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Sample records for aleph delphi l3

  1. Aleph

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-07

    Aleph is a PIC/DSMC (particle-in-cell/direct simulation Monte Carlo) software package for the simulation of low temperature plasmas. Aleph is intended to be a production quality code capable of handling complex 3D geometries. Unstructured triangular (2D) or tetrahedral (3D) meshes are used to represent simulation domains. Aleph runs either in serial on a single processor or desktop machine, or can be run in parallel using the MPI message-passing library, to enable faster performance on large problems. Aleph employs dynamic load balancing to efficiently harness thousands of processors on high performance computers and enable simulations of up to millions of mesh elements and billions of particles. Multiple decompositions of the same mesh are used: one for the particles, and one for the field solves. Electrostatic fields are computed using an unstructured mesh finite element method (FEM), and the resulting linear systems are solved using solvers from the Trilinos package (http://trilinos.org/).

  2. Aleph Field Solver Challenge Problem Results Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Russell; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Aleph models continuum electrostatic and steady and transient thermal fields using a finite-element method. Much work has gone into expanding the core solver capability to support enriched modeling consisting of multiple interacting fields, special boundary conditions and two-way interfacial coupling with particles modeled using Aleph's complementary particle-in-cell capability. This report provides quantitative evidence for correct implementation of Aleph's field solver via order- of-convergence assessments on a collection of problems of increasing complexity. It is intended to provide Aleph with a pedigree and to establish a basis for confidence in results for more challenging problems important to Sandia's mission that Aleph was specifically designed to address.

  3. The data acquisition system for ALEPH

    SciTech Connect

    Videau, I.

    1985-08-01

    The ALEPH Collaboration is formed by 27 institutes from nine countries plus CERN and counts about 300 physicists and engineers. Its spokesman is Jack Steinberger (CERN). The ALEPH Detector is being built by the collaboration now, in order to operate at LEP beginning of 1989. LEP is the Large Electron Positron Collider built at CERN. Its initial energy will be of 90GeV (Phase I) and its nominal luminosity 10/sup 32/cm/sup -1/s/sup -1/. It is foreseen to increase the energy of the machine up to about 200 GeV during Phase II.

  4. ALEPH: Israel's Research Library Network: Background, Evolution, and Implications for Networking in a Small Country.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazinger, Susan S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes ALEPH, the research library network in Israel, and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of its decentralized structure. Highlights include comparisons between RLIN and ALEPH; centralized versus decentralized networks; the format of ALEPH; authority control in ALEPH; and non-Roman scripts in both networks. (16 references) (LRW)

  5. Boltzmann-Electron Model in Aleph.

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Thomas Patrick; Hooper, Russell

    2014-11-01

    We apply the Boltzmann-electron model in the electrostatic, particle-in-cell, finite- element code Aleph to a plasma sheath. By assuming a Boltzmann energy distribution for the electrons, the model eliminates the need to resolve the electron plasma fre- quency, and avoids the numerical "grid instability" that can cause unphysical heating of electrons. This allows much larger timesteps to be used than with kinetic electrons. Ions are treated with the standard PIC algorithm. The Boltzmann-electron model re- quires solution of a nonlinear Poisson equation, for which we use an iterative Newton solver (NOX) from the Trilinos Project. Results for the spatial variation of density and voltage in the plasma sheath agree well with an analytic model

  6. Evaluation of the Aleph PIC Code on Benchmark Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Jeremiah; Pacheco, Jose; Grillet, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Aleph is a massively parallel, 3D unstructured mesh, Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, developed to model low temperature plasma applications. In order to verify and validate performance, Aleph is benchmarked against a series of canonical problems to demonstrate statistical indistinguishability in the results. Here, a series of four problems is studied: Couette flows over a range of Knudsen number, sheath formation in an undriven plasma, the two-stream instability, and a capacitive discharge. These problems respectively exercise collisional processes, particle motion in electrostatic fields, electrostatic field solves coupled to particle motion, and a fully coupled reacting plasma. Favorable comparison with accepted results establishes confidence in Aleph's capability and accuracy as a general purpose PIC code. Finally, Aleph is used to investigate the sensitivity of a triggered vacuum gap switch to the particle injection conditions associated with arc breakdown at the trigger. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Preserving access to ALEPH computing environment via virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscetti, Simone; Boccali, Tommaso; Maggi, Marcello; Arezzini, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    The ALEPH Collaboration [1] took data at the LEP (CERN) electron-positron collider in the period 1989-2000, producing more than 300 scientific papers. While most of the Collaboration activities stopped in the last years, the data collected still has physics potential, with new theoretical models emerging, which ask checks with data at the Z and WW production energies. An attempt to revive and preserve the ALEPH Computing Environment is presented; the aim is not only the preservation of the data files (usually called bit preservation), but of the full environment a physicist would need to perform brand new analyses. Technically, a Virtual Machine approach has been chosen, using the VirtualBox platform. Concerning simulated events, the full chain from event generators to physics plots is possible, and reprocessing of data events is also functioning. Interactive tools like the DALI event display can be used on both data and simulated events. The Virtual Machine approach is suited for both interactive usage, and for massive computing using Cloud like approaches.

  8. Development of software for ALEPH using structured techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, G.

    1987-08-01

    Structured Analysis/Structured Design (de Marco, Yourdon) was chosen by the ALEPH collaboration some 2 years ago to support development of off-line and data-acquisition software in our distributed environment. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts we will show how the various methods are being applied and comment on practical experiences. A formal model is being used to describe the data and the transition from abstract data flows to real-life data will be shown. The rôle of automated tools to support the methodology will be stressed. These techniques have been accepted very positively by the physicists since they provide improved ways to communicate and document complex software issues without introducing burdensome overheads.

  9. 75 FR 16513 - Delphi Packard Electrical/Electronic Architecture, a Subsidiary of Delphi Corporation, Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delphi Packard Electrical/Electronic Architecture, a Subsidiary of..., applicable to workers of Delphi Packard Electrical/Electronic Architecture, a subsidiary of Delphi... Electrical/Electronic Architecture, a subsidiary of Delphi Corporation. The Department has determined...

  10. Implications of final L3 measurement of {sigma}{sub tot}({gamma}{gamma}{yields}bb)

    SciTech Connect

    Chyla, Jiri

    2006-02-01

    The excess of data on the total cross section of bb production in {gamma}{gamma} collisions over QCD predictions, observed by L3, OPAL and DELPHI Collaborations at LEP2, has so far defied explanation. The recent final analysis of L3 data has brought important new information concerning the dependence of the observed excess on the {gamma}{gamma} collisions energy W{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}. The implications of this dependence are discussed.

  11. Determination of the QCD coupling from ALEPH τ decay data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pich, Antonio; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the determination of the strong coupling from τ decay, using the most recent release of the experimental ALEPH data. We critically review all theoretical strategies used in previous works and put forward various novel approaches which allow one to study complementary aspects of the problem. We investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods, trying to uncover their potential hidden weaknesses and test the stability of the obtained results under slight variations of the assumed inputs. We perform several determinations, using different methodologies, and find a very consistent set of results. All determinations are in excellent agreement, and allow us to extract a very reliable value for αs(mτ2). The main uncertainty originates in the pure perturbative error from unknown higher orders. Taking into account the systematic differences between the results obtained with the contour-improved perturbation theory and fixed-order perturbation theory prescriptions, we find αs(nf=3 )(mτ2)=0.328 ±0.013 which implies αs(nf=5 )(MZ2)=0.1197 ±0.0015 .

  12. Secondary neutron source modelling using MCNPX and ALEPH codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakas, Christos; Kerkar, Nordine

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the subcritical state and divergence of reactors requires the presence of neutron sources. But mainly secondary neutrons from these sources feed the ex-core detectors (SRD, Source Range Detector) whose counting rate is correlated with the level of the subcriticality of reactor. In cycle 1, primary neutrons are provided by sources activated outside of the reactor (e.g. Cf252); part of this source can be used for the divergence of cycle 2 (not systematic). A second family of neutron sources is used for the second cycle: the spontaneous neutrons of actinides produced after irradiation of fuel in the first cycle. Both families of sources are not sufficient to efficiently monitor the divergence of the second cycles and following ones, in most reactors. Secondary sources cluster (SSC) fulfil this role. In the present case, the SSC [Sb, Be], after activation in the first cycle (production of Sb124, unstable), produces in subsequent cycles a photo-neutron source by gamma (from Sb124)-neutron (on Be9) reaction. This paper presents the model of the process between irradiation in cycle 1 and cycle 2 results for SRD counting rate at the beginning of cycle 2, using the MCNPX code and the depletion chain ALEPH-V1 (coupling of MCNPX and ORIGEN codes). The results of this simulation are compared with two experimental results of the PWR 1450 MWe-N4 reactors. A good agreement is observed between these results and the simulations. The subcriticality of the reactors is about at -15,000 pcm. Discrepancies on the SRD counting rate between calculations and measurements are in the order of 10%, lower than the combined uncertainty of measurements and code simulation. This comparison validates the AREVA methodology, which allows having an SRD counting rate best-estimate for cycles 2 and next ones and optimizing the position of the SSC, depending on the geographic location of sources, main parameter for optimal monitoring of subcritical states.

  13. Muon-pair production by atmospheric muons in CosmoALEPH.

    PubMed

    Maciuc, F; Grupen, C; Hashim, N-O; Luitz, S; Mailov, A; Müller, A-S; Putzer, A; Sander, H-G; Schmeling, S; Schmelling, M; Tcaciuc, R; Wachsmuth, H; Ziegler, Th; Zuber, K

    2006-01-20

    Data from a dedicated cosmic ray run of the ALEPH detector were used in a study of muon trident production, i.e., muon pairs produced by muons. Here the overburden and the calorimeters are the target materials while the ALEPH time projection chamber provides the momentum measurements. A theoretical estimate of the muon trident cross section is obtained by developing a Monte Carlo simulation for muon propagation in the overburden and the detector. Two muon trident candidates were found to match the expected theoretical pattern. The observed production rate implies that the nuclear form factor cannot be neglected for muon tridents.

  14. L3 Study Team Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, David; L3ST Team

    2017-01-01

    The NASA-Chartered L3 Study Team is working to develop the US community participation and to support NASA's contribution to the ESA-led LISA mission to observe gravitational waves via space-based detectors. The present activities of the L3ST will be described, and the next steps for the Study Team will also be given. NASA supports travel activities and support for the Study Team activities.

  15. 75 FR 28655 - Delphi Packard Electrical/Electronic Architecture, a Subsidiary of Delphi Corporation, Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delphi Packard Electrical/Electronic Architecture, a Subsidiary of..., applicable to workers of Delphi Packard Electrical/Electronic Architecture, a subsidiary of Delphi.../Electronic Architecture, a subsidiary of Delphi Corporation, including on-site leased ] workers from...

  16. The NASA L3 Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The Astrophysics Implementation Plan calls for a minority role in L3, planned for launch in 2034. L3 The third large mission in ESAs Cosmic Visions 2015-2025 Programme NASA and ESA have been discussing a collaboration for 2 years Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) ESA study evaluating and recommend scientific performance tradeoffs, detection technologies, technology development activities, data analysis capabilities, schedule and cost US representatives: Guido Mueller, Mark Kasevich, Bill Klipstein, RTS Started in October 2014, concluding with a final report in late Marchor early April 2016. ESA solicited interest from ESA Member States in November 2015 NASA is continuing technology development support. ESA is restarting technology development activities.

  17. The DELPHI time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, C.; Cairanti, G.; Charpentier, P.; Clara, M.P.; Delikaris, D.; Foeth, H.; Heck, B.W.; Hilke, H.J.; Sulkowski, K.; Aubret, C.

    1989-02-01

    The central tracking device of the DELPHI Experiment at LEP is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with an active volume of 2 x 1.34m in length and 2.22m in diameter. Since spring 1988 the TPC has undergone extensive tests in a cosmic ray set-up. It will be installed in the LEP tunnel by early 1989. This report covers the construction, the read-out electronics and the contribution of the TPC to the DELPHI trigger. Emphasis is given to novelties which are not used in similar detectors.

  18. L3 Interactive Data Language

    SciTech Connect

    Hohn, Michael; Adams, Paul

    2006-09-05

    The L3 system is a computational steering environment for image processing and scientific computing. It consists of an interactive graphical language and interface. Its purpose is to help advanced users in controlling their computational software and assist in the management of data accumulated during numerical experiments. L3 provides a combination of features not found in other environments; these are: - textual and graphical construction of programs - persistence of programs and associated data - direct mapping between the scripts, the parameters, and the produced data - implicit hierarchial data organization - full programmability, including conditionals and functions - incremental execution of programs The software includes the l3 language and the graphical environment. The language is a single-assignment functional language; the implementation consists of lexer, parser, interpreter, storage handler, and editing support, The graphical environment is an event-driven nested list viewer/editor providing graphical elements corresponding to the language. These elements are both the represenation of a users program and active interfaces to the values computed by that program.

  19. Observation of an excess in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at ALEPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Boix, G.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Valassi, A.; Ward, J. J.; Wright, A. E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Halley, A. W.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Thomson, E.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; Giehl, I.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Kröcker, M.; Müller, A.-S.; Nürnberger, H.-A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Heister, A.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Régie, J.-B.; Yuan, C.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Loomis, C.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Shao, N.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Walsh, J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-12-01

    A search has been performed for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the data sample collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies up to 209GeV. An excess of /3σ beyond the background expectation is found, consistent with the production of the Higgs boson with a mass near 114GeV/c2. Much of this excess is seen in the four-jet analyses, where three high purity events are selected.

  20. Delphi: An Overview, An Application, Some Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Carl M.; Coke, James G.

    This paper discusses Delphi-a method of utilizing individuals' knowledge, judgment, and opinions to address complex questions and applies the method to a community planning project in Stow, Ohio. There are four phases of any Delphi: (1) exploring the subject under discussion, with each individual contributing pertinent information, (2) reaching an…

  1. Terminating Sequential Delphi Survey Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

    2012-01-01

    The Delphi survey technique is an iterative mail or electronic (e-mail or web-based) survey method used to obtain agreement or consensus among a group of experts in a specific field on a particular issue through a well-designed and systematic multiple sequential rounds of survey administrations. Each of the multiple rounds of the Delphi survey…

  2. The Delphi Method for Graduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skulmoski, Gregory J.; Hartman, Francis T.; Krahn, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The Delphi method is an attractive method for graduate students completing masters and PhD level research. It is a flexible research technique that has been successfully used in our program at the University of Calgary to explore new concepts within and outside of the information systems body of knowledge. The Delphi method is an iterative process…

  3. Lepton forward-backward asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R. ); DELPHI Collaboration,

    1992-02-01

    Results of Forward-Backward Asymmetries with Leptons measured at [ital Z][sup 0] energies are presented. Details of the analysis by the DELPHI Collaboration are given together with the most recent values of the peak Asymmetries for electrons, muons, and taus obtained by ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations at LEP.

  4. Development and validation of ALEPH2 Monte Carlo burn-up code

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Eynde, G.; Stankovskiy, A.; Fiorito, L.; Broustaut, M.

    2013-07-01

    The ALEPH2 Monte Carlo depletion code has two principal features that make it a flexible and powerful tool for reactor analysis. First of all, its comprehensive nuclear data library ensures the consistency between steady-state Monte Carlo and deterministic depletion modules. It covers neutron and proton induced reactions, neutron and proton fission product yields, spontaneous fission product yields, radioactive decay data and total recoverable energies per fission. Secondly, ALEPH2 uses an advanced numerical solver for the first order ordinary differential equations describing the isotope balances, namely a Radau IIA implicit Runge-Kutta method. The versatility of the code allows using it for time behavior simulation of various systems ranging from single pin model to full-scale reactor model. The code is extensively used for the neutronics design of the MYRRHA research fast spectrum facility which will operate in both critical and sub-critical modes. The code has been validated on the decay heat data from JOYO experimental fast reactor. (authors)

  5. Trilinear gauge couplings at DELPHI

    SciTech Connect

    McCubbin, Martin

    1997-06-15

    Preliminary measurements of trilinear gauge couplings are presented using data taken by DELPHI at 161 GeV and 172 GeV. Values for the couplings WWV (V=Z,{gamma}) are determined from a study of the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} using differential distributions from the WW final state in which one W decays hadronically and the other leptonically, and total cross-section data from all WW final states. Limits are also derived on neutral ZV{gamma} couplings from an analysis of the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}+invisible particles.

  6. Web-based dynamic Delphi: a new survey instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, JingTao; Liu, Wei-Ning

    2006-04-01

    We present a mathematical model for a dynamic Delphi survey method which takes advantages of Web technology. A comparative study on the performance of the conventional Delphi method and the dynamic Delphi instrument is conducted. It is suggested that a dynamic Delphi survey may form a consensus quickly. However, the result may not be robust due to the judgement leaking issues.

  7. Branching ratios and spectral functions of τ decays: Final ALEPH measurements and physics implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; Bonis, I. De; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Filippis, N. De; Palma, M. De; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    2005-12-01

    The full LEP-1 data set collected with the ALEPH detector at the Z pole during 1991-1995 is analysed in order to measure the τ decay branching fractions. The analysis follows the global method used in the published study based on 1991-1993 data, but several improvements are introduced, especially concerning the treatment of photons and π0's. Extensive systematic studies are performed, in order to match the large statistics of the data sample corresponding to over 300 000 measured and identified τ decays. Branching fractions are obtained for the two leptonic channels and 11 hadronic channels defined by their respective numbers of charged particles and π0's. Using previously published ALEPH results on final states with charged and neutral kaons, corrections are applied to the hadronic channels to derive branching ratios for exclusive final states without kaons. Thus the analyses of the full LEP-1 ALEPH data are combined to yield a complete description of τ decays, encompassing 22 non-strange and 11 strange hadronic modes. Some physics implications of the results are given, in particular related to universality in the leptonic charged weak current, isospin invariance in a1 decays, and the separation of vector and axial-vector components of the total hadronic rate. Finally, spectral functions are determined for the dominant hadronic modes and updates are given for several analyses. These include: tests of isospin invariance between the weak charged and electromagnetic hadronic currents, fits of the ρ resonance lineshape, and a QCD analysis of the non-strange hadronic decays using spectral moments, yielding the value αs(mτ2)=0.340±0.005exp±0.014th. The evolution to the Z mass scale yields αs(MZ2)=0.1209±0.0018. This value agrees well with the direct determination from the Z width and provides the most accurate test to date of asymptotic freedom in the QCD gauge theory.

  8. Using WWW to Improve Software Development and Maintenance: Application of the Light System to Aleph Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimar, A.; Aimar, M.; Khodabandeh, A.; Palazzi, P.; Rousseau, B.; Ruggier, M.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas Illas, P.

    Programmers who develop, use, maintain, modify software are faced with the problem of scanning and understanding large amounts of documents, ranging from source code to requirements, analysis and design diagrams, user and reference manuals, etc. This task is non trivial and time consuming, because of the number and size of documents, and the many implicit cross-references that they contain. In large distributed development teams, where software and related documents are produced at various sites, the problem can be even more severe. LIGHT, Life cycle Global HyperText, is an attempt to solve the problem using WWW technology. The basic idea is to make all the software documents, including code, available and cross-connected on the WWW. The first application of this concept to go in production is JULIA/LIGHT, a system to convert and publish on WWW the software documentation of the JULIA reconstruction program of the ALEPH experiment at CERN, European Organisation for Particle Physics, Geneva.

  9. Improving TMD classification using the Delphi technique.

    PubMed

    John, M T

    2010-10-01

    The classification of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is still controversial. Consensus methods such as the Delphi technique, a method that polls experts' anonymous opinion in an iterative process with controlled feedback and statistical aggregation of group response, could be valuable to improve this challenging topic. The article illustrates the application of the Delphi technique for deciding whether the terms myalgia or myofascial pain should be used in a TMD classification system and discusses the technique's potential for TMD classification in general. In three Delphi rounds, 14 TMD experts from the Division of TMD and Orofacial Pain of the University of Minnesota reached a consensus about which TMD diagnoses should be included in a TMD classification system. They preferred the term myofascial pain over myalgia. The Delphi technique has the potential to provide answers to complex questions in TMD classification, e.g., TMD nomenclature and range as well as scope of conditions included in a future TMD classification system.

  10. Alchemy of the Oracle: The Delphi Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, William J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the origins and foundations of the Delphi technique. Outlines procedures for using it in research to obtain the insights of experts. Addresses limitations of the technique. (Contains 44 references.) (SK)

  11. AMD and TACC Consolidation: A Delphi Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Hammer and Champy, 2003). 4 The intent of this study is not to be a litmus test advocating for or against AMDs consolidation into TACC...consensus increases during subsequent Delphi rounds and what is the overall strength of the panel’s consensus ( Schmidt , 1997:765). The Kendall’s W...Figure 14: Interpretation of Kendall’s W ( Schmidt , 1997: 767) Delphi Study and Mobility C2 A noted problem in this research is to first

  12. Remediation System Evaluation, Delphi Corporation Site in Vandalia, Ohio

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This RSE pertains to aspects of the corrective action underway at two neighboring plants, the Delphi Energy and Chassis Systems Plant and Delphi Safety and Interior Systems Plant, collectively referred to as the “facility” in this report.

