed in paired transects at eight locations. Nested piezometers, completed at various depths in the alluvial aquifer, and surface-water gages, installed in the Rio Grande and riverside drains, were instrumented with pressure transducers. Water-level and water-temperature data were collected from 2009 to 2010.Water levels from the piezometers indicated that groundwater movement was usually away from the river towards the riverside drains. Annual mean horizontal groundwater gradients in the inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.0024 (I-25 East) to 0.0144 (Pajarito East). The median hydraulic conductivity values of the inner valley alluvial aquifer, determined from slug tests, ranged from 30

  13. Evaluation of sediments in the Middle Rio Grande, Elephant Butte Reservoir, and Caballo Reservoir as potential sources for toxic materials. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Brandvold, D.K.; Lynch, T.R.; Brandvold, L.A.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of a large number of priority pollutant trace metal and organic species in water and sediments in surface waters in the Middle Rio Grande region of New Mexico has been surveyed. In addition to sediments and water, limnological data was collected on the reservoirs, radionuclide and particle size analysis was performed on the sediments and a limited number of fish were surveyed for trace metals and organics. The sediments carry elevated levels of the metals Hg, Cd, As, Se, and U and fish may be biomagnifying Hg, Pb, and V through the food chain. Detectable levels of 18 different chlorinated organic pesticides were found in samples of water and bottom sediments.

  14. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2003-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; McCoy, Kurt J.; More, Geoff J.M.; Worthington, Jeffrey A.; Bandy-Baldwin, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    The Albuquerque, New Mexico, area has two principal sources of water: groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system and surface water from the San Juan-Chama Diversion Project. From 1960 to 2002, groundwater withdrawals from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system have caused water levels to decline more than 120 feet in some places within the Albuquerque area, resulting in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a detailed characterization of the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande riparian corridor in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to provide hydrologic data and enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to the riverside drains. A simple conceptual model of flow indicates that the groundwater table gently slopes from the Rio Grande towards riverside drains and the outer boundaries of the inner valley. Water infiltrating from the Rio Grande initially moves vertically below the river, but, as flow spreads farther into the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer, flow becomes primarily horizontal. The slope of the water-table surface may be strongly controlled by the riverside drains and influenced by other more distal hydrologic boundary conditions, such as groundwater withdrawals by wells. Results from 35 slug tests performed in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer during January and February 2009 indicate that hydraulic-conductivity values ranged from 5 feet per day to 160 feet per day with a median hydraulic-conductivity for all transects of 40 feet per day. Median annual horizontal hydraulic gradients in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.011 to 0

  15. The upper mantle structure of the central Rio Grande rift region from teleseismic P and S wave travel time delays and attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, P.D.; Davis, P.M.; Baldridge, W.S.; Olsen, K.H.; Glahn, A.; Achauer, U.; Spence, W.

    1996-01-01

    The lithosphere beneath a continental rift should be significantly modified due to extension. To image the lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift (RGR), we analyzed teleseismic travel time delays of both P and S wave arrivals and solved for the attenuation of P and S waves for four seismic experiments spanning the Rio Grande rift. Two tomographic inversions of the P wave travel time data are given: an Aki-Christofferson-Husebye (ACH) block model inversion and a downward projection inversion. The tomographic inversions reveal a NE-SW to NNE-SSW trending feature at depths of 35 to 145 km with a velocity reduction of 7 to 8% relative to mantle velocities beneath the Great Plains. This region correlates with the transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Rio Grande rift and is bounded on the NW by the Jemez lineament, a N52??E trending zone of late Miocene to Holocene volcanism. S wave delays plotted against P wave delays are fit with a straight line giving a slope of 3.0??0.4. This correlation and the absolute velocity reduction imply that temperatures in the lithosphere are close to the solidus, consistent with, but not requiring, the presence of partial melt in the mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. The attenuation data could imply the presence of partial melt. We compare our results with other geophysical and geologic data. We propose that any north-south trending thermal (velocity) anomaly that may have existed in the upper mantle during earlier (Oligocene to late Miocene) phases of rifting and that may have correlated with the axis of the rift has diminished with time and has been overprinted with more recent structure. The anomalously low-velocity body presently underlying the transition zone between the core of the Colorado Plateau and the rift may reflect processes resulting from the modern (Pliocene to present) regional stress field (oriented WNW-ESE), possibly heralding future extension across the Jemez lineament and transition zone.

  16. Comparative morphology of immature stages of four species of Chinavia (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae), with a key to the species of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fürstenau, Brenda Bianca Rodrigues Jesse; Schwertner, Cristiano Feldens; Grazia, Jocelia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Chinavia Orian (1965) is one of the most diverse genera of Pentatomidae, distributed in the Afrotropical, Neotropical and Nearctic Regions. Thirty-two species are recorded for Brazil, some of them having potential economic impact because they are found on crops and referred to as pests. The morphology of the five nymphal instars of Chinavia armigera (Stål, 1859), Chinavia aseada (Rolston, 1983), Chinavia brasicola (Rolston, 1983) and Chinavia runaspis (Dallas, 1851) are described here. Through a comparative study, identification keys were developed to allow an early identification of the 12 Chinavia species of Rio Grande do Sul. PMID:24039512

  17. Wildfire Impacts on Water Quality, Macroinvertebrates and Trout: An Initial Survey After the West Fork Complex Fire in the Upper Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, A.; Knipper, K. R.; Randall, J.; Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Forest fires affect water quality in the disrupted watershed, which can devastate the aquatic ecosystem including sensitive trout (Salmonidae) and macroinvertebrate species. The West Fork Fire Complex consumed 88,724 acres of forest in the state of Colorado during the summer of 2013. The majority (88%) of the burn area was comprised of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanii) trees killed previously by Spruce Beetle (Ips spp.). Damage to the soils was of moderate to high severity in the majority of the area (60%). The recent fire surrounded the Rio Grande, affecting water quality and habitat critical to insects and fish. The water quality of the Rio Grande (above and below the burn) and some of the effected tributaries is currently being monitored for both quality and quantity. Parameters important to the survival of aquatic life, such as flow, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, turbidity, nutrients, and suspended and dissolved metals are being monitored along the Rio Grande and in tributaries. Macroinvertebrate and fish populations are sampled in the same locations. First year observations showed the ecosystem to be relatively resilient, with stable water quality and survival of insects and fish. However, an intense monsoon season this summer is driving extensive sediments into tributaries from steep, severely burned hillslopes. These monsoon events have caused acute and dramatic fish kills, where hundreds of trout were reported killed in one tributary in a single day event. Turbidity was observed as high as 488 NTU in the impacted stream with fish kill, whereas the turbidity was 25 NTU in a neighboring tributary outside of the burn area. Salmonids can be negatively impacted by relatively low turbidity, with prior studies noting that the turbidity threshold for rainbow trout is 70 NTU. Continued monitoring of water quality, macroinvertebrate populations, and fish populations is being undertaken to determine

  18. Using new approaches to environmental decision-making: An application of integrated assessment methods to water resource issues in the binational Lower Rio Grande basin

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, M.L.

    1999-12-31

    This article examines a unique application of integrated assessment methodologies to analyze water scarcity, development and the environment in the semi-arid Lower Rio Grande/Rio Bravo watershed. US and Mexican data are analyzed to produce an integrated baseline report of current socio-economic, ecological, water supply and demand, water quality, and management conditions and trends. The baseline report provides the basis for subsequent analysis of alternative future scenarios for the region. Scenarios are developed by combining demographic projections with alternatives for future water availability, irrigation technologies, and management practices. The integrated assessment methodology is evaluated as a general tool for environmental decision-making. Problems encountered in applying the methodology are discussed, as are possibilities for improvements. The article concludes that, despite inherent difficulties, integrated assessments can provide a powerful framework by which to analyze complex environmental issues involving different disciplines and large amounts of information.

  19. Quality of water and sediment in streams affected by historical mining, and quality of Mine Tailings, in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin, Big Bend Area of the United States and Mexico, August 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.; Kolbe, Christine M.; Belzer, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the International Boundary and Water Commission - U.S. and Mexican Sections, the National Park Service, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the Secretaria de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales in Mexico, the Area de Proteccion de Flora y Fauna Canon de Santa Elena in Mexico, and the Area de Proteccion de Flora y Fauna Maderas del Carmen in Mexico, collected samples of stream water, streambed sediment, and mine tailings during August 2002 for a study to determine whether trace elements from abandoned mines in the area in and around Big Bend National Park have affected the water and sediment quality in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin of the United States and Mexico. Samples were collected from eight sites on the main stem of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo, four Rio Grande/Rio Bravo tributary sites downstream from abandoned mines or mine-tailing sites, and 11 mine-tailing sites. Mines in the area were operated to produce fluorite, germanium, iron, lead, mercury, silver, and zinc during the late 1800s through at least the late 1970s. Moderate (relatively neutral) pHs in stream-water samples collected at the 12 Rio Grande/Rio Bravo main-stem and tributary sites indicate that water is well mixed, diluted, and buffered with respect to the solubility of trace elements. The highest sulfate concentrations were in water samples from tributaries draining the Terlingua mining district. Only the sample from the Rough Run Draw site exceeded the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards general-use protection criterion for sulfate. All chloride and dissolved solids concentrations in water samples were less than the general-use protection criteria. Aluminum, copper, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc were detected in all water samples for which each element was analyzed. Cadmium, chromium, and lead were detected in samples less frequently, and silver was not detected in any of the samples. None of the sample concentrations of

  20. [Environmental, social, and roadway vulnerability in accidents involving transportation of hazardous products: a case study of the BR-101 highway between Osório and Torres in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Maria Auxiliadora Cannarozzo; Nodari, Christine Tessele; Pereira, Kimberllyn Rosa da Silva

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the environmental and social vulnerability and identify critical highway stretches for accidents involving transportation of hazardous products on the BR-101 highway between the cities of Osório and Torres in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The study's approach consisted of a multiple-criteria analysis combining highway safety analysis and environmental and social vulnerability analysis in the occurrence of accidents with hazardous products, plus cartographic analysis techniques. Thirty-eight kilometers of the highway showed high vulnerability, of which 8 kilometers with critical vulnerability, associated with bridges over rivers, water uptake points, a tunnel, environmental preservation areas, and an urban area. These stretches should be prioritized when developing action plans for accident mitigation and development of public policies for this highway. This proved to be an unprecedented approach when compared to existing studies and a potentially useful tool for decision-making in emergency operations. PMID:27653196

  1. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; Oelsner, Gretchen P.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Goeff J.M. Moret,; Jeffery A. Worthington,; Kimberly M. Bandy-Baldwin,

    2016-03-17

    The Albuquerque area of New Mexico has two principal sources of water: (1) groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, and (2) surface water from the Rio Grande. From 1960 to 2002, pumping from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system caused groundwater levels to decline more than 120 feet while water-level declines along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque were generally less than 40 feet. These differences in water-level declines in the Albuquerque area have resulted in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande.In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, acting as fiscal agent for the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer in the Albuquerque area of New Mexico. The study provides hydrologic data in order to enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to riverside drains. The study area extends about 20 miles along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area. Piezometers and surface-water gages were installed in paired transects at eight locations. Nested piezometers, completed at various depths in the alluvial aquifer, and surface-water gages, installed in the Rio Grande and riverside drains, were instrumented with pressure transducers. Water-level and water-temperature data were collected from 2009 to 2010.Water levels from the piezometers indicated that groundwater movement was usually away from the river towards the riverside drains. Annual mean horizontal groundwater gradients in the inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.0024 (I-25 East) to 0.0144 (Pajarito East). The median hydraulic conductivity values of the inner valley alluvial aquifer, determined from slug tests, ranged from 30

  2. Petrofabrics of olivine in a rift axis and rift shoulder and their implications for seismic anisotropy beneath the Rio Grande rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Munjae; Jung, Haemyeong; Kil, Youngwoo

    2015-04-01

    Mantle-derived xenoliths associated with continental rifting can provide important information about the mantle structure and the physicochemical properties of deformation processes in the upper mantle. Metasomatized spinel peridotites from Adam's Diggings (AD) at a rift shoulder and Elephant Butte (EB) at a rift axis in the Rio Grande rift (RGR) were investigated to understand the deformation processes and seismic anisotropy occurring in the upper mantle. As determined through analysis of the lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with electron backscatter diffraction (SEM/EBSD), AD peridotites exhibited C-type LPO of olivine indicating a dominant slip system of (100)[001] at the rift shoulder, whereas EB peridotites exhibited A-type LPO indicating a dominant slip system of (010)[100] at the rift axis. Both geochemical data and microstructural observations indicate that the localized mantle enrichment processes, including melts with hydrous fluids, controlled multiple mantle metasomatisms and deformation of rocks under wet conditions (with olivine C-type LPO) at the rift shoulder (AD), whereas mantle depletion by decompression partial melting caused deformation of rocks under dry conditions (with olivine A-type LPO) at the rift axis (EB). These observations provide evidence for localized hydration and physicochemical heterogeneity of the upper mantle in the Rio Grande rift (RGR) zone. Seismic anisotropy observed beneath this zone can be attributed to the transtensional rupture, such as inhomogeneous stretching, and the petrofabrics of olivine beneath the study area.

  3. Deep Production Well for Geothermal Direct-Use Heating of A Large Commercial Greenhouse, Radium Springs, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Witcher

    2002-01-02

    Expansion of a large commercial geothermally-heated greenhouse is underway and requires additional geothermal fluid production. This report discusses the results of a cost-shared U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and A.R. Masson, Inc. drilling project designed to construct a highly productive geothermal production well for expansion of the large commercial greenhouse at Radium Springs. The well should eliminate the potential for future thermal breakthrough from existing injection wells and the inducement of inflow from shallow cold water aquifers by geothermal production drawdown in the shallow reservoir. An 800 feet deep production well, Masson 36, was drilled on a US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Geothermal Lease NM-3479 at Radium Springs adjacent to the A. R. Masson Radium Springs Farm commercial greenhouse 15 miles north of Las Cruces in Dona Ana County, New Mexico just west of Interstate 25 near the east bank of the Rio Grande. The area is in the Rio Grande rift, a tectonically-active region with high heat flow, and is one of the major geothermal provinces in the western United State.

