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Sample records for alentejo soils surface

  1. Telemedicine in Alentejo.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago Cravo; Bayer, Steffen; Gonçalves, Luís; Barlow, James

    2014-01-01

    Alentejo covers a third of Portugal, yet it is home to only 5% of the population. Residents of the region are poorer, older, and less educated than the rest of the country. There is a shortage of physicians in several specialties. The low population density, a concentration of specialized services, and a poor public transportation network all create barriers to access. Telemedicine was introduced in 1998 to help address these challenges. In this article, we provide an overview of the program and its current status, focusing on infrastructure, services, and activity volume. We also discuss the impact the program has had from the perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals. From 1998 to 2011, there were 132,546 episodes of service using telemedicine, including real-time teleconsultations, teleradiology, teleultrasound, and telepathology. At present, the network includes 20 primary care units and five hospitals, covering almost 30,000 km(2) and 500,000 people. Units have high-resolution videoconferencing equipment, access to patients' clinical records, an image archive, and peripherals, such as electronic dermatoscopes and phonendoscopes. Teleconsultations are available in 15 medical specialties and areas, ranging from neurology to pediatric surgery. In 2008, regional health authorities started a tele-education program, and by the end of 2011, 876 healthcare professionals, across 52 locations, had participated in remote learning sessions. More than a decade since telemedicine was introduced in Alentejo, it is now an integral part of everyday service provision. A comprehensive assessment of the costs and consequences of the program is currently underway.

  2. Telemedicine in Alentejo

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Steffen; Gonçalves, Luís; Barlow, James

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alentejo covers a third of Portugal, yet it is home to only 5% of the population. Residents of the region are poorer, older, and less educated than the rest of the country. There is a shortage of physicians in several specialties. The low population density, a concentration of specialized services, and a poor public transportation network all create barriers to access. Telemedicine was introduced in 1998 to help address these challenges. In this article, we provide an overview of the program and its current status, focusing on infrastructure, services, and activity volume. We also discuss the impact the program has had from the perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals. From 1998 to 2011, there were 132,546 episodes of service using telemedicine, including real-time teleconsultations, teleradiology, teleultrasound, and telepathology. At present, the network includes 20 primary care units and five hospitals, covering almost 30,000 km2 and 500,000 people. Units have high-resolution videoconferencing equipment, access to patients' clinical records, an image archive, and peripherals, such as electronic dermatoscopes and phonendoscopes. Teleconsultations are available in 15 medical specialties and areas, ranging from neurology to pediatric surgery. In 2008, regional health authorities started a tele-education program, and by the end of 2011, 876 healthcare professionals, across 52 locations, had participated in remote learning sessions. More than a decade since telemedicine was introduced in Alentejo, it is now an integral part of everyday service provision. A comprehensive assessment of the costs and consequences of the program is currently underway. PMID:24180419

  3. Minerals and trace elements in silcretes of the Sado basin (Alentejo, southern Portugal) and implications for silcrete formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Kullmann, Sarah; Zarei, Mehdi; Stahr, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Soils in the eastern part of the Sado basin (southern Portugal) are often characterized by massive cementations caused by silica. The thickness and massive character of these silcretes led to the hypothesis that accumulation of silica took place not only vertically within a soil profile, but also by enrichment through lateral water and element flow into the Sado basin. The aims of the study reported here were: 1) to characterize the cementing agent with regard to its mineralogy; 2) to test the hypothesis that silification was enhanced through lateral silica transport from the adjacent Alto Alentejo into the Sado basin. Aim 1) was achieved by scratching silica coatings from ped surfaces of the silicified soil horizons and cleaning them manually in the lab under a binocular microscope. After careful smashing with a mortar, density separation by sodium polytungstate solution was applied to remove any remaining mineral grains from the silica samples. The cleaned silica samples were then subjected to XRD and SEM in combination with EDS. Aim 2) was attained by using trace element contents of predominant rock types of the Alto Alentejo and of the silcretes in the Sado basin for identifying lateral pathways of water and silica in the landscape. Ten rock samples from the assumed source area of silica were combusted by fusion melt, and their contents of Ba, Co, Cs, Nb, Pb, Rb, Sr, Y and Zr were analyzed by ICP-MS. The same elements were analyzed in NaOH extracts of the cemented soil horizons in the Sado basin. The X-ray diagrams of the silica coatings show the expected broad hump of amorphous silica. In addition, quartz, kaolinite, and surprisingly high amounts of halloysite are identified, the latter reflecting conditions of intensive weathering and pedogenesis during the formation of the silica coatings. This intensive soil formation and hence silification most likely took place during Pliocene. Greater age is impossible, because the silification took place in Pliocene

  4. Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture Using Fractal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen Chang; He, Chun Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    This study establishes the relationship between surface soil moisture and fractal dimension. The surface soil moisture is one of important factors in the hydrological cycle of surface evaporation. It could be used in many fields, such as reservoir management, early drought warning systems, irrigation scheduling and management, and crop yield estimations. Soil surface cracks due to dryness can be used to describe drought conditions. Soil cracking phenomenon and moisture have a certain relationship, thus this study makes used the fractal theory to interpret the soil moisture represented by soil cracks. The fractal dimension of surface soil cracking is a measure of the surface soil moisture. Therefore fractal dimensions can also be used to indicate how dry of the surface soil is. This study used the sediment in the Shimen Reservoir to establish the fractal dimension and soil moisture relation. The soil cracking is created under the control of temperature and thickness of surface soil layers. The results show the increase in fractal dimensions is accompanied by a decreases in surface soil moisture. However the fractal dimensions will approach a constant even the soil moisture continually decreases. The sigmoid function is used to fit the relation of fractal dimensions and surface soil moistures. The proposed method can be successfully applied to estimate surface soil moisture. Only a photo taken from the field is needed and is sufficient to provide the fractal dimension. Consequently, the surface soil moisture can be estimated quickly and accurately.

  5. Evaporation from heterogeneous soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

    2009-04-01

    Evaporation rate is a key process of water exchange between soil surfaces and atmosphere and is controlled by both atmospheric demand and soil hydraulic properties. Initially high evaporation rates are sustained by capillary-induced water flow from receding drying front to evaporating surface. In heterogeneous soils air invades preferentially coarse-textured regions whereas fine textured surface regions remain water saturated. We investigated experimentally and numerically effects of hydraulic coupling on drying rate of heterogeneous porous media. Laboratory experiments with vertical contrasts between fine (0.1-0.5 mm) and coarse sand (0.3-0.9 mm) showed that the period of high drying rate was extended compared to evaporation from homogeneous materials. Water flow from coarse material to supply water evaporated from fine textured surface was monitored by neutron radiography imaging. Due to the high hydraulic conductivity of the coarse material the viscous head loss could be neglected for flow distances analyzed in the experiments (< 600 mm). We proposed a model to explore effects of hydraulic coupling on evaporation for a wide range of soil textural classes at plot scale. When the drying front in the coarse reaches a certain characteristic depth (defined by the pore size distribution) no water evaporates from the coarse surface, yet, subsurface flow from coarse to the fine textured inclusion persists and feeds enhanced evaporation rate. Assuming energy input was not limiting, evaporation from the fine textured inclusion may increase to compensate reduction of evaporating surface. For loam or silt as inclusion in sandy material, water was extracted from regions with more than 10 m in distance before flow was limited by viscous effects. In case of clay inclusions the radius of water extraction was smaller due to enhanced viscous resistance. The findings of the numerical study can be applied as well to assess the effect of shrubs or compacted trafficked zones on the

  6. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints.

  7. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints. PMID:26613514

  8. Characteristic variations in reflectance of surface soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Surface soil samples from a wide range of naturally occurring soils were obtained for the purpose of studying the characteristic variations in soil reflectance as these variations relate to other soil properties and soil classification. A total 485 soil samples from the U.S. and Brazil representing 30 suborders of the 10 orders of 'Soil Taxonomy' was examined. The spectral bidirectional reflectance factor was measured on uniformly moist soils over the 0.52 to 2.32 micron wavelength range with a spectroradiometer adapted for indoor use. Five distinct soil spectral reflectance curve forms were identified according to curve shape, the presence or absence of absorption bands, and the predominance of soil organic matter and iron oxide composition. These curve forms were further characterized according to generically homogeneous soil properties in a manner similar to the subdivisions at the suborder level of 'Soil Taxonomy'. Results indicate that spectroradiometric measurements of soil spectral bidirectional reflectance factor can be used to characterize soil reflectance in terms that are meaningful to soil classification, genesis, and survey.

  9. Soil Hydrophobicity in Andisol under Soil Surface Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchi, Atsuko; Mizoguchi, Masaru; Nishimura, Taku; Imoto, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    Soil is known to exhibit hydrophobic properties after a forest fire. Experiments conducted by DeBano et al., (1976) showed that the organic compounds in the soil become volatized under high-temperatures, move downward along the soil temperature gradient, and form a hydrophobic layer deep within the soil profile. However, less is known about effects of oxygen atmosphere on morphological changes of organic matter in soil. In this study, we sought to clarify the increase in soil hydrophobicity as well as the changes in carbon and nitrogen content in response to heating of the ground surface in the field and both column and muffle furnace heating in the laboratory. In the muffle furnace burning, soil samples heated under oxygen-deprived conditions exhibited similar carbon and nitrogen dynamics and increased hydrophobicity with temperatures those observed in the field and column experiments. Soil samples under oxygen-deprived condition showed hydrophobicity and some carbon content by heating with 300°C and higher, while almost no carbon remained after heating with 400°C under oxygen available condition. Soil C/N ratio increased by heating with higher temperature under oxygen-deprived condition. Results suggested limited supply of oxygen might have an effect to produce soil hydrophobicity under soil surface burning.

  10. Mapping and classification of geoforms in the Serra de Grândola (Alentejo, South West, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto Paixão, Helena M.; Granja Martins, Fernando M.; Zavala, Lorena M.; Jordán, Antonio; Pereira, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    The study of geomorphic processes is the starting point for development and sustainable land management. These processes may cause risks that represent threats to environment, population and human activities. So, studying its genesis is important to find tools that can mitigate threats. In the last few decades, geographic information systems (GIS) have become an essential tool for environmental management. The integration of digital terrain models in GIS has contributed to improve environmental studies and knowledge, as they are a support for modelling geoforms (terrain units resulting from climate and other natural processes and their interactions with the Earth's surface). In this research, geoforms from the Serra de Grândola area (Alentejo, South West, Portugal) are classified according to the most important physical and structural differences. The methodology is based on the Hammond's hierarchical criteria and in the geographical information related to soft-slopes, local relief and terrain profiles.

  11. The surface area of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Lee, J.-F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The previously reported surface area for soil organic matter (SOM) of 560-800 m2/g as determined by the ethylene glycol (EG) retention method was reexamined by the standard BET method based on nitrogen adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. Test samples consisted of two high organic content soils, a freeze-dried soil humic acid, and an oven-dried soil humic acid. The measured BET areas for these samples were less than 1 m2/g, except for the freeze-dried humic acid. The results suggest that surface adsorption of nonionic organic compounds by SOM is practically insignificant in comparison to uptake by partition. The discrepancy between the surface areas of SOM obtained by BET and EG methods was explained in terms of the 'free surface area' and the 'apparent surface area' associated with these measurements.The previously reported surface area for soil organic matter (SOM) of 560-800 m2/g as determined by the ethylene glycol (EG) retention method was reexamined by the standard BET method based on nitrogen adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. Test samples consisted of two high organic content soils, a freeze-dried soil humic acid, and an oven-dried soil humic acid. The measured BET areas for these samples were less than 1 m2/g, except for the freeze-dried humic acid. The results suggest that surface adsorption of nonionic organic compounds by SOM is practically insignificant in comparison to uptake by partition. The discrepancy between the surface areas of SOM obtained by BET and EG methods was explained in terms of the 'free surface area' and the 'apparent surface area' associated with these measurements.

  12. Pattern Effects of Soil on Photovoltaic Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burton, Patrick D.; Hendrickson, Alex; Ulibarri, Stephen Seth; Riley, Daniel; Boyson, William E.; King, Bruce H.

    2016-06-06

    The texture or patterning of soil on PV surfaces may influence light capture at various angles of incidence (AOI). Accumulated soil can be considered a microshading element, which changes with respect to AOI. Laboratory deposition of simulated soil was used to prepare test coupons for simultaneous AOI and soiling loss experiments. A mixed solvent deposition technique was used to consistently deposit patterned test soils onto glass slides. Transmission decreased as soil loading and AOI increased. Dense aggregates significantly decreased transmission. But, highly dispersed particles are less prone to secondary scattering, improving overall light collection. In order to test AOI losses on relevant systems, uniform simulated soil coatings were applied to split reference cells to further examine this effect. Finally, the measured optical transmission and area coverage correlated closely to the observedmore » $$I_{{rm SC}}$$. Angular losses were significant at angles as low as 25°.« less

  13. Lunar soil and surface processes studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. P.

    1975-01-01

    Glass particles in lunar soil were characterized and compared to terrestrial analogues. In addition, useful information was obtained concerning the nature of lunar surface processes (e.g. volcanism and impact), maturity of soils and chemistry and heterogeneity of lunar surface material. It is felt, however, that the most important result of the study was that it demonstrated that the investigation of glass particles from the regolith of planetary bodies with little or no atmospheres can be a powerful method for learning about the surface processes and chemistry of planetary surfaces. Thus, the return of samples from other planetary bodies (especially the terrestrial planets and asteroids) using unmanned spacecraft is urged.

  14. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m-2 s-1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm-2 s-1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  15. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m‑2 s‑1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm‑2 s‑1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  16. BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological remediation of soils contaminated with organic chemicals is an alternative treatment technology that can often meet the goal of achieving a permanent clean-up remedy at hazardous waste sites, as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) for impl...

  17. Acoustic techniques for studying soil-surface seals and crusts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of raindrops on a soil surface during a rainstorm may cause soil-surface sealing and upon drying, soil crusting. Soil-surface sealing is a result of the clogging of interaggregate pores by smaller suspended particles in the water and by structural deformation of the soil fabric, which red...

  18. Soil Surface Roughness through Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Valencia, J. L.; Moratiel, R.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.; Agro-Environmental Modeling

    2011-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon involving the detachment and transport of soil particles, storage and runoff of rainwater, and infiltration. The relative magnitude and importance of these processes depends on several factors being one of them surface micro-topography, usually quantified trough soil surface roughness (SSR). SSR greatly affects surface sealing and runoff generation, yet little information is available about the effect of roughness on the spatial distribution of runoff and on flow concentration. The methods commonly used to measure SSR involve measuring point elevation using a pin roughness meter or laser, both of which are labor intensive and expensive. Lately a simple and inexpensive technique based on percentage of shadow in soil surface image has been developed to determine SSR in the field in order to obtain measurement for wide spread application. One of the first steps in this technique is image de-noising and thresholding to estimate the percentage of black pixels in the studied area. In this work, a series of soil surface images have been analyzed applying several de-noising wavelet analysis and thresholding algorithms to study the variation in percentage of shadows and the shadows size distribution. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010- 21501/AGR and by Xunta de Galicia through project no INCITE08PXIB1621 are greatly appreciated.

  19. Some surface properties of Apollo 17 soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Gammage, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The surface chemistry of Apollo 17 lunar fines samples 74220 (the orange soil) and 74241 (the gray control soil) has been studied by measuring the adsorption of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen (all at -196 C) and also water vapor (at 20 C or 22 C). In agreement with results for samples from other missions, both samples had low initial specific surface areas, consisted of nonporous particles, and were attacked by water vapor at high relative pressures to give an increased specific surface area and create a pore system which gave rise to a capillary condensation hysteresis loop in the adsorption isotherms. In contrast to previous samples, both of the Apollo 17 soils were partially hydrophobic in their initial interaction with water vapor (both samples were completely hydrophilic after the reaction with water). The results are consistent with formation at high temperatures without subsequent exposure to significant amounts of water.

  20. Cave-soils, the soils forming underneath the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Endre; Bertóti, Diána; Kovács, Károly; Vadnai, Péter

    2015-04-01

    Limestone cave sediments of the Bükk-mountain in the North-Eastern part of Hungary were described, analysed and classified using WRB soil classification system. Cave sediments can be considered as soils, partly on the basis of their origin, partly of processes taking place in them. Based on the results, it can be concluded that cave soils are often shallow, lying directly above the continuous rock. In general they are layered, with clearly distinct layers of alluvial origin. Their organic matter content depends on the nature of the sediment. They often contain considerable quantities of undecomposed organic sediment, acting as the basis for very intensive soil life, which can be detected in the soil structure and may in some cases result in Vermic characteristics. The texture is very variable, ranging from clay to rough gravelly sand. Almost 100% of the soils are calcareous, the lime content is of secondary origin and its amount is at least 2%. Therefore, the pH values fluctuate from neutral to 8.5, mostly having a value around 8. In rare cases gley formation also occurs, especially on poorly drained areas, where there is no water flow to refresh the dissolved oxygen content. In the "oxy-aquic" state, characterized by high dissolved oxygen content, the iron is not reduced, so gley formation is not induced. From pedological point of view, cave sediments show a very diverse picture. Besides sedimentary layers, numerous soil formation processes can be detected, which can be considered analogue with surface processes, therefore they definitely need to be classified as soils. According to all these, in the Hungarian classification cave soils are primarily classified as alluvial, colluvial or lithomorphic soils. The WRB classification places them mainly in the Fluvisol and Leptosol Reference Groups, and according to the soils examined in the present work, they can be described with the Leptic (Epileptic), Fluvic (in rare cases Colluvic), Vermic, Calcaric, Eutric, Gleyic

  1. Comprehensive soil surface characterisation by RADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Manuel; Gronz, Oliver; Beiske, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    The characteristics of the soil's surface have been revealed to be extremely relevant for soil surface processes. Texture, aggregates and roughness are interdependent across scales and have a strong influence on infiltration, runoff generation, water flow velocity as well as on particle detachment and transport. They also have shown to be relevant for splash detachment and initialisation of concentrated flow. But these soil surface characteristics are also highly variable during erosive events, and thus, their impact on the processes mentioned above may change. Therefore it is necessary to develop methods for a comprehensive and quantitative characterisation of the soils' surface across scales. Here, we present a first approach using a frequency modulated polarimetric radar to characterise different surfaces (from flat to rough in a scale of cm to dm size of the roughness elements) and of different materials (steel plates as strong reflector, sand [0.5-1 mm], fine [2-4 mm] and coarse [15-30 mm] rock fragments. The radar is a prototype built by IMST GmbH (Kamp-Lintfort, Germany), emitting on the 24 GHz band, allowing for a frequency modulation between 500 and 2500 MHz with variable ramp times. The emission is on a circular clockwise polarisation, whilst it is able to receive both, clockwise and counter-clockwise polarisations. We tested also the dependency of the reflected signals on imaging position and angle, as well as on the different emission parameters, such as amplitude modulation and ramp time. The results show that the angle of acquisition influences clearly the received signal intensity (in both polarisation directions). This implies the need to develop topographical corrections for further applications. In addition we could observe a significant influence of the device position on the results, which implies, on one hand, a high sensitivity relating to the soil's surface, but on the other hand it leads to a high level of uncertainty. The reflection

  2. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bircher, Simone; Andreasen, Mie; Vuollet, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zakharova, Elena; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Yann H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finnish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology (HOBE). For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in the literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified. For the Decagon 5TE, apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large specific surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger nonlinearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high-level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here-proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and

  3. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bircher, S.; Andreasen, M.; Vuollet, J.; Vehviläinen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Jonard, F.; Weihermüller, L.; Zakharova, E.; Wigneron, J.-P.; Kerr, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology HOBE. For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified: for the Decagon 5TE apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger non-linearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and HOBE sites are

  4. Surface Mining: Soil, Coal, and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. Fred

    Soil is a resource that is for all practical purposes nonrenewable. Natural soils have been formed over periods of thousands of years, although with intensive management and with inputs of nutrients and conditioners this time could be reduced.Coal is another precious resource, of critical importance as an interim fuel for perhaps the next hundred years or so, until renewable energy resources based on nuclear fusion or solar energy can become economic and widespread. Surface mining is the most efficient method for obtaining coal at lowest cost. But it disturbs the soil and takes it out of agricultural production for many years or decades, and sometimes forever, unless the land is properly restored at considerable cost.

  5. Soil erosion and surface runoff model SMODERP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, P.; Vrana, K.; Dostal, T.

    2012-04-01

    This contribution presents a software tool for calculation and prediction of soil erosion and surface runoff from agricultural lands. There is no universal tool to properly describe the origin and the processes related to the surface runoff and sediment transport in different scales. For a design of any technical erosion control measures, that are used to interrupt the surface runoff, it is necessary to identify basic outflow characteristics (discharge, flow volume). Numerical model SMODERP was developed for determination of these characteristics. The model is being developed at the Department of Irrigation, Drainage and Landscape Engineering , Civil Engineering Faculty, CTU in Prague. SMODERP is physically based one-dimensional episodic model that includes the processes of infiltration, surface retention, surface roughness and vegetation impact on runoff. The model has been substantially upgraded and tested in last few years. Especially runoff parameters, time and spatial discretisation were recalibrated and validated. Runoff parameters were recalibrated on the set of forty measurements performed on the laboratory rainfall simulator on five soil types. The parameters were designed for five soil types categories according to content of particles with size up to 0.01 mm (Novak soil classification). The precipitation episodes can be chosen from the attached catalogue or can be designed by a user. We also present how the input data can be obtained based on available resources (soil maps and data, land use, terrain models, field research, etc.) and how can be used in the assessment erosion risk and in designing of erosion control measures. The model is meant to be used not only for the research purposes, but mainly for the engineering practice. We present the new version of the model that includes a new user friendly graphical interface. The research has been supported by the research grants SGS SGS11/148/OHK1/3T/11 "Experimental Research on Rainfall-runoff and Erosion

  6. Estimation of soil moisture from diurnal surface temperature observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Camillo, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A coupled heat and moisture balance model was used to determine the thermal inertia of a grass covered top soil under different meteorological conditions. Relations between thermal inertia and soil moisture were established using the De Vries models for thermal conductivity and heat capacity to relate soil moisture and thermal inertia as a function of soil type. A sensitivity study of the surface roughness length and thermal inertia on diurnal surface temperature shows the necessity of focusing on the night time surface temperature rather than on the day time surface temperature, in order to estimate the soil moisture content of the top soil.

  7. Turbulence-induced thermal signatures over evaporating bare soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-07-01

    Soil wetness and airflow turbulence are key factors affecting surface energy balance components thereby influencing surface skin temperature. Turbulent eddies interacting with evaporating surfaces often induce localized and intermittent evaporative and sensible heat fluxes that leave distinct thermal signatures. These surface thermal fluctuations observable by infrared thermography (IRT) offer a means for characterization of overlaying turbulent airflows and remote quantification of surface wetness. We developed a theoretical and experimental methodology for using rapid IR surface temperature measurements to deduce surface wetness and evaporative fluxes from smooth bare soils. The mechanistic model provides theoretical links between surface thermal fluctuations, soil, and aerodynamic properties enabling thermal inferences of soil wetness with explicit consideration of soil thermal capacity and airflow turbulence effects. The method potentially improves accuracy of soil wetness assessment by IRT-based techniques whose performance is strongly influenced by surface-turbulence interactions and offers new ways for quantifying fluxes directly at their origin.

  8. Minimizing Emissions From Soil Fumigation By Surface Seal Methods.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is an important management practice for controlling soil pests in many high value crops. Reducing atmospheric emissions can minimize the impact of soil fumigation on the environment. Water seals (sprinkling water on the soil surface) to reduce fumigant emissions is more cost-effecti...

  9. Monitoring endosulfan in surface soil across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, H.; Liu, L.; Tian, C.; Li, Y.-F.

    2009-04-01

    Endosulfan, as a mixture of α- and β-endosulfan, is a cyclodiene insecticide that is still extensively used worldwide. Endosulfan was classified by the US Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants, and is a candidate as one of new persistent organic pollutants under the Stockholm Convention. Concentrations of endosulfan (including α-, β-isomer and their metabolite endosulfan sulfate) in Chinese surface soils are reported from 92 sites (70 for rural and 22 for urban) across China in 2005. The mean concentrations (pg/g dry weight (dw)) were in the sequence of endosulfan sulfate (363 ± 1534) > β-endoslfan (105 ± 539) > α-endosulfan (39 ± 252), which is consistent with persistence of these compounds in soil. The highest concentration of total endosulfan (13,203 pg/g dw) was found at an rural site in eastern China. High concentrations in some urban sites suggested the local endosulfan use in these cities, most likely on the vegetable land. Endosulfan soil residue inventories in China from 1995 to 2004 with 1/4 °Ã- 1/6 ° longitude and latitude resolution by using Simplified Gridded Emission and Residue Model (SGERM) have been developed in our group. The measured soil concentration data for α- and β-endosulfan at the 92 monitoring sites for 2005 were compared to their corresponding modeled concentration data for 2004 and a good consistence was found. First, one-way analysis (ANOVA) was made to address the possible difference between monitoring and modeling data for both α- and β-endosulfan respectively, and the results show that, at the 0.05 level, no significantly differences were found between them. Secondly, regression analysis between the monitoring and modeled data indicated the good correlations with R = 0.75 for β-endosulfan and a weak correlation with R = 0.19 for α-endosulfan, which is expected since β-endosulfan is much more persistent in soil than α-endosulfan, thus much smaller variation of concentrations in soil

  10. Grass mulching effect on infiltration, surface runoff and soil loss of three agricultural soils in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adekalu, K O; Olorunfemi, I A; Osunbitan, J A

    2007-03-01

    Mulching the soil surface with a layer of plant residue is an effective method of conserving water and soil because it reduces surface runoff, increases infiltration of water into the soil and retard soil erosion. The effectiveness of using elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) as mulching material was evaluated in the laboratory using a rainfall simulator set at rainfall intensities typical of the tropics. Six soil samples, two from each of the three major soil series representing the main agricultural soils in South Western Nigeria were collected, placed on three different slopes, and mulched with different rates of the grass. The surface runoff, soil loss, and apparent cumulative infiltration were then measured under each condition. The results with elephant grass compared favorably with results from previous experiments using rice straw. Runoff and soil loss decreased with the amount of mulch used and increased with slope. Surface runoff, infiltration and soil loss had high correlations (R = 0.90, 0.89, and 0.86, respectively) with slope and mulch cover using surface response analysis. The mean surface runoff was correlated negatively with sand content, while mean soil loss was correlated positively with colloidal content (clay and organic matter) of the soil. Infiltration was increased and soil loss was reduced greatly with the highest cover. Mulching the soils with elephant grass residue may benefit late cropping (second cropping) by increasing stored soil water for use during dry weather and help to reduce erosion on sloping land.

  11. Phosphorus Release to Floodwater from Calcareous Surface Soils and Their Corresponding Subsurface Soils under Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jayarathne, P D K D; Kumaragamage, D; Indraratne, S; Flaten, D; Goltz, D

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced phosphorus (P) release from soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions has been well documented for noncalcareous and surface soils, but little information is available for calcareous and subsurface soils. We compared the magnitude of P released from 12 calcareous surface soils and corresponding subsurface soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions and examined the reasons for the differences. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm) soils were packed into vessels and flooded for 8 wk. Soil redox potential and concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and total dissolved Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn in floodwater and pore water were measured weekly. Soil test P was significantly smaller in subsurface soils than in corresponding surface soils; thus, the P release to floodwater from subsurface soils was significantly less than from corresponding surface soils. Under anaerobic conditions, floodwater DRP concentration significantly increased in >80% of calcareous surface soils and in about 40% of subsurface soils. The increase in floodwater DRP concentration was 2- to 17-fold in surface soils but only 4- to 7-fold in subsurface soils. With time of flooding, molar ratios of Ca/P and Mg/P in floodwater increased, whereas Fe/P and Mn/P decreased, suggesting that resorption and/or reprecipitation of P took place involving Fe and Mn. Results indicate that P release to floodwater under anaerobic conditions was enhanced in most calcareous soils. Surface and subsurface calcareous soils in general behaved similarly in releasing P under flooded, anaerobic conditions, with concentrations released mainly governed by initial soil P concentrations. PMID:27380087

  12. Quantification of soil surface roughness evolution under simulated rainfall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness is commonly identified as one of the dominant factors governing runoff and interrill erosion. The objective of this study was to compare several existing soil surface roughness indices and to test the Revised Triangular Prism surface area Method (RTPM) as a new approach to cal...

  13. The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

  14. Provenance of upper Triassic sandstone, southwest Iberia (Alentejo and Algarve basins): tracing variability in the sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. F.; Ribeiro, C.; Gama, C.; Drost, K.; Chichorro, M.; Vilallonga, F.; Hofmann, M.; Linnemann, U.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS U-Pb analyses have been conducted on detrital zircon of Upper Triassic sandstone from the Alentejo and Algarve basins in southwest Iberia. The predominance of Neoproterozoic, Devonian, Paleoproterozoic and Carboniferous detrital zircon ages confirms previous studies that indicate the locus of the sediment source of the late Triassic Alentejo Basin in the pre-Mesozoic basement of the South Portuguese and Ossa-Morena zones. Suitable sources for the Upper Triassic Algarve sandstone are the Upper Devonian-Lower Carboniferous of the South Portuguese Zone (Phyllite-Quartzite and Tercenas formations) and the Meguma Terrane (present-day in Nova Scotia). Spatial variations of the sediment sources of both Upper Triassic basins suggest a more complex history of drainage than previously documented involving other source rocks located outside present-day Iberia. The two Triassic basins were isolated from each other with the detrital transport being controlled by two independent drainage systems. This study is important for the reconstruction of the late Triassic paleogeography in a place where, later, the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean took place separating Europe from North America.

  15. Soil remediation by surface heating and vacuum extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemeir, G.L.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1995-12-01

    A novel in-situ, thermal-vacuum method has been developed to remove contaminants from near-surface soils and pavements. Heat is supplied to the soil by downward conduction from a surface heater. Vaporized products are collected under an impermeable sheet into a vacuum system for further treatment or disposal.

  16. Soil and Surface Runoff Phosphorus Relationships for Five Typical USA Midwest Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessively high soil P can increase P loss with surface runoff. This study used indoor rainfall simulations to characterize soil and runoff P relationships for five Midwest soils (Argiudoll, Calciaquaoll, Hapludalf, and two Hapludolls). Topsoil (15-cm depth, 241–289 g clay kg–1 and pH 6.0–8.0) was ...

  17. A Bayesian Approach to the Orientations of Central Alentejo Megalithic Enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, Fernando; Tirapicos, Luís; Smith, Andrew

    2009-12-01

    In this work we have conducted a study on the orientations in the landscape of twelve megalithic enclosures in the Alentejo region of southern Portugal. Some of these sites date back to the sixth or fifth millennium B.C. and are among the oldest stone enclosures in Europe. The results of the survey show a pattern toward eastern rising orientations. We used dedicated GIS software from one of the authors to produce horizon profiles and applied a statistical Bayesian approach in an attempt to check how the data would fit to different models. In particular, we tested our results for a possible ritual interest in the Autumn or Harvest Full Moon and discuss previous studies by Michael Hoskin and colleges on the orientations of seven stone dolmens of this area that have shown the existence of a possible custom for an orientation toward the sunrise.

  18. Biochar Amendment to the Soil Surface Reduces Fumigant Emissions and Enhances Soil Microorganism Recovery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guoqing; Ashworth, Daniel J; Gan, Jay; Yates, Scott R

    2016-02-01

    During soil fumigation, it is ideal to mitigate soil fumigant emissions, ensure pest control efficacy, and speed up the recovery of the soil microorganism population established postapplication. However, no current fumigant emission reduction strategy can meet all these requirements. In the present study, replicated soil columns were used to study the effect of biochar derived from rice husk (BR) and green waste (BG) applied to the soil surface on 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) emissions and soil gas distribution, and on microorganism population re-establishment. Relative to fumigated bare soil (no emission reduction strategy), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) treatments, BR gave dramatic emission reductions for both fumigants with no obvious emission peak, whereas BG was very effective only for 1,3-D. With BR application, the concentration of fumigant in the soil gas was higher than in the bare soil and ATS treatment. After the soil column experiment, mixing the BR with the fumigated soil resulted in higher soil respiration rates than were observed for HDPE and ATS treatments. Therefore, biochar amendment to the soil surface may be an effective strategy for fumigant emission reduction and the recovery of soil microorganism populations established postapplication. PMID:26726779

  19. Biochar Amendment to the Soil Surface Reduces Fumigant Emissions and Enhances Soil Microorganism Recovery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guoqing; Ashworth, Daniel J; Gan, Jay; Yates, Scott R

    2016-02-01

    During soil fumigation, it is ideal to mitigate soil fumigant emissions, ensure pest control efficacy, and speed up the recovery of the soil microorganism population established postapplication. However, no current fumigant emission reduction strategy can meet all these requirements. In the present study, replicated soil columns were used to study the effect of biochar derived from rice husk (BR) and green waste (BG) applied to the soil surface on 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) emissions and soil gas distribution, and on microorganism population re-establishment. Relative to fumigated bare soil (no emission reduction strategy), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) treatments, BR gave dramatic emission reductions for both fumigants with no obvious emission peak, whereas BG was very effective only for 1,3-D. With BR application, the concentration of fumigant in the soil gas was higher than in the bare soil and ATS treatment. After the soil column experiment, mixing the BR with the fumigated soil resulted in higher soil respiration rates than were observed for HDPE and ATS treatments. Therefore, biochar amendment to the soil surface may be an effective strategy for fumigant emission reduction and the recovery of soil microorganism populations established postapplication.

  20. Soil surface CO2 fluxes on the Konza Prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Garcia, R.; Verma, Shoshi B.

    1990-01-01

    The utilization of a soil chamber to measure fluxes of soil-surface CO2 fluxes is described in terms of equipment, analytical methods, and estimate quality. A soil chamber attached to a gas-exchange system measures the fluxes every 5-15 min, and the data are compared to measurements of the CO2 fluxes from the canopy and from the soil + canopy. The soil chamber yields good measurements when operated in a closed system that is ported to the free atmosphere, and the CO2 flux is found to have a diurnal component.

  1. Mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W. )

    1989-12-01

    Radionuclide-bearing soil particles on plant surfaces can be ingested and contribute to human dose, but evaluating the potential dose is limited by the relatively few data available on the masses of soil particles present on plant surfaces. This report summarizes mass loading data (i.e., mass of soil per unit of vegetation) for crops in the southeastern United States and compares these data to (1) those from other regions and (2) the mass loadings used in radionuclide transfer models to predict soil contamination of plant surfaces. Mass loadings were estimated using the 238Pu content of crops as an indicator of soil on plant surfaces. Crops were grown in two soils: a sandy clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil. Concentrations of soil on southeastern crops (i.e., mg soil g-1 plant) differed by more than a factor of 100 due to differences in crop growth form and biomass. Mean concentrations ranged from 1.7 mg g-1 for corn to 260 mg g-1 for lettuce. Differences in mass loadings between soils were less than those among crops. Concentrations differed by less than a factor of two between the two soil types. Because of (1) the differences among crops and (2) the limited data available from other systems, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding regional or climatic variation in mass loadings. There is, however, little evidence to suggest large differences among regions. The mass loadings used to predict soil contamination in current radionuclide transfer models appear to be less than those observed for most crops.

  2. Soil Surface Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Soil Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkebauer, T. J.; Billesbach, D.

    2006-12-01

    We have been monitoring soil surface CO2 fluxes at three AmeriFlux sites in eastern Nebraska for several years. Recently, we have installed soil CO2 sensors at the rainfed soybean site in order to obtain profiles of CO2 concentrations in soil air (to 0.8 m depth). Supporting data include profiles of soil water content and soil temperature, aboveground biomass, leaf area index and precipitation. Soil surface fluxes had been rather small for much of the 2006 growing season (e.g., midday values of about 5 umol/m2/s) due, in large part, to the very dry conditions in eastern Nebraska and the consequent low soil water contents. However, copious rainfall in August raised soil water contents to field capacity throughout the profile. Soil air CO2 concentrations during this period also increased and reached peaks near 10% (at 0.4 and 0.8 m depth). Through analyses of relationships between surface CO2 flux and profiles of soil parameters we seek to identify biophysical factors responsible for controlling surface fluxes as well as to begin to quantify sources and sinks of CO2 within the soil profile (e.g., plant-related production of CO2 due to root exudation and respiration). The influence of precipitation events on CO2 profiles and fluxes is of particular interest.

  3. Visually assessing the level of development and soil surface stability of cyanobacterially dominated biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Witwicki, D.L.; Miller, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an integral part of dryland ecosystems and often included in long-term ecological monitoring programs. Estimating moss and lichen cover is fairly easy and non-destructive, but documenting cyanobacterial level of development (LOD) is more difficult. It requires sample collection for laboratory analysis, which causes soil surface disturbance. Assessing soil surface stability also requires surface disturbance. Here we present a visual technique to assess cyanobacterial LOD and soil surface stability. We define six development levels of cyanobacterially dominated soils based on soil surface darkness. We sampled chlorophyll a concentrations (the most common way of assessing cyanobacterial biomass), exopolysaccharide concentrations, and soil surface aggregate stability from representative areas of each LOD class. We found that, in the laboratory and field, LOD classes were effective at predicting chlorophyll a soil concentrations (R2=68-81%), exopolysaccharide concentrations (R2=71%), and soil aggregate stability (R2=77%). We took representative photos of these classes to construct a field guide. We then tested the ability of field crews to distinguish these classes and found this technique was highly repeatable among observers. We also discuss how to adjust this index for the different types of BSCs found in various dryland regions.

  4. Liquid Spills on Permeable Soil Surfaces: Experimental Confirmations

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.

    2005-09-29

    Predictive tools for assessing the quantity of a spill on a soil from the observed spreading area could contribute to improving remediation when it is necessary. On a permeable soil, the visible spill area only hints about the amount of liquid that might reside below the surface. An understanding of the physical phenomena involved with spill propagation on a soil surface is key to assessing the liquid amount possibly present beneath the surface. The objective of this study is an improved prediction capability for spill behavior.

  5. Soil Surface Structure: A key factor for the degree of soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.; Bryant, R.; Hamlett, C.; McHale, G.; Newton, M.; Shirtcliffe, N.

    2012-04-01

    Despite of considerable efforts, the degree of water repellency has not always been fully explained by chemical property of soil (termed hydrophobicity). That might be because the structure of a soil surface was not considered properly, which is another main factor determining the severity of soil water repellency. Surface structure has only recently been considered in soil science, whilst it has been paid attention for several decades in materials science due to its relevance to industrial applications. In this contribution, comparison of critical contact angles measured on different surface structures (made with glass beads, glass shards and beach sands) is presented and the effect of surface structure on manifestation of soil water repellency is discussed in terms of several different variables such as the individual particles shape, and areal and structural factors of the actual surface.

  6. [Investigation of polarization characteristics of soil surface with low vegetation cover and different soil moisture].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Xiao-bing; Hong, Jin

    2010-11-01

    Compared with the spectral detection method, polarization detection could obtain more information of the target. For example, the polarization detection could be applied to interpret the refractive index and the surface roughness of the object, or retrieve the soil moisture, etc. Polarization detection provides a new approach to quantitative retrieval of soil moisture, and this is very important in agriculture, hydrology, meteorology and ecology. The polarization characteristics of soil surface with low vegetation cover,which is a example of mixed pixel in remote sensing, were researched with experiments, and the relationship between the polarization characteristics and soil moisture was also explored. The results showed that the polarization characteristics of soil surface with low vegetation cover are mainly determined by the area of bare soil, and are strongly relevant with the soil moisture. For the results of experiments in this paper, the IDOLP of soil surface with low vegetation cover increased with increasing soil moisture when the viewing angle of instrument was between 20 degree and 60 degree, while the incident angle of light source was fixed at 40 degree. This paper offered a new method to retrieve moisture content of soil with low vegetation cover.

  7. Infiltration in soils with a saturated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogarth, W. L.; Lockington, D. A.; Barry, D. A.; Parlange, M. B.; Haverkamp, R.; Parlange, J.-Y.

    2013-05-01

    An earlier infiltration equation relied on curve fitting of infiltration data for the determination of one of the parameters, which limits its usefulness in practice. This handicap is removed here, and the parameter is now evaluated by linking it directly to soil-water properties. The new predictions of infiltration using this evaluation are quite accurate. Positions and shapes of soil-water profiles are also examined in detail and found to be predicted analytically with great precision.

  8. Modeling fine-scale soil surface structure using geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.; Brazier, R. E.; Kuhn, N. J.

    2013-04-01

    There is widespread recognition that spatially distributed information on soil surface roughness (SSR) is required for hydrological and geomorphological applications. Such information is necessary to describe variability in soil structure, which is highly heterogeneous in time and space, to parameterize hydrology and erosion models and to understand the temporal evolution of the soil surface in response to rainfall. This paper demonstrates how results from semivariogram analysis can quantify key elements of SSR for such applications. Three soil types (silt, silt loam, and silty clay) were used to show how different types of structural variance in SSR evolve during simulated rainfall events. All three soil types were progressively degraded using artificial rainfall to produce a series of roughness states. A calibrated laser profiling instrument was used to measure SSR over a 10 cm × 10 cm spatial extent, at a 2 mm resolution. These data were geostatistically analyzed in the context of aggregate breakdown and soil crusting. The results show that such processes are represented by a quantifiable decrease in sill variance, from 7.81 (control) to 0.94 (after 60 min of rainfall). Soil surface features such as soil cracks, tillage lines and erosional areas were quantified by local maxima in semivariance at a given length scale. This research demonstrates that semivariogram analysis can retrieve spatiotemporal variations in soil surface condition; in order to provide information on hydrological pathways. Consequently, geostatistically derived SSR shows strong potential for inclusion as spatial information in hydrology and erosion models to represent complex surface processes at different soil structural scales.

  9. Assessment of soil surface BRDF using an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Coburn, C. A.; Ren, X.; Mazumdar, D.; Myshak, S.; Mullin, A.; Teillet, P. M.

    2010-10-01

    Ground reference data are important for understanding and characterizing angular effects on the images acquired by satellite sensors with off-nadir capability. However, very few studies have considered image-based soil reference data for that purpose. Compared to non-imaging instruments, imaging spectrometers can provide detailed information to investigate the influence of spatial components on the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a mixed target. This research reported in this paper investigated soil spectral reflectance changes as a function of surface roughness, scene components and viewing geometries, as well as wavelength. Soil spectral reflectance is of particular interest because it is an essential factor in interpreting the angular effects on images of vegetation canopies. BRDF data of both rough and smooth soil surfaces were acquired in the laboratory at 30° illumination angle using a Specim V10E imaging spectrometer mounted on the University of Lethbridge Goniometer System version 2.5 (ULGS-2.5). The BRDF results showed that the BRDF of the smooth soil surface was dominated by illuminated pixels, whereas the shaded pixels were a larger component of the BRDF of the rough surface. In the blue, green, red, and near-infrared (NIR), greater BRDF variation was observed for the rough than for the smooth soil surface. For both soil surface roughness categories, the BRDF exhibited a greater range of values in the NIR than in the blue, green, or red. The imaging approach allows the characterization of the impact of spatial components on soil BRDF and leads to an improved understanding of soil reflectance compared to non-imaging BRDF approaches. The imaging spectrometer is an important sensor for BRDF investigations where the effects of individual spatial components need to be identified.

  10. Antisoiling technology: Theories of surface soiling and performance of antisoiling surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Physical examination of surfaces undergoing natural outdoor soiling suggests that soil matter accumulates in up to three distinct layers. The first layer involves strong chemical attachment or strong chemisorption of soil matter on the primary surface. The second layer is physical, consisting of a highly organized arrangement of soil creating a gradation in surface energy from a high associated with the energetic first layer to the lowest possible state on the outer surfce of the second layer. The lowest possible energy state is dictated by the physical nature of the regional atmospheric soiling materials. These first two layers are resistant to removal by rain. The third layer constitutes a settling of loose soil matter, accumulating in dry periods and being removed during rainy periods. Theories and evidence suggest that surfaces that should be naturally resistant to the formation of the first two-resistant layers should be hard, smooth, hydrophobic, free of first-period elements, and have the lowest possible surface energy. These characteristics, evolving as requirements for low-soiling surfaces, suggest that surfaces or surface coatings should be of fluorocarbon chemistry. Evidence for the three-soil-layer concept, and data on the positive performance of candidate fluorocarbon coatings on glass and transparent plastic films after 28 months of outdoor exposure, are presented.

  11. How surface roughness affects chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness affects transport processes, e.g., runoff generation, infiltration, sediment detachment, etc., occurring on the surface. Nevertheless, how soil roughness affects chemical transport is less known. In this study, we partitioned roughness elements into mounds which diverge water ...

  12. Unraveling the size distributions of surface properties for purple soil and yellow soil.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Zhu, Hualing; Tian, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Soils contain diverse colloidal particles whose properties are pertinent to ecological and human health, whereas few investigations systematically analyze the surface properties of these particles. The objective of this study was to elucidate the surface properties of particles within targeted size ranges (i.e. >10, 1-10, 0.5-1, 0.2-0.5 and <0.2 μm) for a purple soil (Entisol) and a yellow soil (Ultisol) using the combined determination method. The mineralogy of corresponding particle-size fractions was determined by X-ray diffraction. We found that up to 80% of the specific surface area and 85% of the surface charge of the entire soil came from colloidal-sized particles (<1 μm), and almost half of the specific surface area and surface charge came from the smallest particles (<0.2 μm). Vermiculite, illite, montmorillonite and mica dominated in the colloidal-sized particles, of which the smallest particles had the highest proportion of vermiculite and montmorillonite. For a given size fraction, the purple soil had a larger specific surface area, stronger electrostatic field, and higher surface charge than the yellow soil due to differences in mineralogy. Likewise, the differences in surface properties among the various particle-size fractions can also be ascribed to mineralogy. Our results indicated that soil surface properties were essentially determined by the colloidal-sized particles, and the <0.2 μm nanoparticles made the largest contribution to soil properties. The composition of clay minerals within the diverse particle-size fractions could fully explain the size distributions of surface properties.

  13. A Methodology for Soil Moisture Retrieval from Land Surface Temperature, Vegetation Index, Topography and Soil Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture conditions have an impact upon hydrological processes, biological and biogeochemical processes, eco-hydrology, floods and droughts due to changing climate, near-surface atmospheric conditions and the partition of incoming solar and long-wave radiation between sensible and latent heat fluxes. Hence, soil moisture conditions virtually effect on all aspects of engineering / military engineering activities such as operational mobility, detection of landmines and unexploded ordinance, natural material penetration/excavation, peaking factor analysis in dam design etc. Like other natural systems, soil moisture pattern can vary from completely disorganized (disordered, random) to highly organized. To understand this varying soil moisture pattern, this research utilized topographic wetness index from digital elevation models (DEM) along with vegetation index from remotely sensed measurements in red and near-infrared bands, as well as land surface temperature (LST) in the thermal infrared bands. This research developed a methodology to relate a combined index from DEM, LST and vegetation index with the physical soil moisture properties of soil types and the degree of saturation. The advantage in using this relationship is twofold: first it retrieves soil moisture content at the scale of soil data resolution even though the derived indexes are in a coarse resolution, and secondly the derived soil moisture distribution represents both organized and disorganized patterns of actual soil moisture. The derived soil moisture is used in driving the hydrological model simulations of runoff, sediment and nutrients.

  14. Control of Eolian soil erosion from waste site surface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1994-11-01

    Physical models were tested in a wind tunnel to determine optimum surface-ravel admixtures for protecting silt-loam soil from erosion by, wind and saltating, sand stresses. The tests were performed to support the development of a natural-material surface barrier for and waste sites. Plans call for a 2-m deep silt-loam soil reservoir to retain infiltrating water from rainfall and snowmelt. The objective of the study was to develop a gravel admixture that would produce an erosion-resistant surface layer during, periods of extended dry climatic stress. Thus, tests were performed using simulated surfaces representing dry, unvegetated conditions present just after construction, after a wildfire, or during an extended drought. Surfaces were prepared using silt-loam soil mixed with various grades of sand and Travel. Wind-induced surface shear stresses were controlled over the test surfaces, as were saltating, sand mass flow rates and intensities. Tests were performed at wind speeds that approximated and exceeded local 100-year peak gust intensities. Surface armors produced by pea gravel admixtures were shown to provide the best protection from wind and saltating sand stresses. Compared with unprotected silt-loam surfaces, armored surfaces reduced erosion rates by more than 96%. Based in part on wind tunnel results, a pea gravel admixture of 15% will be added to the top 1 in of soil in a prototype barrier under construction in 1994. Field tests are planned at the prototype site to provide data for comparison with wind tunnel results.

  15. Statistical characteristics of simulated radar imagery from bare soil surfaces: Effects of surface roughness and soil moisture variability

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, R.M.; Rundquist, D.C. ); Pardipuram, R. )

    1994-01-01

    The potential of high-resolution radar imagery to estimate various hydrological parameters, such as soil moisture, has long been recognized. Image simulation is one approach to study the interrelationships between the radar response and the underlying ground parameters. In order to perform realistic simulations, the authors incorporated the effects of naturally occurring spatial variability and spatial correlations of those ground parameters that affect the radar response, primarily surface roughness and soil moisture. Surface roughness and soil moisture images were generated for a hypothetical 100 x 100 m bare soil surface area at 1 m resolution using valid probability distribution and correlation lengths, These values were then used to obtain copolarized radar scattering coefficients at 2 GHz (L band) and 10 GHz (X band) frequencies using appropriate backscatter models, which were then converted to a digital number within 0--255 gray scale in order to generate radar images. The effect of surface roughness variability causes variability in the radar image, which is more apparent under smooth soil conditions. On the other hand, the inherent spatial pattern in soil moisture tends to cause similar patterns in the radar image under rougher soil conditions. The maximum difference between contrast-enhanced mean values of the radar image digital number due to moisture variations occurs at surface roughness values in the 1.5--2.0 cm range.

  16. Soil moisture from temperature measurements at the Earth's surface, update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Soil moisture budgets at the Earth's surface were investigated based on soil and atmospheric temperature variations. A number of data sets were plotted and statistically analyzed in order to accentuate the existence and the characteristics of mesoscale soil temperature extrema variations and their relations to other parameters. The correlations between diurnal temperature extrema for air and soil in drought and non-drought periods appear to follow different characteristic patterns, allowing an inference of soil moisture content from temperature data. The recovery of temperature extrema after a precipitation event also follows a characteristic power curve rise between two limiting values which is an indicator of evaporation rates. If these indicators are applied universally to regional temperature data, soil moisture content or drought conditions can be inferred directly from temperature measurements.

  17. Close or not so close? Provenance studies of megalithic monuments from Alentejo (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaventura, R.; Moita, P.

    2012-04-01

    There has been a significant amount of studies about megalithic tombs conducted in the Alentejo region. However the geological provenance of monoliths used in the construction of those tombs usually was not a priority among researchers with rare exceptions (Dehn, Kalb and Vortisch, 1991; Boaventura, 2000). Recent studies of dolmens (Oliveira, 1997 and 2006; Gonçalves, 2003) refer only to a brief characterization of rocks, such as "granite or schist slabs", highlighting certain types if the geological stratum is identical or not to the stone blocks. On the other hand, when the type of raw material appears to be similar with the bedrock, it is common and empirically assumed its local provenance. With the aim of testing and expand the knowledge about the provenance of the slabs used in the construction of megalithic tombs, several lithic samples from dolmen slabs and outcrops in their surroundings were collected for analysis and comparison. The samples were characterized by petrographic studies in thin section as well with a geochemical analyses performed by XRF that gives major elements as well some trace elements. The dolmens tested for this project are located roughly between the northeast to west of the town of Monforte (Upper region of Alentejo, Portugal) and are named, from south to north, as Serrinha, Rabuje group (1 to 5), Geodésico de Besteiros 3 and Velho. The field work and petrographic studies revealed that the slabs are constituted mainly by several types of granitoids (gnaissic, red, white, tonalitic), amphibolites and mottled schist shale. The comparison of chemical analyses between slabs and selected outcrops revealed that the provenances are in most of the cases from the nearby geological stratum. In fact, major elements (e.g. MgO, SiO2, CaO) as well trace elements (e.g. Sr, Y, Zr, Nb) compositions are similar on slab samples and in rocks from the outcrops. If in terms of major elements a similarity was already expectable, or easier to obtain, the

  18. Estimating Surface Soil Moisture in Simulated AVIRIS Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Michael L.; Li, Lin; Ustin, Susan L.

    2004-01-01

    Soil albedo is influenced by many physical and chemical constituents, with moisture being the most influential on the spectra general shape and albedo (Stoner and Baumgardner, 1981). Without moisture, the intrinsic or matrix reflectance of dissimilar soils varies widely due to differences in surface roughness, particle and aggregate sizes, mineral types, including salts, and organic matter contents. The influence of moisture on soil reflectance can be isolated by comparing similar soils in a study of the effects that small differences in moisture content have on reflectance. However, without prior knowledge of the soil physical and chemical constituents within every pixel, it is nearly impossible to accurately attribute the reflectance variability in an image to moisture or to differences in the physical and chemical constituents in the soil. The effect of moisture on the spectra must be eliminated to use hyperspectral imagery for determining minerals and organic matter abundances of bare agricultural soils. Accurate soil mineral and organic matter abundance maps from air- and space-borne imagery can improve GIS models for precision farming prescription, and managing irrigation and salinity. Better models of soil moisture and reflectance will also improve the selection of soil endmembers for spectral mixture analysis.

  19. Spectral reflectance of surface soils: Relationships with some soil properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiesewetter, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Using a published atlas of reflectance curves and physicochemical properties of soils, a statistical analysis was carried out. Reflectance bands which correspond to five of the wavebands used by NASA's Thematic Mapper were examined for relationships to specific soil properties. The properties considered in this study include: Sand Content, Silt Content, Clay Content, Organic Matter Content, Cation Exchange Capacity, Iron Oxide Content and Moisture Content. Regression of these seven properties on the mean values of five TM bands produced results that indicate that the predictability of the properties can be increased by stratifying the data. The data was stratified by parent material, taxonomic order, temperature zone, moisture zone and climate (combined temperature and moisture). The best results were obtained when the sample was examined by climatic classes. The middle Infra-red bands, 5 and 7, as well as the visible bands, 2 and 3, are significant in the model. The near Infra-red band, band 4, is almost as useful and should be included in any studies. General linear modeling procedures examined relationships of the seven properties with certain wavebands in the stratified samples.

  20. Soil surface disturbances in cold deserts: Effects on nitrogenase activity in cyanobacterial-lichen soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne

    1996-01-01

    CyanobacteriaMichen soil crusts can be a dominant source of nitrogen for cold-desert ecosystems. Effects of surface disturbance from footprints, bike and vehicle tracks on the nitrogenase activity in these crusts was investigated. Surface disturbances reduced nitrogenase activity by 30-100%. Crusts dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus on sandy soils were the most susceptible to disruption; crusts on gypsiferous soils were the least susceptible. Crusts where the soil lichen Collema tenax was present showed less immediate effects; however, nitrogenase activity still declined over time. Levels of nitrogenase activity reduction were affected by the degree of soil disruption and whether sites were dominated by cyanobacteria with or without heterocysts. Consequently, anthropogenic surface disturbances may have serious implications for nitrogen budgets in these ecosystems.

  1. Testing continuous earthquake detection and location in Alentejo (South Portugal) by waveform coherency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Catarina; Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Custódio, Susana

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade a permanent seismic network of 30 broadband stations, complemented by dense temporary deployments, covered Portugal. This extraordinary network coverage enables now the computation of a high-resolution image of the seismicity of Portugal, which in turn will shed light on the seismotectonics of Portugal. The large data volumes available cannot be analyzed by traditional time-consuming manual location procedures. In this presentation we show first results on the automatic detection and location of earthquakes occurred in a selected region in the south of Portugal Our main goal is to implement an automatic earthquake detection and location routine in order to have a tool to quickly process large data sets, while at the same time detecting low magnitude earthquakes (i.e., lowering the detection threshold). We present a modified version of the automatic seismic event location by waveform coherency analysis developed by Grigoli et al. (2013, 2014), designed to perform earthquake detections and locations in continuous data. The event detection is performed by continuously computing the short-term-average/long-term-average of two different characteristic functions (CFs). For the P phases we used a CF based on the vertical energy trace, while for S phases we used a CF based on the maximum eigenvalue of the instantaneous covariance matrix (Vidale 1991). Seismic event detection and location is obtained by performing waveform coherence analysis scanning different hypocentral coordinates. We apply this technique to earthquakes in the Alentejo region (South Portugal), taking advantage from a small aperture seismic network installed in the south of Portugal for two years (2010 - 2011) during the DOCTAR experiment. In addition to the good network coverage, the Alentejo region was chosen for its simple tectonic setting and also because the relationship between seismicity, tectonics and local lithospheric structure is intriguing and still poorly understood. Inside

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of soil temperature, moisture and surface soil properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajek, B. F.; Dane, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to: (l) Relate in-situ measured soil-water content and temperature profiles to remotely sensed surface soil-water and temperature conditions; to model simultaneous heat and water movement for spatially and temporally changing soil conditions; (2) Determine the spatial and temporal variability of surface soil properties affecting emissivity, reflectance, and material and energy flux across the soil surface. This will include physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics of primary soil components and aggregate systems; and (3) Develop surface soil classes of naturally occurring and distributed soil property assemblages and group classes to be tested with respect to water content, emissivity and reflectivity. This document is a report of studies conducted during the period funded by NASA grants. The project was designed to be conducted over a five year period. Since funding was discontinued after three years, some of the research started was not completed. Additional publications are planned whenever funding can be obtained to finalize data analysis for both the arid and humid locations.