  13. Colour Reconnection at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.

    2002-03-01

    The preliminary results on the search of colour reconnection effects (CR) from the four experiments at LEP, Aleph, Delphi, L3 and Opal, are reviewed. Extreme models are excluded by studies of standard variables, and on going studies of a method first suggested by L3, the particle flow method1, are yet inconclusive.

  14. Consolidating AMC’s Contingency Response Capabilities: A Delphi Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    Integration-Guard-Active-Components Schmidt, R. (1997). Managing Delphi Surveys Using Nonparametric Statistical Techniques . Decision Science, 763-774...A DELPHI STUDY GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air...21 Delphi Technique

  15. Assessment of critical thinking: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sheila A

    2014-11-01

    Nurse educators are responsible for preparing nurses who critically analyze patient information and provide meaningful interventions in today's complex health care system. By using the Delphi research method, this study, utilized the specialized and experiential knowledge of Certified Nurse Educators. This original Delphi research study asked Certified Nurse Educators how to assess the critical-thinking ability of nursing students in the clinical setting. The results showed that nurse educators need time, during the clinical experience, to accurately assess each individual nursing student. This study demonstrated the need for extended student clinical time, and a variety of clinical learning assessment tools.

  16. Computer Technology and Education: A Policy Delphi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steier, Lloyd P.

    Realizing the educational potential of computer technology largely depends on developing appropriate policies related to the technology. A Policy Delphi method was used to identify changes in education that are both probable and possible on account of the introduction of computers, and to explore potential patterns for arriving at a desired…

  17. The Delphi Decision-Making Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinelli, Teri

    1983-01-01

    Reports generalizations about specific patterns emerging from a panel employing a decision-making Delphi process that attempted to forecast the long-range general environment for higher education in Michigan. Participating were 24 influential persons with knowledge of factors important within the state. (Author/RH)

  18. The Future of Telecommunications: A Delphi Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1981-01-01

    Reports the results of a Delphi survey of international experts on the future of telecommunications. Predicts new and expanding services that will be available over the next twenty years. Outlines space applications and advanced technology, regulatory and social issues, and institutional and economic issues which will characterize the field of…

  19. Electric/hybrid vehicle Delphi survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

    1995-08-08

    This document presents the methodology and results of the Delphi survey. The viewgraphs depict the surveyed population in detail and the surveyed vehicles attributes such as range, recharging time, velocity, acceleration, etc. These opinions are given for forecast years 2000, 2010, and 2020.

  20. The Delphi Method in Rehabilitation Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez-Ramos, Robinson; Leahy, Michael; Estrada Hernandez, Noel

    2007-01-01

    Rehabilitation researchers have found in the application of the Delphi method a more sophisticated way of obtaining consensus from experts in the field on certain matters. The application of this research methodology has affected and certainly advanced the body of knowledge of the rehabilitation counseling practice. However, the rehabilitation…

  1. The Stammering Information Programme: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berquez, Ali E.; Cook, Frances M.; Millard, Sharon K.; Jarvis, Effie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To find out what information children, parents and education staff feel would be important to know to support a child who stutters in the educational environment, in order to develop appropriate resources. Method: A Delphi study was carried out to seek the opinions of experts about the information to include. A structured six stage…

  2. Cross platform development using Delphi and Kylix

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.L.; Nishimura, H.; Timossi, C.

    2002-10-08

    A cross platform component for EPICS Simple Channel Access (SCA) has been developed for the use with Delphi on Windows and Kylix on Linux. An EPICS controls GUI application developed on Windows runs on Linux by simply rebuilding it, and vice versa. This paper describes the technical details of the component.

  3. Internet-based Delphi research: case based discussion.

    PubMed

    Cole, Zachary Douglas; Donohoe, Holly M; Stellefson, Michael L

    2013-03-01

    The interactive capacity of the Internet offers benefits that are intimately linked with contemporary research innovation in the natural resource and environmental studies domains. However, e-research methodologies, such as the e-Delphi technique, have yet to undergo critical review. This study advances methodological discourse on the e-Delphi technique by critically assessing an e-Delphi case study. The analysis suggests that the benefits of using e-Delphi are noteworthy but the authors acknowledge that researchers are likely to face challenges that could potentially compromise research validity and reliability. To ensure that these issues are sufficiently considered when planning and designing an e-Delphi, important facets of the technique are discussed and recommendations are offered to help the environmental researcher avoid potential pitfalls associated with coordinating e-Delphi research.

  4. Internet-Based Delphi Research: Case Based Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Zachary Douglas; Donohoe, Holly M.; Stellefson, Michael L.

    2013-03-01

    The interactive capacity of the Internet offers benefits that are intimately linked with contemporary research innovation in the natural resource and environmental studies domains. However, e-research methodologies, such as the e-Delphi technique, have yet to undergo critical review. This study advances methodological discourse on the e-Delphi technique by critically assessing an e-Delphi case study. The analysis suggests that the benefits of using e-Delphi are noteworthy but the authors acknowledge that researchers are likely to face challenges that could potentially compromise research validity and reliability. To ensure that these issues are sufficiently considered when planning and designing an e-Delphi, important facets of the technique are discussed and recommendations are offered to help the environmental researcher avoid potential pitfalls associated with coordinating e-Delphi research.

  5. Internet-Based Delphi Research: Case Based Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Holly M.; Stellefson, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The interactive capacity of the Internet offers benefits that are intimately linked with contemporary research innovation in the natural resource and environmental studies domains. However, e-research methodologies, such as the e-Delphi technique, have yet to undergo critical review. This study advances methodological discourse on the e-Delphi technique by critically assessing an e-Delphi case study. The analysis suggests that the benefits of using e-Delphi are noteworthy but the authors acknowledge that researchers are likely to face challenges that could potentially compromise research validity and reliability. To ensure that these issues are sufficiently considered when planning and designing an e-Delphi, important facets of the technique are discussed and recommendations are offered to help the environmental researcher avoid potential pitfalls associated with coordinating e-Delphi research. PMID:23288149

  6. A Delphi forecast of technology in education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a Delphi forecast of the utilization and social impacts of large-scale educational telecommunications technology. The focus is on both forecasting methodology and educational technology. The various methods of forecasting used by futurists are analyzed from the perspective of the most appropriate method for a prognosticator of educational technology, and review and critical analysis are presented of previous forecasts and studies. Graphic responses, summarized comments, and a scenario of education in 1990 are presented.

  7. [Application of Delphi method in traditional Chinese medicine clinical research].

    PubMed

    Bi, Ying-fei; Mao, Jing-yuan

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, Delphi method has been widely applied in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical research. This article analyzed the present application situation of Delphi method in TCM clinical research, and discussed some problems presented in the choice of evaluation method, classification of observation indexes and selection of survey items. On the basis of present application of Delphi method, the author analyzed the method on questionnaire making, selection of experts, evaluation of observation indexes and selection of survey items. Furthermore, the author summarized the steps of application of Delphi method in TCM clinical research.

  8. Delphi project in bronchial asthma. Two stages.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Benítez, M; Ibero Iborra, M; Sanz Ortega, J; Garde Garde, J

    2010-01-01

    From the paediatric point of view, we have undertaken two Delphi studies into bronchial asthma. The first is related to the consensus known as the consensus document of the five associations. The second is more recent and has been undertaken with GEMA (the Spanish Guidelines on the Management of Asthma). The aim of this paper is to carry out a descriptive study comparing the 2 Delphi processes and to objectively assess if in some way behaviour over the past two years has changed as far as expert opinion is concerned. In the consensus document those points giving rise to most controversy were the treatment of children under three years of age and treatment with immunotherapy in allergic asthma. It is also necessary to highlight how important it was at that particular point in time to define the phenotypes of wheezing and the predictive index of asthma in children of less than 3 years of age. Of the 52 questions in the questionnaire, in 13.6% the panel of experts reached no consensus in their positions. Following GEMA the Delphi methodology, 56 questions were asked in the first round of the questionnaire, and consensus was reached in 87.5%. As regards the paediatric part relating to diagnosis and treatment in children, agreement was reached on all the questions in the first round. Agreement was reached in 8.92% questions in the second round. Clinical guidelines and consensus documents can modify behaviour towards an illness, both in the diagnosis and treatment.

  9. The Gravitational Universe - ESA's L3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido; Ando, Masaki; Binetruy, Pierre; Bouyer, Philippe; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Cruise, Mike; Favata, Fabio; Gehler, Martin; Genzel, Reinhard; Jennrich, Oliver; Kasevich, Mark; Klipstein, Bill; Perryman, Michael; Safa, Frederic; Schutz, Bernard; Stebbins, Robin; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Following the advice of ESA's Senior Survey Committee (SSC) the Science Programme Committee (SPC) decided in November 2013 to select the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for their L3 mission. The Director of Science and Robotic Exploration (D/SRE) has established a Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team (GOAT) to advise on the scientific and technological approaches for a gravitational wave observatory with a planned launch date in 2034. Our team is comprised of scientists from Europe and the US as well as scientists and engineers from ESA and observers from NASA and JAXA. We meet about every ten weeks, evaluate the technical readiness of all necessary technologies, study the science impact of different mission designs, and will advise ESA on the required future technology development. We will report on our progress and plans forward to a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. For JAXA.

  10. 77 FR 4614 - In the Matter of the Review of the Designation of Aum Shinrikyo (aka AUM, Aleph and Other Aliases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Review of the Designation of Aum Shinrikyo (aka AUM, Aleph and Other Aliases); As a Foreign Terrorist Organization Pursuant to Section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as Amended Based upon a review of the...

  11. Delphi`s DETOXSM process: Preparing to treat high organic content hazardous and mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.T.; Rogers, T.W.; Goldblatt, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Technology Center is sponsoring a full-scale technology demonstration of Delphi Research, Inc.`s patented DETOX{sup SM} catalytic wet chemical oxidation waste treatment process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The process is being developed primarily to treat hazardous and mixed wastes within the DOE complex as an alternative to incineration, but it has significant potential to treat wastes in the commercial sector. The results of the demonstration will be intensively studied and used to validate the technology. A critical objective in preparing for the demonstration was the successful completion of a programmatic Operational Readiness Review. Readiness Reviews are required by DOE for all new process startups. The Readiness Review provided the vehicle to ensure that Delphi was ready to start up and operate the DETOX{sup SM} process in the safest manner possible by implementing industry accepted management practices for safe operation. This paper provides an overview of the DETOX{sup SM} demonstration at SRS, and describes the crucial areas of the Readiness Review that marked the first steps in Delphi`s transition from a technology developer to an operating waste treatment services provider.

  12. [What is the Delphi method? Strengths and shortcomings].

    PubMed

    Ciałkowska, Magdalena; Adamowski, Tomasz; Piotrowski, Patryk; Kiejna, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a condensed discussion and explanation of the Delphi method. This technique is used for problem solving and decision making. The Delphi Method was originally developed during the cold war by the U.S. Intelligence think tank, the RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California in the 1950's and 1960's. It was designed for use on complex or ambiguous problems that exceed the capabilities of a single person. Most researchers make distinctions between the conventional Delphi and the policy Delphi. The last decades have seen increasing interest in the use of Delphi in a wide range of health-care applications. The Delphi method has been applied in a wide range of European Commission funded research projects, e.g. in EUNOMIA and DEMoB.inc projects. The Delphi method is characterized by the following features: anonymity of responses from panel experts, asynchronicity, controlled feedback and statistical description of responses. The objective of most Delphi applications is the reliable and creative exploration of problems or the production of suitable information for decision making.

  13. Using the Delphi Technique to Support Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitlington, Helen Barbara; Coetzer, Alan John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of the use of the Delphi technique to support curriculum development with a view to enhancing existing literature on use of the technique for renewal of business course curricula. Design/methodology/approach: The authors outline the Delphi process for obtaining consensus amongst a…

  14. Professional Status of Elementary Teaching in Turkey: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Ali E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether elementary teaching can be considered to be a profession in Turkey in comparison to selected characteristics that previous scholars have found to be common to all professions. Evidence was drawn primarily from a Delphi study conducted in three rounds. Educators of various kinds served as Delphi participants. The…

  15. Personal Learning Environments and University Teacher Roles Explored Using Delphi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaikh, Zaffar Ahmed; Khoja, Shakeel Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research using an online Delphi method, which aimed to explore university teacher roles and readiness for learner-centred pedagogy, driven by personal learning environments (PLEs). Using a modified Policy Delphi technique, a group of researchers worked with 34 international experts who are university teachers by…

  16. Reference Materials in LIS Instruction: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabina, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a Delphi study conducted over a two-month period in 2011. The purpose of the study was to identify reference sources that should be covered in basic reference courses taught in LIS programs in the United States. The Delphi method was selected for its appropriateness in soliciting expert opinions and assessing the…

  17. Using the Delphi Technique in Educational Technology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nworie, John

    2011-01-01

    As educational technology practitioners and researchers engage in research in the field, a wide array of research methodologies are available to them. One such methodology is the Delphi Technique. Use of the Delphi Technique offers many benefits, including the ability to obtain expert opinion, build consensus, determine the suitability of the…

  18. Career and Technical Education at a Crossroads: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Career and technical education in the United States has reached a critical juncture. A three round Delphi method was used to determine a consensus on the future events of career and technical education to better inform educational decision makers. Forty-one individual experts in the field were invited to serve as panelists for the Delphi study and…

  19. Expert Consensus for Discharge Referral Decisions Using Online Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Kathy H.; Holmes, John H.; Naylor, Mary D.; Liberatore, Matthew; Nydick, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the results of using a modified Delphi approach designed to achieve consensus from eight discharge planning experts regarding the decision to refer hospitalized older adults for post-discharge follow-up. Experts reviewed 150 cases using an online website designed to facilitate their interaction and efforts to reach agreement on the need for a referral for post-discharge care and the appropriate site for such care. In contrast to an average of eight weeks to complete just 50 cases using the traditional mail method, the first online Delphi round for 150 cases were completed in six weeks. Data provided by experts suggest that online Delphi is a time efficient and acceptable methodology for reaching group consensus. Other benefits include instant access to Delphi decision results, live knowledge of the time requirements and progress of each expert, and cost savings in postage, paper, copying, and storage of paper documents. This online Delphi methodology is highly recommended. PMID:14728143

  20. Measurement of |Vcs| with DELPHI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golob, Boštjan

    1998-10-01

    Pair production of charged weak bosons W+/- at LEP2 collider can be exploited to measure the absolute value of the Vcs element of Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. The value can be most accurately extracted from the measured hadronic branching ratio of W+/- bosons. An independent method to obtain the |Vcs| value consists of tagging the flavour of primary quarks in jets, produced in W+/- decays. Using both methods on the data collected with DELPHI experiment during 1996 and 1997 runs, we obtained |Vcs|=0.99+/-0.06(stat.)+/-0.04(syst.). Combined result of |Vcs| measurements with four LEP experiments enables a test of CKM matrix unitarity.

  1. Study of the CP asymmetry of B0-->J/ψ K0S decays in ALEPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Boix, G.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A. E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Thomson, E.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Giehl, I.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Heister, A.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Yuan, C.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-01-01

    The decay B0-->J/ψK0S is reconstructed with J/ψ-->e+e- or μ+μ- and K0S-->π+π-. From the full ALEPH dataset at LEP1 of about 4 million hadronic Z decays, 23 candidates are selected with an estimated purity of 71%. They are used to measure the CP asymmetry of this decay, given by /sin2β in the Standard Model, with the result sin2β=0.84+0.82-1.04+/-0.16. This is combined with existing measurements from other experiments, and increases the confidence level that CP violation has been observed in this channel to 98%.

  2. The Effects of L2 Experience on L3 Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onishi, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the influence of experience with a second language (L2) on the perception of phonological contrasts in a third language (L3). This study contributes to L3 phonology by examining the influence of L2 phonological perception abilities on the perception of an L3 at the beginner level. Participants were native speakers of Korean…

  3. A study of the b-quark fragmentation function with the DELPHI detector at LEP I and an averaged distribution obtained at the Z Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2011-02-01

    The nature of b-quark jet hadronisation has been investigated using data taken at the Z peak by the DELPHI detector at LEP. Two complementary methods are used to reconstruct the energy of weakly decaying b-hadrons, EB^{weak}. The average value of x^{weak}B = EB^{weak}/E_{beam} is measured to be 0.699±0.011. The resulting x^{weak}B distribution is then analysed in the framework of two choices for the perturbative contribution (parton shower and Next to Leading Log QCD calculation) in order to extract measurements of the non-perturbative contribution to be used in studies of b-hadron production in other experimental environments than LEP. In the parton shower framework, data favour the Lund model ansatz and corresponding values of its parameters have been determined within PYTHIA 6.156 from DELPHI data: a= 1.84^{+0.23}_{-0.21}quadandquad b=0.642^{+0.073}_{-0.063} GeV^{-2}, with a correlation factor ρ=92.2%. Combining the data on the b-quark fragmentation distributions with those obtained at the Z peak by ALEPH, OPAL and SLD, the average value of x^{weak}B is found to be 0.7092±0.0025 and the non-perturbative fragmentation component is extracted. Using the combined distribution, a better determination of the Lund parameters is also obtained: a= 1.48^{+0.11}_{-0.10}quadandquad b=0.509^{+0.024}_{-0.023} GeV^{-2}, with a correlation factor ρ=92.6%.

  4. Evaluation of Nine Consensus Indices in Delphi Foresight Research and Their Dependency on Delphi Survey Characteristics: A Simulation Study and Debate on Delphi Design and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Birko, Stanislav; Dove, Edward S.; Özdemir, Vural

    2015-01-01

    The extent of consensus (or the lack thereof) among experts in emerging fields of innovation can serve as antecedents of scientific, societal, investor and stakeholder synergy or conflict. Naturally, how we measure consensus is of great importance to science and technology strategic foresight. The Delphi methodology is a widely used anonymous survey technique to evaluate consensus among a panel of experts. Surprisingly, there is little guidance on how indices of consensus can be influenced by parameters of the Delphi survey itself. We simulated a classic three-round Delphi survey building on the concept of clustered consensus/dissensus. We evaluated three study characteristics that are pertinent for design of Delphi foresight research: (1) the number of survey questions, (2) the sample size, and (3) the extent to which experts conform to group opinion (the Group Conformity Index) in a Delphi study. Their impacts on the following nine Delphi consensus indices were then examined in 1000 simulations: Clustered Mode, Clustered Pairwise Agreement, Conger’s Kappa, De Moivre index, Extremities Version of the Clustered Pairwise Agreement, Fleiss’ Kappa, Mode, the Interquartile Range and Pairwise Agreement. The dependency of a consensus index on the Delphi survey characteristics was expressed from 0.000 (no dependency) to 1.000 (full dependency). The number of questions (range: 6 to 40) in a survey did not have a notable impact whereby the dependency values remained below 0.030. The variation in sample size (range: 6 to 50) displayed the top three impacts for the Interquartile Range, the Clustered Mode and the Mode (dependency = 0.396, 0.130, 0.116, respectively). The Group Conformity Index, a construct akin to measuring stubbornness/flexibility of experts’ opinions, greatly impacted all nine Delphi consensus indices (dependency = 0.200 to 0.504), except the Extremity CPWA and the Interquartile Range that were impacted only beyond the first decimal point (dependency

  5. Evaluation of Nine Consensus Indices in Delphi Foresight Research and Their Dependency on Delphi Survey Characteristics: A Simulation Study and Debate on Delphi Design and Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Birko, Stanislav; Dove, Edward S; Özdemir, Vural

    2015-01-01

    The extent of consensus (or the lack thereof) among experts in emerging fields of innovation can serve as antecedents of scientific, societal, investor and stakeholder synergy or conflict. Naturally, how we measure consensus is of great importance to science and technology strategic foresight. The Delphi methodology is a widely used anonymous survey technique to evaluate consensus among a panel of experts. Surprisingly, there is little guidance on how indices of consensus can be influenced by parameters of the Delphi survey itself. We simulated a classic three-round Delphi survey building on the concept of clustered consensus/dissensus. We evaluated three study characteristics that are pertinent for design of Delphi foresight research: (1) the number of survey questions, (2) the sample size, and (3) the extent to which experts conform to group opinion (the Group Conformity Index) in a Delphi study. Their impacts on the following nine Delphi consensus indices were then examined in 1000 simulations: Clustered Mode, Clustered Pairwise Agreement, Conger's Kappa, De Moivre index, Extremities Version of the Clustered Pairwise Agreement, Fleiss' Kappa, Mode, the Interquartile Range and Pairwise Agreement. The dependency of a consensus index on the Delphi survey characteristics was expressed from 0.000 (no dependency) to 1.000 (full dependency). The number of questions (range: 6 to 40) in a survey did not have a notable impact whereby the dependency values remained below 0.030. The variation in sample size (range: 6 to 50) displayed the top three impacts for the Interquartile Range, the Clustered Mode and the Mode (dependency = 0.396, 0.130, 0.116, respectively). The Group Conformity Index, a construct akin to measuring stubbornness/flexibility of experts' opinions, greatly impacted all nine Delphi consensus indices (dependency = 0.200 to 0.504), except the Extremity CPWA and the Interquartile Range that were impacted only beyond the first decimal point (dependency = 0

  6. The Delphi Technique Used in Laser Incident Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Delphi method is a name that has been applied to a technique used for the elicitation of opinions with the object of obtaining a group response of a...lists and analyzing ranked responses. The Delphi technique was considered to be the optimal method for the limited amount of time available for data...are reported. In order to identify patterns of injuries, best evaluation methods , and successful techniques for protection, it is important to

  7. 78 FR 48467 - Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Products and Service Solutions Division, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Products and Service Solutions... workers of Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Product and Service Solutions Division, Original Equipment... of ] Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Product and Service Solutions Division, including on-site...