  4. Variations in the Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Rio Grande do Sul-Brazil: A Comparative Analysis between 2002 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Gus, Iseu; Ribeiro, Rodrigo Antonini; Kato, Sérgio; Bastos, Juliano; Medina, Claudio; Zazlavsky, Claudio; Portal, Vera Lucia; Timmers, Rita; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros; Gottschall, Carlos Antônio Mascia

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the importance of coronary artery disease (CAD), continuous investigation of the risk factors (RFs) is needed. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of RFs for CAD in cities in Rio Grande do Sul State, and compare it with that reported in a similar study conducted in the same cities in 2002. Methods Cross-sectional study on 1,056 healthy adults, investigating the prevalence and absolute and relative frequencies of the following RFs for CAD: obesity, systemic arterial hypertension (SAH), dyslipidemias, smoking, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes mellitus, and family history, as well as age and sex. Data was collected in 19 cities, host of the Offices of the Regional Coordinators of Health, as in the 2002 study. Results Twenty-six percent of the sample consisted of older adults and 57% were women. The prevalence of sedentary lifestyle was 44%, history family 50%, smoking 23%, overweight/obesity 68%, dyslipidemia (high cholesterol levels) 43%, SAH 40%, and diabetes 11%. When compared to the 2002 study, the prevalence of active smoking and sedentary behavior decreased, whereas the prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia and obesity increased. Obesity is the most prevalent RF in women, and SAH the most prevalent in men. Conclusions The prevalence of RFs for CAD in Rio Grande do Sul State remains high. Hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia are still prevalent and require major prevention programs. Smoking and physical inactivity have decreased in the state, suggesting the efficacy of related campaigns. PMID:26761368

  5. Analysis of regional scale risk to whirling disease in populations of Colorado and Rio Grande cutthroat trout using Bayesian belief network model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolb Ayre, Kimberley; Caldwell, Colleen A.; Stinson, Jonah; Landis, Wayne G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and spread of the parasite Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, has contributed to the collapse of wild trout populations throughout the intermountain west. Of concern is the risk the disease may have on conservation and recovery of native cutthroat trout. We employed a Bayesian belief network to assess probability of whirling disease in Colorado River and Rio Grande cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus and Oncorhynchus clarkii virginalis, respectively) within their current ranges in the southwest United States. Available habitat (as defined by gradient and elevation) for intermediate oligochaete worm host, Tubifex tubifex, exerted the greatest influence on the likelihood of infection, yet prevalence of stream barriers also affected the risk outcome. Management areas that had the highest likelihood of infected Colorado River cutthroat trout were in the eastern portion of their range, although the probability of infection was highest for populations in the southern, San Juan subbasin. Rio Grande cutthroat trout had a relatively low likelihood of infection, with populations in the southernmost Pecos management area predicted to be at greatest risk. The Bayesian risk assessment model predicted the likelihood of whirling disease infection from its principal transmission vector, fish movement, and suggested that barriers may be effective in reducing risk of exposure to native trout populations. Data gaps, especially with regard to location of spawning, highlighted the importance in developing monitoring plans that support future risk assessments and adaptive management for subspecies of cutthroat trout.

  6. Seepage investigations of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, 2006-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crilley, D.M.; Matherne, A.M.; Thomas, Nicole; Falk, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Seepage investigations were conducted annually by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1988 to 1998 and from 2004 to 2013 along a 64-mile reach of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, as part of the Mesilla Basin monitoring program. Results of studies conducted from 2006 to 2013 are presented in this report. Seepage investigations were conducted over a period of 1–2 days in February of each year, during low-flow conditions in the non-irrigation season. During the seepage investigations, discharge was measured at as many as 24 sites along the Rio Grande and as many as 20 inflow sites within the study reach. Net seepage gain or loss was computed for each subreach by subtracting the discharge measured at the upstream location from the discharge measured at the closest downstream location along the river and then subtracting any inflow to the river within the subreach. An estimated gain or loss was determined to be significant when it exceeded the cumulative measurement uncertainty associated with the net seepage computation. Study reaches during 2006 to 2013 ranged from 20.2 to 64 miles in length, and seepage losses ranged from 8.2 ± 3.1 to 47.9 ± 8.2 cubic feet per second.

  7. Proposed expansion of the City of Albuquerque/U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level monitoring network for the middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Middle Rio Grande Basin in central New Mexico, extending from Cochiti Lake on the north to San Acacia on the south, covers an area of about 3,060 square miles. Ground-water withdrawals in the basin are concentrated in and around the city of Albuquerque. Because of rapid increases in population and associated ground-water pumpage, a network of wells was established cooperatively by the City of and the U.S. Geological Survey between April 1982 and September 1983 to monitor changes in ground-water levels throughout the basin. Expansion of this network has been identified as an essential element in plans to study the relation between surface water and ground water in the basin. An inventory of existing wells in the Albuquerque metropolitan area has brought together information on about 400 wells that either are being monitored for water levels or would be good candidates for monitoring. About 115 wells or well sites are proposed as additions to the current 128-well ground-water-level monitoring network for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. Despite the extensive network that would be created by the addition of the proposed existing wells, however, certain parts of the Albuquerque metropolitan area would remain without adequate coverage areally and/or with depth in the Santa Fe Group aquifer until the installation of the proposed new monitoring wells.

  8. Constraints on the timing and tectonic setting of mantle metasomatism beneath the Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerly, B. L.; Lassiter, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Cryptic metasomatism of mantle xenoliths from the Jemez lineament, a transition zone between the Rio Grande rift (RGR) and Colorado Plateau (CP), is manifested by LREE-enrichment and heterogeneous isotopic compositions. The timing and source of metasomatism is unclear. Dehydration of the subducted Farallon plate during flat-slab subduction (~75-40Ma) has been proposed to explain Tertiary volcanism in western North America as well as metasomatic signatures in peridotites and eclogite xenoliths from the Colorado Plateau (Lipman 1992, Smith et al. 2004). Alternatively, metasomatism could be related to the formation of the Yavapai province crust and lithosphere ~1.7Ga (Bennett and DePaolo, 1987). We examined major element, trace element, and isotopic compositions of a suite of xenoliths from the Jemez lineament in an attempt to understand nature and timing of metasomatism of the lithospheric mantle beneath the CP and RGR. We sampled a suite of xenoliths hosted in an alkalic basalt cinder cone, Cerro Chato, in the Chain of Craters area SW of Grants, NM, USA. The xenoliths include type-I spinel peridotites (olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + spinel ± Fe-sulfides). The type-I xenoliths are LREE-enriched and display HFSE depletion in CPX. The HFSE depletion is not seen in whole-rock analyses. Strong positive correlations of Sr/Nd with 87Sr/86Sr and La/Sm with 87Sr/86Sr are also present. Type-II peridotites (wehrlites), which do not display LREE-enrichment or strong HFSE depletion, of which some contain trace amounts of amphibole, are also present at Cerro Chato. The isotopic composition of the two xenolith types overlap, with 87Sr/86Sr 0.7040-.7043, ɛNd ranging from +4.7 to +6.1 and 187Os/188Os 0.118-0.122. The TRD age for the most refractory xenolith from Cerro Chato yields an age of 1.66 Ga, consistent with the age of the local continental crust. Depleted mantle model extraction ages range from 152-219 Ma. This is consistent with a pseudo-isochron age for the

  9. Carbon stocks quantification in agricultural systems employing succession and rotation of crops in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michele K. C.; Marinho, Mara de A.; Denardin, José E.; Zullo, Jurandir, Jr.; Paz-González, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Soil and vegetation constitute respectively the third and the fourth terrestrial reservoirs of Carbon (C) on Earth. C sequestration in these reservoirs includes the capture of the CO2 from the atmosphere by photosynthesis and its storage as organic C. Consequently, changes in land use and agricultural practices affect directly the emissions of the greenhouse gases and the C sequestration. Several studies have already demonstrated that conservation agriculture, and particularly zero tillage (ZT), has a positive effect on soil C sequestration. The Brazilian federal program ABC (Agriculture of Low Carbon Emission) was conceived to promote agricultural production with environmental protection and represents an instrument to achieve voluntary targets to mitigate emissions or NAMAS (National Appropriated Mitigation Actions). With financial resources of about US 1.0 billion until 2020 the ABC Program has a target of expand ZT in 8 million hectares of land, with reduction of 16 to 20 million of CO2eq. Our objective was to quantify the C stocks in soil, plants and litter of representative grain crops systems under ZT in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Two treatments of a long term experimental essay (> 20 years) were evaluated: 1) Crop succession with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)/soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merril); 2) Crop rotation with wheat/soybean (1st year), vetch (Vicia sativa L.)/soybean (2nd year), and white oat (Avena sativa L.)/sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) (3rd year). C quantification in plants and in litter was performed using the direct method of biomass quantification. The soil type evaluated was a Humic Rhodic Hapludox, and C quantification was executed employing the method referred by "C mass by unit area". Results showed that soybean plants under crop succession presented greater C stock (4.31MgC ha-1) comparing with soybean plants cultivated under crop rotation (3.59 MgC ha-1). For wheat, however, greater C stock was quantified in plants under rotation

  10. Oblique transfer of extensional strain between basins of the middle Rio Grande rift, New Mexico: fault kinematic and paleostress constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Hudson, Mark R.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Thompson, Ren A.

    2013-01-01

    The structural geometry of transfer and accommodation zones that relay strain between extensional domains in rifted crust has been addressed in many studies over the past 30 years. However, details of the kinematics of deformation and related stress changes within these zones have received relatively little attention. In this study we conduct the first-ever systematic, multi-basin fault-slip measurement campaign within the late Cenozoic Rio Grande rift of northern New Mexico to address the mechanisms and causes of extensional strain transfer associated with a broad accommodation zone. Numerous (562) kinematic measurements were collected at fault exposures within and adjacent to the NE-trending Santo Domingo Basin accommodation zone, or relay, which structurally links the N-trending, right-stepping en echelon Albuquerque and Española rift basins. The following observations are made based on these fault measurements and paleostresses computed from them. (1) Compared to the typical northerly striking normal to normal-oblique faults in the rift basins to the north and south, normal-oblique faults are broadly distributed within two merging, NE-trending zones on the northwest and southeast sides of the Santo Domingo Basin. (2) Faults in these zones have greater dispersion of rake values and fault strikes, greater dextral strike-slip components over a wide northerly strike range, and small to moderate clockwise deflections of their tips. (3) Relative-age relations among fault surfaces and slickenlines used to compute reduced stress tensors suggest that far-field, ~E-W–trending σ3 stress trajectories were perturbed 45° to 90° clockwise into NW to N trends within the Santo Domingo zones. (4) Fault-stratigraphic age relations constrain the stress perturbations to the later stages of rifting, possibly as late as 2.7–1.1 Ma. Our fault observations and previous paleomagnetic evidence of post–2.7 Ma counterclockwise vertical-axis rotations are consistent with increased

  11. Evaluation of soil sustainability along the Rio Grande in West Texas: changes in salt loading and organic nutrients due to farming practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. L.; Ganjegunte, G.; Borrok, D. M.; Lougheed, V.; Ma, L.; Jin, L.

    2011-12-01

    Growing populations demand an increase in the amount of food being produced, which in turn, puts pressure on the productivity and sustainability of soils. The use of flood irrigation from the Rio Grande, which contains high salinity, has greatly increased the sodicity and enhanced leaching of the nutrients in the Rio Grande Basin. To evaluate soil health in this area, Rio Grande, soil water, drainage water, and soils from four different sites were collected during the 2011 irrigation season. Sample sites include two pecan fields (Pecan1 and Pecan 2), one cotton field (Cotton), and one alfalfa field (Alfalfa). Each site was equipped with ECH2O-5TE sensors (Decagon Devices Inc., Pullman, WA) to measure soil moisture, temperature, and electrical conductivity (EC), along with lysimeters at depths of 15, 30, and 60 cm to collect soil water samples. Soil solution, irrigation water and drainage water were analyzed for pH, EC (measure of salinity), major cation (Ca, Mg, Na and K) concentrations and soils were analyzed for sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, a measure of sodicity) using standard methods. Soil extraction data suggests that water-soluble cation concentrations increase with depth and are significantly higher in clay-rich soils than sandy ones. Na is the most dominant water-soluble cation with it's concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 5.6 cmolc kg-1. Among all crop types, Cotton soils have the highest amount of water-soluble cations. Preliminary data shows that in the Cotton, Pecan 1 and Pecan 2 sites, soil sodicity increases with depth and becomes greater than 13 mmols1/2 L-1/2 at 30 cm below ground surface, while Alfalfa soils are generally less sodic. Overall, Cotton soils had the highest sodicity, up to 19.2 mmols1/2 L-1/2, which is well above the tolerance level of this crop. Sodicity affects soil permeability, and coincides with areas of high clay content. These observations are in agreement with the facts that pecan orchards are more intensively irrigated and

  12. The geomorphic effectiveness of a large flood on the Rio Grande in the Big Bend region: insights on geomorphic controls and post-flood geomorphic response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, David J.; Schmidt, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1940s, the Rio Grande in the Big Bend region has undergone long periods of channel narrowing, which have been occasionally interrupted by rare, large floods that widen the channel (termed a channel reset). The most recent channel reset occurred in 2008 following a 17-year period of extremely low stream flow and rapid channel narrowing. Flooding was caused by precipitation associated with the remnants of tropical depression Lowell in the Rio Conchos watershed, the largest tributary to the Rio Grande. Floodwaters approached 1500 m3/s (between a 13 and 15 year recurrence interval) and breached levees, inundated communities, and flooded the alluvial valley of the Rio Grande; the wetted width exceeding 2.5 km in some locations. The 2008 flood had the 7th largest magnitude of record, however, conveyed the largest volume of water than any other flood. Because of the narrow pre-flood channel conditions, record flood stages occurred. We used pre- and post-flood aerial photographs, channel and floodplain surveys, and 1-dimensional hydraulic models to quantify the magnitude of channel change, investigate the controls of flood-induced geomorphic changes, and measure the post-flood response of the widened channel. These analyses show that geomorphic changes included channel widening, meander migration, avulsions, extensive bar formation, and vertical floodplain accretion. Reach-averaged channel widening between 26 and 52% occurred, but in some localities exceeded 500%. The degree and style of channel response was related, but not limited to, three factors: 1) bed-load supply and transport, 2) pre-flood channel plan form, and 3) rapid declines in specific stream power downstream of constrictions and areas of high channel bed slope. The post-flood channel response has consisted of channel contraction through the aggradation of the channel bed and the formation of fine-grained benches inset within the widened channel margins. The most significant post-flood geomorphic