  3. Novel Measurement and Monitoring Approaches for Surface and Near-Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. B.; Sheng, W.; Zhou, R.; Sadeghi, M.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    The top inch of the earth's soil surface is a very dynamic and important layer where physical and biogeochemical processes take place under extreme diurnal and seasonal moisture and temperature variations. Some of these critical surfaces include biocrusts, desert pavements, agricultural lands, mine tailings, hydrophobic forest soils, all of which can significantly impact environmental conditions at large-scales. Natural hazards associated with surface conditions include dust storms, post-fire erosion and flooding in addition to crop failure. Less obvious, though continually occurring, are microbial-induced gas emissions that are also significantly impacted by surface conditions. With so much at stake, it is surprising that in today's technological world there are few if any sensors designed for monitoring the top few mm or cm of the soil surface. In particular, remotely sensed data is expected to provide near-real time surface conditions of our Earth, but we lack effective tools to measure and calibrate surface soil moisture. We are developing multiple methods for measurement and monitoring of surface and near-surface soil water content which include gravimetric as well as electromagnetic approaches. These novel measurement solutions and their prospects to improve soil surface water content determination will be presented.

  4. Influence of surface crusting on infiltration of a loess plateau soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface sealing and crusting are common widespread processes that occur in many cultivated soils worldwide, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Soil crusting negatively affects water infiltration, increases surface runoff, reduces seedling emergence, restricts air exchange between the soil and ...

  5. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations for lunar soil breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filleux, C.; Spear, R. H.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reaction depth profiling technique previously described by Filleux et al. (1977) has been used to measure the depth distribution of C on grain surfaces for Apollo 11, 15, 16 and 17 soil breccias. The surface C concentration of all samples studied lies between 2 and 8 times 10 to the 15th atoms per sq cm, showing no correlation with the volume C, which varies over an order of magnitude. If the observed variation represents the presence of unexposed grains on the surfaces studied, these results indicate a steady state surface C concentration of 5 to 10 times 10 to the 15th atoms per sq cm, accumulated over a time scale short compared with that required for the formation of volume-related C and with the mean lifetime of grains at the lunar surface. About one-third to one-half of the total C in lunar soil seems to be surface-correlated.

  6. Photodegradation of bensulfuron-methyl on soil surface.

    PubMed

    Si, You-Bin; Yue, Yong-De; Chen, Huai-Man; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2004-03-01

    Photolysis of bensulfuron-methyl on soil surface was studied under sunlight and UV light. Seven photoproducts were isolated and characterised by spectroscopic methods. The major processes in the photolysis of bensulfuron-methyl in soil are cleavage of the sulfonylurea bridge, scission of the SO2NH bond and contraction of the sulfuronylurea bridge. The rates of photodegradation of bensulfuron-methyl on different soils followed first-order rate kinetics with half lives of 21.9, 28.4, 36.9, 59.2 and 47.2 h (UV) and 23.1, 27.5, 29.1, 38.9 and 33.8 days (sunlight) for vertisol, alluvial, alfisol, red and laterite soils, respectively. The differences in rates of photodegradation were dependent upon the soil texture and organic matter content. PMID:15025240

  7. Photodegradation of bensulfuron-methyl on soil surface.

    PubMed

    Si, You-Bin; Yue, Yong-De; Chen, Huai-Man; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2004-03-01

    Photolysis of bensulfuron-methyl on soil surface was studied under sunlight and UV light. Seven photoproducts were isolated and characterised by spectroscopic methods. The major processes in the photolysis of bensulfuron-methyl in soil are cleavage of the sulfonylurea bridge, scission of the SO2NH bond and contraction of the sulfuronylurea bridge. The rates of photodegradation of bensulfuron-methyl on different soils followed first-order rate kinetics with half lives of 21.9, 28.4, 36.9, 59.2 and 47.2 h (UV) and 23.1, 27.5, 29.1, 38.9 and 33.8 days (sunlight) for vertisol, alluvial, alfisol, red and laterite soils, respectively. The differences in rates of photodegradation were dependent upon the soil texture and organic matter content.

  8. Limewashing paintings in Alentejo urban heritage: pigment characterization and differentiation by WDXRF and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, M.; Carvalho, M. L.; Seruya, A.; Ribeiro, I.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Mirão, J.

    2008-01-01

    Pigments used in traditional limewashing paintings in Alentejo urban Heritage are inorganic materials and can be grouped into four categories: a) reds red ochre (from terras rossas, red schists and iron ore deposits weathering), almagres, terra roxa (natural processed red ochres) and synthetic red iron oxides; b) yellows yellow ochre (from schists and iron ore deposits), processed natural ochres, yellow iron synthetic oxides, c) blacks black earths and black iron synthetic oxides and d) blues artificial ultramarine. The present work proposes to characterize natural, natural processed and synthetic pigments by comparing phase and elemental compositions. The results reveal differences in Fe, Si, K and Al total content according to their origin and fabrication process and reveal intentional addition of white charges like carbonates. Elements like Zr, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ca and Zn are present in all categories. Under optical microscopy, some samples of processed natural pigments do not exhibit optical activity, thus revealing mixtures with synthetic pigments, while natural pigments present a strong birefringence colorless due to optically active minerals.

  9. Soil surface roughness and porosity under different tillage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, J.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Gómez, J. A.; Valencia, J. L.; Zarco, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Both soil porosity and surface elevation can be altered by tillage operation. Even though the surface porosity is an important parameter of a tilled field, however, no practical technique for rapid and non-contact measurement of surface porosity has been developed yet. On the contrary, the surface elevation of tilled soil can be quickly determined with a laser profiler. Working under the assumption that the surface elevation of a tilled field is a complicated superposition of the soil terrain profile at a larger-scale and the roughness at a fine-scale, this study included three aspects: (i) to establish an index (Roughness Index, RI) at a fine-scale to associate the surface roughness with porosity; (ii) to examine the correlation between surface porosity and the proposed RI by three types of tillage treatment in the field; and (iii) to check the scaling/multiscaling behavior among different grid sizes of calculating RI on predicting surface porosity. Consequently, the statistical results from each tilled plot show a strong correlation between the surface porosity and the defined RI in an early stage (ca. 2 days) after tillage. Acknowledgements Funding provided by CEIGRAM (Research Centre for the Management of Agricultural and Environmental Risks)and Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  10. Microwave backscatter dependence on surface roughness, soil moisture, and soil texture. II - Vegetation-covered soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bradley, G. A.; Dobson, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental investigation to determine the relationship between radar backscatter coefficient (sigma) and soil moisture for vegetation-covered soil. These results extend a previous report which showed the experimental relationship between sigma and soil moisture for bare soil. It is shown that the highest correlation between sigma and soil moisture is 0.92 for the combined response of four crop types measured at 4.25 GHz, 10 deg incidence angle, and HH polarization. Radar look direction, relative to the crop row direction, is shown to have an insignificant effect on soil-moisture estimation if the radar frequency is higher than 4 GHz. The dependence on soil type can be minimized by expressing soil moisture in units of percent of field capacity. The possibility of using a single radar for measuring soil moisture for both bare and vegetated fields is demonstrated with a linear estimation algorithm having an experimental correlation coefficinet of 0.8.

  11. Passive Microwave Observation of Diurnal Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Swift, Calvin T.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave radiometers operating at low frequencies are sensitive to surface soil moisture changes. Few studies have been conducted that have involved multifrequency observations at frequencies low enough to measure a significant soil depth and not be attenuated by the vegetation cover. Another unexplored aspect of microwave observations at low frequencies has been the impact of diurnal variations of the soil moisture and temperature on brightness temperature. In this investigation, observations were made using a dual frequency radiometer (1.4 and 2.65 GHz) over bare soil and corn for extended periods in 1994. Comparisons of emissivity and volumetric soil moisture at four depths for bare soils showed that there was a clear correspondence between the 1 cm soil moisture and the 2.65-GHz emissivity and between the 3-5 cm soil moisture and the 1.4-GHZ emissivity, which confirms previous studies. Observations during drying and rainfall demonstrate that new and unique information for hydrologic and energy balance studies can be extracted from these data.

  12. Surface heating blanket for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Egmond, C.F.; Carl, F.G. Jr.; Stegemeier, G.L.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1993-07-20

    A heater assembly is described for use in soil remediation comprising: a plurality of metallic support rods spaced parallel to each other; a continuous metallic strand spirally encircling adjacent ones of said support rods and forming rungs therearound, said rungs extending the length of said support rods, making low resistance contact therewith but being frictionally movable with respect thereto; an electric beater element located between and parallel to a selected pair of said support rods and between said rungs encircling said selected support rods, said heater being in low resistance frictional contact with said rungs along its length; a layer of insulation on top of said assembly; and an impermeable sheet placed on top of said insulation.

  13. Denitrification 'hot spots' in soil following surface residue application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, Marianne; Morley, Nicholas J.; Hallett, Paul D.; Watson, Christine; Baggs, Elizabeth M.

    2015-04-01

    The availability of organic C is an important driver for the production and reduction of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) during denitrification. Denitrification as a response to plant residue amendments to soil surfaces has been extensively researched. However, the nature of hotspot sites of N2O production and reduction within the soil profile, especially in relation to the location of applied residues, is unknown. In a laboratory experiment we investigated the relationship between denitrifier N2O surface fluxes and N2O production and reduction sites. Probes which equilibrate with the soil gas phase by diffusion were developed to quantify denitrification products and product ratios at 1-2 cm, 4.5-5.5 cm or 8-9 cm from the surface. 13C labelled barley straw was incorporated at rates of 0, 2 and 4 t ha-1 into the top 3 cm of soil and subsequently amended with 14NH415NO3. In a three week experiment the soil gas phase at the three depths was analysed for 15N-N2O, 15N-N2, 13C-CO2 and O2 concentrations. Additionally, cores were destructively sampled for mineral 15N as well as microbial C and dissolved C in the respective depths. 15N-N2O and CO2 surface fluxes peaked one day after N application, with residue application resulting in significantly higher 15N-N2O emission rates compared to the non-amended control. The timing of the 15N-N2O surface flux on day 1 was related to maximum 15N-N2O concentrations of 36.6 μg 15N L-1 within the pore space at 5 cm depth. Three days after fertilizer application 15N-N2O pore space concentrations had significantly increased to 193 μg 15N L-1 at 9 cm depth indicating denitrifier activity at greater depth. Denitrification below the soil surface could be explained by increased microbial activity, oxygen depletion with increasing depth and progressive downwards diffusion of fertilizer NO3-. However, C availability appeared to only affect denitrification in the surface layer in which the residue was incorporated. Our results provide

  14. Estimating rootzone soil moisture by assimilating both microwave based surface soil moisture and thermal based soil moisture proxy observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of synthetic data assimilation experiments are carried out at the USDA Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) site in Beltsville, Maryland. As a first case, only surface soil moisture retrievals are assimilated into a land surface model using the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). This...

  15. Comparing and Combining Surface Soil Moisture Products from AMSR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, R.; Kim, S.; Liu, Y.; Johnson, F.; Sharma, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important variable in hydrological systems as its part of the water cycle in the atmosphere, the land surface and subsurface. Microwave remote sensing is a viable tool to monitor global soil moisture conditions at regular time intervals. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is a sensor onboard the Global Change Observation Mission 1 - Water that was launched in May 2012. Multiple soil moisture products from AMSR2 observations exist; these were compared and combined with special emphasis to the global scale. The first product is retrieved by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) algorithm, the other uses the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM). These two products were compared against each other and evaluated against COSMOS data over the United States, Australia, Europe and Africa. The temporal correlations highlight differences in the representation of the seasonal cycle of soil moisture. It is hypothesized that four factors, physical surface temperatures, surface roughness, vegetation and ground soil wetness conditions, affect the quality of soil moisture retrievals. The complementary between the products led to the opportunity to combine them into a superior one that benefits from the strengths of both algorithms.These soil moisture algorithms share the same background in the radiative transfer model, but each algorithm applies different approaches to reflect various external conditions. As a result, the performance of the products is complementary in many locations in terms of bias, RMSE and, most importantly temporal correlation coefficients. Here, we present a methodology that combines the two AMSR2 based soil moisture products into a single product, which improves the overall performance by leveraging the strengths of the individual products. The new product is combined by applying an optimal weighting factor, calculated based on variance and correlation coefficients against a reference dataset. The complementary

  16. Soil surface sealing reverse or promote desertification?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Thompson, Sally; Chen, Li; Svoray, Tal; Sela, Shai; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation cover in dry regions is a key variable determining desertification. Bare soils exposed to rainfall by desertification can form physical crusts that reduce infiltration, exacerbating water stress on the remaining vegetation. Paradoxically, field studies show that crust removal is associated with plant mortality in desert systems, while artificial biological crusts can improve plant regeneration. Here, it is shown how physical crusts can act as either drivers of, or buffers against desertification depending on their environmental context. The behavior of crusts is first explored using a simplified theory for water movement on a uniform, partly vegetated slope subject to stationary hydrologic conditions. Numerical model runs supplemented with field data from a semiarid Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site are then applied to represent more realistic environmental conditions. When vegetation cover is significant, crusts can drive desertification, but this process is potentially self-limiting. For low vegetation cover, crusts mitigate against desertification by providing water subsidy to plant communities through a runoff-runon mechanism.

  17. Surface properties of a north ray crater soil /Apollo 16/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Gammage, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Surface properties of lunar fines sample 67481 have been investigated by measuring the adsorptions of nitrogen (at -196 C) and water (at 20 C). Characteristics of this sample are similar to those of samples from other locations on the lunar surface and include the more typical alteration reaction with adsorbed water. Although their maturities are markedly different, the surface properties of 67481 are very much like those of the more mature 63341 from the adjacent station 13. These results indicate that the surface properties of lunar soils attain an equilibrium state faster than other properties used to indicate maturity.

  18. Near surface soil vapor clusters for monitoring emissions of volatile organic compounds from soils.

    PubMed

    Ergas, S J; Hinlein, E S; Reyes, P O; Ostendorf, D W; Tehrany, J P

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to develop and test a method of determining emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other gases from soil surfaces. Soil vapor clusters (SVCs) were designed as a low dead volume, robust sampling system to obtain vertically resolved profiles of soil gas contaminant concentrations in the near surface zone. The concentration profiles, when combined with a mathematical model of porous media mass transport, were used to calculate the contaminant flux from the soil surface. Initial experiments were conducted using a mesoscale soil remediation system under a range of experimental conditions. Helium was used as a tracer and trichloroethene was used as a model VOC. Flux estimations using the SVCs were within 25% of independent surface flux estimates and were comparable to measurements made using a surface isolation flux chamber (SIFC). In addition, method detection limits for the SVC were an order of magnitude lower than detection limits with the SIFC. Field trials, conducted with the SVCs at a bioventing site, indicated that the SVC method could be easily used in the field to estimate fugitive VOC emission rates. Major advantages of the SVC method were its low detection limits, lack of required auxiliary equipment, and ability to obtain real-time estimates of fugitive VOC emission rates.

  19. Predicting surface vibration from underground railways through inhomogeneous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Simon; Hunt, Hugh

    2012-04-01

    Noise and vibration from underground railways is a major source of disturbance to inhabitants near subways. To help designers meet noise and vibration limits, numerical models are used to understand vibration propagation from these underground railways. However, the models commonly assume the ground is homogeneous and neglect to include local variability in the soil properties. Such simplifying assumptions add a level of uncertainty to the predictions which is not well understood. The goal of the current paper is to quantify the effect of soil inhomogeneity on surface vibration. The thin-layer method (TLM) is suggested as an efficient and accurate means of simulating vibration from underground railways in arbitrarily layered half-spaces. Stochastic variability of the soil's elastic modulus is introduced using a K-L expansion; the modulus is assumed to have a log-normal distribution and a modified exponential covariance kernel. The effect of horizontal soil variability is investigated by comparing the stochastic results for soils varied only in the vertical direction to soils with 2D variability. Results suggest that local soil inhomogeneity can significantly affect surface velocity predictions; 90 percent confidence intervals showing 8 dB averages and peak values up to 12 dB are computed. This is a significant source of uncertainty and should be considered when using predictions from models assuming homogeneous soil properties. Furthermore, the effect of horizontal variability of the elastic modulus on the confidence interval appears to be negligible. This suggests that only vertical variation needs to be taken into account when modelling ground vibration from underground railways.

  20. Plutonium hazard in respirable dust on the surface of soil.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C J; Tidball, R R; Severson, R C

    1976-08-01

    Plutonium-239 in the fine particulate soil fraction of surface dust is subject to suspension by air currents and is a potential health hazard to humans who may inhale it. This respirable particulate fraction is defined as particles less than or equal to 5 micrometers. The respirable fraction of surface dust was separated by ultrasonic dispersion and a standard water-sedimentation procedure. Plutonium concentration in this fraction of off-site soils located downwind from the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (Jefferson County, Colorado) were as much as 380 times the background concentration. It is prposed that this method of evaluation defines more precisely the potential health hazard from the respirable fraction of plutonium-contaminated soils. PMID:941018

  1. Surface Roughness Parameter Uncertainties on Radar Based Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Su, Z.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Surface roughness variations are often assumed to be negligible for the retrieval of sol moisture. Although previous investigations have suggested that this assumption is reasonable for natural vegetation covers (i.e. Moran et al. 2002), in-situ measurements over plowed agricultural fields (i.e. Callens et al. 2006) have shown that the soil surface roughness can change considerably due to weathering induced by rain.

  2. [Distribution of soil organic carbon in surface soil along a precipitation gradient in loess hilly area].

    PubMed

    Sun, Long; Zhang, Guang-hui; Luan, Li-li; Li, Zhen-wei; Geng, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, 7 survey sites, i.e. a total 63 investigated plots were selected. At each sites, woodland, grassland, and cropland with similar restoration age were selected to investigate soil organic carbon distribution in surface soil (0-30 cm), and the influence of factors, e.g. climate, soil depth, and land uses, on soil organic carbon distribution were analyzed. The result showed that, along the precipitation gradient, the grassland (8.70 g . kg-1) > woodland (7.88 g . kg-1) > farmland (7.73 g . kg-1) in concentration and the grassland (20.28 kg . m-2) > farmland (19.34 kg . m-2) > woodland (17.14 kg . m-2) in density. The differences of soil organic carbon concentration of three land uses were not significant. Further analysis of pooled data of three land uses showed that the surface soil organic carbon concentration differed significantly at different precipitation levels (P<0.00 1). Significant positive relationship was detected between mean annual precipitation and soil organic carbon concentration (r=0.838, P<0.001) in the of pooled data. From south to north (start from northernmost Ordos), i.e. along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, the soil organic carbon increased with annual precipitation 0. 04 g . kg-1 . mm-1, density 0.08 kg . m-2 . mm-1. The soil organic carbon distribution was predicted with mean annual precipitation, soil clay content, plant litter in woodland, and root density in farmland.

  3. [Distribution of soil organic carbon in surface soil along a precipitation gradient in loess hilly area].

    PubMed

    Sun, Long; Zhang, Guang-hui; Luan, Li-li; Li, Zhen-wei; Geng, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, 7 survey sites, i.e. a total 63 investigated plots were selected. At each sites, woodland, grassland, and cropland with similar restoration age were selected to investigate soil organic carbon distribution in surface soil (0-30 cm), and the influence of factors, e.g. climate, soil depth, and land uses, on soil organic carbon distribution were analyzed. The result showed that, along the precipitation gradient, the grassland (8.70 g . kg-1) > woodland (7.88 g . kg-1) > farmland (7.73 g . kg-1) in concentration and the grassland (20.28 kg . m-2) > farmland (19.34 kg . m-2) > woodland (17.14 kg . m-2) in density. The differences of soil organic carbon concentration of three land uses were not significant. Further analysis of pooled data of three land uses showed that the surface soil organic carbon concentration differed significantly at different precipitation levels (P<0.00 1). Significant positive relationship was detected between mean annual precipitation and soil organic carbon concentration (r=0.838, P<0.001) in the of pooled data. From south to north (start from northernmost Ordos), i.e. along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, the soil organic carbon increased with annual precipitation 0. 04 g . kg-1 . mm-1, density 0.08 kg . m-2 . mm-1. The soil organic carbon distribution was predicted with mean annual precipitation, soil clay content, plant litter in woodland, and root density in farmland. PMID:27396128

  4. Photodegradation of pesticides on plant and soil surfaces.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    importance of an emission spectrum of the light source near its surface was clarified. Most photochemical information comes from photolysis in organic solvents or on glass surfaces and/or plant metabolism studies. Epicuticular waxes may be approximated by long-chain hydrocarbons as a very viscous liquid or solid, but the existing form of pesticide molecules in waxes is still obscure. Either coexistence of formulation agents or steric constraint in the rigid medium would cause a change of molecular excitation, deactivation, and photodegradation mechanisms, which should be further investigated to understand the dissipation profiles of a pesticide in or on crops in the field. A thin-layer system with a coat of epicuticular waxes extracted from leaves or isolated cuticles has been utilized as a model, but its application has been very limited. There appear to be gaps in our knowledge about the surface chemistry and photochemistry of pesticides in both rigid media and plant metabolism. Photodegradation studies, for example, by using these models to eliminate contribution from metabolic conversion as much as possible, should be extensively conducted in conjunction with wax chemistry, with the controlling factors being clarified. As with soil surfaces, the effects of atmospheric oxidants should also be investigated. Based on this knowledge, new methods of kinetic analysis or a device simulating the fate of pesticides on these surfaces could be more rationally developed. Concerning soil photolysis, detailed mechanistic analysis of the mobility and fate of pesticides together with volatilization from soil surfaces has been initiated and its spatial distribution with time has been simulated with reasonable precision on a laboratory scale. Although mechanistic analyses have been conducted on penetration of pesticides through cuticular waxes, its combination with photodegradation to simulate the real environment is awaiting further investigation.

  5. The Effect of Soil Hydraulic Properties vs. Soil Texture in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, E. D.; Small, E. E.

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of Soil Hydraulic Property (SHP) selection on modeled surface fluxes following a rain storm in a semi-arid environment. SHPs are often defined based on a Soil Texture Class (STC). To examine the effectiveness of this approach, the Noah land surface model was run with each of 1306 soils in a large SHP database. Within most STCs, the outputs have a range of 350 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat fluxes, and 8K for surface temperature. The average difference between STC median values is only 100 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat. It is concluded that STC explains 5-15% of the variance in model outputs and should not be used to determine SHPs.

  6. Soil Surface Seismic Hazard and Design Basis Guideline for PC 1 and 2 SRS Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.C.

    2000-04-26

    This report describes the development of Savannah River Site (SRS) soil seismic hazard for oscillator frequencies of 1, 2, 5, and 10 Hz. This soil surface hazard supersedes all previous soil hazard analyses conducted for the SRS.

  7. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  8. Superhydrophobic surfaces: A model approach to predict contact angle and surface energy of soil particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; Hamlett, Christopher; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael; Bachmann, Joerg; Woche, S.

    2010-05-01

    C. Hamlett(a), G. McHALE(a), N. Shirtcliffe(a), M. Newton(a), S.K. Woche(b), and J. BACHMANN(b) aSchool of Science & Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS, UK and bInstitute of Soil Science, Leibniz University Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str.2, 30419, Hannover, Germany. Summary Wettability of soil affects a wide variety of processes including infiltration, preferential flow and surface runoff. The problem of determining contact angles and surface energy of powders, such as soil particles, remains unsolved. So far, several theories and approaches have been proposed, but formulation of surface and interfacial free energy, as regards its components, is still a very debatable issue. In the present study, the general problem of the interpretation of contact angles and surface free energy on chemically heterogeneous and rough soil particle surfaces are evaluated by a reformulation of the Cassie-Baxter equation assuming that the particles are attached on to a plane and rigid surface. Compared with common approaches, our model considers a roughness factor which depends on the Young's Law contact angle determined by the surface chemistry. Results of the model are discussed and compared with independent contact angle measurements using the Sessile Drop and the Wilhelmy Plate methods. Based on contact angle data, the critical surface tension of the grains were determined by the method proposed by Zisman. Experiments were made with glass beads and three soil materials ranging from sand to clay. Soil particles were coated with different loadings of dichlorodimethylsilane (DCDMS) to vary the wettability. Varying the solid surface tension using DCDMS treatments provided pure water wetting behaviours ranging from wettable to extremely hydrophobic with contact angles >150°. Results showed that the critical surface energy measured on grains with the highest DCDMS loadings was similar to the surface energy measured independently on ideal DCDMS

  9. Multifrequency measurements of the effects of soil moisture, soil texture, and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.; Engman, E. T.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment on remote sensing of soil moisture content was conducted over bare fields with microwave radiometers at the frequencies of 1.4, 5, and 10.7 GHz, during July-September of 1981. Three bare fields with different surface roughnesses and soil textures were prepared for the experiment. The experimental results show that the effect of surface roughness is to increase the soil's brightness temperature and to reduce the slope of regression between brightness temperature and moisture content. The slopes of regression for soils with different textures are found to be comparable and the effect of soil texture is reflected in the difference of regression line intercepts at brightness-temperature axis. Measurements on wet smooth bare fields give lower brightness temperatures at 5 than at 1.4 GHz. This phenomenon is not expected from current radiative transfer theory, using laboratory measurements of the relationship between permittivity and moisture content for different soil-water mixtures at frequencies of not greater than 5 GHz.

  10. Soil surface roughness decay in contrasting climates, tillage types and management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Bertol, Ildegardis; Tondello Barbosa, Fabricio; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Soil surface roughness describes the variations in the elevation of the soil surface. Such variations define the soil surface microrelief, which is characterized by a high spatial variability. Soil surface roughness is a property affecting many processes such as depression storage, infiltration, sediment generation, storage and transport and runoff routing. Therefore the soil surface microrelief is a key element in hydrology and soil erosion processes at different spatial scales as for example at the plot, field or catchment scale. In agricultural land soil surface roughness is mainly created by tillage operations, which promote to different extent the formation of microdepressions and microelevations and increase infiltration and temporal retention of water. The decay of soil surface roughness has been demonstrated to be mainly driven by rain height and rain intensity, and to depend also on runoff, aggregate stability, soil reface porosity and soil surface density. Soil roughness formation and decay may be also influenced by antecedent soil moisture (either before tillage or rain), quantity and type of plant residues over the soil surface and soil composition. Characterization of the rate and intensity of soil surface roughness decay provides valuable information about the degradation of the upper most soil surface layer before soil erosion has been initiated or at the very beginning of soil runoff and erosion processes. We analyzed the rate of decay of soil surface roughness from several experiments conducted in two regions under temperate and subtropical climate and with contrasting land use systems. The data sets studied were obtained both under natural and simulated rainfall for various soil tillage and management types. Soil surface roughness decay was characterized bay several parameters, including classic and single parameters such as the random roughness or the tortuosity and parameters based on advanced geostatistical methods or on the fractal theory. Our

  11. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations. [in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filleux, C.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of surface concentrations of carbon in lunar soils and soil breccias provide information on the origin of carbon in the regolith. The reaction C-12 (d, p sub zero) is used to measure 'surface' and 'volume' concentrations in lunar samples. This method has a depth resolution of 1 micron, which permits only a 'surface' and a 'volume' component to be measured. Three of four Apollo 16 double drive tube samples show a surface carbon concentration of about 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm, whereas the fourth sample gave 4 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. It can be convincingly shown that the measured concentration does not originate from fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon contaminants. Surface adsorbed layers of CO or CO2 are removed by a sputter cleaning procedure using a 2-MeV F beam. It is shown that the residual C concentration of 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm cannot be further reduced by increased F fluence, and it is therefore concluded that it is truly lunar. If one assumes that the measured surface C concentration is a steady-state concentration determined only by a balance between solar-wind implantation and sputtering, a sputter erosion rate of 0.1 A/yr is obtained. However, it would be more profitable to use an independently derived sputter erosion rate to test the hypothesis of a solar-wind origin of the surface carbon.

  12. NH 3 soil and soil surface gas measurements in a triticale wheat field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neftel, A.; Blatter, A.; Gut, A.; Högger, D.; Meixner, F.; Ammann, C.; Nathaus, F. J.

    We present a new approach for a continuous determination of NH 3 concentration in the open pore space of the soil and on the soil surface. In a semi-permeable membrane of 0.5 m length a flow of 0.5 s1pm maintained. In the tube the NH 3 concentration adjusts itself to the surrounding air concentration by diffusion through the membrane. Continuous measurements have been performed in a triticale wheat field over a period of several weeks in a field experiment at Bellheim (FRG) during June and July 1995 within the frame of the European program EXAMINE (Exchange of Atmospheric Ammonia with European Ecosystems). Soil concentrations are generally below the detection limit of 0.1 μg m -3. We conclude, that the investigated soil is generally a sink for NH 3. The NH 3 concentration on the soil surface shows a diurnal variation due to a combination of physico-chemical desorption and adsorption phenomena associated with changes in wetness of the surrounding surfaces and the NH 3 concentration in the canopy.

  13. Determination of antibiotic residues in manure, soil, and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, T.; Schneider, R.J.; Farber, H.A.; Skutlarek, D.; Meyer, M.T.; Goldbach, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    In the last years more and more often detections of antimicrobially active compounds ("antibiotics") in surface waters have been reported. As a possible input pathway in most cases municipal sewage has been discussed. But as an input from the realm of agriculture is conceivable as well, in this study it should be investigated if an input can occur via the pathway application of liquid manure on fields with the subsequent mechanisms surface run-off/interflow, leaching, and drift. For this purpose a series of surface waters, soils, and liquid manures from North Rhine-Westphalia (Northwestern Germany) were sampled and analyzed for up to 29 compounds by HPLC-MS/MS. In each of the surface waters antibiotics could be detected. The highest concentrations were found in samples from spring (300 ng/L of erythromycin). Some of the substances detected (e.g., tylosin), as well as characteristics in the landscape suggest an input from agriculture in some particular cases. In the investigation of different liquid manure samples by a fast immunoassay method sulfadimidine could be detected in the range of 1...2 mg/kg. Soil that had been fertilized with this liquid manure showed a content of sulfadimidine extractable by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of 15 ??g/kg dry weight even 7 months after the application. This indicates the high stability of some antibiotics in manure and soil.

  14. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns.

  15. Copper distribution in surface and subsurface soil horizons.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Lago, Daniel; Vega, Flora A; Silva, Luis Felipe O; Andrade, María Luisa

    2014-09-01

    The horizons of four natural soils were treated with Cu(2+) in an acid medium to study the retention capacity of Cu. The possible mineralogical changes arising because of the treatment were also studied. The soil properties and characteristics with the greatest influence on the metal retention and its distribution among the different soil fractions were determined. Crystalline phases of each horizon were determined by X-ray diffraction (XDR). The morphology, structural distribution and particle chemical composition of soil samples were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Cu distribution in the different geochemical phases of the soil was studied using a sequential extraction. The treatment led to an increase in the amorphous phases and the formation of new crystalline phases, such as rouaite (Cu2(NO3)(OH)3) and nitratine (NaNO3). Cu was also found superficially sorbed on amorphous hydroxy compounds of Fe that interact with albite, muscovite and gibbsite, and also on spherical and curved particles of aluminium clays. The largest amount of Cu retained was in an exchangeable form, and the smallest amount associated with the crystalline Fe oxides and residual fraction. In the surface horizons, the predominant Cu retention process is complexation in organomineral associations, while in the subsurface horizons it is adsorption.

  16. Automatic Earthquake Detection and Location by Waveform coherency in Alentejo (South Portugal) Using CatchPy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Matos, C.; Grigoli, F.; Cesca, S.; Heimann, S.; Rio, I.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic data processing is currently undergoing a step change, benefitting from high-volume datasets and advanced computer power. In the last decade, a permanent seismic network of 30 broadband stations, complemented by dense temporary deployments, covered mainland Portugal. This outstanding regional coverage currently enables the computation of a high-resolution image of the seismicity of Portugal, which contributes to fitting together the pieces of the regional seismo-tectonic puzzle. Although traditional manual inspections are valuable to refine automatic results they are impracticable with the big data volumes now available. When conducted alone they are also less objective since the criteria is defined by the analyst. In this work we present CatchPy, a scanning algorithm to detect earthquakes in continuous datasets. Our main goal is to implement an automatic earthquake detection and location routine in order to have a tool to quickly process large data sets, while at the same time detecting low magnitude earthquakes (i.e. lowering the detection threshold). CatchPY is designed to produce an event database that could be easily located using existing location codes (e.g.: Grigoli et al. 2013, 2014). We use CatchPy to perform automatic detection and location of earthquakes that occurred in Alentejo region (South Portugal), taking advantage of a dense seismic network deployed in the region for two years during the DOCTAR experiment. Results show that our automatic procedure is particularly suitable for small aperture networks. The event detection is performed by continuously computing the short-term-average/long-term-average of two different characteristic functions (CFs). For the P phases we used a CF based on the vertical energy trace while for S phases we used a CF based on the maximum eigenvalue of the instantaneous covariance matrix (Vidale 1991). Seismic event location is performed by waveform coherence analysis, scanning different hypocentral coordinates

  17. Geochemistry and provenance of the Carboniferous Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group, South Portuguese Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, R. C. G. S.; Fernandes, P.; Rodrigues, B.; Pereira, Z.; Oliveira, J. T.

    2013-02-01

    This work is focused on the turbiditic sediments from the Carboniferous Baixo Alentejo Flysch Group (BAFG) in the South Portuguese Zone, an external zone of the Iberian Variscides. The aim of this work is to constrain the provenance and tectonic setting of these sediments in a context of a complex evolution of SW Iberian Variscides. For this purpose, we performed a systematic study of petrographical and geochemical signatures of greywackes and shales from the three BAFG formations: Mértola, Mira and Brejeira. Major and trace element composition and ratios suggest heterogeneous source area composition for BAFG shales and greywackes. For the oldest Mértola Formation greywackes, source area is dominated by granitoid rocks with minor mafic input. The latter becomes residual in the Mira Formation. The youngest Brejeira Formation greywackes show clear felsic affiliation associated with an increase in recycled components. The shales of all three BAFG formations denote a granodioritic affiliation. Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) and Plagioclase Index of Alteration (PIA) values suggest moderate weathering in the source areas of Mértola and Mira formations. These indices, together with A-CN-K relations, point out to steady-state weathering conditions in the source areas of both formations. In contrast, both CIA and PIA values for the Brejeira Formation indicate variable conditions of palaeoweathering, from moderate to intense, as a consequence of non-steady-state conditions probably triggered by tectonic instability in the provenance area. Compared to the greywackes, the shales of all three BAFG formations exhibit higher CIA and PIA values, as well as low K2O/Al2O3 (~ 0.2) and index of compositional variability (< 1), reflecting the cumulative effect of multiple cycles of sedimentary recycling and prolonged chemical weathering history. Major and trace element distribution and upper continental crust-normalized multi-element plots suggest that the sediments of BAFG were

  18. Soil roughness, slope and surface storage relationship for impervious areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borselli, Lorenzo; Torri, Dino

    2010-11-01

    SummaryThe study of the relationships between surface roughness, local slope gradient and maximum volume of water storage in surface depressions is a fundamental element in the development of hydrological models to be used in soil and water conservation strategies. Good estimates of the maximum volume of water storage are important for runoff assessment during rainfall events. Some attempts to link surface storage to parameters such as indices of surface roughness and, more rarely, local gradient have been proposed by several authors with empirical equations often conflicting between them and usually based on a narrow range of slope gradients. This suggests care in selecting any of the proposed equations or models and invites one to verify the existence of more realistic experimental relationships, based on physical models of the surfaces and valid for a larger range of gradients. The aim of this study is to develop such a relation for predicting/estimating the maximum volume of water that a soil surface, with given roughness characteristics and local slope gradient, can store. Experimental work has been carried out in order to reproduce reliable rough surfaces able to maintain the following properties during the experimental activity: (a) impervious surface to avoid biased storage determination; (b) stable, un-erodible surfaces to avoid changes of retention volume during tests; (c) absence of hydrophobic behaviour. To meet the conditions a-c we generate physical surfaces with various roughness magnitude using plasticine (emulsion of non-expansible clay and oil). The plasticine surface, reproducing surfaces of arable soils, was then wetted and dirtied with a very fine timber sawdust. This reduced the natural hydrophobic behaviour of the plasticine to an undetectable value. Storage experiments were conducted with plasticine rough surfaces on top of large rigid polystyrene plates inclined at different slope gradient: 2%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%. Roughness data collected on

  19. Shallow Subsurface Soil Moisture Dynamics in the Root-Zone and Bulk Soil of Sparsely Vegetated Land Surfaces as Impacted by Near-Surface Atmospheric State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental state variable that provides the water necessary for plant growth and evapotranspiration. Soil moisture has been extensively studied in the context of bare surface soils and root zones. Less attention has focused on the effects of sparse vegetation distributions, such as those typical of agricultural cropland and other natural surface environments, on soil moisture dynamics. The current study explores root zone, bulk soil, and near-surface atmosphere interactions in terms of soil moisture under different distributions of sparse vegetation using multi-scale laboratory experimentation and numerical simulation. This research is driven by the need to advance our fundamental understanding of soil moisture dynamics in the context of improving water conservation and next generation heat and mass transfer numerical models. Experimentation is performed in a two-dimensional 7.3 m long intermediate scale soil tank interfaced with a climate-controlled wind tunnel, both of which are outfitted with current sensor technologies for measuring atmospheric and soil variables. The soil tank is packed so that a sparsely vegetated soil is surrounded by bulk bare soil; the two regions are separated by porous membranes to isolate the root zone from the bulk soil. Results show that in the absence of vegetation, evaporation rates vary along the soil tank in response to longitudinal changes in humidity; soil dries fastest upstream where evaporation rates are highest. In the presence of vegetation, soil moisture in the bulk soil closest to a vegetated region decreases more rapidly than the bulk soil farther away. Evapotranspiration rates in this region are also higher than the bulk soil region. This study is the first step towards the development of more generalized models that account for non-uniformly distributed vegetation and land surfaces exhibiting micro-topology.

  20. Soil texture and granulometry at the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, A.; Deschamps, M.; Zimbelman, J.

    1992-01-01

    The microtexture of the near-surface Martian soil was sensed with three diagnostic parameters: (1) the albedo A at normal incidence and phase angle 5 degrees, which relates to the composition of the top surface exposed layer; (2) the polarization parameter b characterizes the texture of the top surface layer in terms of grain size; and (3) the thermal inertia parameter I which refers to the soil compaction through the first few decimeters below the top surface sensed by polarimetry, in terms of size for the pieces making a granular regolith. Parameter b was derived from instrument VPM on board the Soviet spacecraft MARS-5, inertial I is from IRTM on the American Viking, and albedo A from both. The polarimetric scans racked strips covering two contrasted regions, the dark hued Mare Erythraeum, and the adjacent bright orange Thaumasia. Erythraem is characterized everywhere by a same type of terrain, despite the large geomorphological diversity of the surface. There is an ubiquitous coating or mantling with small dark grains, of both albedo 12.7 percent and particle size 10 to 20 microns, above a subsurface dislocation in pieces around 300 to 600 microns. A simple model is with sand-size particles completely coated with 15 micron dark grains.

  1. Effect of surface roughness on the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Newton, R. W.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the brightness temperature of a moist terrain was studied through the modification of Fresnel reflection coefficient and using the radiative transfer equation. The modification involves introduction of a single parameter to characterize the roughness. It is shown that this parameter depends on both the surface height variance and the horizontal scale of the roughness. Model calculations are in good quantitative agreement with the observed dependence of the brightness temperature on the moisture content in the surface layer. Data from truck mounted and airborne radiometers are presented for comparison. The results indicate that the roughness effects are greatest for wet soils where the difference between smooth and rough surfaces can be as great as 50K.

  2. Quantifying the Rate of Surface Soil Drying Following Precipitation Events Using PBO H2o Soil Moisture Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prue, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Surface soil moisture affects latent and sensible heat fluxes, as well as setting the top boundary condition for water redistribution within the soil column. The fluctuations in surface soil moisture have been described in numerous modeling studies, but characterization based on measurements is lacking. We use a new soil moisture dataset based on reflected GPS signals to provide some constraints on rates of surface soil drying after a rain event. The soil moisture time series used in this study are derived from GPS data collected at NSF's EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) sites. The University of Colorado Boulder's PBO H2O project estimates daily near-surface soil moisture (approximately 0-5 cm) from the interference pattern between the direct and ground-reflected GPS signals. The sensing footprint is ~1000 m2, and thus intermediate in scale between in situ and remotely sensed observations. Twelve sites from this network of more than 100 were used in this study. To characterize the rate of soil drying, we fit exponential curves to daily soil moisture observations following ten isolated rainfall events at each site. Event sizes varied from 5 to 40 mm and were followed by 17 days without rain. The decay model fits the data quite well, with r2 values exceeding 0.85 in nearly all cases. For 95% of the events studied, the exponential decay constant (e-folding time) fell between 2 and 6 days. Precipitation amount is not correlated with drydown rates. Instead, the rate of soil drying is well-correlated with air temperature: the exponential constant decreases by 0.1 days per degree Celsius. We are currently investigating how other factors, such as soil type and vegetation, influence soil drying. This study highlights the utility of the PBO H2O soil moisture product. Surface soil moisture changes rapidly, and thus the dynamics of surface soil moisture cannot be accurately characterized using datasets based on less than daily measurements.

  3. Effects of near soil surface characteristics on soil detachment by overland flow in a natural succession grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation restoration probably has great effects on the process of soil detachment. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of near soil surface characteristics on soil detachment by overland flow in a 7-year naturally restored grassland. Four treatments were designed to characterize th...

  4. Comparative analysis of different measurement techniques for characterizing soil surface roughness in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Agirre, Alex; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Valle, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Álvaro; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface roughness can be defined as the variation in soil surface elevations, and as such, it is a key element in hydrology and soil erosion processes. In agricultural soils, roughness is mainly an anthropic factor determined by the type of tillage and management. Roughness is also a property with a high spatial variability, since the same type of tillage can result in surfaces with different roughness depending on the physical characteristics of the soil and atmospheric conditions. In order to quantify roughness and to parameterize its role in different processes, different measurement techniques have been used and several parameters have been proposed in the literature. The objective of this work is to evaluate different measurement techniques and assess their accuracy and suitability for quantifying surface roughness in agricultural soils. With this aim, a comparative analysis of three roughness measurement techniques has been carried out; (1) laser profilometer, (2) convergent photogrammetry and (3) terrestrial laser scanner. Roughness measurements were done in 3 experimental plots (5x5 meters) with different tillage treatments (representing different roughness conditions) obtained with typical agricultural tools. The laser profilometer registered vertically the distance from a reference bar down to the surface. It had a vertical accuracy of 1.25 mm, a sampling interval of 5 mm and a total length profile of 5 m. Eight profiles were taken per plot, four in parallel to tillage direction and four in perpendicular. Convergent photogrammetry consisted of 20-30 images taken per plot from a height of 5-10 m above ground (using an elevation platform), leading to point clouds of ~25 million points per plot. Terrestrial laser scanner measurements were taken from the four sides of each plot at a measurement height of ~1.75 m above ground. After orientating and corregistering the four scans, point clouds of ~60 million points were obtained per plot. The comparative

  5. Spatial and temporal distribution of cyanobacterial soil crusts in the Kalahari: Implications for soil surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A. D.; Dougill, A. J.

    2007-03-01

    Localised patterns of erosion and deposition in vegetated semi-arid rangelands have been shown to influence ecological change and biogeochemical cycles. In the flat, vegetated Kalahari rangelands of Southern Africa the factors regulating erodibility of the fine sand soils and the erosivity of wind regimes require further investigation. This paper reports on the spatial and temporal patterns of cyanobacterial soil crust cover from ten sites at five sampling locations in the semi-arid Kalahari and discusses the likely impact on factors regulating surface erodibility and erosivity. Cyanobacterial soil crust cover on Kalahari Sand varied between 11% and 95% of the ground surface and was higher than previously reported. Cover was inversely related to grazing with the lowest crust cover found close to boreholes and the highest in the Game Reserve and Wildlife Management Zone. In grazed areas, crusts form under the protective canopies of the thorny shrub Acacia mellifera. Fenced plot data showed that crusts recover quickly from disturbance, with a near complete surface crust cover forming within 15 months of disturbance. Crust development is restricted by burial by wind blown sediment and by raindrop impact. Crusts had significantly greater organic matter and total nitrogen compared to unconsolidated surfaces. Crusts also significantly increased the compressive strength of the surface (and thus decreased erodibility) and changed the surface roughness. Establishing exactly how these changes affect aeolian erosion requires further process-based studies. The proportion of shear velocity acting on the surface in this complex mixed bush-grass-crust environment will be the key to understanding how crusts affect erodibility.

  6. A unified bounding surface plasticity model for unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. R.; Khalili, N.

    2006-03-01

    A unified constitutive model for unsaturated soils is presented in a critical state framework using the concepts of effective stress and bounding surface plasticity theory. Consideration is given to the effects of unsaturation and particle crushing in the definition of the critical state. A simple isotropic elastic rule is adopted. A loading surface and a bounding surface of the same shape are defined using simple and versatile functions. The bounding surface and elastic rules lead to the existence of a limiting isotropic compression line, towards which the stress trajectories of all isotropic compression load paths approach. A non-associated flow rule of the same general form is assumed for all soil types. Isotropic hardening/softening occurs due to changes in plastic volumetric strains as well as suction for some unsaturated soils, enabling the phenomenon of volumetric collapse upon wetting to be accounted for. The model is used to simulate the stress-strain behaviour observed in unsaturated speswhite kaolin subjected to three triaxial test load paths. The fit between simulation and experiment is improved compared to that of other constitutive models developed using conventional Cam-Clay-based plasticity theory and calibrated using the same set of data. Also, the model is used to simulate to a high degree of accuracy the stress-strain behaviour observed in unsaturated Kurnell sand subjected to two triaxial test load paths and the oedometric compression load path. For oedometric compression theoretical simulations indicate that the suction was not sufficiently large to cause samples to separate from the confining ring.

  7. Dust deposition and the soiling of glossy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brooks, K; Schwar, M J

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of changes in reflectance caused by dust deposits on a glossy surface using a standard gloss-meter are described. A microscope slide exposed at a roadside and a rooftop site in central London was used as a convenient collector surface to simulate the soiling by dust of such glossy surfaces as glass, polished metal and plastic, automotive finishes and gloss paint. Measured reductions in gloss made over a number of weeks showed mean values between 1.4% and 1.9% per 6 h. Measurements made at the roadside showed an approximately linear relationship between gloss and percentage area of the slide covered by dust, as measured by a Magiscan II image analyser set up to measure particles greater than 5 microm in diameter. No such relationship was observed for measurements made at the rooftop site.

  8. Soil texture and granulometry at the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, A.; Deschamps, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1993-02-01

    Attention is given to a characterization of the physical behavior of the Martian upper surface in its first few decimeters on the basis of mutual relationships between three parameters: the linear polarization of the reflected light, the visual albedo, and the thermal inertia. Polarimetric scans raked a strip covering two contrasting regions, the dark-hued Mare Erythraeum, and the light-hued Thaumasia. Erythraeum is characterized everywhere by a uniform polarization response, despite the large geomorphological diversity of the surface. A ubiquitous coating or mantling with small dark grains of albedo 12.7 percent, with a radius of 10 to 20 microns, is indicated. Thaumasia exhibits a large variety of soil properties. A typical location with albedo of 16.3 percent has a surface covered with orange grains, probably very dispersed in size, for which the largest grains are 20 to 40 microns.

  9. Soil texture and granulometry at the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollfus, Audouin; Deschamps, Marc; Zimbelman, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to a characterization of the physical behavior of the Martian upper surface in its first few decimeters on the basis of mutual relationships between three parameters: the linear polarization of the reflected light, the visual albedo, and the thermal inertia. Polarimetric scans raked a strip covering two contrasting regions, the dark-hued Mare Erythraeum, and the light-hued Thaumasia. Erythraeum is characterized everywhere by a uniform polarization response, despite the large geomorphological diversity of the surface. A ubiquitous coating or mantling with small dark grains of albedo 12.7 percent, with a radius of 10 to 20 microns, is indicated. Thaumasia exhibits a large variety of soil properties. A typical location with albedo of 16.3 percent has a surface covered with orange grains, probably very dispersed in size, for which the largest grains are 20 to 40 microns.

  10. Influence of surface and subsurface tillage on soil physical properties and soil/plant relationships of planted loblolly pine

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Kelting; H. L. Allen

    2000-05-01

    Soil tillage can improve tree survival and growth by reducing competing vegetation, increasing nutrient availability, improving planting quality, and improving soil physical properties. The authors conducted a tillage study with competition control and nutrient amendments to isolate the physical effects of tillage on tree growth. The objectives of this study were to understand: (1) how tillage affects soil physical properties; (2) the relationships between these properties and root growth; (3) linkages between root growth response and aboveground growth; and (4) tillage effects on aboveground growth. Four replicates of a 2x2 factorial combination of surface (disking) and subsurface (subsoiling) were installed on a well-drained, clay-textured subsoil, soil located on the Piedmont of North Carolina. Disking improved soil physical properties (reduced bulk density and increased aeration porosity) in the surface 20-cm of soil. Subsoiling improved soil physical properties at all depths in the planting row, with improvements still noted at 60-cm from the planting row in the surface 10-cm of soil. Rooting patterns followed the changes in soil physical properties. Despite improvements in soil physical properties and changes in rooting patterns, aboveground tree growth was not affected by tillage. The results of this study point to the need for better diagnostics for identifying sites were tillage is appropriate in situations where fertilization and vegetation control are planned. Potential factors to consider are presence and abundance of old root channels, soil shrink/swell capacity, soil structure, presence and depth to root restricting layers, and historical precipitation records.

  11. Variation of soil surface roughness under simulated rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Valencia, J. L.; Moratiel, R.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.

    2012-04-01

    Soil surface micro-topography or roughness (SSR) defines the physical boundary between overland flow and soil. Due to its unique position, soil roughness potentially affects surface processes such as infiltration, flow routing, erosion and sedimentation. Thus the decay of SSR under different rainfall intensities is of most interest in soil erosion. While some authors have chosen exponent function of cumulative rainfall to describe the decay of SSR, others have used the kinetic energy of rainfall. SSR at the field level is an easy visually perceptible notion, but difficult to describe numerically. In this study we didn't use pin-meter or laser techniques to quantify SSR. Percentage of micro-topographic shadows, under fixed sunlight conditions, has been applied based on former works that proved it is an easy and reliable method to estimate SSR. Two experimental plots, of 1m x 1m, were subjected to successive simulated rainfall events with an intensity of 67 mm/h and a height of 2 m. Both plots were a harrowed plot with an oriented roughness and 6% slope. Images were obtained each 15 minutes of rainfall with an incident angle of light of 45° approximately. The image was acquired by an OLYMPUS X-925, having a size of 2976x3968 pixels and corresponding to an area of 75 cm x 100 cm. For denoising process, the image was cropped to 590x800 pixels and for image binarization Indicator Kriging (IK) method was used. Comparisons of both plots respect to SSR evolution, runoff accumulation and shadows morphology are showed. Acknowledgements Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  12. [Effects of soil surface mulching on solar greenhouse grafted and own-rooted cucumber growth and soil environment].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Sheng; Liang, Yinli; Wang, Juyuan

    2005-12-01

    The study on the effects of different soil surface mulching models, including wheat straw mulching (WS), plastic film mulching (PF), and wheat straw plus plastic film mulching (WP), on the growth of solar greenhouse grafted and own-rooted cucumber and on soil environment showed that soil surface mulching not only increased the individuals of pistillate flower, improved its differentiation and development, shortened fruit-developing period, increased fruit weight, reduced fruit malformation percentage, but also raised total yield. Among the test mulching models, WP was better than WS and PF, and the effects were superior on grafted than on own-rooted cucumber. Soil surface mulching also had considerable effects on soil environment, but the effects varied with different modules. For example, under field condition, the diurnal change of soil temperature was a single-peak curve, with its peak higher and appeared at 14:30 in 5 cm and 10 cm soil depth, but lower and appeared later in deeper soil layers. In this study, WS lowered the maximum soil temperature and raised the minimum soil temperature, making soil temperature quite stable, while PF raised the maximum soil temperature much higher and enhanced the minimum soil temperature less than WS and WP, making the largest variation range of soil temperature. WP played a role of raising soil temperature and kept it stable. Similar to the diurnal change of soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm depth, that of soil respiration rate was also a single-peak curve. The soil respiration rate in all treatmentg was significantly higher than that of CK, and WP had a higher soil respiration rate than PF and WS. There was a significant positive correlation between soil respiration rate and soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm depth. By the end of the experiment, soil bulk density at the depth of 0-20 cm was measured, which was significantly lower in WS and WP than in CK and PF. The difference in soil bulk density was gradually inconspicuous

  13. Evaluating near-surface soil moisture using Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Four dates of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data were analyzed in order to evaluate HCMM thermal data use in estimating near-surface soil moisture in a complex agricultural landscape. Because of large spatial and temporal ground cover variations, HCMM radiometric temperatures alone did not correlate with soil water content. The radiometric temperatures consisted of radiance contributions from different canopies and their respective soil backgrounds. However, when surface soil temperatures were empirically estimated from HCMM temperatures and percent cover of each pixel, a highly significant correlation was obtained between the estimated soil temperatures and near-surface soil water content.

  14. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Soil surface lowering due to soil erosion in villages near Lake Victoria, Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meyer, A.; Deckers, J.; Poesen, J.; Isabirye, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the effort to pinpoint the sources of sediment pollution in Lake Victoria, the contribution of sedi-ment from compounds, landing sites, main roads and footpaths is determined in the catchment of Na-bera Bay and Kafunda Bay at the northern shore of Lake Victoria in southern Uganda. The amount of soil loss in compounds and landing sites is determined by the reconstruction of the original and current soil surface according to botanical and man-made datable objects. The soil erosion rate is then deter-mined by dividing the eroded soil volume (corrected for compaction) by the age of the oldest datable object. In the study area, the average soil erosion rate in compounds amounts to 107 Mg ha-1 year-1 (per unit compound) and in landing sites to 207 Mg ha-1 year-1 (per unit landing site). Although com-pounds and landing sites occupy a small area of the study area (1.1 %), they are a major source of sediment to Lake Victoria (63 %). The soil loss on footpaths and main roads is calculated by multip-lying the total length of footpaths and main roads with the average width and depth (measured towards a reference surface). After the correction for compaction is carried out, the soil erosion rate on foot-paths amounts to 34 Mg ha-1 year-1 and on main roads to 35 Mg ha-1 year-1. Also footpaths and main roads occupy a small area of the study area (1.1 %), but contribute disproportionately to the total soil loss in the catchment (22 %). In this research, the information about the village/compound given by the villager/owner is indispensable. In accordance to an adaptation of the model of McHugh et al. (2002), 32 % of the sediment that is generated in the catchment, is deposited in Lake Victoria (i.e. 2 209 Mg year-1 or 0.7 Mg ha-1 year-1). The main buffer in the study area is papyrus at the shore of Lake Victoria. Also sugarcane can be a major buffer. However, the sugarcane-area is intersected by com-pounds, landing sites, footpaths and main roads that generate large amounts of

  16. Evaluating soil moisture constraints on surface fluxes in land surface models globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Phil; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher; Folwell, Sonja; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen; Hagemann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture availability exerts a strong control over land evaporation in many regions. However, global climate models (GCMs) disagree on when and where evaporation is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of the relevant modelled processes has suffered from a lack of reliable, global observations of land evaporation at the GCM grid box scale. Satellite observations of land surface temperature (LST) offer spatially extensive but indirect information about the surface energy partition and, under certain conditions, about soil moisture availability on evaporation. Specifically, as soil moisture decreases during rain-free dry spells, evaporation may become limited leading to increases in LST and sensible heat flux. We use MODIS Terra and Aqua observations of LST at 1 km from 2000 to 2012 to assess changes in the surface energy partition during dry spells lasting 10 days or longer. The clear-sky LST data are aggregated to a global 0.5° grid before being composited as a function dry spell day across many events in a particular region and season. These composites are then used to calculate a Relative Warming Rate (RWR) between the land surface and near-surface air. This RWR can diagnose the typical strength of short term changes in surface heat fluxes and, by extension, changes in soil moisture limitation on evaporation. Offline land surface model (LSM) simulations offer a relatively inexpensive way to evaluate the surface processes of GCMs. They have the benefits that multiple models, and versions of models, can be compared on a common grid and using unbiased forcing. Here, we use the RWR diagnostic to assess global, offline simulations of several LSMs (e.g., JULES and JSBACH) driven by the WATCH Forcing Data-ERA Interim. Both the observed RWR and the LSMs use the same 0.5° grid, which allows the observed clear-sky sampling inherent in the underlying MODIS LST to be applied to the model outputs directly. This approach avoids some of the difficulties in analysing free

  17. Influence of soil surface characteristics and water repellence on soil infiltration and soil loss of Andisols (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepción, Jiménez; Jonay, Neris; Josué, Fuentes; Marisa, Tejedor

    2010-05-01

    Infiltration is a crucial process in the hydrological cycle, since it controls - among other things - the generation of run-off, erosion and aquifer recharge. Undisturbed Andisols are considered resistant to water erosion; a characteristic closely associated with their high porosity that permits a rapid rainfall infiltration and high structural stability. In spite of that, the high content of organic C on this type of soils, and the positive relation between this property and water repellence, could allow the presence of some soil surface characteristics that may change this behaviour. The aim of this work was to study the influence of these hydrophobic layers on water infiltration and soil loss on Andisols of Tenerife. Twelve sites were chosen, all of which are located on the northern side of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), between 825-1400 m.a.s.l. The soils are allophanic Andisols (Typic/Lithic Hapludands and Typic Haplustands) and vitric Andisols (Typic Udivitrands) under pine forest. In each site, soil surface features with potential hydrological implications were described. To determine infiltration, a rainfall simulator with the following characteristics was used: 35 x 25 x 30 cm metal box with nozzles in the bottom, 2.5 cm apart (diameter of drops = 2-3 mm). The 4 box adjustable legs were set at 2 m height. Prior to installing the rainfall simulator, study zones were marked out using 30 cm-tall metal sheets. Each area measured approximately 875 cm2 and measurements were taken for slopes of 10 and 30% when it was possible. At the end of the slope a 25 cm-wide collector was semi-buried to collect runoff and sediment. Rainfall of variable intensity between 50-70 mmh-1 was simulated for periods of 30-45 minutes. Time to runoff (TR), volume to runoff (VR), steady-state infiltration rate (IR), runoff/rainfall ratio (RR), soil loss rate (SED) and sediment concentration (CSED) were measured. For some of the studied soils, the formation of horizons

  18. Modelling interactions between soil evolution and diffusive surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Mike; Johnson, Michelle; Gloor, Emanual

    2014-05-01

    Bioturbation, combined with settlement under gravity, generates profiles of bulk density, porosity and hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). Rates of bioturbation are linked to rates of diffusive downslope sediment transport (creep) and rates can be compared via the increase in OSL ages of soil aggregate grains with depth. Some primary porosity is also produced by weathering of rock to saprolite, often with little reduction in bulk density but some dilation of joints. Downward percolation of rain water near the surface is controlled by the diffusion-induced decrease in porosity and Ksat, driving lateral subsurface flow in the zone of fluctuating water table, and leaving progressively less water for downward percolation. As the depth to the weathering front is varied, progressively less water is therefore available for weathering, producing the observed decrease in weathering rate with increasing soil depth. These processes are modelled by repeatedly applying a stochastic realisation of daily rainfalls for an area until the annual hydrological cycle stabilises, providing the average partition of rainfall into its components of evapotranspiration, lateral flow and downward percolation, with depth in the soil. The average hydrology is then applied to drive evolution of the weathering profile over longer time spans.