  8. DELPHI: An introduction to output layout and data content

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.

    1994-08-16

    DELPHI was the data summary and interpretation code used by gas diagnostics personnel during the period from 1968 through 1986. It was written by Floyd Momyer, and went through several revisions during its period of use. Described here is the final version, which provided the most extensive set of summary tables. Earlier versions of the code lacked some of the capabilities of the final version, but what they did include was of substantially the same format. DELPHI was run against most available input decks in the mid 1980s. Microfiche and hardcopy output were generated. Both now reside in our archives. These reruns used modified input decks, which may not have had the proper {open_quotes}trigger{close_quotes} to instruct DELPHI to output some tables. These tables could, therefore be missing from a printout even though the necessary data was present. Also, modifications to DELPHI did, in some instances, eliminate DELPHIs` capability to correctly output some of the earlier optional tables. This monologue is intended to compliment the archived printout, and to provide enough insight so that someone unfamiliar with the techniques of Gas Diagnostics can retrieve the results at some future date. DELPHI last ran on the CDC-7600 machines, and was not converted to run on the Crays when the CDC-7600`s were decommissioned. DELPHI accepted data from various analytical systems, set up data summary tables, and combined preshot tracer and detector data with these results to calculate the total production of measured species and the indicated fission yields and detector conversions.

  9. 75 FR 41521 - Delphi Corporation, Automotive Holding Group, Plant 6, Currently Known as General Motors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Chemicals, Interim Physicians, LLC and HSS Material Management, Flint, MI; Delphi Corporation, Automotive..., Flint, MI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and..., Flint, Michigan and Delphi Corporation, Automotive Holding Group, Plant 2, including on-site...

  10. 75 FR 41521 - Delphi Corporation, Automotive Holding Group, Instrument Cluster Plant, Currently Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delphi Corporation, Automotive Holding Group, Instrument Cluster Plant..., 2007, applicable to workers of Delphi Corporation, Automotive Holding Group, Instrument Cluster Plant... Holding Group, Instrument Cluster Plant, currently known as General Motors Corporation, Flint,...

  11. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance Delphi SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Larry Chick; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann

    2003-05-20

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW SOFC power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: 1. Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with piped-in water (Demonstration System A). 2. Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This topical report covers work performed by Delphi Automotive Systems from January through June 2002 under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246 for the 5 kW mass-market automotive (gasoline) auxiliary power unit. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks for the automotive 5 kW system: 1. System Design and Integration 2. SOFC Stack Development 3. Reformer Development The next anticipated Technical Progress Report will be submitted January 30, 2003 and will include tasks contained within the cooperative agreement including development work on the Demonstration System A, if available.

  12. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; H. Skip Mieney

    2003-06-09

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with piped-in water (Demonstration System A); and Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from July through December 2002 under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246 for the 5 kW mass-market automotive (gasoline) auxiliary power unit. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks for the automotive 5 kW system: Task 1--System Design and Integration; Task 2--Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3--Reformer Developments; Task 4--Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5--Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6--System Fabrication; and Task 7--System Testing.

  13. Delphi technique used in laser incident surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Krystyn R.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Neal, Thomas A.

    2004-07-01

    There are several data sources for collecting laser incidents. All reviewed sources collect information differently for varying purposes. An effort was undertaken to combine laser exposure reporting data into a single database so that trends in laser incidents could be identified. A review of available datasets revealed significant disparities in laser exposure reporting. As a result, utilizing the existing database to predict personnel at increased risk for laser exposure and injury is challenging if not impossible. For example, many of the data sources do not contain information about physical examinations, diagnosis, or medical follow-up, which are important for studying laser injury outcomes. This study proposes using the Delphi Technique to identify relevant fields that should be collected for a laser incident database based on the experiences of three groups of United States Air Force (USAF) professionals: (1) Engineers (Bioenvironmental Engineers), (2) Health Physicists, and (3) Physicians (Ophthalmologists and Flight Surgeons). In broad terms, these three professional groups coordinate laser incident analyses and investigations. Knowing what information is most important for studying laser incidents is the first step in establishing an effective database that will assist in identifying occupations that are at high-risk for laser injury. Robust data sets obtained for analysis by these healthcare professionals can be an effective tool for laser injury prevention and management.

  14. Emergence and Evolution of Zfp36l3

    PubMed Central

    Gingerich, Timothy J.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Lai, Wi S.; Randall, Thomas A.; Steppan, Scott J.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, the Zfp36 gene family consists of three conserved members, with a fourth member, Zfp36l3, present only in rodents. The ZFP36 proteins regulate post-transcriptional gene expression at the level of mRNA stability in organisms from humans to yeasts, and appear to be expressed in all major groups of eukaryotes. In Mus musculus, Zfp36l3 expression is limited to the placenta and yolk sac, and is important for overall fecundity. We sequenced the Zfp36l3 gene from more than 20 representative species, from members of the Muridae, Cricetidae and Nesomyidae families. Zfp36l3 was not present in Dipodidae, or any families that branched earlier, indicating that this gene is exclusive to the Muroidea superfamily. We provide evidence that Zfp36l3 arose by retrotransposition of an mRNA encoded by a related gene, Zfp36l2 into an ancestral rodent X chromosome. Zfp36l3 has evolved rapidly since its origin, and numerous modifications have developed, including variations in start codon utilization, de novo intron formation by mechanisms including a nested retrotransposition, and the insertion of distinct repetitive regions. One of these repeat regions, a long alanine rich-sequence, is responsible for the full-time cytoplasmic localization of Mus musculus ZFP36L3. In contrast, this repeat sequence is lacking in Peromyscus maniculatus ZFP36L3, and this protein contains a novel nuclear export sequence that controls shuttling between the nucleus and cytosol. Zfp36l3 is an example of a recently acquired, rapidly evolving gene, and its various orthologues illustrate several different mechanisms by which new genes emerge and evolve. PMID:26493225

  15. 78 FR 48468 - Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site... to workers of Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, including on-site leased workers... Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division. The Department has determined that these...

  16. Defining Multimorbidity: From English to Portuguese Using a Delphi Technique

    PubMed Central

    Prazeres, Filipe; Santiago, Luiz Miguel; Simões, José Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To translate the European General Practice Research Network multimorbidity definition according to Portuguese cultural and linguistic features. Methods. Similar to the process completed in several other European countries, a forward and backward translation of the English multimorbidity definition using the Delphi technique was performed in Portugal. Results. Twenty-three general practitioners (GPs)—14 males and 9 females—agreed to form the Portuguese expert panel for the Delphi process (59% acceptance rate). The Portuguese definition of multimorbidity was achieved after two Delphi rounds with a mean (SD) consensus score for final round of 8.43/9 (0.73). Conclusion. With this paper the definition of multimorbidity is now available in a new language—Portuguese. Its availability in the local language will raise Portuguese GPs' awareness about multimorbidity and allow future national and international research. The operationalization of the definition will allow an easier identification of patients with multimorbidity. PMID:26682225

  17. The development of a position statement using the Delphi technique.

    PubMed

    Gruber, M

    1993-10-01

    The need to develop practice-related documents in an accurate, efficient, and economical manner is the responsibility of the Board of Directors of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates (SGNA). When the results of large, randomized, controlled, clinical trials are available, documents can be based on the information published in scientific literature. GI nursing, however, is in a novice phase regarding controlled research trials; thus, other methods of obtaining reliable information are required. The Delphi technique was selected to obtain the consensus of experts. The Delphi technique enables a free and open exchange of ideas while respecting the economics of a deficit budget. This article describes the Delphi process and the manner in which it was used to prepare the SGNA position statement, "Responsibilities of the Gastroenterology Registered Nurse related to Conscious Sedation."

  18. AFP-L3 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    AFP-L3, also known as lectin-bound AFP, is an isoform of AFP, a major plasma protein produced by the yolk sac and the liver during fetal life. Alpha-fetoprotein expression in adults is often associated with hepatoma or teratoma. The L3 isoform is specific to malignant tumors and its detected presence may serve to identify patients who could benefit from monitoring for the development of HCC in high risk populations (i.e. chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis).

  19. NASA's Preparations for ESA's L3 Gravitational Wave Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2016-03-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) selected gravitational-wave astrophysics as the science theme for its third large mission opportunity, known as `L3,' under its Cosmic Vision Programme. NASA is seeking a role as an international partner in L3. NASA is: (1) participating in ESA's early mission activities, (2) developing potential US technology contributions, (3) participating in ESA's LISA Pathfinder mission, (4) and conducting a study of how NASA might participate. This talk will survey the status of these activities.

  20. Delphi analysis: a technique for identifying and ranking environmental and natural resource policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Leitch, J.A.; Leistritz, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    A Delphi-type survey and a consensus-building workshop were carried out to identify the most significant natural resource issues and problems emerging in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain states. Approximately 107 issues initially were identified through a literature search and an inquiry Delphi round. Delphi round enabled the list to be narrowed to 25 issues. While consensus was found on the top 25 issues as a group, neither the Delphi panel nor the workshop participants agreed on the top five. Specific issues related to water and energy comprised the majority of those identified as most significant. Overall, the Delphi method appears to be a powerful and flexible tool for evaluating emerging environmental issues and problems. The analysis suggests that Delphi findings are quite robust with respect to minor changes in panel composition. Delphi thus appears to be an approach that may find increasing application in environmental policy analysis. 11 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Expert Consensus on Characteristics of Wisdom: A Delphi Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Ardelt, Monika; Blazer, Dan; Kraemer, Helena C.; Vaillant, George; Meeks, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Wisdom has received increasing attention in empirical research in recent years, especially in gerontology and psychology, but consistent definitions of wisdom remain elusive. We sought to better characterize this concept via an expert consensus panel using a 2-phase Delphi method. Design and Methods: A survey questionnaire comprised 53…

  2. How to Use the Delphi Technique to Forecast Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Ken; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A brief review of current techniques for forecasting trends and planning ways in which training can facilitate technology and human resource change--trend extrapolation, scenario forecasting, relevance trees, and technology assessment--is followed by a discussion of the Delphi Technique, its development, advantages and disadvantages, and how the…

  3. The Delphi Process: Some Assumptions and Some Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, James S.

    The effectiveness of the Delphi Technique is evaluated in terms of immediate and delayed controlled information feedback (feedback within 5 seconds as compared with a 24-hour delay); and the relationships that exist among measures of integrative complexity, estimations about the time of occurrence of future events, and time delay between task…

  4. Identifying Quality Indicators of SAE and FFA: A Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Charles Cordell, III; Kitchel, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine quality indicators for SAE and FFA according to 36 experts across the United States. This is a part of a larger study looking at all components of the traditional three-circle model. The study utilized the Delphi technique to garner expert opinion about quality indicators in Agricultural Education. For…

  5. Reinforcement of Science Learning through Local Culture: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to explore the ways to reinforce science learning through local culture by using Delphi technique. Twenty four participants in various fields of study were selected. The result of study provides a framework for reinforcement of science learning through local culture on the theme life and environment. (Contains 1 table.)

  6. Why Do Student Nurses Leave? Suggestions from a Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Last, Lynn; Fulbrook, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Focus groups and interviews gathered professional opinions about why students leave nursing; results were formulated into a questionnaire administered to 32 students in a three-round Delphi. Factors contributing to attrition included theory-practice gap, university-clinical site relationships, unmet expectations, stress, and not feeling valued.…

  7. Electronic-Imen-Delphi (EID): An Online Conferencing Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David; Sharbat, Aviva

    2000-01-01

    Examines the efficiency of the Imen-Delphi (ID) technique as an electronic procedure for conferencing that helps participants clarify their opinions and expectations regarding preferable and possible futures. Describes an electronic version of the original ID procedure and tested its efficiency among a group of experts on virtual reality and…

  8. A Delphi Study: The Characteristics of Democratic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, H. Eylem; Erden, Münire

    2014-01-01

    The authors aim to identify characteristics of democratic schools. The Delphi technique used in this study is based on attaining a consensus among a group of experts over 3 rounds with 22 experts from 9 countries participating in the first round. By the end of the third round, 339 items referring to democratic school characteristics were…

  9. A Delphi Study to Update CTE Teacher Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, R. Adam; Zinser, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to create a contemporary taxonomy of Career and Technical Education (CTE) teacher competencies in order to evaluate and improve CTE teacher education. Design/methodology/approach: This study utilized a modified Delphi technique with a large sample of CTE experts--teachers, administrators, and…

  10. The Delphi: Education and Assessment in Institutional Goal Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Linda S.

    1985-01-01

    The use of delphi techniques in a school of osteopathic medicine is described to assess and change faculty perceptions of institutional goals and needs such as curriculum orientation, campus design and location, faculty personnel policy, teaching and instructional evaluation, student characteristics and admission policies, and administrative…

  11. Magnitude Discrimination Index: A Merger of Delphi Assumptions and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    The advantages of the Delphi Technique are that it relies on collective expert judgment, prevents the excessive influence in decision-making of those in positions of status, and encourages consensus. The technique consists of five steps: (1) asking experts to list items relevant to a topic; (2) returning the list to the participants and asking…

  12. A Delphi Study and Initial Validation of Counselor Supervision Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuer Colburn, Anita A.; Grothaus, Tim; Hays, Danica G.; Milliken, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    The authors addressed the lack of supervision training standards for doctoral counseling graduates by developing and validating an initial list of supervision competencies. They used content analysis, Delphi polling, and content validity methods to generate a list, vetted by 2 different panels of supervision experts, of 33 competencies grouped…

  13. Identifying Threshold Concepts for Information Literacy: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Hofer, Amy R.; Hanick, Silvia Lin; Brunetti, Korey

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Delphi method to engage expert practitioners on the topic of threshold concepts--core ideas and processes in a discipline that students need to grasp in order to progress in their learning, but that are often unspoken or unrecognized by expert practitioners--for information literacy. A panel of experts considered two questions:…

  14. Health Professionals' Perceptions of Sexual Assault Management: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancey, Jonine; Meuleners, Lynn; Phillips, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore health professionals' perceptions of sexual assault management practices and identify issues related to these practices across Western Australia (WA). Design: A two-round electronic Delphi study was undertaken with health professionals (medical doctors, registered nurses, social workers and managers). Setting: Healthcare…

  15. Establishing a Research Agenda for Art Therapy: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Donna; Deaver, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Art therapy in the United States is a young profession that would benefit from an identified research agenda to marshal resources more effectively to address gaps in the knowledge base. This article describes a Delphi study of U.S. art therapy researchers who were surveyed on research priorities for the profession. The research panelists were…

  16. Delphi technique in environmental assessment. I. Implementation and effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, J.S.; Mar, B.W.; Horner, R.R.

    1985-09-01

    The effectiveness with which a panel of experts, operating within the context of a Delphi technique, could be used to develop information for use in environmental monitoring program design and environmental decision-making was investigated. The Delphi technique was evaluated to determine selection criteria for an expert panel, how many panelists are necessary, what types of information can be considered effectively, and how many iterations are necessary. Small panels consisting of less than 10 individuals representing a variety of areas of experiences appeared sufficient for developing information about conceptual or philosophical issues. Neither large (e.g. 60 persons) nor small panels were effective for considering factual or data-based issues. Two iterations (i.e. an initial questionnaire with one follow-up) were adequate to determine the panel consensus. The costs of this implementation were compared with two other information-gathering techniques, the nominal group technique and retention of expert consultants. The costs of implementing the Delphi technique were between 10 and 60% of the costs of the two other methods. The Delphi method can provide an alternative or complementary means of accessing expert opinion at a reasonable cost. 9 references, 2 tables.

  17. Spectacular Education with Programming Plain Multimedia Elements in Delphi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menyhárt, László

    2011-01-01

    I present a witty solution in this article about how we may obtain data simply and cheaply from physical experiments, with which we can do counting, as well. To this interdisciplinary task I turn to Delphi for help, in which we can program a digital video as a multimedia element. I show an example from the programming of plain multimedia elements…

  18. Open Educational Resources: A Delphi Study of Instructional Design Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Marnice K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this modified Delphi research study was to investigate instructional designers' beliefs about the instructional strategies and activities to be included in a universal framework for designing quality, self-directed, multimedia, open educational resources (OERs). With the rapid growth of availability and use of OERs by a widely…

  19. Issues Facing Urban Agriscience Teachers: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Wendy J.; Washburn, Shannon G.

    2009-01-01

    This national study used the Delphi technique to identify the issues facing urban agriscience teachers. The first round of the study used a questionnaire with one open-ended question to generate responses from the expert panel. In the second round, respondents were asked to rate their level of agreement with 72 issues identified in round one using…

  20. Secondary Engineering Competencies: A Delphi Study of Engineering Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kara S.; Rogers, George E.

    2008-01-01

    The central purpose of this study was to expand upon previous research in relation to competencies that are desired by university engineering faculty in their incoming freshman. This study used a Delphi technique as noted by Paige, Dugger, and Wolansky (1996) and Wicklein (1993) to identify and analyze what secondary education competencies should…

  1. Helping Competencies of Student Affairs Professionals: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather student affairs professionals' perceptions of the knowledge and skills needed to effectively help students. Using the Delphi method, 159 entry-level and mid-level student affairs administrators from institutions across the United States were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the helping skills they use…

  2. Successful and Unsuccessful Multicultural Supervisory Behaviors: A Delphi Poll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dressel, Jeana L.; Consoli, Andres J.; Kim, Bryan S.K.; Atkinson, Donald R.

    2007-01-01

    Using the Delphi method, university counseling center supervisors with significant experience in multicultural supervision generated and ranked elements of successful and unsuccessful multicultural supervision. Twenty-seven of 35 successful elements and 24 of 33 unsuccessful elements involved cultural considerations. Multicultural supervision was…

  3. Experimental Assessment of Delphi Procedures with Group Value Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalkey, Norman C.; Rourke, Daniel L.

    This report describes the results of an experiment assessing the appropriateness of Delphi procedures for formulating group value judgments. Two groups of subjects--upperclass and graduate students from UCLA--were asked to generate and rate value categories relating to higher education and the quality of life. The initial lists (300 and 250 items…

  4. B and D spectroscopy at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Muheim, Franz

    1999-02-17

    Results from the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL on the spectroscopy of B and charmed mesons are presented. The predictions of Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) for the masses and the widths of excited L=1 B mesons are supported by a new measurement from L3. A few B{sub c}{sup +} candidate events have masses consistent with the recent CDF observation and the predictions. New results on D** production and B{yields}D**l{nu} are also presented. The evidence for a D*{sup '} meson reported recently by DELPHI is not supported by OPAL and CLEO.

  5. How to use the nominal group and Delphi techniques.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Sara S; King, Michelle; Tully, Mary P

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) and Delphi Technique are consensus methods used in research that is directed at problem-solving, idea-generation, or determining priorities. While consensus methods are commonly used in health services literature, few studies in pharmacy practice use these methods. This paper provides an overview of the NGT and Delphi technique, including the steps involved and the types of research questions best suited to each method, with examples from the pharmacy literature. Methodology The NGT entails face-to-face discussion in small groups, and provides a prompt result for researchers. The classic NGT involves four key stages: silent generation, round robin, clarification and voting (ranking). Variations have occurred in relation to generating ideas, and how 'consensus' is obtained from participants. The Delphi technique uses a multistage self-completed questionnaire with individual feedback, to determine consensus from a larger group of 'experts.' Questionnaires have been mailed, or more recently, e-mailed to participants. When to use The NGT has been used to explore consumer and stakeholder views, while the Delphi technique is commonly used to develop guidelines with health professionals. Method choice is influenced by various factors, including the research question, the perception of consensus required, and associated practicalities such as time and geography. Limitations The NGT requires participants to personally attend a meeting. This may prove difficult to organise and geography may limit attendance. The Delphi technique can take weeks or months to conclude, especially if multiple rounds are required, and may be complex for lay people to complete.

  6. NASA's Preparations for ESA's L3 Gravitational Wave Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.

    2016-01-01

    In November 2013, the European Space Agency (ESA) selected the science theme, the "Gravitational Universe," for its third large mission opportunity, known as 'L3,' under its Cosmic Vision Programme. The planned launch date is 2034. NASA is seeking a role as an international partner in L3. NASA is supporting: (1) US participation in early mission studies, (2) US technology development, (3) pre-decadal preparations, (4) ESA's LISA Pathfinder mission and (5) the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System project. This talk summarizes NASA's preparations for a future gravitational-wave mission.