  13. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas; organic compounds and trace elements in bed sediment and fish tissue, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.F.; Anderholm, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of contaminants in aquatic systems are major components of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Bed-sediment samples were collected at 18 sites in the Rio Grande Valley study unit between September 1992 and March 1993 to characterize the geographic distribution of organic compounds, including chlorinated insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and other chlorinated hydrocarbons, and also trace elements. Two-millimeter-size- fraction sediment was analyzed for organic compounds and less than 63-micron-size-fraction sediment was analyzed for trace elements. Concentrations of p,p'-DDE were detected in 33 percent of the bed-sediment samples. With the exception of DDT-related compounds, no other organochlorine insecticides or polychlorinated biphenyls were detected in samples of bed sediment. Whole-body fish samples were collected at 11 of the bed- sediment sites and analyzed for organic compounds. Organic compounds were reported more frequently in samples of fish, and more types of organic compounds were found in whole-body fish samples than in bed-sediment samples. Concentrations of p,p'-DDE were detected in 91 percent of whole-body fish samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls, cis-chlordane, trans-chlordane, trans- nonachlor, and hexachlorobenzene were other organic compounds detected in whole-body samples of fish from at least one site. Because of the extent of mineralized areas in the Rio Grande Basin arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, and zinc concentrations in bed-sediment samples could represent natural conditions at most sites. However, a combination of natural conditions and human activities appears to be associated with elevated trace-element concentrations in the bed-sediment sample from the site Rio Grande near Creede, Colorado, because this sample exceeded the background trace-element concentrations calculated for this study. Fish-liver samples were collected at 12 of the bed

  14. Structural and geochemical characteristics of faulted sediments and inferences on the role of water in deformatiion, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, J.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    The San Ysidro fault is a spectacularly exposed normal fault located in the northwestern Albuquerque Basin of the Rio Grande Rift. This intrabasin fault is representative of many faults that formed in poorly lithified sediments throughout the rift. The fault is exposed over nearly 10 km and accommodates nearly 700 m of dip slip in subhorizontal, siliciclastic sediments. The extent of the exposure facilitates study of along-strike variations in deformation mechanisms, archi tecture, geochemistry, and permeability. The fault is composed of structural and hydrogeologic components that include a clay-rich fault core, a calcite-cemented mixed zone, and a poorly developed damage zone primarily consisting of deformation bands. Structural textures suggest that initial deformation in the fault occurred at low temperature and pressure, was within the paleosaturated zone of the evolving Rio Grande Rift, and was dominated by particulate flow. Little geochemical change is apparent across the fault zone other than due to secondary processes. The lack of fault-related geochemical change is interpreted to reflect the fundamental nature of water-saturated, particulate fl ow. Early mechanical entrainment of low-permeability clays into the fault core likely caused damming of groundwater flow on the up-gradient, footwall side of the fault. This may have caused a pressure gradient and flow of calcite-saturated waters in higher-permeability, fault-entrained siliciclastic sediments, ultimately promoting their cementation by sparry calcite. Once developed, the cemented and clay-rich fault has likely been, and continues to be, a partial barrier to cross-fault groundwater flow, as suggested by petrophysical measurements. Aeromagnetic data indicate that there may be many more unmapped faults with similar lengths to the San Ysidro fault buried within Rio Grande basins. If these buried faults formed by the same processes that formed the San Ysidro fault and have persistent low

  15. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination: Rio Grande aquifer system in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Heywood, Charles E.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as “the study well”). The study well produces about 3,000 gallons of water per minute from the Rio Grande aquifer system. Water samples were collected at the study well, at two other nearby public-supply wells, and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the study well. Untreated water samples from the study well contained arsenic at concentrations exceeding the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrate also were detected, although at concentrations at least an order of magnitude less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary influences on the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Albuquerque: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) groundwater development (introduction of manmade recharge and discharge sources), (3) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer, and (4) seasonal pumping stresses. Concentrations of the isotope carbon-14 indicate that groundwater from most sampled wells in the local study area is predominantly water that entered, or recharged, the aquifer more than 6,000 years ago. However, the additional presence of the age tracer tritium in several groundwater samples at concentrations above 0.3 tritium units indicates that young (post-1950) recharge is reaching the aquifer across broad areas beneath Albuquerque. This young recharge is mixing with the thousands-of-years-old water, is migrating to depths as great as 245 feet below the water table, and is traveling to some (but not all) of the public-supply wells sampled. Most groundwater samples containing a

  16. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination: Rio Grande aquifer system in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Heywood, Charles E.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as “the study well”). The study well produces about 3,000 gallons of water per minute from the Rio Grande aquifer system. Water samples were collected at the study well, at two other nearby public-supply wells, and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the study well. Untreated water samples from the study well contained arsenic at concentrations exceeding the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrate also were detected, although at concentrations at least an order of magnitude less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary influences on the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Albuquerque: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) groundwater development (introduction of manmade recharge and discharge sources), (3) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer, and (4) seasonal pumping stresses. Concentrations of the isotope carbon-14 indicate that groundwater from most sampled wells in the local study area is predominantly water that entered, or recharged, the aquifer more than 6,000 years ago. However, the additional presence of the age tracer tritium in several groundwater samples at concentrations above 0.3 tritium units indicates that young (post-1950) recharge is reaching the aquifer across broad areas beneath Albuquerque. This young recharge is mixing with the thousands-of-years-old water, is migrating to depths as great as 245 feet below the water table, and is traveling to some (but not all) of the public-supply wells sampled. Most groundwater samples containing a

  17. Hydrologic data on channel adjustments, 1970 to 1975, on the Rio Grande downstream from Cochiti Dam, New Mexico before and after closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, Jack D.; Roybal, F.E.; Funderburg, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Cross-section channel profiles, sediment transport and hydrologic data have been observed and computed for a series of pre-dam and post-dam investigations from 1970 to 1975 at 37 cross sections established along a 59-mile study reach from Cochiti Dam to Isleta Diversion Dam, New Mexico. Cochiti Dam began impounding water in November 1973. Because the dam will trap virtually all of the sediment load originating upstream and water discharge will be controlled, it is expected that equilibrium values of channel width, depth, slope and sediment-transport capability in the existing main stem of the Rio Grande will change. Changes in cross sections with time and space and changes in size distribution of sediments are documented. (Woodard-USGS).

  18. Genetic identification of Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest in an endemic area of a mild spotted fever in Rio Grande do Sul state, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo Voizzoni, Vinicius; Barbosa Silva, Arannadia; Medeiros Cardoso, Karen; Barbosa Dos Santos, Fernanda; Stenzel, Barbara; Amorim, Marinete; Vilges de Oliveira, Stefan; Salles Gazeta, Gilberto

    2016-10-01

    Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest causes a less severe rickettsiosis, with two cases confirmed until now. The tick species Amblyomma ovale is appointed as the main vector of this bacterium. The southern region of Brazil has reported patients with spotted fever who have milder symptoms. In 2013, during an investigation of rickettsiosis cases, an A. ovale tick was found attached to a man in an area where there were two cases. The parasite was processed for molecular analysis and the rickettsial infection was confirmed based on phylogenetic analysis of genes ompA, ompB and geneD (sca4). In the present study the human pathogenic Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest was identified in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil. Since A. ovale, its main vector, is found frequently parasitizing dogs, animals that can cross international borders freely in southern Brazil, this bacteria can bring major concerns in terms of public health. PMID:27338183

  19. Comparative study of the floral biology and of the response of productivity to insect visitation in two rapeseed cultivars (Brassica napus L.) in Rio Grande do Sul.

    PubMed

    Blochtein, B; Nunes-Silva, P; Halinski, R; Lopes, L A; Witter, S

    2014-11-01

    Planning the artificial pollination of agricultural crops requires knowledge of the floral biology and reproductive system of the crop in question. Many studies have shown that rapeseed (Brassica napus Linnaeus) is self-compatible and self-pollinated, but its productivity may be increased by insect visitation. In the present study, the floral biology and the response of productivity to insect visitation of two rapeseed cultivars (Hyola 420 and Hyola 61) were analyzed and compared in three regions of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The rapeseed flowers presented three stages during anthesis, with the time periods varying between the cultivars. Both cultivars are self-compatible, but free visitation of insects increased productivity by 17% in the Hyola 420 cultivar and by approximately 30% in the Hyola 61 cultivar. Therefore, it is concluded that the cultivar Hyola 61 is more dependent on insect pollination than Hyola 420. PMID:25627587

  20. Macroergonomic intervention for work design improvement and raw materials waste reduction in a small footwear components company in Rio Grande do Sul-Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cornelli, Renata; Guimarães, Lia Buarque de Macedo

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a macroergonomic intervention carried out in a small footwear components company located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The company's demand was related to the waste of the expensive raw-material (thermoplastic polyurethane or TPU) used to manufacture the components (high heels pegs). According to the managerial staff, the waste was workers responsibility due to the craft characteristic of the process. A participative method was used to evaluate the problems, propose and implement solutions, as well as evaluate their impact on the workers and the Company. Improvements in the work conditions resulted in increase of workers' satisfaction with the work and in 31.5% waste reduction.

  1. First 'Rauisuchian' archosaur (Pseudosuchia, Loricata) for the Middle Triassic Santacruzodon Assemblage Zone (Santa Maria Supersequence), Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Marcel B.; Schultz, Cesar L.; Bertoni-Machado, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Rauisuchia’ are a group of Triassic pseudosuchian archosaurs that displayed a near worldwide distribution. In Brazil, their fossils are found only in the Santa Maria Formation (Paraná Basin) of the Rio Grande do Sul State, specifically in the Middle Triassic Dinodontosaurus assemblage zone (AZ) and the Late Triassic Hyperodapedon AZ (Rauisuchus tiradentes). Between these two cenozones is the Santacruzodon AZ (Middle Triassic), whose record was, until now, restricted to non-mammalian cynodonts and the proterochampsian Chanaresuchus bonapartei. Here we present the first occurrence of a rauisuchian archosaur for this cenozone, from the Schoenstatt outcrop, located near the city of Santa Cruz do Sul and propose a new species, based on biostratigraphical evidence and a comparative osteological analysis. PMID:25714091

  2. Aggressive interactions between the invasive Rio Grande cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus) and native bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), with notes on redspotted sunfish (Lepomis miniatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, O. Thomas; O' Connell, Martin T.; Schofield, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    The Rio Grande cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus) has been established in the Greater New Orleans Metropolitan area for at least 20 years, and its effect on native fishes is unknown. Behavioral trials were performed to determine if aggressive interactions occur between invasive H. cyanoguttatus and native bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). When defending a territory as the resident, L. macrochirus were markedly aggressive, averaging 11.6 aggressive actions per lO-min behavioral trial. In contrast, L. macrochirus were extremely passive as invaders, with 0.5 aggressive actions per trial. Herichthys cyanoguttatus were equally aggressive as residents and as invaders, averaging 4.9 and 6.0 aggressive actions per trial, respectively. Herichthys cyanoguttatus interacted aggressively with native species whether they held territory or not, indicating that this invasive species may have fundamentally different strategies of aggression compared with native L. macrochirus. These differences may explain the continued success of H. cyanoguttatus as an invasive fish in southeastern Louisiana.

  3. Genetic identification of Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest in an endemic area of a mild spotted fever in Rio Grande do Sul state, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo Voizzoni, Vinicius; Barbosa Silva, Arannadia; Medeiros Cardoso, Karen; Barbosa Dos Santos, Fernanda; Stenzel, Barbara; Amorim, Marinete; Vilges de Oliveira, Stefan; Salles Gazeta, Gilberto

    2016-10-01

    Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest causes a less severe rickettsiosis, with two cases confirmed until now. The tick species Amblyomma ovale is appointed as the main vector of this bacterium. The southern region of Brazil has reported patients with spotted fever who have milder symptoms. In 2013, during an investigation of rickettsiosis cases, an A. ovale tick was found attached to a man in an area where there were two cases. The parasite was processed for molecular analysis and the rickettsial infection was confirmed based on phylogenetic analysis of genes ompA, ompB and geneD (sca4). In the present study the human pathogenic Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest was identified in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil. Since A. ovale, its main vector, is found frequently parasitizing dogs, animals that can cross international borders freely in southern Brazil, this bacteria can bring major concerns in terms of public health.

  4. [Prescribed and unprescribed drug use among pregnant patients attended by the Unified Health System in Santa Rosa (State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil)].