  19. Impacts of snow and organic soils parameterization on northern Eurasian soil temperature profiles simulated by the ISBA land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Brun, Eric; Boone, Aaron; Delire, Christine; Le Moigne, Patrick; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed how an improved representation of snowpack processes and soil properties in the multilayer snow and soil schemes of the Interaction Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model impacts the simulation of soil temperature profiles over northern Eurasian regions. For this purpose, we refine ISBA's snow layering algorithm and propose a parameterization of snow albedo and snow compaction/densification adapted from the detailed Crocus snowpack model. We also include a dependency on soil organic carbon content for ISBA's hydraulic and thermal soil properties. First, changes in the snowpack parameterization are evaluated against snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface albedo, and soil temperature at a 10 cm depth observed at the Col de Porte field site in the French Alps. Next, the new model version including all of the changes is used over northern Eurasia to evaluate the model's ability to simulate the snow depth, the soil temperature profile, and the permafrost characteristics. The results confirm that an adequate simulation of snow layering and snow compaction/densification significantly impacts the snowpack characteristics and the soil temperature profile during winter, while the impact of the more accurate snow albedo computation is dominant during the spring. In summer, the accounting for the effect of soil organic carbon on hydraulic and thermal soil properties improves the simulation of the soil temperature profile. Finally, the results confirm that this last process strongly influences the simulation of the permafrost active layer thickness and its spatial distribution.

  20. Effect of some surface and subsurface attributes on soil water erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertol, Ildegardis; César Ramos, Júlio; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Mirás Avalos, José Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon depending on climate, topography, soil intrinsic characteristics, crop and residue cover, and management and conservation practices that may be accelerated by man activities. Within the above mentioned factors, soil cover and soil management most influence soil erosion. Soil management includes mechanical mobilization and in soil conservationist systems soil residues are mobilized for increasing soil surface roughness. Even if soil roughness is ephemeral, it increases soil water storage and sediment retention in surface microdepressions, which contributes to decrease water erosion. Conservationist soil management systems also maintain the soil surface covered by crop residues, which are more persistent than roughness and contribute to dissipate kinetic energy from raindrops and partly also from runoff. Crop residues are more efficient than soil roughness in controlling water erosion because of its ability to retain detached soil particles. The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of both soil cover by crop residues and soil surface roughness in controlling water erosion. A field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. The following treatments were evaluated: 1) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), 2) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa), 3) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass, 4) scarification after cultivation of common vetch, 5) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. Treatments #1 and 2 involved no-tilled soil with a rather smooth soil surface, where roots and crop residues of the previous crop were maintained. Treatments # 3 and 4 involved a rather high roughness, absence of previous crop residues and maintenance of antecedent roots. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator

  1. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to study the feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to investigate seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils. In the study, temporal variations of subsurface soil properties were measured and monitored by using a combination of a new seismic su...

  2. Rediscovering the palette of Alentejo (Southern Portugal) earth pigments: provenance establishment and characterization by LA-ICP-MS and spectra-colorimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, M.; Green, R.; Carvalho, M. L.; Seruya, A.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Mirão, J.

    2009-09-01

    Colored earth pigments sourced from Alentejo, Portugal, can be geologically categorized as either weathered carbonate rocks (terra rossas), schist units, or weathered iron ore deposits. The material was used until the mid-1900s by local residents as an ingredient in their traditional lime wash paintings and possibly in the production of artistic murals across the Alentejo region since pre-historic times. An integrated methodology incorporating laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and spectra-colorimetric analysis (CIELAB coordinates and reflectance curves), complemented by XRD, WDXRF, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, and granulometric analysis, was used to characterize thirty-one Alentejo colored earths in an effort to correlate provenance with pigments properties. Data obtained from elemental analysis (major and trace) revealed a generic and similar elemental “fingerprint” that unable their distinction according to geographic provenance. Samples of weathered iron ore deposits derived from explored iron, copper, and sulfur mines are more easily discriminated using the chalcophilic (“sulfur-loving“) elements. Color analysis revealed a range of hues; olive-yellow to dark reddish-brown owing mainly to differences in the type and proportion of the color component present, independent of the accessory mineral.

  3. Mechanisms of surface runoff genesis on a subsurface drained soil affected by surface crusting: A field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augeard, Bénédicte; Kao, Cyril; Chaumont, Cédric; Vauclin, Michel

    Artificial drainage has been subject to widespread criticism because of its impact on water quality and because there is suspicion that it may have detrimental effects on flood genesis. The present work aims at a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling infiltration and surface runoff genesis, particularly in soils with artificial drainage and affected by surface crusting. A field experiment was conducted during one drainage season (November 2003-March 2004) in the Brie region (80 km east of Paris, France) on a subsurface drained silty soil. Water table elevation and surface runoff were monitored above the drain and at midpoint between drains. Soil water pressure head was measured at various depths and locations between the midpoint and the drain. Soil surface characteristics (microtopography and degree of structural and sedimentary crust development) were recorded regularly on the experimental site and on other plots of various drainage intensities. The results show that the first surface runoff events were induced by high water table. However, runoff was higher at midpoint between the drains because water table reached the soil surface at that point, thus considerably reducing infiltration capacity compared to that above the drain. Comparing different plots, the area with older drainage installation (1948) yielded the most surface runoff. Wider drain spacing, smaller drain depth and possible plugging may have led to a greater area of saturated soil between drains. During the winter period, the impact of raindrops induced the formation of a structural crust on the soil surface. Furthermore, the development of the sedimentary crust, which was favored by water actually flowing on the soil surface during the high water table periods could be correlated with surface runoff volume. The formation of this crust had a significant impact on runoff occurrence at the end of the winter. Therefore, poorly drained fields presented more favorable conditions for both

  4. Comparing soil and pond ash feedlot pen surfaces for environmental management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removing manure and replacing soil to maintain pen surfaces is expensive. Pond ash (PA), a coal-fired electrical generation by-product, has good support qualities. A study was conducted comparing the performance of pond ash (PA) surfaced pens with soil surface (SS) pens. Four pens of an eight pen se...

  5. Flow Cell Sampling Technique: A new approach to analyze physical soil and particle surface properties of undisturbed soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Jiem; Leue, Martin; Heinze, Stefanie; Bachmann, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    During unsaturated water conditions, water flow occurs in the soil mainly by water film flow and depends on moisture content and pore surface properties. More attention is attributed to coatings enclosing soil particles and thus may affect wetting properties as well as hydraulic soil functions. Particle coatings are most likely responsible for many adsorption processes and are expected to favor local heterogeneous microstructure with enhanced biological activity. Many of the effects described cannot be detected on the basis of conventional soil column experiments, which were usually made to study soil hydraulic processes or surface - soil solution exchange processes. The general objective of this study was to develop a new field sampling method to unravel heterogeneous flow processes on small scales in an undisturbed soil under controlled lab conditions. This will be done by using modified flow cells (Plexiglas). Beside the measurements within a flow cell as breakthrough curves, the developed technique has several additional advantages in contrast to common columns or existing flow chamber/cell designs. The direct modification from the sampling frame to the flow cell provides the advantage to combine several analyses. The new technique enables to cut up to 5 thin undisturbed soil slices (quasi-replicates) down to 10 and/or 5 mm. Relative large particles, for instance, may limit this sampling method. The large observation area of up to 150 cm2 allows the characterization of particle surface properties in a high spatial resolution within an undisturbed soil sample. This sampling technique, as shown in our study, has the opportunity to link soil wetting hydraulic and several particle surface properties to spatial soil heterogeneities. This was shown with tracer experiments, small-scale contact angle measurements and analyses of the spatial distribution of functional groups of soil organic matter via DRIFT mapping.

  6. Characterization Investigation Study: Volume 3, Radiological survey of surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Solow, A.J.; Phoenix, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Feed Materials Production Center was constructed to produce high purity uranium metal for use at various Department of Energy facilities. The waste products from these operations include general uncontaminated scrap and refuse, contaminated and uncontaminated metal scrap, waste oils, low-level radioactive waste, co-contaminated wastes, mixed waste, toxic waste, sludges from water treatment, and fly ash from the steam plant. This material is estimated to total more than 350,000 cubic meters. Other wastes stored in this area include laboratory chemicals and other combustible materials in the burn pit; fine waste stream sediments in the clear well; fly ash and waste oils in the two fly ash areas; lime-alum sludges and boiler plant blowdown in the lime sludge ponds; and nonradioactive sanitary waste, construction rubble, and asbestos in the sanitary landfill. A systematic survey of the surface soils throughout the Waste Storage Area, associated on-site drainages, and the fly ash piles was conducted using a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-Energy Radiation (FIDLER). Uranium is the most prevalent radioactive element in surface soil; U-238 is the principal radionuclide, ranging from 2.2 to 1790 pCi/g in the general Waste Storage Area. The maximum values for the next highest activity concentrations in the same area were 972 pCi/g for Th-230 and 298 pCi/g for U-234. Elevated activity concentrations of Th-230 were found along the K-65 slurry line, the maximum at 3010 pCi/g. U-238 had the highest value of 761 pCi/g in the drainage just south of pit no. 5. The upper fly ash area had the highest radionuclide activity concentrations in the surface soils with the maximum values for U-238 at 8600 pCi/g, U-235 at 2190 pCi/g, U-234 at 11,400 pCi/g, Tc-99 at 594 pCi/g, Ra-226 at 279 pCi/g, and Th-230 at 164 pCi/g.

  7. Thermography for estimating near-surface soil moisture under developing crop canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Previous investigations of thermal infrared techniques using remote sensors (thermography) for estimating soil water content have been limited primarily to bare soil. Ground-based and aircraft investigations were conducted to evaluate the potential for extending the thermography approach to developing crop canopies. A significant exponential relationship was found between the volumetric soil water content in the 0-4 cm soil layer and the diurnal difference between surface soil temperature measured at 0230 and 1330 LST (satellite overpass times of NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission - HCMM). Surface soil temperatures were estimated using minimum air temperature, percent cover of the canopy and remote measurements of canopy temperature. Results of the investigation demonstrated that thermography can potentially be used to estimate soil temperature and soil moisture throughout a complete growing season for a number of different crops and soils.

  8. Seed reserves diluted during surface soil reclamation in eastern Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scoles-Sciulla, S. J.; DeFalco, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Surface soil reclamation is used to increase the re-establishment of native vegetation following disturbance through preservation and eventual replacement of the indigenous seed reserves. Employed widely in the mining industry, soil reclamation has had variable success in re-establishing native vegetation in arid and semi-arid regions. We tested whether variable success could be due in part to a decrease of seed reserves during the reclamation process by measuring the change in abundance of germinable seed when surface soil was mechanically collected, stored in a soil pile for 4 months, and reapplied upon completion of a roadway. Overall seed reserve declines amounted to 86% of the original germinable seed in the soil. The greatest decrease in seed reserves occurred during soil collection (79% of original reserves), compared to the storage and reapplication stages. At nearby sites where stored surface soil had been reapplied, no perennial plant cover occurred from 0.5 to 5 years after application and <1% cover after 7 years compared to 5% cover in nearby undisturbed areas. The reduction in abundance of germinable seed during reclamation was primarily due to dilution of seed reserves when deeper soil fractions without seed were mixed with the surface soil during collection. Unless more precise techniques of surface soil collection are utilized, soil reclamation alone as a means for preserving native seed reserves is a method ill-suited for revegetating disturbed soils with a shallow seed bank, such as those found in the Mojave Desert. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  9. Comparison of remote measurements of infrared surface temperatures and microwave soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Eileen M.; Carlson, Toby N.

    1987-01-01

    Scatterometric measurements of active microwave soil water content and radiometric measurements of thermal IR surface temperatures were made simultaneously fron an aircraft flying 400 m over an agricultural region of France after harvesting. The surface temperatures were used to deterine soil moisture availability estimates according to the Carlson (1986) model. Surface temperature or soil moisture availability and microwave soil moisture were correlated. The standard error in the IR temperature and soil moisture availability due to influences other than soil moisture is found to be + or - 2 C. The standard deviation of the temperature/moisture availability is greater than this standard error. It is shown that correlations between soil water content and moisture availability improve with increasing spatial or temporal variance in the measure surface temperatures.

  10. Spatial and temporal dynamics of soil-surface carbon dioxide emissions in bioenergy corn rotations and reconstructed prairies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-surface CO2 efflux is a major export of carbon from the soil system. The interest in bioenergy cropping systems has raised questions as to the potential of management strategies to deteriorate soil carbon pools and soil quality. The objective of this research was to evaluate dynamic soil-surfac...

  11. Temporal stability analysis of surface and subsurface soil moisture for a transect in artificial revegetation desert area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-ping; Pan, Yan-xia; Zhang, Ya-feng; Dou, Deqiang; Hu, Rui; Zhang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    We studied the temporal stability characteristics of near-surface soil moisture.The strong temporal persistence existed for near-surface soil moisture.Identified representative locations well-represented the mean soil moisture content.The mean soil moisture contents can be predicted by other topography and soil factors.A priori identification of representative locations is presently infeasible for other fields.

  12. On the soil roughness parameterization problem in soil moisture retrieval of bare surfaces from Synthetic Aperture Radar 1959

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar has shown its large potential for retrieving soil moisture maps at regional scales. However, since the backscattered signal is determined by several surface characteristics, the retrieval of soil moisture is an ill-posed problem when using single configuration imagery. Unles...

  13. The role of soil surface water regimes and raindrop impact on hillslope soil erosion and nutrient losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface water regimes on hill-slopes may appreciably affect soil erosion and nutrient losses. Different water regimes are often prevalent on different parts of the slope and therefore may affect these losses differently. A laboratory rainfall simulator study was conducted to determine the effec...

  14. Explosive particle soil surface dispersion model for detonated military munitions.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, John E; Rishel, Jeremy P; Walsh, Marianne E; Walsh, Michael R; Taylor, Susan

    2015-07-01

    The accumulation of high explosive mass residue from the detonation of military munitions on training ranges is of environmental concern because of its potential to contaminate the soil, surface water, and groundwater. The US Department of Defense wants to quantify, understand, and remediate high explosive mass residue loadings that might be observed on active firing ranges. Previously, efforts using various sampling methods and techniques have resulted in limited success, due in part to the complicated dispersion pattern of the explosive particle residues upon detonation. In our efforts to simulate particle dispersal for high- and low-order explosions on hypothetical firing ranges, we use experimental particle data from detonations of munitions from a 155-mm howitzer, which are common military munitions. The mass loadings resulting from these simulations provide a previously unattained level of detail to quantify the explosive residue source-term for use in soil and water transport models. In addition, the resulting particle placements can be used to test, validate, and optimize particle sampling methods and statistical models as applied to firing ranges. Although the presented results are for a hypothetical 155-mm howitzer firing range, the method can be used for other munition types once the explosive particle characteristics are known.

  15. Controls on deep versus near-surface soil CO2 production and soil organic matter turnover (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SIX, J. W.; Berhe, A.; Yanni, S.; Gillabel, J.; van oost, K.

    2013-12-01

    At the soil profile scale, driving factors of decomposition and C turnover can change independently with depth, making a depth-specific assessment of controlling factors, such as temperature, dry-wet cycles, and vertical soil movement, is essential. In a set of depth explicit experiments and modeling exercises, we have tried to elucidate the effects of these controlling factors within the soil profile. In a first experiment, we combined 13C- and 14C-methodology with fractionation techniques to assess the C turnover of labile versus resistant C across the soil profile. As expected, the turnover of labile C increased drastically with increasing soil depth and had a Q10 of 2.8 in the surface layer. In a second experiment, we measured CO2, O2, temperature, and soil water content in two plots at 15, 30, 50, 70, and 90 cm depths to further elucidate the temperature sensitivity of soil C across the profile. Under non-limiting moisture (θ>20%) the Q10 value for the A horizon was 5.3 decreasing to 1.3 at θ<10%. In the C2 horizon at θ>20%, Q10 was 3.1 indicating that it is less sensitive to temperature variations than topsoil when moisture is non-limiting. In a follow-up third experiment, we conducted a wetting and drying experiment to assess the effect of changing moisture regimes on deep soil C dynamics. We found that soil CO2 production across the soil profile was more sensitive to changes in soil moisture during the drying than wetting phases, especially in the top 30 cm of soil. On the contrary, soil CO2 production across the soil profile was more sensitive to changes in soil temperature during wetting than drying phase. Deep soil CO2 production was significantly more sensitive to changes in temperature during the wetting phase, compared to SOM in topsoil layers. Finally, we developed a depth-explicit SOM model based on carbon isotopes and radionuclides. We found that it was essential to include vertical soil transport and its depth attenuation in order to correctly

  16. Nocturnal soil CO2 uptake and its relationship to sub-surface soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes in a Chihuahuan Desert shrubland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite their prevalence, little attention has been given to quantifying aridland soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes over prolonged, annually occurring dry periods. We measured surface soil respiration (Rsoil), volumetric soil moisture and temperature in inter- and under-canopy soils, sub-surface soi...

  17. Effect of soil surface conditions on runoff velocity and sediment mean aggregate diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César Ramos, Júlio; Bertol, Ildegardis; Paz González, Antonio; de Souza Werner, Romeu; Marioti, Juliana; Henrique Bandeira, Douglas; Andrighetti Leolatto, Lidiane

    2013-04-01

    Soil cover and soil management are the factors that most influence soil erosion by water, because they directly affect soil surface roughness and surface cover. The main effect of soil cover by crop residues consists in dissipation of kinetic energy of raindrops and also partly kinetic energy of runoff, so that the soil disaggregation is considerably reduced but, in addition, soil cover captures detached soil particles, retains water on its surface and decreases runoff volume and velocity. In turn, soil surface roughness, influences soil surface water storage and infiltration and also runoff volume and velocity, sediment retention and subsequently water and sediment losses. Based on the above rationale, we performed a field experiment to assess the influence of soil cover and soil surface roughness on decay of runoff velocity as well as on mean diameter of transported sediments (D50 index). The following treatments were evaluated: SRR) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on a smooth soil surfcace, SRV) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa) on a smooth soil surface, SSR) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass resulting in a rough surface, SSV) scarification after cultivation of common vetch resulting in a rough surface, and SBS) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. The field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator. During each test, rain intensity was 60 mmhr-1, whereas rain duration was 90 minutes. Runoff velocity showed no significant differences between cultivated treatments. However, when compared to bare soil treatment, SBS (0.178 m s-1) and irrespective of the presence of surface crop residues or scarification operations, cultivated soil treatments significantly reduced runoff velocity

  18. Characterising soil surface condition and carbon vulnerability using spatial statistics and directional reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2008-12-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of Soil Organic Matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to soil organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness, indicating that a physical soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Remotely sensed data can provide a cost- effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Growing recognition of the importance of the directional reflectance domain has highlighted their potential application for monitoring changes in soil surface roughness, associated with the breakdown of macro-aggregates and therefore SOM release. This is particularly relevant for soil condition monitoring because during soil structural degradation, changes in the self-shadowing effects of soil aggregates has a measurable effect on directional reflectance factors measured by proximal remote sensing devices. Field and laboratory data are therefore required for an empirical understanding of soil directional reflectance, underpinning subsequent model development. This experiment details the use of hyperspectral multiple view angle, proximal reflectance data (400-2500 nm) for describing changes in soil surface structure. Five different soil crusting states were produced, simulating a progressive decline in soil surface structure using artificial rainfall. Each stage was characterised using a close-range laser scanning device with a 2 mm spatial sampling methodology. Data were analysed within a geostatistical framework, where variogram analysis quantitatively confirmed the change in soil surface structure during crusting (sill variance = 0

  19. A physical scaling model for aggregation and disaggregation of field-scale surface soil moisture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Richa; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are needed as measurements and desired predictions are often not available at concurrent spatial support volumes or temporal discretizations. Surface soil moisture values of interest to hydrologic studies are estimated using ground based measurement techniques or utilizing remote sensing platforms. Remote sensing based techniques estimate field-scale surface soil moisture values, but are unable to provide the local-scale soil moisture information that is obtained from local measurements. Further, obtaining field-scale surface moisture values using ground-based measurements is exhaustive and time consuming. To bridge this scale mismatch, we develop analytical expressions for surface soil moisture based on sharp-front approximation of the Richards equation and assumed log-normal distribution of the spatial surface saturated hydraulic conductivity field. Analytical expressions for field-scale evolution of surface soil moisture to rainfall events are utilized to obtain aggregated and disaggregated response of surface soil moisture evolution with knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The utility of the analytical model is demonstrated through numerical experiments involving 3-D simulations of soil moisture and Monte-Carlo simulations for 1-D renderings—with soil moisture dynamics being represented by the Richards equation in each instance. Results show that the analytical expressions developed here show promise for a principled way of scaling surface soil moisture.

  20. A physical scaling model for aggregation and disaggregation of field-scale surface soil moisture dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Richa; Govindaraju, Rao S

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are needed as measurements and desired predictions are often not available at concurrent spatial support volumes or temporal discretizations. Surface soil moisture values of interest to hydrologic studies are estimated using ground based measurement techniques or utilizing remote sensing platforms. Remote sensing based techniques estimate field-scale surface soil moisture values, but are unable to provide the local-scale soil moisture information that is obtained from local measurements. Further, obtaining field-scale surface moisture values using ground-based measurements is exhaustive and time consuming. To bridge this scale mismatch, we develop analytical expressions for surface soil moisture based on sharp-front approximation of the Richards equation and assumed log-normal distribution of the spatial surface saturated hydraulic conductivity field. Analytical expressions for field-scale evolution of surface soil moisture to rainfall events are utilized to obtain aggregated and disaggregated response of surface soil moisture evolution with knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The utility of the analytical model is demonstrated through numerical experiments involving 3-D simulations of soil moisture and Monte-Carlo simulations for 1-D renderings-with soil moisture dynamics being represented by the Richards equation in each instance. Results show that the analytical expressions developed here show promise for a principled way of scaling surface soil moisture.

  1. Application of a Mesoscale Atmospheric Coupled Fire Model BRAMS-FIRE to Alentejo Woodland Fire and Comparison of Performance with the Fire Model WRF-Sfire.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, S. R.; Menezes, I. C.; Stockler, R.; Mello, R.; Ribeiro, N. A.; Corte-Real, J. A. M.; Surový, P.

    2014-12-01

    Models of fuel with the identification of vegetation patterns of Montado ecosystem in Portugal was incorporated in the mesoscale Brazilian Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS) and coupled with a spread woodland fire model. The BRAMS-FIRE is a new system developed by the "Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos" (CPTEC/INPE, Brazil) and the "Instituto de Ciências Agrárias e Ambientais Mediterrâneas" (ICAAM, Portugal). The fire model used in this effort was originally, developed by Mandel et al. (2013) and further incorporated in the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF). Two grids of high spatial resolution were configured with surface input data and fuel models integrated for simulations using both models BRAMS-FIRE and WRF-SFIRE. One grid was placed in the plain land near Beja and the other one in the hills of Ossa to evaluate different types of fire propagation and calibrate BRAMS-FIRE. The objective is simulating the effects of atmospheric circulation in local scale, namely the movements of the heat front and energy release associated to it, obtained by this two models in an episode of woodland fire which took place in Alentejo area in the last decade, for application to planning and evaluations of agro woodland fire risks. We aim to model the behavior of forest fires through a set of equations whose solutions provide quantitative values of one or more variables related to the propagation of fire, described by semi-empirical expressions that are complemented by experimental data allow to obtain the main variables related advancing the perimeter of the fire, as the propagation speed, the intensity of the fire front and fuel consumption and its interaction with atmospheric dynamic system. References Mandel, J., J. D. Beezley, G. Kelman, A. K. Kochanski, V. Y. Kondratenko, B. H. Lynn, and M. Vejmelka, 2013. New features in WRF-SFIRE and the wildfire forecasting and danger system in Israel. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, submitted

  2. Application of a mesoscale atmospheric coupled fire model BRAMS-SFIRE to Alentejo wildland fire and comparison of performance with the fire model WRF-SFIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Isilda; Freitas, Saulo; Stockler, Rafael; Mello, Rafael; Ribeiro, Nuno; Corte-Real, João; Surový, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Models of fuel with the identification of vegetation patterns of Montado ecosystem in Portugal was incorporated in the mesoscale Brazilian Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS) and coupled with a spread wildland fire model. The BRAMS-FIRE is a new system developed by the Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC/INPE, Brazil) and the Instituto de Ciências Agrárias e Ambientais Mediterrâneas (ICAAM, Portugal). The fire model used in this effort was originally, developed by Mandel et al. (2013) and further incorporated in the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF). Two grids of high spatial resolution were configured with surface input data and fuel models integrated for simulations using both models BRAMS-SFIRE and WRF-SFIRE. One grid was placed in the plain land and the other one in the hills to evaluate different types of fire propagation and calibrate BRAMS-SFIRE. The objective is simulating the effects of atmospheric circulation in local scale, namely the movements of the heat front and energy release associated to it, obtained by this two models in an episode of wildland fire which took place in Alentejo area in the last decade, for application to planning and evaluations of agro wildland fire risks. We aim to model the behavior of forest fires through a set of equations whose solutions provide quantitative values of one or more variables related to the propagation of fire, described by semi-empirical expressions that are complemented by experimental data allow to obtain the main variables related advancing the perimeter of the fire, as the propagation speed, the intensity of the fire front and fuel consumption and its interaction with atmospheric dynamic system References Mandel, J., J. D. Beezley, G. Kelman, A. K. Kochanski, V. Y. Kondratenko, B. H. Lynn, and M. Vejmelka, 2013. New features in WRF-SFIRE and the wildfire forecasting and danger system in Israel. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, submitted, Numerical Wildfires, Carg

  3. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis to identify sources of soil in surface water.

    PubMed

    Banowetz, Gary M; Whittaker, Gerald W; Dierksen, Karen P; Azevedo, Mark D; Kennedy, Ann C; Griffith, Stephen M; Steiner, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to improve land-use practices to prevent contamination of surface waters with soil are limited by an inability to identify the primary sources of soil present in these waters. We evaluated the utility of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles of dry reference soils for multivariate statistical classification of soils collected from surface waters adjacent to agricultural production fields and a wooded riparian zone. Trials that compared approaches to concentrate soil from surface water showed that aluminum sulfate precipitation provided comparable yields to that obtained by vacuum filtration and was more suitable for handling large numbers of samples. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles were developed from reference soils collected from contrasting land uses in different seasons to determine whether specific fatty acids would consistently serve as variables in multivariate statistical analyses to permit reliable classification of soils. We used a Bayesian method and an independent iterative process to select appropriate fatty acids and found that variable selection was strongly impacted by the season during which soil was collected. The apparent seasonal variation in the occurrence of marker fatty acids in FAME profiles from reference soils prevented preparation of a standardized set of variables. Nevertheless, accurate classification of soil in surface water was achieved utilizing fatty acid variables identified in seasonally matched reference soils. Correlation analysis of entire chromatograms and subsequent discriminant analyses utilizing a restricted number of fatty acid variables showed that FAME profiles of soils exposed to the aquatic environment still had utility for classification at least 1 wk after submersion. PMID:16391284

  4. The SMAP level 4 surface and root zone soil moisture data assimilation product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, ho...

  5. Calibration and validation of the COSMOS rover for surface soil moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mobile COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS) rover may be useful for validating satellite-based estimates of near surface soil moisture, but the accuracy with which the rover can measure 0-5 cm soil moisture has not been previously determined. Our objectives were to calibrate and va...

  6. Mutagenicity of surface soil from residential areas in Kyoto city, Japan, and identification of major mutagens.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tetsushi; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Konishi, Erina; Hoshino, Yuri; Hasei, Tomohiro; Asanoma, Masaharu; Hirayama, Teruhisa; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the mutagenic potential of surface soil in residential areas in Kyoto city, surface soil samples were collected twice or three times from 12 sites, and their organic extracts were examined by the Ames/Salmonella assay. Almost all (>92%) samples showed mutagenicity in TA98 without and with S9 mix, and 8/25 (32%) samples showed high (1000-10,000 revertants/g of soil) or extreme (>10,000 revertants/g of soil) activity. Moreover, to identify the major mutagens in surface soil in Kyoto, a soil sample was collected at a site where soil contamination with mutagens was severe and continual. The soil extract, which showed potent mutagenicity in TA98 without S9 mix, was fractionated by diverse column chromatography methods. Five major mutagenic constituents were isolated and identified to be 1,6-dinitropyrene (DNP), 1,8-DNP, 1,3,6-trinitropyrene (TNP), 3,9-dinitrofluoranthene (DNF), and 3,6-dinitrobenzo[e]pyrene (DNBeP) by co-chromatography using high performance liquid chromatography and spectral analysis. Contribution ratios of 1,6-DNP, 1,8-DNP, 1,3,6-TNP, 3,9-DNF, and 3,6-DNBeP to total mutagenicity of the soil extract in TA98 without S9 mix were 3, 10, 10, 10, and 6%, respectively. These nitroarenes were detected in surface soil samples collected from four different residential sites in other prefectures, and their contribution ratios to soil mutagenicity were from 0.7 to 22%. These results suggest that surface soil in residential areas in Kyoto was widely contaminated with mutagens and there were some sites where surface soils were heavily polluted. 1,6-DNP, 1,8-DNP, 1,3,6-TNP, 3,9-DNF, and 3,6-DNBeP may be major mutagenic constituents that contaminate surface soil in Kyoto and other residential areas.

  7. A physically based surface resistance model for evaporation from bare soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2015-02-01

    The resistance to vapor transfer across the soil-air interface, termed surface resistance, plays an important role in determining the evaporation rate from unsaturated bare soils. A physically based analytical model is developed to describe the surface resistance under varying liquid water saturation. When the vaporization plane remains in the topmost soil layer (TSL), the model considers the vapor transport through the external diffusive layer (EDL), and the hydraulic connection between the capillary water in the TSL and underneath water source for evaporation. When the vaporization plane develops below the TSL, the model predicts the surface resistance by taking into account the development of the dry soil layer, the major barrier for vapor transport at the soil-drying stage. With the consideration of the soil pore size distribution, the model is applicable to different soil types. The model was validated against six sets of laboratory experiments on the drying process of initially water-saturated soil columns under nonisothermal conditions. These experiments were conducted using different soil types and/or heat intensities above the soil surface. The model was found to perform well over intermediate and low liquid water saturation ranges while underestimating the surface resistance for the high liquid water saturation range. The results suggest that the model overall represents reasonably well the processes underlying the vapor transfer across the soil-air interface. Future model improvement may be gained by considering the hydraulic connection between the capillary water and film water in the TSL.

  8. Using Remote Sensing Platforms to Estimate Near-Surface Soil Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. G.; Shaw, J. N.; Rickman, D.; Mask, P. L.; Wersinger, J. M.; Luvall, J.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of near-surface soil properties via remote sensing (RS) could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction, fertilization regimes, and allocation of agrochemicals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and near surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil water content, soil organic carbon (SOC), particle size distribution (PSD), and citrate dithionite extractable iron (Fed) content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured at sampling. Results showed RS data acquired from lands with less than 4 % surface soil water content best approximated near-surface soil properties at the Coastal Plain site where loamy sand textured surfaces were predominant. Utilizing a combination of band ratios in stepwise regression, Fed (r2 = 0.61), SOC (r2 = 0.36), sand (r2 = 0.52), and clay (r2 = 0.76) were related to RS data at the Coastal Plain site. In contrast, the more clayey Ridge and Valley soils had r-squares of 0.50, 0.36, 0.17, and 0.57. for Fed, SOC, sand and clay, respectively. Use of estimated eEmissivity did not generally improve estimates of near-surface soil attributes.

  9. Improved Prediction of Quasi-Global Vegetation Conditions Using Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Crow, Wade

    2012-01-01

    The added value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and soil moisture estimates obtained both before and after the assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) into a soil water balance model. Higher soil moisture/VI lag correlations imply an enhanced ability to predict future vegetation conditions using estimates of current soil moisture. Results demonstrate that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals substantially improve the performance of a global drought monitoring system - particularly in sparsely-instrumented areas of the world where high-quality rainfall observations are unavailable.

  10. The use of physicochemical methods to detect organic food soils on stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, K A; Benson, P; Smith, L A; Verran, J

    2009-11-01

    Food processing surfaces fouled with organic material pose problems ranging from aesthetic appearance, equipment malfunction and product contamination. Despite the importance of organic soiling for subsequent product quality, little is known about the interaction between surfaces and organic soil components. A range of complex and defined food soils was applied to 304 stainless steel (SS) surfaces to determine the effect of type and concentration of soil on surface physicochemical parameters, viz surface hydrophobicity (DeltaG(iwi)), surface free energy (gamma(s)), Lifshitz van der Waals (gamma_LW(s)), Lewis acid base (gamma_AB(s)), electron acceptor (gamma_+(s) ) and electron donor (gamma_-(s) ) measurements. When compared to the control surface, changes in gamma_AB(s), gamma_+(s) and gamma_-(s) were indicative of surface soiling. However, soil composition and surface coverage were heterogeneous, resulting in complex data being generated from which trends could not be discerned. These results demonstrate that the retention of food soil produces changes in the physicochemical parameters of the surface that could be used to indicate the hygienic status of a surface. PMID:20183133

  11. Soil surface potentials induced by ITAIPU HVDC ground return current. Part I - Theoretical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarsky, D.; Pinto, L.J.; Caroli, C.E.; Santos, N. )

    1988-07-01

    The methodology for the theoretical evaluation of the soil surface potentials induced in ground return mode, is presented. For each electrode, soil resistivity data acquisition is discussed, giving rise to soil models amenable to mathematical analysis. For one electrode, the soil model considers a slanting interface between the first two layers, empirically considering the influence of a third deeper layer. For the other, the model consists of four different soil layers with horizontal interfaces, for which a special numerical approach is used, that can be extended to the case of AC induction between parallel wires over multilayer soils.

  12. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Mathilde I; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2008-12-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a time-course experiment was performed under laboratory conditions. Earthworms were incubated in perspex columns filled with sandy soil (2% organic matter, 2.9% clay) or loamy clay soil (15% organic matter, 20% clay), and surface casts were collected after up to 80 days. On the sandy soil, A. caliginosa and L. rubellus brought approximately 7.1-16 g dry wt. casts/g fresh wt. earthworm to the surface, which is significantly more than A. chlorotica and L. terrestris (2.5-5.0 g dry wt./g fresh wt.). A. caliginosa was the only species that produced significantly more surface casts in the sandy soil than in the loamy clay soil. In the loamy clay soil, no differences in biomass-corrected casting rates were found among the species. Surface casting rates tended to decrease after 20 days. Considering the densities of the different species in a Dutch floodplain area Afferdensche and Deestsche Waarden, surface cast production is estimated to amount to 2.0 kg dry soil/m2 after 80 days, which could be extrapolated to 2.7-9.1 kg/m2 per year. These amounts correspond to a surface deposition of a layer of approximately 1.9-6.5 mm/year, which is of the same order or even slightly higher than the sedimentation rate and much higher than the amount of soil brought to the soil surface by bioturbating small mammals. PMID:18771792

  13. Changes in Temperature and Fate of Soil Organic Matter in an Andisol due to Soil Surface Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchi, Atsuko; Nishimura, Taku; Mizoguchi, Masaru; Imoto, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    This is a print of a camera-ready Japanese manuscript for the Transactions of JSIDRE. This will provide an example and directions for the layout and font size/style to be used. Please refer to this when preparing the headings, figures/table and text of your manuscript. The manuscript should be submitted on A4 size. Changes in temperature, soil moisture, and carbon and nitrogen contents were measured in Andisol under soil surface burning. Soil samples were packed into an unglazed cylinder of 15 cm inner diameter and 30 cm high. Charcoal was burned for 6 hours on the surface of the soil column. During the burning soil surface temperature rose to between 600-700°C. In initially wet soil, rise in soil temperature was retarded for a while at around 95-100°C. On the other hand, in initially dry Toyoura sand showed more rapid temperature increase without retardation. The temperature retardation in the wet soil could be caused by consumption of latent heat by vaporization of soil water. Rate of proceeding of the 100°C front was proportional to square root of the burning time. This indicates that higher the initial volumetric water content, shallower the depth affected by burning. Soil samples suffered temperature above 500°C still had total carbon and nitrogen contents of over 20 and 1 g kg-1, respectively, whereas the soil that was heated up to over 500°C by muffle furnace contained less than 0.4 and 0.1 g kg-1 of the carbon and nitrogen.

  14. Parameterization of albedo, thermal inertia, and surface roughness of desert scrub/sandy soil surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Mccumber, M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral albedo, A sub n, for the direct solar beam is defined as A sub n (r sub i,s, theta sub 0) = r sub i exp(-s tan theta sub 0)1-I(s) where I(s) is the integral over all reflection angles describing the interception by the absorbing plants of the flux reflected from the soil, r sub i soil reflectance, assumed Lambertian, S the projection on a vertical plane of plants per unit surface area, and theta sub 0 is the solar zenith angle. Hemispheric reflectance for the direct solar beam equals 1-I(s) times the reflectance to the zenith. The values of s of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 respectively quantify sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert scrub. Thin plants are assumed to be of negligible thermal inertia, and thus directly yield the absorbed insolation to the atmosphere. Surface thermal inertia is therefore effectively reduced. The ratio of surface roughness height to plant height is parameterized for sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert-scrub as a function of s based on data expressing the dependence of this ratio on plant silhouette.

  15. Transport of phenolic compounds from leaf surface of creosotebush and tarbush to soil surface by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hyder, P W; Fredrickson, E L; Estell, R E; Lucero, M E

    2002-12-01

    During the last 100 years, many desert grasslands have been replaced by shrublands. One possible mechanism by which shrubs outcompete grasses is through the release of compounds that interfere with neighboring plants. Our objective was to examine the movement of secondary compounds from the leaf surface of creosotebush and tarbush to surrounding soil surfaces via precipitation. Units consisting of a funnel and bottle were used to collect stemflow, throughfall, and interspace precipitation samples from 20 creosotebush (two morphotypes) and 10 tarbush plants during three summer rainfall events in 1998. Precipitation samples were analyzed for total phenolics (both species) and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (creosotebush only). Phenolics were detected in throughfall and stemflow of both species with stemflow containing greater concentrations than throughfall (0.088 and 0.086 mg/ml for stemflow and 0.022 and 0.014 mg/ml for throughfall in creosotebush morphotypes U and V, respectively: 0.044 and 0.006 mg/ml for tarbush stemflow and throughfall, respectively). Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was not found in any precipitation collections. The results show that phenolic compounds produced by creosotebush and tarbush can be transported to the soil surface by precipitation, but whether concentrations are ecologically significant is uncertain. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was not present in the runoff from creosotebush.

  16. Application of IEM model on soil moisture and surface roughness estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jiancheng; Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Hsu, A. Y.; Engman, E. T.

    1995-01-01

    Monitoring spatial and temporal changes of soil moisture are of importance to hydrology, meteorology, and agriculture. This paper reports a result on study of using L-band SAR imagery to estimate soil moisture and surface roughness for bare fields. Due to limitations of the Small Perturbation Model, it is difficult to apply this model on estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness directly. In this study, we show a simplified model derived from the Integral Equation Model for estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness. We show a test of this model using JPL L-band AIRSAR data.

  17. A long-term simulation of surface fluxes and soil moisture

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Lee, R.L.; Ek, M.

    1993-09-01

    The heat fluxes over land surfaces play important roles in shaping atmospheric flows on various temporal and spatial scales. Fast and McCorcle showed that sea-breeze-like mesoscale circulations can develop over land surfaces of heterogeneous soil type and soil moisture. Evaporation from land surfaces is one of the major moisture sources for the summertime convective precipitation in extratropics. General circulation model studies also indicate that surface characteristics cause a significant impact on the simulated climate.

  18. Impact of sea-level rise on earthquake and landslide triggering offshore the Alentejo margin (SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, M. C.; Roque, C.; Luttrell, K. M.; Vázquez, J. T.; Alonso, B.

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes and submarine landslides are recurrent and widespread manifestations of fault activity offshore SW Iberia. The present work tests the effects of sea-level rise on offshore fault systems using Coulomb stress change calculations across the Alentejo margin. Large-scale faults capable of generating large earthquakes and tsunamis in the region, especially NE-SW trending thrusts and WNW-ESE trending dextral strike-slip faults imaged at basement depths, are either blocked or unaffected by flexural effects related to sea-level changes. Large-magnitude earthquakes occurring along these structures may, therefore, be less frequent during periods of sea-level rise. In contrast, sea-level rise promotes shallow fault ruptures within the sedimentary sequence along the continental slope and upper rise within distances of <100 km from the coast. The results suggest that the occurrence of continental slope failures may either increase (if triggered by shallow fault ruptures) or decrease (if triggered by deep fault ruptures) as a result of sea-level rise. Moreover, observations of slope failures affecting the area of the Sines contourite drift highlight the role of sediment properties as preconditioning factors in this region.

  19. Role of soil health in maintaining environmental sustainability of surface coal mining.

    PubMed

    Acton, Peter M; Fox, James F; Campbell, J Elliott; Jones, Alice L; Rowe, Harold; Martin, Darren; Bryson, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    Mountaintop coal mining (MCM) in the Southern Appalachian forest region greatly impacts both soil and aquatic ecosystems. Policy and practice currently in place emphasize water quality and soil stability but do not consider upland soil health. Here we report soil organic carbon (SOC) measurements and other soil quality indicators for reclaimed soils in the Southern Appalachian forest region to quantify the health of the soil ecosystem. The SOC sequestration rate of the MCM soils was 1.3 MgC ha(-1) yr(-1) and stocks ranged from 1.3 ± 0.9 to 20.9 ± 5.9 Mg ha(-1) and contained only 11% of the SOC of surrounding forest soils. Comparable reclaimed mining soils reported in the literature that are supportive of soil ecosystem health had SOC stocks 2.5-5 times greater than the MCM soils and sequestration rates were also 1.6-3 times greater. The high compaction associated with reclamation in this region greatly reduces both the vegetative rooting depth and infiltration of the soil and increases surface runoff, thus bypassing the ability of soil to naturally filter groundwater. In the context of environmental sustainability of MCM, it is proposed that the entire watershed ecosystem be assessed and that a revision of current policy be conducted to reflect the health of both water and soil.

  20. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, Peter; Button, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen

    2015-06-14

    The goals of the project were: Determine applicability of transmission line method (TLM) to evaluate sheet resistance of soils on module glass;
    Evaluate various soils on glass for changes in surface resistance and their ability to promote potential-induced degradation with humidity (PID);
    Evaluate PID characteristics, rate, and leakage current increases on full-size mc-Si modules associated with a conductive soil on the surface.

  1. Phosphorus solubility of agricultural soils: a surface charge and phosphorus-31 NMR speciation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated ten soils from six states in United States to determine the relationship between potentiometric titration derived soil surface charge and Phosphorus-31 (P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) speciation with the concentration of water-extractable P (WEP). The surface charge value at the...

  2. Role of Subsurface Physics in the Assimilation of Surface Soil Moisture Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, R. H.

    2010-01-01

    Root zone soil moisture controls the land-atmosphere exchange of water and energy and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly scales. Assimilation of satellite-based surface soil moisture observations into a land surface model is an effective way to estimate large-scale root zone soil moisture. The propagation of surface information into deeper soil layers depends on the model-specific representation of subsurface physics that is used in the assimilation system. In a suite of experiments we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture observations into four different models (Catchment, Mosaic, Noah and CLM) using the Ensemble Kalman Filter. We demonstrate that identical twin experiments significantly overestimate the information that can be obtained from the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations. The second key result indicates that the potential of surface soil moisture assimilation to improve root zone information is higher when the surface to root zone coupling is stronger. Our experiments also suggest that (faced with unknown true subsurface physics) overestimating surface to root zone coupling in the assimilation system provides more robust skill improvements in the root zone compared with underestimating the coupling. When CLM is excluded from the analysis, the skill improvements from using models with different vertical coupling strengths are comparable for different subsurface truths. Finally, the skill improvements through assimilation were found to be sensitive to the regional climate and soil types.

  3. Implementation of surface soil moisture data assimilation with watershed scale distributed hydrological model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper aims to investigate how surface soil moisture data assimilation affects each hydrologic process and how spatially varying inputs affect the potential capability of surface soil moisture assimilation at the watershed scale. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is coupled with a watershed scal...

  4. Improving satellite-based rainfall estimates over land using spaceborne surface soil moisture retrievals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over land, remotely-sensed surface soil moisture and precipitation accumulation retrievals contain complementary information that can be exploited for the mutual benefit of both products. Here a Kalman filtering based tool is developed that utilizes a time series of spaceborne surface soil moisture ...

  5. Impact of soil vertical water movement on the energy balance of different land surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqiu; Chen, George Tai-Jen; Hu, Yanbing

    2007-08-01

    The soil heat flux determination method proposed by Gao (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 114:165-178, 2005) is discussed for (1) dry surfaces, (2) bare soil or sparse short-grass lands, and (3) dense-grass surfaces or forest. Our analysis shows that, when neglecting the contribution of soil vertical water movement to soil heat flux, the energy components measured independently will (1) still achieve balance over dry surfaces, and (2) be significantly in imbalance over bare soil or sparse short-grass lands. The mean of bare ground evaporation modeled by SiB2 is 1.58 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2), and the mean of soil water flux obtained by the method of Gao is 1.22 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2) for the Naqu site in the summer of 1998. Comparison of the bare ground evaporation with the mean of soil water flux shows a difference, the causes of which are investigated. Physically, the bare ground evaporation is equal to the sum of soil water flux and water content change in the soil surface layer. Because the bare ground evaporation is very limited for the dense-grass surfaces or forest, our analysis implies that the energy imbalance encountered over the dense-grass or forest is not caused by the fact that previous researchers neglected soil water movements in their energy budget analyses. PMID:17429698

  6. Soil surface CO2 fluxes and the carbon budget of a grassland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Garcia, R.; Verma, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of soil surface CO2 fluxes are reported for three sites within the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) area, and simple empirical equations are fit to the data to provide predictions of soil fluxes from environmental observations. A prototype soil chamber, used to make the flux measurements, is described and tested by comparing CO2 flux measurements to a 40-L chamber, a 1-m/cu chamber, and eddy correlation. Results suggest that flux measurements with the prototype chamber are consistent with measurements by other methods to within about 20 percent. A simple empirical equation based on 10-cm soil temperature, 0- to 10-cm soil volumetric water content, and leaf area index predicts the soil surface CO2 flux with a rms error of 1.2 micro-mol sq m/s for all three sites. Further evidence supports using this equation to evaluate soil surface CO2 during the 1987 FIFE experiment. The soil surface CO2 fluxes when averaged over 24 hours are comparable to daily gross canopy photosynthetic rates. For 6 days of data the net daily accumulation of carbon is about 0.6 g CO2 sq m/d; this is only a few percent of the daily gross accumulation of carbon by photosynthesis. As the soil became drier in 1989, the net accumulation of carbon by the prairie increased, suggesting that the soil flux is more sensitive to temperature and drought than the photosynthetic fluxes.

  7. Predicting root zone soil moisture with satellite near-surface moisture data in semiarid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfreda, S.; Baldwin, D. C.; Keller, K.; Smithwick, E. A. H.; Caylor, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most critical variables in semiarid environment is the soil water content that represents a controlling factor for both ecological and hydrological processes. Soil moisture monitoring over large scales may be extremely useful, but it is limited by the fact that most of the available tools provides only surface measurements not representative of the effective amount of water stored in the subsurface. Therefore, a methodology able to infer root-zone soil moisture starting from surface measurements is highly desirable. Recently a new simplified formulation has been introduced to provide a formal description of the mathematical relationship between surface measurements and root-zone soil moisture (Manfreda et al., HESS 2014). This is a physically based approach derived from the soil water balance equation, where different soil water loss functions have been explored in order to take into account for the non-linear processes governing soil water fluxes. The study highlighted that the soil loss function is the key for such relationship that is therefore strongly influenced by soil type and physiological plant types. The new formulation has been tested on soil moisture based on measurements taken from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) and the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) databases. The method sheds lights on the physical controls for soil moisture dynamics and on the possibility to use such a simplified method for the description of root-zone soil moisture. Furthermore, the method has been also couple with an Enasamble Kalman Filter (EnKF) in order to optimize its performances for the large scale monitoring based the new satellite near-surface moisture data (SMAP). The optimized SMAR-EnKF model does well in both wet and dry climates and across many different soil types (51 SCAN locations) providing a strategy for real-time soil moisture monitoring.

  8. Surface Soil Moisture from Satellite Altimetry- from CryoSat2 to Sentinel3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, P. A. M.; Balmbra, R.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring surface soil moisture using satellite radar altimetry is a comparatively novel application. Detailed models of surface brightness, regressed to dry earth conditions, are combined with multi-mission recalibrated backscatter to yield time series of surface soil moisture. This method can be utilized wherever the surface is dry for at least part of each year; thus the current application is over desert and semi-arid terrain where other remote sensing techniques encounter difficulties. Re-crafting these models for Cryosat2 has achieved model coherence better than 0.3dB. This paper presents results from surface soil moisture measurements from Cryosat2 data over desert surfaces in both SAR and LRM modes. The spatial resolution that can be achieved with Cryosat2 data is discussed, and results from both SAR and LRM mode are used to confirm the potential of this technique to retrieve surface soil moisture from Sentinel3 altimeter waveforms.

  9. [Effects of soil crusts on surface hydrology in the semiarid Loess hilly area].

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wen, Zhi; Chen, Li-Ding; Chen, Jin; Wu, Dong-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Soil crusts are distributed extensively in the Chinese Loess Plateau and play key roles in surface hydrological processes. In this study, a typical loess hilly region in Anjiagou catchment, Dingxi city, Gansu province was selected as the study region, and soil crusts in the catchment were investigated. Then, the hydrological effect of soil crusts was studied by using multi-sampling and hydrological monitoring experiments. Several key results were shown as follows. Firstly, compared with bared soil without crust cover, soil crusts can greatly reduce the bulk density, improve the porosity of soil, and raise the holding capacity of soil moisture which ranges from 1.4 to 1.9 times of that of bared soil. Secondly, the role of soil crust on rainfall interception was very significant. Moss crust was found to be strongest on rainfall interception, followed by synantectic crusts and lichen crusts. Bared soil without covering crusts was poorest in resisting rainfall splash. Thirdly, hydrological simulation experiments indicate that soil crusts play a certain positive role in promoting the water infiltration capacity, and the mean infiltration rate of the crusted soil was 2 times higher than that of the no-crust covered soils. While the accumulated infiltrated water amounts was also far higher than that of the bared soil.

  10. A radiosity-based model to compute the radiation transfer of soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feng; Li, Yuguang

    2011-11-01

    A good understanding of interactions of electromagnetic radiation with soil surface is important for a further improvement of remote sensing methods. In this paper, a radiosity-based analytical model for soil Directional Reflectance Factor's (DRF) distributions was developed and evaluated. The model was specifically dedicated to the study of radiation transfer for the soil surface under tillage practices. The soil was abstracted as two dimensional U-shaped or V-shaped geometric structures with periodic macroscopic variations. The roughness of the simulated surfaces was expressed as a ratio of the height to the width for the U and V-shaped structures. The assumption was made that the shadowing of soil surface, simulated by U or V-shaped grooves, has a greater influence on the soil reflectance distribution than the scattering properties of basic soil particles of silt and clay. Another assumption was that the soil is a perfectly diffuse reflector at a microscopic level, which is a prerequisite for the application of the radiosity method. This radiosity-based analytical model was evaluated by a forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing model under the same structural scenes and identical spectral parameters. The statistics of these two models' BRF fitting results for several soil structures under the same conditions showed the good agreements. By using the model, the physical mechanism of the soil bidirectional reflectance pattern was revealed.

  11. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparent and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. These results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales. PMID:26785770

  12. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens

    PubMed Central

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparent and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. These results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales. PMID:26785770

  13. Directional reflectance factors for monitoring spatial changes in soil surface structure and soil organic matter erosion in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of soil organic matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness (SSR), indicating that a soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Accurate, spatially-continuous measurements of SSR are therefore needed at a variety of spatial and temporal scales to understand the spatial nature of SOM erosion and deposition. Remotely-sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of directional reflectance factors to monitor soil crusting within a controlled laboratory experiment, due to changes in the levels of self-shadowing effects by soil aggregates. However, further research is needed to test this approach in situ, where other soil variables may affect measured reflectance factors and to investigate the use of directional reflectance factors for monitoring soil erosion processes. This experiment assesses the potential of using directional reflectance factors to monitor changes in SSR, aggregate stability and soil organic carbon (SOC) content for two agricultural conditions. Five soil plots representing tilled and seedbed soils were subjected to different durations of natural rainfall, producing a range of different levels of SSR. Directional reflectance factors were measured concomitantly with sampling for soil structural and biochemical tests at each soil plot. Soil samples were taken to measure aggregate stability (wet sieving), SOC (loss on ignition) and soil moisture (gravimetric method). SSM

  14. Using IKONOS Imagery to Estimate Surface Soil Property Variability in Two Alabama Physiographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dana; Shaw, Joey; Rickman, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of surface soil properties is used to assess past erosion and predict erodibility, determine nutrient requirements, and assess surface texture for soil survey applications. This study was designed to evaluate high resolution IKONOS multispectral data as a soil- mapping tool. Imagery was acquired over conventionally tilled fields in the Coastal Plain and Tennessee Valley physiographic regions of Alabama. Acquisitions were designed to assess the impact of surface crusting, roughness and tillage on our ability to depict soil property variability. Soils consisted mostly of fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Plinthic Kandiudults at the Coastal Plain site and fine, kaolinitic, thermic Rhodic Paleudults at the Tennessee Valley site. Soils were sampled in 0.20 ha grids to a depth of 15 cm and analyzed for % sand (0.05 - 2 mm), silt (0.002 -0.05 mm), clay (less than 0.002 mm), citrate dithionite extractable iron (Fe(sub d)) and soil organic carbon (SOC). Four methods of evaluating variability in soil attributes were evaluated: 1) kriging of soil attributes, 2) co-kriging with soil attributes and reflectance data, 3) multivariate regression based on the relationship between reflectance and soil properties, and 4) fuzzy c-means clustering of reflectance data. Results indicate that co-kriging with remotely sensed data improved field scale estimates of surface SOC and clay content compared to kriging and regression methods. Fuzzy c-means worked best using RS data acquired over freshly tilled fields, reducing soil property variability within soil zones compared to field scale soil property variability.