  7. Appraisal Systems in L2 vs. L3 Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrys-Barker, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    This article offers a comment on the ways multilingual language users perceive their L2 and L3 learning experiences at the level of appraisals, that is, variables that "assign value to current stimuli based on past experience". In the theoretical part of the article the concept of appraisals is introduced and briefly outlined from the different…

  8. The Impact of Analogy on L3 Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karami, Hossein; Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2014-01-01

    Little research has been conducted to investigate the effect of analogy on third language (L3, hereafter) reading comprehension though some experts believe that it has facilitating and debilitating effects on L1 and L2 respectively. This article explores the effect of analogies on reading comprehension of expository texts by students of English as…

  9. The Impact of Formal Schemata on L3 Reading Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2010-01-01

    Rhetorical structure refers to a complex network of relationships and the way the underlying ideas are organized within a text. This study was conducted to see whether explicit instruction of descriptive and causative text organization positively affected L3 reading recall. 240 Turkish students of EFL who had Persian as their second language were…

  10. L3 Acquisition of German Adjectival Inflection: A Generative Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaensch, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Studies testing the knowledge of syntactic properties have resulted in two potentially contrasting proposals in relation to third language acquisition (TLA); the Cumulative Enhancement Model (Flynn et al., 2004), which proposes that previously learned languages will positively affect the acquisition of a third language (L3); and the "second…

  11. L2-Accented Speech in L3 Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrembel, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    The paper is aimed at investigating the sources of cross-linguistic influence in the third language (L3) phonology, and, particularly, the impact of the second language (L2) on the phonological acquisition of another foreign language. The study consisted in foreign accent judgements performed by a group of expert judges who were presented with…

  12. Metaphonological Awareness in Multilinguals: A Case of L3 Polish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrembel, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on an unexplored area of metalinguistic awareness in the acquisition of third language (L3) phonology, hereafter referred to as metaphonological awareness. It addresses the role of attention and noticing in input processing. The contribution constitutes a part of a larger scale project on metaphonological awareness in various…

  13. Basic concepts and architectural details of the Delphi trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Bocci, V.; Booth, P.S.L.; Bozzo, M. |

    1995-08-01

    Delphi (DEtector with Lepton, Photon and Hadron Identification) is one of the four experiments of the LEP (Large Electron Positron) collider at CERN. The detector is laid out to provide a nearly 4 {pi} coverage for charged particle tracking, electromagnetic, hadronic calorimetry and extended particle identification. The trigger system consists of four levels. The first two are synchronous with the BCO (Beam Cross Over) and rely on hardwired control units, while the last two are performed asynchronously with respect to the BCO and are driven by the Delphi host computers. The aim of this paper is to give a comprehensive global view of the trigger system architecture, presenting in detail the first two levels, their various hardware components and the latest modifications introduced in order to improve their performance and make more user friendly the whole software user interface.

  14. Characteristics and classification of nanoparticles: expert Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    Berube, David; Cummings, Christopher; Cacciatore, Michael; Scheufele, Dietram; Kalin, Jason

    2011-06-01

    Research needs assessment regarding environmental health and safety (EHS) of nanoparticles is problematic. Generating benchmark data to assess research and policy initiatives seems daunting. This study's findings present more granular and qualitative assessments of expert preferences and concerns. This three-round Delphi study elicits expert estimations of problematic nanoparticle characteristics and classifications from a sample of nanoscience experts in chemistry, EHS policy, engineering, environmental toxicology, and human toxicology (n = 18). The Delphi method is a forecasting tool designed for expert evaluation of events under high degrees of uncertainty. Results demonstrate high concordance indicating favorable consensus among the sample concerning characteristics and classifications of nanoparticles that are potentially or actually problematic to EHS. These findings establish a benchmark for future investigations of expert preferences and concerns.

  15. Verification of a Quality Management Theory: Using a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: A model of quality management called Strategic Collaborative Quality Management (SCQM) model was developed based on the quality management literature review, the findings of a survey on quality management assessment in healthcare organisations, semi-structured interviews with healthcare stakeholders, and a Delphi study on healthcare quality management experts. The purpose of this study was to verify the SCQM model. Methods: The proposed model was further developed using feedback from thirty quality management experts using a Delphi method. Further, a guidebook for its implementation was prepared including a road map and performance measurement. Results: The research led to the development of a context-specific model of quality management for healthcare organisations and a series of guidelines for its implementation. Conclusion: A proper model of quality management should be developed and implemented properly in healthcare organisations to achieve business excellence. PMID:24596883

  16. Identifying the features of an exercise addiction: A Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Lucy; Owens, Glynn; Cruz, Borja del Pozo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There remains limited consensus regarding the definition and conceptual basis of exercise addiction. An understanding of the factors motivating maintenance of addictive exercise behavior is important for appropriately targeting intervention. The aims of this study were twofold: first, to establish consensus on features of an exercise addiction using Delphi methodology and second, to identify whether these features are congruous with a conceptual model of exercise addiction adapted from the Work Craving Model. Methods A three-round Delphi process explored the views of participants regarding the features of an exercise addiction. The participants were selected from sport and exercise relevant domains, including physicians, physiotherapists, coaches, trainers, and athletes. Suggestions meeting consensus were considered with regard to the proposed conceptual model. Results and discussion Sixty-three items reached consensus. There was concordance of opinion that exercising excessively is an addiction, and therefore it was appropriate to consider the suggestions in light of the addiction-based conceptual model. Statements reaching consensus were consistent with all three components of the model: learned (negative perfectionism), behavioral (obsessive–compulsive drive), and hedonic (self-worth compensation and reduction of negative affect and withdrawal). Conclusions Delphi methodology allowed consensus to be reached regarding the features of an exercise addiction, and these features were consistent with our hypothesized conceptual model of exercise addiction. This study is the first to have applied Delphi methodology to the exercise addiction field, and therefore introduces a novel approach to exercise addiction research that can be used as a template to stimulate future examination using this technique. PMID:27554504

  17. UTC Power/Delphi SECA CBS Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Michael; Kerr, Rich

    2013-04-04

    The subject report summarizes the results of solid oxide fuel cell development conducted by UTC Power in conjunction with Delphi Automotive Systems under a cost-share program with from October 2008 through March of 2013. Over that period Delphi Automotive Systems developed a nearly four times larger area solid oxide fuel cell stack capable of operating on pre-reformed natural gas and simulated coal gas with durability demonstrated to 5,000 hours and projected to exceed 10,000 hours. The new stack design was scaled to 40-cell stacks with power output in excess of 6.25kW. Delphi also made significant strides in improving the manufacturability, yield and production cost of these solid oxide fuel cells over the course of the program. Concurrently, UTC Power developed a conceptual design for a 120 MW Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) operating on coal syngas with as high as 57% Higher Heating Value (HHV) efficiency as a measure of the feasibility of the technology. Subsequently a 400 kW on-site system preliminary design with 55% Lower Heating Value (LHV) efficiency operating on natural gas was down-selected from eighteen candidate designs. That design was used as the basis for a 25kW breadboard power plant incorporating four Delphi cell stacks that was tested on natural gas before the program was discontinued due to the sale of UTC Power in early 2013. Though the program was cut short of the endurance target of 3,000 hours, many aspects of the technology were proven including: large-area, repeatable cell manufacture, cell stack operation on simulated coal gas and natural gas and integrated power plant operation on natural gas. The potential of the technology for high efficiency stationary electric power generation is clear. Acceptable production costs, durability, and reliability in real world environments are the remaining challenges to commercialization.

  18. Identifying the features of an exercise addiction: A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Lucy; Owens, Glynn; Cruz, Borja Del Pozo

    2016-09-01

    Objectives There remains limited consensus regarding the definition and conceptual basis of exercise addiction. An understanding of the factors motivating maintenance of addictive exercise behavior is important for appropriately targeting intervention. The aims of this study were twofold: first, to establish consensus on features of an exercise addiction using Delphi methodology and second, to identify whether these features are congruous with a conceptual model of exercise addiction adapted from the Work Craving Model. Methods A three-round Delphi process explored the views of participants regarding the features of an exercise addiction. The participants were selected from sport and exercise relevant domains, including physicians, physiotherapists, coaches, trainers, and athletes. Suggestions meeting consensus were considered with regard to the proposed conceptual model. Results and discussion Sixty-three items reached consensus. There was concordance of opinion that exercising excessively is an addiction, and therefore it was appropriate to consider the suggestions in light of the addiction-based conceptual model. Statements reaching consensus were consistent with all three components of the model: learned (negative perfectionism), behavioral (obsessive-compulsive drive), and hedonic (self-worth compensation and reduction of negative affect and withdrawal). Conclusions Delphi methodology allowed consensus to be reached regarding the features of an exercise addiction, and these features were consistent with our hypothesized conceptual model of exercise addiction. This study is the first to have applied Delphi methodology to the exercise addiction field, and therefore introduces a novel approach to exercise addiction research that can be used as a template to stimulate future examination using this technique.

  19. Thin gap gas chambers for the DELPHI endcaps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Hrubec, J.

    1996-12-31

    Thin Gap Gas Chambers have been proposed for an upgrade of the endcaps of the DELPHI detector at LEP. Two full size chambers have been built and a study of the optimal operating conditions has been carried out. In this paper the main construction parameters are discussed and test results will be given. Tests of the electronic readout were performed and the general feasibility of the detector is demonstrated.

  20. Photon induced L3 vacancy alignment at tuned photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Himani; Kaur, Gurpreet; Tiwari, Manoj K.; Mittal, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Photon induced L3 X-ray measurements for Lα/Lℓ cross-section ratios in elements, 66 ⩽ Z ⩽ 83, at tuned photon energies on synchrotron Beamline-16 at Indus-2, India have been used to study the effect of Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions and photon energies on alignment of L3 vacancies. Certainty and reliability of the measurements were checked from comparison of measured Lα and Lℓ fluorescence cross-sections at E1 excitation with available theoretical/empirical/experimental values that required additional measurements for source, geometry and efficiency factor S0GɛLα/ℓ in the used set-up. Fall/rise trend of the ratios with energy for different Z's was found to resemble the off/on-set pattern of CK transitions as pointed out by Bambynek et al. and Campbell. Evaluated alignment parameter A2 values are very much within the limits, 0.05 L3 are aligned (A2 ≦ 0.2) in all the cases. The pattern of A'2 (Coster-Kronig corrected A2) variation with energy for Dy, W, Pt, Hg and Bi resembles our previously reported theoretical patterns that lends mutual support for both current measurements and earlier theoretical results.

  1. Using Delphi technique in a consensual curriculum for periodontics.

    PubMed

    Fried, Hana; Leao, Anna Thereza

    2007-11-01

    Periodontics has experienced several important conceptual changes in the last few decades. As such, it is important to have a periodontics curriculum built upon the expertise of specialists in that discipline and reflecting those changes. The main goal of this study was to attain a consensus, through the use of the Delphi technique, on the topics that should be included in a periodontics curriculum for undergraduate dental students. A sample of periodontics lecturers from nine dental schools in two Brazilian cities was used, and a Delphi technique approach was followed to investigate sample member perceptions on the subject. Participants received four postal mail questionnaires asking them to rate and rerate eighty-nine topics for possible inclusion in the curriculum. A descriptive analysis was conducted, and topic frequencies were calculated. Topics rated as highly important for inclusion were the following: health, ailment, prevention, etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. The Delphi technique approach proved successful in involving periodontics lecturers in the design of a periodontics curriculum for undergraduate dental students.

  2. Electroweak measurements in electron-positron collisions at W-boson-pair energies at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; DELPHI Collaboration; L3 Collaboration; OPAL Collaboration; LEP Electroweak Working Group 1

    2013-11-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3 fb-1 collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 GeV to 209 GeV.

  3. Constraints on the Z-Z' mixing angle from data measured for the process e + e - → W + W - at the LEP2 collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vas. V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of effects induced by new neutral gauge Z' bosons was performed on the basis of data from the OPAL, DELPHI, ALEPH, and L3 experiments devoted to measuring differential cross sections for the process of the annihilation production of pairs of charged gauge W ± bosons at the LEP2 collider. By using these experimental data, constraints on the Z'-boson mass and on the angle of Z-Z' mixing were obtained for a number of extended gauge models.

  4. Reducing Energy Cost and Greenhouse Gas Emission in the Corporate Sector, a Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    The study is titled "Reducing energy cost and GreenHouse Gas emission in the corporate sector, A Delphi Study". The study applied the Delphi methodology and focused on the Green IT solutions that can help the modern corporate organizations with less than 1000 employees to decrease their energy costs and GHG emissions. The study presents…

  5. DELPHI--An Information Resource in a Multivendor Multiprotocol Network Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedayao, Jeff; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes DELPHI, a networked information resource for Intel Corporation that provides a bulletin board, databases, technical memos, hazardous material handling information, and stock quotes. Topics addressed include the diverse network environments at Intel, connecting the services to these environments, experiences with DELPHI, and future plans.…

  6. A Delphi Study on Staff Bereavement Training in the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Jennifer A.; Truesdale, Jesslyn

    2015-01-01

    The Delphi technique was used to obtain expert panel consensus to prioritize content areas and delivery methods for developing staff grief and bereavement curriculum training in the intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) field. The Delphi technique was conducted with a panel of 18 experts from formal and informal disability caregiving,…

  7. Methodological and Conceptual Issues Confronting a Cross-Country Delphi Study of Educational Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Hsin-Ling; Altschuld, James W.; Lee, Yi-Fang

    2008-01-01

    Although the Delphi is widely used, research on certain methodological issues is somewhat limited. After a brief introduction to the strengths, limitations, and methodological challenges of the technique, we share our experiences (as well as problems encountered) with an electronic Delphi of educational program evaluation (EPE) in the Asia-Pacific…

  8. Exploration to Identify Professional Dispositions of School Librarians: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Gail; Jones, Jami L.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an exploratory study to identify professional dispositions of school librarians. The authors employed the Delphi method, a qualitative research method that emphasizes expert knowledge and consensus within a particular field. The Delphi panel consisted of members of the editorial boards of nationally recognized…

  9. A Delphi Study: Exploring Faculty Perceptions of the Best Practices Influencing Student Persistence in Blended Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Kim Elise

    2010-01-01

    This Delphi study explored the instructional practices of community college faculty who were teaching blended or Web-assisted courses and how these practices influenced student persistence. The Delphi method provided qualitative data in the form of expert advice through consensus building on the instructional practices most likely to influence…

  10. Concepts and Contexts in Engineering and Technology Education: An International and Interdisciplinary Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossouw, Ammeret; Hacker, Michael; de Vries, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by a similar study by Osborne et al. we have conducted a Delphi study among experts to identify key concepts to be taught in engineering and technology education and relevant and meaningful contexts through which these concepts can be taught and learnt. By submitting the outcomes of the Delphi study to a panel of experts in a two-day…

  11. Projecting Agricultural Education Programs for the 21st Century Using a Modified Delphi Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Maynard J.

    A modified three-step Delphi procedure was used to conduct a series of national studies of futurists regarded by their peers as top experts in agricultural education. The primary objective was to project enrollments in agricultural education programs for the 21st century. Other study objectives were to ascertain whether the Delphi technique could…

  12. Advantages and Limitations of the e-Delphi Technique: Implications for Health Education Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohoe, Holly; Stellefson, Michael; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    In the last 30 years, the application of the Delphi technique has been increasing. With the recent availability and established popularity of Internet-based research tools, the Internet has been identified as a means for mitigating Delphi limitations, maximizing its advantages, and expanding the breadth of its application. The discourse on the…

  13. Testing the Stability of Experts' Opinions between Successive Rounds of Delphi Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yu Nu

    The Delphi method is a means of structuring group communication process so that a group of experts can gather information or forecast future problems effectively. A primary objective of a Delphi study is to obtain consensual and consistent opinions from a group of experts in two or more successive rounds on a given research subject. Consensus and…

  14. 21 CFR 866.6030 - AFP-L3% immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AFP-L3% immunological test system. 866.6030... Systems § 866.6030 AFP-L3% immunological test system. (a) Identification. An AFP-L3% immunological test... measure, by immunochemical techniques, AFP and AFP-L3 subfraction in human serum. The device is...

  15. Using the Delphi method to engage stakeholders: a comparison of two studies.

    PubMed

    Geist, Monica R

    2010-05-01

    Involving stakeholders can greatly impact evaluation results. The Delphi method, a consensus-building tool, is a promising process to promote and encourage involvement from all stakeholders during the evaluation framing process. The Delphi method removes geographic challenges and time boundaries allowing all stakeholders to participate. The Delphi method uses a series of surveys interspersed with controlled feedback designed to gather information and build consensus without requiring face-to-face meetings. Two different formats of the Delphi method, a paper-and-pencil, postal-mail version and a web-based, real-time computer version are compared in this study. Both versions of the Delphi were administered to a non-profit community based organization as part of framing an evaluation. Participation rates were better with the paper-pencil version. The quantity and quality of data collected were comparable in both versions.

  16. Design and energy performance of the archaeological museum of Delphi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombazis, A. N.; Vratsanos, N.; Kontomichali, E.; Santamouris, M.; Zannis, G.; Assimakopoulos, M. N.; Geros, V.; Pavlou, K.

    2006-12-01

    The archaeological museum of Delphi is one of the most visited museums in Greece with visitors ranging from about 150,000 to 300,000 per year. The building was retrofitted as a result of the Greek case study in the demonstration project `MUSEUMS-Energy Efficiency and Sustainability in Retrofitted and New Museum Buildings' which was executed within the fifth Framework Programme of the European Commission DG TREN (Energie Programme). The retrofitting works aimed to integrate bioclimatic and sustainable measures in the existing exhibition halls, to minimize energy consumption and to improve comfort and exhibition quality.

  17. Fine-grained aggregates in L3 chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Kitamura, M.; Morimoto, N.

    1987-12-01

    The textures and chemical compositions of the constituent minerals of the fine-grained aggregates (FGAs) of L3 chondrites were studied by the backscattered electron image technique, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Plagioclase and glass in the interstices between fine grains of olivine and pyroxene indicate that the FGAs once partly melted. Compositional zoning and decomposition texture of pyroxenes are similar to those observed in chondrules, indicating a common cooling history of the FGAs and chondrules. Therefore, the mechanism that caused melting of the FGAs is considered to be the same as for chondrules. Bulk compositions of the FGAs are within the range of those of chondrules, so some chondrules probably were produced by complete melting of the same precursor materials as those of the FGAs. The precursor materials must have included fine olivine and other grains that probably are condensates.

  18. Search for long lived staus with the DELPHI detector.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, Francesca R.

    1998-04-01

    In the framework of Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), gravitino interactions at ordinary energies are only important in the limit M_tilde G arrow 0. However, in the context of the Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking models, which favor M_tilde G > ~ 1 eV, the gravitino could be the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) and the decay of the Next to LSP into gravitino would be accessible at LEP. The decay tilde τ arrow τ tilde G was searched for with the DELPHI detector, in the range M_tilde G <= 100 eV. For very short tilde τ decay lengths the analysis makes use of a method based on track impact parameters. For longer lifetimes, these decays are expected to take place within the tracking detector volume and therefore the decay vertices should be reconstructed. The results obtained by these two analyses are combined with those of the searches for heavy stable charged particles and for conventional MSSM tilde τ decays, in order to set limits on M_tildeτ irrespective of the gravitino mass. The results obtained using the data collected by DELPHI during the LEP II runs at center of mass energies from 130 to 184 GeV will be presented.

  19. Delphi Study: HIV/AIDS and the Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Whitehill, William R.; Wright, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    Recent announcements in the news of HIV/AIDS contraction by famous sports figures have focused world attention on the fact that athletes are not immune to this deadly virus. In view of this, we reviewed the literature to examine what studies have been directed specifically at the athletic population and HIV/AIDS. Unfortunately, because of the relatively new nature of this problem, little data exists for examination. A panel of experts was assembled to participate in a Delphi methodology project. This educational study was designed to examine three issues surrounding the athletic community and HIV/AIDS. The three questions examined in this study were: 1) should medical testing be undertaken within the athletic community to determine exposure to the virus; 2) if testing is undertaken, what privacy/confidentiality measures should be incorporated to protect the individual and the results of the test; and 3) what educational interventions should be developed and implemented to help the athlete understand the disease and prevent the spread. The responses from the Delphi participants indicate that the HIV/AIDS dilemma is a societal issue and should not single out a segment of the population—in this case the athletic community. The panel also indicated that privacy and confidentiality are crucial in protecting the individual athlete and test results. The development and implementation of educational interventions is the most important component in the entire issue of HIV/AIDS and the athletic community. PMID:16558273

  20. Categorization and hierarchy of workplace bullying strategies: a Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carballeira, Alvaro; Escartín Solanelles, Jordi; Visauta Vinacua, Bienvenido; Porrúa García, Clara; Martín-Peña, Javier

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports a study of the characteristics of psychological abuse strategies deployed in the workplace (mobbing or workplace bullying). Based on a literature review, the aim of the present study is two fold: firstly to propose a new taxonomy of mobbing strategies and to provide an operational definition for each of them, and secondly, to assess this taxonomy with the aid of several experts, by using a Delphi survey, and to evaluate the severity of each of the mobbing strategies. The experts were asked to evaluate the adequacy and the severity of the definitions for each mobbing strategy. Thirty experts working in various professions (psychology, medicine, law, sociology, etc.) participated in a two-round Delphi survey. The experts estimated that the new taxonomy and the operational definitions were appropriate, establishing content and construct validity. They ranked the workplace bullying strategies in terms of descending importance: strategies of direct nature, followed by indirect strategies. Theoretical implications of the study, its limitations and future research are discussed.