    PubMed

    Brum, Lucimar Filot da Silva; Pereira, Patricia; Felicetti, Lilian Leticia; da Silveira, Renata Dischke

    2011-05-01

    In order to ascertain the use of prescribed and unprescribed drugs among pregnant patients of the Unified Health System (SUS), a descriptive study comprised of a sample of pregnant women was carried out in the city of Santa Rosa, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected by means of structured interviews and consultation of patient records of pregnant women in the prenatal period. The prevalence of drug use was 90%, corresponding to an average of 4.1 drugs per pregnant woman, of which 83.6% were prescribed and 16.4% were self-medicated. Of this total, 17.5% of the drugs were included in fetal risk category C. The use of drugs during pregnancy is frequent and the majority of the pregnant women used one or more prescribed and unprescribed drugs during pregnancy. These data suggest the need for preventive measures to promote rational drug use during pregnancy. PMID:21655716

  5. Petrogenesis of coeval sodic and potassic alkaline magmas at Spanish Peaks, Colorado: Magmatism related to the opening of the Rio Grande rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, A. Brooke Hamil; McGregor, Heath; Roden, Michael F.; Salters, Vincent J. M.; Sarafian, Adam; Leahy, Rory

    2016-07-01

    Approximately coeval, relatively primitive (∼5-10% MgO with exception of a trachyandesite) alkaline mafic dikes and sills at or near Spanish Peaks, CO are divided into relatively sodic and potassic varieties on the basis of K2O/Na2O. Many of these dikes are true lamprophyres. In spite of variable alkali element ratios, the alkaline rocks share a number of geochemical similarities: high LIL element contents, high Ba and similar Sr, Nd and Hf isotope ratios near that of Bulk Earth. One important difference is that the potassic rocks are characterized by lower Al2O3 contents, typically less than 12 wt.%, than the sodic dikes/sills which typically have more than 13 wt.% Al2O3, and this difference is independent of MgO content. We attribute the distinct Al2O3 contents to varying pressure during melting: a mica-bearing, Al-poor vein assemblage for the potassic magmas melted at higher pressure than an aluminous amphibole-bearing vein assemblage for the sodic magmas. Remarkable isotopic and trace element similarities with approximately contemporaneous, nearby Rio Grande rift-related basalts in the San Luis Valley, indicate that the magmatism at Spanish Peaks was rift-related, and that lithosphere sources were shared between some rift magmas and those at Spanish Peaks. High Zn/Fe ratios in the Spanish Peaks mafic rocks point to a clinopyroxene- and garnet-rich source such as lithosphere veined by pyroxenite or eclogite. Lithospheric melting was possibly triggered by foundering of cool, dense lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift during the initiation of rifting with the potassic parent magmas generated by higher pressure melting of the foundered lithosphere than the sodic parent magmas. This process, caused by gravitational instability of the lithosphere (Elkins-Tanton, 2007) may be common beneath active continental rifts.

  6. Potential effects of environmental contaminants on P450 aromatase activity and DNA damage in swallows from the Rio Grande and Somerville, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sitzlar, M.A.; Mora, M.A.; Fleming, J.G.W.; Bazer, F.W.; Bickham, J.W.; Matson, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and cave swallows (P. fulva) were sampled during the breeding season at several locations in the Rio Grande, Texas, to evaluate the potential effects of environmental contaminants on P450 aromatase activity in brain and gonads and DNA damage in blood cells. The tritiated water-release aromatase assay was used to measure aromatase activity and flow cytometry was used to measure DNA damage in nucleated blood cells. There were no significant differences in brain and gonadal aromatase activities or in estimates of DNA damage (HPCV values) among cave swallow colonies from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) and Somerville. However, both brain and gonadal aromatase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in male cliff swallows from Laredo than in those from Somerville. Also, DNA damage estimates were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in cliff swallows (males and females combined) from Laredo than in those from Somerville. Contaminants of current high use in the LRGV, such as atrazine, and some of the highly persistent organochlorines, such as toxaphene and DDE, could be potentially associated with modulation of aromatase activity in avian tissues. Previous studies have indicated possible DNA damage in cliff swallows. We did not observe any differences in aromatase activity or DNA damage in cave swallows that could be associated with contaminant exposure. Also, the differences in aromatase activity and DNA damage between male cliff swallows from Laredo and Somerville could not be explained by contaminants measured at each site in previous studies. Our study provides baseline information on brain and gonadal aromatase activity in swallows that could be useful in future studies. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. Imaging the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Great Plains, Rio Grande Rift, and Colorado Plateau using receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Aster, Richard; Ni, James; Grand, Stephen; West, Michael; Gao, Wei; Baldridge, W. Scott; Semken, Steve

    2005-05-01

    The seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle of the southwestern United States is examined using receiver functions calculated from teleseismic arrivals recorded in the Colorado Plateau-Rio Grande Rift-Great Plains Seismic Transect (LA RISTRA) experiment. We apply receiver function estimation and filtering methods developed by Wilson and Aster (2005) to produce receiver functions with decreased sensitivity to noise and deconvolutional instability. Crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratios are estimated using both direct and reverberated P-to-S receiver function modes. We apply regularized receiver function migration methods to produce a multiple-suppressed image of the velocity discontinuity structure of the subsurface. Our results show that crustal thickness averages 44.1 ± 2.3 km beneath the Great Plains (GP) and 45.6 ± 1.1 km beneath the Colorado Plateau (CP). Crustal thinning beneath the Rio Grande Rift (RGR) is broadly symmetric about the rift axis, with the thinnest crust (35 km) located directly beneath the rift axis, suggesting a pure shear stretched lithosphere beneath the RGR. We also observe a prominent northwest dipping discontinuity, ranging from 65 to 85 km deep beneath the CP, and possible subcrustal discontinuities beneath the GP. These discontinuities, along with recent xenolith data, are consistent with preserved ancient lithospheric structures such as relict suture zones associated with Proterozoic subduction. We observe an upper mantle discontinuity at 220-300 km depth that may correlate with similar discontinuities observed beneath eastern North America. We also observe relatively flat discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth, indicating there is not a large-scale thermal anomaly beneath the RGR at these depths.

  8. Usage and administration manual for a geodatabase compendium of water-resources data-Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 1889-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, developed a geodatabase compendium (hereinafter referred to as the 'geodatabase') of available water-resources data for the reach of the Rio Grande from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. Since 1889, a wealth of water-resources data has been collected in the Rio Grande Basin from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, for a variety of purposes. Collecting agencies, researchers, and organizations have included the U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Reclamation, International Boundary and Water Commission, State agencies, irrigation districts, municipal water utilities, universities, and other entities. About 1,750 data records were recently (2010) evaluated to enhance their usability by compiling them into a single geospatial relational database (geodatabase). This report is intended as a user's manual and administration guide for the geodatabase. All data available, including water quality, water level, and discharge data (both instantaneous and daily) from January 1, 1889, through December 17, 2009, were compiled for the study area. A flexible and efficient geodatabase design was used, enhancing the ability of the geodatabase to handle data from diverse sources and helping to ensure sustainability of the geodatabase with long-term maintenance. Geodatabase tables include daily data values, site locations and information, sample event information, and parameters, as well as data sources and collecting agencies. The end products of this effort are a comprehensive water-resources geodatabase that enables the visualization of primary sampling sites for surface discharges, groundwater elevations, and water-quality and associated data for the study area. In addition, repeatable data processing scripts, Structured Query Language queries for loading prepared data sources, and a detailed process for refreshing all data in the

  9. Biological studies and field observations in Europe of Lasioptera donacis potential biological control agent of giant reed, Arundo donax, an invasive weed of the Rio Grande Basin of Texas and Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giant reed, Arundo donax L. (Poaceae; Arundinoideae), is a clonal reed grass that is native from the western Mediterranean to India and invasive in North America and other arid temperate/subtropical parts of the world, including the Rio Grande Basin of Texas and Mexico. A biological control of gian...

  10. Landsat sattelite multi-spectral image classification of land cover and land use changes for GIS-based urbanization analysis in irrigation districts of lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley in the south of Texas is experiencing rapid increase of population to bring up urban growth that continues influencing on the irrigation districts in the region. This study evaluated the Landsat satellite multi-spectral imagery to provide information for GIS-based urbaniz...

  11. Geophysical Characterization by the SAGE Program of a Newly Proposed, Low Temperature-EGS Prospect in the Central Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Zablowski, P.; Castro, B.; Le Pape, F.; Biagini, B.; Kennedy, M.; Feucht, D. W.; Pellerin, L.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Hasterok, D. P.; Biehler, S.; McPhee, D. K.; Ferguson, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    In 2011 the SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) program began initial field evaluation of a recently proposed geothermal prospect located approximately 20 km northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico. New magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity measurements in the Caja del Rio volcanic field have been combined with previous industry seismic results and SAGE MT, gravity, and seismic data to define parameters important for potential low temperature and EGS development. A thick, 2.0-2.5 km-deep, water-saturated, electrically conductive section overlies resistive basement, presumably Paleozoic limestone on top of Precambrian granite. Therefore, by projecting a measured 58oC/km near-surface temperature gradient, the area would easily meet the criterion for high grade EGS of impermeable basement rock at >200oC at less than 4 km depth. MT-derived depth estimates of a ubiquitous, highly conductive midcrustal conductor along with thermal conductivity values, and estimates of radiogenic heat flow allowed thermal modeling of the entire upper crust. This relies on recent evidence that the midcrustal conductor depth is a good proxy for the depth to the 500oC isotherm in active tectonic areas. The resulting thermal calculations yield a surface heat flow of 80 mW/m2 for a 2 km-deep sedimentary column and a 14 km-deep conductor. Forced, westward flowing groundwater convection over a basement high has been proposed for the thermal anomaly. Our initial geophysical results do not provide strong evidence for this. Rather, we favor the possibility that deeply penetrating, permeable fault conduits provide pathways for ascending warm water beneath the volcanic field. This is supported by high 3He/4He ratios measured in groundwater samples. The Caja del Rio area appears to be the most attractive geothermal prospect in the central Rio Grande rift outside of the near-by, world-class Valles caldera geothermal area.

  12. Design and Compilation of a Geodatabase of Existing Salinity Information for the Rio Grande Basin, from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County Line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Maltby, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, compiled salinity-related water-quality data and information in a geodatabase containing more than 6,000 sampling sites. The geodatabase was designed as a tool for water-resource management and includes readily available digital data sources from the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas, Paso del Norte Watershed Council, numerous other State and local databases, and selected databases maintained by the University of Arizona and New Mexico State University. Salinity information was compiled for an approximately 26,000-square-mile area of the Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. The geodatabase relates the spatial location of sampling sites with salinity-related water-quality data reported by multiple agencies. The sampling sites are stored in a geodatabase feature class; each site is linked by a relationship class to the corresponding sample and results stored in data tables.

  13. Environmental evolution of the Rio Grande drainage basin and Nasca region (Peru) in 2003-2007 using ENVISAT ASAR and ASTER time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, Francesca; Tapete, Deodato; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Recent palaeo-environmental studies and remote sensing investigations demonstrated that the Rio Grande drainage basin in Southern Peru is a still evolving landscape, and impacts due to its changes have implications for the preservation of both the natural and cultural features of the Nasca region, well-known for the evidences of the ancient Paracas and Nasca Civilizations, who flourished from the 4th century BC to the 6th century AD. To image the modifications occurred in the last decade, we exploited the entire 4year-long stack of ENVISAT ASAR C-band archive imagery available over the region, which was provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) via the Cat-1 project 11073. The latter supports the activities of the Italian mission of heritage Conservation and Archaeogeophysics (ITACA), which directly involve researchers from the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage (IBAM) and the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis (IMAA), National Research Council (CNR) of Italy. With the aim of reconstructing the temporal evolution of the Rio Grande drainage basin and its effects and implications for the heritage of the region, we processed 8 ASAR Image Mode IS2 scenes acquired in descending mode between 04/02/2003 and 15/11/2005 and 5 images in ascending mode between 24/07/2005 and 11/11/2007, and focused on SAR backscattering information, amplitude change detection methods and extraction of ASAR-derived time series of the backscattering coefficient over target areas of interest. The ASAR 2003-2007 analysis was coupled and integrated with NDVI-based soil moisture and vegetation change assessment performed by using ASTER multi-spectral data acquired during the same time frame of the ASAR stacks, on 30/05/2003, 01/06/2004 and 10/06/2007. The research was performed both at the regional scale over the entire Rio Grande drainage basin, with particular focus on its tributaries Rio Ingenio, Rio Nazca and Rio Taruga, and at the local scale over the

  14. The prevalence of elder abuse in the Porto Alegre metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Santos, Camila Mello dos; De Marchi, Renato Jose; Martins, Aline Blaya; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Padilha, Dalva Maria Pereira; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of the elderly is a form of violence to come to the public's attention. Dental professionals are in an ideal position to identify physical abuse. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of elderly abuse and analyze the database of injury reports that can be identified by dental teams. A documentary analysis study developed by the Elderly Protection Police Station of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, was carried out. The information used came from 2,304 complaints filed at the aforementioned institution between the years of 2004 and 2006. The records of abuse are categorized as injury, neglect, mistreatment, theft, financial abuse, threat, disturbing the peace, atypical fact, and others. The injuries that could be identified by the dental team were classified according to the injury's location in the area of the head, face, mouth and neck. Descriptive analysis was performed, and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the distributions of the types of elder abuse in relation to sex and age. The most frequent of the different types of abuse was theft, with a prevalence of 17.8%, followed by disturbing the peace at 11.8%. Disturbing the peace, threat, and bodily injury were significantly associated with women. Elder abuse among women and men declines with age. The prevalence of head injury was 25% of the total injuries, most often in females, and in those aged < 70 years. Based on these results, it is necessary that the dental team observe the elderly person's appearance for suspicious physical signs. PMID:23657487

  15. New perspectives on the evolution of narrow, modest extension continental rifts: Embryonic core complexes and localized, rapid Quaternary extension in the Rio Grande rift, central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Kelley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Updated models for continental rift zones need to address the role and development of low-angle normal fault networks, episodicity of extension, and interaction of 'active and passive' driving mechanisms. In the Rio Grande rift, USA, low-angle normal faults are found throughout the entire length of the rift, but make up a small percentage of the total fault population. The low-angle Jeter and Knife Edge faults, for example, crop out along the SW and NE margins of the Albuquerque basin, respectively. Apatite fission track (AFT) age-elevation data and apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) ages from these rift flank uplifts record cooling between ~21 - 16 Ma in the NE rift flank and ~20 - 10 Ma in the SW, which coincides with times of rapid extension and voluminous syntectonic sedimentation. The timing of exhumation is also similar to rift flanks farther north in active margins based on AFT data alone. In addition, synthetic faults in the hanging wall of each low-angle fault become progressively steeper and younger basinward, and footwall blocks are the highest elevation along the rift flanks. These observations are consistent with a model where initially high-angle faults are shallowed in regions of maximum extension. As they rotate, new intrabasinal faults emerge which also can be rotated if extension continues. These relationships are similarly described in mature core complexes, and if these processes continued in the Rio Grande rift, it could eventually result in mid-crustal ductily deformed rocks in the footwall placed against surficial deposits in the hanging wall across faults that have been isostatically rotated to shallow dips. Although existing data are consistent with highest strain rates during a pulse of extension along the entire length of the rift 20-10 Ma., GPS-constrained measurements suggest that the rift is still actively-extending at 1.23-1.39 nstr/yr (Berglund et al., 2012). Additional evidence for Quaternary extension comes from travertine deposits that are

  16. Simulated effects of ground-water management scenarios on the Santa Fe group aquifer system, Middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico, 2001-40

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; McAda, Douglas P.