  15. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (< 0.001 mm) and physical clay (< 0.01 mm) contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data. PMID:26090852

  16. Phosphorus in surface runoff from calcareous arable soils of the semiarid Western United States.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin L; Kay, Mary A; Westermann, Dale T

    2004-01-01

    Management strategies that minimize P transfer from agricultural land to water bodies are based on relationships between P concentrations in soil and runoff. This study evaluated such relationships for surface runoff generated by simulated sprinkler irrigation onto calcareous arable soils of the semiarid western United States. Irrigation was applied at 70 mm h(-1) to plots on four soils containing a wide range of extractable P concentrations. Two irrigation events were conducted on each plot, first onto dry soil and then after 24 h onto wet soil. Particulate P (>0.45 microm) was the dominant fraction in surface runoff from all soils and was strongly correlated with suspended sediment concentration. For individual soil types, filterable reactive P (<0.45 microm) concentrations were strongly correlated with all soil-test P methods, including environmental tests involving extraction with water (1:10 and 1:200 soil to solution ratio), 0.01 M CaCl(2), and iron strips. However, only the Olsen-P agronomic soil-test procedure gave models that were not significantly different among soils. Soil chemical differences, including lower CaCO(3) and water-extractable Ca, higher water-extractable Fe, and higher pH, appeared to account for differences in filterable reactive P concentrations in runoff from soils with similar extractable P concentrations. It may therefore be possible to use a single agronomic test to predict filterable reactive P concentrations in surface runoff from calcareous soils, but inherent dangers exist in assuming a consistent response, even for one soil within a single field. PMID:15356242

  17. Element concentrations in surface soils of the Coconino Plateau, Grand Canyon region, Coconino County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2016-09-15

    This report provides the geochemical analyses of a large set of background soils collected from the surface of the Coconino Plateau in northern Arizona. More than 700 soil samples were collected at 46 widespread areas, sampled from sites that appear unaffected by mineralization and (or) anthropogenic contamination. The soils were analyzed for 47 elements, thereby providing data on metal concentrations in soils representative of the plateau. These background concentrations can be used, for instance, for comparison to metal concentrations found in soils potentially affected by natural and anthropogenic influences on the Coconino Plateau in the Grand Canyon region of Arizona.The soil sampling survey revealed low concentrations for the metals most commonly of environmental concern, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, copper, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, lead, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. For example, the median concentrations of the metals in soils of the Coconino Plateau were found to be comparable to the mean values previously reported for soils of the western United States.

  18. Density and stability of soil organic carbon beneath impervious surfaces in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongqiang; Wu, Shaohua; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0-20 cm) under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (P<0.05) positive correlation between the densities of SOC and total nitrogen (N) in the open soils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt)). The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks.

  19. Density and Stability of Soil Organic Carbon beneath Impervious Surfaces in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zongqiang; Wu, Shaohua; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0–20 cm) under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (P<0.05) positive correlation between the densities of SOC and total nitrogen (N) in the open soils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt)). The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks. PMID:25299685

  20. Influence of lateral subsurface flow and connectivity on soil water storage in land surface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jonggun; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral surface/subsurface flow and their connectivity play a significant role in redistributing soil water, which has a direct effect on biological, chemical, and geomorphological processes in the root zone (~1 m). However, most of the land surface models neglect the horizontal exchanges of water at the grid or subgrid scales, focusing only on the vertical exchanges of water as one-dimensional process. To develop better hydrologic understanding and modeling capability in complex landscapes, in this study we added connectivity-based lateral subsurface flow algorithms in the Community Land Model. To demonstrate the impact of lateral flow and connectivity on soil water storage we designed three cases including the following: (1) with complex surface topography only, (2) with complex surface topography in upper soil layers and soil hydraulic properties with uniform anisotropy. and (3) with complex surface topography and soil hydraulic properties with spatially varying anisotropy. The connectivity was considered as an indicator for the variation of anisotropy in the case 3, which was created by wetness conditions or geophysical controls (e.g., soil type, normalized difference vegetation index, and topographic index). These cases were tested in two study sites (ER 5 field and ER-sub watershed in Oklahoma) comparing to the field (gravimetric and remote sensing) soil moisture observations. Through the analysis of spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of soil moisture predictions from the study cases, surface topography was found to be a crucial control in demonstrating the variation of near surface soil moisture, but not significantly affected the subsurface flow in deeper soil layers. In addition, we observed the best performance in case 3 representing that the lateral connectivity can contribute effectively to quantify the anisotropy and redistributing soil water in the root zone. Hence, the approach with connectivity-based lateral subsurface flow was able to better

  1. Quantification of chemical transport processes from the soil to surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kun; Huang, Chi-Hua; Wang, Guang-Qian; Fu, Xu-Dong; Parker, Gary

    2013-01-01

    There is a good conceptual understanding of the processes that govern chemical transport from the soil to surface runoff, but few studies have actually quantified these processes separately. Thus, we designed a laboratory flow cell and experimental procedures to quantify the chemical transport from soil to runoff water in the following individual processes: (i) convection with a vertical hydraulic gradient, (ii) convection via surface flow or the Bernoulli effect, (iii) diffusion, and (iv) soil loss. We applied different vertical hydraulic gradients by setting the flow cell to generate different seepage or drainage conditions. Our data confirmed the general form of the convection-diffusion equation. However, we now have additional quantitative data that describe the contribution of each individual chemical loading process in different surface runoff and soil hydrological conditions. The results of this study will be useful for enhancing our understanding of different geochemical processes in the surface soil mixing zone. PMID:23673742

  2. Ectomycorrhizal influence on particle size, surface structure, mineral crystallinity, functional groups, and elemental composition of soil colloids from different soil origins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Wang, Wenjie; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus) and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam) and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil), we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P > 0.05). These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O-H stretching and bending, C-H stretching, C=O stretching, etc.) by 3-26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz) by 40-300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12-35% decreases in most functional groups, 15-55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P < 0.05). These different responses sharply decreased element ratios (C:O, C:N, and C:Si) in soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  3. Spatial variability of specific surface area of arable soils in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, S.; Sokolowska, Z.; Usowicz, B.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluation of soil spatial variability is an important issue in agrophysics and in environmental research. Knowledge of spatial variability of physico-chemical properties enables a better understanding of several processes that take place in soils. In particular, it is well known that mineralogical, organic, as well as particle-size compositions of soils vary in a wide range. Specific surface area of soils is one of the most significant characteristics of soils. It can be not only related to the type of soil, mainly to the content of clay, but also largely determines several physical and chemical properties of soils and is often used as a controlling factor in numerous biological processes. Knowledge of the specific surface area is necessary in calculating certain basic soil characteristics, such as the dielectric permeability of soil, water retention curve, water transport in the soil, cation exchange capacity and pesticide adsorption. The aim of the present study is two-fold. First, we carry out recognition of soil total specific surface area patterns in the territory of Poland and perform the investigation of features of its spatial variability. Next, semivariograms and fractal analysis are used to characterize and compare the spatial variability of soil specific surface area in two soil horizons (A and B). Specific surface area of about 1000 samples was determined by analyzing water vapor adsorption isotherms via the BET method. The collected data of the values of specific surface area of mineral soil representatives for the territory of Poland were then used to describe its spatial variability by employing geostatistical techniques and fractal theory. Using the data calculated for some selected points within the entire territory and along selected directions, the values of semivariance were determined. The slope of the regression line of the log-log plot of semi-variance versus the distance was used to estimate the fractal dimension, D. Specific surface area

  4. Biochar amendment to the soil surface reduces fumigant emissions and enhances soil microorganism recovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During soil fumigation, it is ideal to mitigate soil fumigant emissions, ensure pest control efficacy, and speed up the recovery of the soil microorganism population established post-application. However, there is currently no fumigant emission reduction strategy that can meet all the above requirem...

  5. Spectral reflectance of surface soils - A statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, K. R.; Henninger, D. L.; Thompson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the physical and chemical properties of soils to their spectral reflectance as measured at six wavebands of Thematic Mapper (TM) aboard NASA's Landsat-4 satellite was examined. The results of performing regressions of over 20 soil properties on the six TM bands indicated that organic matter, water, clay, cation exchange capacity, and calcium were the properties most readily predicted from TM data. The middle infrared bands, bands 5 and 7, were the best bands for predicting soil properties, and the near infrared band, band 4, was nearly as good. Clustering 234 soil samples on the TM bands and characterizing the clusters on the basis of soil properties revealed several clear relationships between properties and reflectance. Discriminant analysis found organic matter, fine sand, base saturation, sand, extractable acidity, and water to be significant in discriminating among clusters.

  6. Soil surface protection by Biocrusts: effects of functional groups on textural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Martínez, Isabel; Flores Flores, José Luis; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-04-01

    In drylands, where vegetation cover is commonly scarce, soil surface is prone to wind and water soil erosion, with the subsequent loss of topsoil structure and chemical properties. These processes are even more pronounced in ecosystems subjected to extra erosive forces, such as grasslands and rangelands that support livestock production. However, some of the physiological and functional traits of biocrusts (i.e., complex association of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, fungi and soil particles) make them ideal to resist in disturbed environments and at the same time to protect soil surface from mechanical perturbations. In particular, the filaments and exudates of soil cyanobacteria and the rhizines of lichen can bind together soil particles, forming soil aggregates at the soil surface and thus enhancing soil stability. Also, they act as "biological covers" that preserve the most vulnerable soil layer from wind and runoff erosion and raindrop impact, maintaining soil structure and composition. In this work, we evaluated soil textural properties and organic matter content under different functional groups of biocrusts (i.e., cyanobacteria crust, 3 lichen species, 1 moss species) and in bare soil. In order to assess the impact of livestock trampling on soil properties and on Biocrust function, we sampled three sites conforming a disturbance gradient (low, medium and high impact sites) and a long-term livestock exclusion as control site. We found that the presence of biocrusts had little effects on soil textural properties and organic matter content in the control site, while noticeable differences were found between bare soil and soil under biocrusts (e.g., up to 16-37% higher clay content, compared to bare soil and up to 10% higher organic matter content). In addition, we found that depending on morphological traits and grazing regime, the effects of biocrusts changed along the gradient. For example, soil under the lichen Diploschistes diacapsis, with thick thallus

  7. Application of manure to no-till soils: Phosphorus losses by sub-surface and surface pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concern over the acceleration of eutrophication by agricultural runoff has focused attention on manure management in no-till. We evaluated losses of phosphorus (P) in sub-surface and surface flow as a function of dairy manure application to no-till soils on a dairy farm in north-central Pennsylvania...

  8. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the paper is to study the temporal variations of the subsurface soil properties due to seasonal and weather effects using a combination of a new seismic surface method and an existing acoustic probe system. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based multi-channel analysis of surface wav...

  9. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health. PMID:27641002

  10. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, J. L.; Stott, I.; Davies, Z. G.; Gaston, K. J.; Leake, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health. PMID:27641002

  11. Acoustic Techniques for Measuring Surface Sealing and Crusting of Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, C. J.; Leary, D.; Dicarlo, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The microtopography of soils is an important surface characteristic that effects water ponding, infiltration, and consequently soil erosion. During a rainstorm event the surface microtopography and soil matrix evolve, thereby altering the erosion and runoff dynamics. The impact of raindrops cause the breakdown of soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can then be deposited into the smaller depressions. The redistribution of soil particles on the surface during rainfall produce a thin surface layer often referred to as surface sealing or crusting. For the purpose of this presentation, surface sealing will be used to describe a reduction in the ability of fluid to flow across the surface. Surface crusting will be associated with the formation of a thin layer of higher stiffness or larger mechanical strength. The sensitivity of acoustics to the effects of sealing and crusting was examined by measuring the acoustic-to seismic (A/S) transfer function and acoustic reflectivity on two different soils in a dry, wetted and rained-on state. The A/S transfer function measurement involves the use of a suspended loud speaker to impinge acoustic energy from the air onto the sample and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the induced surface particle velocity. Therefore, the A/S transfer function is a measure of the seismic energy that has been transferred into the soil from the airborne wave. The acoustic surface reflectivity is a measurement of the amount of acoustic energy reflected from the surface and requires the use of a microphone suspended above the surface. Results suggests that the seismic energy transferred (A/S transfer function) is sensitive to crust formation but is not as sensitive to sealing. The amount of reflected acoustic energy appears to be more sensitive to sealing than crusting.

  12. Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-01-06

    Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

  13. A New Model of Size-graded Soil Veneer on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Abhijit; McKay, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction. We propose a new model of distribution of submillimeter sized lunar soil grains on the lunar surface. We propose that in the uppermost millimeter or two of the lunar surface, soil-grains are size graded with the finest nanoscale dust on top and larger micron-scale particles below. This standard state is perturbed by ejecta deposition of larger grains at the lunar surface, which have a coating of dusty layer that may not have substrates of intermediate sizes. Distribution of solar wind elements (SWE), agglutinates, vapor deposited nanophase Fe0 in size fractions of lunar soils and ir spectra of size fractions of lunar soils are compatible with this model. A direct test of this model requires bringing back glue-impregnated tubes of lunar soil samples to be dissected and examined on Earth.

  14. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    Controlled ground-based passive microwave radiometric measurements on soil moisture were conducted to determine the effects of terrain surface roughness and vegetation on microwave emission. Theoretical predictions were compared with the experimental results and with some recent airborne radiometric measurements. The relationship of soil moisture to the permittivity for the soil was obtained in the laboratory. A dual frequency radiometer, 1.41356 GHz and 10.69 GHz, took measurements at angles between 0 and 50 degrees from an altitude of about fifty feet. Distinct surface roughnesses were studied. With the roughness undisturbed, oats were later planted and vegetated and bare field measurements were compared. The 1.4 GHz radiometer was less affected than the 10.6 GHz radiometer, which under vegetated conditions was incapable of detecting soil moisture. The bare surface theoretical model was inadequate, although the vegetation model appeared to be valid. Moisture parameters to correlate apparent temperature with soil moisture were compared.

  15. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  16. Residues of endosulfan in surface and subsurface agricultural soil and its bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Odukkathil, Greeshma; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of many hydrophobic pesticides has been reported by various workers in various soil environments and its bioremediation is a major concern due to less bioavailability. In the present study, the pesticide residues in the surface and subsurface soil in an area of intense agricultural activity in Pakkam Village of Thiruvallur District, Tamilnadu, India, and its bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium was investigated. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface soils (15-30 cm and 30-40 cm) were sampled, and pesticides in different layers of the soil were analyzed. Alpha endosulfan and beta endosulfan concentrations ranged from 1.42 to 3.4 mg/g and 1.28-3.1 mg/g in the surface soil, 0.6-1.4 mg/g and 0.3-0.6 mg/g in the subsurface soil (15-30 cm), and 0.9-1.5 mg/g and 0.34-1.3 mg/g in the subsurface soil (30-40 cm) respectively. Residues of other persistent pesticides were also detected in minor concentrations. These soil layers were subjected to bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium under a simulated soil profile condition in a soil reactor. The complete removal of alpha and beta endosulfan was observed over 25 days. Residues of endosulfate were also detected during bioremediation, which was subsequently degraded on the 30th day. This study revealed the existence of endosulfan in the surface and subsurface soils and also proved that the removal of such a ubiquitous pesticide in the surface and subsurface environment can be achieved in the field by bioaugumenting a biosurfactant-producing bacterial consortium that degrades pesticides.

  17. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Surface Soil Properties in Alabama Ultisols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dana G.; Shaw, Joey N.; Rickman, Doug; Mask, Paul L.; Luvall, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of surface soil properties via remote sensing could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction and allocation of agrochemicals for precision management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High-resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil organic carbon, particle size distribution, and citrate dithionite extractable iron content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured during sampling. Two methods of analysis were evaluated: 1) multiple linear regression using common spectral band ratios, and 2) partial least squares regression. Our data show that thermal infrared spectra are highly, linearly related to soil organic carbon, sand and clay content. Soil organic carbon content was the most difficult to quantify in these highly weathered systems, where soil organic carbon was generally less than 1.2%. Estimates of sand and clay content were best using partial least squares regression at the Valley site, explaining 42-59% of the variability. In the Coastal Plain, sandy surfaces prone to crusting limited estimates of sand and clay content via partial least squares and regression with common band ratios. Estimates of iron oxide content were a function of mineralogy and best accomplished using specific band ratios, with regression explaining 36-65% of the variability at the Valley and Coastal Plain sites, respectively.

  18. Carbon mineralization in surface and subsurface soils in a subtropical mixed forest in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Tian, Q.

    2014-12-01

    About a half of soil carbon is stored in subsurface soil horizons, their dynamics have the potential to significantly affect carbon balancing in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the main factors regulating subsurface soil carbon mineralization are poorly understood. As affected by mountain humid monsoon, the subtropical mountains in central China has an annual precipitation of about 2000 mm, which causes strong leaching of ions and nutrition. The objectives of this study were to monitor subsurface soil carbon mineralization and to determine if it is affected by nutrient limitation. We collected soil samples (up to 1 m deep) at three locations in a small watershed with three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-30 cm, below 30 cm). For the three layers, soil organic carbon (SOC) ranged from 35.8 to 94.4 mg g-1, total nitrogen ranged from 3.51 to 8.03 mg g-1, microbial biomass carbon (MBC) ranged from 170.6 to 718.4 μg g-1 soil. We measured carbon mineralization with the addition of N (100 μg N/g soil), P (50 μg P/g soil), and liable carbon (glucose labeled by 5 atom% 13C, at five levels: control, 10% MBC, 50% MBC, 100% MBC, 200% MBC). The addition of N and P had negligible effects on CO2 production in surface soil layers; in the deepest soil layer, the addition of N and P decreased CO2 production from 4.32 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1. Glucose addition stimulated both surface and subsurface microbial mineralization of SOC, causing priming effects. With the increase of glucose addition rate from 10% to 200% MBC, the primed mineralization rate increased from 0.19 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1 (fifth day of glucose addition). The magnitude of priming effect increased from 28% to 120% as soil layers go deep compare to the basal CO2 production (fifth day of 200% MBC glucose addition, basal CO2 production rate for the surface and the deepest soil was 11.17 and 2.88 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1). These results suggested that the mineralization of subsurface carbon is more

  19. Multiscale analysis of surface soil moisture dynamics in a mesoscale catchment utilizing an integrated ecohydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korres, W.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture is one of the fundamental variables in hydrology, meteorology and agriculture, influencing the partitioning of solar energy into latent and sensible heat flux as well as the partitioning of precipitation into runoff and percolation. Numerous studies have shown that in addition to natural factors (rainfall, soil, topography etc.) agricultural management is one of the key drivers for spatio-temporal patterns of soil moisture in agricultural landscapes. Interactions between plant growth, soil hydrology and soil nitrogen transformation processes are modeled by using a dynamically coupled modeling approach. The process-based ecohydrological model components of the integrated decision support system DANUBIA are used to identify the important processes and feedbacks determining soil moisture patterns in agroecosystems. Integrative validation of plant growth and surface soil moisture dynamics serves as a basis for a spatially distributed modeling analysis of surface soil moisture patterns in the northern part of the Rur catchment (1100 sq km), Western Germany. An extensive three year dataset (2007-2009) of surface soil moisture-, plant- (LAI, organ specific biomass and N) and soil- (texture, N, C) measurements was collected. Plant measurements were carried out biweekly for winter wheat, maize, and sugar beet during the growing season. Soil moisture was measured with three FDR soil moisture stations. Meteorological data was measured with an eddy flux station. The results of the model validation showed a very good agreement between the modeled plant parameters (biomass, green LAI) and the measured parameters with values between 0.84 and 0.98 (Willmotts index of agreement). The modeled surface soil moisture (0 - 20 cm) showed also a very favorable agreement with the measurements for winter wheat and sugar beet with an RMSE between 1.68 and 3.45 Vol.-%. For maize, the RMSE was less favorable particularly in the 1.5 months prior to harvest. The modeled soil

  20. Organic matter composition of soil macropore surfaces under different agricultural management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Leue, Marin; Magid, Jacob; Gerke, Horst H.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the heterogeneous nature of soil, i.e. properties and processes occurring specifically at local scales is essential for best managing our soil resources for agricultural production. Examination of intact soil structures in order to obtain an increased understanding of how soil systems operate from small to large scale represents a large gap within soil science research. Dissolved chemicals, nutrients and particles are transported through the disturbed plow layer of agricultural soil, where after flow through the lower soil layers occur by preferential flow via macropores. Rapid movement of water through macropores limit the contact between the preferentially moving water and the surrounding soil matrix, therefore contact and exchange of solutes in the water is largely restricted to the surface area of the macropores. Organomineral complex coated surfaces control sorption and exchange properties of solutes, as well as availability of essential nutrients to plant roots and to the preferentially flowing water. DRIFT (Diffuse Reflectance infrared Fourier Transform) Mapping has been developed to examine composition of organic matter coated macropores. In this study macropore surfaces structures will be determined for organic matter composition using DRIFT from a long-term field experiment on waste application to agricultural soil (CRUCIAL, close to Copenhagen, Denmark). Parcels with 5 treatments; accelerated household waste, accelerated sewage sludge, accelerated cattle manure, NPK and unfertilized, will be examined in order to study whether agricultural management have an impact on the organic matter composition of intact structures.

  1. Cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization impact on surface residue, soil carbon sequestration, and crop yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information is needed on the effect of management practices on soil C storage for obtaining C credit. The effects of tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization were evaluated on dryland crop and surface residue C and soil organic C (SOC) at the 0-120 cm depth in a Williams loam from 2006 to 201...

  2. Soil heat flux calculation for sunlit and shaded surfaces under row crops: 2. Model Test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method to calculate surface soil heat flux (G0) as a function of net radiation to the soil (RN,S) was developed that accounts for positional variability across a row crop interrow. The method divides the interrow into separate sections, which may be shaded, partially sunlit, or fully sunlit, and c...

  3. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  4. Comparison of models for determining soil-surface carbon dioxide effluxes in different agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-surface CO2 efflux (SCE) models are appealing due to expense and labor of fine temporal- and spatial-resolution field measurements. However, several simple SCE models are reported in the literature. Our objective was to compare and validate selected soil temperature (Ts)- and water content ('v)...

  5. Sub-surface soil carbon changes affects biofuel greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in direct soil organic carbon (SOC) can have a major impact on overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from biofuels when using life-cycle assessment (LCA). Estimated changes in SOC, when accounted for in an LCA, are typically derived from near-surface soil depths (<30 cm). Changes in subsurf...

  6. Comparing soil and pond ash feedlot pen surfaces for environmental management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hauling soil/manure out and fill-soil in to maintain adequate feedlot pen surfaces is time consuming and expensive. Pond ash (PA), a by-product from coal-fired electrical generation has very good support qualities even when wet. Four pens of an eight pen series, each with dimensions of 7.3 m by 20.7...

  7. Groundwater control of mangrove surface elevation: shrink and swell varies with soil depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, K.R.T.; Smith, T. J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Anderson, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    We measured monthly soil surface elevation change and determined its relationship to groundwater changes at a mangrove forest site along Shark River, Everglades National Park, Florida. We combined the use of an original design, surface elevation table with new rod-surface elevation tables to separately track changes in the mid zone (0?4 m), the shallow root zone (0?0.35 m), and the full sediment profile (0?6 m) in response to site hydrology (daily river stage and groundwater piezometric pressure). We calculated expansion and contraction for each of the four constituent soil zones (surface [accretion and erosion; above 0 m], shallow zone [0?0.35 m], middle zone [0.35?4 m], and bottom zone [4?6 m]) that comprise the entire soil column. Changes in groundwater pressure correlated strongly with changes in soil elevation for the entire profile (Adjusted R2 5 0.90); this relationship was not proportional to the depth of the soil profile sampled. The change in thickness of the bottom soil zone accounted for the majority (R2 5 0.63) of the entire soil profile expansion and contraction. The influence of hydrology on specific soil zones and absolute elevation change must be considered when evaluating the effect of disturbances, sea level rise, and water management decisions on coastal wetland systems.

  8. Apollo program soil mechanics experiment. [interaction of the lunar module with the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    The soil mechanics investigation was conducted to obtain information relating to the landing interaction of the lunar module (LM) with the lunar surface, and lunar soil erosion caused by the spacecraft engine exhaust. Results obtained by study of LM landing performance on each Apollo mission are summarized.

  9. The SMAP Level 4 surface and root-zone soil moisture product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slated for launch in 2015, the NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive mission represents a generational advance in our ability to globally observe time and space variations in surface soil moisture fields. The SMAP mission concept is based on the integrated use of L-band active radar and passive radiome...

  10. Spatial Distribution of Surface Soil Moisture in a Small Forested Catchment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the spatial distribution of soil moisture is an important hydrological question. We measured the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture (upper 6 cm) using an Amplitude Domain Reflectometry sensor at the plot scale (2 × 2 m) and small catchment scale (0.84 ha) in...

  11. Improving hydrologic predictions of a catchment model via assimilation of surface soil moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper examines the potential for improving Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrologic predictions within the 341 km2 Cobb Creek Watershed in southwestern Oklahoma through the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations using an Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). In a series of synthet...

  12. Investigation of the pathway of contaminated soil transported to plant surfaces by raindrop splash

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, M.; Hakonson, T.E.; Whicker, F.W.; White, G.C.

    1983-10-21

    The environmental transport pathway of soil-borne radioisotopes to vegetation surfaces via raindrop splash was studied. The data show that soil can significantly contribute to the contamination found on plants. Further detailed study is needed to calculate the rate constant for the raindrop splash and retention pathways. 8 references, 1 figure. (ACR)

  13. SORPTION OF 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN FROM WATER BY SURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of l4C-labeled 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin (TCDD) from water by two uncontaminated surface soils from the Times Beach, MO, area was evalu- ated by using batch shake testing. Sorption isotherm plots for the soil with the lower fraction organic carbon (f,) wer...

  14. Effect of Vegetation Patterns on SAR derived Surface Soil Moisture Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, C. N.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture can be regarded as one of the important life sustaining entities on our planet. Among its various functions, the first is probably to enable the growth of vegetation on the land surface. Apart from this, water stored in soils plays many other important roles in the global water (and energy) cycle. In the past decades, radar imaging has proven its potential to quantitatively estimate the near surface water content of soils at high spatial resolutions. The use of active microwave data to measure surface soil moisture requires the consideration of several factors like e.g. soil texture, surface roughness, and vegetation. Among these factors, the presence of a vegetation cover is perhaps the major impediment to accurate quantitative retrievals of soil moisture. On the one hand, the vegetation has a disturbing effect on the radar reflectivity and thus causes errors in the soil moisture retrieval which is generally based on theoretical or experimental relationships between the dielectric properties of the soil surface and the radar backscattering coefficient. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of vegetation with e.g. different crop types with different transpiration coefficients and different phenological development, etc, can cause large variations in the plant water consumption and thus has a significant impact on the soil moisture patterns. We have developed methods to estimate the amount of biomass for different crop types and the underlying surface soil water content directly from polarimetric L-band SAR images. While the horizontally-transmit horizontally-receive co-polarization (hh) is most sensitive towards the dielectric soil properties, the horizontally-transmit vertically-receive cross-polarization (hv) is much more sensitive towards the backscattering from the vegetation canopy. In addition the polarimetric observables entropy (H), alpha angle (α), and the total reflected power (span), all of which are highly affected by the canopy

  15. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.-K.; Turner, N. C.; Song, L.; Gu, Y.-J.; Wang, T.-C.; Li, F.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S.) and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile. The results showed that the concentration of SOC in the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0-2.0 m soil depth. Over the 7-year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha-1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha-1 in the bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1-2 m depth of the soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of the SOC sequestered in the 2 m deep soil profile under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  16. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  17. Land surface model calibration through microwave data assimilation for improving soil moisture simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Zhu, La; Chen, Yingying; Zhao, Long; Qin, Jun; Lu, Hui; Tang, Wenjun; Han, Menglei; Ding, Baohong; Fang, Nan

    2016-02-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in climate system, and its accurate simulation needs effective soil parameter values. Conventional approaches may obtain soil parameter values at point scale, but they are costly and not efficient at grid scale (10-100 km) of current climate models. This study explores the possibility to estimate soil parameter values by assimilating AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System) brightness temperature (TB) data. In the assimilation system, the TB is simulated by the coupled system of a land surface model (LSM) and a radiative transfer model (RTM), and the simulation errors highly depend on parameters in both the LSM and the RTM. Thus, sensitive soil parameters may be inversely estimated through minimizing the TB errors. A crucial step for the parameter estimation is made to suppress the contamination of uncertainties in atmospheric forcing data. The effectiveness of the estimated parameter values is evaluated against intensive measurements of soil parameters and soil moisture in three grasslands of the Tibetan Plateau and the Mongolian Plateau. The results indicate that this satellite data-based approach can improve the data quality of soil porosity, a key parameter for soil moisture modeling, and LSM simulations with the estimated parameter values reasonably reproduce the measured soil moisture. This demonstrates it is feasible to calibrate LSMs for soil moisture simulations at grid scale by assimilating microwave satellite data, although more efforts are expected to improve the robustness of the model calibration.

  18. The impact of the soil surface properties in water erosion seen through LandSoil model sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampalini, Rossano; Follain, Stéphane; Cheviron, Bruno; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Couturier, Alain; Walter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative models of soil redistribution at the landscape scale are the current tools for understanding space-time processes in soil and landscape evolution. But models use larger and larger numbers of variables and sometimes it becomes difficult to understand their relative importance and model behaviours in critical conditions. Sensitivity analysis (SA) is widely used to clarify models behaviours, their structure giving fundamental information to ameliorate models their selves. We tested the LandSoil model (LANDscape design for SOIL conservation under soil use and climate change) a model designed for the analysis of agricultural landscape evolution at a fine spatial resolution scale [1-10 meters] and a mid-term temporal scale [10-100 years]. LandSoil is suitable for simulations from parcel to catchment scale. It is spatially distributed, event-based, and considers water and tillage erosion processes that use a dynamic representation of the agricultural landscape through parameters such as a monthly representation of soil surface properties. Our aim was to identify most significant parameters driving the model and to highlight potential particular/singular behaviours of parameter combinations and relationships. The approach was to use local sensitivity analysis, also termed 'one-factor-at-time' (OAT) which consists of a deterministic, derivative method, inquiring the local response O to a particular input factor Pi at a specified point P0 within the full input parameter space of the model expressed as: δO/δP = (O2-O1) / (P2-P1) The local sensitivity represents the partial derivatives of O with respect to Pi at the point P0. In the SA procedure the topographical entity is represented by a virtual hillslope on which soil loss and sensitivity are calculated. Virtual hillslope is inspired from the virtual catchment framework proposed by Cheviron at al. (2011): a fixed topology consisting of a 3X3 square pixel structure having 150 m length allowing to test

  19. Adsorption and structural fractionation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by soil mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avneri, Shani; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2015-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents a small but highly reactive fraction of the soil organic matter (SOM). One of the important processes affecting the fate of DOM in soils is its interactions with mineral phases. Adsorptive fractionation of DOM by soils and minerals has been observed previously, however detailed changes in composition of DOM due to its interactions with mineral soils were not yet elucidated. In this research the adsorption and physico-chemical fractionation of DOM by soil poor with organic matter and rich with iron oxides and clay fraction was investigated. The changes in DOM structural composition were studied using separation with polymeric resins. The following fractions were obtained: hydrophobic acid (HoA), hydrophobic neutral (HoN), hydrophilic acid (HiA), hydrophilic base (HiB), and hydrophilic neutral (HiN). Two types of DOM were studied: DOM extracted from composted biosolids (compost DOM) and DOM from Suwanee River (SRNOM). Sorption affinity of DOM to soil mineral surfaces was source and chemistry dependent. SRNOM, which was characterized by higher content of aromatic and carboxylic groups demonstrated higher affinity to the studied soil than compost DOM. For both DOM samples preferential adsorption of HoA by soil (50-85% from adsorbed carbon) was observed. Desorption of both DOM types demonstrated significant hysteresis (up to 90-100% of dissolved organic carbon was retained by the soil after 3 cycles of desorption stages). This suggests that DOM desorption behavior was affected by HoA dominant adsorption to the soil mineral fraction, and not by DOM source. Results of this study indicate that interactions of different types of DOM with mineral soil may result in similar changes in composition and properties of DOM both in the supernatant as well as in the adsorbed phase. The change in DOM composition due to its interaction with soil minerals may influence the interactions of pollutants with DOM and soil particle surfaces.

  20. Mapping soil surface macropores using infrared thermography: an exploratory laboratory study.

    PubMed

    de Lima, João L M P; Abrantes, João R C B; Silva, Valdemir P; de Lima, M Isabel P; Montenegro, Abelardo A A

    2014-01-01

    Macropores and water flow in soils and substrates are complex and are related to topics like preferential flow, nonequilibrium flow, and dual-continuum. Hence, the quantification of the number of macropores and the determination of their geometry are expected to provide a better understanding on the effects of pores on the soil's physical and hydraulic properties. This exploratory study aimed at evaluating the potential of using infrared thermography for mapping macroporosity at the soil surface and estimating the number and size of such macropores. The presented technique was applied to a small scale study (laboratory soil flume). PMID:25371915

  1. The Impact of Microwave-Derived Surface Soil Moisture on Watershed Hydrological Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. E.; Hsu, A. Y.; Jackson, T. J.; Wood, E. F.; Zion, M.

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of incorporating microwave-derived soil moisture information in a semi-distributed hydrological model was demonstrated for the Washita '92 experiment in the Little Washita River watershed in Oklahoma. Initializing the hydrological model with surface soil moisture fields from the ESTAR airborne L-band microwave radiometer on a single wet day at the start of the study period produced more accurate model predictions of soil moisture than a standard hydrological initialization with streamflow data over an eight-day soil moisture drydown.

  2. Evaluating RGB photogrammetry and multi-temporal digital surface models for detecting soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia; Seeger, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Photogrammetry is a widely used tool for generating high-resolution digital surface models. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), equipped with a Red Green Blue (RGB) camera, have great potential in quickly acquiring multi-temporal high-resolution orthophotos and surface models. Such datasets would ease the monitoring of geomorphological processes, such as local soil erosion and rill formation after heavy rainfall events. In this study we test a photogrammetric setup to determine data requirements for soil erosion studies with UAVs. We used a rainfall simulator (5 m2) and above a rig with attached a Panasonic GX1 16 megapixel digital camera and 20mm lens. The soil material in the simulator consisted of loamy sand at an angle of 5 degrees. Stereo pair images were taken before and after rainfall simulation with 75-85% overlap. Acquired images were automatically mosaicked to create high-resolution orthorectified images and digital surface models (DSM). We resampled the DSM to different spatial resolutions to analyze the effect of cell size to the accuracy of measured rill depth and soil loss estimations, and determined an optimal cell size (thus flight altitude). Furthermore, the high spatial accuracy of the acquired surface models allows further analysis of rill formation and channel initiation related to e.g. surface roughness. We suggest implementing near-infrared and temperature sensors to combine soil moisture and soil physical properties with surface morphology for future investigations.

  3. Soil moisture sensing with aircraft observations of the diurnal range of surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Blanchard, B.; Anderson, A.; Wang, V.

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft observations of the surface temperature were made by measurements of the thermal emission in the 8-14 micrometers band over agricultural fields around Phoenix, Arizona. The diurnal range of these surface temperature measurements were well correlated with the ground measurement of soil moisture in the 0-2 cm layer. The surface temperature observations for vegetated fields were found to be within 1 or 2 C of the ambient air temperature indicating no moisture stress. These results indicate that for clear atmospheric conditions remotely sensed surface temperatures are a reliable indicator of soil moisture conditions and crop status.

  4. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.-K.; Turner, N. C.; Song, L.; Gu, Y.-J.; Wang, T.-C.; Li, F.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S.) and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile, and to estimate the long-term potential for SOC sequestration in the soil under the three forage legumes. The results showed that the concentration of SOC of the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0-2.0 m soil depth measured. Over the 7 year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha-1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha-1 under bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1-2 m depth of soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of SOC sequestered through the upper 2 m of soil under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  5. Interception of Vapor Flow near Soil Surface for Water Conservation and Drought Alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Hishida, K.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid and vapor flow of water in soil and the eventual vaporization of all waters near the soil surface are mechanisms controlling the near-surface evaporation. Interception and prevention of the vapor form of flow is critical for soil water conservation and drought alleviation in the arid and semiarid regions. Researches are conducted to quantify the amount of near-surface vapor flow in the semi-arid Loess Plateau of China and the central California of USA. Quantitative leaf water absorption and desorption functions were derived and tested based on laboratory experiments. Results show that plant leaves absorb and release water at different speeds depending on species and varieties. The "ideal" native plants in the dry climates can quickly absorb water and slowly release it. This water-holding capacity of a plant is characterized by the plant's water retention curves. Field studies are conducted to measure the dynamic water movements from the soil surface to ten meters below the surface in an attempt to quantify the maximum depths of water extraction due to different vegetation types and mulching measures at the surface. Results show that condensation is usually formed on soil surface membranes during the daily hours when the temperature gradients are inverted toward the soil surface. The soil temperature becomes stable at 13 Degree Celsius below the 4-meter depth in the Loess Plateau of China thus vapor flow is not likely deriving from deeper layers. However, the liquid flow may move in and out depending on water potential gradients and hydraulic conductivity of the layers. The near-surface vapor flow can be effectively intercepted by various mulching measures including gravel-and-sand cover, plant residue and plastic membranes. New studies are attempted to quantify the role of vapor flow for the survival of giant sequoias in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  6. Fixation of soil surface contamination using natural polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Natural polysaccharides were evaluated as alternatives to commercially available dust-control agents for application in buried-waste and contaminated-soil remediation situations. Materials were identified and evaluated with specific criteria in mind: the materials must be environmentally benign and must not introduce any additional hazardous materials; they must be effective for at least 2 or 3 days, but they do not necessarily have to be effective for more than 2 to 3 weeks; they should be relatively resistant to light traffic; they must not interfere with subsequent soil treatment techniques, especially soil washing; and they must be relatively inexpensive. Two products, a pregelled potato starch and a mixture of carbohydrates derived from sugar beets, were selected for evaluation. Testing included small- and large-scale field demonstrations, laboratory physical property analyses, and wind-tunnel evaluations.

  7. Mapping Surface Soil Organic Carbon for Crop Fields with Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Feng; Kissel, David E.; West, Larry T.; Rickman, Doug; Luvall, J. C.; Adkins, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The organic C concentration of surface soil can be used in agricultural fields to vary crop production inputs. Organic C is often highly spatially variable, so that maps of soil organic C can be used to vary crop production inputs using precision farming technology. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping soil organic C on three fields, using remotely sensed images of the fields with a bare surface. Enough soil samples covering the range in soil organic C must be taken from each field to develop a satisfactory relationship between soil organic C content and image reflectance values. The number of soil samples analyzed in the three fields varied from 22 to 26. The regression equations differed between fields, but gave highly significant relationships with R2 values of 0.93, 0.95, and 0.89 for the three fields. A comparison of predicted and measured values of soil organic C for an independent set of 2 soil samples taken on one of the fields gave highly satisfactory results, with a comparison equation of % organic C measured + 1.02% organic C predicted, with r2 = 0.87.

  8. Estimating surface soil moisture from satellite microwave measurements and a satellite derived vegetation index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, Manfred; Chang, Alfred; Golus, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Normalized 18-GHz microwave brightness temperatures, T(B), and a vegetation index determined from satellite radiometer data are combined with climatically modeled surface moisture estimates to constrain a simple physically based soil moisture model. It is found that the normalized T(B) values correlated well with soil moisture when the data were segregated by vegetation index range, but less so when all the data were combined. By using the vegetation index parameter, the model is shown to account for about 70 percent of the variability in modeled surface soil moisture.

  9. Pyrene and chrysene fate in surface soil and sand microcosms.

    PubMed

    Roper, J C; Pfaender, F K

    2001-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major components of wastes from municipal gas plants and many wood preservatives. Soil contaminated with these wastes is a potential threat to human health because of the carcinogenicity of many PAHs. This study follows the fate of two four-ring PAHs, pyrene and chrysene, in three matrices: an adapted soil (obtained from a site contaminated with PAHs for more than 75 years), an uncontaminated soil (with and without an inoculum of adapted soil), and sand mixed with an inoculum of adapted soil. Radiolabeled pyrene, chrysene, and salicylic acid (a metabolite of PAH biodegradation) were used to trace the mineralization, transformation, extractability, and formation of an unextractable residual over time. Linear approximations of the rates of these processes were made. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of extracts from inoculated soil showed the transient formation of two known metabolites: 1-hydroxypyrene (from pyrene) and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (from chrysene). The amount of extractable label diminished steadily over the course of the study in systems that were not inhibited with sodium azide, whereas the amount of extractable label remained relatively constant in inhibited systems. Correspondingly, the amount of nonextractable residual label generally increased during each incubation in uninhibited systems, whereas the amount of this residual label remained relatively constant in inhibited systems. In contrast, the rate and extent of mineralization varied widely across matrix types. This suggests that alterations of the PAH that impact extractability and residual formation are common, in contrast to mineralization, which was apparently limited to adapted communities.

  10. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann Y.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quad-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well- managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. Prior to its application for soil moisture inversion, a good agreement was found between the single-scattering IEM simulations and the L band measurements of SIR-C and AIRSAR over a wide range of soil moisture and surface roughness conditions. The sensitivity of soil moisture variation to the co-polarized signals were then examined under the consideration of the calibration accuracy of various components of SAR measurements. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  11. Multi-frequency SAR data for soil surface moisture estimation over agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Baghdadi, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a crucial role in the continental water cycle, in particular through its influence on the distribution of precipitation between surface runoff and infiltration, which is the main driver behind most hydrological and geomorphologic processes. Although there is now a good understanding of soil hydrodynamics and water transfer in porous media, the development of reliable techniques allowing field heterogeneities to be fully analyzed in space and time remains a key issue. In recent decades, various inversion models have been proposed for the retrieval of surface parameters (mainly soil moisture and surface roughness) from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) high resolution measurements. The proposed techniques depend particularly on two instrumental parameters: the radar system's spatial resolution and the number of configurations measured during satellite acquisitions (mainly incidence angle and polarization). In this paper, our objective is to illustrate different applications of SAR data to estimate soil moisture over bare soil and vegetation cover areas (wheat, olive groves, meadows ...). Potential of very high resolution data, with the availability of TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed constellations is also discussed. This study is based on different experimental campaigns organized over different sites in humid and semi-arid regions. Ground measurements (soil moisture, soil roughness, vegetation description) over test fields were carried out simultaneously to SAR measurements. Effect of vegetation attenuation on radar signal is considered through a synergy with optical remote sensing. Soil moisture precision for all proposed applications is generally ranged between 3 and 5% of volumetric moisture. These methodologies are developed in the context of the preparation for having a high soil moisture operational product, with SENTINEL and/or the other planned constellations. After an analysis of radar data sensitivity (C and X bands) to surface parameters

  12. Modeling and measurement of microwave emission and backscattering from bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, S.; Wegmuller, U.

    1992-01-01

    A multifrequency ground-based radiometer-scatterometer system working at frequencies between 3.0 GHz and 11.0 GHz has been used to study the effect of soil moisture and roughness on microwave emission and backscattering. The freezing and thawing effect of the soil surface and the changes of the surface roughness due to rain and erosion are reported. To analyze the combined active and passive data, a scattering model based on physical optics approximation for the low frequency and geometrical optics approximation for high frequency has been developed. The model is used to calculate the bistatic scattering coefficients from the surface. By considering the conservation of energy, the result has been integrated over a hemisphere above the surface to calculate the emissivity. The backscattering and emission model has been coupled with the observed data in order to extract soil moisture and surface roughness.

  13. Sagebrush carrying out hydraulic lift enhances surface soil nitrogen cycling and nitrogen uptake into inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Cardon, Zoe G; Stark, John M; Herron, Patrick M; Rasmussen, Jed A

    2013-11-19

    Plant roots serve as conduits for water flow not only from soil to leaves but also from wetter to drier soil. This hydraulic redistribution through root systems occurs in soils worldwide and can enhance stomatal opening, transpiration, and plant carbon gain. For decades, upward hydraulic lift (HL) of deep water through roots into dry, litter-rich, surface soil also has been hypothesized to enhance nutrient availability to plants by stimulating microbially controlled nutrient cycling. This link has not been demonstrated in the field. Working in sagebrush-steppe, where water and nitrogen limit plant growth and reproduction and where HL occurs naturally during summer drought, we slightly augmented deep soil water availability to 14 HL+ treatment plants throughout the summer growing season. The HL+ sagebrush lifted greater amounts of water than control plants and had slightly less negative predawn and midday leaf water potentials. Soil respiration was also augmented under HL+ plants. At summer's end, application of a gas-based (15)N isotopic labeling technique revealed increased rates of nitrogen cycling in surface soil layers around HL+ plants and increased uptake of nitrogen into HL+ plants' inflorescences as sagebrush set seed. These treatment effects persisted even though unexpected monsoon rainstorms arrived during assays and increased surface soil moisture around all plants. Simulation models from ecosystem to global scales have just begun to include effects of hydraulic redistribution on water and surface energy fluxes. Results from this field study indicate that plants carrying out HL can also substantially enhance decomposition and nitrogen cycling in surface soils.

  14. Effect of rock fragments on soil surface cracks development in Vertisols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, L.; Mele, G.; Terribile, F.

    2012-04-01

    Coarse fragments influence many soil physical properties. Available studies that address the controversial role of rock fragments in soil functioning are often oriented to assess effects of their presence in relation to specific applicative problems like soil erosion or their influence in agricultural practices. Experimental research is mostly based on the evaluation of the effect of rock fragments cover on soil erosion and of coarse fragment content on water infiltration. Much less is known on the role of stones on the development of soil surface cracks, which in turn influence many other soil properties including thermal conductivity and preferential flows. Surface cracks are especially important in Vertisols where cracks occurrence, width and depth constitute diagnostic criteria for Vertisol identification and classification (e.g. WRB, Soil Taxonomy). This is because soil cracks largely affect land management. In this work we designed a lab experiment in order to evaluate the effect of rock fragments on surface cracks development of a Vertisol. Two concentrations of three different sizes of rock fragments (basaltic type) were mixed with the soil material after sieving and put in flowerpots having diameter of 15cm; then such samples have undergone nine wet/dry cycles. At the end digital images of sample surface were acquired and examined by image analysis. In particular the cracking density was measured by a skeletonization process and the mean width of cracks was determined through a mathematical morphology approach. Results showed that the surface cracking density increased with rock fragments concentration and decreased with the rock fragment size while the mean width of fractures increased with rock fragment size and decreased with rock fragments concentration.

  15. Sagebrush carrying out hydraulic lift enhances surface soil nitrogen cycling and nitrogen uptake into inflorescences

    PubMed Central

    Cardon, Zoe G.; Stark, John M.; Herron, Patrick M.; Rasmussen, Jed A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant roots serve as conduits for water flow not only from soil to leaves but also from wetter to drier soil. This hydraulic redistribution through root systems occurs in soils worldwide and can enhance stomatal opening, transpiration, and plant carbon gain. For decades, upward hydraulic lift (HL) of deep water through roots into dry, litter-rich, surface soil also has been hypothesized to enhance nutrient availability to plants by stimulating microbially controlled nutrient cycling. This link has not been demonstrated in the field. Working in sagebrush-steppe, where water and nitrogen limit plant growth and reproduction and where HL occurs naturally during summer drought, we slightly augmented deep soil water availability to 14 HL+ treatment plants throughout the summer growing season. The HL+ sagebrush lifted greater amounts of water than control plants and had slightly less negative predawn and midday leaf water potentials. Soil respiration was also augmented under HL+ plants. At summer’s end, application of a gas-based 15N isotopic labeling technique revealed increased rates of nitrogen cycling in surface soil layers around HL+ plants and increased uptake of nitrogen into HL+ plants’ inflorescences as sagebrush set seed. These treatment effects persisted even though unexpected monsoon rainstorms arrived during assays and increased surface soil moisture around all plants. Simulation models from ecosystem to global scales have just begun to include effects of hydraulic redistribution on water and surface energy fluxes. Results from this field study indicate that plants carrying out HL can also substantially enhance decomposition and nitrogen cycling in surface soils. PMID:24191007

  16. Evaluation of Volatilization by Organic Chemicals Residing Below the Soil Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, William A.; Russo, David; Streile, Gary; El Abd, Hesham

    1990-01-01

    Although volatile organic compounds located in buried waste repositories or distributed through the unsaturated soil zone have the potential to migrate to the atmosphere by vapor diffusion, little attention has been paid in the past to estimating the importance of volatilization losses. In this paper a screening model is introduced which evaluates the relative volatilization losses of a number of organic compounds under standard soil conditions. The model is an analytic solution to the problem wherein the organic chemical is located at time zero at uniform concentration in a finite layer of soil covered by a layer of soil devoid of chemical. The compound is assumed to move by vapor or liquid diffusion and by mass flow under the influence of steady upward or zero water flow while undergoing first-order degradation and linear equilibrium adsorption. Loss to the atmosphere is governed by vapor diffusion through a stagnant air boundary layer. Calculations are performed on 35 organic compounds in two model soils with properties characteristic of sandy and clayey soil. The model identifies those compounds with high potential for loss during 1 year after incorporation under 100 cm of soil cover and also is used to calculate the minimum soil cover thickness required to reduce volatilization losses to insignificant levels during the lifetime of the compound in the soil. From the latter calculation it was determined that certain compounds may volatilize from deep subsurface locations or even groundwater unless the soil surface is sealed to prevent gas migration.

  17. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas.

  18. Using Multi-Dimensional Microwave Remote Sensing Information for the Retrieval of Soil Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzahn, P.; Ludwig, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this Paper the potential of multi parametric polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) data for soil surface roughness estimation is investigated and its potential for hydrological modeling is evaluated. The study utilizes microwave backscatter collected from the Demmin testsite in the North-East Germany during AgriSAR 2006 campaign using fully polarimetric L-Band airborne SAR data. For ground truthing extensive soil surface roughness in addition to various other soil physical properties measurements were carried out using photogrammetric image matching techniques. The correlation between ground truth roughness indices and three well established polarimetric roughness estimators showed only good results for Re[ρRRLL] and the RMS Height s. Results in form of multitemporal roughness maps showed only satisfying results due to the fact that the presence and development of particular plants affected the derivation. However roughness derivation for bare soil surfaces showed promising results.

  19. Soil surface searching and transport of Euphorbia characias seeds by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espadaler, Xavier; Gómez, Crisanto

    The intensity of exploring the soil surface by ants was studied for the four species involved in the dispersal and predation of seeds of the West-Mediterranean myrmecochorous plant Euphorbia characias. During the dehiscence period (June) the whole soil surface is sccanned in 43 minutes. Not all ants that find a seed take it to the nest. For the four ant species studied ( Pheidole pallidula, Aphaenogaster senilis, Tapinoma nigerrimum, Messor barbarus) the proportion of ants that finally take the seed is 67.6%. In spite of this, the high level of soil surface searching explains the rather short time that seeds remain on the soil before being removed. The presence of an elaiosome is a key element in the outcome of the ant-seed interaction: a seed with elaiosome has a seven-fold increase in probability of being taken to the nest if found by a non-granivorous ant. The predator-avoidance hypothesis for myrmecochory is supported.

  20. Soil surface carbon dioxide efflux of bioenergy cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioenergy cropping systems have been proposed as a way to enhance United States energy security. However, research on greenhouse gas emissions from such systems is needed to ensure environmental sustainability in the field. Since soil aeration properties are dynamic, high-resolution data are needed ...

  1. Microscope Image of a Martian Soil Surface Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is the closest view of the material underneath NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This sample was taken from the top centimeter of the Martian soil, and this image from the lander's Optical Microscope demonstrates its overall composition.

    The soil is mostly composed of fine orange particles, and also contains larger grains, about a tenth of a millimeter in diameter, and of various colors. The soil is sticky, keeping together as a slab of material on the supporting substrate even though the substrate is tilted to the vertical.

    The fine orange grains are at or below the resolution of the Optical Microscope. Mixed into the soil is a small amount&mdashabout 0.5 percent&mdashof white grains, possibly of a salt. The larger grains range from black to almost transparent in appearance. At the bottom of the image, the shadows of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) beams are visible. This image is 1 millimeter x 2 millimeters.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. [Influence of different types of surface on the diversity of soil fauna in Beijing Olympic Park].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying-shi; Li, Xiao-wen; Li, Feng; Li, Hai-mei

    2015-04-01

    Soil fauna are impacted by urbanization. In order to explore the stress of different surface covers on diversity and community structure of soil fauna, we conducted this experiment in Beijing Olympic Park. In autumn of 2013, we used Baermann and Tullgren methods to study the diversity of soil fauna in the depth of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm under four different land covers i.e. bared field (BF), totally impervious surface (TIS), partly impervious surface (PIS) and grassland (GL). The results showed that the total number of soil fauna in 100 cm3 was in order of GL (210) > PIS (193) > TIS (183) > BF (90), and the number of nematodes accounted for 72.0%-92.8% of the total number. On the vertical level, except for the TIS, the other three types of surface soil fauna had the surface gathered phenomenon. The Shannon diversity index and the Pielou evenness index of BF were lower, but the Simpson dominance index was higher than in the other land covers. The Shannon index and Margalef richness indes of GL were higher than those of the other land covers. The Shannon indexes of TIS and PIS were between the BF and GL. Except for the TIS and GL, the similarity indexes were between 0.4-0.5, indicating moderate non-similar characteristics. The diversity of soil fauna was significantly correlated with temperature, pH and available potassium.

  3. Arsenic Enrichment in Surface Water and Soil in Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Wang, M.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Corresponding author: yan.zheng@qc.cuny.edu The average soil arsenic concentration was reported to be 18.7 mg/kg based on a survey of 205 samples in Tibet. This is considerably higher than the commonly cited crustal background value of 10 mg/kg of As for soil, and is unlikely due to anthropogenic pollution. To investigate the origin of this geochemical anomaly in soil arsenic, water (n=80), stream sediment (n=69), soil (n=79), rock (n=58) samples were collected from the Yarlung Zangbo (upstream of Brahmaputra) River drainage and Shiquan (upstream of Indus) River drainage basins in June of 2008. Arsenic enrichment is pronounced in the Shiquan River drainage. The average arsenic concentration in soil, stream sediment and stream water is 34±23 mg/kg (n=33, range <12-84 mg/kg), 35± mg/kg (n=37, range <14-197 mg/kg) and 5±69 g/L (n=39, range 2-252 g/L), respectively. In the Yarlung Zangbo River drainage, the average arsenic concentration in soil, stream sediment and stream water is 28±35 mg/kg (n=23, range <12-152 mg/kg), 22±7 mg/kg (n=28, range <14-44 mg/kg) and 11±16 g/L (n=30, range 2 -83 g/L), respectively. The average concentration of arsenic in upstream water of Yarlung Zangbo River is 38±28 g/L (n=5), and is much higher than the value of 5±3 g/L (n=23) downstream. The high background concentration of arsenic in soil of this area may be associated to the broad distribution of ophiolite melange and meta-sedimentary sequences containing shale, phyllite and schist that may be rich in arsenic. However, the maximum concentration of arsenic in rock is only 35±6mg/kg in metamorphic breccia. About 91% of the rock samples are lower than the limit of detection of XRF (15 mg/kg). Thus, it is more likely that soil As enrichment result from the weathering process of rocks under cold and arid plateau conditions. Whether this soil As anomaly in Tibetan Plateau affects the down stream flood plain sedimentary As content or not requires further study. Other types water

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban street dust and surface soil: comparisons of concentration, profile, and source.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Gao; Yang, Meng; Jia, Hong-Liang; Zhou, Lei; Li, Yi-Fan

    2009-02-01

    Street dust and surface soil samples in urban areas of Dalian, a coastal city in Liaoning Province, China, were collected and analyzed for 25 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentrations, distribution, and sources of PAHs in dust and soil were determined. The concentrations of total PAHs in street dust ranged between 1890 and 17,070 ng/g (dry weight), with an average of 7460 ng/g, whereas the concentrations of total PAHs in surface soil varied greatly, from 650 to 28,900 ng/g, with a mean value of 6440 ng/g. Statistical paired t-test confirmed that total PAH concentrations have no significant difference between street dust and surface soil. Mean PAH concentrations in two type samples were much higher at industrial sites than at business/residential or garden sites. PAHs were dominated by higher molecular weight PAH (4- to 6-ring) homologues, which accounted for about 73% and 72% of total PAHs in street dust and surface soil, respectively. Principal component analysis was used in source apportionment of PAHs in dust and soil. Pyrogenic and petrogenic sources contributed 70% and 22.4% of total PAHs in street dusts, and fossil fuel (coal and petroleum) and biomass combustion accounted for 64.4% and 5.6% of total PAHs in pyrogenic sources, respectively. In surface soil, total PAHs were dominated by pyrogenic sources. The diagnostic ratios of benz[a]anthracene/chrysene confirmed that PAHs in street dust and surface soil of a Dalian urban zone might come mostly from the emission of local sources.