  1. Defining personal utility in genomics: A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Kohler, J; Turbitt, E; Lewis, K L; Wilfond, B S; Jamal, L; Peay, H L; Biesecker, L G; Biesecker, B B

    2017-02-20

    Individual genome sequencing results are valued by patients in ways distinct from clinical utility. Such outcomes have been described as components of "personal utility," a concept that broadly encompasses patient-endorsed benefits, that is operationally defined as non-clinical outcomes. No empirical delineation of these outcomes has been reported. To address this gap, we administered a Delphi survey to adult participants in a NIH clinical exome study to extract the most highly endorsed outcomes constituting personal utility. Forty research participants responded to a Delphi survey to rate 35 items identified by a systematic literature review of personal utility. Two rounds of ranking resulted in 24 items that represented 14 distinct elements of personal utility. Elements most highly endorsed by participants were: increased self-knowledge, knowledge of "the condition," altruism, and anticipated coping. Our findings represent the first systematic effort to delineate elements of personal utility that may be used to anticipate participant expectation and inform genetic counseling prior to sequencing. The 24 items reported need to be studied further in additional clinical genome sequencing studies to assess generalizability in other populations. Further research will help to understand motivations and to predict the meaning and use of results.

  2. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and {sup 252}Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-{alpha}), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-{alpha}) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the {alpha} value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the {sup 252}Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  3. Gadamerian philosophical hermeneutics as a useful methodological framework for the Delphi technique.

    PubMed

    Guzys, Diana; Dickson-Swift, Virginia; Kenny, Amanda; Threlkeld, Guinever

    2015-01-01

    In this article we aim to demonstrate how Gadamerian philosophical hermeneutics may provide a sound methodological framework for researchers using the Delphi Technique (Delphi) in studies exploring health and well-being. Reporting of the use of Delphi in health and well-being research is increasing, but less attention has been given to covering its methodological underpinnings. In Delphi, a structured anonymous conversation between participants is facilitated, via an iterative survey process. Participants are specifically selected for their knowledge and experience with the topic of interest. The purpose of structuring conversation in this manner is to cultivate collective opinion and highlight areas of disagreement, using a process that minimizes the influence of group dynamics. The underlying premise is that the opinion of a collective is more useful than that of an individual. In designing our study into health literacy, Delphi aligned well with our research focus and would enable us to capture collective views. However, we were interested in the methodology that would inform our study. As researchers, we believe that methodology provides the framework and principles for a study and is integral to research integrity. In assessing the suitability of Delphi for our research purpose, we found little information about underpinning methodology. The absence of a universally recognized or consistent methodology associated with Delphi was highlighted through a scoping review we undertook to assist us in our methodological thinking. This led us to consider alternative methodologies, which might be congruent with the key principles of Delphi. We identified Gadamerian philosophical hermeneutics as a methodology that could provide a supportive framework and principles. We suggest that this methodology may be useful in health and well-being studies utilizing the Delphi method.

  4. Gadamerian philosophical hermeneutics as a useful methodological framework for the Delphi technique

    PubMed Central

    Guzys, Diana; Dickson-Swift, Virginia; Kenny, Amanda; Threlkeld, Guinever

    2015-01-01

    In this article we aim to demonstrate how Gadamerian philosophical hermeneutics may provide a sound methodological framework for researchers using the Delphi Technique (Delphi) in studies exploring health and well-being. Reporting of the use of Delphi in health and well-being research is increasing, but less attention has been given to covering its methodological underpinnings. In Delphi, a structured anonymous conversation between participants is facilitated, via an iterative survey process. Participants are specifically selected for their knowledge and experience with the topic of interest. The purpose of structuring conversation in this manner is to cultivate collective opinion and highlight areas of disagreement, using a process that minimizes the influence of group dynamics. The underlying premise is that the opinion of a collective is more useful than that of an individual. In designing our study into health literacy, Delphi aligned well with our research focus and would enable us to capture collective views. However, we were interested in the methodology that would inform our study. As researchers, we believe that methodology provides the framework and principles for a study and is integral to research integrity. In assessing the suitability of Delphi for our research purpose, we found little information about underpinning methodology. The absence of a universally recognized or consistent methodology associated with Delphi was highlighted through a scoping review we undertook to assist us in our methodological thinking. This led us to consider alternative methodologies, which might be congruent with the key principles of Delphi. We identified Gadamerian philosophical hermeneutics as a methodology that could provide a supportive framework and principles. We suggest that this methodology may be useful in health and well-being studies utilizing the Delphi method. PMID:25948132

  5. Informing the Age-of-Acquisition Debate: L3 as a Litmus Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Following Cabrelli et al. (What the start of L3 tells us about the end of L2: N-drop in L2 and L3 Portuguese, BUCLD, 2008), Iverson (Competing SLA hypotheses assessed: Comparing heritage and successive Spanish bilinguals of L3 Brazilian Portuguese, Mouton de Gruyter, 2009) and others, I argue that the L3 initial state is an important tool in…

  6. Identifying indicators through modified Delphi technique in polytechnics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashir, Irdayanti Mat; Mustapha, Ramlee; Yusoff, Abdullah

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to examine how the panel has been selected as experts in assessing indicators of innovative instructional leadership (IIL) administrator in polytechnics based on 222 items were obtained through previous studies. A total of eleven people were selected as the expert panels in a study where expert selection criteria based on their background in the leadership. Experts were interviewed separately. Interviews were carried out for a half hour in their offices. The data obtained were analyzed using Atlas Ti. Overall findings indicate experts agree that a total of 188 items and 14 indicators should be maintained in this innovative instructional leadership instruments and next by using Modified Delphi Technique. The instrument will then be analyzed to obtain findings on the perception of lecturers on every administrator innovative instructional leadership in their respective polytechnics.

  7. Measurement of |V{sub cs}| with DELPHI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Golob, Bostjan

    1998-10-19

    Pair production of charged weak bosons W{sup {+-}} at LEP2 collider can be exploited to measure the absolute value of the V{sub cs} element of Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. The value can be most accurately extracted from the measured hadronic branching ratio of W{sup {+-}} bosons. An independent method to obtain the |V{sub cs}| value consists of tagging the flavour of primary quarks in jets, produced in W{sup {+-}} decays. Using both methods on the data collected with DELPHI experiment during 1996 and 1997 runs, we obtained |V{sub cs}|=0.99{+-}0.06(stat.){+-}0.04(syst.). Combined result of |V{sub cs}| measurements with four LEP experiments enables a test of CKM matrix unitarity.

  8. Performance of the DELPHI small angle tile calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1996-06-01

    The DELPHI STIC detector is a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter with wave length shifting optical fibers used for light collection. The main goal of the calorimeter at LEP100 is to measure the luminosity with an accuracy better than 0.1%. The detector has been in operation since the 1994 LEP run. Presented here is the performance measured during the 1994--1995 LEP runs, with the emphasis on the achieved energy and space resolution, the long-term stability and the efficiency of the detector. The new bunchtrains mode of LEP requires a rather sophisticated trigger and timing scheme which is also presented. To control the trigger efficiency and stability of the calorimeter channels, a LED-based monitoring system has been developed.

  9. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-3 - Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... involving fast-pay stock. 1.7701(l)-3 Section 1.7701(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE....7701(l)-3 Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock. (a) Purpose and scope. This section is intended to prevent the avoidance of tax by persons participating in fast-pay arrangements...

  10. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  11. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  12. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-3 - Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....401(l)-3 Section 1.401(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(l)-3... employer-provided benefits under a defined benefit plan is permitted under section 401(l) and this...

  13. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-3 - Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....401(l)-3 Section 1.401(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.401(l)-3 Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans. (a) Requirements—(1) In general. Disparity... 401(l) and this section for a plan year only if the plan satisfies paragraphs (a)(2) through (a)(6)...

  14. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  15. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  16. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-3 - Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....401(l)-3 Section 1.401(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.401(l)-3 Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans. (a) Requirements—(1) In general. Disparity... 401(l) and this section for a plan year only if the plan satisfies paragraphs (a)(2) through (a)(6)...

  17. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-3 - Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....401(l)-3 Section 1.401(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY.... § 1.401(l)-3 Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans. (a) Requirements—(1) In general. Disparity... 401(l) and this section for a plan year only if the plan satisfies paragraphs (a)(2) through (a)(6)...

  18. L1 and L2 Distance Effects in Learning L3 Dutch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepens, Job J.; der Slik, Frans; Hout, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    Many people speak more than two languages. How do languages acquired earlier affect the learnability of additional languages? We show that linguistic distances between speakers' first (L1) and second (L2) languages and their third (L3) language play a role. Larger distances from the L1 to the L3 and from the L2 to the L3 correlate with lower…

  19. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  20. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-3 - Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... involving fast-pay stock. 1.7701(l)-3 Section 1.7701(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Valuations § 1.7701(l)-3 Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock. (a) Purpose and... tax effect as a fast-pay arrangement. (3) Benefited stock. With respect to any fast-pay stock,...

  1. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-3 - Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... involving fast-pay stock. 1.7701(l)-3 Section 1.7701(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Valuations § 1.7701(l)-3 Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock. (a) Purpose and... tax effect as a fast-pay arrangement. (3) Benefited stock. With respect to any fast-pay stock,...

  2. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-3 - Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... involving fast-pay stock. 1.7701(l)-3 Section 1.7701(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Valuations § 1.7701(l)-3 Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock. (a) Purpose and... tax effect as a fast-pay arrangement. (3) Benefited stock. With respect to any fast-pay stock,...

  3. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-3 - Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... involving fast-pay stock. 1.7701(l)-3 Section 1.7701(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Valuations § 1.7701(l)-3 Recharacterizing financing arrangements involving fast-pay stock. (a) Purpose and... tax effect as a fast-pay arrangement. (3) Benefited stock. With respect to any fast-pay stock,...

  4. Structural and functional characterization of Delphinus delphis hemoglobin system.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Barbara; Messana, Irene; Maggiani, Federica; Olianas, Alessandra; Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Crnjar, Roberto; Castagnola, Massimo; Giardina, Bruno; Sanna, Maria Teresa

    2009-11-01

    Structural analysis of the hemoglobin (Hb) system of Delphinus delphis revealed a high globin multiplicity: HPLC-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis evidenced three major beta (beta1 16,022 Da, beta2 16,036 Da, beta3 16,036 Da, labeled according to their progressive elution times) and two major alpha globins (alpha1 15,345 Da, alpha2 15,329 Da). ESI-tandem mass and nucleotide sequence analyses showed that beta2 globin differs from beta1 for the substitution Val126 --> Leu, while beta3 globin differs from beta2 for the isobaric substitution Lys65 --> Gln. The alpha2 globin differs from the alpha1 for the substitution Ser15 --> Ala. Anion-exchange chromatography allowed the separation of two Hb fractions and HPLC-ESI-MS analysis revealed that the fraction with higher pI (HbI) contained beta1, beta2 and both the alpha globins, and the fraction with lower pI (HbII) contained beta3 and both the alpha globins. Both D. delphis Hb fractions displayed a lower intrinsic oxygen affinity, a decreased effect of 2,3-BPG and a reduced cooperativity with respect to human HbA(0), with HbII showing the more pronounced differences. With respect to HbA(0), either the substitution Probeta5 --> Gly or the Probeta5 --> Ala is present in all the cetacean beta globins sequenced so far, and it has been hypothesized that position 5 of beta globins may have a role in the interaction with 2,3-BPG. Regarding the particularly lowered cooperativity of HbII, it is interesting to observe that the variant human HbA, characterized by the substitution Lysbeta65 --> Gln (HbJ-Cairo) has a decreased cooperativity with respect to HbA(0).

  5. Modified Policy-Delphi study for exploring obesity prevention priorities

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Emily; Palermo, Claire; Reidlinger, Dianne P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Until now, industry and government stakeholders have dominated public discourse about policy options for obesity. While consumer involvement in health service delivery and research has been embraced, methods which engage consumers in health policy development are lacking. Conflicting priorities have generated ethical concern around obesity policy. The concept of ‘intrusiveness’ has been applied to policy decisions in the UK, whereby ethical implications are considered through level of intrusiveness to choice; however, the concept has also been used to avert government regulation to address obesity. The concept of intrusiveness has not been explored from a stakeholder's perspective. The aim is to investigate the relevance of intrusiveness and autonomy to health policy development, and to explore consensus on obesity policy priorities of under-represented stakeholders. Methods and analysis The Policy-Delphi technique will be modified using the James Lind Alliance approach to collaborative priority setting. A total of 60 participants will be recruited to represent three stakeholder groups in the Australian context: consumers, public health practitioners and policymakers. A three-round online Policy-Delphi survey will be undertaken. Participants will prioritise options informed by submissions to the 2009 Australian Government Inquiry into Obesity, and rate the intrusiveness of those proposed. An additional round will use qualitative methods in a face-to-face discussion group to explore stakeholder perceptions of the intrusiveness of options. The novelty of this methodology will redress the balance by bringing the consumer voice forward to identify ethically acceptable obesity policy options. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was granted by the Bond University Health Research Ethics Committee. The findings will inform development of a conceptual framework for analysing and prioritising obesity policy options, which will be relevant

  6. Teacher Competencies in Health Education: Results of a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Moynihan, Sharon; Paakkari, Leena; Välimaa, Raili; Jourdan, Didier; Mannix-McNamara, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this research study was to identify the core competencies for health education teachers in supporting the development of health literacy among their students. Method/Results A three round Delphi method was employed. Experts in health education were asked to identify core competencies for school health educators. Twenty six participants from the academic field were invited to participate in the study. Twenty participants completed the first round of the Delphi, while eighteen took part in round two and fifteen participated in the final round. Data were collected using an electronic questionnaire. The first round contained an open ended question in which participants were asked to name and define all the competencies they perceived were important. Thematic analysis was undertaken on these data. A list of 36 competencies was created from this round. This list was then returned to the same participants and they were asked to rate each competency on a 7 point semantic differential scale in terms of importance. The resulting data were then analysed. For the final round, participants were presented with a list of 33 competencies and were asked to rank them again, in order of importance. Conclusion Twelve core competencies emerged from the analysis and these competencies comprised of a mixture of knowledge, attitude and skills. The authors suggest that how these competencies are achieved and operationalised in the school context can be quite complex and multi-faceted. While the authors do not seek to generalise from the study they suggest that these competencies are an important input for all stakeholders, in order to question national and international teacher guidelines. In addition the competencies identified may provide a useful starting point for others to undertake deeper analysis of what it means to be an effective health educator in schools. PMID:26630180

  7. Transcriptomes and pathways associated with infectivity, survival and immunogenicity in Brugia malayi L3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ben-Wen; Rush, Amy C; Mitreva, Makedonka; Yin, Yong; Spiro, David; Ghedin, Elodie; Weil, Gary J

    2009-01-01

    Background Filarial nematode parasites cause serious diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness in humans, and heartworm infections in dogs. Third stage filarial larvae (L3) are a critical stage in the life cycle of filarial parasites, because this is the stage that is transmitted by arthropod vectors to initiate infections in mammals. Improved understanding of molecular mechanisms associated with this transition may provide important leads for development of new therapies and vaccines to prevent filarial infections. This study explores changes in gene expression associated with the transition of Brugia malayi third stage larvae (BmL3) from mosquitoes into mammalian hosts and how these changes are affected by radiation. Radiation effects are especially interesting because irradiated L3 induce partial immunity to filarial infections. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of such vaccines are unkown. Results Expression profiles were obtained using a new filarial microarray with 18, 104 64-mer elements. 771 genes were identified as differentially expressed in two-way comparative analyses of the three L3 types. 353 genes were up-regulated in mosquito L3 (L3i) relative to cultured L3 (L3c). These genes are important for establishment of filarial infections in mammalian hosts. Other genes were up-regulated in L3c relative to L3i (234) or irradiated L3 (L3ir) (22). These culture-induced transcripts include key molecules required for growth and development. 165 genes were up-regulated in L3ir relative to L3c; these genes encode highly immunogenic proteins and proteins involved in radiation repair. L3ir and L3i have similar transcription profiles for genes that encode highly immunogenic proteins, antioxidants and cuticle components. Conclusion Changes in gene expression that normally occur during culture under conditions that support L3 development and molting are prevented or delayed by radiation. This may explain the enhanced

  8. Big brother - a fully automated control system for the DELPHI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Franek, B.; Sekulin, R.; Doenszelmann, M.; Gasper, C.; Charpentier, Jonker, M.

    1994-12-31

    The integrated control system of the DELPHI experiment is described. It allows the data to be taken in an almost automatic fashion. This is achieved by computer monitoring of the states of the LEP machine, the DELPHI subdetectors (SC) and the Data Acquisition System (DAS). Depending on these states, computer initiated actions are then taken. It has been designed using {open_quote}State Manager{close_quote} concept already used for local and central controls of DAS and SC.

  9. Three Unusual Chondrules in the Bovedy (L3) Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, H. G. M.

    1993-07-01

    The Bovedy (L3) chondrite [1] has recently been studied petrographically using SEM and EMPA as part of a general review of the Irish meteorites. The following chondrules are notable: Chondrule 1. A covered thin-section of the Bovedy (Sprucefield) meteorite contains a very highly-strained, ellipsoidal, radiating pyroxene chondrule with a semi-major axis of 2mm. The elongation ratio, 2.6 x, is higher than values published elsewhere [2]. Chondrule 2. A slab of Bovedy (~48 cm^2) contains an exceptionally large, ellipsoidal, porphyritic olivine chondrule (semi-major axis = 1.4 cm, minor axis = 0.8 cm). This is among the largest droplet chondrule on record [2]. The chondrule is texturally identical to other PO chondrules in the meteorite. Chondrule 3. A polished thin-section, prepared from the above slab, contains an ellipsoidal-to-irregular shaped glassy chondrule (Fig. 1). SEM and EMPA confirm a composition of pyroxenitic glass (brown) with globular and elongate inclusions of silica glass (colorless). Representative EMPA of the brown glass (in wt%) is: SiO2 57.49, Al2O3 0.93, Cr2O3 0.38, FeO 14.22, MnO 0.63, MgO 23.32, CaO 2.69, Na2O 1.03 (no other elements detected). This can be recast as a pyroxene with formula Ca(sub)0.10 Na(sub)0.07 Fe(sub)0.43Mg(sub)1.26Al(sub)0.04 Cr(sub)0.01Mn(sub)0.02Si(sub)2.08O(sub)6. The composition corresponds closely with that reported by [3] for a silica pyroxenite clast from the same meteorite. It suggests that the chondrule was derived by rapid melting of the material represented by the clast, which has been interpreted as an igneous fractionate formed in a planetary environment. References: [1] Graham A. L. et al. (1976) GCA, 40, 529-535. [2] Grossman J. N. et al. (1988) In Meteorites and the Early Solar System (J. F. Kerridge and M. S. Matthews, eds.), 619-659, Univ. Arizona. [3] Ruzicka A. and Boynton W. V. (1992) Meteoritics, 27, 283. Fig. 1, which appears here in the hard copy, shows a photograph of chondrule 3 photographed in

  10. Mutant ubiquitin (UBB+1) associated with neurodegenerative disorders is hydrolyzed by ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCH-L3).

    PubMed

    Dennissen, Frank J A; Kholod, Natalia; Hermes, Denise J H P; Kemmerling, Nadja; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Dantuma, Nico P; van Leeuwen, Fred W

    2011-08-19

    Mutant ubiquitin (UBB(+1)) accumulates in the hallmarks of tauopathies and polyglutamine diseases. We show that the deubiquitinating enzyme YUH1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its mouse and human ortholog UCH-L3 are able to hydrolyze the C-terminal extension of UBB(+1). This yields another dysfunctional ubiquitin molecule (UB(G76Y)) with biochemical properties similar to full length UBB(+1). UBB(+1) may be detected in post-mortem tissue due to impaired C-terminal truncation of UBB(+1). Although the level of UCH-L3 protein in several neurodegenerative diseases is unchanged, we show that in vitro oxidation of recombinant UCH-L3 impairs its deubiquitinating activity. We postulate that impaired UCH-L3 function may contribute to the accumulation of full length UBB(+1) in various pathologies.

  11. DELirium Prediction Based on Hospital Information (Delphi) in General Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Young; Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Cho, Won Hyun

    2016-03-01

    To develop a simple and accurate delirium prediction score that would allow identification of individuals with a high probability of postoperative delirium on the basis of preoperative and immediate postoperative data.Postoperative delirium, although transient, is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery. However, there has been no appropriate tool to predict postoperative delirium.This was a prospective observational single-center study, which consisted of the development of the DELirium Prediction based on Hospital Information (Delphi) score (n = 561) and its validation (n = 533). We collected potential risk factors for postoperative delirium, which were identified by conducting a comprehensive review of the literatures.Age, low physical activity, hearing impairment, heavy alcoholism, history of prior delirium, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, emergency surgery, open surgery, and increased preoperative C-reactive protein were identified as independent predictors of postoperative delirium. The Delphi score was generated using logistic regression coefficients. The maximum Delphi score was 15 and the optimal cut-off point identified with the Youden index was 6.5. Generated area under the (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.911 (95% CI: 0.88-0.94). In the validation study, the calculated AUC of the ROC curve based on the Delphi score was 0.938 (95% Cl: 0.91-0.97). We divided the validation cohort into the low-risk group (Delphi score 0-6) and high-risk group (7-15). Sensitivity of Delphi score was 80.8% and specificity 92.5%.Our proposed Delphi score could help health-care provider to predict the development of delirium and make possible targeted intervention to prevent delirium in high-risk surgery patients.