    2003-01-01

    Future conditions in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system through 2040 were simulated using the most recent revision of the U.S. Geological Survey groundwater- flow model for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. Three simulations were performed to investigate the likely effects of different scenarios of future groundwater pumping by the City of Albuquerque on the ground-water system. For simulation I, pumping was held constant at known year-2000 rates. For simulation II, pumping was increased to simulate the use of pumping to meet all projected city water demand through 2040. For simulation III, pumpingwas reduced in accordance with a plan by the City of Albuquerque to use surfacewater to meet most of the projectedwater demand. The simulations indicate that for each of the three pumping scenarios, substantial additional watertable declines would occur in some areas of the basin through 2040. However, the reduced pumping scenario of simulation III also results in water-table rise over a broad area of the city. All three scenarios indicate that the contributions of aquifer storage and river leakage to the ground-water system would change between 2000 and 2040. Comparisons among the results for simulations I, II, and III indicate that the various pumping scenarios have substantially different effects on water-level declines in the Albuquerque area and on the contribution of each water-budget component to the total budget for the ground-water system. Between 2000 and 2040, water-level declines for continued pumping at year-2000 rates are as much as 120 feet greater than for reduced pumping; water-level declines for increased pumping to meet all projected city demand are as much as 160 feet greater. Over the same time period, reduced pumping results in retention in aquifer storage of about 1,536,000 acre-feet of ground water as compared with continued pumping at year- 2000 rates and of about 2,257,000 acre-feet as compared with increased pumping. The quantity of water retained in

  17. Plant water use characteristics of five dominant shrub species of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA: implications for shrubland restoration and conservation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Arjun; White, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    The biogeographic distribution of plant species is inherently associated with the plasticity of physiological adaptations to environmental variation. For semi-arid shrublands with a legacy of saline soils, characterization of soil water-tolerant shrub species is necessary for habitat restoration given future projection of increased drought magnitude and persistence in these ecosystems. Five dominant native shrub species commonly found in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX, USA, were studied, namely Acacia farnesiana, Celtis ehrenbergiana, Forestiera angustifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata and Prosopis glandulosa. To simulate drought conditions, we suspended watering of healthy, greenhouse-grown plants for 4 weeks. Effects of soil salinity were also studied by dosing plants with 10% NaCl solution with suspended watering. For soil water deficit treatment, the soil water potential of P. glandulosa was the highest (-1.20 MPa), followed by A. farnesiana (-4.69 MPa), P. aculeata (-5.39 MPa), F. angustifolia (-6.20 MPa) and C. ehrenbergiana (-10.02 MPa). For the soil salinity treatment, P. glandulosa also had the highest soil water potential value (-1.60 MPa), followed by C. ehrenbergiana (-1.70 MPa), A. farnesiana (-1.84 MPa), P. aculeata (-2.04 MPa) and F. angustifolia (-6.99 MPa). Within the species, only C. ehrenbergiana and F. angustifolia for soil water deficit treatment and A. farnesiana for the salinity treatment had significantly lower soil water potential after 4 weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). We found that soil water potential, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis of the species significantly reduced over time for both treatments (P < 0.05). We conclude that while all species exhibited capacities to withstand current water availability, some species demonstrated limited tolerance for extreme water stress that may be important for management of future shrub diversity in Lower Rio Grande Valley. PMID:27293626

  18. New perspectives on the geometry of the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico: Insights from geophysical models of rift-fill thickness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V. J.; Connell, Sean D.

    2013-01-01

    Discrepancies among previous models of the geometry of the Albuquerque Basin motivated us to develop a new model using a comprehensive approach. Capitalizing on a natural separation between the densities of mainly Neogene basin fill (Santa Fe Group) and those of older rocks, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) geophysical model of syn-rift basin-fill thickness that incorporates well data, seismic-reflection data, geologic cross sections, and other geophysical data in a constrained gravity inversion. Although the resulting model does not show structures directly, it elucidates important aspects of basin geometry. The main features are three, 3–5-km-deep, interconnected structural depressions, which increase in size, complexity, and segmentation from north to south: the Santo Domingo, Calabacillas, and Belen subbasins. The increase in segmentation and complexity may reflect a transition of the Rio Grande rift from well-defined structural depressions in the north to multiple, segmented basins within a broader region of crustal extension to the south. The modeled geometry of the subbasins and their connections differs from a widely accepted structural model based primarily on seismic-reflection interpretations. Key elements of the previous model are an east-tilted half-graben block on the north separated from a west-tilted half-graben block on the south by a southwest-trending, scissor-like transfer zone. Instead, we find multiple subbasins with predominantly easterly tilts for much of the Albuquerque Basin, a restricted region of westward tilting in the southwestern part of the basin, and a northwesterly trending antiform dividing subbasins in the center of the basin instead of a major scissor-like transfer zone. The overall eastward tilt indicated by the 3D geophysical model generally conforms to stratal tilts observed for the syn-rift succession, implying a prolonged eastward tilting of the basin during Miocene time. An extensive north-south synform in the

  19. Plant water use characteristics of five dominant shrub species of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA: implications for shrubland restoration and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Arjun; White, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The biogeographic distribution of plant species is inherently associated with the plasticity of physiological adaptations to environmental variation. For semi-arid shrublands with a legacy of saline soils, characterization of soil water-tolerant shrub species is necessary for habitat restoration given future projection of increased drought magnitude and persistence in these ecosystems. Five dominant native shrub species commonly found in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX, USA, were studied, namely Acacia farnesiana, Celtis ehrenbergiana, Forestiera angustifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata and Prosopis glandulosa. To simulate drought conditions, we suspended watering of healthy, greenhouse-grown plants for 4 weeks. Effects of soil salinity were also studied by dosing plants with 10% NaCl solution with suspended watering. For soil water deficit treatment, the soil water potential of P. glandulosa was the highest (−1.20 MPa), followed by A. farnesiana (−4.69 MPa), P. aculeata (−5.39 MPa), F. angustifolia (−6.20 MPa) and C. ehrenbergiana (−10.02 MPa). For the soil salinity treatment, P. glandulosa also had the highest soil water potential value (−1.60 MPa), followed by C. ehrenbergiana (−1.70 MPa), A. farnesiana (−1.84 MPa), P. aculeata (−2.04 MPa) and F. angustifolia (−6.99 MPa). Within the species, only C. ehrenbergiana and F. angustifolia for soil water deficit treatment and A. farnesiana for the salinity treatment had significantly lower soil water potential after 4 weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). We found that soil water potential, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis of the species significantly reduced over time for both treatments (P < 0.05). We conclude that while all species exhibited capacities to withstand current water availability, some species demonstrated limited tolerance for extreme water stress that may be important for management of future shrub diversity in Lower Rio Grande Valley. PMID:27293626

  20. Plant water use characteristics of five dominant shrub species of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas, USA: implications for shrubland restoration and conservation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Arjun; White, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    The biogeographic distribution of plant species is inherently associated with the plasticity of physiological adaptations to environmental variation. For semi-arid shrublands with a legacy of saline soils, characterization of soil water-tolerant shrub species is necessary for habitat restoration given future projection of increased drought magnitude and persistence in these ecosystems. Five dominant native shrub species commonly found in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, TX, USA, were studied, namely Acacia farnesiana, Celtis ehrenbergiana, Forestiera angustifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata and Prosopis glandulosa. To simulate drought conditions, we suspended watering of healthy, greenhouse-grown plants for 4 weeks. Effects of soil salinity were also studied by dosing plants with 10% NaCl solution with suspended watering. For soil water deficit treatment, the soil water potential of P. glandulosa was the highest (-1.20 MPa), followed by A. farnesiana (-4.69 MPa), P. aculeata (-5.39 MPa), F. angustifolia (-6.20 MPa) and C. ehrenbergiana (-10.02 MPa). For the soil salinity treatment, P. glandulosa also had the highest soil water potential value (-1.60 MPa), followed by C. ehrenbergiana (-1.70 MPa), A. farnesiana (-1.84 MPa), P. aculeata (-2.04 MPa) and F. angustifolia (-6.99 MPa). Within the species, only C. ehrenbergiana and F. angustifolia for soil water deficit treatment and A. farnesiana for the salinity treatment had significantly lower soil water potential after 4 weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). We found that soil water potential, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis of the species significantly reduced over time for both treatments (P < 0.05). We conclude that while all species exhibited capacities to withstand current water availability, some species demonstrated limited tolerance for extreme water stress that may be important for management of future shrub diversity in Lower Rio Grande Valley.

  1. Near-continuous suspended sediment monitoring of the Rio Grande using multi-frequency acoustic instrumentation in Big Bend National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. J.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Sabol, T. A.; Griffiths, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua and Coahuila, Mexico, is in disequilibrium. The river in this reach rapidly narrows during low-flow years, and widens during rare, large magnitude floods. One management strategy to improve in-channel habitat for the native ecosystem is to limit the rate and magnitude of channel narrowing during low-flow years through water releases from re-operated upstream dams. The proposed purpose of these dam re-operations is to maximize fine-sediment transport downstream, thereby limiting fine-sediment deposition within the channel and channel narrowing. A suspended-sediment monitoring program consisting of two suspended-sediment gages was established in November 2010 at two sites in Big Bend National Park (BBNP), Texas, to inform these management efforts. Suspended-sediment gages consist of two single-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler profilers that collect data at 15-minute intervals. Acoustic attenuation is used to calculate silt-and-clay concentration, and acoustic backscatter is used to calculate sand concentration in two size classes. Acoustic attenuation and backscatter are calibrated to velocity-weighted suspended silt-and-clay and sand concentrations in the cross sections near the acoustic instrumentation by using standard depth-integrating samplers deployed according to the Equal-Width-Increment (EWI) method. During flood periods, when depth-integrated samples cannot be collected, automatic pump samplers collect suspended-sediment samples to augment the EWI dataset. Initial analyses indicate that steady, long-duration dam releases are able to transport a consistent load of silt and clay through the study reach in BBNP. However, when tributary flash floods are superimposed on dam releases, the large influx of silt and clay from these tributary floods is not transported through the study reach, even though discharge remains high. When tributary flash floods occur during low-flow periods on

  2. Status of fish communities in the Rio Grande, Big Bend National Park, Texas - comparison before and after Spring 2003 period of low flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    2005-01-01

    During 2003–04 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, re-evaluated the status of fish communities in three reaches of the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park that originally were evaluated when the three reaches were established for study in 1999. The objective was to determine whether there were measurable differences between 1999 and 2003–04 (referred to as 2004) fish community status that likely are attributable to a rare 58-day period of low flow (less than 1 cubic meter per second) in spring 2003 at the Johnson Ranch gaging station on the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park. The total number of fish species collected at all three sites (Boquillas, Johnson Ranch, and Santa Elena) in 1999 was greater than in 2004. The number of fish species collected at the Boquillas site in 1999 (10) was twice that collected in 2004; the number of species collected at the Johnson Ranch site in 1999 (nine) was almost twice that collected in 2004 (five). In contrast, the numbers at the Santa Elena site were nearly the same, 15 species in 1999, 14 in 2004. Percent community similarity for the Boquillas site is 8.04, for the Johnson Ranch site, 6.65, and for the Santa Elena site, 47.6, which indicates considerably more similarity between the 1999 and 2004 fish communities at the Santa Elena site than for the Boquillas and Johnson Ranch sites. At the Boquillas and Johnson Ranch sites, the fish communities shifted from small minnow (Cyprinidae) dominated in 1999 to largely gar (Lepisosteidae) and catfish (Ictaluridae) dominated in 2004. In contrast, no such shift occurred at the Santa Elena site between 1999 and 2004. Differences in flow conditions between the two downstream sites and the Santa Elena site might account for the dissimilar findings. The findings of the study provide some evidence that the spring 2003 period of low flow affected fish communities, but the findings are not definitive as other factors such as increased salinity

  3. Seafloor Tectonic Fault Fabric and the Evolution of the Walvis Ridge-Rio Grande Rise Hot Spot Twins in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, W. W.; Engfer, D.; Thoram, S.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Class, C.

    2015-12-01

    Walvis Ridge (WR) and Rio Grande Rise (RGR) are Cretaceous-Cenozoic large igneous provinces (LIPs) formed by the Tristan-Gough hot spot interacting with the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Although hot spot-ridge interaction has long been considered a primary factor controlling WR-RGR morphology, details are fuzzy owing to sparse geophysical data. We examined tectonic fabric revealed in satellite altimetry-derived gravity data to infer details about RGR-WR evolution. Plate tectonic reconstructions indicate that the main RGR plateau and large N-S plateau in the eastern WR erupted at the same point at ~90 Ma. Over the next ~8 Myr, these conjunct LIPs formed a "V" shape with a basin in between. Curved fracture zones within the basin imply the two LIPs formed around a microplate. The prominent rift in the middle of RGR formed nearly perpendicular to the RGR-WR intersection, suggesting an extensional microplate boundary. Hot spot eruptions continued at the MAR, emplacing the eastern WR and two main RGR plateaus until ~60 Ma. During this period, the N-S trending Eastern Rio Grande Rise (ERGR) was erupted along the MAR. Both the ERGR and WR formed bathymetric lineaments parallel to seafloor fault fabric and were likely connected. This resulted in WR seamounts with a "tadpole" shape, the head being small to medium seamounts on the WR track and the tails being low, spreading-fabric-parallel ridges extending up to ~150 km northward. Similar, small seamounts are found in the contemporaneous ERGR. Another critical observation is that the WR-RGR formed at a large crustal discontinuity (~700 km at anomaly C33, ~84 Ma) at one or more fracture zone offsets. By late Cenozoic time (anomaly C5, ~10 Ma), the offset was reduced by half while several new fracture zones formed at the junction between RGR and WR. This implies a connection between ridge reorganization and RGR-WR volcanism that may have resulted from the fracture zones becoming oblique to the spreading direction as Euler poles

  4. Reconnaissance evaluation of water resources for hydraulic coal mining, Grand Hogback coal field: Garfield and Rio Blanco Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, William M.; Britton, Linda J.; Boyd, Elaine L.