  5. Modeling spatial and seasonal soil moisture in a semi arid hillslope: The impact of integrating soil surface seal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, Shai; Svoray, Tal; Assouline, Shmuel

    2010-05-01

    Modeling hillslope hydrology and the complex and coupled reaction of runoff processes to rainfall, lies in the focus of a growing number of research studies. The ability to characterize and understand the mechanisms underlying the complex hillslope soil moisture patterns, which trigger spatially variable non linear runoff initiation, still remains a current hydrological challenge especially in ungauged catchments. In humid climates, connectivity of transient moisture patches was suggested as a unifying concept for studying thresholds for subsurface flow and redistribution of soil moisture at the hillslope scale. In semiarid areas, however, transient moisture patches control also the differentiation between evaporation and surface runoff and the ability to identify a unifying concept controlling the large variability of soil moisture at the hillslope scale remains an open research gap. At the LTER Lehavim site in the center of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E) a typical hillslope (0.115 km2) was chosen offering different aspects and a classic geomorphologic banding. The annual rainfall is 290 mm, the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess and the dominant rock formations are Eocenean limestone and chalk with patches of calcrete. The vegetation is characterised by scattered dwarf shrubs (dominant species Sarcopoterium spinosum) and patches of herbaceous vegetation, mostly annuals, are spread between rocks and dwarf shrubs. An extensive spatial database of soil hydraulic and environmental parameters (e.g. slope, radiation, bulk density) was measured in the field and interpolated to continuous maps using geostatistical techniques and physically based modelling. To explore the effect of soil surface sealing, Mualem and Assouline (1989) equations describing the change in hydraulic parameters resulting from soil seal formation were applied. Two simple indices were developed to describe local evaporation values and contribution of water from rock outcrops to the soil

  6. Retrieval of Surface and Subsurface Moisture of Bare Soil Using Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaeenejad, A.; Moghaddam, M.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many hydrological and biological processes. Soil moisture information is vital to understanding the cycling of water, energy, and carbon in the Earth system. Knowledge of soil moisture is critical to agencies concerned with weather and climate, runoff potential and flood control, soil erosion, reservoir management, water quality, agricultural productivity, drought monitoring, and human health. The need to monitor the soil moisture on a global scale has motivated missions such as Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) [1]. Rough surface scattering models and remote sensing retrieval algorithms are essential in study of the soil moisture, because soil can be represented as a rough surface structure. Effects of soil moisture on the backscattered field have been studied since the 1960s, but soil moisture estimation remains a challenging problem and there is still a need for more accurate and more efficient inversion algorithms. It has been shown that the simulated annealing method is a powerful tool for inversion of the model parameters of rough surface structures [2]. The sensitivity of this method to measurement noise has also been investigated assuming a two-layer structure characterized by the layers dielectric constants, layer thickness, and statistical properties of the rough interfaces [2]. However, since the moisture profile varies with depth, it is sometimes necessary to model the rough surface as a layered structure with a rough interface on top and a stratified structure below where each layer is assumed to have a constant volumetric moisture content. In this work, we discretize the soil structure into several layers of constant moisture content to examine the effect of subsurface profile on the backscattering coefficient. We will show that while the moisture profile could vary in deeper layers, these layers do not affect the scattered electromagnetic field significantly. Therefore, we can use just a few layers

  7. Transformation of lignin in surface and buried soils of mountainous landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. O.; Kovalev, I. V.

    2009-11-01

    The content and composition of the lignin phenols in plants and soils of vertical natural zones were studied in the Northern Caucasus region and Northwestern Tien Shan. Three types of lignin transformation were revealed: steppe, forest, and meadow ones. It was shown that the degree of oxidation of the biopolymer during the transformation of organic matter increased when going from the living plant tissues to humic acids in surface and buried soils. The portion of lignin fragments remained unchanged during the biopolymer transformation in the following series: plant tissues-falloff-litter-soil-humic acids-buried humic acids. It was also shown that the biochemical composition of the plants had a decisive effect on the structure of the humic acids in the soils. The quantitative analysis of the lignin phenols and the 13C NMR spectroscopy proved that the lignin in higher plants was involved in the formation of specific compounds of soil humus, including aliphatic and aromatic molecular fragments. The first analysis of the lignin content and composition in buried soils of different ages was performed, and an increase in the degree of oxidation of the lignin structures was revealed in the soil chronoseries. It was proposed to use the proportions of lignin phenols in surface and buried soils as diagnostic criteria of the vegetation types in different epochs.

  8. Surface temperature and soil moisture retrieval in the Sahel from airborne multifrequency microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Calvet, J.C.

    1996-03-01

    Bipolarized microwave brightness temperatures of Sahel semiarid landscapes are analyzed at two frequencies: 5.05 and 36.5 GHz. These measurements were performed in Niger, West Africa, by the radiometer PORTOS in the framework of the Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel (HAPEX-Sahel), during the end of the rainy season (August--September 1992). The airborne microwave data were collected simultaneously with radiosoundings of the atmosphere, and ground measurements of surface temperature, soil moisture, and biomass of several vegetation types. After estimating the soil roughness parameters, it is shown that two kinds of vegetation canopies must be considered: sparse canopies and patchy canopies including bare soil strips. The mixed soil vegetation microwave emission is analyzed using a random continuous approach. The sparse canopy emission is efficiently described by considering the vegetation layer as homogeneous. Conversely, a simple soil-vegetation mixing equation must be used for the patchy canopies. The problem with retrieving the canopy temperature and the near-surface soil moisture is addressed. For every canopy, soil moisture retrieval is possible. Soil moisture maps are proposed. The canopy temperature can also be retrieved with good accuracy provided both vertical (v) and horizontal (h) polarizations are available. It is shown that the retrieved variables can be used to separate landscape units through a classification procedure.

  9. Phosphatase activity in the surface and buried chestnut soils of the Volga-Don interfluve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutova, T. E.; Demkina, T. S.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; Demkin, V. A.

    2012-04-01

    The phosphatase activity (PA) was studied in the chestnut paleosols buried in 1718-1720 under the Anna Ivanovna rampart in the southern part of the Privolzhskaya Upland and in the middle of the third millennium BC under the burial mound of the Bronze Age on the Northern Yergeni Upland; the background analogues of these soils were also examined. The PA values in the fresh soil samples varied from 2.5 to 37 mg of P2O5/10 g of soil per h with maximums in the A1 horizon of the surface soils and in the B1 horizon of the paleosols. The PA values depended on the time of storage of the samples: with time, they increased by 2.6-2.9 times in the A1 horizon of the background surface soil and decreased by 20-60% in the other soil samples. The specific distribution patterns of the PA values in the soil profiles remained the same independently of the time of storage of the samples. Relatively small amounts of the soil samples were sufficient for the reliable determination of the PA: 1-2 g for the A1 horizon and 3-5 g for the B1 and B2 horizons. The time of incubation with the substrate had to be increased up to 4 h for the long-stored samples.

  10. Soil surface acidity plays a determining role in the atmospheric-terrestrial exchange of nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Melissa A; Bish, David L; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-12-30

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important hydroxyl (OH) radical source that is formed on both ground and aerosol surfaces in the well-mixed boundary layer. Recent studies report the release of HONO from nonacidic soils, although it is unclear how soil that is more basic than the pKa of HONO (∼ 3) is capable of protonating soil nitrite to serve as an atmospheric HONO source. Here, we used a coated-wall flow tube and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to study the pH dependence of HONO uptake onto agricultural soil and model substrates under atmospherically relevant conditions (1 atm and 30% relative humidity). Experiments measuring the evolution of HONO from pH-adjusted surfaces treated with nitrite and potentiometric titrations of the substrates show, to our knowledge for the first time, that surface acidity rather than bulk aqueous pH determines HONO uptake and desorption efficiency on soil, in a process controlled by amphoteric aluminum and iron (hydr)oxides present. The results have important implications for predicting when soil nitrite, whether microbially derived or atmospherically deposited, will act as a net source or sink of atmospheric HONO. This process represents an unrecognized mechanism of HONO release from soil that will contribute to HONO emissions throughout the day.

  11. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of 137Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of 137Cs in forest surface (0–3 cm) soils. The K2SO4 extraction process liberated 2.1%–12.8% of the total 137Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher 137Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the 137Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout 137Cs. The results indicate that uptake of 137Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile 137Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  12. Soil surface acidity plays a determining role in the atmospheric-terrestrial exchange of nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Melissa A.; Bish, David L.; Raff, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important hydroxyl (OH) radical source that is formed on both ground and aerosol surfaces in the well-mixed boundary layer. Recent studies report the release of HONO from nonacidic soils, although it is unclear how soil that is more basic than the pKa of HONO (∼3) is capable of protonating soil nitrite to serve as an atmospheric HONO source. Here, we used a coated-wall flow tube and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to study the pH dependence of HONO uptake onto agricultural soil and model substrates under atmospherically relevant conditions (1 atm and 30% relative humidity). Experiments measuring the evolution of HONO from pH-adjusted surfaces treated with nitrite and potentiometric titrations of the substrates show, to our knowledge for the first time, that surface acidity rather than bulk aqueous pH determines HONO uptake and desorption efficiency on soil, in a process controlled by amphoteric aluminum and iron (hydr)oxides present. The results have important implications for predicting when soil nitrite, whether microbially derived or atmospherically deposited, will act as a net source or sink of atmospheric HONO. This process represents an unrecognized mechanism of HONO release from soil that will contribute to HONO emissions throughout the day. PMID:25512517

  13. Photodegradation of antibiotics on soil surfaces: laboratory studies on sulfadiazine in an ozone-controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Wolters, André; Steffens, Markus

    2005-08-15

    Among the processes affecting transport and degradation of antibiotics released to the environment during application of manure and slurry to agricultural land, photochemical transformations are of particular interest. Drying-out of the top soil layer under field conditions enables sorption of surface-applied antibiotics to soil dust, thus facilitating direct, indirect, and sensitized photodegradation at the soil/atmosphere interface. For studying various photochemical transformation processes of sulfadiazine, a photovolatility chamber designed in accordance with the requirements of the USEPA Guideline and 161-3 was used. Application of 14C-labeled sulfadiazine enabled complete mass balances and allowed for investigating the impact of various surfaces (glass and soil dust) and environmental factors, i.e., irradiation and atmospheric ozone, on photodegradation and volatilization. Volatilization was shown to be a negligible process. Even after increasing the air temperature up to 35 degrees C only minor amounts of sulfadiazine and transformation products (0.01-0.28% of applied radioactivity) volatilized. Due to direct and indirect photodegradation, the highest extent of mineralization to 14CO2 (3.9%), the formation of degradation products and of nonextractable soil residues was measured in irradiated soil dust experiments using ozone concentrations of 200 ppb. However, even in the dark significant mineralization was observed when ozone was present, indicating ozone-controlled transformation of sulfadiazine to occur at the soil surface.

  14. The Role of Iron-Bearing Minerals in NO2 to HONO Conversion on Soil Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Mulu A; Bish, David L; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Engelhard, Mark H; Raff, Jonathan D

    2016-08-16

    Nitrous acid (HONO) accumulates in the nocturnal boundary layer where it is an important source of daytime hydroxyl radicals. Although there is clear evidence for the involvement of heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on surfaces as a source of HONO, mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used coated-wall flow tube measurements of NO2 reactivity on environmentally relevant surfaces (Fe (hydr)oxides, clay minerals, and soil from Arizona and the Saharan Desert) and detailed mineralogical characterization of substrates to show that reduction of NO2 by Fe-bearing minerals in soil can be a more important source of HONO than the putative NO2 hydrolysis mechanism. The magnitude of NO2-to-HONO conversion depends on the amount of Fe(2+) present in substrates and soil surface acidity. Studies examining the dependence of HONO flux on substrate pH revealed that HONO is formed at soil pH < 5 from the reaction between NO2 and Fe(2+)(aq) present in thin films of water coating the surface, whereas in the range of pH 5-8 HONO stems from reaction of NO2 with structural iron or surface complexed Fe(2+) followed by protonation of nitrite via surface Fe-OH2(+) groups. Reduction of NO2 on ubiquitous Fe-bearing minerals in soil may explain HONO accumulation in the nocturnal boundary layer and the enhanced [HONO]/[NO2] ratios observed during dust storms in urban areas. PMID:27409359

  15. Mapping the total phosphorus concentration of biosolid amended surface soils using LANDSAT TM data.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, B B Maruthi; Vincent, Robert K; Witter, Jason D; Spongberg, Alison L

    2009-04-01

    Conventional methods for soil sampling and analysis for soil variability in chemical characteristics are too time-consuming and expensive for multi-seasonal monitoring over large-scale areas. Hence, the objectives of this study are: 1) to determine changes in chemical concentrations of soils that are amended with treated sewage sludge; and 2) to determine if LANDSAT TM data can be used to map surface chemical characteristics of such amended soils. For this study, we selected two fields in NW Ohio, designated as F34 and F11, that had been applied with 34 and 11 ton acre(-1) of biosolids, respectively. Soil samples from a total of 70 sampling locations across the two fields were collected one day prior to LANDSAT 5 overpass and were analyzed for several elemental concentrations. The accumulation of Ba, Cd, Cu, S and P were found to be significantly higher in the surface soils of field F34, compared to field F11. Regression equations were established to search for algorithms that could map these five elemental concentrations in the surface soils using six, dark-object-subtracted (DOS) LANDSAT TM bands and the 15 non-reciprocal spectral ratios derived from these six bands for the May 20, 2005, LANDSAT 5 TM image. Phosphorus (P) had the highest R(2) adjusted value (67.9%) among all five elements considered, and the resulting algorithm employed only spectral ratios. This model was successfully tested for robustness by applying it to another LANDSAT TM image obtained on June 5, 2005. Our results enabled us to conclude that LANDSAT TM imagery of bare-soil fields can be used to quantify and map the spatial variation of total phosphorous concentration in surface soils. This research has significant implications for identification and mapping of areas with high P, which is important for implementing and monitoring the best phosphorous management practices across the region.

  16. Organochlorine pesticides contamination in surface soils from two pesticide factories in Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifei; Dong, Liang; Shi, Shuangxin; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Yeru

    2009-10-01

    The present article attempts to investigate organochlorine pesticides' (OCPs) contamination in soils from polluted sites and to assess the soil quality in the study area. HCHs and eight other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) pesticides were studied in surface soil samples collected from a new (F) and an old (G) pesticide factory in Southeast China. According to the measured results, surface soils from F and G were contaminated with HCHs, DDTs, HCB, and chlordane, with beta-HCH and p,p'-DDT being the two dominant substances. The total OCPs concentrations of surface soils from F and G were 0.84 and 166mgkg(-1) respectively. Cluster analysis was performed to group the soil sites in terms of their total OCPs contamination levels. The ratios of alpha-HCH/gamma-HCH, o,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDT, and trans-/cis- chlordane in some of the soil samples are similar to their technical products in the study area which indicates the lack of hazardous waste management practices of the pesticide production and transportation. According to GB 15618-1995, the HCHs could be classified as light pollution and little pollution for F and G, whereas DDTs levels of F and G could be defined as little pollution and heavy pollution, respectively. This study indicates that surface soils, especially residential area soils from F and G were facing varying degrees of pollutions. The situation is more hazardous due to the continuous exposure of the population that lives in the surroundings. Therefore, on-site remediation technologies and the best available techniques/best environmental practices (BAT/BEP) should be carried out on these factories with the national implementation of the Stockholm Convention.

  17. NOX AND CO EMISSIONS FROM SOIL AND SURFACE LITTER IN A BRAZILIAN SAVANNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land clearing and burning in the tropics often results in increased solar irradiation of soil and surface organic matter. This increased light exposure and surface heating may impact the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO), trace gases that play an importa...

  18. Effects of rainfall and surface flow on chemical diffusion from soil to runoff water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although basic processes of diffusion and convection have been used to quantify chemical transport from soil to surface runoff, there are little research results actually showing how these processes were affected by rainfall and surface flow. We developed a laboratory flow cell and a sequence of exp...

  19. Estimation of Soil Moisture for Vegetated Surfaces Using Multi-Temporal L-Band SAR Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Sun, G.; Hsu, A.; Wang, J.; ONeill, P.; Ranson, J.; Engman, E. T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the technique to estimate ground surface and vegetation scattering components, based on the backscattering model and the radar decomposition theory, under configuration of multi-temporal L-band polarimetric SAR measurement. This technique can be used to estimate soil moisture of vegetated surface.

  20. Development of a Cryosphere Land Surface Model with Coupled Snow and Frozen Soil Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Sun, L.; Yang, K.; Tian, L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a land surface model with coupled snow and frozen soil physics has been developed by improving the formulations of snow and frozen soil for a hydrologically-improved land surface model (HydroSiB2). First, an energy-balance based 3-layer snow model has been incorporated into the HydroSiB2 (hereafter HydroSiB2-S) for an improved description of internal processes of snow pack. Second, a universal and simplified soil model has been coupled with HydroSiB2-S to enable the calculation of soil water freezing and thawing (hereafter HydroSiB2-SF). In order to avoid the instability caused by the uncertainty in estimating water phase changes, enthalpy is adopted as a prognostic variable instead of snow/soil temperature in the energy balance equation of the snow/frozen soil module. The newly developed models were then rigorously evaluated at two typical sites over Tibetan Plateau (one snowy and the other non-snowy, with both underlying frozen soil). At the snowy site in northeast TP (DY in the upper Hei River), HydroSiB2-SF demonstrated significant improvements over HydroSiB2-F (that is the model same as HydroSiB2-SF but using the original single-layer snow module of HydroSiB2), showing the importance of snow internal processes described by 3-layer snow parameterization. At the non-snowy site in southwest TP (Ngari, extremely dry), HydroSiB2-SF gave reasonable simulations of soil water phase changes while HydroSiB2-S did not, indicating the crucial role of frozen soil module in depicting the soil thermal and water dynamics. Finally, HydroSiB2-SF was proved capable of simulating upward moisture fluxes towards freezing front from the unfrozen soil layers below in winter.

  1. Estimation of near-surface soil moisture based on MODIS data over Taklamakan's Oases - China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Moawad; Meixner, Franz X.; Behrendt, Thomas; Mamtimin, Buhalqem

    2013-04-01

    Soil moisture is the most important factor that shapes the biotic and aboitic properties of the soil. Crop yielding is more often determined by the availability of soil moisture rather than deficiency of other nutrients. Hence, soil moisture management is imperative for sustainable food production and water supply; it also controls the response and feedback mechanisms between land surface and atmospheric processes and has been widely recognized in numerous environmental studies. However, spatially and temporally limited in-situ field observations are not appropriate to describe spatial variations of soil moisture over large areas. Consequently, there is a great need for satellite remote sensing to estimate and monitor the spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture. Recent advances in remote sensing have shown that soil moisture can be estimated by a variety of methods using visible bands (VIS), thermal infrared (TIR) and microwave imaging systems. Particularly optical remote sensing provides fine to moderate spatial resolution for near surface soil moisture estimation. In that context, MODIS data are a well-suited source for soil moisture estimation on a moderate-scale of spatial domain. The main objective of this work is to estimate the near-surface soil moisture (the "surface wetness") of some oases located in Taklamakan Desert (Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Northwest China) using MODIS data in combination with in-situ (field) observations. The Taklamakan Desert encloses many oases of different sizes, where key oases (watered by rainfall and irrigation) are Awati, Kuqa, and Turpan in the north, Milan, Ruoqiang, Waxxari, Qiemo, Minfeng, Yutian and Hotan in the south, and Shache in the west. This study uses the triangular (or trapezoid) method based on land surface temperature and vegetation index (Ts/VI) feature space. For the period 28 July to 29 August 2010, Ts and VI were derived from MODIS (day/night) land surface temperature (MOD11A2- 8 days) and

  2. Estimating Long Term Surface Soil Moisture in the GCIP Area From Satellite Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, Manfred; deJeu, Vrije; VandeGriend, Adriaan A.

    2000-01-01

    Soil moisture is an important component of the water and energy balances of the Earth's surface. Furthermore, it has been identified as a parameter of significant potential for improving the accuracy of large-scale land surface-atmosphere interaction models. However, accurate estimates of surface soil moisture are often difficult to make, especially at large spatial scales. Soil moisture is a highly variable land surface parameter, and while point measurements are usually accurate, they are representative only of the immediate site which was sampled. Simple averaging of point values to obtain spatial means often leads to substantial errors. Since remotely sensed observations are already a spatially averaged or areally integrated value, they are ideally suited for measuring land surface parameters, and as such, are a logical input to regional or larger scale land process models. A nine-year database of surface soil moisture is being developed for the Central United States from satellite microwave observations. This region forms much of the GCIP study area, and contains most of the Mississippi, Rio Grande, and Red River drainages. Daytime and nighttime microwave brightness temperatures were observed at a frequency of 6.6 GHz, by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), onboard the Nimbus 7 satellite. The life of the SMMR instrument spanned from Nov. 1978 to Aug. 1987. At 6.6 GHz, the instrument provided a spatial resolution of approximately 150 km, and an orbital frequency over any pixel-sized area of about 2 daytime and 2 nighttime passes per week. Ground measurements of surface soil moisture from various locations throughout the study area are used to calibrate the microwave observations. Because ground measurements are usually only single point values, and since the time of satellite coverage does not always coincide with the ground measurements, the soil moisture data were used to calibrate a regional water balance for the top 1, 5, and 10 cm

  3. Influence of Soil Heterogeneity on Mesoscale Land Surface Fluxes During Washita '92

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Jin, Hao

    1998-01-01

    The influence of soil heterogeneity on the partitioning of mesoscale land surface energy fluxes at diurnal time scales is investigated over a 10(exp 6) sq km domain centered on the Little Washita Basin, Oklahoma, for the period June 10 - 18, 1992. The sensitivity study is carried out using MM5/PLACE, the Penn State/NCAR MM5 model enhanced with the Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange or PLACE. PLACE is a one-dimensional land surface model possessing detailed plant and soil water physics algorithms, multiple soil layers, and the capacity to model subgrid heterogeneity. A series of 12-hour simulations were conducted with identical atmospheric initialization and land surface characterization but with different initial soil moisture and texture. A comparison then was made of the simulated land surface energy flux fields, the partitioning of net radiation into latent and sensible heat, and the soil moisture fields. Results indicate that heterogeneity in both soil moisture and texture affects the spatial distribution and partitioning of mesoscale energy balance. Spatial averaging results in an overprediction of latent heat flux, and an underestimation of sensible heat flux. In addition to the primary focus on the partitioning of the land surface energy, the modeling effort provided an opportunity to examine the issue of initializing the soil moisture fields for coupled three-dimensional models. For the present case, the initial soil moisture and temperature were determined from off-line modeling using PLACE at each grid box, driven with a combination of observed and assimilated data fields.

  4. Spatial Distribution and Pattern Persistence of Surface Soil Moisture and Temperature Over Prairie from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Daoyi; Engman, Edwin T.; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Images remotely sensed aboard aircraft during FIFE, namely, PBMR (microwave) soil moisture and NS001 thermal infrared surface temperature, were mapped on the same coordinate system covering the 20 km x 20 km experimental site. For both kinds of image data, the frequency distributions were close to symmetric, and the area average compared reasonably well with the ground based measurements. For any image on any given day, the correlation between the remotely sensed values and collocated ground based measurements over the area was usually high in the case of NS001 surface temperature but low in the case of PBMR soil moisture. On the other hand, at any given flux station the correlation between the PBMR and gravimetric soil moisture over all available days was usually high. The correlation pixel by pixel between images of PBMR on different days was generally high. The preservation of the spatial patterns of soil moisture was also evaluated by considering the correlation station by station between ground-based soil moisture measurements on different days; no persistence of spatial pattern was apparent during wet periods, but a definite pattern gradually established itself toward the end of each drying episode. The spatial patterns of surface temperature revealed by NS001 were not preserved even within a single day. The cross-correlations among the two kinds of images and the vegetation index NDVI were normally poor. This suggests that different processes of vegetation growth, and of the near-surface soil water and energy budgets.

  5. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, William

    2016-04-01

    The increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change requires an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This study describes a new model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use during fires. The model is based on conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10,000 and 50,000 Wm2. In general, the model simulates the observed temperature dynamics quite well, but is less precise (but still good) at capturing the moisture dynamics. The model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50-90 C), and can provide quite accurate predictions of the total amount of soil moisture evaporated during the laboratory experiments. Overall, this new model provides a much more physically realistic simulation over all previous models developed for the same purpose.

  6. Geospatial Analysis of Near-Surface Soil Moisture Time Series Data Over Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwal, P.; Murthy, C. S.; Raju, P. V.; Sesha Sai, M. V. R.

    2016-06-01

    The present study has developed the time series database surface soil moisture over India, for June, July and August months for the period of 20 years from 1991 to 2010, using data products generated under Climate Change Initiative Programme of European Space Agency. These three months represent the crop sowing period in the prime cropping season in the country and the soil moisture data during this period is highly useful to detect the drought conditions and assess the drought impact. The time series soil moisture data which is in 0.25 degree spatial resolution was analyzed to generate different indicators. Rainfall data of same spatial resolution for the same period, generated by India Meteorological Department was also procured and analyzed. Geospatial analysis of soil moisture and rainfall derived indicators was carried out to study (1) inter annual variability of soil moisture and rainfall, (2) soil moisture deviations from normal during prominent drought years, (3) soil moisture and rainfall correlations and (4) drought exposure based on soil moisture and rainfall variability. The study has successfully demonstrated the potential of these soil moisture time series data sets for generating regional drought surveillance information products, drought hazard mapping, drought exposure analysis and detection of drought sensitive areas in the crop planting period.

  7. Relating TRMM precipitation radar land surface backscatter response to soil moisture in the Southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Sumit; Stephen, Haroon; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2011-05-01

    SummarySoil moisture is an important variable in the hydrological cycle and plays a vital role in agronomy, meteorology, and hydrology. It regulates the exchange of water and heat between land surface and atmosphere and thus plays an important role in the development of weather patterns. It is difficult to obtain a comprehensive spatio-temporal map of soil moisture because of expensive installation of soil moisture measuring instruments. In this paper, a model to estimate soil moisture ( m s) using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMMPR) backscatter ( σ°) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is developed for the Southern United States. Soil moisture data from Soil and Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) stations is used to calibrate and validate the model. The estimated values of m s compare well with the ground measurements of soil moisture. The model works well for various landcovers but works best for low density vegetated areas (closed shrubland). All the soil moisture estimates in this landcover have an absolute error of less than 8%. The model performance deteriorates with increase in vegetation density (crops and forest). Overall, the model performance is satisfactory for all landcover types with RMSE less than 6.3% and absolute error of 10% or less for 90% of the estimates. Estimation of soil moisture over a large area with low error provides another use of TRMMPR data.

  8. Preliminary results on soil-emitted gamma radiation and its relation with the local atmospheric electric field at Amieira (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, F.; Silva, H. G.; Bárias, S.; Barbosa, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The atmospheric electric field near the Earth's surface is dominated by atmospheric pollutants and natural radioactivity, with the latter directly linked to radon (222Rn) gas. For a better comprehension on the temporal variability of both the atmospheric electric field and the radon concentration and its relation with local atmospheric variables, simultaneous measurements of soil-emitted gamma radiation and potential gradient (defined from the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field) were taken every minute, along with local meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity and daily solar radiation). The study region is Amieira, part of the Alqueva lake in Alentejo Portugal, where an interdisciplinary meteorological campaign, ALEX2014, took place from June to August 2014. Soil gamma radiation is more sensitive to small concentrations of radon as compared with alpha particles measurements, for that reason it is more suited for sites with low radon levels, as expected in this case. Preliminary results are presented here: statistical and spectral analysis show that i) the potential gradient has a stronger daily cycle as compared with the gamma radiation, ii) most of the energy of the gamma signal is concentrated in the low frequencies (close to 0), contrary to the potential gradient that has most of the energy in frequency 1 (daily cycle) and iii) a short-term relation between gamma radiation and the potential gradient has not been found. Future work and plans are also discussed.

  9. Updated global soil map for the Weather Research and Forecasting model and soil moisture initialization for the Noah land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DY, C. Y.; Fung, J. C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A meteorological model requires accurate initial conditions and boundary conditions to obtain realistic numerical weather predictions. The land surface controls the surface heat and moisture exchanges, which can be determined by the physical properties of the soil and soil state variables, subsequently exerting an effect on the boundary layer meteorology. The initial and boundary conditions of soil moisture are currently obtained via National Centers for Environmental Prediction FNL (Final) Operational Global Analysis data, which are collected operationally in 1° by 1° resolutions every 6 h. Another input to the model is the soil map generated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (FAO-UNESCO) soil database, which combines several soil surveys from around the world. Both soil moisture from the FNL analysis data and the default soil map lack accuracy and feature coarse resolutions, particularly for certain areas of China. In this study, we update the global soil map with data from Beijing Normal University in 1 km by 1 km grids and propose an alternative method of soil moisture initialization. Simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model show that spinning-up the soil moisture improves near-surface temperature and relative humidity prediction using different types of soil moisture initialization. Explanations of that improvement and improvement of the planetary boundary layer height in performing process analysis are provided.

  10. Patterns and scaling properties of surface soil moisture in an agricultural landscape: An ecohydrological modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korres, W.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2013-08-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in hydrology, meteorology and agriculture. Soil moisture, and surface soil moisture in particular, is highly variable in space and time. Its spatial and temporal patterns in agricultural landscapes are affected by multiple natural (precipitation, soil, topography, etc.) and agro-economic (soil management, fertilization, etc.) factors, making it difficult to identify unequivocal cause and effect relationships between soil moisture and its driving variables. The goal of this study is to characterize and analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of surface soil moisture (top 20 cm) in an intensively used agricultural landscape (1100 km2 northern part of the Rur catchment, Western Germany) and to determine the dominant factors and underlying processes controlling these patterns. A second goal is to analyze the scaling behavior of surface soil moisture patterns in order to investigate how spatial scale affects spatial patterns. To achieve these goals, a dynamically coupled, process-based and spatially distributed ecohydrological model was used to analyze the key processes as well as their interactions and feedbacks. The model was validated for two growing seasons for the three main crops in the investigation area: Winter wheat, sugar beet, and maize. This yielded RMSE values for surface soil moisture between 1.8 and 7.8 vol.% and average RMSE values for all three crops of 0.27 kg m-2 for total aboveground biomass and 0.93 for green LAI. Large deviations of measured and modeled soil moisture can be explained by a change of the infiltration properties towards the end of the growing season, especially in maize fields. The validated model was used to generate daily surface soil moisture maps, serving as a basis for an autocorrelation analysis of spatial patterns and scale. Outside of the growing season, surface soil moisture patterns at all spatial scales depend mainly upon soil properties. Within the main growing season, larger scale

  11. [Distribution and sources of oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in surface soil of Beijing, China].

    PubMed

    He, Guang-Xiu; Zhang, Zhi-Huan; Peng, Xu-Yang; Zhu, Lei; Lu, Ling

    2011-11-01

    62 surface soil samples were collected from different environmental function zones in Beijing. Sulfur and oxygen heterocyclic aromatic compounds were detected by GC/MS. The objectives of this study were to identify the composition and distribution of these compounds, and discuss their sources. The results showed that the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soils mainly contained dibenzofuran, methyl- and C2-dibenzofuran series, dibenzothiophene, methyl-, C2- and C3-dibenzothiophene series and benzonaphthothiophene series. The composition and distribution of the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil samples varied in the different environmental function zones, of which some factories and the urban area received oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds most seriously. In Beijing, the degree of contamination by oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the north surface soil was higher than that in the south. There were preferable linear correlations between the concentration of dibenzofuran series and fluorene series, as well as the concentration of dibenzothiophene series and dibenzofuran series. The oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil were mainly derived from combustion products of oil and coal and direct input of mineral oil, etc. There were some variations in pollution sources of different environmental function zones.

  12. Impact of long-term land application of biosolids on groundwater quality and surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Surampalli, R.Y.; Lin, K.L.; Banerji, S.K.

    1995-11-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the long-term land application of Biosolids and its potential impact on groundwater quality and surface soils. For this study, an existing site, that has been in operation for 8--15 years were selected for sampling and analyses. From this site sludge applied soil samples, background soil samples, and groundwater monitoring samples were obtained. The samples were analyzed for the following: pH, conductivity, total solids, fecal coliform, fecal streptococci, nitrate nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, TKN, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc. The results of this study indicate that groundwater at this biosolids application site was not contaminated with heavy metals or pathogens. The bacteriological soil data also indicated that the levels of fecal coliform and fecal streptococci were close to background level with no evidence of contamination. The results also indicate that there is no heavy metals buildup in biosolids-amended soils.

  13. Study on ozone treatment of soil for agricultural application of surface dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Takuya; Abiru, Tomoya; Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Ebihara, Kenji; Nagahama, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, application of plasma technologies to the agricultural field has attracted much interest because residual pesticides and excessive nitrogen oxides contained in plants, soil, and groundwater have become a serious issue worldwide. Since almost all of the atmospheric discharge plasma generates ozone, the effects of ozone are among the key factors for their agricultural applications. We have proposed the use of ozone generated using surface barrier discharge plasma for soil disinfection or sterilization. In this work, the ozone consumption coefficient and diffusion coefficient in soil were measured by the ultraviolet absorption method. The pH(H2O) and amount of nitrogen nutrient in soil after ozone diffusion treatment were studied and plant growth was observed simultaneously. The effect of ozone treatment on the amount of DNA in soil was also investigated and compared with that determined from the obtained ozone consumption coefficient.

  14. Concentrations and geographic distribution of selected organic pollutants in Scottish surface soils.

    PubMed

    Rhind, S M; Kyle, C E; Kerr, C; Osprey, M; Zhang, Z L; Duff, E I; Lilly, A; Nolan, A; Hudson, G; Towers, W; Bell, J; Coull, M; McKenzie, C

    2013-11-01

    Concentrations of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) representing three chemical classes (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and the organic pollutant diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), were determined in surface soil samples (0-5 cm) collected at 20 km grid intersects throughout Scotland over a three-year period. Detectable amounts of all chemical classes and most individual congeners were present in all samples. There were no consistent effects of soil or vegetation type, soil carbon content, pH, altitude or distance from centres of population on concentrations which exhibited extreme variation, even in adjacent samples. It is concluded that soil POPs and DEHP concentrations and associated rates of animal and human exposure were highly variable, influenced by multiple, interacting factors, and not clearly related to local sources but possibly related to wet atmospheric deposition and the organic carbon content of the soil.

  15. Soil characteristics and vegetation features of abandoned and artificially revegetated surface mines in the Cumberland Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Rafaill, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    Soil characteristics and vegetational features of four 15-to-20-year-old contour coal surface mines in the Cumberland Mountains were compared. Two of the mines were abandoned after mining and are located in Campbell County, Tennessee. The other two mines, located in Bell County, Kentucky, were reclaimed after mining. The soils at all four sites were found to be in early stages of soil development. Chemical and physical soil factors were not detrimental to plant growth. Total overstory density at the abandoned sites was similar to that on the reclaimed mines, but one and one-half times as many tree size stems and twice as much basal area coverage were found on the abandoned sites as compared to the reclaimed mines. Many features resulting from prelaw contour mining practices benefited the development of plant communities on the mined land. Information should be sought from the study of plant communities which develop over the years on surface mines.

  16. Some physicochemical properties of surface layer soils shelterbelts in agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskulska, R.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    Shelterbelts belong to very efficient biogeochemical barriers. They decrease the migration of chemical compounds between ecosystems. The investigations were carried out in the Chlapowski's Agroecological Park in Turew situated 40 km South-West of Poznań, Poland. This area is located on loamy soils, which contains 70% cultivated fields and 14% shelterbelts and small afforestations. The shelterbelts represent different ages and the content of plants as well as humus quantity in surface layer. The first one is 100-year-old shelterbelt, where predominant species is Crataegus monogyna Jacq., Quercus rober L., and Fraxinus excelsior (L.) and is characterized by a well-developed humus level. The other one is 14-year-old shelterbelt. It includes 13 species of trees and revealed a small amount of humus. The soil under both shelterbelts is mineral, grey-brown podzolic in surface layer compound from light loamy sands and weakly loamy sands. The soil samples were taken from surface layer (0-20 cm). pH 1N KCl, hydrolytic acidity, cation-exchange capacity, total proper area, total organic carbon and dissociation constants were determined in soils. The study showed that the soil under shelterbelts revealed acidic properties. It was observed that soils of 100-year-old shelterbelt characterizing lowest values pH = 4.2 revealed highest values of hydrolytic acidity equaled to 7.8 cmol(+)ṡkg-1. The physicochemical properties of investigated soils shoved specific surface areas (22.8 m2ṡg-1), cationic sorptive capacity (12.9 cmol(+)ṡkg-1). TOC (1.6%) 100-year-old shelterbelt was higher than in 14-year-old shelterbelt. The dissociation constants were determined by potentiometric titration. This investigation revealed that the pK value was the highest in the humus of 100-year-old shelterbelt (pKa = 3.1). However, soils of 14-year-old shelterbelt characterized by the lovest pK equaled to 2.8. The surface layer soils shelterbelts in agricultural landscape with good humus development

  17. Satellite surface soil moisture from SMOS and Aquarius: Assessment for applications in agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Catherine; Rowlandson, Tracy; Berg, Aaron; Burns, Travis; L'Heureux, Jessika; Tetlock, Erica; Adams, Justin R.; McNairn, Heather; Toth, Brenda; Itenfisu, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Satellite surface soil moisture has become more widely available in the past five years, with several missions designed specifically for soil moisture measurement now available, including the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission. With a wealth of data now available, the challenge is to understand the skill and limitations of the data so they can be used routinely to support monitoring applications and to better understand environmental change. This paper examined two satellite surface soil moisture data sets from the SMOS and Aquarius missions against in situ networks in largely agricultural regions of Canada. The data from both sensors was compared to ground measurements on both an absolute and relative basis. Overall, the root mean squared errors for SMOS were less than 0.10 m3 m-3 at most sites, and less where the in situ soil moisture was measured at multiple sites within the radiometer footprint (sites in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario). At many sites, SMOS overestimates soil moisture shortly after rainfall events compared to the in situ data; however this was not consistent for each site and each time period. SMOS was found to underestimate drying events compared to the in situ data, however this observation was not consistent from site to site. The Aquarius soil moisture data showed higher root mean squared errors in areas where there were more frequent wetting and drying cycles. Overall, both data sets, and SMOS in particular, showed a stable and consistent pattern of capturing surface soil moisture over time.

  18. [Distribution Characteristics and Source Identification of Organochlorine Pesticides in Surface Soil in Karst Underground River Basin].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng-lan; Sun, Yu-chuan; Zhang, Mei; Yu, Qin; Xu, Xin

    2016-03-15

    Six typical surface soil samples were taken in Laolongdong underground river basin, and 20 OCPs were analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with micro-⁶³Ni electron capture detector. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, composition and source of organochlorine pesticides ( OCPs) in the surface soil of Laolongdong underground river basin, and to further evaluate the pollution level. The results showed that 20 OCPs were inordinately detected in the soil samples and the detection rate of 16 OCPs (except for p,p'-DDE, cis-Chlordane, trans-Chlordane, dieldrin) was 100%. Moreover, the CHLs and DDTs were the main contaminants, and there were obvious differences in the concentrations of organochlorine pesticides between different sampling points. The concentration range of total OCPs was 5.57-2,618.57 ng · g⁻¹ with a mean of 467.28 ng · g⁻¹. Compared with other regions both at home and abroad, the concentrations of HCHs and DDTs in the surface soil samples of the studied area were arranged from high to middle levels. The total concentrations of OCPs, HCHs, DDTs and CHLs had a similar variation tendency in spatial distribution, upstream > midstream > downstream, and the concentrations of OCPs in upstream were obviously higher than those in midstream and downstream. Source analysis indicated that the HCHs mainly came from the use of lindane. DDTs in soil came from not only the early residues but also recently illegal use of industrial DDTs and the input of dicofol. In addition, chlordan was mainly from the early residues and atmospheric deposition. Compared with the Environmental Quality Standard for Soils of China and Netherlands, the level of OCPs in Xinli vilage soil was categorized as highly polluted, but the levels of OCPs in Longjing bay, Xia spit, and Zhao courtyard soils were classified as slightly polluted, while the Longjing adjacency and gaozhong temple soils belonged to unpolluted ones.

  19. [Distribution Characteristics and Source Identification of Organochlorine Pesticides in Surface Soil in Karst Underground River Basin].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng-lan; Sun, Yu-chuan; Zhang, Mei; Yu, Qin; Xu, Xin

    2016-03-15

    Six typical surface soil samples were taken in Laolongdong underground river basin, and 20 OCPs were analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with micro-⁶³Ni electron capture detector. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, composition and source of organochlorine pesticides ( OCPs) in the surface soil of Laolongdong underground river basin, and to further evaluate the pollution level. The results showed that 20 OCPs were inordinately detected in the soil samples and the detection rate of 16 OCPs (except for p,p'-DDE, cis-Chlordane, trans-Chlordane, dieldrin) was 100%. Moreover, the CHLs and DDTs were the main contaminants, and there were obvious differences in the concentrations of organochlorine pesticides between different sampling points. The concentration range of total OCPs was 5.57-2,618.57 ng · g⁻¹ with a mean of 467.28 ng · g⁻¹. Compared with other regions both at home and abroad, the concentrations of HCHs and DDTs in the surface soil samples of the studied area were arranged from high to middle levels. The total concentrations of OCPs, HCHs, DDTs and CHLs had a similar variation tendency in spatial distribution, upstream > midstream > downstream, and the concentrations of OCPs in upstream were obviously higher than those in midstream and downstream. Source analysis indicated that the HCHs mainly came from the use of lindane. DDTs in soil came from not only the early residues but also recently illegal use of industrial DDTs and the input of dicofol. In addition, chlordan was mainly from the early residues and atmospheric deposition. Compared with the Environmental Quality Standard for Soils of China and Netherlands, the level of OCPs in Xinli vilage soil was categorized as highly polluted, but the levels of OCPs in Longjing bay, Xia spit, and Zhao courtyard soils were classified as slightly polluted, while the Longjing adjacency and gaozhong temple soils belonged to unpolluted ones. PMID:27337880

  20. Phosphorus speciation of forest-soil organic surface layers using P K-edge XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Prietzel, Jörg; Thieme, Jürgen; Paterson, David

    2012-02-07

    The phosphorus (P) speciation of organic surface layers from two adjacent German forest soils with different degree of water-logging (Stagnosol, Rheic Histosol) was analyzed by P K-edge XANES and subsequent Linear Combination Fitting. In both soils, {approx} 70% of the P was inorganic phosphate and {approx} 30% organic phosphate; reduced P forms such as phosphonate were absent. The increased degree of water-logging in the Histosol compared to the Stagnosol did not affect P speciation.

  1. Phosphorus Speciation of Forest-soil Organic Surface Layers using P K-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    J Prietzel; J Thieme; D Paterson

    2011-12-31

    The phosphorus (P) speciation of organic surface layers from two adjacent German forest soils with different degree of water-logging (Stagnosol, Rheic Histosol) was analyzed by P K-edge XANES and subsequent Linear Combination Fitting. In both soils, {approx}70% of the P was inorganic phosphate and {approx}30% organic phosphate; reduced P forms such as phosphonate were absent. The increased degree of water-logging in the Histosol compared to the Stagnosol did not affect P speciation.

  2. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann; ONeill, Peggy; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quasi-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well-managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  3. A one-dimensional interactive soil-atmosphere model for testing formulations of surface hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1990-01-01

    A model representing a soil-atmosphere column in a GCM is developed for off-line testing of GCM soil hydrology parameterizations. Repeating three representative GCM sensitivity experiments with this one-dimensional model demonstrates that, to first order, the model reproduces a GCM's sensitivity to imposed changes in parameterization and therefore captures the essential physics of the GCM. The experiments also show that by allowing feedback between the soil and atmosphere, the model improves on off-line tests that rely on prescribed precipitation, radiation, and other surface forcing.

  4. Response surface methodology for the microwave-assisted extraction of insecticides from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Soriano, M Carmen; Peña, Aránzazu; Mingorance, M Dolores

    2007-09-01

    The extraction of two pyrethroid insecticides (deltamethrin and alpha-cypermethrin) together with three organophosphorus insecticides (dimethoate, diazinon and malathion) from soil samples was carried out with microwave-assisted technology. Experimental designs showed that extraction temperature, addition of water to the extractant and solvent/soil ratio were the variables that affected the recoveries of the pesticide the most. Response surface methodology was applied to find the optimum values of the variables involved in the extractions of the analytes. In addition, in order to achieve near-optimal extraction conditions, a desirability function was used to optimize the five pesticides simultaneously. The optimized conditions were applied to different types of soils.

  5. Impact of Soil Moisture Assimilation on Land Surface Model Spinup and Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanello, J. A., Jr.; Kumar, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Lawston, P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in satellite monitoring of the terrestrial water cycle have led to a concerted effort to assimilate soil moisture observations from various platforms into offline land surface models (LSMs). One principal but still open question is that of the ability of land data assimilation (LDA) to improve LSM initial conditions for coupled short-term weather prediction. In this study, the impact of assimilating Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) soil moisture retrievals on coupled WRF forecasts is examined during the summers of dry (2006) and wet (2007) surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. LDA is carried out using NASA's Land Information System (LIS) and the Noah LSM using an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) approach. The impacts of LDA on the a) soil moisture and soil temperature initial conditions for WRF, b) land-atmosphere coupling characteristics, and c) ambient weather of the coupled LIS-WRF simulations are then assessed. Results show that impacts of soil moisture LDA during the spinup can significantly modify LSM states and fluxes, depending on regime and season. Results also quantify the impacts of using seasonal versus cumulative CDF matching and coarse vs. fine-scale atmospheric forcing approaches. Downstream impacts on coupled simulations vary according to the strength of the LDA impact at initialization, and significant modification to the soil moisture-flux-PBL-ambient weather process chain are observed. Overall, improvements due to LDA in this study show promise for future soil moisture assimilation applications in weather and climate.

  6. Surface-Correlated Nanophase Iron Metal in Lunar Soils: Petrography and Space Weathering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Space weathering is a term used to include all of the processes that act on material exposed at the surface of a planetary or small body. In the case of the Moon, it includes a variety of processes that formed the lunar regolith, caused the maturation of lunar soils, and formed patina on rock surfaces. The processes include micrometeorite impact and reworking, implantation of solar wind and flare particles, radiation damage and chemical effects from solar particles and cosmic rays, interactions with the lunar atmosphere, and sputtering erosion and deposition. Space weathering effects collectively result in a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. Understanding these effects is critical in order to fully integrate the lunar sample collection with remotely sensed data from recent robotic missions (e.g., Lunar Prospector, Clementine, Galileo). Our objective is to determine the origin of space weathering effects in lunar soils through combined electron microscopy and microspectrophotometry techniques applied to individual soil particles from <20 pm size factions (dry-sieved) of mature lunar soils. It has been demonstrated that it is the finest size fraction (<25 pm) of lunar soils that dominates the optical properties of the bulk soils.

  7. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Weihai; Guo, Qiuju; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Guan

    2008-07-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ((222)Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil (226)Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the (222)Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average (222)Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7+/-9.4 mBq m(-2)s(-1). Both regional and seasonal variations in the (222)Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil (226)Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China.

  8. [Relationship between ephemeral plants distribution and soil moisture on longitudinal dune surface in Gurbantonggut desert].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Jiang, Jin; Lei, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Congju

    2004-04-01

    Ephemeral plant is a particular group of desert flora only distributed in northern Xinjiang, China. In this study, field surveys of vegetation and soil moisture were conducted in the southern area of the Gurbantonggut desert from March to August 2002. The species number, coverage and growth of ephemerals and soil moisture were measured in 7 quadrats at different geomorphic positions on the longitudinal dune surface. The results showed that soil moisture in a depth of 0-30 cm affected ephemeral plants distribution significantly. In early spring, the soil moisture was 4.62% on the intredune, 3.98% on the plinth, and 2.01% on the crest. Consequently, the average coverage of ephemeral plants reached 51.8%, 38.2% and 4.4%, respectively. The existence of ephemeral plants distribution influenced soil moisture as well. In later May, there was an increase of surface soil moisture from the interdune to the crest. The soil moisture was 1.00% on the intredune, 1.90% on the plinth, and 2.45% on the crest.

  9. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potential for dating land surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-07-01

    To exploit natural sedimentary archives and geomorphic landforms it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. This paper explores the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric 10Be in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or the surface exposure determination using in situ produced 10Be). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric 10Be and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of 10Be deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric 10Be deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant 10Be input for the Central Alps, and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the 10Be inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the 10Be input agreed reasonably well with the age using surface exposure or radiocarbon dating. The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced ages that were mostly too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the 10Be inventory and 10Be deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The calculated erosion rates using these scenarios seemed to be plausible with values in the range of 0-57 mm/ky. The dating of soils using 10Be has

  10. 10Be inventories in Alpine soils and their potentiality for dating land surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Markus; Brandová, Dagmar; Böhlert, Ralph; Favilli, Filippo; Kubik, Peter W.

    2010-05-01

    To exploit natural archives and geomorphic objects it is necessary to date them first. Landscape evolution of Alpine areas is often strongly related to the activities of glaciers in the Pleistocene and Holocene. At sites where no organic matter for radiocarbon dating exists and where suitable boulders for surface exposure dating (using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides) are absent, dating of soils could give information about the timing of landscape evolution. We explored the applicability of soil dating using the inventory of meteoric Be-10 in Alpine soils. For this purpose, a set of 6 soil profiles in the Swiss and Italian Alps was investigated. The surface at these sites had already been dated (using the radiocarbon technique or surface exposure dating using in situ produced Be-10). Consequently, a direct comparison of the ages of the soils using meteoric Be-10 and other dating techniques was made possible. The estimation of Be-10 deposition rates is subject to severe limitations and strongly influences the obtained results. We tested three scenarios using a) the meteoric Be-10 deposition rates as a function of the annual precipitation rate, b) a constant Be-10 input for the Central Alps and c) as b) but assuming a pre-exposure of the parent material. The obtained ages that are based on the Be-10 inventory in soils and on scenario a) for the Be-10 input agreed reasonably well with the expected age (obtained from surface exposure or radiocarbon dating). The ages obtained from soils using scenario b) produced mostly ages that were too old whereas the approach using scenario c) seemed to yield better results than scenario b). Erosion calculations can, in theory, be performed using the Be-10 inventory and Be-10 deposition rates. An erosion estimation was possible using scenario a) and c), but not using b). The estimated erosion rates are in a reasonable range. The dating of soils using Be-10 has several potential error sources. Analytical errors as well as errors

  11. Impact of slope gradient on soil surface features and infiltration on steep slopes in northern Laos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribolzi, O.; Patin, J.; Bresson, L. M.; Latsachack, K. O.; Mouche, E.; Sengtaheuanghoung, O.; Silvera, N.; Thiébaux, J. P.; Valentin, C.

    2011-04-01

    It was recently demonstrated that, infiltration into mountain-tilled soils with highly stable microaggregates, increases with increasing slope gradient. In this work we investigate the processes that underpin this phenomenon by means of field experiments and modelling. The study area is located in northern Laos. Rainfall simulations were conducted in two 1-m 2 plots using a portable field simulator. The drop size distribution and kinetic energy were similar to that occurring on the occasion of tropical downpours. Soils exhibited a clay loam texture and very similar organic matter contents across experimental plots, but differed greatly in slope gradient (30% and 75%). Runoff water samples were collected at intervals ranging from 1 to 3 min, depending on the runoff intensity. Plots microtopography was measured before and after rainfall simulations using an automatic surface roughness meter on a 1-cm grid. High-resolution bulk density images were obtained from soil slices using a standard X-ray generator. Final infiltration rates of 6 and 21 mm h -1; soil detachment of 667 and 310 g m -2; surface lowering due to soil loss of 0.82 and 0.38 mm; surface lowering due to compaction of 1.21 and 0.90 mm; percentage area with sieving crust of 36% and 90%; percentage area with erosion crust of 63% and 0%; were obtained for the 30% and 75% slopes, respectively. Three main conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) high intensity rainfall can rapidly transform soil surface features of steep bare soil; (2) on steeper slopes, the micro-relief tends to form micro-terraces much more pervious and less erodible than the ripple-like roughness that formed on gentler slopes; and (3) there was a more pronounced lowering of the soil surface due to compaction and denser microlayers on gentler slopes. The latter conclusion confirms the hypothesis that higher effective rainfall intensity is responsible for the formation of less permeable erosion crusts under 30% slope gradients while more

  12. Effect of Space Radiation Processing on Lunar Soil Surface Chemistry: X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukes, C.; Loeffler, M.J.; Baragiola, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current understanding of the chemistry and microstructure of the surfaces of lunar soil grains is dominated by a reference frame derived mainly from electron microscopy observations [e.g. 1,2]. These studies have shown that the outermost 10-100 nm of grain surfaces in mature lunar soil finest fractions have been modified by the combined effects of solar wind exposure, surface deposition of vapors and accretion of impact melt products [1,2]. These processes produce surface-correlated nanophase Feo, host grain amorphization, formation of surface patinas and other complex changes [1,2]. What is less well understood is how these changes are reflected directly at the surface, defined as the outermost 1-5 atomic monolayers, a region not easily chemically characterized by TEM. We are currently employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surface chemistry of lunar soil samples that have been previously studied by TEM. This work includes modification of the grain surfaces by in situ irradiation with ions at solar wind energies to better understand how irradiated surfaces in lunar grains change their chemistry once exposed to ambient conditions on earth.

  13. Effects of Regional Topography and Spacecraft Observation Geometry on Surface Soil Moisture Estimation Accuracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; West, R. D.; Colliander, A.; Kim, S.; Dunbar, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active-Passive Mission (SMAP), launched in January 2015, provides near-daily global surface soil moisture estimates via combined Active Radar and Passive Radiometer observations at various spatial resolutions. The goal of this mission is to enhance our understanding of global carbon and water cycles. This presentation will focus on a comprehensive assessment of the SMAP high resolution radar backscatter data (formally the L1C_S0_HiRes data product) obtained over a 3 km Woody Savanna region in north-central California during a 2.5 month period starting late May 2015. The effects of spacecraft observation geometry (fore- and aft-looks as well as ascending and descending obits) along with regional topography on soil moisture estimation abilities will be examined. Furthermore surface soil moisture retrievals, obtained through utilization of different combinations of observation geometries, will be compared to an existing network of in situsensors. Current electromagnetic scattering and emission models do not properly account for surface topography, therefore physical forward model predictions and observations have unaccounted mismatch errors which also affect soil moisture estimation accuracies. The goal of this study is to quantify these soil moisture prediction errors and highlight the need for new and complete Electromagnetic modeling efforts.

  14. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-20

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparentmore » and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. In conclusion, these results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales.« less

  15. Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Feedbacks on Atmospheric Tracers: The Effects of Soil Moisture on Precipitation and Near-Surface Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Ahmed B.

    The atmospheric component is described by rapid fluctuations in typical state variables, such as temperature and water vapor, on timescales of hours to days and the land component evolves on daily to yearly timescales. This dissertation examines the connection between soil moisture and atmospheric tracers under varying degrees of soil moisture-atmosphere coupling. Land-atmosphere coupling is defined over the United States using a regional climate model. A newly examined soil moisture-precipitation feedback is identified for winter months extending the previous summer feedback to colder temperature climates. This feedback is driven by the freezing and thawing of soil moisture, leading to coupled land-atmosphere conditions near the freezing line. Soil moisture can also affect the composition of the troposphere through modifying biogenic emissions of isoprene (C5H8). A novel first-order Taylor series decomposition indicates that isoprene emissions are jointly driven by temperature and soil moisture in models. These compounds are important precursors for ozone formation, an air pollutant and a short-lived forcing agent for climate. A mechanistic description of commonly observed relationships between ground-level ozone and meteorology is presented using the concept of soil moisture-temperature coupling regimes. The extent of surface drying was found to be a better predictor of ozone concentrations than temperature or humidity for the Eastern U.S. This relationship is evaluated in a coupled regional chemistry-climate model under several land-atmosphere coupling and isoprene emissions cases. The coupled chemistry-climate model can reproduce the observed soil moisture-temperature coupling pattern, yet modeled ozone is insensitive to changes in meteorology due to the balance between isoprene and the primary atmospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). Overall, this work highlights the importance of soil moisture-atmosphere coupling for previously neglected cold climate

  16. The effect of surface sealing on soil moisture dynamics in a semiarid hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, S.; Svoray, T.; Assouline, S.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying hillslope soil moisture dynamics and vegetation patchiness remains a current challenge in hydrology, especially in ungauged watersheds. In dry areas, these mechanisms include the formation of surface seals, that although directly affects infiltration and evaporation fluxes, researchers usually disregard its development when predicting soil moisture patterns. The role of these seals in shaping spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture, considered as the primary limiting factor for dry area plant distribution, is still an open research gap. At the LTER Lehavim site, in the center of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E), a typical hillslope (0.115 Km2) was chosen offering different aspects and a classic geomorphologic banding. Annual rainfall is 290 mm, the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess and the dominant rock formations are Eocenean limestone and chalk with patches of calcrete. The vegetation is characterised by scattered dwarf shrubs (dominant species Sarcopoterium spinosum) and patches of herbaceous vegetation, mostly annuals, are spread between rocks and dwarf shrubs. An extensive spatial database of soil hydraulic and environmental parameters (e.g. slope, radiation, bulk density) was measured in the field and was interpolated to continuous maps using geostatistical techniques and physically-based models. To explore the effect of soil surface sealing, the Mualem and Assouline (1989) equations, describing the change in hydraulic parameters resulting from soil seal formation, were applied explicitly in space to the entire hillslope. Two simple indices were developed to describe local evaporation rates and the contribution of water from rock outcrops to the downslope soil patches. This spatio-temporal database was used to characterise 1187 cells serving as an input to a numeric model (Hydrus 1D) solving the flow equations to predict soil water content at the single storm and the seasonal scales. Predictions were

  17. A soil diffusion-reaction model for surface COS flux: COSSM v1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K.; Lett, C.; Seibt, U.

    2015-07-01

    Soil exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the second largest COS flux in terrestrial ecosystems. A novel application of COS is the separation of gross primary productivity (GPP) from concomitant respiration. This method requires that soil COS exchange is relatively small and can be well quantified. Existing models for soil COS flux have incorporated empirical temperature and moisture functions derived from laboratory experiments, but not explicitly resolved diffusion in the soil column. We developed a 1-D diffusion-reaction model for soil COS exchange that accounts for COS uptake and production, relates source-sink terms to environmental variables, and has an option to enable surface litter layers. We evaluated the model with field data from a wheat field (Southern Great Plains (SGP), OK, USA) and an oak woodland (Stunt Ranch Reserve, CA, USA). The model was able to reproduce all observed features of soil COS exchange such as diurnal variations and sink-source transitions. We found that soil COS uptake is strongly diffusion controlled, and limited by low COS concentrations in the soil if there is COS uptake in the litter layer. The model provides novel insights into the balance between soil COS uptake and production: a higher COS production capacity was required despite lower COS emissions during the growing season compared to the post-senescence period at SGP, and unchanged COS uptake capacity despite the dominant role of COS emissions after senescence. Once there is a database of soil COS parameters for key biomes, we expect the model will also be useful to simulate soil COS exchange at regional to global scales.