  12. The structure-activity relationships of L3MBTL3 inhibitors: flexibility of the dimer interface.

    PubMed

    Camerino, Michelle A; Zhong, Nan; Dong, Aiping; Dickson, Bradley M; James, Lindsey I; Baughman, Brandi M; Norris, Jacqueline L; Kireev, Dmitri B; Janzen, William P; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frye, Stephen V

    2013-11-01

    We recently reported the discovery of UNC1215, a potent and selective chemical probe for the L3MBTL3 methyllysine reader domain. In this article, we describe the development of structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a second series of potent L3MBTL3 antagonists which evolved from the structure of the chemical probe UNC1215. These compounds are selective for L3MBTL3 against a panel of methyllysine reader proteins, particularly the related MBT family proteins, L3MBTL1 and MBTD1. A co-crystal structure of L3MBTL3 and one of the most potent compounds suggests that the L3MBTL3 dimer rotates about the dimer interface to accommodate ligand binding.

  13. The structure-activity relationships of L3MBTL3 inhibitors: flexibility of the dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Camerino, Michelle A.; Zhong, Nan; Dong, Aiping; Dickson, Bradley M.; James, Lindsey I.; Baughman, Brandi M.; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Kireev, Dmitri B.; Janzen, William P.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported the discovery of UNC1215, a potent and selective chemical probe for the L3MBTL3 methyllysine reader domain. In this article, we describe the development of structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a second series of potent L3MBTL3 antagonists which evolved from the structure of the chemical probe UNC1215. These compounds are selective for L3MBTL3 against a panel of methyllysine reader proteins, particularly the related MBT family proteins, L3MBTL1 and MBTD1. A co-crystal structure of L3MBTL3 and one of the most potent compounds suggests that the L3MBTL3 dimer rotates about the dimer interface to accommodate ligand binding. PMID:24466405

  14. Recovery in psychosis: a Delphi study with experts by experience.

    PubMed

    Law, Heather; Morrison, Anthony P

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to establish consensus about the meaning of recovery among individuals with experience of psychosis. A Delphi approach was utilized to allow a large sample of service users to be anonymously consulted about their views on recovery. Service users were invited to take part in a 3-stage consultation process. A total of 381 participants gave their views on recovery in the main stage of this study, with 100 of these taking part in the final review stage. The final list of statements about recovery included 94 items, which were rated as essential or important by >80% of respondents. These statements covered items which define recovery, factors which help recovery, factors which hinder recovery, and factors which show that someone is recovering. As far as we are aware, it is the first study to identify areas of consensus in relation to definitions of recovery from a service user perspective, which are typically reported to be an idiosyncratic process. Implications and recommendations for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  15. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

    2003-12-08

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of hearing in Delphinus delphis.

    PubMed

    Aroyan, J L

    2001-12-01

    Physical modeling is a fertile approach to investigating sound emission and reception (hearing) in marine mammals. A method for simulation of hearing was developed combining three-dimensional acoustic propagation and extrapolation techniques with a novel approach to modeling the acoustic parameters of mammalian tissues. Models of the forehead and lower jaw tissues of the common dolphin, Delphinus delphis, were created in order to simulate the biosonar emission and hearing processes. This paper outlines the methods used in the hearing simulations and offers observations concerning the mechanisms of acoustic reception in this dolphin based on model results. These results include: (1) The left and right mandibular fat bodies were found to channel sound incident from forward directions to the left and right tympanic bulla and to create sharp maxima against the lateral surfaces of each respective bulla; (2) The soft tissues of the lower jaw improved the forward directivity of the simulated receptivity patterns; (3) A focal property of the lower-jaw pan bones appeared to contribute to the creation of distinct forward receptivity peaks for each ear; (4) The reception patterns contained features that may correspond to lateral hearing pathways. A "fast" lens mechanism is proposed to explain the focal contribution of the pan bones in this dolphin. Similar techniques may be used to study hearing in other marine mammals.

  17. A combined ANP-delphi approach to evaluate sustainable tourism

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Melon, Monica

    2012-04-15

    The evaluation of sustainable tourism strategies promoted by National Parks (NP) related stakeholders is a key concern for NP managers. To help them in their strategic evaluation procedures, in this paper we propose a methodology based on the Analytic Network Process and a Delphi-type judgment-ensuring procedure. The approach aims at involving stakeholders in a participatory and consensus-building process. The methodology was applied to Los Roques NP in Venezuela. The problem included three sustainable tourism strategies defined by the stakeholders: eco-efficient resorts, eco-friendly leisure activities and ecological transportation systems. Representatives of eight stakeholders participated in the methodology. 13 sustainability criteria were selected. Results provide some important insights into the overall philosophy and underlying participants' conception of what sustainable development of Los Roques NP means. This conception is broadly shared by stakeholders as they coincided in the weights of most of the criteria, which were assigned individually through the questionnaire. It is particularly noteworthy that tourists and environmentalists almost fully match in their assessments of criteria but not of the alternatives. Moreover, there is a great agreement in the final assessment. This suggests that the regular contact among the different stakeholders, i.e. tourists with inhabitants, authorities with environmentalists, tour operators with representatives of the ministry, etc. has led to a common understanding of the opportunities and threats for the NP. They all agreed that the procedure enhances participation and transparency and it is a necessary source of information and support for their decisions.

  18. Hepatic CREB3L3 controls whole-body energy homeostasis and improves obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Yabe, Sachiko; Furusawa, Mika; Tokushige, Naoko; Tezuka, Hitomi; Mikami, Motoki; Iwata, Wakiko; Shingyouchi, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kiwata, Shiori; Fujimoto, Yuri; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Danno, Hirosuke; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masako; Kawakami, Yasushi; Urayama, Osamu; Sone, Hirohito; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in the liver is the key to maintaining systemic energy homeostasis during starvation. The membrane-bound transcription factor cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3L3) has been reported to be activated during fasting and to regulate triglyceride metabolism. Here, we show that CREB3L3 confers a wide spectrum of metabolic responses to starvation in vivo. Adenoviral and transgenic overexpression of nuclear CREB3L3 induced systemic lipolysis, hepatic ketogenesis, and insulin sensitivity with increased energy expenditure, leading to marked reduction in body weight, plasma lipid levels, and glucose levels. CREB3L3 overexpression activated gene expression levels and plasma levels of antidiabetic hormones, including fibroblast growth factor 21 and IGF-binding protein 2. Amelioration of diabetes by hepatic activation of CREB3L3 was also observed in several types of diabetic obese mice. Nuclear CREB3L3 mutually activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α promoter in an autoloop fashion and is crucial for the ligand transactivation of PPARα by interacting with its transcriptional regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α. CREB3L3 directly and indirectly controls fibroblast growth factor 21 expression and its plasma level, which contributes at least partially to the catabolic effects of CREB3L3 on systemic energy homeostasis in the entire body. Therefore, CREB3L3 is a therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes.

  19. Examining the Roles of Blended Learning Approaches in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Environments: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Hyo-Jeong; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a Delphi method was used to identify and predict the roles of blended learning approaches in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments. The Delphi panel consisted of experts in online learning from different geographic regions of the world. This study discusses findings related to (a) pros and cons of blended…

  20. Discovery of a chemical probe for the L3MBTL3 methyllysine reader domain.

    PubMed

    James, Lindsey I; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Zhong, Nan; Krichevsky, Liubov; Korboukh, Victoria K; Herold, J Martin; MacNevin, Christopher J; Norris, Jacqueline L; Sagum, Cari A; Tempel, Wolfram; Marcon, Edyta; Guo, Hongbo; Gao, Cen; Huang, Xi-Ping; Duan, Shili; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F; Kireev, Dmitri B; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Brown, Peter J; Bedford, Mark T; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frye, Stephen V

    2013-03-01

    We describe the discovery of UNC1215, a potent and selective chemical probe for the methyllysine (Kme) reading function of L3MBTL3, a member of the malignant brain tumor (MBT) family of chromatin-interacting transcriptional repressors. UNC1215 binds L3MBTL3 with a K(d) of 120 nM, competitively displacing mono- or dimethyllysine-containing peptides, and is greater than 50-fold more potent toward L3MBTL3 than other members of the MBT family while also demonstrating selectivity against more than 200 other reader domains examined. X-ray crystallography identified a unique 2:2 polyvalent mode of interaction between UNC1215 and L3MBTL3. In cells, UNC1215 is nontoxic and directly binds L3MBTL3 via the Kme-binding pocket of the MBT domains. UNC1215 increases the cellular mobility of GFP-L3MBTL3 fusion proteins, and point mutants that disrupt the Kme-binding function of GFP-L3MBTL3 phenocopy the effects of UNC1215 on localization. Finally, UNC1215 was used to reveal a new Kme-dependent interaction of L3MBTL3 with BCLAF1, a protein implicated in DNA damage repair and apoptosis.

  1. CREB3L3 controls fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in synergy with PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Tezuka, Hitomi; Han, Song-iee; Takei, Kenta; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Sone, Hirohito; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    CREB3L3 is involved in fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in a mutual manner with PPARα. To evaluate relative contribution, a combination of knockout and transgenic mice was investigated. On a ketogenic-diet (KD) that highlights capability of hepatic ketogenesis, Creb3l3−/− mice exhibited reduction of expression of genes for fatty oxidation and ketogenesis comparable to Ppara−/− mice. Most of the genes were further suppressed in double knockout mice indicating independent contribution of hepatic CREB3L3. During fasting, dependency of ketogenesis on CREB3L3 is lesser extents than Ppara−/− mice suggesting importance of adipose PPARα for supply of FFA and hyperlipidemia in Creb3l3−/− mice. In conclusion CREB3L3 plays a crucial role in hepatic adaptation to energy starvation via two pathways: direct related gene regulation and an auto-loop activation of PPARα. Furthermore, as KD-fed Creb3l3−/− mice exhibited severe fatty liver, activating inflammation, CREB3L3 could be a therapeutic target for NAFLD. PMID:27982131

  2. Examining the Impact of L2 English on L3 Selves: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this Swedish case study of four upper secondary students engaged in simultaneous second language (L2; English) and third language (L3; Spanish, French and Russian) learning, a possible selves perspective was used to investigate the impact of English on L3 motivation. Using a maximum variation sampling strategy, participants were selected from a…

  3. The Acquisition of L3 English Vowels by Infant German-Italian Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missaglia, Federica

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a specific case of L3 acquisition: the starting position for English vowel acquisition by infant German-Italian bilinguals will be investigated in light of prototype theory. The chosen example of triple language contact is characterised by consecutive bilingualism as the basis of L3 acquisition, where the learners' L2…

  4. L3 Syntactic Transfer Selectivity and Typological Determinacy: The Typological Primacy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The present article addresses the following question: what variables condition syntactic transfer? Evidence is provided in support of the position that third language (L3) transfer is selective, whereby, at least under certain conditions, it is driven by the typological proximity of the target L3 measured against the other previously acquired…

  5. An electrochemical biosensor for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein-L3 with practical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlong; Gao, Tao; Gu, Shiyu; Zhi, Jun; Yang, Jie; Li, Genxi

    2017-01-15

    The detection of alpha-fetoprotein-L3 (AFP-L3) is of great importance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosis, but remains unsatisfactory owing to poor sensitivity and complex operating steps. In this work, a simple and sensitive method has been proposed for the detection of AFP-L3. Firstly, biotinylated Lens culinaris agglutinin-integrated silver nanoparticles (B-LCA-AgNPs) is fabricated. Owing to the specific interaction between Lens culinaris agglutinin and AFP-L3, AFP-L3 can be detected directly through the electrochemical signal readout of AgNPs, avoiding separated steps used in clinical practice. Furthermore, after the recognition between B-LCA-AgNPs and AFP-L3, large amount of AgNPs can be gathered at the binding site through avidin-biotin interactions, which can amplify the signal. Therefore, detection of AFP-L3 can be sensitively achieved. Moreover, compared with the other approaches, this new method has a better linear correlation (25-15,000pg/mL) and a lower detection limit (12pg/mL). Also, the new method developed in this work has been demonstrated to have good stability and reproducibility for the assay of AFP-L3 in human serum samples, so, it may hold a great application prospect in clinical diagnostics.

  6. L2 and L3 Ultimate Attainment: An Investigation of Two Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermas, Abdelkader

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the upper limit of ultimate attainment in the L2 French and L3 English of trilingual learners. The learners are native speakers of Moroccan Arabic who started learning L2 French at eight and L3 English at 16. They are advanced in both languages. Four constructions representing the verb movement and null subject parameter were…

  7. The Bilingual Advantage in L3 Learning: A Developmental Study of Rhotic Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopecková, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Facilitative effects of bilingualism on general aspects of third language (L3) proficiency have been demonstrated in numerous studies conducted in bilingual communities and classrooms around the world. When it comes to L3 phonology, however, empirical evidence has been scarce and inconclusive in respect to the question of whether and/or how…

  8. On L3,∞-stability of the Navier-Stokes system in exterior domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    This paper studies the stability of a stationary solution of the Navier-Stokes system with a constant velocity at infinity in an exterior domain. More precisely, this paper considers the stability of the Navier-Stokes system governing the stationary solution which belongs to the weak L3-space L 3 , ∞. Under the condition that the initial datum belongs to a solenoidal L 3 , ∞-space, we prove that if both the L 3 , ∞-norm of the initial datum and the L 3 , ∞-norm of the stationary solution are sufficiently small then the system admits a unique global-in-time strong L 3 , ∞-solution satisfying both L 3 , ∞-asymptotic stability and L∞-asymptotic stability. Moreover, we investigate L 3 , r-asymptotic stability of the global-in-time solution. Using Lp-Lq type estimates for the Oseen semigroup and applying an equivalent norm on the Lorentz space are key ideas to establish both the existence of a unique global-in-time strong (or mild) solution of our system and the stability of our solution.

  9. Rethinking clinical governance: healthcare professionals’ views: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Gepke L; Ahaus, Kees; Welker, Gera A; Heineman, Erik; van der Laan, Maarten J; Muntinghe, Friso L H

    2017-01-01

    Objective Although the guiding principle of clinical governance states that healthcare professionals are the leading contributors to quality and safety in healthcare, little is known about what healthcare professionals perceive as important for clinical governance. The aim of this study is to clarify this by exploring healthcare professionals' views on clinical governance. Design Based on a literature search, a list of 99 elements related to clinical governance was constructed. This list was refined, extended and restricted during a three-round Delphi study. Setting and participants The panel of experts was formed of 24 healthcare professionals from an academic hospital that is seen as a leader in terms of its clinical governance expertise in the Netherlands. Main outcome measures Rated importance of each element on a four-point scale. Results The 50 elements that the panel perceived as most important related to adopting a bottom-up approach to clinical governance, ownership, teamwork, learning from mistakes and feedback. The panel did not reach a consensus concerning elements that referred to patient involvement. Elements that referred to a managerial approach to clinical governance and standardisation of work were rejected by the panel. Conclusions In the views of the panel of experts, clinical governance is a practice-based, value-driven approach that has the goal of delivering the highest possible quality care and ensuring the safety of patients. Bottom-up approaches and effective teamwork are seen as crucial for high quality and safe healthcare. Striving for high quality and safe healthcare is underpinned by continuous learning, shared responsibility and good relationships and collaboration between healthcare professionals, managers and patients. PMID:28082364

  10. Developing a model osteoarthritis consultation: a Delphi consensus exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition managed in general practice, but often not in line with published guidance. The ideal consultation for a patient presenting with possible OA is not known. The aim of the study was to develop the content of a model OA consultation for the assessment and treatment of older adults presenting in general practice with peripheral joint problems. Methods A postal Delphi consensus exercise was undertaken with two expert groups: i) general practitioners (GPs) with expertise in OA management and ii) patients with experience of living with OA. An advisory group generated 61 possible consultation tasks for consideration in the consensus exercise. Expert groups were asked to consider which tasks should be included in the model OA consultation. The exercise was completed by 15 GPs and 14 patients. The level of agreement for inclusion in the model was set at 90%. Results The model OA consultation included 25 tasks to be undertaken during the initial consultation between a GP and a patient presenting with peripheral joint pain. The 25 tasks provide detailed advice on how the following elements of the consultation should be addressed: i) assessment of chronic joint pain, ii) patient’s ideas and concerns, iii) exclusion of red flags, iv) examination, v) provision of the diagnosis and written information, vi) promotion of exercise and weight loss, vii) initial pain management and viii) arranging a follow-up appointment. Both groups prioritised a bio-medical approach to the consultation, rather than a bio-psycho-social one, suggesting a discordance between current thinking and research evidence. Conclusions This study has enabled the priorities of GPs and patients to be identified for a model OA consultation. The results of this consensus study will inform the development of best practice for the management of OA in primary care and the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for OA in primary care. PMID:23320630

  11. Single-photon events in the DELPHI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Elisabeth Falk

    1998-08-01

    A series of studies pertaining to the STIC calorimeter at the DELPHI experiment at LEP is presented, and a new generation of fast wire scanners for emittance measurements at PS is described. The STIC studies are centered around a single-photon analysis, in which the reaction e+c/sp-/to/gamma + invisible particles was studied at center-of-mass energies of 161, 172 and 183 GeV. The cross section thus obtained was used to measure the number of neutrino families, and also to set limits on physics reactions occuring outside the framework of the Standard Model. The single-photon analysis is rendered difficult by an abundance of off-energy electron background. This type of background was examined in a separate series of Monte Carlo simulations, which are also reported. The STIC calorimeter modules have been equipped with a tracking device in the form of silicon-strip detectors, in order to improve the rejection of off-energy electrons in single-proton analyses. Results from a study of the performance of these detectors are presented. A method to reduce coherent noise in the silicon-strip detectors is also described. A new generation of fast wire scanners was installed at PS in 1994. The wire scanners are an important tool for measuring transverse beam profiles, from which transverse emittances are derived. An upgrade of a previous set of wire scanners was essential in order to obtain a reliable instrument that provides highly accurate emittance measurements, in particular in view of the future use of the PS accelerator complex as part of the injector chain for LHC. A presentation is given of the new instrument.

  12. Inhaled treatment of COPD: a Delphi consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Ninane, Vincent; Corhay, Jean-Louis; Germonpré, Paul; Janssens, Wim; Joos, Guy F; Liistro, Giuseppe; Vincken, Walter; Gurdain, Sandra; Vanvlasselaer, Evelyne; Lehouck, An

    2017-01-01

    Background Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) global strategy (2015) provides guidance for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with different first-choice options per GOLD category without specification. Objectives To evaluate the level of medical experts’ consensus on their preferred first-choice treatment within different COPD categories. Methods A two-round Delphi Panel consisting of 15 questions was completed by Belgian pulmonologists (n=31) and European (n=10) COPD experts. Results Good consensus was reached by both expert groups for long-acting bronchodilators instead of short-acting bronchodilators as first-choice treatment in GOLD A. Single bronchodilation with long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) was preferred over long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) and LABA/LAMA as first-choice treatment in GOLD B and GOLD C. For GOLD D patients based on the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)<50%, a very good consensus was reached for LAMA/LABA as first-choice treatment. For GOLD D patients based on frequent or severe exacerbations, there was a good consensus for LABA/LAMA/inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) as first choice in the Belgian group. According to the European experts, both LABA/LAMA and LABA/LAMA/ICS could be the first choice for these patients. Conclusion Belgian and European experts recommend long-acting bronchodilators as first-choice treatment. Treatment containing ICS was found only appropriate in patients with FEV1<50% and ≥2 moderate exacerbations or 1 severe exacerbation/year. PMID:28293106

  13. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; Larry Chick

    2004-05-07

    The objective of this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate; and Task 10 Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program. In this reporting period, unless otherwise noted Task 6--System Fabrication and Task 7--System Testing will be reported within Task 1 System Design and Integration. Task 8--Program Management, Task 9--Stack Testing with Coal Based Reformate, and Task 10--Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program will be reported on in the Executive Summary section of this report.