    1978-01-01

    Surface-water and ground-water data were compiled for the parts of the Colorado River and the White River basins in and adjacent to the Grand Hogback coal field. The data were evaluated to assess the quantity and quality of water resources available in the area for use in hydraulic coal mining. Based on discharge records, surface-water supplies of most streams should be adequate to meet the demands for hydraulic mining of 1 million tons of coal per year with a recycled water system. However, on some of the smaller streams in the area, some storage of water may be required for use during low-flow periods to meet minimum-flow requirements for downstream reaches. Other potential sources of water include Rifle Gap Reservoir, Harvey Gap Reservoir, and ground water from valley-fill deposits along major streams and rivers. The surface water and ground water should be of adequate quality for use in hydraulic mining, with the possible exceptions of suspended-sediment concentrations that periodically may be as much as 18,800 milligrams per liter in streams in the Rifle Creek drainage, and dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 20,000 milligrams per liter in some aquifers. Data are insufficient to assess the potential impact of hydraulic coal mining on downstream water quality. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Evidence of Gondwana early rifting process recorded by Resende-Ilha Grande Dike Swarm, southern Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Eliane; Heilbron, Monica; de Morisson Valeriano, Claudio; de Almeida, Julio César Horta; Szatmari, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Continental flood basalts and dike swarm have been related to continental breakup process through geological time. The Resende - Ilha Grande Dike swarm (RIGDS) located in the southeast Brazil, is related the Gondwana breakup and composed of dikes/sills intruded in Precambrian gneiss. The dikes have three distinguish orientations: NNW more inland; NS-NNE in the central segment and NE orientation in the coast line, consistent with Precambrian structural lineaments. The swarm comprises high-TiO2 tholeiitic basalts divided into three suites based on REE and Sr and Nd isotope data. The Resende and Volta Redonda suites present higher initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios between 0.7077 and 0.7065, while Angra dos Reis suite presents values of 0.7066 to 0.7057. Geochemical and isotopic data support the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) as the main source for the high-TiO2 basalts. The suites heterogeneities are explained by different compositions of SCLM in accreted Precambrian terranes and/or different degree of partial melting and fractional. 40Ar/39Ar data indicate age interval between ca. 156 to 144 Ma for the swarm, older than the average for Gondwana breakup (ca. 130-120 Ma). The age interval places the RIGDS between the Karoo magmatism (181-178 Ma) and the Paraná-Etendeka magmatism (133-134 Ma) and indicates that extensional process affected the supercontinent prior the break-up.

  6. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas; summary and analysis of water-quality data for the basic-fixed-site network, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    The Rio Grande Valley study unit of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program collected monthly water- quality samples at a network of surface-water sites from April 1993 through September 1995. This basic-fixed-site network consisted of nine main-stem sites on the Rio Grande, five sites on tributaries of the Rio Grande, two sites on streams in the Rio Grande Valley study unit that are not directly tributary to the Rio Grande, and one site on a conveyance channel. During each monthly sampling, field properties were measured and samples were collected for the analysis of dissolved solids, major constituents, nutrients, selected trace elements, and suspended-sediment concentrations. During selected samplings, supplemental samples were collected for the analysis of additional trace elements, organic carbon, and/or pesticides. Spatial variations of dissolved-solids, major-constituent, and nutrient data were analyzed. The report presents summary statistics for the monthly water-quality data by sampling site and background information on the drainage basin upstream from each site. Regression equations are presented that relate dissolved-solids, major-constituent, and nutrient concentrations to streamflow, selected field properties, and time. Median instantaneous streamflow at each basic-fixed site ranged from 1.4 to 1,380 cubic feet per second. Median specific conductance at each basic-fixed site ranged from 84 to 1,680 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, and median pH values ranged from 7.8 to 8.5. The water sampled at the basic-fixed sites generally was well oxygenated and had a median dissolved-oxygen percent of saturation range from 89 to 108. With the exception of Rio Grande above mouth of Trinchera Creek, near Lasauses, Colorado, dissolved-solids concentrations in the main stem of the Rio Grande generally increased in a downstream direction. This increase is from natural sources such as ground-water inflow and

  7. Avidity of IgG for rubella: an evaluation of the need for implementation at the Materno-Infantil Presidente Vargas Hospital in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, M M; Tessaro, M M; Cruz e Silva, J; Giordano, S A; d'Azevedo, P A

    2004-06-01

    Rubella serum assays performed in the laboratory of the Materno-Infantil Presidente Vargas Hospital (HMIPV) from 1998 to 2002 were reviewed to determine if IgG avidity assays should be implemented. IgG was determined using the Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay, ELFA, VIDAS system, bioMerieux or the Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay, MEIA, Axsym system, Abbott, and IgM was determined using the ELFA, VIDAS system, bioMerieux, a capture format assay. Specific IgG was assayed in 2,863 samples, with positive results for 84% of the patients, for the most part with high levels of antibodies. IgM was assayed in 2,851 samples, being positive in 14 (0.49%) and inconclusive in 25 (0.88%). Serology for toxoplasmosis was also positive or inconclusive in 5 patients. After a cost-effectiveness analysis, it was decided not to implement avidity assays, considering that the HMIPV is a public institution, with limited funding. Difficulties concerning the integration of the Clinical Pathology Service with the Clinical Staff of the institution were also considered.

  8. Magnetotelluric Investigation of Structures Related to a Geothermal Anomaly in the Buckman Well field in the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Chu, S.; McCormack, K.; Barghouty, L. K.; Mostafanejad, A.; Lasscock, B.; Bedrosian, P.; Pellerin, L.

    2013-12-01

    High borehole temperature gradients have been measured over short spatial scales in the Buckman Well Field located within the Espanola Basin of the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico. The proximity of the well field to the young Caja del Rio volcanic plateau prompted a study undertaken by the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program to uncover structure related to this geothermal anomaly. The localized nature of this geothermal anomaly is suggested to be indicative of a local controlling structure as opposed to a more regional structure. Two-dimensional (2-D) models were constructed using magnetotelluric (MT) and audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data acquired during 2011-13 seasons of the SAGE field program. Geoelectric strike, being important in determining whether an optimal survey design was employed for 2-D MT inverse modeling, was determined from Swift';s formula, which is subject to galvanic distortion. The geoelectric strike direction obtained from a phase tensor analysis, unaffected by such distortion, generally agreed with the established geological strike of the region. The phase tensor analysis shows predominantly 2-D behavior, although some three-dimensional (3-D) character is observed in the low-frequency MT data. An independent statistical metric developed at SAGE confirms these findings. This observation could be reflected as a conductive anomaly found in the 2-D MT inverse model. Synthetic data were generated to test the sensitivity of the 2-D inversion method to different layer resistivity values and faulted structures in the AMT range. Using these synthetic results to understand the inversion of field data we identify conductive horizons at 100 m and 250-300 m depth. The MT models estimate basin depth at 3-4 km in accordance with independent constraints from geologic mapping, gravity models and seismic imaging. Variations in basement topography correlate to some degree with previously proposed structural features elsewhere beneath the Caja del

  9. The sea-level highstand correlated to marine isotope stage (MIS) 7 in the coastal plain of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Renato P; Dillenburg, Sergio R; Schultz, Cesar L; Ferigolo, Jorge; Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Pereira, Jamil C; Holanda, Elizete C; Pitana, Vanessa G; Kerber, Leonardo

    2014-12-01

    The coastal plain of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in southern Brazil, includes four barrier-lagoon depositional systems formed by successive Quaternary sea-level highstands that were correlated to marine isotope stages (MIS) 11, 9, 5 and 1, despite the scarcity of absolute ages. This study describes a sea-level highstand older than MIS 5, based on the stratigraphy, ages and fossils of the shallow marine facies found in coastal barrier (Barrier II). This facies outcrops along the banks of Chuí Creek, it is composed of fine, well-sorted quartz sand and contains ichnofossils Ophiomorpha nodosa and Rosselia sp., and molluscan shells. The sedimentary record indicates coastal aggradation followed by sea-level fall and progradation of the coastline. Thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR) ages from sediments and fossil shells point to an age of ∼220 ka for the end of this marine transgression, thus correlating it to MIS 7 (substage 7e). Altimetric data point to a maximum amplitude of about 10 meters above present-day mean sea-level, but tectonic processes may be involved. Paleoceanographic conditions at the time of the highstand and correlations with other deposits in the Brazilian coasts are also discussed.

  10. The sea-level highstand correlated to marine isotope stage (MIS) 7 in the coastal plain of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Renato P; Dillenburg, Sergio R; Schultz, Cesar L; Ferigolo, Jorge; Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Pereira, Jamil C; Holanda, Elizete C; Pitana, Vanessa G; Kerber, Leonardo

    2014-12-09

    The coastal plain of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in southern Brazil, includes four barrier-lagoon depositional systems formed by successive Quaternary sea-level highstands that were correlated to marine isotope stages (MIS) 11, 9, 5 and 1, despite the scarcity of absolute ages. This study describes a sea-level highstand older than MIS 5, based on the stratigraphy, ages and fossils of the shallow marine facies found in coastal barrier (Barrier II). This facies outcrops along the banks of Chuí Creek, it is composed of fine, well-sorted quartz sand and contains ichnofossils Ophiomorpha nodosa and Rosselia sp., and molluscan shells. The sedimentary record indicates coastal aggradation followed by sea-level fall and progradation of the coastline. Thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR) ages from sediments and fossil shells point to an age of ∼220 ka for the end of this marine transgression, thus correlating it to MIS 7 (substage 7e). Altimetric data point to a maximum amplitude of about 10 meters above present-day mean sea-level, but tectonic processes may be involved. Paleoceanographic conditions at the time of the highstand and correlations with other deposits in the Brazilian coasts are also discussed.

  11. Factors Controlling Pre-Columbian and Early Historic Maize Productivity in the American Southwest, Part 1: The Southern Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande Regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.

    2011-01-01

    Maize is the New World's preeminent grain crop and it provided the economic basis for human culture in many regions within the Americas. To flourish, maize needs water, sunlight (heat), and nutrients (e. g., nitrogen). In this paper, climate and soil chemistry data are used to evaluate the potential for dryland (rainon-field) agriculture in the semiarid southeastern Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande regions. Processes that impact maize agriculture such as nitrogen mineralization, infiltration of precipitation, bare soil evaporation, and transpiration are discussed and evaluated. Most of the study area, excepting high-elevation regions, receives sufficient solar radiation to grow maize. The salinities of subsurface soils in the central San Juan Basin are very high and their nitrogen concentrations are very low. In addition, soils of the central San Juan Basin are characterized by pH values that exceed 8.0, which limit the availability of both nitrogen and phosphorous. In general, the San Juan Basin, including Chaco Canyon, is the least promising part of the study area in terms of dryland farming. Calculations of field life, using values of organic nitrogen for the upper 50 cm of soil in the study area, indicate that most of the study area could not support a 10-bushel/acre crop of maize. The concepts, methods, and calculations used to quantify maize productivity in this study are applicable to maize cultivation in other environmental settings across the Americas. ?? 2010 US Government.

  12. Analysis of the Evolution of Astronomical Concepts Presented by Teachers of Some Schools (Mauá, Ribeirão Pires and Rio Grande da Serra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    The reason for the development of this work is based on knowing many Basic Education's teachers (EB) don't deal concepts related to astronomy and when they do, followed didactic books which contain many conceptual errors, it also know that astronomy is one of the contents that it being taught in the EB and do part of what is proposed by the Education Ministry and Education Department São Paulo State and also, that several researchers point out many mistakes in the teaching of Astronomy. It's purpose of minimizing some deficiencies, which was drawed an University Extension Course for Teachers of Diretoria de Ensino Regional (Mauá, Ribeirão Pires and Rio Grande da Serra) with the following objectives: to raise alternative conceptions; to subsidize teachers by means of lectures, discussions and workshops, and to check the learning after the course. Therefore, sixteen questions were applied before and after the course, so it was established that 100% of the teachers knew the names of the phases of the moon, 97.0% understood that the Solar System is composed by eight planets, 78.1% explained as occured "Lunar Eclipse", "Solar Eclipse" and "Solstice", 72.7% knew to explain the occurrence of the seasons of the year; 64.5% explained the occurrence of the equinox correctly, 89.7% were able to define properly "comet"; 63.6% defined "Asteroid", 54.5% defined "meteor"; 58.1% defined "galaxy", and 42.4% defined "planet".