  18. A soil diffusion-reaction model for surface COS flux: COSSM v1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K.; Lett, C.; Seibt, U.

    2015-10-01

    Soil exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the second largest COS flux in terrestrial ecosystems. A novel application of COS is the separation of gross primary productivity (GPP) from concomitant respiration. This method requires that soil COS exchange is relatively small and can be well quantified. Existing models for soil COS flux have incorporated empirical temperature and moisture functions derived from laboratory experiments but not explicitly resolved diffusion in the soil column. We developed a mechanistic diffusion-reaction model for soil COS exchange that accounts for COS uptake and production, relates source-sink terms to environmental variables, and has an option to enable surface litter layers. We evaluated the model with field data from a wheat field (Southern Great Plains (SGP), OK, USA) and an oak woodland (Stunt Ranch Reserve, CA, USA). The model was able to reproduce all observed features of soil COS exchange such as diurnal variations and sink-source transitions. We found that soil COS uptake is strongly diffusion controlled and limited by low COS concentrations in the soil if there is COS uptake in the litter layer. The model provides novel insights into the balance between soil COS uptake and production: a higher COS production capacity was required despite lower COS emissions during the growing season compared to the post-senescence period at SGP, and unchanged COS uptake capacity despite the dominant role of COS emissions after senescence. Once there is a database of soil COS parameters for key biomes, we expect the model will also be useful to simulate soil COS exchange at regional to global scales.

  19. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  20. The influence of surface reflectance anisotropy on estimation of soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Roosjen, Peter; Clevers, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The spatial variation in soil properties is an important factor for agricultural management. Unmanned airborne vehicles (UAV's) equipped with a hyperspectral mapping system may provide these data, but anisotropic reflectance effects may have an influence on the derived soil properties. Besides influencing the reflectance, angular observations may deliver added information about soil properties. We investigated the anisotropic behavior of 59 soil samples with a large variation in soil composition, by measuring their reflectance (350-2500 nm) over 92 different angles using a robot-based laboratory goniometer system. The results show that the anisotropic behavior of the soils influences the measured reflectance significantly, which limits the accurate prediction of soil properties (OM and clay especially). However, prediction accuracies of OM increase when spectra are measured under specific angles. Prediction accuracies further increase when a combination of observation angles is being used. Apart from that, using UAV's the wavelength range is limited to about 1000 nm. In general, this will decrease the model performance, but our results show that this effect can largely be compensated by combining multiple observation angles. Altogether, we demonstrate that surface anisotropy influences the prediction of soil properties negatively. This effect can be reduced by combining spectra acquired under different angles. Moreover, predictions can be improved if combinations of different observation angles are used.

  1. Simple surface foam application enhances bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil in cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Jongshin; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-04-01

    Landfarming of oil-contaminated soil is ineffective at low temperatures, because the number and activity of micro-organisms declines. This study presents a simple and versatile technique for bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil, which involves spraying foam on the soil surface without additional works such as tilling, or supply of water and air. Surfactant foam containing psychrophilic oil-degrading microbes and nutrients was sprayed twice daily over diesel-contaminated soil at 6 °C. Removal efficiencies in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) at 30 days were 46.3% for landfarming and 73.7% for foam-spraying. The first-order kinetic biodegradation rates for landfarming and foam-spraying were calculated as 0.019 d(-1) and 0.044 d(-1), respectively. Foam acted as an insulating medium, keeping the soil 2 °C warmer than ambient air. Sprayed foam was slowly converted to aqueous solution within 10-12h and infiltrated the soil, providing microbes, nutrients, water, and air for bioaugmentation. Furthermore, surfactant present in the aqueous solution accelerated the dissolution of oil from the soil, resulting in readily biodegradable aqueous form. Significant reductions in hydrocarbon concentration were simultaneously observed in both semi-volatile and non-volatile fractions. As the initial soil TPH concentration increased, the TPH removal rate of the foam-spraying method also increased.

  2. Source apportionment and health risk assessment of trace metals in surface soils of Beijing metropolitan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Lu, Sijin; Wang, Yeyao; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the exposure risks of trace metals in contamination soils and apportioning their sources are the basic preconditions for soil pollution prevention and control. In this study, a detailed investigation was conducted to assess the health risks of trace metals in surface soils of Beijing which is one of the most populated cities in the world and to apportion their potential sources. The data set of metals for 12 elements in 240 soil samples was collected. Pollution index and enrichment factor were used to identify the general contamination characteristic of soil metals. The probabilistic risk model was employed for health risk assessment, and a chemometrics technique, multivariate curve resolution-weighted alternating least squares (MCR-WALS), was applied to apportion sources. Results suggested that the soils in Beijing metropolitan region were contaminated by Hg, Cd, Cu, As, and Pb in varying degree, lying in the moderate pollution level. As a whole, the health risks posed by soil metals were acceptable or close to tolerable. Comparatively speaking, children and adult females were the relatively vulnerable populations for the non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks, respectively. Atmospheric deposition, fertilizers and agrochemicals, and natural source were apportioned as the potential sources determining the contents of trace metals in soils of Beijing area with contributions of 15.5%-16.4%, 5.9%-7.7% and 76.0%-78.6%, respectively.

  3. Source apportionment and health risk assessment of trace metals in surface soils of Beijing metropolitan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Lu, Sijin; Wang, Yeyao; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the exposure risks of trace metals in contamination soils and apportioning their sources are the basic preconditions for soil pollution prevention and control. In this study, a detailed investigation was conducted to assess the health risks of trace metals in surface soils of Beijing which is one of the most populated cities in the world and to apportion their potential sources. The data set of metals for 12 elements in 240 soil samples was collected. Pollution index and enrichment factor were used to identify the general contamination characteristic of soil metals. The probabilistic risk model was employed for health risk assessment, and a chemometrics technique, multivariate curve resolution-weighted alternating least squares (MCR-WALS), was applied to apportion sources. Results suggested that the soils in Beijing metropolitan region were contaminated by Hg, Cd, Cu, As, and Pb in varying degree, lying in the moderate pollution level. As a whole, the health risks posed by soil metals were acceptable or close to tolerable. Comparatively speaking, children and adult females were the relatively vulnerable populations for the non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks, respectively. Atmospheric deposition, fertilizers and agrochemicals, and natural source were apportioned as the potential sources determining the contents of trace metals in soils of Beijing area with contributions of 15.5%-16.4%, 5.9%-7.7% and 76.0%-78.6%, respectively. PMID:26439517

  4. Relationships between groundwater, surface water, and soil salinity in Polder 32, Southwest Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, D. C.; Ayers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    In the coastal areas of Southwest Bangladesh polders are surrounded by tidal channels filled with brackish water. In the wet season, farmers create openings in the embankments to irrigate rice paddies. In the dry season, farmers do the same to create saline shrimp ponds. Residents on Polder 32, located within the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta system, practice these seasonal farming techniques. Soils in the area are entisols, being sediment recently deposited, and contain mostly silt-sized particles. Brackish water in brine shrimp ponds may deposit salt in the soil, causing soil salinization. However, saline connate groundwater could also be contributing to soil salinization. Groundwater, surface water (fresh water pond, rice paddy and tidal channel water) and soil samples have been analyzed via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and ion chromatography in an attempt to correlate salinity measurements with each other in order to determine major sources of soil salinity. Multiple parameters, including distances of samples from tidal channels, inland streams, shrimp ponds and tube wells were measured to see if spatial correlations exist. Similarly, values from wet and dry seasons were compared to quantify temporal variations. Salt content in many soil samples were found to be high enough to significantly decrease rice yields. Continued soil salinization can decrease these yields even more, leading to farmers not producing enough food to sustain their families.

  5. A comparison of six methods for measuring soil-surface carbon dioxide fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, J.M.; Kucharik, C.J.; Gower, S.T.; Baldocchi, D.D.; Crill, P.M.; Rayment, M.; Savage, K.; Striegl, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of soil-surface CO2 fluxes are important for characterizing the carbon budget of boreal forests because these fluxes can be the second largest component of the budget. Several methods for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes are available: (1) closed-dynamic-chamber systems, (2) closed-static-chamber systems, (3) open-chamber systems, and (4) eddy covariance systems. This paper presents a field comparison of six individual systems for measuring soil-surface CO2 fluxes with each of the four basic system types represented. A single system is used as a reference and compared to each of the other systems individually in black spruce (Picea mariana), jack pine (Pinus banksiana), or aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests. Fluxes vary from 1 to 10 ??mol CO2 m-2 s-1. Adjustment factors to bring all of the systems into agreement vary from 0.93 to 1.45 with an uncertainty of about 10-15%.

  6. The Influence of Rotation, Tillage and Row Spacing on Near-Surface Soil Temperature for Winter Wheat in Southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Larney, F. J.; Ren, Tennis L.; McGinn, Sean M.; Lindwall, C W.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

    2003-02-01

    The influence of rotation, tillage and row spacing on near-surface soil temperature for winter wheat in southern Alberta. Rotation, tillage and row spacing and their effects on surface residue levels can modify soil temperature. Our study investigated the effect of rotation, tillage and row spacing on near-surface (0.025 m) soil temperature under winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in 1993-94 and 1994-95.

  7. A compendium of results from long-range alpha detector soil surface monitoring: June 1992--May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, S.E.; Bounds, J.A.; Allander, K.S.; Johnson, J.D.; MacArthur, D.W.; Caress, R.W.

    1994-11-01

    Soil surface monitors based on long-range alpha detector (LRAD) technology are being used to monitor alpha contamination at various sites in the Department of Energy complex. These monitors, the large soil-surface monitor (LSSM) and the small soil-surface monitor (SSSM), were used to help characterize sites at Fernald, Ohio, and active or inactive firing sites at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Monitoring results are presented herein in chronological order.

  8. Monitoring Land Surface Soil Moisture from Space with in-Situ Sensors Validation: The Huntsville Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Steve Shih-Tseng

    1997-01-01

    Based on recent advances in microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and in pursuit of research interests in areas of hydrology, soil climatology, and remote sensing, the Center for Hydrology, Soil Climatology, and Remote Sensing (HSCARS) conducted the Huntsville '96 field experiment in Huntsville, Alabama from July 1-14, 1996. We, researchers at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center's MSFC/ES41, are interested in using ground-based microwave sensors, to simulate land surface brightness signatures of those spaceborne sensors that were in operation or to be launched in the near future. The analyses of data collected by the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) and the C-band radiometer, which together contained five frequencies (6.925,10.7,19.35, 37.1, and 85.5 GHz), and with concurrent in-situ collection of surface cover conditions (surface temperature, surface roughness, vegetation, and surface topology) and soil moisture content, would result in a better understanding of the data acquired over land surfaces by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TMI), and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR), because these spaceborne sensors contained these five frequencies. This paper described the approach taken and the specific objective to be accomplished in the Huntsville '97 field experiment.

  9. Massively Parallel Computation of Soil Surface Roughness Parameters on A Fermi GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojie; Song, Changhe

    2016-06-01

    Surface roughness is description of the surface micro topography of randomness or irregular. The standard deviation of surface height and the surface correlation length describe the statistical variation for the random component of a surface height relative to a reference surface. When the number of data points is large, calculation of surface roughness parameters is time-consuming. With the advent of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architectures, inherently parallel problem can be effectively solved using GPUs. In this paper we propose a GPU-based massively parallel computing method for 2D bare soil surface roughness estimation. This method was applied to the data collected by the surface roughness tester based on the laser triangulation principle during the field experiment in April 2012. The total number of data points was 52,040. It took 47 seconds on a Fermi GTX 590 GPU whereas its serial CPU version took 5422 seconds, leading to a significant 115x speedup.

  10. The effect of soil surface sealing on vegetation water uptake along a dry climatic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, Shai; Svoray, Tal; Assouline, Shmuel

    2015-09-01

    Soil surface sealing is a widespread natural process occurring frequently in bare soil areas between vegetation patches. The low hydraulic conductivity that characterizes the seal layer reduces both infiltration and evaporation fluxes from the soil, and thus has the potential to affect local vegetation water uptake (VWU). This effect is investigated here using experimental data, 2-D physically based modeling, and a long-term climatic data set from three dry sites presenting a climatic gradient in the Negev Desert, Israel. The Feddes VWU parameters for the dominant shrub at the study site (Sarcopoterium spinosum) were acquired using lysimeter experiments. The results indicate that during the season surface sealing could either increase or decrease VWU depending on initial soil water content, rainfall intensity, and the duration of the subsequent drying intervals. These factors have a marked effect on interannual variability of the seal layer effect on VWU, which on average was found to be 26% higher under sealed conditions than in the case of unsealed soil surfaces. The seal layer was found to reduce the period where the vegetation was under water stress by 31% compared with unsealed conditions. This effect was more pronounced for seasons with total rainfall depth higher than 10 cm/yr, and was affected by interseasonal climatic variability. These results shed light on the importance of surface sealing in dry environments and its contribution to the resilience of woody vegetation.

  11. Pollution distribution of heavy metals in surface soil at an informal electronic-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2014-02-01

    We studied distribution of heavy metals [lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in surface soil at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling workshop near Metro Manila in the Philippines to evaluate the pollution size (spot size, small area or the entire workshop), as well as to assess heavy metal transport into the surrounding soil environment. On-site length-of-stride-scale (~70 cm) measurements were performed at each surface soil point using field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF). The surface soil at the e-waste recycling workshop was polluted with Cu, Zn and Pb, which were distributed discretely in surface soil. The site was divided into five areas based on the distance from an entrance gate (y-axis) of the e-waste recycling workshop. The three heavy metals showed similar concentration gradients in the y-axis direction. Zn, Pb and Cu concentrations were estimated to decrease to half of their maximum concentrations at ~3, 7 and 7 m from the pollution spot, respectively, inside the informal e-waste recycling workshop. Distance from an entrance may play an important role in heavy metal transport at the soil surface. Using on-site FP-XRF, we evaluated the metal ratio to characterise pollution features of the solid surface. Variability analysis of heavy metals revealed vanishing surficial autocorrelation over metre ranges. Also, the possibility of concentration prediction at unmeasured points using geostatistical kriging was evaluated, and heavy metals had a relative "small" pollution scales and remained inside the original workshop compared with toxic organohalogen compounds. Thus, exposure to heavy metals may directly influence the health of e-waste workers at the original site rather than the surrounding habitat and environmental media. PMID:23645478

  12. Pollution distribution of heavy metals in surface soil at an informal electronic-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2014-02-01

    We studied distribution of heavy metals [lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in surface soil at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling workshop near Metro Manila in the Philippines to evaluate the pollution size (spot size, small area or the entire workshop), as well as to assess heavy metal transport into the surrounding soil environment. On-site length-of-stride-scale (~70 cm) measurements were performed at each surface soil point using field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF). The surface soil at the e-waste recycling workshop was polluted with Cu, Zn and Pb, which were distributed discretely in surface soil. The site was divided into five areas based on the distance from an entrance gate (y-axis) of the e-waste recycling workshop. The three heavy metals showed similar concentration gradients in the y-axis direction. Zn, Pb and Cu concentrations were estimated to decrease to half of their maximum concentrations at ~3, 7 and 7 m from the pollution spot, respectively, inside the informal e-waste recycling workshop. Distance from an entrance may play an important role in heavy metal transport at the soil surface. Using on-site FP-XRF, we evaluated the metal ratio to characterise pollution features of the solid surface. Variability analysis of heavy metals revealed vanishing surficial autocorrelation over metre ranges. Also, the possibility of concentration prediction at unmeasured points using geostatistical kriging was evaluated, and heavy metals had a relative "small" pollution scales and remained inside the original workshop compared with toxic organohalogen compounds. Thus, exposure to heavy metals may directly influence the health of e-waste workers at the original site rather than the surrounding habitat and environmental media.

  13. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  14. Active and passive remote sensing of surface soil moisture from TRMM satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, S.; Oki, T.; Musiake, K.

    2003-04-01

    Two microwave sensors on board Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Precipitation Radar (PR) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), are used to make global surface soil moisture map in this research. Firstly, a soil moisture estimation algorithm from TRMM/PR is developed. In this algorithm, the backscattering coefficients at land surface (σ^0) observed by TRMM/PR are used. As σ^0 is attenuated by strong rainfall, the data observed during rainfall is not included in our calculation. TRMM/PR has poor spatial resolution compared with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), but the observation frequency (temporal resolution) is as high as passive microwave sensors. Though TRMM/PR observes by multiple incident angles from 0o to 18o, our algorithm is basically designed for the observations by 12o. It is shown by a sensitivity analysis that σ^0 is less affected by the ratio of surface vegetation cover (f) when it is observed by 12o. However, if the temporal change of f is not significant, the σ^0 observed by incident angles among 3o to 18o are well correlated with those by 12o. In such case, our algorithm can be applied to large number of observations by 3 to 18 degrees. Secondly, another soil moisture estimation algorithm from TRMM/TMI is developed. A microwave transfer model in soil-vegetation-atmosphere layers is used to retrieve soil moisture from single index such as polarization difference (PD) / frequency difference (FD) of brightness temperatures. Soil moisture estimates from different algorithms are compared to each other and are compared with estimates from TRMM/PR. In order to simulate realistic seasonal variation of soil moisture, it is necessary to give monthly Leaf Area Index (LAI) data from other satellite information. Other vegetation parameters (eg. Stem Area Index (SAI)) and soil roughness are also important because they significantly affect the sensitivity of PD/FD against LAI. PD of 10GHz is the best index to retrieve soil moisture because this is less

  15. Calculations of microwave brightness temperature of rough soil surfaces: Bare field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Schmugge, T. J.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A model for simulating the brightness temperatures of soils with rough surfaces is developed. The surface emissivity of the soil media is obtained by the integration of the bistatic scattering coefficients for rough surfaces. The roughness of a soil surface is characterized by two parameters, the surface height standard deviation sigma and its horizontal correlation length l. The model calculations are compared to the measured angular variations of the polarized brightness temperatures at both 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequences. A nonlinear least-squares fitting method is used to obtain the values of delta and l that best characterize the surface roughness. The effect of shadowing is incorporated by introducing a function S(theta), which represents the probability that a point on a rough surface is not shadowed by other parts of the surface. The model results for the horizontal polarization are in excellent agreement with the data. However, for the vertical polarization, some discrepancies exist between the calculations and data, particularly at the 1.4 GHz frequency. Possible causes of the discrepancy are discussed.

  16. Analyzing model uncertainty in predicted surface fluxes resulting from prescribed soil and vegetation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankov, M.; Prochaka, L.; Mölders, N.

    2003-12-01

    The atmosphere and land-surface continuously interact, for which the surface affects current weather and climate. The biosphere-soil system plays an important role because it is the media in those interactions. The processes that describe those interactions are the exchange of momentuum, heat, water vapor, and matter. To include these processes at the soil-biosphere-atmosphere interface in atmospheric models they have to be parameterized. The different vegetation and soil types are realized by prescribed plant physiological and soil physical parameters (e.g. soil hydraulic conductivity, soil thermal conductivity, porosity, pore-size distribution index, leaf area index, albedo and emissivity of the foliage and soil, minimum stomatal resistance, canopy height, etc.) in these parameterizations. The parameters can vary even among the same soil or plant type. The order of magnitude of those variations can be as much as the mean values of the parameters themselves. In order to improve weather prediction the model uncertainty, caused by the necessity to prescribe parameters, has to be minimized. To asses the errors uncertainty analysis with respect to the prescribed parameters is carried out using the Gaussian Error Propagation method. We use the PennState/NCAR mesoscale meteorological model MM5 coupled with the Oregon State University land surface model (OSULSM) as the test-platform. The Gaussian Error Propagation technique provides error bars for the fluxes simulated by MM5. Moreover, the technique can point out which parameters contribute the most to the error, and should be replaced in future model development. Our preliminary results show that throughout the domain errors were at low or moderate levels. The highest errors predicted appear to be associated with scarcely vegetated, sandy clay loam areas and areas covered by ice and snow.

  17. Multi-surface modeling to predict free zinc ion concentrations in low-zinc soils.

    PubMed

    Duffner, Andreas; Weng, Liping; Hoffland, Ellis; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2014-05-20

    Multi-surface models are widely used to assess the potential ecotoxicological risk in metal-contaminated soils. Their accuracy in predicting metal speciation in soils with low metal levels was not yet tested. Now highly sensitive analytical techniques are available to experimentally validate such models at low concentration levels. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of a multi-surface model to predict the Zn(2+) concentration and to improve our understanding of Zn bioavailability in low-Zn soils. High-Zn soils were included as controls. Model parameters were determined independently on the basis of earlier peer-reviewed publications. Model output was validated against free Zn(2+) concentrations determined with the soil column Donnan membrane technique in a range of soils varying in potentially available Zn, organic matter, clay silicate, and iron (hydr)oxide contents and pH. Deviations between predicted Zn(2+) concentrations and experimentally determined values over the whole Zn concentration range were less or equal to the experimental standard error, except for one low-Zn soil. The Zn(2+) concentration was mainly controlled by adsorption, where organic matter was predicted to be the dominant soil sorbent. The predicted Zn(2+) concentration depends more sensitively upon changes of the reactive Zn pool (application of 0.6, 1.2, 2.4, and 3.6 mg of Zn kg(-1) of soil) and organic matter content (± 0.2 and 0.4%) than pH changes (± 0.5 and 1 pH unit). PMID:24742258

  18. Multi-surface modeling to predict free zinc ion concentrations in low-zinc soils.

    PubMed

    Duffner, Andreas; Weng, Liping; Hoffland, Ellis; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2014-05-20

    Multi-surface models are widely used to assess the potential ecotoxicological risk in metal-contaminated soils. Their accuracy in predicting metal speciation in soils with low metal levels was not yet tested. Now highly sensitive analytical techniques are available to experimentally validate such models at low concentration levels. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of a multi-surface model to predict the Zn(2+) concentration and to improve our understanding of Zn bioavailability in low-Zn soils. High-Zn soils were included as controls. Model parameters were determined independently on the basis of earlier peer-reviewed publications. Model output was validated against free Zn(2+) concentrations determined with the soil column Donnan membrane technique in a range of soils varying in potentially available Zn, organic matter, clay silicate, and iron (hydr)oxide contents and pH. Deviations between predicted Zn(2+) concentrations and experimentally determined values over the whole Zn concentration range were less or equal to the experimental standard error, except for one low-Zn soil. The Zn(2+) concentration was mainly controlled by adsorption, where organic matter was predicted to be the dominant soil sorbent. The predicted Zn(2+) concentration depends more sensitively upon changes of the reactive Zn pool (application of 0.6, 1.2, 2.4, and 3.6 mg of Zn kg(-1) of soil) and organic matter content (± 0.2 and 0.4%) than pH changes (± 0.5 and 1 pH unit).

  19. Transport of trace metals in runoff from soil and pond ash feedlot surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Gilley, J.E.; Cottrell, G.L.; Woodbury, B.L.; Berry, E.D.; Eigenbert, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of pond ash (fly ash that has been placed in evaporative ponds for storage and subsequently dewatered) for feedlot surfaces provides a drier environment for livestock and furnishes economic benefits. However, pond ash is known to have high concentrations of trace elements, and the runoff water-quality effects of feedlot surfaces amended with pond ash are not well defined. For this study, two experimental units (plots) were established in eight feedlot pens. Four of the pens contained unamended soil surfaces, and the remaining four pens had pond-ash amended surfaces. Before each test, unconsolidated surface material was removed from four of the plots for each of the amendment treatments, resulting in eight unamended plots and eight pond-ash amended plots. Concentrations for 23 trace elements were measured in cattle feedlot surface material and in the runoff water from three simulated rainfall events. Trace element concentrations in surface material and runoff did not differ between surface consolidation treatments. Amending the feedlot surface material with pond ash resulted in a significant increase in concentration for 14 of the 17 trace elements. Runoff concentrations for 21 trace elements were affected by pond-ash amendment. Sixteen of 21 trace element concentrations that differed significantly were greater in runoff from unamended soil surfaces. Concentrations in runoff were significantly correlated with concentrations in feedlot surface material for boron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and uranium.

  20. Modelling and interpreting biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structure using automated micropenetrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoon, Stephen R.; Felde, Vincent J. M. N. L.; Drahorad, Sylvie L.; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Soil penetrometers are used routinely to determine the shear strength of soils and deformable sediments both at the surface and throughout a depth profile in disciplines as diverse as soil science, agriculture, geoengineering and alpine avalanche-safety (e.g. Grunwald et al. 2001, Van Herwijnen et al. 2009). Generically, penetrometers comprise two principal components: An advancing probe, and a transducer; the latter to measure the pressure or force required to cause the probe to penetrate or advance through the soil or sediment. The force transducer employed to determine the pressure can range, for example, from a simple mechanical spring gauge to an automatically data-logged electronic transducer. Automated computer control of the penetrometer step size and probe advance rate enables precise measurements to be made down to a resolution of 10's of microns, (e.g. the automated electronic micropenetrometer (EMP) described by Drahorad 2012). Here we discuss the determination, modelling and interpretation of biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structures using automated micropenetrometry. We outline a model enabling the interpretation of depth dependent penetration resistance (PR) profiles and their spatial differentials using the model equations, σ {}(z) ={}σ c0{}+Σ 1n[σ n{}(z){}+anz + bnz2] and dσ /dz = Σ 1n[dσ n(z) /dz{} {}+{}Frn(z)] where σ c0 and σ n are the plastic deformation stresses for the surface and nth soil structure (e.g. soil crust, layer, horizon or void) respectively, and Frn(z)dz is the frictional work done per unit volume by sliding the penetrometer rod an incremental distance, dz, through the nth layer. Both σ n(z) and Frn(z) are related to soil structure. They determine the form of σ {}(z){} measured by the EMP transducer. The model enables pores (regions of zero deformation stress) to be distinguished from changes in layer structure or probe friction. We have applied this method to both artificial calibration soils in the

  1. PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR METALS IN SURFACE WATER, SOIL, AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents metal partition coefficients for the surface water pathway and for the source model used in the Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partition ...

  2. Global fields of soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration derived from observed precipitation and surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Y.; Walker, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    The global fields of normal monthly soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration are derived with a simple water budget model that has precipitation and potential evapotranspiration as inputs. The precipitation is observed and the potential evapotranspiration is derived from the observed surface air temperature with the empirical regression equation of Thornthwaite (1954). It is shown that at locations where the net surface radiation flux has been measured, the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation is in good agreement with those obtained with the radiation-based formulations of Priestley and Taylor (1972), Penman (1948), and Budyko (1956-1974), and this provides the justification for the use of the Thornthwaite equation. After deriving the global fields of soil moisture and evapotranspiration, the assumption is made that the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation and by the Priestley-Taylor equation will everywhere be about the same; the inverse of the Priestley-Taylor equation is used to obtain the normal monthly global fields of net surface radiation flux minus ground heat storage. This and the derived evapotranspiration are then used in the equation for energy conservation at the surface of the earth to obtain the global fields of normal monthly sensible heat flux from the land surface to the atmosphere.

  3. Correcting rainfall using satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals: The Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, W. T.; van den Berg, M. J.; Huffman, G. J.; Pellarin, T.

    2011-08-01

    Recently, Crow et al. (2009) developed an algorithm for enhancing satellite-based land rainfall products via the assimilation of remotely sensed surface soil moisture retrievals into a water balance model. As a follow-up, this paper describes the benefits of modifying their approach to incorporate more complex data assimilation and land surface modeling methodologies. Specific modifications improving rainfall estimates are assembled into the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART), and the resulting algorithm is applied outside the contiguous United States for the first time, with an emphasis on West African sites instrumented as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis experiment. Results demonstrate that the SMART algorithm is superior to the Crow et al. baseline approach and is capable of broadly improving coarse-scale rainfall accumulations measurements with low risk of degradation. Comparisons with existing multisensor, satellite-based precipitation data products suggest that the introduction of soil moisture information from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer via SMART provides as much coarse-scale (3 day, 1°) rainfall accumulation information as thermal infrared satellite observations and more information than monthly rain gauge observations in poorly instrumented regions.

  4. The role of fire on soil mounds and surface roughness in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soulard, Christopher E.; Esque, Todd C.; Bedford, David R.; Bond, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in arid land management centers on understanding the long-term effects of fire on desert ecosystems. To assess the effects of fire on surface topography, soil roughness, and vegetation, we used terrestrial (ground-based) LiDAR to quantify the differences between burned and unburned surfaces by creating a series of high-resolution vegetation structure and bare-earth surface models for six sample plots in the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, Arizona. We find that 11 years following prescribed burns, mound volumes, plant heights, and soil-surface roughness were significantly lower on burned relative to unburned plots. Results also suggest a linkage between vegetation and soil mounds, either through accretion or erosion mechanisms such as wind and/or water erosion. The biogeomorphic implications of fire-induced changes are significant. Reduced plant cover and altered soil surfaces from fire likely influence seed residence times, inhibit seed germination and plant establishment, and affect other ecohydrological processes.

  5. Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Soils: The Roles of Surface Exposure Time and Bulk Chemical Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering effects on lunar soil grains result from both radiation-damaged and deposited layers on grain surfaces. Typically, solar wind irradiation forms an amorphous layer on regolith silicate grains, and induces the formation of surficial metallic Fe in Fe-bearing minerals [1,2]. Impacts into the lunar regolith generate high temperature melts and vapor. The vapor component is largely deposited on the surfaces of lunar soil grains [3] as is a fraction of the melt [4, this work]. Both the vapor-deposits and the deposited melt typically contain nanophase Fe metal particles (npFe0) as abundant inclusions. The development of these rims and the abundance of the npFe0 in lunar regolith, and thus the optical properties, vary with the soil mineralogy and the length of time the soil grains have been exposed to space weathering effects [5]. In this study, we used the density of solar flare particle tracks in soil grains to estimate exposure times for individual grains and then perform nanometer-scale characterization of the rims using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The work involved study of lunar soil samples with different mineralogy (mare vs. highland) and different exposure times (mature vs. immature).

  6. A Comparison of Land Surface Model Soil Hydraulic Properties Estimated by Inverse Modeling and Pedotransfer Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, Ethan D.; Small, Eric E.

    2007-01-01

    Soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) regulate the movement of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land surface. At present, SHPS are commonly defined by a simple pedotransfer function from soil texture class, but SHPs vary more within a texture class than between classes. To examine the impact of using soil texture class to predict SHPS, we run the Noah land surface model for a wide variety of measured SHPs. We find that across a range of vegetation cover (5 - 80% cover) and climates (250 - 900 mm mean annual precipitation), soil texture class only explains 5% of the variance expected from the real distribution of SHPs. We then show that modifying SHPs can drastically improve model performance. We compare two methods of estimating SHPs: (1) inverse method, and (2) soil texture class. Compared to texture class, inverse modeling reduces errors between measured and modeled latent heat flux from 88 to 28 w/m(exp 2). Additionally we find that with increasing vegetation cover the importance of SHPs decreases and that the van Genuchten m parameter becomes less important, while the saturated conductivity becomes more important.

  7. Sulfolane attenuation by surface and subsurface soil matrices.

    PubMed

    Saint-Fort, R

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate sulfolane (tetrahydrothiophene-1, 1-dioxide) attenuation by soil and subsurface materials collected from a sour gas plant site using batch equilibration systems. The analyzed sample materials used in this study showed a wide range in terms of their selected physical and chemical properties. The reaction of sulfolane with the sample materials was fast initially and followed by slower rates at longer times. There was not much increase in the amount of sulfolane sorbed after about 5 hours of equilibration time irrespective of the temperature of the system. The rate of sorption of sulfolane followed a first-order reaction at both 25 and 8 degrees C temperature conditions and not affected by the temperatures range considered in this study. It appears that the sorption data of sulfolane on the various sorbents could be best described mathematically by the Freundlich equation. Kd values derived at 25 degrees C ranged from 0.05 to 0.88 L/kg and from 0.30 to 1.23 L/kg at 8 degrees C. Furthermore, increasing the ionic strength of the solution didn't affect sulfolane sorption by the various sorbents, which indicates that sulfolane sorption is not consistent with an ion-exchange mechanism but rather occurs through dipole-dipole interactions. Desorption of sulfolane was relative high in all systems. Multiple regression analysis shows a high level of correlation between Kd and several soil parameters. No sulfolane biodegradation was detected under anerobic conditions in any of the microcosms systems after 45 days of incubation at 25 and 8 degrees C, respectively. Sulfolane biodegradation data could be all fitted to zero-order kinetics. Biodegradation rates of sulfolane in the microcosms was the highest in sample depth 0-0.20 m, decreased with sample depth but significantly increased with the addition of nitrogen, and markedly decreased with temperature. At 25 degrees C and no supplement of N, biodegradation rate ranged from 4.26 to 12.70 mg

  8. Dew-worms in white nights: High latitude light constrains earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) behaviour at the soil surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil is an effective barrier to light penetration that limits the direct influence of light on belowground organisms. Variation in aboveground light conditions, however, is important to soil-dwelling animals that are periodically active on the soil surface. A prime example is the earthworm Lumbricus...

  9. Soil heat flux calculation for sunlit and shaded surfaces under row crops: 1 - Model Development and sensitivity analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil heat flux at the surface (G0) is strongly influenced by whether the soil is shaded or sunlit, and therefore can have large spatial variability for incomplete vegetation cover, such as across the interrows of row crops. Most practical soil-plant-atmosphere energy balance models calculate G0 as a...

  10. Surface Electrical Conductivity Prediction by Soil Moisture and Electromagnetic Mapping Techniques: Implication for Landmine Detection Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsube, J.; McNairn, H.; Keating, P. K.; Das, Y.; Dyke, L.; Best, M. E.; Singhroy, V.; Connell-Madore, S.; Hunter, J.; Klassen, R.; Dilabio, R.; Moore, A.

    2004-05-01

    Electrical conductivity (EC) can be a source of significant signal interference in landmine detection, implying that there is a necessity for soil EC prediction in order to carry out safe demining operations in landmine affected countries in the world. A fundamental study on soil EC mechanisms and their relationship to moisture content has been carried out in order to increase the soil EC prediction accuracy when using data from various sensors, such as remote sensing, airborne and surficial electromagnetic (EM) methods. Results indicate that soil moisture consists of free water filling pore spaces and bound water which forms adsorbed water layers on the grain surfaces. The response of these two water phases to drying rates and EC are very different, to the extent that a moist clay poor soil may have low EC but a dry clay rich soil may have higher EC. This is a result of not only the bound water layers being a significant source of EC, but of the capillary component of the free water reacting differently to the different grain-sizes of the soil. The capillary water forms important electrical conductive bridges between the adsorbed water layers on the grains that constitute the soil. This implies that information on soil texture, mineralogy and their distribution are required for accurate EC prediction. Whereas information on these soil characteristics may be acquired by remote sensing and soil maps, soil moisture content is likely to vary from the time of data acquisition to that of demining operations, implying methods to predict these changes are required. In addition, soil type inhomogeniety, such as vertical and horizontal variation can also be a source of inaccuracies in moisture and EC predictions. However, these investigations also indicate that a wide band electrical frequency signal may have the possibility of providing information on, not only metallic mineral content, but on pore space, clay mineral type and water content. In addition, applications of

  11. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface.

    PubMed

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3-5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. PMID:27132250

  12. Individual-Based Model of Microbial Life on Hydrated Rough Soil Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Microbial life in soil is perceived as one of the most interesting ecological systems, with microbial communities exhibiting remarkable adaptability to vast dynamic environmental conditions. At the same time, it is a notoriously challenging system to understand due to its complexity including physical, chemical, and biological factors in synchrony. This study presents a spatially-resolved model of microbial dynamics on idealised rough soil surfaces represented as patches with different (roughness) properties that preserve the salient hydration physics of real surfaces. Cell level microbial interactions are considered within an individual-based formulation including dispersion and various forms of trophic dependencies (competition, mutualism). The model provides new insights into mechanisms affecting microbial community dynamics and gives rise to spontaneous formation of microbial community spatial patterns. The framework is capable of representing many interacting species and provides diversity metrics reflecting surface conditions and their evolution over time. A key feature of the model is its spatial scalability that permits representation of microbial processes from cell-level (micro-metric scales) to soil representative volumes at sub-metre scales. Several illustrative examples of microbial trophic interactions and population dynamics highlight the potential of the proposed modelling framework to quantitatively study soil microbial processes. The model is highly applicable in a wide range spanning from quantifying spatial organisation of multiple species under various hydration conditions to predicting microbial diversity residing in different soils. PMID:26807803

  13. Individual-Based Model of Microbial Life on Hydrated Rough Soil Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsu; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Microbial life in soil is perceived as one of the most interesting ecological systems, with microbial communities exhibiting remarkable adaptability to vast dynamic environmental conditions. At the same time, it is a notoriously challenging system to understand due to its complexity including physical, chemical, and biological factors in synchrony. This study presents a spatially-resolved model of microbial dynamics on idealised rough soil surfaces represented as patches with different (roughness) properties that preserve the salient hydration physics of real surfaces. Cell level microbial interactions are considered within an individual-based formulation including dispersion and various forms of trophic dependencies (competition, mutualism). The model provides new insights into mechanisms affecting microbial community dynamics and gives rise to spontaneous formation of microbial community spatial patterns. The framework is capable of representing many interacting species and provides diversity metrics reflecting surface conditions and their evolution over time. A key feature of the model is its spatial scalability that permits representation of microbial processes from cell-level (micro-metric scales) to soil representative volumes at sub-metre scales. Several illustrative examples of microbial trophic interactions and population dynamics highlight the potential of the proposed modelling framework to quantitatively study soil microbial processes. The model is highly applicable in a wide range spanning from quantifying spatial organisation of multiple species under various hydration conditions to predicting microbial diversity residing in different soils. PMID:26807803

  14. Summary report: Assessment of deep injection well associated surface soils at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pole, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes sampling activities and analytical results of the chemical and radiological content of surface soils from storm water retention basins and drainage ditches associated with eight deep injection wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The results of the sampling effort were intended to support permitting of the injection wells by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources. In August 1992, the surface soils associated with eight storm water retention basins and ditches were sampled. All samples were collected and analyzed in accordance with a written sampling and analysis plan. The samples were analyzed by an off-Site contract laboratory, and the results were compared to local and regional soil analytical data to determine the presence of contaminants. The results indicated that the surface soils from the storm water retention basins and ditches did not have concentrations of metals or radionuclides greater than the range of concentrations found in local and regional soils. Volatile organic compounds were below detection limits.

  15. Summary of solar experience with the soiling of optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Call, P J

    1980-02-01

    The results of a workshop held on July 16-17, 1979 to discuss available experimental data, current and planned experimental investigations, directly applicable optical principles, and relevant theory are summarized. The summary is in terms of the magnitude of effects on various types of systems and the effects of location, surface properties, and natural/artificial removal. The economics of prevention, tolerance, and removal are also summarized. (MHR)

  16. The environmental fate of arsenic in surface soil contaminated by historical herbicide application.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongqiang; Donahoe, Rona J

    2008-11-01

    Soils from many industrial sites are contaminated with arsenic because of the historical application of herbicide containing arsenic trioxide. The strong affinity of aqueous arsenic species for soil components has led to the retention of significant amounts of arsenic in surface soils decades after the original source application. Soil collected from a site which received a one-time surficial application of arsenical herbicide in the 1950s was investigated to understand the fate of arsenic under natural leaching conditions. Sequential chemical extraction of the contaminated soil revealed that the majority of the arsenic is in its secondary form. The synthetic acid rain leaching of arsenic from the weathered soil can be divided into two distinct stages. During the first stage, the leachate arsenic concentration underwent a rapid decline which suggests an equilibrium-controlled release event. The second leaching stage was marked by a slow, steady release of arsenic, a signature of a kinetically controlled process. A mathematical approach was employed to identify and describe the two distinct arsenic releasing processes (equilibrium desorption and kinetic desorption). This model considers both desorption processes simultaneously and produces leachate arsenic concentrations in good agreement with the measured data. According to the modeling results, 20% of the arsenic remaining in the soil resides in the herbicide source material after five decades of natural leaching; 25% exists on reversible adsorption sites and 55% is present on irreversible adsorption sites.

  17. Be-7 as a tracer for short-term soil surface changes - opportunities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Within the last 20 years the cosmogenic nuclide Beryllium-7 was successfully established as a suitable tracer element to detect soil surface changes with a high accuracy. Particularly soil erosion rates from single precipitation events are in the focus of different studies due to the short radioactive half-life of the Be-7 isotope. High sorption at topmost soil particles and immobility at given pH-values enable fine-scaled erosion modelling down to 2 mm increments. But some important challenging limitations require particular attention, starting from sampling up to the final data evaluation. E.g. these are the realisation of the fine increment soil collection, the limiting amount of measurable samples per campaign due to the short radioactive half-life and the specific requirements for the detector measurements. Both, the high potential and the challenging limitations are presented as well as future perspectives of that tracer method.

  18. CONSERVB: A numerical method to compute soil water content and temperature profiles under a bare surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbavel, C. H. M.; Lascano, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, yet fairly simple model of water disposition in a bare soil profile under the sequential impact of rain storms and other atmospheric influences, as they occur from hour to hour is presented. This model is intended mostly to support field studies of soil moisture dynamics by our current team, to serve as a background for the microwave measurements, and, eventually, to serve as a point of departure for soil moisture predictions for estimates based in part upon airborne measurements. The main distinction of the current model is that it accounts not only for the moisture flow in the soil-atmosphere system, but also for the energy flow and, hence, calculates system temperatures. Also, the model is of a dynamic nature, capable of supporting any required degree of resolution in time and space. Much critical testing of the sample is needed before the complexities of the hydrology of a vegetated surface can be related meaningfully to microwave observations.

  19. Elevated soil CO2 efflux at the boundaries between impervious surfaces and urban greenspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XiaoGang; Hu, Dan; Ma, ShengLi; Zhang, Xia; Guo, Zhen; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2016-09-01

    Impervious surfaces and greenspaces have significant impacts on ecological processes and ecosystem services in urban areas. However, there have been no systematic studies of how the interaction between the two forms of land cover, and especially their edge effects, influence ecosystem properties. This has made it difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of urban greenspace design in meeting environmental goals. In this study, we investigated edge effects on soil carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in Beijing and found that soil CO2 flux rates were averagely 73% higher 10 cm inwards from the edge of greenspaces. Distance, soil temperature, moisture, and their interaction significantly influenced soil CO2 flux rates. The magnitude and distance of edge effects differed among impervious structure types. Current greening policy and design should be adjusted to avoid the carbon sequestration service of greenspaces being limited by their fragmentation.

  20. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  1. Colloidal phosphorus in surface runoff and water extracts from semiarid soils of the western United States.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin L; Kay, Mary A; Westermann, Dale T

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal particles in runoff may have an important role in P transfer from soils to waterbodies, but remain poorly understood. We investigated colloidal molybdate-reactive phosphorus (MRP) in surface runoff and water extracts of calcareous arable soils from the semiarid western United States. Colloidal MRP was determined by ultrafiltration and operationally defined as MRP associated with particles between 1 microm and 1 nm diameter, although a smaller pore-size filter (0.3 nm) was used to define the lower size limit of colloids in water extracts. In surface runoff from three calcareous soils generated by simulated sprinkler irrigation, colloidal MRP concentrations ranged between 0.16 and 3.07 microM, constituting between 11 and 56% of the MRP in the <1-microm fraction. Concentrations were strongly correlated with agronomic and environmental soil-test P concentrations for individual soils. Water extracts of a range of similar soils contained two size fractions of colloidal MRP: a larger fraction (1.0-0.2 microm) probably associated with fine clays, and a smaller fraction (3-0.3 nm) probably associated with Ca-phosphate minerals. Colloidal MRP was solubilized in the acidic medium of the colorimetric detection procedure, suggesting that a fraction of the filterable MRP in runoff from calcareous soils may not be as readily bioavailable as free phosphate in waterbodies. Our results suggest that colloidal MRP is an important but poorly understood component of P transfer in runoff from calcareous western U.S. soils and should be given greater consideration in mechanistic studies of the P transfer process. PMID:15254129

  2. Spatial Arrangment of Organic Compounds on a Model Mineral Surface: Implications for Soil Organic Matter Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Ambaye, Haile Arena; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Kilbey, S. Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Lauter, Valeria; Mayes, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the mineral organic carbon interface may influence the extent of stabilization of organic carbon compounds in soils, which is important for global climate futures. The nanoscale structure of a model interface was examined here by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose and amphiphilic stearic acid, onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3). Neutron reflectometry, a technique which provides depth-sensitive insight into the organization of the thin films, indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid, a result that was verified by water contact angle measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the thermodynamic driving force behind glucose partitioning on the mineral interface: The entropic penalty of confining the less mobile glucose on the mineral surface is lower than for stearic acid. The fundamental information obtained here helps rationalize how complex arrangements of organic carbon on soil mineral surfaces may arise

  3. The role of soil surface crusting in desertification and strategies to reduce crusting.

    PubMed

    Fox, D M; Bryan, R B; Price, A G

    2004-12-01

    Soil crusting decreases infiltration, increases erosion, and impedes vegetation establishment, so reducing the impact of crusting is of major importance in combating desertification. Although surface crusting has been the subject of considerable research over the past 50 years or more, the practical management of soil crusts remains a challenge for many dryland communities. Crusting occurs in two steps, an initial aggregate breakdown period that occurs under rainfall and a subsequent hardening phase during drying. Several factors influence crust development, but the single most important one is soil aggregate stability. Strategies to reduce crusting can be based either on protecting the surface from raindrop impact or improving aggregate stability, or a combination of both. However, crust control is labor and/or capital intensive and must be thought out clearly in terms of the benefits to be achieved.

  4. Study on the Surface-Physicochemical-Property Changing of Bentonite by Adapting a New Soil Stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Xiang, Wei; Lang, Linzhi; Cui, Deshan

    2015-04-01

    Surface-physicochemical-property of clays has been proved to have direct influence on its mechanic behavior. Specific surface area (SSA) is one of the most important factors for surface-physicochemical-property assessment. The smaller SSA tends higher strength (shear strength, unconfined compressive strength and tensile strength) under different water contents of soil. In this paper, a new soil stabilizer (Tung oil-based sulfonated) is developed and applied to improve the properties of Ca-bentonite. The differences of specific surface area, fractal dimension and micro geometric morphology between raw Ca-bentonite samples and modified ones are investigated based on the data acquired from water vapor, nitrogen adsorption experiments and SEM experiments. Results show that the SSA including external SSA and total SSA of treated samples decrease largely and apparently when compared to that of the raw samples. Furthermore, the higher volume ratio between soil stabilizer and water, the more decrease in SSA. Compared to the ones of raw Ca-bentonite, the external SSA and total SSA of the modified Ca-bentonite samples decrease by 48.5% and 25.2%, respectively, when the volume ratio was 1:50. This result implies that the connection of montmorillonite particles becomes more tightly after the treatment by the soil stabilizer. In addition, an obvious decreasing trend is found in fractal dimension by analysis of water vapor adsorption isotherms. This finding indicates that the pore surface tends to be smoother by the chemical action among particles bonds, more condensable in aggregates and shorter space between the interlayer of montmorillonite. SEM results display that the new soil stabilizer developed a quantity of lamellar aggregates but did not change the structure of montmorillonite. Based on all mentioned above, the results of fractal dimension analysis are verified. Consequently, this study shows that the new soil stabilizer (Tung oil-based sulfonated) has obvious effects

  5. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Fernanda Adame, Maria; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  6. Land surface temperature inversion of bare soil and vegetation cover based on MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Zhou, Song; Wang, Zhezhen; Lv, Nan; Jiang, Jianwu; Wang, Ke

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature is one of the most important parameters in hydrology and agricultural production research . Split-window algorithm based on MODIS data was briefly introduced in this paper and applied in Hetao Irrigation District. Comparison between data retrieval and field collected data showed that data retrieval could reflect land surface temperature basic accurately .Linear fitting of different time series data can improve retrieval precision effectively. The results provide support for drought forecast, soil moisture monitoring etc. in the future.

  7. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  8. Specific surface area effect on adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP by soils and modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP (3,5,6, trichloro-2-pyridinol) was determined in four soils (Mollisol, Inceptisol, Entisol, Alfisol) having different specific surface areas (19–84 m2/g) but rather similar organic matter content (2.4–3.5%). Adsorption isotherms were derived from batch equilibr...

  9. The physical and chemical properties and resource potential of Martian surface soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Gooding, J. L.; Roush, T.; Banin, A.; Burt, D.; Clark, B. C.; Flynn, G.; Gwynne, O.

    The physical and chemical properties of Martian surface soils are reviewed from the perspective of providing resources to support human activities on Mars. The relevant properties can only be inferred from limited analyses performed by the Viking Landers, from information derived from remote sensing, and from analysis of the SNC meteorites thought to be from Mars.

  10. Improving surface energy balance closure by reducing errors in soil heat flux measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flux plate method is the most commonly employed method for measuring soil heat flux (G) in surface energy balance studies. Although relatively simple to use, the flux plate method is susceptible to significant errors. Two of the most common errors are heat flow divergence around the plate and fa...

  11. Treatment Of Polychlorinated Biphenyls In Two Surface Soils Using Catalyzed H2O2 Propagations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two surface soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) collected from Superfund sites in the New England region of the United States, Fletcher Paints and Merrimack Industrial Metals, were evaluated for field treatment at the bench level using catalyzed H2...

  12. Optimal averaging of soil moisture predictions from ensemble land surface model simulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The correct interpretation of ensemble 3 soil moisture information obtained from the parallel implementation of multiple land surface models (LSMs) requires information concerning the LSM ensemble’s mutual error covariance. Here we propose a new technique for obtaining such information using an inst...

  13. The potential utility of land surface modeling and data assimilation for satellite soil moisture validation activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the past five years, a number of different modeling and/or data assimilation strategies have been introduced to conduct validation/evaluation of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals. These strategies can be (roughly) separated into three separate categories: 1) triple collocation (TC)...

  14. Soil depth mapping using seismic surface waves: Evaluation on eroded loess covered hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardie, Severine; Samyn, Kevin; Cerdan, Olivier; Grandjean, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    The purposes of the multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project are the integration and improvement of in situ and proximal technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators. Foreseen developments concern sensor technologies, data processing and their integration to applications of (digital) soil mapping (DSM). Among available techniques, the seismic one is, in this study, particularly tested for characterising soil vulnerability to erosion. The spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method is an in situ seismic technique used for evaluation of the stiffnesses (G) and associated depth in layered systems. A profile of Rayleigh wave velocity versus frequency, i.e., the dispersion curve, is calculated from each recorded seismogram before to be inverted to obtain the vertical profile of shear wave velocity Vs. Then, the soil stiffness can easily be calculated from the shear velocity if the material density is estimated, and the soil stiffness as a function of depth can be obtained. This last information can be a good indicator to identify the soil bedrock limit. SASW measurements adapted to soil characterisation is proposed in the DIGISOIL project, as it produces in an easy and quick way a 2D map of the soil. This system was tested for the digital mapping of the depth of loamy material in a catchment of the European loess belt. The validation of this methodology has been performed with the realisation of several acquisitions along the seismic profiles: - Several boreholes were drilled until the bedrock, permitting to get the geological features of the soil and the depth of the bedrock; - Several laboratory measurements of various parameters were done on samples taken from the boreholes at various depths, such as dry density, solid density, and water content; - Dynamic penetration tests were also conducted along the seismic profile, until the bedrock is attained. Some empirical correlations between the parameters measured with laboratory tests

  15. Spatiotemporal evolution of water content at the rainfall-event scale under soil surface sealing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, S.; Svoray, T.; Assouline, S.

    2012-04-01

    Surface water content dynamics rules the partitioning between infiltration, runoff, and evaporation fluxes. Extending the knowledge on factors controlling top-soil water content temporal stability (TS) is needed to calibrate and validate various remote sensing technologies. Spatiotemporal evolution of water content is highly non-linear, being affected by various factors at different spatial and temporal scales. In semi-arid climates, this evolution is significantly affected by the formation of surface seals, shown in previous studies to significantly reduce both infiltration and evaporation fluxes from the soil. The drying regime in a natural sealed soil system exerts a sharp contrast in the soil profile - a very dry seal is superimposed on top of a wetter soil layer. One question is thus, whether seal layers contribute to or destroy temporal stability of top soil water content at the hillslope scale. To address this question, a typical hillslope (0.115 km2) was chosen at the LTER Lehavim site in the south of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E) offering different aspects and a classic geomorphologic banding. The annual rainfall is 297 mm, the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess and the dominant rock formations are Eocenean limestone and chalk with patches of calcrete. The vegetation is characterised by scattered dwarf shrubs (dominant species Sarcopoterium spinosum) and patches of herbaceous vegetation, mostly annuals, are spread between rocks and dwarf shrubs. An extensive spatial database of soil hydraulic and environmental parameters (e.g. slope, radiation, bulk density) was measured in the field and interpolated to continuous maps using geostatistical techniques and physically based modelling. To explore the effect of soil surface sealing, Mualem and Assouline [1989] model describing the change in hydraulic parameters resulting from soil seal formation were applied. This spatio-temporal database was used to characterise 8240 spatial cells (3X3m2) serving as

  16. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture using the particle batch smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on estimating surface sensible and latent heat fluxes from land surface temperature (LST) time series and soil moisture observations. Surface turbulent heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology and other climate-related fields, but in-situ measurements are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that the time series of LST contains information of energy partitioning and that surface turbulent heat fluxes can be determined from assimilation of LST. These studies are mainly based on two assumptions: (1) a monthly value of bulk heat transfer coefficient under neutral conditions (CHN) which scales the sum of the fluxes, and (2) an evaporation fraction (EF) which stays constant during the near-peak hours of the day. Previous studies have applied variational and ensemble approaches to this problem. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) algorithm is adopted to test its capability in this application. The PBS can be seen as an extension of the standard particle filter (PF) in which the states and parameters within a fix window are updated in a batch using all observations in the window. The aim of this study is two-fold. First, the PBS is used to assimilate only LST time series into the force-restore model to estimate fluxes. Second, a simple soil water transfer scheme is introduced to evaluate the benefit of assimilating soil moisture observations simultaneously. The experiments are implemented using the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) (FIFE) data. It is shown that the restored LST time series using PBS agrees very well with observations, and that assimilating LST significantly improved the flux estimation at both daily and half-hourly time scales. When soil moisture is introduced to further constrain EF, the accuracy of estimated EF is greatly improved. Furthermore, the RMSEs of retrieved fluxes are effectively reduced at both

  17. Temporal and spatial development of surface soil conditions at two created riverine marshes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher J; Mitsch, William J; Nairn, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    The amount of time it takes for created wetlands to develop soils comparable to natural wetlands is relatively unknown. Surface soil changes over time were evaluated in two created wetlands (approximately 1 ha each) at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park in Columbus, Ohio. The two wetlands were constructed in 1993 to be identical in size and geomorphology, and maintained to have the same hydrology. The only initial difference between the wetlands was that one was planted with native macrophytes while the other was not. In May 2004, soil samples were collected (10 yr and 2 mo after the wetlands were flooded) and compared to samples collected in 1993 (after the wetlands were excavated but before flooding) and 1995 (18 mo after the wetlands were flooded). In all three years, soils were split into surface (0-8 cm) and subsurface (8-16 cm) depths and analyzed for soil organic matter, total C, total P, available P, exchangeable cations, and pH. Soils in the two wetlands have changed substantially through sedimentation and organic accretion. Between 1993 and 1995, soils were most influenced by the deposition of senescent macroalgae, the mobilization of soluble nutrients, and the precipitation of CaCO(3). Between 1995 and 2004, soil parameters were influenced more by the deposition of organic matter from colonized macrophyte communities. Mean percent organic matter at the surface increased from 5.3 +/- 0.1% in 1993, 6.1 +/- 0.2% in 1995, to 9.5 +/- 0.2% in 2004. Mean total P increased from 493 +/- 18 microg g(-1) in 1993, 600 +/- 23 microg g(-1) in 1995, to 724 +/- 20 microg g(-1) in 2004. Spatial analyses of percent organic matter (a commonly used indicator of hydric soil condition) at both wetlands in 1993, 1995, and 2004 showed that soil conditions have become increasingly more variable. High spatial structure (autocorrelation) between data points was detected in 1993 and 2004, with data in 2004 exhibiting a much higher overall variance and narrower range of

  18. Temporal and spatial development of surface soil conditions at two created riverine marshes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher J; Mitsch, William J; Nairn, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    The amount of time it takes for created wetlands to develop soils comparable to natural wetlands is relatively unknown. Surface soil changes over time were evaluated in two created wetlands (approximately 1 ha each) at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park in Columbus, Ohio. The two wetlands were constructed in 1993 to be identical in size and geomorphology, and maintained to have the same hydrology. The only initial difference between the wetlands was that one was planted with native macrophytes while the other was not. In May 2004, soil samples were collected (10 yr and 2 mo after the wetlands were flooded) and compared to samples collected in 1993 (after the wetlands were excavated but before flooding) and 1995 (18 mo after the wetlands were flooded). In all three years, soils were split into surface (0-8 cm) and subsurface (8-16 cm) depths and analyzed for soil organic matter, total C, total P, available P, exchangeable cations, and pH. Soils in the two wetlands have changed substantially through sedimentation and organic accretion. Between 1993 and 1995, soils were most influenced by the deposition of senescent macroalgae, the mobilization of soluble nutrients, and the precipitation of CaCO(3). Between 1995 and 2004, soil parameters were influenced more by the deposition of organic matter from colonized macrophyte communities. Mean percent organic matter at the surface increased from 5.3 +/- 0.1% in 1993, 6.1 +/- 0.2% in 1995, to 9.5 +/- 0.2% in 2004. Mean total P increased from 493 +/- 18 microg g(-1) in 1993, 600 +/- 23 microg g(-1) in 1995, to 724 +/- 20 microg g(-1) in 2004. Spatial analyses of percent organic matter (a commonly used indicator of hydric soil condition) at both wetlands in 1993, 1995, and 2004 showed that soil conditions have become increasingly more variable. High spatial structure (autocorrelation) between data points was detected in 1993 and 2004, with data in 2004 exhibiting a much higher overall variance and narrower range of

  19. [Spatial variation characteristics of surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on Karst slopes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Chen, Hong-Song; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yun-Peng; Ye, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ke-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Surface soil water-physical properties play a decisive role in the dynamics of deep soil water. Knowledge of their spatial variation is helpful in understanding the processes of rainfall infiltration and runoff generation, which will contribute to the reasonable utilization of soil water resources in mountainous areas. Based on a grid sampling scheme (10 m x 10 m) and geostatistical methods, this paper aimed to study the spatial variability of surface (0-10 cm) soil water content, soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on a typical shrub slope (90 m x 120 m, projected length) in Karst area of northwest Guangxi, southwest China. The results showed that the surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity had different spatial dependence and spatial structure. Sample variogram of the soil water content was fitted well by Gaussian models with the nugget effect, while soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity were fitted well by exponential models with the nugget effect. Variability of soil water content showed strong spatial dependence, while the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity showed moderate spatial dependence. The spatial ranges of the soil water content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were small, while that of the soil bulk density was much bigger. In general, the soil water content increased with the increase of altitude while it was opposite for the soil bulk densi- ty. However, the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity had a random distribution of large amounts of small patches, showing high spatial heterogeneity. Soil water content negatively (P < 0.01) correlated with the bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity, while there was no significant correlation between the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  20. Differences in the Spatio-temporal Distribution of Soil Moisture from Near Surface Hydrology in a Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornelsen, K. C.; Coulibaly, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological land-surface schemes (H-LSS) are important tools for numerical weather prediction and water resources modelling. Because they are applied at low resolution, lateral water flows within and on top of the surface are often simple, ignoring catchment scale runoff mechanisms (Bierkens, 2015). This limitation has effects on the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture, which is known to have a strong impact on land-atmosphere coupling (Koster et al. 2004), and may limit the effectiveness of using the runoff from these models for applications such as flood forecasting. In an effort to better partition the water balance, Soulis et al. (2000) introduced interflow and overland flow mechanisms into the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) and coupled it to a routing model. This enhanced H-LSS, known as MESH, has been demonstrated to simulate more realistic runoff than the traditional version of CLASS (Pietroniro et al. 2007) and is one of few large scale models to include interflow processes. In a comparative study using Canadian basins we explore the impact of enhancing the hydrological processes in MESH on the spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture by variance decomposition (Mittelbach and Seneviratne, 2012) and wavelet analysis. Compared to CLASS, the soil moisture in MESH tends to dry faster following rainfall and during snow melt as water is distributed to streams. The difference is most pronounced during wet seasons (spring) while the differences are minor during dry periods, even following rain. As a result, the influence of the time variant and time in-variant controls on soil moisture variance were 23% higher and 21% lower respectively for MESH compared to CLASS. Significant differences were most prominent at short time scales, but were found to persist for periods up to two weeks during wet periods. These findings have implications for the timing and strength of land-atmosphere coupling and the timing and strength of runoff.