  14. Core competencies for UK occupational health nurses: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Demou, E.; Kiran, S.; Gaffney, M.; Stevenson, M.; Macdonald, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational health nurses (OHNs) play a pivotal role in the delivery of occupational health (OH) services. Specific competency guidance has been developed in a number of countries, including the UK. While it is acknowledged that UK OHN practice has evolved in recent years, there has been no formal research to capture these developments to ensure that training and curricula remain up-to-date and reflect current practice. Aims To identify current priorities among UK OHNs of the competencies required for OH practice. Methods A modified Delphi study undertaken among representative OHN networks in the UK. This formed part of a larger study including UK and international occupational physicians. The study was conducted in two rounds using a questionnaire based on available guidance on training competencies for OH practice, the published literature, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Consensus among OHNs was high with 7 out of the 12 domains scoring 100% in rating. ‘Good clinical care’ was the principal domain ranked most important, followed by ‘general principles of assessment & management of occupational hazards to health’. ‘Research methods’ and ‘teaching & educational supervision’ were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established UK OHNs’ current priorities on the competencies required for OH practice. The timing of this paper is opportune with the formal launch of the Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing planned in 2018 and should inform the development of competency requirements as part of the Faculty’s goals for standard setting in OHN education and training. PMID:27492470

  15. Expert Consensus on Characteristics of Wisdom: A Delphi Method Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Ardelt, Monika; Blazer, Dan; Kraemer, Helena C.; Vaillant, George; Meeks, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Wisdom has received increasing attention in empirical research in recent years, especially in gerontology and psychology, but consistent definitions of wisdom remain elusive. We sought to better characterize this concept via an expert consensus panel using a 2-phase Delphi method. Design and Methods: A survey questionnaire comprised 53 Likert scale statements related to the concepts of wisdom, intelligence, and spirituality was developed to determine if and how wisdom was viewed as being distinct from the latter 2 concepts. Of the 57 international wisdom experts contacted by e-mail, 30 completed the Phase 1 survey and 27 also completed the Phase 2 survey. Results: In Phase 1, there were significant group differences among the concepts of wisdom, intelligence, and spirituality on 49 of the 53 items rated by the experts. Wisdom differed from intelligence on 46 of these 49 items, whereas wisdom differed from spirituality on 31 items. In Phase 2, we sought to define wisdom further by selecting 12 items based on Phase 1 results. Most experts agreed on many of the suggested characteristics of wisdom—that is, it is uniquely human; a form of advanced cognitive and emotional development that is experience driven; and a personal quality, albeit a rare one, which can be learned, increases with age, can be measured, and is not likely to be enhanced by taking medication. Implications: There was considerable agreement among the expert participants on wisdom being a distinct entity and a number of its characteristic qualities. These data should help in designing additional empirical research on wisdom. PMID:20233730

  16. Role of uL3 in Multidrug Resistance in p53-Mutated Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Saide, Assunta; Smaldone, Silvia; Faraonio, Raffaella; Russo, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common causes of death among adults. Chemotherapy is crucial in determining patient survival and quality of life. However, the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) continues to pose a significant challenge in the management of cancer. In this study, we analyzed the role of human ribosomal protein uL3 (formerly rpL3) in multidrug resistance. Our studies revealed that uL3 is a key determinant of multidrug resistance in p53-mutated lung cancer cells by controlling the cell redox status. We established and characterized a multidrug resistant Calu-6 cell line. We found that uL3 down-regulation correlates positively with multidrug resistance. Restoration of the uL3 protein level re-sensitized the resistant cells to the drug by regulating the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glutathione content, glutamate release, and cystine uptake. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase assays demonstrated that uL3 coordinated the expression of stress-response genes acting as transcriptional repressors of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and glutathione S-transferase α1 (GST-α1), independently of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Altogether our results describe a new function of uL3 as a regulator of oxidative stress response genes and advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying multidrug resistance in cancers. PMID:28273808

  17. Therapeutic Potential of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mycolic Acid Transporter, MmpL3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Wallach, Joshua B.; North, E. Jeffrey; Lee, Richard E.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, whole-cell-based screens for novel small molecule inhibitors active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in culture followed by the whole-genome sequencing of spontaneous resistant mutants have identified multiple chemical scaffolds thought to kill the bacterium through the inactivation of the mycolic acid transporter, MmpL3. Consistent with the fact that MmpL3 is required for the formation of the mycobacterial outer membrane, we have conclusively shown in this study, using conditionally regulated knockdown mutants, that mmpL3 is required for the replication and viability of M. tuberculosis, both under standard laboratory growth conditions and during the acute and chronic phases of infection in mice. Speaking for the vulnerability of this target, silencing mmpL3 had a rapid bactericidal effect on actively replicating cells in vitro and reduced by 3 to 5 logs in less than 4 weeks the bacterial loads of acutely and chronically infected mouse lungs, respectively. Depletion of MmpL3 further rendered M. tuberculosis hypersusceptible to MmpL3 inhibitors. The exquisite vulnerability of MmpL3 at all stages of the infection establishes this transporter as an attractive new target with the potential to improve and shorten current drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis chemotherapies. PMID:27297488

  18. Mode analysis of photonic crystal L3 cavities in self-suspended lithium niobate membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Diziain, Séverine Geiss, Reinhard; Zilk, Matthias; Schrempel, Frank; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Pertsch, Thomas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-16

    We report on a multimodal analysis of photonic crystal L3 cavities milled in lithium niobate free-standing membranes. The classical L3 cavity geometry is compared to an L3 cavity containing a second lattice superimposed on the primary one. Those two different geometries are investigated in terms of vertical radiation and quality (Q) factor for each mode of the cavities. Depending on the cavity geometry, some modes undergo an enhancement of their vertical radiation into small angles while other modes experience a higher Q factor. Experimental characterizations are corroborated by three-dimensional finite difference time domain simulations.

  19. A review of Delphi surveys conducted to establish research priorities by specialty nursing organizations from 1985 to 1995.

    PubMed

    Rudy, S F

    1996-01-01

    Many nursing specialty organizations have completed Delphi surveys to establish their research priorities. The Society of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Nurses (SOHN) is currently conducting its own Delphi survey to the same end. This paper reviews the various Delphi methods employed by specialty nursing organizations on their members between 1985 and 1995. The studies reviewed are carefully limited to those commissioned by specialty nursing organizations and exclusive of those conducted by independent researchers who may have utilized specialty organization members. It presents an introduction to and definition of the Delphi methodology, as well as delving into methodologic and practical aspects of implementing a Delphi survey. It adds to the literature some information previously lacking on cost and time lines for studies, and will serve as a useful guide for future specialty nursing organizations who undertake a Delphi study as a novice effort. It intentionally does not recount the research priorities identified because it does not want to influence, in any way, responses of SOHN members involved in the ongoing Round I Delphi.

  20. Practices for the Use of Technology in High Schools: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The Delphi method was used to generate practices regarding the use of technology in high schools. In addition to generating the practices, teacher leaders, administrators, researchers, and policymakers were asked to rate and come to consensus regarding their importance. Consensus was achieved on 32 of the 34 practices and six themes emerged around…

  1. Teacher Leadership: A Delphi Study of Factors in Building Teacher Leadership Capacity in Elementary Educational Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castilleja Gray, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify and describe the most important factors that motivate or deter teachers in deciding to take on the informal or formal role of teacher-leader in Riverside County elementary school districts. Methodology: Endemic of a Delphi method, the instruments used within this study collected data…

  2. Idea Generation and Exploration: Benefits and Limitations of the Policy Delphi Research Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Kathy K.; Hart, Jan K.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers use the policy Delphi method to explore a complex topic with little historical context that requires expert opinion to fully understand underlying issues. The benefit of this research technique is the use of experts who have more timely information than can be gleamed from extant literature. Additionally, those experts place…

  3. Comparing Management Models of Secondary Schools in Tamaulipas, Mexico: An Exploration with a Delphi Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro-Leal, Marco Aurelio; Garcia, Concepcion Nino; Saldivar, Luisa Caballero

    2012-01-01

    For a preliminary exploration of management models between two secondary schools, a Delphi method was used in order to identify and focus relevant topics for a larger research. A first approximation with this method proved to be a heuristic tool to focus and define some categories and guidelines of enquiry. It was found that in both of the schools…

  4. Delphi in Criminal Justice Policy: A Case Study on Judgmental Forecasting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loyens, Kim; Maesschalck, Jeroen; Bouckaert, Geert

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an in-depth case study analysis of a pilot project organized by the section "Strategic Analysis" of the Belgian Federal Police. Using the Delphi method, which is a judgmental forecasting technique, a panel of experts was questioned about future developments of crime, based on their expertise in criminal or social…

  5. The Delphi Technique: A Research Strategy for Career and Technical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitt-Gohdes, Wanda L.; Crews, Tena B.

    2004-01-01

    Career and technical education research often centers around quantitative research designs. The Delphi Technique provides a structured communication process designed to produce a detailed examination of a topic and/or problem and discussion from the participating group. The contributions of individuals via this tool produce a group perspective not…

  6. A View to the Future of the Library and Information Science Profession: A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruchson-Arbib, Shifra; Bronstein, Jenny

    2002-01-01

    Discusses results of a Delphi study conducted in Israel that examined the views of library and information science (LIS) experts on the future of the profession in light of the changes in information technology. Considers the transition to virtual libraries; to a user-centered approach; and skills and roles of LIS professionals. (Author/LRW)

  7. Factors Influencing Continuing Professional Development: A Delphi Study among Nursing Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekelmans, Gerard; Poell, Rob F.; van Wijk, Kees

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to present an inventory of expert opinions on the factors that influence the participation of registered nurses in continuing professional development (CPD) activities. Design/methodology/approach: A Delphi study was conducted among 38 Dutch experts (nursing employers, managers, education institutions, and…

  8. Using Delphi to Achieve Congruent Objectives and Activities in a Pediatrics Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Keith G.; Moore, Larry F.

    1979-01-01

    The use of the Delphi technique is demonstrated in conjunction with activity analysis to obtain consensus on and clarity of objectives and activities of full-time members of an academic medical department. The results show which activities contributed to the department objectives and which areas have a divergence of objectives. (Author/LBH)

  9. Identifying the Professional Development Needs of Adjunct Faculty Using an Online Delphi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddie, Stephani B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this online Delphi was to explore the professional development needs and preferences of adjunct faculty, specifically those who teach online. The study involved adjunct faculty who were categorized by their self-selected type of adjunct faculty member: specialist, aspiring academic, professional/freelancer, and career-ender. Through…

  10. Current Developments in Education in Mexico and Trends for the 1980s: A Modified Delphi Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Stanley G.

    Twenty-nine professional educators at the Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara and post-graduate students of educational administration participated in a study to identify trends in education based on change in the society and the environment. Researchers used a modification of Delphi Technique, an intuitive method for organizing and sharing the…

  11. Development of a School Nursing Research Agenda in Florida: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Barry, Charlotte D.

    2006-01-01

    Research is important to the image, visibility, and viability of school nursing. Each state school nursing association should evaluate member commitment to school nursing research based on their unique set of financial, educational, and organizational resources. A 3-round Delphi study was conducted in which Florida school nurses identified…

  12. The Semiconductor Industry and Emerging Technologies: A Study Using a Modified Delphi Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Edgar A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to determine what leaders in the semiconductor industry thought the future of computing would look like and what emerging materials showed the most promise to overcome the current theoretical limit of 10 nanometers for silicon dioxide. The researcher used a modified Delphi technique in two…

  13. Knowledge as an Aspect of Scientific Competence for Citizenship: Results of a Delphi Study in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    España-Ramos, Enrique; González-García, Francisco José; Blanco-López, Ángel; Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on scientific knowledge as one aspect of the scientific competencies that citizens should ideally possess. The analysis is based on a Delphi study we conducted with Spanish experts from different science-related fields. The results showed that although the experts proposed several examples of scientific knowledge, the degree…

  14. Assessing the Trends and Challenges of Teaching Marketing Abroad: A Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    The past 20 years have seen a growth in the teaching of marketing in business schools around the world. This article reports the trends and challenges that will face U.S. marketing educators teaching abroad over the next 10 years. Predictions are from a Delphi panel of U.S. marketing educators experienced in teaching marketing abroad to non-U.S.…

  15. Trends that FCS Education Should Address: A Delphi Study Reveals Top 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Karen L.; Davis, Kimberlee

    2011-01-01

    This study used the Delphi method to identify trends of importance to family and consumer sciences (FCS) education. A panel of 21 FCS education experts identified 16 trends and evaluated them by importance, desirability, feasibility, and confidence in validity of the trend. Nutrition appeared as a top priority, followed by consumer economics. The…

  16. Data Driven Decision Making and the School Administrator: A Delphi Study Forecast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, Cheryl Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Although the number of high-needs schools that are failing to achieve "Adequate Yearly Progress" (AYP) steadily increases, some are successfully increasing student achievement, staff productivity and collegiality. The purpose of this study was to use a three-round Delphi process to obtain the expert opinions of 10 administrators who…

  17. Recommended Skill Requirements of Recent Management Information Systems Graduates for Employment: A Modified Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strnad, Michael A., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Modified Delphi study was to achieve a consensus and forecast a prediction from expert IT hiring managers on what skills are required of MIS graduates for employment. In doing so, guidance could be provided to academic leaders who design curricula for MIS students on the required skills for employment. This study was conducted…

  18. Incorporating Nonparametric Statistics into Delphi Studies in Library and Information Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Boryung; Jin, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Delphi technique is widely used in library and information science research. However, many researchers in the field fail to employ standard statistical tests when using this technique. This makes the technique vulnerable to criticisms of its reliability and validity. The general goal of this article is to explore how…

  19. A Delphi Study of Effective Practices for Developing Competency-Based Learning Models in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre-Hite, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is an increase in competency-based education programs in higher education institutions in response to student and employer needs. However, research is lacking on effective practices for developing competencies, assessments, and learning resources for these programs. The purpose of this qualitative Delphi study was to gather expert…

  20. Identification of Core Competencies for an Undergraduate Food Safety Curriculum Using a Modified Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lynette M.; Wiedmann, Martin; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia; Oliver, Haley F.; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Moore, Christina M.; Stevenson, Clinton D.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Identification of core competencies for undergraduates in food safety is critical to assure courses and curricula are appropriate in maintaining a well-qualified food safety workforce. The purpose of this study was to identify and refine core competencies relevant to postsecondary food safety education using a modified Delphi method. Twenty-nine…

  1. Using the Delphi Technique to Assess Educational Needs Related to Extension's 4-H Beef Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Chun; Gamon, Julia A.

    1997-01-01

    Delphi panels completing questionnaires included 32 parents of 4-H students, 16 extension beef specialists, 21 4-H field specialists, and 21 industry representatives. They identified 31 subject-matter and 30 life-skill topics useful for 4-H manuals. Emerging topics included consumer and environmental concerns. (SK)

  2. Workplace Issues in Extension--A Delphi Study of Extension Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroth, Michael; Peutz, Joey

    2011-01-01

    Using the Delphi technique, expert Extension educators identified and prioritized those workplace issues they believe will be the most important to attract, motivate, and retain Extension educators/agents over the next 5 to 7 years. Obtaining and then utilizing a talented, highly motivated workforce during a period when many will be retiring will…

  3. A Delphi Survey on Citizenship Education in Asean Countries: Findings for Brunei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Hajah Sallimah Haji Mohammed; Laxman, Kumar; Jawawi, Rosmawijah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Delphi Survey was to elucidate Bruneian Education experts' responses to five questions regarding their knowledge and understanding of the charateristics of citizenship education viz. Environment, Coexistence, Culture, Social Justice and Equity, Democracy, Sustainable Development, Interdependence, Foreign Language, Social Welfare,…

  4. The Policy Delphi: A Method for Identifying Intended and Unintended Consequences of Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, R. Adam

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights a rarely utilized but effective technique for identifying intended and unintended consequences of past or current policy or policy change. The author guides the reader through the process of identifying potential participants, contacting participants, developing the policy Delphi instrument, and analyzing the findings by…

  5. Development Of A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack By Delphi And Battelle

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, Subhasish; Shaffer, Steven J.; Zizelman, James; Chick, Lawrence A.; Baskaran, Suresh; Chou, Y. S.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Deibler, John E.; Maupin, Gary D.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Peters, Timothy J.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Weil, K. Scott; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-01-20

    Delphi and Battelle are developing a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack for transportation and residential applications. This paper describes the status of development of the Generation 2 stack and key progress made in addressing some of the challenges in this technology.

  6. Using Delphi Methodology to Design Assessments of Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manizade, Agida Gabil; Mason, Marguerite M.

    2011-01-01

    Descriptions of methodologies that can be used to create items for assessing teachers' "professionally situated" knowledge are lacking in mathematics education research literature. In this study, researchers described and used the Delphi method to design an instrument to measure teachers' pedagogical content knowledge. The instrument focused on a…

  7. Identification of Researchable Topics on International Agricultural Education. A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.; Madou-Bangurah, Kabba

    A modified Delphi technique was used to identify topics in international agricultural education considered by eight experts on agricultural education to be areas needing research. All eight (100%) of the experts completed the first-round mail questionnaire, and seven (87.5%) completed the second and third rounds. Survey category areas were as…

  8. Towards an Understanding of Instructional Design Heuristics: An Exploratory Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Cindy S.; Ertmer, Peggy A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that experienced instructional designers often use heuristics and adapted models when engaged in the instructional design problem-solving process. This study used the Delphi technique to identify a core set of heuristics designers reported as being important to the success of the design process. The overarching purpose of the…

  9. Determining e-Portfolio Elements in Learning Process Using Fuzzy Delphi Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamad, Syamsul Nor Azlan; Embi, Mohamad Amin; Nordin, Norazah

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Fuzzy Delphi method results obtained in the study on determining e-Portfolio elements in learning process for art and design context. This method bases on qualified experts that assure the validity of the collected information. In particular, the confirmation of elements is based on experts' opinion and…

  10. Development of an Adolescent Alcohol Misuse Intervention Based on the Prototype Willingness Model: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Emma; Martin, Jilly; Foxcroft, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the use of the Delphi method to gain expert feedback on the identification of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) and development of a novel intervention to reduce adolescent alcohol misuse, based on the Prototype Willingness Model (PWM) of health risk behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: Four…

  11. Identifying Core Mobile Learning Faculty Competencies Based Integrated Approach: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbarbary, Rafik Said

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on the integrated approach as a concept framework to identify, categorize, and rank a key component of mobile learning core competencies for Egyptian faculty members in higher education. The field investigation framework used four rounds Delphi technique to determine the importance rate of each component of core competencies…

  12. Assessment Leaders' Perspectives of Institutional Cultures of Assessment: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Matthew; Henderson, Susan; Bustamante, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Institutional cultures of assessment are praised as beneficial to student learning. Yet, extant studies have not explored the theoretical foundations and pragmatic approaches to shaping cultures of assessment. The researchers used the Delphi method to explore 10 higher education assessment leaders' attitudes and theoretical perspectives regarding…

  13. Designing Graduate-Level Plant Breeding Curriculum: A Delphi Study of Private Sector Stakeholder Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jane K.; Repinski, Shelby L.; Hayes, Kathryn N.; Bliss, Frederick A.; Trexler, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    A broad-based survey using the Delphi method was conducted to garner current information from private sector stakeholders and build consensus opinions supporting key ideas for enhancing plant breeder education and training. This study asked respondents to suggest and rate topics and content they deemed most important to plant breeding graduate…

  14. Research priorities for nursing professional development: a modified e-Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Harper, Mary G; Asselin, Marilyn E; Kurtz, Abby C; MacArthur, Susan K; Perron, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the National Nursing Staff Development Organization Research Committee identified the need to delineate research priorities for nursing professional development (NPD). A Delphi study with 13 experts in NPD resulted in the identification of 24 priorities for the next 5 years. These priorities provide the future direction for NPD research and funding.

  15. Current and Emerging Ethical Issues in Counseling: A Delphi Study of Expert Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlihy, Barbara; Dufrene, Roxane L.

    2011-01-01

    A Delphi study was conducted to ascertain the opinions of panel experts regarding the most important current and emerging ethical issues facing the counseling profession. Expert opinions on ethical issues in counselor preparation also were sought. Eighteen panelists responded to 3 rounds of data collection interspersed with feedback. Themes that…

  16. Co-Creating Nano-Imaginaries: Report of a Delphi-Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deblonde, Marian; Van Oudheusden, Michiel; Evers, Johan; Goorden, Lieve

    2008-01-01

    In the first phase of the research project Nanotechnologies for Tomorrow's Society (www.nanosoc.be), the research consortium explored a variety of futuristic visions or technoscientific imaginaries. This exploration took the form of a Policy Delphi, adapted to the particular objective of jointly constructing nano-imaginaries, taking participants'…

  17. Qualitative Delphi Study of Factors Influencing Data Center Investment in Eco-Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, M. Bennett

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative investigation explored the diffusion of eco-innovations within the U.S. data center industry from 2007 to 2015 whose adoption was intended to decouple digital economy growth from environmental impact. Using diffusion of innovation theory to inform the study, and synthesizing subject matter expert input from a Delphi panel…

  18. Financial Leadership Competencies for Public College and University Presidential Leaders in Georgia: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the mixed-method Delphi study is to identify the financial leadership competencies considered most important in operating public higher education institutions. The current study also determined whether differences existed in the perceptions of participants' age, level of education, years of service as a president, the number of…

  19. Competencies for Leaders of Volunteers During the Next Decade: A National Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Barry L.