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus among users attending a voluntary testing centre in Rio Grande, southern Brazil: predictive factors and hepatitis C virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Germano, F N; dos Santos, C A; Honscha, G; Strasburg, A; Gabbi, B; Mendoza-Sassi, R A; Soares, E A; Seuánez, H N; Soares, M A; Martínez, A M B

    2010-07-01

    We estimated the prevalence of hepatitis C (HCV) infection and associated risk factors in 750 individuals attending the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center of Rio Grande (VCT/RG), in Southern Brazil, and identified viral genotypes. Demographic data and risk factors for HCV transmission were also collected and analysed. Anti-HCV antibody-positive individuals were tested for HCV-RNA and genotyped by sequencing the 5' untranslated region of the viral genome. Prevalence estimates of anti-HCV and HCV-RNA were 6% and 5.5%, respectively. We identified genotypes 1 (67%), 2 (2%) and 3 (31%); the latter was more prevalent than in other regions of Brazil. Anti-HCV prevalence in VCT/RG users was similar to previous reports. Age, previous blood transfusion, sexual orientation and injecting drug use were independent predictors of HCV infection. The presence of multiple risk factors was also associated with a higher risk for HCV infection. HCV genotype was not associated with any variable analysed in this study. PMID:20852195

  14. [Food insecurity and overweight in first grade students in the municipal school system in São Leopoldo, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Vicenzi, Keli; Henn, Ruth Liane; Weber, Ana Paula; Backes, Vanessa; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Donatti, Talita; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-05-01

    This cross-sectional school-based study in São Leopoldo, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, evaluated the association between food insecurity and overweight in first grade students in the municipal elementary school system. A total of 2,369 students were invited to participate, of whom 847 were examined, and of these, 782 had data available on weight and height. Dietary data were obtained from a parent or guardian. Food insecurity was measured by the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale (EBIA). Data on weight and height were provided by the Nutrition Service of the Municipal Department of Education. Prevalence rates for overweight and food insecurity were 38.1% and 45.1%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, children with food insecurity had 22% lower odds of overweight. Notwithstanding the inverse association between the exposure and outcome, this sample showed high rates of food insecurity and overweight, revealing a complex relationship and indicating that further research is needed to understand it. Robust public policies are critical for addressing these conditions. PMID:26083182

  15. Characterization of the pyrethroid resistance profile of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus populations from the states of Rio Grande do Sul and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Márcia Cristina; Duarte, Fernanda Calvo; Martins, João Ricardo; Klafke, Guilherme Marcondes; Fiorini, Leonardo Costa; de Barros, Antônio Thadeu Medeiros

    2013-01-01

    Cattle ticks Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus are mainly controlled in Brazil by means of acaricide products, without any official policies in this regard. Acaricides continue to be sold indiscriminately, and this has contributed towards making the problem of resistance widespread, thus making diagnosis and monitoring of tick resistance essential. Here, bioassays (larval packet test) were performed on tick populations from the states of Rio Grande do Sul and Mato Grosso do Sul regarding their susceptibility to cypermethrin, deltamethrin and flumethrin. All the tick samples tested showed resistance to cypermethrin (10) (resistance factor (RF) ranging from 5.6 to 80.3) and deltamethrin (10) (RF ranging from 2.4 to 83.1). Six out of eight populations were resistant to flumethrin (RF ranging from 3.8 to 8.2). PCR molecular analyses did not show any T2134A mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, in any of the sampled populations. The results from this study highlight the critical status of resistance of the cattle tick to synthetic pyrethroids in the regions studied. Further studies are needed to identify the mechanisms responsible for the resistant phenotypes observed in the bioassays. This was the first detection of flumethrin resistance in Brazil. PMID:24142169

  16. Early seafloor spreading in the South Atlantic: new evidence for M-series magnetochrons north of the Rio Grande Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Dale E.; Hall, Stuart A.

    2016-08-01

    Recent tectonic reconstructions of the South Atlantic have partitioned the ocean basin into several segments based upon one or more proposed intraplate South American deformation zones. In several of these reconstructions, opening of the southern segment(s) by seafloor spreading prior to Aptian-Albian time is accompanied by contemporaneous strike-slip motion along an intraplate boundary extending southeastward from the Andean Cochabamba—Santa Cruz bend to the Rio Grande Fracture Zone (RGFZ). We have examined new magnetic data over the Pelotas, Santos and Campos Basins, offshore Argentina and Brazil, acquired by ION-GXT in tandem with long-offset, long record seismic reflection data, and identified seafloor spreading anomalies M4, M3, M2 and M0 (˜131, ˜129, ˜128 and ˜125 Ma). Integrating these results with our earlier work, we have been able to correlate magnetochrons M4, M3, M2 and M0 north and south of the RGFZ on the South American margin, and north and south of the Walvis Ridge on the African side. Our results are therefore inconsistent with diachronous opening models that involve substantial continental strike-slip motion north of RGFZ during M4 to M0 time. Although the ocean basin may have opened from south to north, our results indicate that seafloor spreading began north of the RGFZ earlier than previously proposed.

  17. Evaluation of geothermal potential of Rio Grande rift and Basin and Range province, New Mexico. Final technical report, January 1, 1977-May 31, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Callender, J.F.

    1985-04-01

    A study was made of the geological, geochemical and geophysical characteristics of potential geothermal areas in the Rio Grande rift and Basin and Range province of New Mexico. Both regional and site-specific information is presented. Data was collected by: (1) reconnaissance and detailed geologic mapping, emphasizing Neogene stratigraphy and structure; (2) petrologic studies of Neogene igneous rocks; (3) radiometric age-dating; (4) geochemical surveying, including regional and site-specific water chemistry, stable isotopic analyses of thermal waters, whole-rock and mineral isotopic studies, and whole-rock chemical analyses; and (5) detailed geophysical surveys, using electrical, gravity and magnetic techniques, with electrical resistivity playing a major role. Regional geochemical water studies were conducted for the whole state. Integrated site-specific studies included the Animas Valley, Las Cruces area (Radium Springs and Las Alturas Estates), Truth or Consequences region, the Albuquerque basin, the San Ysidro area, and the Abiquiu-Ojo Caliente region. The Animas Valley and Las Cruces areas have the most significant geothermal potential of the areas studied. The Truth or Consequences and Albuquerque areas need further study. The San Ysidro and Abiquiu-Ojo Caliente regions have less significant geothermal potential. 78 figs., 16 tabs.

  18. An Alternative Approach to the Operation of Multinational Reservoir Systems: Application to the Amistad & Falcon System (Lower Rio Grande/Rí-o Bravo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Valdes, J. B.

    2005-12-01

    An optimization approach for the operation of international multi-reservoir systems is presented. The approach uses Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP) algorithms, both steady-state and real-time, to develop two models. In the first model, the reservoirs and flows of the system are aggregated to yield an equivalent reservoir, and the obtained operating policies are disaggregated using a non-linear optimization procedure for each reservoir and for each nation water balance. In the second model a multi-reservoir approach is applied, disaggregating the releases for each country water share in each reservoir. The non-linear disaggregation algorithm uses SDP-derived operating policies as boundary conditions for a local time-step optimization. Finally, the performance of the different approaches and methods is compared. These models are applied to the Amistad-Falcon International Reservoir System as part of a binational dynamic modeling effort to develop a decision support system tool for a better management of the water resources in the Lower Rio Grande Basin, currently enduring a severe drought.

  19. Early seafloor spreading in the South Atlantic: new evidence for M-series magnetochrons north of the Rio Grande Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Dale E.; Hall, Stuart A.

    2016-08-01

    Recent tectonic reconstructions of the South Atlantic have partitioned the ocean basin into several segments based upon one or more proposed intraplate South American deformation zones. In several of these reconstructions, opening of the southern segment(s) by seafloor spreading prior to Aptian-Albian time is accompanied by contemporaneous strike-slip motion along an intraplate boundary extending southeastward from the Andean Cochabamba-Santa Cruz bend to the Rio Grande Fracture Zone (RGFZ). We have examined new magnetic data over the Pelotas, Santos and Campos Basins, offshore Argentina and Brazil, acquired by ION-GXT in tandem with long-offset, long record seismic reflection data, and identified seafloor spreading anomalies M4, M3, M2 and M0 (˜131, ˜129, ˜128 and ˜125 Ma). Integrating these results with our earlier work, we have been able to correlate magnetochrons M4, M3, M2 and M0 north and south of the RGFZ on the South American margin, and north and south of the Walvis Ridge on the African side. Our results are therefore inconsistent with diachronous opening models that involve substantial continental strike-slip motion north of RGFZ during M4 to M0 time. Although the ocean basin may have opened from south to north, our results indicate that seafloor spreading began north of the RGFZ earlier than previously proposed.

  20. [The perception of the young and long-lived elderly 'Gauchos' (from the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) about the public spaces they live in Resumo].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Joel Hirtz do Nascimento; Andrade, Francini Porcher; Paiva, Tiago Sousa; da Silva, Diovana Ourique; Gessinger, Cristiane Fernanda; Bós, Ângelo José Gonçalves

    2015-02-01

    By 2050, the number of Brazilians living in urban areas will be over 200 million and 29% of the population will be elderly. The long-lived elderly are 80 or more years old and the young elderly are between 60 and 79 years of age. The scope of this article was to verify the difference in perception between the young elderly and the long-lived elderly from Rio Grande do Sul (RS) about the urban environment they live in. This is a population-based, observational, descriptive, retrospective study with a quantitative analysis paradigm. Data was analyzed from Elderly Profile research in RS conducted by the Geriatric and Gerontological Institute of PUCRS in partnership with the RS School of Public Health. The sample consisted of 6913 questionnaires answered by the elderly from 59 cities. Data analysis was performed for each age group and independent variables were processed using the Chi-square test, with p under 0.05. Results showed that the perception of difficulties such as a lack of park benches and safety strips, short traffic light times for pedestrians, high steps and bad-smelling public toilets was greater among the young elderly. The long-lived elderly noticed these facts less, though they admitted that they frequent community environments less often. PMID:25715140

  1. [Food insecurity and overweight in first grade students in the municipal school system in São Leopoldo, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Vicenzi, Keli; Henn, Ruth Liane; Weber, Ana Paula; Backes, Vanessa; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Donatti, Talita; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-05-01

    This cross-sectional school-based study in São Leopoldo, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, evaluated the association between food insecurity and overweight in first grade students in the municipal elementary school system. A total of 2,369 students were invited to participate, of whom 847 were examined, and of these, 782 had data available on weight and height. Dietary data were obtained from a parent or guardian. Food insecurity was measured by the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale (EBIA). Data on weight and height were provided by the Nutrition Service of the Municipal Department of Education. Prevalence rates for overweight and food insecurity were 38.1% and 45.1%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, children with food insecurity had 22% lower odds of overweight. Notwithstanding the inverse association between the exposure and outcome, this sample showed high rates of food insecurity and overweight, revealing a complex relationship and indicating that further research is needed to understand it. Robust public policies are critical for addressing these conditions.

  2. Radionuclide and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Fish from the Confluences of Major Canyons That Cross Los Alamos National Laboratory Lands with the Rio Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Kraig, D.H.; Naranjo, L. Jr.; Mullen, M.A.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1999-02-01

    Bottom-feeding fish--catfish, suckers, and carp--that were collected from the confluences of some of the major canyons that cross LANL lands with the Rio Grande (RG) exhibited similar radionuclide (with the exception of {sup 90}Sr), and nonradionuclide concentrations to fish collected upstream of any potential LANL contamination sources. Strontium-90 concentrations in fish from LANL canyons/RG may be associated with LANL operations; however, the concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in fish decrease to background concentrations further downstream of LANL at CR. And, based on the most conservative assumptions (a 95% source term and maximum consumption rate), LANL operations do not result in significant doses to the general public from consuming fish along the length of the RG as it passes through the eastern edge of LANL lands to CR. Moreover, since over 85% of the doses were a result of {sup 90}Sr detected in the muscle plus bone portions of the fish and most of the {sup 90}Sr is associated with the bone, the doses to people that consume only the edible portions of the fish (muscle only), would be significantly lower.

  3. Life history and life tables of Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) on potato under laboratory and field conditions in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Bing; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Hua, Lei; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2010-10-01

    Effective management of potato 'Zebra Chip' (ZC) disease caused by Cadidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (syn. solanacearum) depends on the management of its insect vector insect, potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). To elucidate the age-specific population dynamics of B. cockerelli, the life-table parameters were determined on potato, Solanum tuberosum L., under both laboratory and field conditions in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas. Generally, survival, fecundity, and longevity of B. cockerelli were significantly greater under laboratory than under field conditions. The mortality under laboratory conditions was mainly due to natural intrinsic mortality. However, under field conditions, most (83.2%) B. cockerelli were missing, and of those that were not, they developed slower, and had shorter preoviposition period, shorter oviposition period, shorter longevity, lower fecundity, and higher mortality than those under laboratory conditions. As a result, most of the life-table parameters of B. cockerelli, including the intrinsic rate of increase, finite rate of increase, and net reproductive rate, were significantly lower in the field under the environmental conditions of the LRGV of Texas than in the laboratory. The information could help increase our understanding of the epidemiology of the ZC diseases associated with the pathogens transmitted by this insect pest.

  4. [Use of primary health care services in municipalities in the southern half of the Rio Grande do Sul State: analysis based on information systems].

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Tatiana Engel; Pinto, Juliana Maciel; Riquinho, Deise Lisboa; Roese, Adriana; dos Santos, Daniel Labernarde; de Lima, Maristela Correa Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This study is proposed to describe the supply and demand of Primary Health Care Service in thirteen municipalities of the southern half of Rio Grande do Sul State. For analysis, secondary data were obtained from the Data Processing Department of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Data from appointments, procedures and structure of Primary Health Care Service were associated with concepts present in public policies and specific legal authorization. A quantitative study was carried out through the analyses of absolute frequencies of appointments and procedures from 2000 to 2005. Results showed diversified situations requiring primary health care service, which allowed different interpretations for the situations found. Among them, it can be cited the existence of a database with sub-notifications of appointments and procedures or even the absence of demand and/or supply for those within the municipalities researched. It is suggested the improvement of the mechanisms available for the analysis of primary health care services, which will enable the outlining of possible workflows, trajectories and therapeutic itineraries of users as well as the unveiling of likely local disparities regarding health.

  5. [The role of cultural identities and public health services in the municipalization process taken place in recent decades on small towns of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mejía, Margarita Gaviria; Périco, Eduardo; Oliveira, Laura Barbieri

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents a preliminary results of an ethnographic study in which we observe how is socially experienced the municipality process in six counties of the Forqueta Watershed in Rio Grande do Sul, where the municipal fragmentation has been used as an administrative strategy since the 1990s. Deal about cultural elements and social actions that support construction and/or reconstruction identities to define territories-county's borders. Sociological and anthropological theories have been used to think the identities and the assumption that the integration of social spaces into a territory creates the social necessity to produce a territorial identity, closely linked to a socio-political context and cultural setting. We realize that the decentralization process in small municipalities helps stem the rural exodus, being health services determinant in curbing the migratory flow that characterized these locations reality in recent decades as a result of the agribusiness growth. Today, in these same places, health services represent the main support of collective identity with the territory-county and, instead of emigration, stimulate the immigration. PMID:26017964

  6. Seroprevalence of Brucella ovis in rams and associated flock level risk factors in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, G; Santos, D V; Kohek, I; Stein, M C; Hein, H E; Poeta, A S; Vidor, A C M; Corbellini, L G

    2015-09-01

    A cross-sectional study based on a planned probabilistic sampling was carried out to estimate animal and flock prevalence of Brucella ovis in rams, as well as to determine risk factors at the flock level. Data regarding the flocks were collected by means of a questionnaire applied on 705 farms in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, using one-stage cluster sampling. From the 705 flocks, 20 (2.5%, CI95%: 2.0-3.1%) had at least one positive ram. At the animal level, out of 1800 rams, 52 were positive (2.89%, CI95%: 0.4-5.3%). Statistical analysis identified the following as risk factors: average age of rams in the flocks (PR: 1.99, CI95%: 1.19-3.32); farms larger than 5 km(2) (500 ha) on extension area (PR: 7.46CI95%: 2.03-27.43); and the lack of lambing paddocks (PR: 5.56, CI95%: 1.70-18.11). This study provided relevant information for authorities to elaborate plans for the first Brazilian state based B. ovis disease control and eradication program. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study that shows the importance of lambing paddocks in order to keep pre-lambing and lambing ewes away from the rest of the flock, the lack of this infrastructure was considered an important risk factor for B. ovis.