  1. Soil-geomorphic significance of land surface characteristics in an arid mountain range, Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirmas, D.R.; Graham, R.C.; Kendrick, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Mountains comprise an extensive and visually prominent portion of the landscape in the Mojave Desert, California. Landform surface properties influence the role these mountains have in geomorphic processes such as dust flux and surface hydrology across the region. The primary goal of this study was to describe and quantify land surface properties of arid-mountain landforms as a step toward unraveling the role these properties have in soil-geomorphic processes. As part of a larger soil-geomorphic study, four major landform types were identified within the southern Fry Mountains in the southwestern Mojave Desert on the basis of topography and landscape position: mountaintop, mountainflank, mountainflat (intra-range low-relief surface), and mountainbase. A suite of rock, vegetation, and morphometric land surface characteristic variables was measured at each of 65 locations across the study area, which included an associated piedmont and playa. Our findings show that despite the variation within types, landforms have distinct land surface properties that likely control soil-geomorphic processes. We hypothesize that surface expression influences a feedback process at this site where water transports sediment to low lying areas on the landscape and wind carries dust and soluble salts to the mountains where they are washed between rocks, incorporated into the soil, and retained as relatively long-term storage. Recent land-based video and satellite photographs of the dust cloud emanating from the Sierra Cucapá Mountains in response to the 7.2-magnitude earthquake near Mexicali, Mexico, support the hypothesis that these landforms are massive repositories of dust.

  2. Improving long-term global precipitation dataset using multi-sensor surface soil moisture retrievals and the soil moisture analysis rainfall tool (SMART)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using multiple historical satellite surface soil moisture products, the Kalman Filtering-based Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART) is applied to improve the accuracy of a multi-decadal global daily rainfall product that has been bias-corrected to match the monthly totals of available rain g...

  3. Residential surface soil guidance values applied worldwide to the original 2001 Stockholm Convention POP pesticides.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Aaron A; Li, Zijian

    2015-09-01

    Surface soil contamination is a worldwide problem. Many regulatory jurisdictions attempt to control human exposures with regulatory guidance values (RGVs) that specify a soil's maximum allowable concentration. Pesticides are important soil contaminants because of their intentional toxicity and widespread surface soil application. Worldwide, at least 174 regulatory jurisdictions from 54 United Nations member states have published more than 19,400 pesticide RGVs for at least 739 chemically unique pesticides. This manuscript examines the variability of the guidance values that are applied worldwide to the original 2001 Stockholm Convention persistent organic pollutants (POP) pesticides (Aldrin, Chlordane, DDT, Dieldrin, Endrin, Heptachlor, Mirex, and Toxaphene) for which at least 1667 RGVs have been promulgated. Results indicate that the spans of the RGVs applied to each of these pesticides vary from 6.1 orders of magnitude for Toxaphene to 10.0 orders of magnitude for Mirex. The distribution of values across these value spans resembles the distribution of lognormal random variables, but also contain non-random value clusters. Approximately 40% of all the POP RGVs fall within uncertainty bounds computed from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) RGV cancer risk model. Another 22% of the values fall within uncertainty bounds computed from the USEPA's non-cancer risk model, but the cancer risk calculations yield the binding (lowest) value for all POP pesticides except Endrin. The results presented emphasize the continued need to rationalize the RGVs applied worldwide to important soil contaminants.

  4. Relationship between cell surface properties and transport of bacteria through soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.T.; Manilal, V.B.; Alexander, M. )

    1991-01-01

    One means of bringing about the remediation of underground sites containing polluting chemicals is to inoculate the sites with bacteria able to metabolize those compounds. However, successful bioremediation of such sites requires the movement of the biodegradative bacteria through soil, aquifer solids, or groundwater. A study was conducted to relate the properties of Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Arthrobacter strains to their transport with water moving through soil. The bacteria differed markedly in their extent of transport; their hydrophobicity, as measured by adherence to n-octane and by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography; and their net surface electrostatic charge, as determined by electrostatic interaction chromatography and by measurements of the zeta potential. Transport of the 19 strains through Kendaia loam or their retention by this soil was not correlated with hydrophobicities or net surface charges of the cells or the presence of capsules. Among 10 strains tested, the presence of flagella was also not correlated with transport. Retention was statistically related to cell size, with bacteria shorter than 1.0 {mu}m usually showing higher percentages of cells being transported through the soil. We suggest that more than one characteristic of bacterial cells determines whether the organisms are transported through soil with moving water.

  5. Residential surface soil guidance values applied worldwide to the original 2001 Stockholm Convention POP pesticides.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Aaron A; Li, Zijian

    2015-09-01

    Surface soil contamination is a worldwide problem. Many regulatory jurisdictions attempt to control human exposures with regulatory guidance values (RGVs) that specify a soil's maximum allowable concentration. Pesticides are important soil contaminants because of their intentional toxicity and widespread surface soil application. Worldwide, at least 174 regulatory jurisdictions from 54 United Nations member states have published more than 19,400 pesticide RGVs for at least 739 chemically unique pesticides. This manuscript examines the variability of the guidance values that are applied worldwide to the original 2001 Stockholm Convention persistent organic pollutants (POP) pesticides (Aldrin, Chlordane, DDT, Dieldrin, Endrin, Heptachlor, Mirex, and Toxaphene) for which at least 1667 RGVs have been promulgated. Results indicate that the spans of the RGVs applied to each of these pesticides vary from 6.1 orders of magnitude for Toxaphene to 10.0 orders of magnitude for Mirex. The distribution of values across these value spans resembles the distribution of lognormal random variables, but also contain non-random value clusters. Approximately 40% of all the POP RGVs fall within uncertainty bounds computed from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) RGV cancer risk model. Another 22% of the values fall within uncertainty bounds computed from the USEPA's non-cancer risk model, but the cancer risk calculations yield the binding (lowest) value for all POP pesticides except Endrin. The results presented emphasize the continued need to rationalize the RGVs applied worldwide to important soil contaminants. PMID:26081305

  6. Characteristics of woodland rhizobial populations from surface- and deep-soil environments of the sonoran desert.

    PubMed

    Waldon, H B; Jenkins, M B; Virginia, R A; Harding, E E

    1989-12-01

    A collection of 74 rhizobial isolates recovered from nodules of the desert woody legumes Prosopis glandulosa, Psorothamnus spinosus, and Acacia constricta were characterized by using 61 nutritional and biochemical tests. We compared isolates from A. constricta and Prosopis glandulosa and tested the hypothesis that the rhizobia from a deep-phreatic rooting zone of a Prosopis woodland in the Sonoran Desert of southern California were phenetically distinct from rhizobia from surface soils. Cluster analysis identified four major homogeneous groups. The first phenon contained slow-growing (SG) Prosopis rhizobia from surface and deep-phreatic-soil environments. These isolates grew poorly on most of the media used in the study, probably because of their requirement for a high medium pH. The second group of isolates primarily contained SG Prosopis rhizobia from the deep-phreatic rooting environment and included two fast-growing (FG) Psorothamnus rhizobia. These isolates were nutritionally versatile and grew over a broad pH range. The third major phenon was composed mainly of FG Prosopis rhizobia from surface and dry subsurface soils. While these isolates used a restricted range of carbohydrates (including sucrose) as sole carbon sources, they showed better growth on a range of organic acids as sole carbon sources and amino acids as sole carbon and nitrogen sources than did other isolates in the study. They grew better at 36 degrees C than at 26 degrees C. The FG Acacia rhizobia from surface-soil environments formed a final major phenon that was distinct from the Prosopis isolates. They produced very high absorbance readings on all of the carbohydrates tested except sucrose, grew poorly on many of the other substrates tested, and preferred a 36 to a 26 degrees C incubation temperature. The surface populations of Prosopis rhizobia required a higher pH for growth and, under the conditions used in this study, were less tolerant of low solute potential and high growth

  7. Characteristics of Woodland Rhizobial Populations from Surface- and Deep-Soil Environments of the Sonoran Desert

    PubMed Central

    Waldon, Hollis B.; Jenkins, Michael B.; Virginia, Ross A.; Harding, Ethelynda E.

    1989-01-01

    A collection of 74 rhizobial isolates recovered from nodules of the desert woody legumes Prosopis glandulosa, Psorothamnus spinosus, and Acacia constricta were characterized by using 61 nutritional and biochemical tests. We compared isolates from A. constricta and Prosopis glandulosa and tested the hypothesis that the rhizobia from a deep-phreatic rooting zone of a Prosopis woodland in the Sonoran Desert of southern California were phenetically distinct from rhizobia from surface soils. Cluster analysis identified four major homogeneous groups. The first phenon contained slow-growing (SG) Prosopis rhizobia from surface and deep-phreatic-soil environments. These isolates grew poorly on most of the media used in the study, probably because of their requirement for a high medium pH. The second group of isolates primarily contained SG Prosopis rhizobia from the deep-phreatic rooting environment and included two fast-growing (FG) Psorothamnus rhizobia. These isolates were nutritionally versatile and grew over a broad pH range. The third major phenon was composed mainly of FG Prosopis rhizobia from surface and dry subsurface soils. While these isolates used a restricted range of carbohydrates (including sucrose) as sole carbon sources, they showed better growth on a range of organic acids as sole carbon sources and amino acids as sole carbon and nitrogen sources than did other isolates in the study. They grew better at 36°C than at 26°C. The FG Acacia rhizobia from surface-soil environments formed a final major phenon that was distinct from the Prosopis isolates. They produced very high absorbance readings on all of the carbohydrates tested except sucrose, grew poorly on many of the other substrates tested, and preferred a 36 to a 26°C incubation temperature. The surface populations of Prosopis rhizobia required a higher pH for growth and, under the conditions used in this study, were less tolerant of low solute potential and high growth temperature than were phreatic-soil

  8. Evaluating the Performance of a Surface Barrier on Reducing Soil-Water Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2012-08-31

    One of the most common effective techniques for contaminant remediation in the vadose zone is to use a surface barrier to reduce or eliminate soil-water flow to reduce the contaminant flux to the underlying groundwater. Confirming the reduction of the soil-water flux rate is challenging because of the difficulty of determining the very low soil-water flux beneath the barrier. We propose a hydraulic-conductivity factor, fK, as a conservative indicator for quantifying the reduction of soil-water flow. The factor can be calculated using the measured soil-water content or pressure but does not require the knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity or the hydraulic gradient. The formulas were tested by comparing with changes in hydraulic conductivity, K, from a drainage experiment. The pressure-based formula was further applied to evaluate the performance of the interim surface barrier at T Tank Farm on Hanford Site. Three years after barrier emplacement, the hydraulic conductivity decreased by a factor between 3.8 and 13.0 at the 1-, 2- and 5-m depths. The difference between the conductivity-reduction factor and the flux-rate-reduction factor, fq, was quantified with a numerical simulation. With the calculated fK, the numerically determined fK/fq ratio, and the assumed pre-barrier soil-water flux rate of 100 mm yr-1, the estimated soil-water flux rate 3 years after barrier emplacement was no more than 8.5 mm yr-1 at or above the 5-m depth.

  9. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Devleena; Kumar, T. Satish; Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V.

    2011-03-15

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  10. Behavior of a surface applied radionuclide and a dye tracer in structured and repacked soil monoliths.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, A; Schultze, U; Bugallo, P Bello; Wydler, H; Frossard, E; Flühler, H

    2003-01-01

    There has been increasing evidence in recent years about the impact of soil structure on vadose zone hydrology and the distribution of surface applied chemical substances. We have carried out a combined dye and radionuclide tracer study on two monoliths from the same location, one structured and one repacked, as part of an ongoing study to investigate the link between preferential flow, leaching of surface applied substances and their distribution within the soil.A tracer solution containing 1300 Bq/L (58)Co and 0.31 micromol/L Sulforhodamine B (SB) was added with roughly constant irrigation during a period of three weeks. The dye served as a tracer for water movement within the soil and thus allowed linkage of the radiotracer ((58)Co) with the flow pattern. Both were monitored in the outflow and measured within profile sections after monolith disassembly. Preferential flow in the structured monolith promoted the bypass and transport of both tracers, although transport was impeded at depths greater than 30 cm by compacted soil and reduced hydraulic conductivity. Eighty four percent of radiocobalt and 8% of SB were found in the upper 4 cm of the structured monolith. The homogenized monolith, on the other hand, showed mostly chromatographic infiltration and a more efficient soil filtering capacity with 91% of radiocobalt and 20% SB residing in the upper 4 cm. Furthermore no tracer was found in the outflow of the homogenized monolith during normal to high irrigation or at greater depth within the monolith. We have related flow characteristics and sorption of radiotracers by quantifying dye distributions and radionuclide activities throughout the profiles. Activities within the flow paths are up to 20-times higher than those measured in the soil matrix, and a fraction of radiocobalt follows the dye tracer in spite of cobalt's low mobility. The dye can thus be used to trace radionuclide distribution within the soil block.

  11. Environmental behaviors of phoxim with two formulations in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihua; Ni, Zhanglin; Mo, Runhong; Shen, Danyu; Zhong, Donglian; Tang, Fubin

    2015-09-01

    Phoxim (emulsifiable concentrate (EC) and granules (G)) has been widely used in bamboo forests. The persistence and magnitude of phoxim residues in the crop and soil must be investigated to ensure human and environmental safety. The environmental behaviors of the two formulations were investigated in a bamboo forest under soil surface mulching conditions (CP) and non-covered cultivation conditions (NCP). The half-lives of phoxim in soil under the two conditions in soil were 4.1-6.2days (EC) and 31.5-49.5days (G), respectively. Phoxim in EC could be leached from the topsoil into the subsoil. A minimized leaching effect was observed for G under NCP. Inversely, an enhanced leaching effect was observed for G under CP. The G formulation resulted in more parent compound (in bamboo shoots) and metabolite (in soil) residues of phoxim than in the case of EC, especially under CP conditions. In addition, the intensity and duration of the formulation effect on soil pH adjustment from G were more obvious than that from EC. Results showed that the environmental behaviors (distribution, degradation, residue) of phoxim in the bamboo forest were significantly influenced by the type of formulation. The prolongation effect from phoxim G might cause persistence and long-term environmental risk. However, bamboo shoot consumption could be considered relatively safe after applying the recommended dose of the two phoxim formulations.

  12. Analytical solution describing pesticide volatilization from soil affected by a change in surface condition.

    PubMed

    Yates, S R

    2009-01-01

    An analytical solution describing the fate and transport of pesticides applied to soils has been developed. Two pesticide application methods can be simulated: point-source applications, such as idealized shank or a hot-gas injection method, and a more realistic shank-source application method that includes a vertical pesticide distribution in the soil domain due to a soil fracture caused by a shank. The solutions allow determination of the volatilization rate and other information that could be important for understanding fumigant movement and in the development of regulatory permitting conditions. The solutions can be used to characterize differences in emissions relative to changes in the soil degradation rate, surface barrier conditions, application depth, and soil packing. In some cases, simple algebraic expressions are provided that can be used to obtain the total emissions and total soil degradation. The solutions provide a consistent methodology for determining the total emissions and can be used with other information, such as field and laboratory experimental data, to support the development of fumigant regulations. The uses of the models are illustrated by several examples.

  13. Wetland Ecohydrology: stochastic description of water level fluctuations across the soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, S.; Muneepeerakul, R.; Laio, F.; Ridolfi, L.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2009-12-01

    Wetlands provide a suite of social and ecological critical functions such as being habitats of disease-carrying vectors, providing buffer zones against hurricanes, controlling sediment transport, filtering nutrients and contaminants, and a repository of great biological diversity. More recently, wetlands have also been recognized as crucial for carbon storage in the context of global climate change. Despite such importance, quantitative approaches to many aspects of wetlands are far from adequate. Therefore, improving our quantitative understanding of wetlands is necessary to our ability to maintain, manage, and restore these invaluable environments. In wetlands, hydrologic factors and ecosystem processes interplay and generate unique characteristics and a delicate balance between biotic and abiotic elements. The main hydrologic driver of wetland ecosystems is the position of the water level that, being above or below ground, determines the submergence or exposure of soil. When the water level is above the soil surface, soil saturation and lack of oxygen causes hypoxia, anaerobic functioning of microorganisms and anoxic stress in plants, that might lead to the death of non-adapted organisms. When the water level lies below the soil surface, the ecosystem becomes groundwater-dependent, and pedological and physiological aspects play their role in the soil water balance. We propose here a quantitative description of wetland ecohydrology, through a stochastic process-based water balance, driven by a marked compound Poisson noise representing rainfall events. The model includes processes such as rainfall infiltration, evapotranspiration, capillary rise, and the contribution of external water bodies, which are quantified in a simple yet realistic way. The semi-analytical steady-state probability distributions of water level spanning across the soil surface are validated with data from the Everglades (Florida, USA). The model and its results allow for a quantitative

  14. Comparison of Hard Surface and Soft Soil Impact Performance of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sareen, Ashish K.; Sparks, Chad; Mullins, B. R., Jr.; Fasanella, Edwin; Jackson, Karen

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the soft soil and hard surface impact performance of a crashworthy composite fuselage concept has been performed. Specifically, comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse duration, and onset rate at specific locations on the fuselage were evaluated. In a prior research program, the composite fuselage section was impacted at 25 feet per second onto concrete at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) at NASA Langley Research Center. A soft soil test was conducted at the same impact velocity as a part of the NRTC/RITA Crashworthy and Energy Absorbing Structures project. In addition to comparisons of soft soil and hard surface test results, an MSC. Dytran dynamic finite element model was developed to evaluate the test analysis correlation. In addition, modeling parameters and techniques affecting test analysis correlation are discussed. Once correlated, the analytical methodology will be used in follow-on work to evaluate the specific energy absorption of various subfloor concepts for improved crash protection during hard surface and soft soil impacts.

  15. Using a scoop to derive soil mechanical parameters on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargl, Günter; Poganski, Joshua; Kömle, Norbert I.; Schweiger, Helmut; Macher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We will report on the possibility of using the scoop attached to the instrument deployment arm to perform soil mechanical experiments directly on the surface of Mars. The Phoenix mission flown 2009 had an instrument deployment arm which was also used to sample surface material indo instruments mounted on the lander deck. The flight spare of this arm will again be flown to Mars on board the InSight mission. Although, the primary purpose of the arm and the attached scoop was not soil mechanical investigations it was already demonstrated by the Phoenix mission that the arm can be used to perform auxiliary investigations of the surface materials. We will report on modelling efforts using a Discrete Element Software package to demonstrate that simple soil mechanical experiments can be used to derive essential material parameters like e.g. angle of repose and others. This is of particular interest since it would be possible to implement experiments using the hardware of the InSight mission. PIC Cross section cut through a trench dug out by the scoop and the pile of the deposed material which both can be used to derive soil mechanical parameters.

  16. Effective use of high CO2 efflux at the soil surface in a tropical understory plant

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Atsushi; Nakano, Takashi; Adachi, Minaco; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Osada, Noriyuki; Ladpala, Phanumard; Diloksumpun, Sapit; Puangchit, Ladawan; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Many terrestrial plants are C3 plants that evolved in the Mesozoic Era when atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) were high. Given current conditions, C3 plants can no longer benefit from high ambient [CO2]. Kaempferia marginata Carey is a unique understory ginger plant in the tropical dry forests of Thailand. The plant has two large flat leaves that spread on the soil surface. We found a large difference in [CO2] between the partly closed space between the soil surface and the leaves (638 µmol mol−1) and the atmosphere at 20 cm above ground level (412 µmol mol−1). This finding indicates that the plants capture CO2 efflux from the soil. Almost all of the stomata are located on the abaxial leaf surface. When ambient air [CO2] was experimentally increased from 400 to 600 μmol mol−1, net photosynthetic rates increased by 45 to 48% under near light-saturated conditions. No significant increase was observed under low light conditions. These data demonstrate that the unique leaf structure enhances carbon gain by trapping soil CO2 efflux at stomatal sites under relatively high light conditions, suggesting that ambient air [CO2] can serve as an important selective agent for terrestrial C3 plants. PMID:25758763

  17. Effective use of high CO₂ efflux at the soil surface in a tropical understory plant.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsushi; Nakano, Takashi; Adachi, Minaco; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Osada, Noriyuki; Ladpala, Phanumard; Diloksumpun, Sapit; Puangchit, Ladawan; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Many terrestrial plants are C3 plants that evolved in the Mesozoic Era when atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) were high. Given current conditions, C3 plants can no longer benefit from high ambient [CO2]. Kaempferia marginata Carey is a unique understory ginger plant in the tropical dry forests of Thailand. The plant has two large flat leaves that spread on the soil surface. We found a large difference in [CO2] between the partly closed space between the soil surface and the leaves (638 µmol mol(-1)) and the atmosphere at 20 cm above ground level (412 µmol mol(-1)). This finding indicates that the plants capture CO2 efflux from the soil. Almost all of the stomata are located on the abaxial leaf surface. When ambient air [CO2] was experimentally increased from 400 to 600 μmol mol(-1), net photosynthetic rates increased by 45 to 48% under near light-saturated conditions. No significant increase was observed under low light conditions. These data demonstrate that the unique leaf structure enhances carbon gain by trapping soil CO2 efflux at stomatal sites under relatively high light conditions, suggesting that ambient air [CO2] can serve as an important selective agent for terrestrial C3 plants. PMID:25758763

  18. Mass spectrometer-pyrolysis experiment for atmospheric and soil sample analysis on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, Konrad; Mahaffy, Paul; Niemann, Hasso

    1992-01-01

    Results from the Viking mission will form the foundation for future in-depth investigations of atmosphere-surface interactions on Mars. The two Viking landers carried impressive instrumentation to obtain and analyze soil samples: the sites were observed by cameras, and the collector head was located on a long boom and allowed the collection of large samples at various depths. A selection of grain sizes was possible and a distribution system supplied a number of experiments with soil material. Despite stationary vehicles, a wide sampling field was reachable. The GCMS system, responsible for atmospheric as well as surface soil analysis, worked well on both landers. Atmospheric measurements resulted in the determination of the abundance of noble gases as well as of other molecular species. Isotopic composition measurements included the important ratios of C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, and Ar-36/Ar-40. To verify these past results and to advance detailed studies of noble gas isotope ratios and minor constituents, better instrument sensitivities, higher precision, and lower background contributions are required in future Mars missions. Soil analysis during the Viking mission concentrated on organic material. Heating cycles were performed to 500 C and only water and carbon dioxide were identified. Higher pyrolysis temperatures are of primary importance to advance our understanding of the mineralogy and gas loading of surface material and atmospheric exchange.

  19. Effective use of high CO₂ efflux at the soil surface in a tropical understory plant.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsushi; Nakano, Takashi; Adachi, Minaco; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Osada, Noriyuki; Ladpala, Phanumard; Diloksumpun, Sapit; Puangchit, Ladawan; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-03-11

    Many terrestrial plants are C3 plants that evolved in the Mesozoic Era when atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) were high. Given current conditions, C3 plants can no longer benefit from high ambient [CO2]. Kaempferia marginata Carey is a unique understory ginger plant in the tropical dry forests of Thailand. The plant has two large flat leaves that spread on the soil surface. We found a large difference in [CO2] between the partly closed space between the soil surface and the leaves (638 µmol mol(-1)) and the atmosphere at 20 cm above ground level (412 µmol mol(-1)). This finding indicates that the plants capture CO2 efflux from the soil. Almost all of the stomata are located on the abaxial leaf surface. When ambient air [CO2] was experimentally increased from 400 to 600 μmol mol(-1), net photosynthetic rates increased by 45 to 48% under near light-saturated conditions. No significant increase was observed under low light conditions. These data demonstrate that the unique leaf structure enhances carbon gain by trapping soil CO2 efflux at stomatal sites under relatively high light conditions, suggesting that ambient air [CO2] can serve as an important selective agent for terrestrial C3 plants.

  20. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  1. Meteoric cosmogenic Beryllium-10 adsorbed to river sediment and soil: Applications for Earth-surface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, Jane K.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall scavenges meteoric cosmogenic 10Be from the atmosphere. 10Be falls to the Earth's surface, where it binds tightly to sediment particles in non-acidic soils over the life-span of those soils. As such, meteoric 10Be has the potential to be an excellent geochemical tracer of erosion and stability of surfaces in a diverse range of natural settings. Meteoric 10Be has great potential as a recorder of first-order erosion rates and soil residence times. Even though this tracer was first developed in the late 1980s and showed great promise as a geomorphic tool, it was sidelined in the past two decades with the rise of the "sister nuclide", in situ10Be, which is produced at a known rate inside quartz minerals. Since these early days, substantial progress has been made in several areas that now shed new light on the applicability of the meteoric variety of this cosmogenic nuclide. Here, we revisit the potential of this tracer and we summarize the progress: (1) the atmospheric production and fallout is now described by numeric models, and agrees with present-day measurements and paleo-archives such as from rain and ice cores; (2) short-term fluctuations in solar modulation of cosmic rays or in the delivery of 10Be are averaged out over the time scale soils accumulate; (3) in many cases, the delivery of 10Be is not dependent on the amount of precipitation; (4) we explore where 10Be is retained in soils and sediment; (5) we suggest a law to account for the strong grain-size dependence that controls adsorption and the measured nuclide concentrations; and (6) we present a set of algebraic expressions that allows calculation of both soil or sediment ages and erosion rates from the inventory of meteoric 10Be distributed through a vertical soil column. The mathematical description is greatly simplified if the accumulation of 10Be is at a steady state with its export through erosion. In this case, a surface sample allows for the calculation of an erosion rate. Explored

  2. Diffuse PAH contamination of surface soils: environmental occurrence, bioavailability, and microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anders R; Karlson, Ulrich

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to recognize the scientific and environmental importance of diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Diffuse PAH pollution of surface soil is characterized by large area extents, low PAH concentrations, and the lack of point sources. Urban and pristine topsoils receive a continuous input of pyrogenic PAHs, which induces a microbial potential for PAH degradation. The significance of this potential in relation to black carbon particles, PAH bioaccessibility, microbial PAH degradation, and the fate of diffuse PAHs in soil is discussed. Finally, the state-of-the-art methods for future investigations of the microbial degradation of diffuse PAH pollution are reviewed. PMID:17594088

  3. The impact of different soil bioengineering techniques on the surface erosion of levees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, W.; Meixner, H.; Florineth, F.

    2009-04-01

    The recent flood events have once more drawn attention to the stability and maintenance of river levees. Subsequently, the attention has also been focused on the prevention of erosion by hydraulic forces in case of flooding or overtopping. Vegetation can limit the soil detaching capacity of flowing water, by their retarding effects on runoff and velocity as well as the physical protection of the levee surface. At low discharge intensity vegetation stands rigid and unsubmerged, reducing velocity below required for soil particle entrainment (Coppin and Richards, 1990). At higher discharge capacities flexible vegetation tend to lay down, dissipating energy and providing resistance to scour (Henderson and Shields, 1984). Roots increase the shear strength of the soil (Schiechtl, 1980) and can create a fibrous mat that resists detachment of the surrounding soil matrix (Henderson and Shields, 1984). The erosive capacity of surface water flow is dependant to type and pattern of vegetation. The denser the vegetation, the better the soil surface is protected against erosion. Sets of regulations regard compact turf to be the best vegetation cover for river levees. A contentious issue are woody plants, and many guidelines (DIN 19712, 1997; FEMA, 2005; USACE, 2000) ban woody vegetation from levees for several reasons. So, the planting of woody plants is not an accepted policy by any agency. Within the frame of a research project carried out by the Institute of Soil Bioengineering and Landscape Construction (University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna), focusing on woody plants on levees, the effects of small to medium growing woody (shrubby) plants on erosion while hydraulic forces (overtopping) are tested. Data are drawn from two natural-scaled research levees. The homogenous levees consist of a mineral silt-sand-gravel and have a fill height of 2.7 m and a slope inclination of 2:3. The tests investigate erosion resistance with respect to four different

  4. Evidence of a topographic signal in surface soil moisture derived from ENVISAT ASAR wide swath data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D. C.; Garcia-Pintado, J.; Cloke, H. L.; Dance, S. L.

    2016-03-01

    The susceptibility of a catchment to flooding is affected by its soil moisture prior to an extreme rainfall event. While soil moisture is routinely observed by satellite instruments, results from previous work on the assimilation of remotely sensed soil moisture into hydrologic models have been mixed. This may have been due in part to the low spatial resolution of the observations used. In this study, the remote sensing aspects of a project attempting to improve flow predictions from a distributed hydrologic model by assimilating soil moisture measurements are described. Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) Wide Swath data were used to measure soil moisture as, unlike low resolution microwave data, they have sufficient resolution to allow soil moisture variations due to local topography to be detected, which may help to take into account the spatial heterogeneity of hydrological processes. Surface soil moisture content (SSMC) was measured over the catchments of the Severn and Avon rivers in the South West UK. To reduce the influence of vegetation, measurements were made only over homogeneous pixels of improved grassland determined from a land cover map. Radar backscatter was corrected for terrain variations and normalized to a common incidence angle. SSMC was calculated using change detection. To search for evidence of a topographic signal, the mean SSMC from improved grassland pixels on low slopes near rivers was compared to that on higher slopes. When the mean SSMC on low slopes was 30-90%, the higher slopes were slightly drier than the low slopes. The effect was reversed for lower SSMC values. It was also more pronounced during a drying event. These findings contribute to the scant information in the literature on the use of high resolution SAR soil moisture measurement to improve hydrologic models.

  5. Reducing phosphorus flux from organic soils in surface flow treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Susan M; White, John R

    2011-10-01

    Treatment wetlands have a finite period of effective nutrient removal after which treatment efficiency declines. This is due to the accumulation of organic matter which decreases the capacity and hydraulic retention time of the wetland. We investigated four potential solutions to improve the soluble reactive P (SRP) removal of a municipal wastewater treatment wetland soil including; dry down, surface additions of alum or calcium carbonate and physical removal of the accreted organic soil under both aerobic and anaerobic water column conditions. The flux of SRP from the soil to the water column under aerobic conditions was higher for the continuously flooded controls (1.1±0.4 mg P m(-2) d(-1)), dry down (1.5±0.9 mg P m(-2) d(-1)) and CaCO3 (0.8±0.7 mg P m(-2) d(-1)) treatments while the soil removal and alum treatments were significantly lower at 0.02±0.10 and -0.07±0.02 mg P m(-2) d(-1), respectively. These results demonstrate that the two most effective management strategies at sequestering SRP were organic soil removal and alum additions. There are difficulties and costs associated with removal and disposal of soils from a treatment wetland. Therefore our findings suggest that alum addition may be the most cost effective and efficient means of increasing the sequestering of P in aging treatment wetlands experiencing reduced P removal rates. However, more research is needed to determine the longer term effects of alum buildup in the organic soil on the wetland biota, in particular, on the macrophytes and invertebrates. Since alum effectiveness is time limited, a longer term solution to P flux may favor the organic soil removal. PMID:21802114

  6. Remediation of PCB contaminated soils in the Canadian Arctic: excavation and surface PRB technology.

    PubMed

    Kalinovich, Indra; Rutter, Allison; Poland, John S; Cairns, Graham; Rowe, R Kerry

    2008-12-15

    The site BAF-5 is located on the summit of Resolution Island, Nunavut, just southeast of Baffin Island at 61 degrees 35'N and 60 degrees 40'W. The site was part of a North American military defense system established in the 1950s that became heavily contaminated with PCBs during and subsequent, its operational years. Remediation through excavation of the PCB contaminated soil at Resolution Island began in 1999 and at its completion in 2006 approximately 5 tonnes of pure PCBs in approximately 20,000 m3 of soil were remediated. Remediation strategies were based on both quantity of soil and level of contamination in the soil. Excavation removed 96% of the PCB contaminated soil on site. In 2003, a surface funnel-and-gate permeable reactive barrier was design and constructed to treat the remaining contamination left in rock crevices and inaccessible areas of the site. Excavation had destabilized contaminated soil in the area, enabling contaminant migration through erosion and runoff pathways. The barrier was designed to maximize sedimentation through settling ponds. This bulk removal enabled the treatment of highly contaminated fines and water through a permeable gate. The increased sediment loading during excavation required both modifications to the funnel and a shift to a more permeable, granular system. Granulated activated charcoal was chosen for its ability to both act as a particle retention filter and adsorptive filter. The reduction in mass of PCB and volume of soils trapped by the funnel of the barrier indicate that soils are re-stabilizing. In 2007, nonwoven geotextiles were re-introduced back into the filtration system as fine filtering could be achieved without clogging. Monitoring sites downstream indicate that the barrier system is effective. This paper describes the field progress of PCB remediation at Resolution Island.

  7. Isolation of a novel mutant gene for soil-surface rooting in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root system architecture is an important trait affecting the uptake of nutrients and water by crops. Shallower root systems preferentially take up nutrients from the topsoil and help avoid unfavorable environments in deeper soil layers. We have found a soil-surface rooting mutant from an M2 population that was regenerated from seed calli of a japonica rice cultivar, Nipponbare. In this study, we examined the genetic and physiological characteristics of this mutant. Results The primary roots of the mutant showed no gravitropic response from the seedling stage on, whereas the gravitropic response of the shoots was normal. Segregation analyses by using an F2 population derived from a cross between the soil-surface rooting mutant and wild-type Nipponbare indicated that the trait was controlled by a single recessive gene, designated as sor1. Fine mapping by using an F2 population derived from a cross between the mutant and an indica rice cultivar, Kasalath, revealed that sor1 was located within a 136-kb region between the simple sequence repeat markers RM16254 and 2935-6 on the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 4, where 13 putative open reading frames (ORFs) were found. We sequenced these ORFs and detected a 33-bp deletion in one of them, Os04g0101800. Transgenic plants of the mutant transformed with the genomic fragment carrying the Os04g0101800 sequence from Nipponbare showed normal gravitropic responses and no soil-surface rooting. Conclusion These results suggest that sor1, a rice mutant causing soil-surface rooting and altered root gravitropic response, is allelic to Os04g0101800, and that a 33-bp deletion in the coding region of this gene causes the mutant phenotypes. PMID:24280269

  8. Comparisons of computer-controlled chamber measurements for soil-skin adherence from aluminum and carpet surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alesia; Bursac, Zoran; Coleman, Sheire; Johnson, Wayne

    2009-04-01

    A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between carpet and aluminum sheet samples laden with soil, and human cadaver skin and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass soil transfer. The contact parameters of pressure (10-50 kPa) and time (10-50s) were varied for 768 experiments of mass soil transfer, where two soil types (play sand and lawn soil) and two soil particle sizes (<139.7 and 139.7<381 microm) were used. Mean soil mass transfer to cadaver skin was higher than mean transfer to cotton sheets for both carpet and aluminum transfers, and also generally higher pressure was associated with larger amounts of soil transfer for all contact scenarios. The mean soil adherence from carpet was 0.37+/-0.4 mg/cm(2), while the mean soil adherence from aluminum was 0.42+/-0.6 mg/cm(2). For aluminum, smaller soil particle size was associated with more transfer (p=0.0349), while for carpet, larger soil size was associated with more transfer (p<0.0001). Soil type was significant but only for aluminum surface, where sand was associated with higher adherence (p<0.0001). This data set can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to contaminants found in soils and dust present in indoor environments.

  9. Assessment of Soil-Gas, Surface-Water, and Soil Contamination at the Installation Railhead, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2008-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Harrelson, Larry G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, assessed soil gas, surface water, and soil for contaminants at the Installation Railhead (IR) at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from October 2008 to September 2009. The assessment included delineation of organic contaminants present in soil-gas samples beneath the IR, and in a surface-water sample collected from an unnamed tributary to Marcum Branch in the western part of the IR. Inorganic contaminants were determined in a surface-water sample and in soil samples. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to Fort Gordon personnel pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Soil-gas samples collected within a localized area on the western part of the IR contained total petroleum hydrocarbons; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes (referred to as BTEX); and naphthalene above the method detection level. These soil-gas samples were collected where buildings had previously stood. Soil-gas samples collected within a localized area contained perchloroethylene (PCE). These samples were collected where buildings 2410 and 2405 had been. Chloroform and toluene were detected in a surface-water sample collected from an unnamed tributary to Marcum Branch but at concentrations below the National Primary Drinking Water Standard maximum contaminant level (MCL) for each compound. Iron was detected in the surface-water sample at 686 micrograms per liter (ug/L) and exceeded the National Secondary Drinking Water Standard MCL for iron. Metal concentrations in composite soil samples collected at three locations from land surface to a depth of 6 inches did not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Screening Levels for industrial soil.

  10. Droplet infiltration dynamics on intact surfaces of preferential flow paths in structured soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Horst H.; Leue, Martin; Ellerbrock, Ruth H.

    2010-05-01

    The surfaces of preferential flow paths in structured soils can be formed by clay-organic coatings (i.e., cutanes) on soil aggregates or by linings on biopores (i.e., worm burrows and decayed root channels). The outermost layer of such coatings are mostly covered by organic matter (OM), which finally controls wettability, mass transfer, and sorption properties that are relevant for flow and transport along the flow paths. However, the local hydraulic properties along such surfaces are largely unknown to date mainly because of problems to analyze it without disturbing the coating layer surface. The objective of this study is to compare the droplet infiltration dynamics with that of the local distribution of OM composition at intact aggregate and biopore surfaces. The OM composition is determined using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance mode (DRIFT) in terms of the ratios of CH/CO functional groups. Intact surfaces of aggregated soil samples are scanned using a DRIFT mapping procedure in a 1 mm by 1 mm grid. Droplet infiltration dynamic is observed by means of volume change and contact angle measurements using a Goniometer with a high-speed camera. The aggregate sample surfaces can be distinguished into regions of earthworm burrows, root channels, and clay-organic coatings. Organic coatings on worm burrows and root channels correspond with relatively lower CH/CO-ratios. For the same locations, relatively high CH/CO-ratios generally corresponds with higher degrees of water repellence in term of larger droplet infiltration times. However, the droplet infiltration depends on both the capillarity of the pores and the wettability of the coatings. The temporal changes of contact angles and drop volumes seem to be characteristic for the surface properties. We will present the dynamic behaviour of contact angle and volume of the water droplet at different sample surfaces. The results indicate yet unknown implications for preferential flow and

  11. Distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benhua; Chen, Liang; Huang, Linxian; Wang, Yongseng; Li, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China. At least one VOC was detected in each of the 20 sampling sites, and the maximum number of VOCs detected in the surface water, groundwater, and soil were 13, 16, and 14, respectively. Two of the 10 VOCs with elevated concentrations detected in surface water, groundwater, and soil were chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane. The characteristics of VOCs, which include volatility, boiling point, and solubility, could significantly affect their distribution in surface water, soil, and groundwater. However, due to the direct discharging of chemical industry wastewater into surface water, higher concentrations of VOCs (except chloroform) were detected in surface water than in soil and groundwater. Fortunately, the higher volatility of VOCs prevents the VOCs from impacting groundwater, which helps to maintain a lower concentration of VOCs in the groundwater than in both surface water and soil. This is because pollutants with relatively higher boiling points and lower solubilities have higher detection frequencies in soil, and contaminants with relatively lower boiling points and higher solubilities have higher detection frequencies in water, notably in surface water. PMID:25633950

  12. Distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benhua; Chen, Liang; Huang, Linxian; Wang, Yongseng; Li, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China. At least one VOC was detected in each of the 20 sampling sites, and the maximum number of VOCs detected in the surface water, groundwater, and soil were 13, 16, and 14, respectively. Two of the 10 VOCs with elevated concentrations detected in surface water, groundwater, and soil were chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane. The characteristics of VOCs, which include volatility, boiling point, and solubility, could significantly affect their distribution in surface water, soil, and groundwater. However, due to the direct discharging of chemical industry wastewater into surface water, higher concentrations of VOCs (except chloroform) were detected in surface water than in soil and groundwater. Fortunately, the higher volatility of VOCs prevents the VOCs from impacting groundwater, which helps to maintain a lower concentration of VOCs in the groundwater than in both surface water and soil. This is because pollutants with relatively higher boiling points and lower solubilities have higher detection frequencies in soil, and contaminants with relatively lower boiling points and higher solubilities have higher detection frequencies in water, notably in surface water.

  13. Simple equation to approximate the bidirectional reflectance from vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, C. L.; Norman, J. M.; Blad, B. L.; Welles, J. M.; Campbell, G.

    1985-01-01

    A simple equation has been developed for describing the bidirectional reflectance of some vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces. The equation describes directional reflectance as a function of zenith and azimuth view angles and solar azimuth angle. The equation works for simulated and field measured red and IR reflectance under clear sky conditions. Hemispherical reflectance can be calculated as a function of the simple equation coefficients by integrating the equation over the hemisphere of view angles. A single equation for estimating soil bidirectional reflectance was obtained using the relationships between solar zenith angles and the simple equation coefficients for medium and rough soil distributions. The equation has many useful applications such as providing a lower level boundary condition in complex plant canopy models and providing an additional tool for studying bidirectional effects on pointable sensors.

  14. Field demonstration of technologies for characterization of uranium contamination in surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Cunnane, J.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Perry, D.L.; Tidwell, V.C.; Schwing, J.; Nuhfer, K.R.; Weigand, G.

    1993-03-01

    One means of improving the efficiency of studies associated with CERCLA and RCRA investigations of. sites contaminated with uranium is to introduce new field screening technologies capable of quickly delineating the contamination distribution in surface soils. To this end, the performance of four technologies suitable for field measurement of uranium concentrations in soils was evaluated at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The four technologies tested were high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, wide-area beta scintillation counting, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES), and long-range alpha detection (LRAD). The performance of each technique was assessed by comparing of the results obtained in the field and by comparing the field measurements to data obtained from laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  15. Field demonstration of technologies for characterization of uranium contamination in surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Cunnane, J.C. ); Lee, S.Y. ); Perry, D.L. ); Tidwell, V.C. ); Schwing, J.; Nuhfer, K.R. . Fernald Environmental Management P

    1993-01-01

    One means of improving the efficiency of studies associated with CERCLA and RCRA investigations of. sites contaminated with uranium is to introduce new field screening technologies capable of quickly delineating the contamination distribution in surface soils. To this end, the performance of four technologies suitable for field measurement of uranium concentrations in soils was evaluated at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The four technologies tested were high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, wide-area beta scintillation counting, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES), and long-range alpha detection (LRAD). The performance of each technique was assessed by comparing of the results obtained in the field and by comparing the field measurements to data obtained from laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  16. Runoff and windblown vehicle spray from road surfaces, risks and measures for soil and water.

    PubMed

    Schipper, P N M; Comans, R N J; Dijkstra, J J; Vergouwen, L

    2007-01-01

    Soil and surface water along roads are exposed to pollution from motorways. The main pollutants are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), mineral oil, heavy metals and salt. These pollutants originate from vehicles (fuel, wires, leakage), wear and degradation of road surfaces and road furniture (i.e. crash barriers) and the application of de-icing salts. Runoff, vehicle spray and dry deposition disperse these contaminants into the soft shoulder (verges) of the roads and surface water to a measurable distance of about 50 up to more then 150 m from the road. Despite many monitoring programs, little is known about the risks of this diffuse pollution for soil and water quality and the geochemical and physical factors which determine these risks. Also little is known about the effects of possible measures. Therefore, extensive research has been carried out at two local motorways. Specific measurements on runoff, vehicle spray and effects of measures have been carried out for one year (13 months). This resulted in several new insights. The pollutants appear to adsorb effectively to natural soils. In vulnerable areas groundwater can be protected by adjusting the policy to removing the contaminated upper topsoil of the verges. Discharges of runoff into local surface water are not recommended.

  17. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Extraction and Analysis of PAHs in Surface Soils Near Freeways in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, I.

    2004-12-01

    Large urban areas such as Los Angeles are characterized by high levels of motor vehicle traffic. A by-product of this traffic is the emission of a group of compounds known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are a global-scale persistent environmental hazard, many of which are considered to be carcinogenic. This study investigated the prevalence of 16 PAHs in surface soils near major Los Angeles highways. The first phase of the study was the development of a methodology for efficiently extracting PAHs from soil. Preliminary findings suggested that the most efficient extraction method using an accelerated solvent extractor employed a mixture of acetone and hexane and a static extraction time of 5 minutes (completed in 2 cycles). Extraction efficiency was measured by spiking clean sand with a known amount of a PAH standard and extracting and analyzing the sand. The addition of an extra static cycle produced a significant increase in extraction efficiency. For example, utilization of 2 static cycles recovered 99.6% of the spiked phenanthrene compared to a 44% efficiency for the 1 cycle run. Preliminary results from a field sampling campaign indicated that significant concentrations of PAHs are deposited onto and accumulate in surface soils. Specifically, we found 12.13 μ g/kg of anthracene, 15.82 μ g/kg of benzo(a)pyrene, 23.42 μ g/kg of phenanthrene, and 23.43 μ g/kg of pyrene in surface soils, including soils from a public park. These results indicate that background levels of PAHs in soils may pose a significant health risk to humans. For example, the California preliminary remediation goal for benzo(a)pyrene in residential soils is 62 μ g/kg, slightly greater than our reported background values. A more detailed field sampling campaign will be pursued to elucidate the role of different environmental variables (i.e., time of day, sun intensity, traffic congestion, etc.), on the accumulation of PAHs in soils.

  19. Impact of surface roughness and soil texture on mineral dust emission fluxes modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent; PéRez, Carlos; Haustein, Karsten; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Prigent, Catherine; Alfaro, StéPhane

    2013-06-01

    Dust production models (DPM) used to estimate vertical fluxes of mineral dust aerosols over arid regions need accurate data on soil and surface properties. The Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA) data set was developed for Northern Africa, the Middle East, and East Asia. This regional data set was built through dedicated field campaigns and include, among others, the aerodynamic roughness length, the smooth roughness length of the erodible fraction of the surface, and the dry (undisturbed) soil size distribution. Recently, satellite-derived roughness length and high-resolution soil texture data sets at the global scale have emerged and provide the opportunity for the use of advanced schemes in global models. This paper analyzes the behavior of the ERS satellite-derived global roughness length and the State Soil Geographic data base-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (STATSGO-FAO) soil texture data set (based on wet techniques) using an advanced DPM in comparison to the LISA data set over Northern Africa and the Middle East. We explore the sensitivity of the drag partition scheme (a critical component of the DPM) and of the dust vertical fluxes (intensity and spatial patterns) to the roughness length and soil texture data sets. We also compare the use of the drag partition scheme to a widely used preferential source approach in global models. Idealized experiments with prescribed wind speeds show that the ERS and STATSGO-FAO data sets provide realistic spatial patterns of dust emission and friction velocity thresholds in the region. Finally, we evaluate a dust transport model for the period of March to July 2011 with observed aerosol optical depths from Aerosol Robotic Network sites. Results show that ERS and STATSGO-FAO provide realistic simulations in the region.

  20. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    PubMed

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  1. Aggregate breakdown and surface seal development influenced by rain intensity, slope gradient and soil particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand Sajjadi, S.; Mahmoodabadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aggregate breakdown is an important process which controls infiltration rate (IR) and the availability of fine materials necessary for structural sealing under rainfall. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different slope gradients, rain intensities and particle size distributions on aggregate breakdown and IR to describe the formation of surface sealing. To address this issue, 60 experiments were carried out in a 35 cm x 30 cm x 10 cm detachment tray using a rainfall simulator. By sieving a sandy loam soil, two sub-samples with different maximum aggregate sizes of 2 mm (Dmax 2 mm) and 4.75 mm (Dmax 4.75 mm) were prepared. The soils were exposed to two different rain intensities (57 and 80 mm h-1) on several slopes (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20%) each at three replications. The result showed that the most fraction percentages in soils Dmax 2 mm and Dmax 4.75 mm were in the finest size classes of 0.02 and 0.043 mm, respectively for all slope gradients and rain intensities. The soil containing finer aggregates exhibited higher transportability of pre-detached material than the soil containing larger aggregates. Also, IR increased with increasing slope gradient, rain intensity and aggregate size under unsteady state conditions because of less development of surface seal. But under steady state conditions, no significant relationship was found between slope and IR. The finding of this study revealed the importance of rain intensity, slope steepness and soil aggregate size on aggregate breakdown and seal formation, which can control infiltration rate and the consequent runoff and erosion rates.

  2. Cone penetrometer deployed in situ video microscope for characterizing sub-surface soil properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, S.H.; Knowles, D.S.; Kertesz, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper we report on the development and field testing of an in situ video microscope that has been integrated with a cone penetrometer probe in order to provide a real-time method for characterizing subsurface soil properties. The video microscope system consists of a miniature CCD color camera system coupled with an appropriate magnification and focusing optics to provide a field of view with a coverage of approximately 20 mm. The camera/optic system is mounted in a cone penetrometer probe so that the camera views the soil that is in contact with a sapphire window mounted on the side of the probe. The soil outside the window is illuminated by diffuse light provided through the window by an optical fiber illumination system connected to a white light source at the surface. The video signal from the camera is returned to the surface where it can be displayed in real-time on a video monitor, recorded on a video cassette recorder (VCR), and/or captured digitally with a frame grabber installed in a microcomputer system. In its highest resolution configuration, the in situ camera system has demonstrated a capability to resolve particle sizes as small as 10 {mu}m. By using other lens systems to increase the magnification factor, smaller particles could be resolved, however, the field of view would be reduced. Initial field tests have demonstrated the ability of the camera system to provide real-time qualitative characterization of soil particle sizes. In situ video images also reveal information on porosity of the soil matrix and the presence of water in the saturated zone. Current efforts are focused on the development of automated imaging processing techniques as a means of extracting quantitative information on soil particle size distributions. Data will be presented that compares data derived from digital images with conventional sieve/hydrometer analyses.

  3. Microbial colonisation in diverse surface soil types in Surtsey and diversity analysis of its subsurface microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteinsson, V.; Klonowski, A.; Reynisson, E.; Vannier, P.; Sigurdsson, B. D.; Ólafsson, M.

    2014-09-01

    Colonisation of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue-green algae, most studies have been focusing on settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse soils and the influence of associate vegetation and birds on numbers of environmental bacteria, we collected 45 samples from different soils types on the surface of the island. Total viable bacterial counts were performed with plate count at 22, 30 and 37 °C for all soils samples and the amount of organic matter and nitrogen (N) was measured. Selected samples were also tested for coliforms, faecal coliforms aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The deep subsurface biosphere was investigated by collecting liquid subsurface samples from a 182 m borehole with a special sampler. Diversity analysis of uncultivated biota in samples was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis and cultivation. Correlation was observed between N deficits and the number of microorganisms in surface soils samples. The lowest number of bacteria (1 × 104-1 × 105 g-1) was detected in almost pure pumice but the count was significant higher (1 × 106-1 × 109 g-1) in vegetated soil or pumice with bird droppings. The number of faecal bacteria correlated also to the total number of bacteria and type of soil. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were only detected in vegetated and samples containing bird droppings. The human pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter and Listeria were not in any sample. Both thermophilic bacteria and archaea 16S rDNA sequences were found in the subsurface samples collected at 145 m and 172 m depth at 80 °C and 54 °C, respectively, but no growth was observed in enrichments. The microbiota sequences generally showed low affiliation to any known 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  4. Microbial colonization in diverse surface soil types in Surtsey and diversity analysis of its subsurface microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteinsson, V.; Klonowski, A.; Reynisson, E.; Vannier, P.; Sigurdsson, B. D.; Ólafsson, M.

    2015-02-01

    Colonization of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue-green algae, most studies have been focused on the settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse soils and the influence of associated vegetation and birds on numbers of environmental bacteria, we collected 45 samples from different soil types on the surface of the island. Total viable bacterial counts were performed with the plate count method at 22, 30 and 37 °C for all soil samples, and the amount of organic matter and nitrogen (N) was measured. Selected samples were also tested for coliforms, faecal coliforms and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The subsurface biosphere was investigated by collecting liquid subsurface samples from a 181 m borehole with a special sampler. Diversity analysis of uncultivated biota in samples was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis and cultivation. Correlation was observed between nutrient deficits and the number of microorganisms in surface soil samples. The lowest number of bacteria (1 × 104-1 × 105 cells g-1) was detected in almost pure pumice but the count was significantly higher (1 × 106-1 × 109 cells g-1) in vegetated soil or pumice with bird droppings. The number of faecal bacteria correlated also to the total number of bacteria and type of soil. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were only detected in vegetated samples and samples containing bird droppings. The human pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter and Listeria were not in any sample. Both thermophilic bacteria and archaea 16S rDNA sequences were found in the subsurface samples collected at 145 and 172 m depth at 80 and 54 °C, respectively, but no growth was observed in enrichments. The microbiota sequences generally showed low affiliation to any known 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  5. Impact of Surface Roughness and Soil Texture on Mineral Dust Emission Fluxes Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menut, Laurent; Perez, Carlos; Haustein, Karsten; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Prigent, Catherine; Alfaro, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Dust production models (DPM) used to estimate vertical fluxes of mineral dust aerosols over arid regions need accurate data on soil and surface properties. The Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA) data set was developed for Northern Africa, the Middle East, and East Asia. This regional data set was built through dedicated field campaigns and include, among others, the aerodynamic roughness length, the smooth roughness length of the erodible fraction of the surface, and the dry (undisturbed) soil size distribution. Recently, satellite-derived roughness length and high-resolution soil texture data sets at the global scale have emerged and provide the opportunity for the use of advanced schemes in global models. This paper analyzes the behavior of the ERS satellite-derived global roughness length and the State Soil Geographic data base-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (STATSGO-FAO) soil texture data set (based on wet techniques) using an advanced DPM in comparison to the LISA data set over Northern Africa and the Middle East. We explore the sensitivity of the drag partition scheme (a critical component of the DPM) and of the dust vertical fluxes (intensity and spatial patterns) to the roughness length and soil texture data sets. We also compare the use of the drag partition scheme to a widely used preferential source approach in global models. Idealized experiments with prescribed wind speeds show that the ERS and STATSGO-FAO data sets provide realistic spatial patterns of dust emission and friction velocity thresholds in the region. Finally, we evaluate a dust transport model for the period of March to July 2011 with observed aerosol optical depths from Aerosol Robotic Network sites. Results show that ERS and STATSGO-FAO provide realistic simulations in the region.