  7. [The role of cultural identities and public health services in the municipalization process taken place in recent decades on small towns of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mejía, Margarita Gaviria; Périco, Eduardo; Oliveira, Laura Barbieri

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents a preliminary results of an ethnographic study in which we observe how is socially experienced the municipality process in six counties of the Forqueta Watershed in Rio Grande do Sul, where the municipal fragmentation has been used as an administrative strategy since the 1990s. Deal about cultural elements and social actions that support construction and/or reconstruction identities to define territories-county's borders. Sociological and anthropological theories have been used to think the identities and the assumption that the integration of social spaces into a territory creates the social necessity to produce a territorial identity, closely linked to a socio-political context and cultural setting. We realize that the decentralization process in small municipalities helps stem the rural exodus, being health services determinant in curbing the migratory flow that characterized these locations reality in recent decades as a result of the agribusiness growth. Today, in these same places, health services represent the main support of collective identity with the territory-county and, instead of emigration, stimulate the immigration.

  8. Identifying buried segments of active faults in the northern Rio Grande Rift using aeromagnetic, LiDAR,and gravity data, south-central Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, Cal; Grauch, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    Combined interpretation of aeromagnetic and LiDAR data builds on the strength of the aeromagnetic method to locate normal faults with significant offset under cover and the strength of LiDAR interpretation to identify the age and sense of motion of faults. Each data set helps resolve ambiguities in interpreting the other. In addition, gravity data can be used to infer the sense of motion for totally buried faults inferred solely from aeromagnetic data. Combined interpretation to identify active faults at the northern end of the San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift has confirmed general aspects of previous geologic mapping but has also provided significant improvements. The interpretation revises and extends mapped fault traces, confirms tectonic versus fluvial origins of steep stream banks, and gains additional information on the nature of active and potentially active partially and totally buried faults. Detailed morphology of surfaces mapped from the LiDAR data helps constrain ages of the faults that displace the deposits. The aeromagnetic data provide additional information about their extents in between discontinuous scarps and suggest that several totally buried, potentially active faults are present on both sides of the valley.

  9. Haemoglobin Porto Alegre in a Cuban family.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, G; Lima, F; Wade, M; Estrada, M; Colombo, B; Heredero, L; Granda, H

    1977-01-01

    During a screening programme for abnormal haemoglobins in Habana, one case of Hb Porto Alegre was found in 23 000 cases analysed. The ability of this variant to polymerise in vitro and the absence of clinical features in the carriers have been confirmed. These observations are now explained by the findings of high levels of glutathione in the red cells of subjects heterozygous for Hb Porto Alegre: it is suggested that the increase of glutathione is responsible for the absence of in vivo polymerisation and accounts for the lack of clinical symptoms. Images PMID:604493

  10. Interdisciplinary approach to the ecological status assessment of Rio Quequén Grande watershed in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruggi, L. B.; Caporali, E.; Sala, S.; Kristensen, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Río Quequén Grande (RQG) watershed is located in the southeast section of Buenos Aires province, in Argentina, and it has an area of about 9.940 km2. The RQG outflows into the Atlantic Ocean, near the city of Necochea and it is a representative example of Argentinean River that drains the flat pampas of the region. The region is very important from a social and economical point of view, it is in fact characterized by intense agricultural activity and it is part of one of the most productive plain in the world. In spite of all that, the related environmental impacts, in this part of the world, are habitually faced studying specific aspects and using local measures, which often lead to the collapse of the living riverine systems. In this frame, the integration of all the available data, coupled with specific data from appropriate monitoring campaigns is proposed. Particularly geological, hydrological and geomorphological data are integrated with biological monitoring data for surface water quality assessment. Concepts like biotic integrity or ecological status are introduced to effectively protect and enhance water resources. The aim of the research is to recognize natural and anthropogenic spatial heterogeneity and to test methodologies for ecological status assessment of RQG watershed, integrating abiotic and biotic data together with all the available information. A dedicated Geographic Information System (GIS) is developed and an interdisciplinary approach is implemented. The watershed is characterized, using an integrated informative system of geological, geomorphological, sedimentological, hydrological, geochemical, land uses and biological information. Textural and geochemical river bed sediments data and water chemical parameters of the main tributaries and the main course were also monitored. Bankfull channel and caliche outcrops crossing the RQG channel were mapped and the fluvial cross sections were surveyed. The hydrological and hydraulic analyses

  11. Biologic and genetic comparison of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in free-range chickens from the northern Pará state and the southern state Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil revealed highly diverse and distinct parasite populations.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Sundar, N; Gennari, S M; Minervino, A H H; Farias, N A da R; Ruas, J L; dos Santos, T R B; Cavalcante, G T; Kwok, O C H; Su, C

    2007-01-31

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in 84 free-range chickens (34 from the northern Pará state, and 50 from Rio Grande do Sul, the southern state) from Brazil, South America was determined. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed by the modified agglutination test (MAT), and found in 39 (46.4%) of 84 chickens with titers of 1:10 in one, 1:20 in two, 1:40 in four, 1:80 in seven, 1:160 in five, 1:320 in six, 1:640 in eight and > or =1:1280 in six. Hearts and brains of 45 chickens with titers of 1:20 or less were pooled and fed to two T. gondii-free cats. Hearts and brains of 39 chickens with titers of 1:10 or higher were bioassayed in mice. Feces of cats were examined for oocysts. One cat fed tissues from 31 chickens with titers of less than 1:10 from Rio Grande do Sul shed T. gondii oocysts. T. gondii was isolated by bioassay in mice from 33 chickens with MAT titers of 1:20 or higher. All infected mice from 10 isolates died of toxoplasmosis. All 34 isolates (15 from Pará, 19 from Rio Grande do Sul) were genotyped using 11 genetic markers including SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, a new SAG2 and Apico. Eleven genotypes were revealed for Pará isolates and seven genotypes for Rio Grande do Sul. No genotype was shared between the two geographical locations. These data suggest that T. gondii isolates are highly diverse and genetically distinct between the two different regions in Brazil that are 3500 km apart.

  12. Villa Alegre Learning Guide: Series 500.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilingual Children's Television, Oakland, CA.

    This learning guide, covering the fifth series (26 shows) of the bilingual (Spanish/English) television series "Villa Alegre," provides a brief description of each show. Topics include: "Art All around Us"; "The Night Sky"; "Imaginary Friends"; "Sharing and Caring"; and "Why I Like Me." Each show is described according to: (1) general message; (2)…

  13. Villa Alegre Learning Guide: Series 300.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilingual Children's Television, Oakland, CA.

    This learning guide, covering the third series (65 shows) of the bilingual (Spanish/English) television series "Villa Alegre," describes its objectives and provides teaching materials drawn from each show for use as reinforcers for the concepts presented or as an adjunct to other educational activities. The content of the series is designed around…

  14. 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology, Isotope Geochemistry (Sr, Nd, Pb), and petrology of alkaline lavas near Yampa, Colorado: migration of alkaline volcanism and evolution of the northern Rio Grande rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, Michael A.; Thompson, Ren A.; Lee, John P.; Turner, Kenzie J.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Premo, Wayne R.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic rocks near Yampa, Colorado (USA), represent one of several small late Miocene to Quaternary alkaline volcanic fields along the northeast margin of the Colorado Plateau. Basanite, trachybasalt, and basalt collected from six sites within the Yampa volcanic field were investigated to assess correlations with late Cenozoic extension and Rio Grande rifting. In this paper we report major and trace element rock and mineral compositions and Ar, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data for these volcanic rocks. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology indicates westward migration of volcanism within the Yampa volcanic field between 6 and 4.5 Ma, and the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope values are consistent with a primary source in the Proterozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Relict olivine phenocrysts have Mg- and Ni-rich cores, whereas unmelted clinopyroxene cores are Na and Si enriched with finely banded Ca-, Mg-, Al-, and Ti-enriched rims, thus tracing their crystallization history from a lithospheric mantle source region to one in contact with melt prior to eruption. A regional synthesis of Neogene and younger volcanism within the Rio Grande rift corridor, from northern New Mexico to southern Wyoming, supports a systematic overall southwest migration of alkaline volcanism. We interpret this Neogene to Quaternary migration of volcanism toward the northeast margin of the Colorado Plateau to record passage of melt through subvertical zones within the lithosphere weakened by late Cenozoic extension. If the locus of Quaternary alkaline magmatism defines the current location of the Rio Grande rift, it includes the Leucite Hills, Wyoming. We suggest that alkaline volcanism in the incipient northern Rio Grande rift, north of Leadville, Colorado, represents melting of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle in response to transient infiltration of asthenospheric mantle into deep, subvertical zones of dilational crustal weakness developed during late Cenozoic extension that have been

  15. Variability of surface-water quantity and quality and shallow groundwater levels and quality within the Rio Grande Project Area, New Mexico and Texas, 2009–13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Jessica M.; Sherson, Lauren R.

    2016-03-15

    Drought conditions during the study period of January 1, 2009, to September 30, 2013, caused a reduction in surface-water releases from water-supply storage infrastructure of the Rio Grande Project, which led to changes in surface-water and groundwater (conjunctive) use in downstream agricultural alluvial valleys. Surface water and groundwater in the agriculturally dominated alluvial Rincon and Mesilla Valleys were investigated in this study to measure the influence of drought and subsequent change in conjunctive water use on quantity and quality of these water resources. In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Environment Department and the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, began a study to (1) calculate dissolved-solids loads over the study period at streamgages in the study area where data are available, (2) assess the temporal variability of dissolved-solids loads at and between each streamgage where data are available, and (3) relate the spatiotemporal variability of shallow groundwater data (groundwater levels and quality) within the alluvial valleys of the study area to spatiotemporal variability of surface-water data over the study period. This assessment included the calculation of surface-water dissolved-solids loads at streamgages as well as a mass-balance approach to measure the change in salt load between these streamgages. Bimodal surface-water discharge data led to a temporally-dynamic volumetric definition of release and nonrelease seasons. Continuous surface-water discharge and water-quality data from three streamgages on the Rio Grande were used to calculate daily dissolved-solids loads over the study period, and the results were aggregated annually and seasonally. Results show the majority of dissolved-solids loading occurs during release season; however, decreased duration of the release season over the 5-year study period has resulted in a decrease of the total annual loads at each streamgage

  16. Constructing a near-continuous suspended-sediment budget using acoustic instrumentation on the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. J.; Topping, D. J.; Griffiths, R. E.; Sabol, T. A.; Schmidt, J. C.; Bennett, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua and Coahuila, Mexico, is in disequilibrium. The river in this reach rapidly narrows during low-flow years, and widens during rare, large magnitude floods. One management strategy to improve in-channel habitat for the native ecosystem is to limit the rate and magnitude of channel narrowing during low-flow years through water releases from re-operated upstream dams. The proposed purpose of these dam re-operations is to maximize fine-sediment transport downstream, thereby limiting fine-sediment deposition and channel narrowing. This management strategy requires extensive knowledge of the quantity of fine-sediment supplied to the river channel, the predominant source areas of the supplied sediment, and the suspended-sediment transport dynamics over a range of flow magnitudes and durations. To address these issues, a near-continuous suspended-sediment monitoring program consisting of two suspended-sediment gages was established at two sites in Big Bend National Park, Texas. Suspended-sediment gages consist of two single-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler profilers that collect data at 15-minute intervals. Acoustic attenuation is used to calculate silt-and-clay concentration, and acoustic backscatter adjusted for silt-and-clay concentration is used to calculate sand concentration in two size classes. Acoustic attenuation and backscatter are calibrated using standard depth-integrated samples and cross-section-calibrated automatic pump samples. Two types of floods affect the sediment budgets of the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park, long-duration releases from upstream dams and short-duration flash floods originating in tributaries upstream or between the gages. Initial analyses of suspended-sediment dynamics during long-duration dam releases show that dam releases have the potential to export fine sediment from the national park reach. Dam releases transported approximately 8% of the total silt

  17. Crustal Velocity Structure of the Rio Grande Rift and Rocky Mountains from Local Earthquakes and Blasts Recorded by USArray and CREST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, J.; Sheehan, A. F.; Bilek, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Arrival times from over 3,100 earthquakes and 2,800 mine blasts recorded at USArray Transportable Array (TA) and other regional broadband seismic stations are inverted to find the regional P and S velocity structure in Colorado and New Mexico. Knowledge of the crustal structure in Colorado will help inform to what extent this structure and composition influences the isostatic compensation of high topography in the region. The relationship between the Rio Grande rift and the surrounding physiographic provinces remains enigmatic, and neither the geology nor geophysical surveys have clearly resolved the rift in Colorado. Therefore, tomography may supply more information about velocity variations along the rift within the context of the Colorado Plateau, the Great Plains, and the Rocky Mountains. Thus far, applications with the TA data to resolve P wave crustal structure are rare due to distant station spacing and small magnitude and shallow (mid to upper crustal) local earthquakes. The depths of the earthquakes range from 4 km to the mid-crust, so we expect dense ray coverage in the upper crust. In order to increase the number of crossing rays, we use mine blast P wave arrivals to constrain shallow surface structure. A total of 70,000 P wave arrivals and 18,000 S wave arrivals constitute the dataset. We develop a reliable 1D regional velocity model using 500 of the largest earthquakes with a fixed Vp/Vs ratio from the arrival data, then use this model as an input to investigate the feasibility of utilization of a 3D inversion algorithm. While use of a 3D inversion algorithm will be explored, constructi