  6. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing–most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon’s characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops. PMID:27388276

  7. Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Zinn, Yuri; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Ann, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

  8. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    PubMed

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops. PMID:27388276

  9. [Comparisons of sulfur contents and isotopes between mosses and surface soils in Jiangxi Province].

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Xiao, Hua-Yun; Chen, Yong-Zhong; Zhou, Dan; Luo, Li; Wu, Dai-She

    2013-10-01

    In order to study the influence of atmospheric sulfur on soil sulfur, the forest surface soil samples and moss samples were collected in north areas of Jiangxi province. Contents and isotopes of sulfur in different forms (total sulfur, water-soluble sulfur, absorbed sulfur and organic sulfur) were determined. The average sulfur content of mosses was 0. 34% +/- 0. 20%. All of the delta34S values except at Fengcheng (-3. 31 per thousand) were positive, the average was 5.64 per thousand +/- 2. 23 per thousand. The average contents of soil total sulfur were between 189.0 mg.kg-1 and 793.5 mg.kg-1. The organic sulfur was the main sulfur form in surface soils and the contents of water-soluble sulfur were the lowest. The delta34S values of total sulfur were in the range of 4. 45 per thousand +/-10. 28 per thousand. The highest soil delta34S values were determined for organic sulfur and the delta34S values of water-soluble and absorbed sulfur were similar. The contents of soil total sulfur were much lower than those of the mosses. Except for organic sulfur (R = 0. 50, P >0. 05) , the delta34S values of total sulfur, water-soluble sulfur and absorbed sulfur were all significantly correlated with those of moss sulfur (R >0.7, P <0. 01). These results indicated that atmospheric sulfur directly affected the total sulfur, water-soluble sulfur and absorbed sulfur, but not the organic sulfur.

  10. Modeling soil freezing and thawing fronts in a land surface-atmosphere interaction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuhua

    This dissertation presents development, testing and applications of an algorithm for the simulation of soil freezing and thawing fronts (FTFs) in land surface models. A Two-direction Stefans Algorithm (TDSA), derived from the solution of the Stefan Problem, was developed to predict the position of FTFs in soil. TDSA was tested using observed soil temperature and moisture data from several sites across a north-south transect in North America. TDSA performed well for both permafrost and seasonal frost regions. TDSA was then implemented in the Community Land Model 3 (CLM3), used in a global climate model, to predict FTFs. Several modifications, including incorporation of peat layer, canopy heat capacity, and unfrozen soil water, were also made to make CLM3 compatible to northern cold regions. Coupled CLM3-TDSA Model testing in a boreal forest site in Saskatchewan for multiple years indicated significant improvements in the thermal response of the model, and TDSA provided better simulations of FTFs than the zero-isothermal method. Defining the start and end of the growing season using FTFs significantly improved the simulation of photosynthetic uptake. Projected warming may cause an earlier start of growing season and a higher photosynthesis during spring. Warmer temperatures would increase ecosystem respiration, causing annual net ecosystem productivity to decline. The coupled CLM3-TDSA model was also applied to study the development of ALD (active layer depth) in permafrost regions. The roles of climate warming, soil texture and vegetation were investigated. Results showed that warming caused deeper and earlier thaw of permafrost, soil texture had a significant effect on the development of ALD, and vegetation cover affected the ALD development through its effect on ground surface energy, and the start and length of thawing season. These results showed that TDSA can be applied to study the long term changes in ALD in permafrost regions under projected climate change.

  11. Development, calibration, and performance of a novel biocrust wetness probe (BWP) measuring the water content of biological soil crusts and surface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bettina; Berkemeier, Thomas; Ruckteschler, Nina; Caesar, Jennifer; Ritter, Holger; Heintz, Henno; Brass, Henning

    2015-04-01

    The surface layer of soils as transition zone between pedosphere and atmosphere plays a crucial role in exchange processes of nutrients, atmospheric gases and water. In arid and semiarid regions, this uppermost soil layer is commonly colonized by biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which cover about 46 million km2 worldwide being highly relevant in the global terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycles. Their water status is of major concern, as activity of these poikilohydric organisms is directly controlled by their water content. On-site analyses of both bare and crusted soils thus are urgently needed to correctly model exchange processes of water, nutrients and trace gases at the soil surface. In this study we present the biocrust wetness probe (BWP), which is the first low-cost sensor to reliably measure the water content within biocrusts or the uppermost 5 mm of the substrate. Using a weak alternating current, the electrical conductivity is assessed and an automatic calibration routine allows calculating the water content and precipitation equivalent of the surface layer over time. During one year of continuous field measurements, 60 BWPs were installed in different types of biocrusts and bare soil to measure at 5-minute intervals in the Succulent Karroo, South Africa. All sensors worked reliably and responded immediately and individually upon precipitation events. Upon completion of field measurements, soil and biocrust samples were collected from all measurement spots to compile calibration curves in the lab. In most soil and biocrust samples the water content rose linearly with increasing electrical conductivity values and only for few samples an exponential relationship was observed. Measurements revealed characteristic differences in biocrust and soil wetness patterns, which affect both the water regime and physiological processes in desert regions. Thus BWPs turned out to be well suited sensors for spatio-temporal monitoring of soil water content, allowing

  12. Ag, Ta, Ru, and Ir enrichment in surface soil: Evidence for land pollution of heavy metal from atmospheric deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Guangxi; Zhu, Jianguo; Xiong, Zhengqin; Yamasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2004-03-01

    No observation has so far been reported that heavy metal elements from atmospheric deposition were accumulated widely in the surface soil layers. In this research, 28 soil profiles from different climate zones and agro-ecosystems in China were studied, and obvious enrichment of Ag, Ta, Ru, and Ir in the surface soils was discovered. It indicates that pollution of heavy metals emitted into the atmosphere from industrial activities is no longer limited to soils in the vicinity of power, metallurgic, metalworking, and machine-making industries, and they may settle down extensively on land besides cities and industrial regions.

  13. Relating trends in land surface-air temperature difference to soil moisture and evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veal, Karen; Taylor, Chris; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Ghent, Darren; Harris, Phil; Remedios, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil water is central to both physical and biogeochemical processes within the Earth System. Drying of soils leads to evapotranspiration (ET) becoming limited or "water-stressed" and is accompanied by rises in land surface temperature (LST), land surface-air temperature difference (delta T), and sensible heat flux. Climate models predict sizable changes to the global water cycle but there is variation between models in the time scale of ET decay during dry spells. The e-stress project is developing novel satellite-derived diagnostics to assess the ability of Earth System Models (ESMs) to capture behaviour that is due to soil moisture controls on ET. Satellite records of LST now extend 15 years or more. MODIS Terra LST is available from 2000 to the present and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) LST record runs from 1995 to 2012. This paper presents results from an investigation into the variability and trends in delta T during the MODIS Terra mission. We use MODIS Terra and MODIS Aqua LST and ESA GlobTemperature ATSR LST with 2m air temperatures from reanalyses to calculate trends in delta T and "water-stressed" area. We investigate the variability of delta T in relation to soil moisture (ESA CCI Passive Daily Soil Moisture), vegetation (MODIS Monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and precipitation (TRMM Multi-satellite Monthly Precipitation) and compare the temporal and spatial variability of delta T with model evaporation data (GLEAM). Delta T anomalies show significant negative correlations with soil moisture, in different seasons, in several regions across the planet. Global mean delta T anomaly is small (magnitude mostly less than 0.2 K) between July 2002 and July 2008 and decreases to a minimum in early 2010. The reduction in delta T anomaly coincides with an increase in soil moisture anomaly and NDVI anomaly suggesting an increase in evapotranspiration and latent heat flux with reduced sensible heat flux. In conclusion there have been

  14. Bacterial production of sunscreen pigments increase arid land soil surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, HsiaoChien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northern, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2015-04-01

    Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are desert top soils formations built by complex microbial communities and dominated by the filamentous cyanobacterium Microcoleus sp. BSCs cover extensive desert areas where they correspond to millimeters size mantles responsible of soil stability and fertility. Despite their ecological importance, little is known about how these communities will endure climate change. It has been shown in North America that different species of Microcoleus showed distinct temperature preferences and that their continental biogeography may be susceptible to small changes in temperature with unknown consequences for the ecosystem function. Using a combination of physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to characterize a successional gradient of crust maturity from light to dark BSCs (Moab, Utah) we found that the concentration of scytonemin (a cyanobacterial sunscreen pigment) increased with crust maturity. We also confirmed that scytonemin was by far the major pigment responsible of light absorption in the visible spectrum in BSCs, and is then responsible of the darkening of the BSCs (i.e decrease of albedo) with maturity. We measured the surface temperature and albedo and found, as predicted, a negative linear relationship between these two parameters. The decrease in albedo across the gradient of crust maturity corresponded to an increase in surface temperature up to 10° C. Upon investigation of microbial community composition using SSU rRNA gene analysis, we demonstrate that warmer crust surface temperatures (decreased albedo) are associated with a replacement of the dominant cyanobacterium; the thermosensitive Microcoleus sp. being replaced by a thermotolerant Microcoleus sp. in darker BSCs. This study supports at the local scale a finding previously made at the continental scale, but also sheds light on the importance of scytonemin as a significant warmer of soils with important consequences for BSC composition and function. Based on

  15. Survival of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157 in soil, water and on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maule, A

    2000-01-01

    Cattle and sheep are major reservoirs of Escherichia coli O157 and consequently these and certain other farm animals can pass out large numbers of this organism in their faeces. Thus the ability of the organism to survive in faeces, on pastureland and in associated water systems has important implications for its spread to crops by direct application of manure, by irrigation with infected water or directly to man by contact with animals or contaminated soil. Model systems were used to determine the persistence of the organism in river water, cattle faeces, soil cores and on stainless steel work surfaces. Survival of the organism was found to be greatest in soil cores containing rooted grass. Under these conditions viable numbers were shown to decline from approximately 10(8) g(-1) soil to between 10(6) and 10(7) g(-1) soil after 130 d. When the organism was inoculated into cattle faeces it remained detectable at high levels for more than 50 d. In contrast the organism survived much less readily in cattle slurry and river water where it fell in numbers from more than 10(6) ml(-1) to undetectable levels in 10 and 27 d, respectively. The survival of E. coli O157 was also investigated on stainless steel surfaces, where as air-dried deposits, it was shown to survive for periods in excess of 60 d. It was most stable at chill temperatures (4 degrees C) and viability was only partially reduced at 18 degrees C. In addition to stainless steel, the organism was shown to survive for extended periods on domestic (plastic) cutting boards, both at room and chill temperatures. Sanitizing agents, such as hypochlorites and a compound comprising both cationic and anionic-based active ingredients were found to be effective in killing various VTEC on stainless steel surfaces.

  16. Measured total permittivity of a silt loam soil with low surface electrostatic charge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, S. A.; Arcone, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    Dielectric dispersion and signal attenuation strongly affects the performance of ground--penetrating radar. Both phenomena are determined by soil total permittivity, which, for a given water content, below 100 MHz is thought to be controlled by the quantity of bound water associated with the clay--size mineral fraction. Total permittivity of an unfractionated Fairbanks silt loam soil and selected particle--size fractions were determined from 10 MHz to 6 GHz by time--domain spectroscopy. The reported mineralogy of the soil is largely quartz and albite, with smaller amounts of montmorillonite, kaolinite, and hematite. The reported relative proportions of the soil particle--size fractions were sand, 7 %; coarse silt, 49 %; fine silt, 35 %; and clay, 9 %. The soil had a reported cation exchange capacity of 16 cmol (+)·kg-1 and a measured specific surface of 54.7 m2·g-1. The volumetric water contents of the samples were between 0.25 and 0.36. The particle--size fractions studied were > 20 μm, 10--20 μm, 2--10 μm, and < 2 μm. The measured dielectric dispersion at 10 MHz for these fractions were 22.2, 18.5, 52.3, and 59.3, respectively. The measured dielectric dispersion at 10 MHz for the whole soil was 28.6, which could be explained solely as the contributions from free water and bound water associated with the coarse and fine silt--size fractions, without invoking the contribution of bound water associated with the clay--size fraction. This work was supported by the US Army AT24 project entitled, "Effect of clay particle size on the dielectric permittivity of soils" and Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Military Munitions Project UX 1440.

  17. Urban Soil: Assessing Ground Cover Impact on Surface Temperature and Thermal Comfort.

    PubMed

    Brandani, Giada; Napoli, Marco; Massetti, Luciano; Petralli, Martina; Orlandini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The urban population growth, together with the contemporary deindustrialization of metropolitan areas, has resulted in a large amount of available land with new possible uses. It is well known that urban green areas provide several benefits in the surrounding environment, such as the improvement of thermal comfort conditions for the population during summer heat waves. The purpose of this study is to provide useful information on thermal regimes of urban soils to urban planners to be used during an urban transformation to mitigate surface temperatures and improve human thermal comfort. Field measurements of solar radiation, surface temperature (), air temperature (), relative humidity, and wind speed were collected on four types of urban soils and pavements in the city of Florence during summer 2014. Analysis of days under calm, clear-sky condition is reported. During daytime, sun-to-shadow differences for , apparent temperature index (ATI), and were significantly positive for all surfaces. Conversely, during nighttime, differences among all surfaces were significantly negative, whereas ATI showed significantly positive differences. Moreover, was significantly negative for grass and gravel. Relative to the shaded surfaces, was higher on white gravel and grass than gray sandstone and asphalt during nighttime, whereas gray sandstone was always the warmest surface during daytime. Conversely, no differences were found during nighttime for ATI and measured over surfaces that were exposed to sun during the day, whereas showed higher values on gravel than grass and asphalt during nighttime. An exposed surface warms less if its albedo is high, leading to a significant reduction of during daytime. These results underline the importance of considering the effects of surface characteristics on surface temperature and thermal comfort. This would be fundamental for addressing urban environment issues toward the heat island mitigation considering also the impact of urban

  18. Contribution of root respiration to soil surface CO2 flux in a boreal black spruce chronosequence.

    PubMed

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Wang, Chuankuan; Gower, Stith T

    2004-12-01

    We quantified the contributions of root respiration (RC) and heterotrophic respiration to soil surface CO2 flux (RS) by comparing trenched and untrenched plots in well-drained and poorly drained stands of a black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) fire chronosequence in northern Manitoba, Canada. Our objectives were to: (1) test different equations for modeling RS as a function of soil temperature; and (2) model annual RS and RC for the chronosequence from continuous soil temperature measurements. The choice of equation to model RS strongly affected annual RS and RC, with an Arrhenius-based model giving the best fit to the data, especially at low temperatures. Modeled values of annual RS were positively correlated with soil temperature at 2-cm depth and were affected by year of burn and trenching, but not by soil drainage. During the growing season, measured RC was low in May, peaked in late July and declined to low values by the end of the growing season. Annual RC was < 5% of RS in the recently burned stands, approximately 40% in the 21-year-old stands and 5-15% in the oldest (152-year-old) stands. Evidence suggests that RC may have been underestimated in the oldest stands, with residual root decay from trenching accounting for 5-10% of trenched plot RS at most sites. PMID:15465701

  19. Soil Surface Organic Layers in Alaska's Arctic Foothills: Development, Distribution and Microclimatic Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, C. A.; Mann, D. H.; Verbyla, D.; Valentine, D.; Kunz, M. L.; Heiser, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accumulated organic matter at the ground surface plays an important role in arctic ecosystems. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) influence temperature, moisture, and chemistry in the underlying mineral soil and, on a global basis, comprise enormous stores of labile carbon. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is prerequisite to modeling the responses of arctic ecosystem processes to climate changes. Here, we ask three questions regarding SSOLs in the Arctic Foothills in northern Alaska: 1) What environmental factors control their spatial distribution? 2) How long do they take to form? 3) What is the relationship between SSOL thickness and mineral soil temperature through the growing season? The best topographically-controlled predictors of SSOL thickness and spatial distribution are duration of sunlight during the growing-season, upslope drainage area, slope gradient, and elevation. SSOLs begin to form within several decades following disturbance but require 500-700 years to reach equilibrium states. Once formed, mature SSOLs lower peak growing-season temperature and mean annual temperature in the underlying mineral horizon by 8° and 3° C respectively, which reduces available growing degree days within the upper mineral soil by nearly 80%. How ongoing climate change in northern Alaska will affect the region's SSOLs is an open and potentially crucial question.

  20. Integration of multi-sensor data to measure soil surface changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltner, Anette; Schneider, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation models (DEM) of high resolution and accuracy covering a suitable sized area of interest can be a promising approach to help understanding the processes of soil erosion. Thereby, the plot under investigation should remain undisturbed. The fragile marl landscape in Andalusia (Spain) is especially prone to soil detachment and transport with unique sediment connectivity characteristics due to the soil properties and climatic conditions. A 600 m² field plot is established and monitored during three field campaigns (Sep. 2013, Nov. 2013 and Feb. 2014). Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are suitable tools to generate high resolution topography data that describe soil surface changes at large field plots. Thereby, the advantages of both methods are utilised in a synergetic manner. On the one hand, TLS data is assumed to comprise a higher reliability regarding consistent error behaviour than DEMs derived from overlapping UAV images. Therefore, global errors (e.g. dome effect) and local errors (e.g. DEM blunders due to erroneous image matching) within the UAV data are assessed with the DEMs produced by TLS. Furthermore, TLS point clouds allow for fast and reliable filtering of vegetation spots, which is not as straightforward within the UAV data due to known image matching problems in areas displaying plant cover. On the other hand, systematic DEM errors linked to TLS are detected and possibly corrected utilising the DEMs reconstructed from overlapping UAV images. Furthermore, TLS point clouds are filtered corresponding to the degree of point quality, which is estimated from parameters of the scan geometry (i.e. incidence angle and footprint size). This is especially relevant for this study because the area of interest is located at gentle hillslopes that are prone to soil erosion. Thus, the view of the scanning device onto the surface results in an adverse angle, which is solely slightly improved by the

  1. On the Arctic near-surface permafrost and climate sensitivities to soil and snow model formulations in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquin, J.-P.; Sushama, L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5) simulated near surface permafrost and its climate interactions to soil and snow formulations. In particular, sensitivities to the depth of the soil column, inclusion of organic soils and modified snow conductivity formulation are investigated. The impact of these modifications are first assessed in offline simulations performed with the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which is the land surface scheme used in CRCM5, when driven by ERA-40/ERA-Interim for the 1957-2008 period. Analysis of CLASS simulations shows major improvements in the simulated permafrost extent, particularly with a deeper soil column. Inclusion of organic soil decreased the summer ground heat flux and therefore the summer soil temperatures, leading to improvements in the simulated active layer thickness (ALT). The impact of the new snow thermal conductivity formulation is moderate compared to the effect of organic soils, but reduces the cold biases in winter soil temperatures. CRCM5 experiments revealed similar sensitivities to soil depth, organic soil and snow conductivity changes as with the offline simulations. Significant changes are noted in the land-atmosphere interactions, through modified energy and moisture partitioning at the surface resulting from the inclusion of the organic soils. The inter-annual variability of the ALT shows larger sensitivities to summer temperatures for mineral soil while experiments including organic soils show increased sensitivities to annual temperatures. The ALT trends in the CRCM5 are similar to the observed values, despite the overestimation of ALT associated with a warm bias in the CRCM5 climate.

  2. The Predictability of Soil Moisture and Near-Surface Temperature in Hindcasts of the NCEP Seasonal Forecast Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamitsu, Masao; Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; Schemm, Jae; Ebisuzaki, Wesley

    2003-02-01

    Using the NCEP-DOE reanalysis (R-2) soil wetness and the NCEP Seasonal Forecast System, seasonal predictability of the soil moisture and near-surface temperature, and the role of land surface initial conditions are examined. Two sets of forecasts were made, one starting from climatological soil moisture as initial condition and the other from R-2 soil moisture analysis. Each set consisted of 10-member ensemble runs of 7-month duration. Initial conditions were taken from the first 5 days of April, 12 h apart, for the 1979-96 period.The predictive skill of soil moisture was found to be high over arid/semiarid regions. The model prediction surpassed the persisted anomaly forecast, and the soil moisture initial condition was essential for skillful predictions over these areas. Over temperate zones with more precipitation, and over tropical monsoon regions, the predictive skill of the soil moisture declined steeply in the first 3-4 months. This is due to the difficulties in predicting precipitation accurately. In contrast, the situation was very different over tropical South America where tropical SST forcing controlled the precipitation and where the model simulated the precipitation well. The forecast starting from climatological soil moisture approached the forecast skill of initial soil moisture in 3-4 months; after that the effect of initial soil moisture information tended to disappear.The near-surface temperature anomaly forecast was closely related to the soil moisture anomaly forecast, but the skill was lower. The verification of temperature made against the U.S. 344 climate division data indicated that the improvement in the forecast skill was not an artifact of the R-2 soil moisture analysis.It was suggested that the equatorial Pacific SST anomaly had an impact on the soil moisture anomaly over the continental United States during the first month of integration, and then it contributed positively toward the prediction of near-surface temperature during the

  3. Cross evaluation of in-situ, synthetic and remotely sensed surface soil moisture in southwestern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Eric; Hasenauer, Stefan; Vahid, Naemi; Wagner, Wolfgang; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is currently underway at 12 automatic weather stations located in southwestern France. The SMOSMANIA profile soil moisture network has several objectives including: (i) the validation of the operational soil moisture products of Météo-France, produced by the hydrometeorological model SIM, (ii) the validation of new versions of the land surface model of Météo-France (ISBA), and (iii) ground-truthing of future airborne Cal/Val campaigns in support of the SMOS mission and in a more general way the verification of remotely sensed soil moisture products. Soil moisture observed at SMOSMANIA constitutes a unique data set as for the first time in Europe, automatic measurements of soil moisture are integrated in an operational meteorological network. Twelve stations of the existing automatic weather station network of Météo-France (RADOME) in southwestern France were upgraded to measure soil moisture at different depths (5, 10, 20, 30 cm) with a twelve minute time step. The network is operational since January 2007. These data permit to evaluate the surface soil moisture (SSM) from the operational SIM suite of model (SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU) used at Météo-France and also remotely sensed METOP/ASCAT (Advanced SCATterometer) surface soil moisture estimates over a two year period (2007-2008). In-situ SSM measurements are necessary to validate remotely sensed SSM estimates. Land surface models can be used to upscale the in situ SSM observations and complete the evaluation of satellite products. The comparison of the SIM and SMOSMANIA data shows a good temporal correlation with an average of r = 0.70 for the twelve stations with a positive mean bias = 0.031 m3m-3 and a mean error RMSE = 0.085 m3m-3. The good correlation shows that the SIM predictions may be used as a credible SSM data set to evaluate the seasonal and interannual variability of the remotely sensed SSM. Regarding the comparison between rescaled in

  4. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1997-10-28

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

  5. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.

    1997-01-01

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

  6. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen Soil Surface CO2 Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. These data are soil surface CO 2 flux data at the SSA-Fen site from 27- May-1994 to 23-Sep-1994 and from 13-May-1995 to 03-Oct-1995. A portable gas exchange system was used to make these measurements. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  7. Soil surface potentials induced by ITAIPU HVDC ground return current. Part II - Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Caroli, C.E.; Santos, N.; Kovarsky, D.; Marques, M.A.M. )

    1988-07-01

    The method used for the measurement of the potential curves in the soil surface is presented, together with its results, obtained at different electrode current levels (100A, 600A, 1500A and 2300A). Circuits and instrumentation used are also presented, as well as notes on measurement noise and on the overall precision obtained. The results are finally also presented in the form of equipotential curves.

  8. Experimental observation of signature changes in bulk soil electrical conductivity in response to engineered surface CO2 leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou X.; Wielopolski L.; Lakkaraju, V. R.; Apple, M.; Dobeck, L. M.; Gullickson, K.; Shaw, J. A.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L. H.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental observations of signature changes of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC) due to CO{sub 2} leakage were carried out at a field site at Bozeman, Montana, to investigate the change of soil geophysical properties in response to possible leakage of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The dynamic evolution of bulk soil EC was measured during an engineered surface leakage of CO{sub 2} through in situ continuous monitoring of bulk soil EC, soil moisture, soil temperature, rainfall rate, and soil CO{sub 2} concentration to investigate the response of soil bulk EC signature to CO{sub 2} leakage. Observations show that: (1) high soil CO{sub 2} concentration due to CO{sub 2} leakage enhances the dependence of bulk soil EC on soil moisture. The bulk soil EC is a linear multivariate function of soil moisture and soil temperature, the coefficient for soil moisture increased from 2.111 dS for the non-leaking phase to 4.589 dS for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase; and the coefficient for temperature increased from 0.003 dS/C for the non-leaking phase to 0.008 dS/C for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase. The dependence of bulk soil EC on soil temperature is generally weak, but leaked CO{sub 2} enhances the dependence, (2) after the CO{sub 2} release, the relationship between soil bulk EC and soil CO{sub 2} concentration observes three distinct CO{sub 2} decay modes. Rainfall events result in sudden changes of soil moisture and are believed to be the driving forcing for these decay modes, and (3) within each mode, increasing soil CO{sub 2} concentration results in higher bulk soil EC. Comparing the first 2 decay modes, it is found that the dependence of soil EC on soil CO{sub 2} concentration is weaker for the first decay mode than the second decay mode.

  9. Manure Injection Affects the Fate of Pirlimycin in Surface Runoff and Soil.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Stephanie B; Maguire, Rory O; Xia, Kang; Cushman, Julia; Knowlton, Katharine; Ray, Partha

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotics used in animal agriculture are of increasing environmental concern due to the potential for increased antibiotic resistance after land application of manure. Manure application technology may affect the environmental behavior of these antibiotics. Therefore, rainfall simulations were conducted on plots receiving three manure treatments (surface application, subsurface injection, and no manure control) to determine the fate and transport of pirlimycin, an antibiotic commonly used in dairy production. Rainfall simulations were conducted immediately and 7 d after application of dairy manure spiked with 128 ng g (wet weight) pirlimycin. Soil samples were collected from all plots at two depths (0-5 and 5-20 cm). For injection plots, soil was collected from injection slits and between slits. Pirlimycin concentrations were higher in soil within the injection slits compared with surface application plots at 0 and 7 d. Pirlimycin concentrations in the 0- to 5-cm depth decreased by 30, 55, and 87% in the injection slit, between injection slits, and surface application plots 7 d after application. Pirlimycin concentrations were 106 ng g in sediment and 4.67 ng mL in water from the surface application plots, which were 21 and 32 times that of the injection plots, respectively. After 7 d, pirlimycin levels in runoff sediment and water decreased 80 to 98%. Surface application resulted in six and three times higher pirlimycin concentrations in water and sediment than injection. These results indicate that pirlimycin is most susceptible to loss immediately after manure application. Thus, injection could be considered a best management practice to prevent loss of antibiotics in surface runoff. PMID:27065398

  10. Potential fate of SOC eroded from natural crusted soil surface under simulated wind driven storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liangang; Fister, Wolfgang; Greenwood, Philip; Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Improving the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on carbon (C) cycling requires a better understanding of the redistribution of eroded sediment and associated soil organic carbon (SOC) across agricultural landscapes. Recent studies conducted on dry-sieved aggregates in the laboratory demonstrated that aggregation can profoundly skew SOC redistribution and its subsequent fate by accelerating settling velocities of aggregated sediment compared to mineral grains, which in turn can increase SOC mineralization into greenhouse gases. However, the erodibility of the soil in the field is more variable than in the laboratory due to tillage, crus formation, drying-wetting and freeze-thaw cycles, and biological effects. This study aimed to investigate the potential fate of the SOC eroded from naturally developed soil surface and to compare the observations with those made in the laboratory. Simulated, short, high intensity wind driven storms were conducted on a crusted loam in the field. The sediments were fractionated with a settling tube according to their potential transport distances. The soil mass, SOC concentration and cumulative 80-day CO2 emission of each fraction were identified. The results show: 1) 53% of eroded sediment and 62% of eroded SOC from the natural surface in the field would be deposited across landscapes, which is six times and three times higher compared to that implied by mineral grains, respectively; 2) the preferential deposition of SOC-rich fast-settling sediment potentially releases approximately 50% more CO2 than the same layer of the non-eroded soil; 3) the respiration of the slow-settling fraction that is potentially transported to the aquatic systems was much more active compared to the other fractions and the bulk soil. Our results confirm in general the conclusions drawn from laboratory and thus demonstrate that aggregation can affect the redistribution of sediment associated SOC under field conditions, including an increase in

  11. Spatial Variability Some Physical and Chemical Prpperties Soil surface In Dasht-e-Tabriz Different Landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughifar, Hamed; Asghar Jafarzadeh, Ali; Torabi, Hosien; Aliasgharzad, Naser; Toomanian, Norair

    2010-05-01

    Spatial distribution of soil properties at the field and watershed scale(region scale) affect yield potential, hydrologic responses , and transport of herbicides and No3 to surface or groundwater.The present study aim was to evaluate some physical and chemical properties spatial variability and frequency distribution within and between landforms of Dash-e-Tabriz in the northwest of Iran.For this evaluation 98 samples from soils surface of layer according to grid sampling design and with 500-1000 meters distance based on soils variability were selected and analysed.Landforms were hill, piedmont plain, plain, river alluvial plain and lowland.The study of soil variables frequency distribution showed that Bd, CEC, Caco3, pH,clay and silt follow normal distribution ,which to study their variation one can use parametric statistical method.Variables such as MWD, N(total), SAR, EC, P(available) and sand showed log-normal distribution,that for their variation study,should first be transformed to a logarithmic scale.The variables frequency distribution increase within landforms,which in lowland, hill, and river alluvial plain they showed normal distribution and only EC in piedmont plain and sand, OC and N(total) in plain had log-normal distributions.The results indicate significantly differences of soil properties distribution among landforms,which clay ,pH, EC ,SAR and MWD, CEC, Bd, N(total), OC, P(available), sand, silt were strongly and moderately spatial dependent respectively and Caco3 had no spatial dependence and it is following nugget model.These results indicate that strong spatial dependence due to the effects of intrinsic factors such as parent material, relief and soil types. Also soil properties variations result from variation in depositional environments and or differences in pedogenic or hydrologic processes for different landform positions,and so it can be affected by the flood irrigation,fertilizeir addition,high watertable level or agriculture practices

  12. Estimation of Surface Runoff in the Jucar River Basin from Rainfall Data and SMOS Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Leal, Julio A.; Estrela, Teodoro; Fidalgo, Arancha; Gabaldo, Onofre; Gonzalez Robles, Maura; Herrera Daza, Eddy; Khodayar, Samiro; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto

    2013-04-01

    Surface runoff is the water that flows after soil is infiltrated to full capacity and excess water from rain, meltwater, or other sources flows over the land. When the soil is saturated and the depression storage filled, and rain continues to fall, the rainfall will immediately produce surface runoff. The Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-CN) method is widely used for determining the approximate direct runoff volume for a given rainfall event in a particular area. The advantage of the method is its simplicity and widespread inclusion in existing computer models. It was originally developed by the US Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, and documented in detail in the National Engineering Handbook, Sect. 4: Hydrology (NEH-4) (USDA-SCS, 1985). Although the SCS-CN method was originally developed in the United States and mainly for the evaluation of storm runoff in small agricultural watersheds, it soon evolved well beyond its original objective and was adopted for various land uses and became an integral part of more complex, long-term, simulation models. The basic assumption of the SCS-CN method is that, for a single storm, the ratio of actual soil retention after runoff begins to potential maximum retention is equal to the ratio of direct runoff to available rainfall. This relationship, after algebraic manipulation and inclusion of simplifying assumptions, results in the following equation given in USDA-SCS (1985): (P--0,2S)2 Q = (P + 0,8S) where Q is the average runoff (mm), P the effective precipitation (mm) and S is potential maximum retention (mm) after the rainfall event. The study has been applied to the Jucar River Basin area, East of Spain. A selection of recent significant rainfall events has been made corresponding to the periods around 22nd November, 2011 and 28-29 September and 10 October, 2012, from Jucar River Basin Authority rain gauge data. Potential maximum retention values for each point have been assumed as the first

  13. Physical Interpretation of the Sensitivity of Polarisation Coherence to Soil Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, F.; Le Toan, T.

    2003-04-01

    Surface roughness is an important geo-physical parameter required for numerous applications such as agronomy, geology, risk assessment, etc. In addition, the estimate of soil roughness may provide valuable a priori information to simplify the problem of soil moisture retrieval from SAR data. In the past, roughness discriminators based on the ratio between soil backscatter at different polarisations (i.e. sigmaHH/ sigmaVV ) and on the correlation coefficient between HH and VV channels (i.e. rhoHHVV) have been suggested. More recently, the potential of the correlation coefficient between co-polarised channels (i.e. polarisation coherence) in an arbitrary state of polarisation has been investigated. In particular, the correlation coefficient between co-polarised channels at circular polarisation (i.e. rhoRRLL ) has been found extremely sensitive to surface roughness and weakly sensitive to soil moisture content. However, notwithstanding these observations have been confirmed by several experimental studies a complete physical understanding of the phenomenon is still missing, at least in the remote sensing community. One of the main reasons for this lack of understanding is that in general, only lowest order approximations of theoretical surface scattering models are exploited in remote sensing applications. These approximations do not include the effect of multiple reflections. They cannot therefore predict accurately the whole covariance matrix often required to synthesise roughness discriminators, such as rhoRRLL. In this respect, despite the fact that higher order approximations of theoretical surface scattering models are mathematically very complex, they are necessary to give indications to understand the phenomenon and they can provide physical guidelines to develop semi-empirical approaches. In this context, the objective of this paper is to present a simple physical framework to interpret the sensitivity of different roughness discriminators to soil roughness

  14. Development of Soils and Communities of Plants and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on West Virginia Surface Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Michael A.; Cumming, Jonathan R.

    2014-11-01

    Surface mining followed by reclamation to pasture is a major driver of land use and cover change in Appalachia. Prior research suggests that many aspects of ecosystem recovery are either slow or incomplete. We examined ecosystem structure—including soil physical and chemical properties, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) infectivity and community composition, and plant diversity and community composition—on a chronosequence of pasture-reclaimed surface mines and a non-mined pasture in northern West Virginia. Surface mining and reclamation dramatically altered ecosystem structure. Some aspects of ecosystem structure, including many measures of soil chemistry and infectivity of AMF, returned rapidly to levels found on the non-mined reference site. Other aspects of ecosystem structure, notably soil physical properties and AMF and plant communities, showed incomplete or no recovery over the short-to-medium term. In addition, invasive plants were prevalent on reclaimed mine sites. The results point to the need for investigation on how reclamation practices could minimize establishment of exotic invasive plant species and reduce the long-term impacts of mining on ecosystem structure and function.

  15. Development of soils and communities of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on West Virginia surface mines.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael A; Cumming, Jonathan R

    2014-11-01

    Surface mining followed by reclamation to pasture is a major driver of land use and cover change in Appalachia. Prior research suggests that many aspects of ecosystem recovery are either slow or incomplete. We examined ecosystem structure-including soil physical and chemical properties, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) infectivity and community composition, and plant diversity and community composition-on a chronosequence of pasture-reclaimed surface mines and a non-mined pasture in northern West Virginia. Surface mining and reclamation dramatically altered ecosystem structure. Some aspects of ecosystem structure, including many measures of soil chemistry and infectivity of AMF, returned rapidly to levels found on the non-mined reference site. Other aspects of ecosystem structure, notably soil physical properties and AMF and plant communities, showed incomplete or no recovery over the short-to-medium term. In addition, invasive plants were prevalent on reclaimed mine sites. The results point to the need for investigation on how reclamation practices could minimize establishment of exotic invasive plant species and reduce the long-term impacts of mining on ecosystem structure and function.

  16. Development of soils and communities of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on West Virginia surface mines.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael A; Cumming, Jonathan R

    2014-11-01

    Surface mining followed by reclamation to pasture is a major driver of land use and cover change in Appalachia. Prior research suggests that many aspects of ecosystem recovery are either slow or incomplete. We examined ecosystem structure-including soil physical and chemical properties, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) infectivity and community composition, and plant diversity and community composition-on a chronosequence of pasture-reclaimed surface mines and a non-mined pasture in northern West Virginia. Surface mining and reclamation dramatically altered ecosystem structure. Some aspects of ecosystem structure, including many measures of soil chemistry and infectivity of AMF, returned rapidly to levels found on the non-mined reference site. Other aspects of ecosystem structure, notably soil physical properties and AMF and plant communities, showed incomplete or no recovery over the short-to-medium term. In addition, invasive plants were prevalent on reclaimed mine sites. The results point to the need for investigation on how reclamation practices could minimize establishment of exotic invasive plant species and reduce the long-term impacts of mining on ecosystem structure and function. PMID:25195033

  17. Dechlorinating chloroacetanilide herbicides by dithionite-treated aquifer sediment and surface soil.

    PubMed

    Boparai, Hardiljeet K; Shea, Patrick J; Comfort, Steve D; Snow, Daniel D

    2006-05-01

    The prevalent use of chloroacetanilide herbicides has resulted in nonpoint contamination of some groundwater and surface water. We determined the efficacy of dithionite-treated sediment and soils to transform chloroacetanilides. When used alone, dithionite rapidly dechlorinates chloroacetanilides in water, with the following order of reactivity: propachlor > alachlor > acetochlor > metolachlor. Stoichiometric release of chloride occurs during reaction with dithionite, and thiosulfate herbicide derivatives are produced. Treating aquifer sediment with dithionite reduces native Fe(lII), creating a redox barrier of Fe(ll)-bearing minerals and surface-bound Fe(ll). Washing the reduced sediment (buffered with citrate-bicarbonate) with oxygen-free water removed Fe(ll) and excess dithionite and no alachlor transformation was observed. In contrast, a dithionite-treated surface soil, rich in clay and iron, effectively dechlorinated alachlor after washing. Exposing alachlor to aquifer sediment treated with dithionite in potassium carbonate buffer (pH 8.5-9.0) produced dechlorinated alachlor as the major degradation product. Our results provide proof-of-concept that dechlorination of chloroacetanilide herbicides by dithionite and dithionite-treated aquifer sediment and soil is a remediation option in natural environments where iron-bearing minerals are abundant.

  18. Comparative analysis of surface soil moisture retrieval using VSWI and TVDI in karst areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongbo; Zhou, Guoqing; Lu, Xianjian

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation Supply Water Index (VSWI) and Temperature Vegetation dryness Index (TVDI) are two most commonly used methods for surface soil moisture (SSM) retrieval using electromagnetic spectrum of visible, near infrared and thermal infrared band. Both of them take into account the effect of vegetation index (VI) and surface temperature (Ts) on SSM. A comparative analysis of the ability and effect of the two methods for SSM retrieval in karst areas was carried out, using the remote sensing data of Landsat 8 OLI_TIRS. The study area is located in Guilin, which is a typical karst area. The experimental results show that TVDI is more suitable for SSM retrieval in karst areas.

  19. Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in concurrently sampled Chinese air and surface soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Liu, Liyan; Li, Yi-Fan; Wang, Degao; Jia, Hongliang; Harner, Tom; Sverko, Ed; Wan, Xinnan; Xu, Diandou; Ren, Nanqi; Ma, Jianmin; Pozo, Karla

    2008-09-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were measured in a concurrent air and surface soil sampling program across China. Passive air samples were collected for approximately 3 months from mid-July to mid-October, 2005 using polyurethane foam (PUF) disk type samplers at 97 sites and surface soil samples were collected in a subset of 51 sites in the same year. As expected, the air concentrations (pg m(-3)) were highest at urban sites (mean of 350 +/- 218) followed by rural (230 +/- 180) and background sites (77 +/- 50). The PCB homologue composition was similar across China, with no distinction among site types, and reflected the profile of Chinese transformer oil with a greater proportion of lower molecular weight (LMW) congeners, particularly the tri-PCBs. This differs from the profile in Chinese soil that was shifted toward the higher molecular weight (HMW) congeners and likely attributed to numerous years of deposition and accumulation in this reservoir. The PCB profile in surface soil also reflects an "urban fractionation effect" with preferential deposition of HMW congeners near sources. The profile of PCBs in Chinese air was shown to be different than reported for Europe and for the Great Lakes Area (GLA) in North America. European and GLA air samples show a distinction between urban and rural/V background sites, with urban sites dominated by tetra- and penta-PCBs, whereas rural and background sites are shifted toward LMW congeners. European and GLA samples also exhibit much higher PCB concentrations at urban sites. This may be attributed to the use of PCBs in building materials in European and North American cities. In China, the difference between urban and rural/background sites is less pronounced. Strong soil-air correlations were found for the LMW PCBs at the background and rural sites, and for the HMW PCBs at the urban sites, a strong evidence of the urban fractionation effect. To our knowledge, this is the first national-scale study in China

  20. Spatial and temporal evolution of the levels of tritium in the Tagus River in its passage through Caceres (Spain) and the Alentejo (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Baeza, A; Brogueira, A M; Carreiro, M C; García, E; Gil, J M; Miró, C; Sequeira, M M; Teixeira, M M

    2001-03-01

    This work is the result of a collaboration between Spanish and Portuguese laboratories. The specific objective was to quantify the time evolution during 1994, 1995 and 1996 of the radioecological impact of the liquid releases of 3H from the Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) in the section of the Tagus River corresponding to Cáceres province in Spain and the Alentejo region in Portugal. We found that the temporal evolution of the levels of tritium depends on the management of the water held in the cooling reservoir of the ANPP and the presence of the dams that exist along the river. This management regime has a 12-month period. Also the movement of the mass of tritiated water (HTO) downriver was much faster during 1996 than 1995 or 1994 due to the hydrological differences between those years and consequently to the different amounts of water transferred between the reservoirs of the dams. From the hypothesis that hydrodynamically it is impossible to differentiate tritiated water from non-tritiated water, a model was constructed that satisfactorily reproduces the temporal evolution of the 3H in the zone of the Tagus River in which the exchange of water takes place, with the cooling reservoir of the Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant. PMID:11228968

  1. Soil Moisture and Vegetation Controls on Surface Energy Balance Using the Maximum Entropy Production Model of Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Parolari, A.; Huang, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to formulate and test plant water stress parameterizations for the recently proposed maximum entropy production (MEP) model of evapotranspiration (ET) over vegetated surfaces. . The MEP model of ET is a parsimonious alternative to existing land surface parameterizations of surface energy fluxes from net radiation, temperature, humidity, and a small number of parameters. The MEP model was previously tested for vegetated surfaces under well-watered and dry, dormant conditions, when the surface energy balance is relatively insensitive to plant physiological activity. Under water stressed conditions, however, the plant water stress response strongly affects the surface energy balance. This effect occurs through plant physiological adjustments that reduce ET to maintain leaf turgor pressure as soil moisture is depleted during drought. To improve MEP model of ET predictions under water stress conditions, the model was modified to incorporate this plant-mediated feedback between soil moisture and ET. We compare MEP model predictions to observations under a range of field conditions, including bare soil, grassland, and forest. The results indicate a water stress function that combines the soil water potential in the surface soil layer with the atmospheric humidity successfully reproduces observed ET decreases during drought. In addition to its utility as a modeling tool, the calibrated water stress functions also provide a means to infer ecosystem influence on the land surface state. Challenges associated with sampling model input data (i.e., net radiation, surface temperature, and surface humidity) are also discussed.

  2. Experimental demonstration of Martian soil simulant removal from a surface using a pulsed plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticoş, C. M.; Scurtu, A.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.

    2015-03-01

    A plasma jet produced in a small coaxial plasma gun operated at voltages up to 2 kV and working in pure carbon dioxide (CO2) at a few Torr is used to remove Martian soil simulant from a surface. A capacitor with 0.5 mF is charged up from a high voltage source and supplies the power to the coaxial electrodes. The muzzle of the coaxial plasma gun is placed at a few millimeters near the dusty surface and the jet is fired parallel with the surface. Removal of dust is imaged in real time with a high speed camera. Mars regolith simulant JSC-Mars-1A with particle sizes up to 5 mm is used on different types of surfaces made of aluminium, cotton fabric, polyethylene, cardboard, and phenolic.

  3. Experimental demonstration of Martian soil simulant removal from a surface using a pulsed plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Ticoş, C M; Scurtu, A; Toader, D; Banu, N

    2015-03-01

    A plasma jet produced in a small coaxial plasma gun operated at voltages up to 2 kV and working in pure carbon dioxide (CO2) at a few Torr is used to remove Martian soil simulant from a surface. A capacitor with 0.5 mF is charged up from a high voltage source and supplies the power to the coaxial electrodes. The muzzle of the coaxial plasma gun is placed at a few millimeters near the dusty surface and the jet is fired parallel with the surface. Removal of dust is imaged in real time with a high speed camera. Mars regolith simulant JSC-Mars-1A with particle sizes up to 5 mm is used on different types of surfaces made of aluminium, cotton fabric, polyethylene, cardboard, and phenolic.

  4. Experimental demonstration of Martian soil simulant removal from a surface using a pulsed plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Ticoş, C M; Scurtu, A; Toader, D; Banu, N

    2015-03-01

    A plasma jet produced in a small coaxial plasma gun operated at voltages up to 2 kV and working in pure carbon dioxide (CO2) at a few Torr is used to remove Martian soil simulant from a surface. A capacitor with 0.5 mF is charged up from a high voltage source and supplies the power to the coaxial electrodes. The muzzle of the coaxial plasma gun is placed at a few millimeters near the dusty surface and the jet is fired parallel with the surface. Removal of dust is imaged in real time with a high speed camera. Mars regolith simulant JSC-Mars-1A with particle sizes up to 5 mm is used on different types of surfaces made of aluminium, cotton fabric, polyethylene, cardboard, and phenolic. PMID:25832231

  5. Surfacing of domestic wastewater applied to soil through drip tubing and reduction in numbers of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Franti, J M; Weaver, R W; McInnes, K J

    2002-09-01

    Drip tubing is a technology that is increasing in use. The effectiveness of such systems in distributing the wastewater uniformly through the soil matrix, providing adequate removal of bacteria from wastewater, and keeping wastewater from reaching the soil surface has not been adequately evaluated. Experiments were conducted at two sites that had used drip tubing for approximately 3 years. This 3-year-old drip tubing and newly installed tubing were used in this investigation. A solution containing Brilliant Blue FCF dye and Escherichia coli, at an approximate concentration of 1 x 10(6) cells ml(-1), was applied to the sites through drip emitters. Reduction i n Escherichia coli populations reaching the soil surface was generally less than 10%. The route of travel for the solution reaching the soil surface was consistently along preferential flow paths and not uniformly through the soil matrix. Instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing installed at 15 cm was nearly 50%. Increasing burial of the drip tubing from 15 to 30 cm nearly eliminated water surfacing. A 31 per emitter dose of water, immediately following drip line installation later increased instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing buried at 30 cm. The volume of water applied per dose had little effect on the number of times water reached the soil surface. Inherent soil structural characteristics limited the drip tubing's ability to uniformly distribute water and adsorb bacteria. Drip tubing installation to 30 cm may be an important practice to reduce public health hazards from the likelihood of wastewater surfacing.

  6. Surfacing of domestic wastewater applied to soil through drip tubing and reduction in numbers of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Franti, J M; Weaver, R W; McInnes, K J

    2002-09-01

    Drip tubing is a technology that is increasing in use. The effectiveness of such systems in distributing the wastewater uniformly through the soil matrix, providing adequate removal of bacteria from wastewater, and keeping wastewater from reaching the soil surface has not been adequately evaluated. Experiments were conducted at two sites that had used drip tubing for approximately 3 years. This 3-year-old drip tubing and newly installed tubing were used in this investigation. A solution containing Brilliant Blue FCF dye and Escherichia coli, at an approximate concentration of 1 x 10(6) cells ml(-1), was applied to the sites through drip emitters. Reduction i n Escherichia coli populations reaching the soil surface was generally less than 10%. The route of travel for the solution reaching the soil surface was consistently along preferential flow paths and not uniformly through the soil matrix. Instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing installed at 15 cm was nearly 50%. Increasing burial of the drip tubing from 15 to 30 cm nearly eliminated water surfacing. A 31 per emitter dose of water, immediately following drip line installation later increased instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing buried at 30 cm. The volume of water applied per dose had little effect on the number of times water reached the soil surface. Inherent soil structural characteristics limited the drip tubing's ability to uniformly distribute water and adsorb bacteria. Drip tubing installation to 30 cm may be an important practice to reduce public health hazards from the likelihood of wastewater surfacing. PMID:12361375

  7. Dryland, calcareous soils store (and lose) significant quantities of near-surface organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Andrew M.; Puttock, Alan K.; Turnbull, Laura; Wainwright, John; Brazier, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    Semiarid ecosystems are susceptible to changes in dominant vegetation which may have significant implications for terrestrial carbon dynamics. The present study examines the distribution of organic carbon (OC) between particle size fractions in near-surface (0-0.05 m) soil and the water erosion-induced redistribution of particle-associated OC over a grass-shrub ecotone, in a semiarid landscape, subject to land degradation. Coarse (>2 mm) particles have comparable average OC concentrations to the fine (<2 mm) particles, accounting for ~24-38% of the OC stock in the near-surface soil. This may be due to aggregate stabilization by precipitated calcium carbonate in these calcareous arid soils. Critically, standard protocols assuming that coarse fraction particles contain no OC are likely to underestimate soil OC stocks substantially, especially in soils with strongly stabilized aggregates. Sediment eroded from four hillslope scale (10 × 30 m) sites during rainstorm events was monitored over four annual monsoon seasons. Eroded sediment was significantly enriched in OC; enrichment increased significantly across the grass-shrub ecotone and appears to be an enduring phenomenon probably sustained through the dynamic replacement of preferentially removed organic matter. The average erosion-induced OC event yield increased sixfold across the ecotone from grass-dominated to shrub-dominated ecosystems, due to both greater erosion and greater OC enrichment. This erosional pathway is rarely considered when comparing the carbon budgets of grasslands and shrublands, yet this accelerated efflux of OC may be important for long-term carbon storage potentials of dryland ecosystems.

  8. Hydrologic Impacts of a Surface-Applied, Organic Emulsion on Arid Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. H.; Caldwell, T. G.; Goreham, J.; Meadows, D. G.; Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; McDonald, E. V.

    2005-12-01

    In-place stabilization of environmental contaminants over land areas poses interesting logistical challenges, especially when considering the impact of the stabilizing agent on soil hydrologic processes like infiltration and surface runoff. As one part of a larger field-based study, we investigated the potential hydrologic impacts of using an organic-based emulsion which was designed to stabilize disturbed and undisturbed desert soils. The emulsion, a blend of organic esters, surfactants, water, and a proprietary chelating agent, was tested at the Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ. The goal of the study was to determine whether, and to what extent, field application of this emulsion altered the soil hydraulic properties and hence the infiltration and runoff potential. A randomized complete block design was used to investigate the effects of soil age (old vs young), treatment concentration (control vs two dilution levels), disturbance level (disturbed vs undisturbed), and time (1 year exposure) on the soil hydraulic properties. Hydraulic properties were determined using a 20 cm diameter tension infiltrometer (triplicate measurements for each treatment combination). Initial results show a significant reduction in the saturated hydraulic conductivity by nearly two orders of magnitude following treatment with the emulsion. Triplicate rainfall simulation experiments were also conducted on the test plots to investigate rainfall-runoff processes. Results immediately following treatment show a reduced time to ponding and a higher potential for surface runoff. Tests conducted quarterly for one year after application, however, indicate that hydrologic impacts diminished with time. Targeted laboratory tests are ongoing to better identify the breakdown mechanisms of the emulsion. The field and laboratory results will help guide larger-scale field applications based on actual field conditions.

  9. Surface hydrology and soil movement in an arid karst: the Nullarbor Plain, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillieson, D. S.; Cochrane, J. A.; Murray, A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nullarbor Plain is the largest karst area in Australia (220,000 km2) and one of the largest in the world. Its climate is arid (Köppen BWk and BWh), and the surface relief is less than 10m. The landscape is divided into extensive closed karstic depressions separated by low rocky ridges, and the dominant vegetation is chenopod shrubland. The extent and severity of soil degradation has been assessed using remote sensing. GPS rectified images from 1972 1973, 1979, 1983, 1988, and 1991 have been compared for two sites on the Nullarbor. Over the 19 years the total extent of bare soil has reduced significantly, but some areas around water points have degraded and there is some disturbance due to fossorial wombats. Sheet-flow processes occur during intense rainfall events, which happen two or three times per decade. Runoff only occurs after the 10- or 50- year return frequency events, and at these times turbid water ponds in depressions and enters caves. Surface soil sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity differ markedly between ridges and depressions; the ridges are clearly zones of groundwater recharge, while ponding is evident in most depressions. Sorptivity is influenced by the extent and nature of ground cover and cryptogam crusts on the soil. The landscape has been divided into classes on the basis of vegetation type and percentage of foliage cover. In each class the activities of fallout radionuclides will be determined by high resolution γ spectroscopy. Preliminary results suggest that in undisturbed sites little sediment movement has occurred over the time scale of cesium-137 (the last 35 years) but that the landscape has been well sorted over a much longer time scale. Future work will investigate disturbed sites to estimate relative soil loss during the pastoral period.

  10. A surface complexation and ion exchange model of Pb and Cd competitive sorption on natural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Susana; O'Day, Peggy A.; Vlassopoulos, Dimitri; García-González, Maria Teresa; Garrido, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    The bioavailability and fate of heavy metals in the environment are often controlled by sorption reactions on the reactive surfaces of soil minerals. We have developed a non-electrostatic equilibrium model (NEM) with both surface complexation and ion exchange reactions to describe the sorption of Pb and Cd in single- and binary-metal systems over a range of pH and metal concentration. Mineralogical and exchange properties of three different acidic soils were used to constrain surface reactions in the model and to estimate surface densities for sorption sites, rather than treating them as adjustable parameters. Soil heterogeneity was modeled with >FeOH and >SOH functional groups, representing Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxide minerals and phyllosilicate clay mineral edge sites, and two ion exchange sites (X - and Y -), representing clay mineral exchange. An optimization process was carried out using the entire experimental sorption data set to determine the binding constants for Pb and Cd surface complexation and ion exchange reactions. Modeling results showed that the adsorption of Pb and Cd was distributed between ion exchange sites at low pH values and specific adsorption sites at higher pH values, mainly associated with >FeOH sites. Modeling results confirmed the greater tendency of Cd to be retained on exchange sites compared to Pb, which had a higher affinity than Cd for specific adsorption on >FeOH sites. Lead retention on >FeOH occurred at lower pH than for Cd, suggesting that Pb sorbs to surface hydroxyl groups at pH values at which Cd interacts only with exchange sites. The results from the binary system (both Pb and Cd present) showed that Cd retained in >FeOH sites decreased significantly in the presence of Pb, while the occupancy of Pb in these sites did not change in the presence of Cd. As a consequence of this competition, Cd was shifted to ion exchange sites, where it competes with Pb and possibly Ca (from the background electrolyte). Sorption on >SOH

  11. Annual variations in the surface radiation budget and soil water and heat content in the Upper Yellow River area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suosuo; Lü, Shihua; Ao, Yinhuan; Shang, Lunyu

    2009-03-01

    Measurements taken between July 2006 to May 2007 at the Maqu station in the Upper Yellow River area were used to study the surface radiation budget and soil water and heat content in this area. These data revealed distinct seasonal variations in downward shortwave radiation, downward longwave radiation, upward longwave radiation and net radiation, with larger values in the summer than in winter because of solar altitudinal angle. The upward shortwave radiation factor is not obvious because of albedo (or snow). Surface albedo in the summer was lower than in the winter and was directly associated with soil moisture and solar altitudinal angle. The annual averaged albedo was 0.26. Soil heat flux, soil temperature and soil water content changed substantially with time and depth. The soil temperature gradient was positive from August to February and was related to the surface net radiation and the heat condition of the soil itself. There was a negative correlation between soil temperature gradient and net radiation, and the correlation coefficient achieved a significance level of 0.01. Because of frozen state of the soil, the maximum soil thermal conductivity value was 1.21 W m-1°C-1 in January 2007. In May 2007, soil thermal conductivity was 0.23 W m-1°C-1, which is the lowest value measured in the study, likely due to the fact that the soil was drier then than in other months. The soil thermal conductivity values for the four seasons were 0.27, 0.38, 0.55 and 0.83 W m-1°C-1, respectively.

  12. Orientation of functional groups of soil organic matter on the surface of water repellent soils determined by pulse saturation magic angle spinning (PSTMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Kawamoto, Ken; Senani Wijewardana, Nadeeka; Müller, Karin; Møldrup, Per; Clothier, Brent; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-05-01

    Orientation of functional groups of soil organic matter on soil particles plays a crucial role in the occurrence of soil water repellency. In addition to a general method to characterize soil organic matter using cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, we determined the surface orientation of functional groups in water repellent soils by using pulse saturation magic angle spinning (PSTMAS) NMR technique. A preliminary experiment confirmed that the PSTMAS NMR spectrum successfully determined the high mobility of methyl group of octadecylsilylated silica gels when a comparison was made with that of CPMAS NMR. This means that the methyl group oriented towards the outside of the silica gel particle. Similarly, for an experimental system consisting of mixtures of octadecylsilylated silica gel and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the extremely high mobility of methyl group derived from DMSO was detected using the same methodology. For water repellent soils from Japan and New Zealand, it was found that the methyl and methylene groups were highly mobile. In contrast, the NMR signals of aromatic moiety, another hydrophobic moiety of soil organic matter, were not as intense in PSTMAS compared with CPMAS. From these results, we conclude that alkyl moiety (methyl and methylene groups) would be oriented towards the outside of the soil particle and would play an important role in the appearance of water repellency of soils