    Using the Delphi technique, a nationwide panel of experts identified 33 competencies that volunteer administrators (VAs) will need during the next decade and categorized them into these five constructs: organizational leadership; systems leadership; organizational culture; personal skills; and management skills. Twelve barriers to acquiring the…

  20. Research Priorities for YouTube and Video-Sharing Technologies: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelson, Chareen; Rice, Kerry; Wyzard, Constance

    2012-01-01

    Online video-sharing services, particularly YouTube, have gained an audience of billions of users including educators and scholars. While the academic literature provides some evidence that YouTube has been studied and written about, little is known about priorities for YouTube research. The study employed the Delphi method to obtain a consensus…

  1. Increasing Activeness and Learning Outcomes by Developing Borland Delphi 7.0 Application as Instructional Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setyorini, Dyna; Churiyah, Madziatul

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to produce instructional media of petty cash fund with Borland Delphi 7.0 application in the Finance Administration subject, Managing Petty Cash Fund material in class XII APK in Vocational High School (SMK) Negeri 1 Pasuruan, East Java, Indonesia. This study used "Research and Development" (R&D) design procedures…

  2. Achieving Next Generation Science Standards through Agricultural Contexts: A Delphi Study of Outdoor Education Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meals, Anthony; Washburn, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    A Delphi survey was conducted with 30 outdoor education experts in Kansas. Participant responses helped frame a Kansas definition of outdoor education and identified essential educational goals and outcomes, critical components for effective outdoor education programming, and barriers facing outdoor education in Kansas. The study highlights…

  3. The Essential Components of Coach Training for Mental Health Professionals: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarity, Marlene Therese

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to discover how coach training experts define coaching and what they would identify to be the essential components of a coach training program for mental health professionals. Methods. A panel of nine experts, through an iterative Delphi process of responding to three rounds of questionnaires, provided…

  4. A Classical Delphi Study to Identify the Barriers of Pursuing Green Information and Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotay, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, classical Delphi study served to explore the apparent lack of corporate commitment to prioritized Green Information Communication Technologies (ICTs), which could delay the economic and social benefits for maximizing the use of natural energy resources in a weak economy. The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership…

  5. Views and Dreams: A Delphi Investigation into Library 2.0 Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Jenny; Aharony, Noa

    2009-01-01

    The study's purpose was to investigate the views and opinions of librarians about the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies into library operations and services. The Delphi technique was chosen as the method of inquiry in this study, in which a group of panelists graded the desirability and probability of a list of statements. Thirty-nine…

  6. A Delphi Investigation into Future Trends in E-Learning in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa; Bronstein, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the views and opinions of e-learning experts regarding future trends in the e-learning arena. The Delphi technique was chosen as a method of study. This technique is an efficient and effective group communication process designed to systematically elicit judgments from experts in their selected area of…

  7. A Delphi Study on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Applied on Computer Science (CS) Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Marcela; Mas-Machuca, Marta; Martinez-Costa, Carme; Maillet, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) is a new pedagogical domain aiming to study the usage of information and communication technologies to support teaching and learning. The following study investigated how this domain is used to increase technical skills in Computer Science (CS). A Delphi method was applied, using three-rounds of online survey…

  8. The Expansion of mtDNA Haplogroup L3 within and out of Africa.

    PubMed

    Soares, Pedro; Alshamali, Farida; Pereira, Joana B; Fernandes, Verónica; Silva, Nuno M; Afonso, Carla; Costa, Marta D; Musilová, Eliska; Macaulay, Vincent; Richards, Martin B; Cerny, Viktor; Pereira, Luísa

    2012-03-01

    Although fossil remains show that anatomically modern humans dispersed out of Africa into the Near East ∼100 to 130 ka, genetic evidence from extant populations has suggested that non-Africans descend primarily from a single successful later migration. Within the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) tree, haplogroup L3 encompasses not only many sub-Saharan Africans but also all ancient non-African lineages, and its age therefore provides an upper bound for the dispersal out of Africa. An analysis of 369 complete African L3 sequences places this maximum at ∼70 ka, virtually ruling out a successful exit before 74 ka, the date of the Toba volcanic supereruption in Sumatra. The similarity of the age of L3 to its two non-African daughter haplogroups, M and N, suggests that the same process was likely responsible for both the L3 expansion in Eastern Africa and the dispersal of a small group of modern humans out of Africa to settle the rest of the world. The timing of the expansion of L3 suggests a link to improved climatic conditions after ∼70 ka in Eastern and Central Africa rather than to symbolically mediated behavior, which evidently arose considerably earlier. The L3 mtDNA pool within Africa suggests a migration from Eastern Africa to Central Africa ∼60 to 35 ka and major migrations in the immediate postglacial again linked to climate. The largest population size increase seen in the L3 data is 3-4 ka in Central Africa, corresponding to Bantu expansions, leading diverse L3 lineages to spread into Eastern and Southern Africa in the last 3-2 ka.

  9. Synergistic Interactions of MmpL3 Inhibitors with Antitubercular Compounds In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sanchez-Hidalgo, Andrea; Jones, Victoria; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; North, E. Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of inhibitors of the essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid transporter, MmpL3, are currently under development as potential novel antituberculosis agents. Using the checkerboard method to study the interaction profiles of various antituberculosis drugs or experimental compounds with two different chemotypes inhibiting this transporter (indolcarboxamides and adamantyl ureas), we showed that MmpL3 inhibitors act synergistically with rifampin, bedaquiline, clofazimine, and β-lactams. PMID:28115355

  10. Tagging staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) with TGFaL3 for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Forough; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Saraji, Alireza Azizi; Hesaraki, Saeed; Aslani, Mohammad Mehdi; Mousavi, Seyed Fazlollah; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2016-04-01

    Recent research has attempted to direct superantigens towards tumors by means of tumor-targeted superantigen (TTS) strategy. In this study, we explored the antitumor property of TTS by fusing the third loop of transforming growth factor α (TGFαL3) to staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) and investigated the possibility of the therapeutic application of TGFαL3-SEB as a novel antitumor candidate in mice bearing breast cancer. Treatment was performed through intratumoral and intravenous injection of TGFαL3-SEB. Tumor size/volume, long-term survival, and cytokine secretion were assessed. In addition, the toxicity of each treatment on liver and kidneys was examined. Our results indicated that the relative tumor volume significantly increased in the mice receiving intratumoral TGFaL3-SEB (p < 0.05). Surprisingly, 5 out of the 14 mice were cleared from the tumor thoroughly in 10-25 days after intratumoral administration of TGFaL3-SEB. Quantification of cytokines clearly showed that the mice receiving intratumoral SEB significantly secreted higher interferon γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). The antitumor effect was followed by inhibition of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and micro vascularization (CD31). The highest and lowest levels of tumor necrosis were observed in the intratumoral administration of TGFαL3-SEB (85 %) and PBS (14 %), respectively. Intratumoral injection of TGFαL3-SEB increased the lifespan of the mice so 37.5 % of them could survive for more than 6 months (p < 0.05). Overall, our findings indicated that intratumoral administration of TGFαL3-SEB effectively inhibited the growth of breast tumors through induction of necrosis and suppressing proliferation and angiogenesis without systemic toxicity.

  11. Discovery of a chemical probe for the L3MBTL3 methyl-lysine reader domain

    PubMed Central

    James, Lindsey I.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Zhong, Nan; Krichevsky, Liubov; Korboukh, Victoria K.; Herold, Martin J.; MacNevin, Christopher J.; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Sagum, Cari A.; Tempel, Wolfram; Marcon, Edyta; Guo, Hongbo; Gao, Cen; Huang, Xi-Ping; Duan, Shili; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Kireev, Dmitri B.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Brown, Peter J.; Bedford, Mark T.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Frye, Stephen V.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the discovery of UNC1215, a potent and selective chemical probe for the methyl-lysine (Kme) reading function of L3MBTL3, a member of the malignant brain tumor (MBT) family of chromatin interacting transcriptional repressors. UNC1215 binds L3MBTL3 with a Kd of 120 nM, competitively displacing mono- or dimethyl-lysine containing peptides, and is greater than 50-fold selective versus other members of the MBT family while also demonstrating selectivity against more than 200 other reader domains examined. X-ray crystallography identified a novel 2:2 polyvalent mode of interaction. In cells, UNC1215 is non-toxic and binds directly to L3MBTL3 via the Kme-binding pocket of the MBT domains. UNC1215 increases the cellular mobility of GFP-L3MBTL3 fusion proteins and point mutants that disrupt the Kme binding function of GFP-L3MBTL3 phenocopy the effects of UNC1215. Finally, UNC1215 demonstrates a novel Kme-dependent interaction of L3MBTL3 with BCLAF1, a protein implicated in DNA damage repair and apoptosis. PMID:23292653

  12. Essentiality of mmpL3 and impact of its silencing on Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Degiacomi, Giulia; Benjak, Andrej; Madacki, Jan; Boldrin, Francesca; Provvedi, Roberta; Palù, Giorgio; Kordulakova, Jana; Cole, Stewart T.; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    MmpL3 is an inner membrane transporter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis responsible for the export of trehalose momomycolate, a precursor of the mycobacterial outer membrane component trehalose dimycolate (TDM), as well as mycolic acids bound to arabinogalactan. MmpL3 represents an emerging target for tuberculosis therapy. In this paper, we describe the construction and characterization of an mmpL3 knockdown strain of M. tuberculosis. Downregulation of mmpL3 led to a stop in bacterial division and rapid cell death, preceded by the accumulation of TDM precursors. MmpL3 was also shown to be essential for growth in monocyte-derived human macrophages. Using RNA-seq we also found that MmpL3 depletion caused up-regulation of 47 genes and down-regulation of 23 genes (at least 3-fold change and false discovery rate ≤1%). Several genes related to osmoprotection and metal homeostasis were induced, while several genes related to energy production and mycolic acids biosynthesis were repressed suggesting that inability to synthesize a correct outer membrane leads to changes in cellular permeability and a metabolic downshift. PMID:28240248

  13. Ubiquitin dimers control the hydrolase activity of UCH-L3.

    PubMed

    Setsuie, Rieko; Sakurai, Mikako; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Wada, Keiji

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) carboxy terminal hydrolase (UCH)-L1 and UCH-L3 are two of the deubiquitinating enzymes expressed in the brain. Both gad mice, which lack UCH-L1 expression and Uchl3 knockout mice exhibit neurodegeneration, although at distinct areas. These phenotypes indicate the importance of UCH-L1 and UCH-L3 in the regulation of the central nervous system. However, molecular substrates and the molecular regulators of UCH-L1 and UCH-L3 remain poorly identified. Here we show that Ub dimers interact non-covalently with UCH-L3 in vitro and in cells. These interactions were not observed with UCH-L1 in cells. In vitro, K48-linked Ub dimers pronouncedly inhibited the hydrolase activity of UCH-L3, while mono-Ub, a previously identified interacting protein, inhibited the hydrolase activity of UCH-L1. These results indicate that mono-Ub and Ub dimers may regulate the enzymatic functions of UCH-L1 and UCH-L3, respectively, in vivo.

  14. Medication dispensing errors in Palestinian community pharmacy practice: a formal consensus using the Delphi technique.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Haddad, Aseel; Khawaja, Baraa; Raie, Rand; Zaneen, Sireen; Edais, Tasneem

    2016-10-01

    Background Medication dispensing errors (MDEs) are frequent in community pharmacy practice. A definition of MDEs and scenarios representing MDE situations in Palestinian community pharmacy practice were not previously approached using formal consensus techniques. Objective This study was conducted to achieve consensus on a definition of MDEs and a wide range of scenarios that should or should not be considered as MDEs in Palestinian community pharmacy practice by a panel of community pharmacists. Setting Community pharmacy practice in Palestine. Method This was a descriptive study using the Delphi technique. A panel of fifty community pharmacists was recruited from different geographical locations of the West Bank of Palestine. A three round Delphi technique was followed to achieve consensus on a proposed definition of MDEs and 83 different scenarios representing potential MDEs using a nine-point scale. Main outcome measure Agreement or disagreement of a panel of community pharmacists on a proposed definition of MDEs and a series of scenarios representing potential MDEs. Results In the first Delphi round, views of key contact community pharmacists on MDEs were explored and situations representing potential MDEs were collected. In the second Delphi round, consensus was achieved to accept the proposed definition and to include 49 (59 %) of the 83 proposed scenarios as MDEs. In the third Delphi round, consensus was achieved to include further 13 (15.7 %) scenarios as MDEs, exclude 9 (10.8 %) scenarios and the rest of 12 (14.5 %) scenarios were considered equivocal based on the opinions of the panelists. Conclusion Consensus on a definition of MDEs and scenarios representing MDE situations in Palestinian community pharmacy practice was achieved using a formal consensus technique. The use of consensual definitions and scenarios representing MDE situations in community pharmacy practice might minimize methodological variations and their significant effects on the

  15. Critical roles of DNase1l3l in lens nuclear degeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Iida, Atsumi; Tabata, Yoko; Baba, Yukihiro; Fujii, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2014-11-01

    The vertebrate lens undergoes organelle and nuclear degradation during lens development, allowing the lens to become transparent. DNase2b is an enzyme responsible for nuclear degradation in the mouse lens; however, dnase2b expression in zebrafish showed a distribution pattern that differed from that in mice. No zebrafish dnase2b was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction until around 120 h postfertilization (hpf), suggesting that dnase2b is not expressed in the critical period for lens nuclear degradation, which corresponds to 56-74 hpf. However, public database searches have indicated that dnase1l3l is strongly and specifically expressed in embryonic zebrafish lens. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that dnase1l3l expression began around 36 hpf and was found exclusively in the lens until the adult stage. Morpholino (MO)-dependent downregulation of dnase1l3l expression during early development in zebrafish led to the failure of nuclear degradation in the lens. Immunostaining of lens sections showed that expression of Pax6, Prox1 and β-catenin was comparable to the control in the early stage of development in dnase1l3l-MO injected embryos. However, downregulation of expression of these genes in lens was not observed in dnase1l3l-MO-treated zebrafish at 72 hpf, suggesting that the lens development was halted. Taken together, we showed that dnase1l3l plays major roles in nuclear degradation in zebrafish lens development. No homologous gene was found in other species in public databases, suggesting that dnase1l3l developed and acquired its function specifically in zebrafish.

  16. Functional analysis of plant NB-LRR gene L3 by using E. coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Xuan, Hua; Gao, Zhiyong

    2016-09-30

    Plant NB-LRR genes mediate plant innate immunity and cause the programmed cell death of plant cells. Very little, however, is known about these processes. Taken advantage of easy manipulation of bacteria, genetic analysis was made to understand the mechanism of lethality of NB-LRR proteins to bacteria and correlate the information back to how NB-LRR proteins cause cell death in plants. It was found that only L3 encoded by NB-LRR gene L3 (At1g15890) specifically caused significant death of BL21(DE3), while other NBS-LRR proteins did not, and 760-851, the truncated form of L3, was essential to the lethality of L3. Gene yedZ (EG14048) and nupG (EG10664) were identified by genome re-sequencing from E. coli, both of which mediate the toxicity of L3 in E. coli. Furthermore, NupG can affect the activity of peroxidase and significantly suppress plant cell death, which is induced by NB-LRR protein RPM1(D505V) encoded by RPM1 (At3g07040) in N. benthamiana. These findings provide evidence that functional analysis of plant NB-LRR genes in microorganisms might be a potential and rapid method.

  17. MmpL3 Inhibitors: Diverse Chemical Scaffolds Inhibit the Same Target.

    PubMed

    Poce, Giovanna; Consalvi, Sara; Biava, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    MmpL3 belongs to the Resistance, Nodulation and Division (RND) superfamily whose role in mycobacteria is the formation of the outer membrane. Indeed, it has been shown that MmpL3 is associated with the export of mycolic acids in the form of trehalose monomycolates (TMM) to the periplasmic space or the outer membrane. In the last few years several whole cell-based screenings of compound libraries brought by a number of diverse chemical scaffolds active against M. tuberculosis (Mtb) that surprisingly share MmpL3 as target. The diverse identified pharmacophores owe important differences among each other, in fact while some of them display inhibitory activity against pathogens that are devoid of mycolic acids and are active against non-replicating Mtb bacilli, some others specifically target mycobacteria and do not kill non-replicating bacilli. The scope of this review is to provide the recent advances in MmpL3 inhibitor discovery with a special focus on structure activity relationship (SAR) studies in order to provide information that could help in developing novel membrane-active anti- TB agents. Moreover, this review will provide the most recent insights into the modes of action of the MmpL3 inhibitors.

  18. ESA’s L3 mission: A space-based gravitational-wave observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Guido

    2016-04-01

    ESA selected the Gravitational Universe as the science theme for one of its future L-class missions. L3 will measure gravitational waves in the 10µHz to 100mHz window; probably the richest of all gravitational wave windows. Expected sources in this frequency band range from massive black hole mergers to extreme mass ratio inspirals to compact galactic binary systems.The L3 mission is expected to be based on the eLISA/LISA design which was submitted by the eLISA consortium as a notional mission concept. NASA started discussions with ESA how to join L3 and participates in ESA’s Gravitational Observatory Advisory Team. NASA is also in the process of setting up its own L3-Study team to look at potential US contributions to L3. This group will also act as the US partner for the eLISA consortium. In summary, the space component of the GW community has gained significant momentum over the last 12 months and a successful pathfinder mission and potential GW discoveries by Advanced LIGO and/or pulsar timing arrays should further strengthen the case for LISA.

  19. DelPhi Web Server: A comprehensive online suite for electrostatic calculations of biological macromolecules and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subhra; Witham, Shawn; Zhang, Jie; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Rocchia, Walter; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Here we report a web server, the DelPhi web server, which utilizes DelPhi program to calculate electrostatic energies and the corresponding electrostatic potential and ionic distributions, and dielectric map. The server provides extra services to fix structural defects, as missing atoms in the structural file and allows for generation of missing hydrogen atoms. The hydrogen placement and the corresponding DelPhi calculations can be done with user selected force field parameters being either Charmm22, Amber98 or OPLS. Upon completion of the calculations, the user is given option to download fixed and protonated structural file, together with the parameter and Delphi output files for further analysis. Utilizing Jmol viewer, the user can see the corresponding structural file, to manipulate it and to change the presentation. In addition, if the potential map is requested to be calculated, the potential can be mapped onto the molecule surface. The DelPhi web server is available from http://compbio.clemson.edu/delphi_webserver.

  20. Transfer to the Collinear Libration Point L3 in the Sun-Earth+Moon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Xi-yun; Tang, Jing-shi; Liu, Lin

    2007-01-01

    The collinear libration point L3 of the sun-earth+moon system is an ideal place for some space missions. Although there has been a great amount of work concerning the applications of the other two collinear libration points L1 and L2, little work has been done about the point L3. In this paper, the dynamics of the libration points was briefly introduced first. Then a way to transfer the spacecraft to the collinear libration point L3 via the invariant manifolds of the other two collinear libration points was proposed. Theoretical works under the model of circular restricted three-body problem were done. For the sun-earth+moon system, this model is a good approximation. The results obtained are useful when a transfer trajectory under the real solar system is designed.

  1. Review of weak mixing angle results at SLC and LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, the authors review recent precise measurements of the weak mixing angle by the SLD experiment at SLC and by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL experiments at LEP. If they assume that the Minimal Standard Model provides a complete description of the quark and lepton couplings to the Z boson, they find sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23143 {+-} 0.00028. If this assumption is relaxed to apply to lepton couplings only, they find sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23106 {+-} 0.00035. They compare these results with other precision electroweak tests.

  2. Search for CP Violating Neutral Higgs Bosons in the MSSM at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Philip; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The LEP collaborations ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL have searched for the neutral Higgs bosons which are predicted within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The data of the four collaborations are statistically combined and show no significant excess of events which would indicate the production of Higgs bosons. The search results are thus used to set upper bounds on the cross sections of various Higgs-like event topologies and limits on MSSM benchmark models, including CP-conserving and CP-violating scenarios. Here, the limits on the model parameters of the CP-violating benchmark scenario CPX and derivates of this scenario are shown.

  3. Constraints on the Z-Z Prime mixing angle from data measured for the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} at the LEP2 collider

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Vas. V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2012-01-15

    An analysis of effects induced by new neutral gauge Z Prime bosons was performed on the basis of data from the OPAL, DELPHI, ALEPH, and L3 experiments devoted to measuring differential cross sections for the process of the annihilation production of pairs of charged gauge W{sup {+-}} bosons at the LEP2 collider. By using these experimental data, constraints on the Z Prime -boson mass and on the angle of Z-Z Prime mixing were obtained for a number of extended gauge models.

  4. Genetically designed L3 photonic crystal nanocavities with measured quality factor exceeding one million

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Y.; Badolato, A.; Pirotta, S.; Urbinati, G.; Gerace, D.; Galli, M.; Minkov, M.; Savona, V.

    2014-06-16

    We report on the experimental realization of ultra-high quality factor (Q) designs of the L3-type photonic crystal nanocavity. Based on genetic optimization of the positions of few nearby holes, our design drastically improves the performance of the conventional L3 as experimentally confirmed by direct measurement of Q ≃ 2 × 10{sup 6} in a silicon-based photonic crystal membrane. Our devices rank among the highest Q/V ratios ever reported in photonic crystal cavities, holding great promise for the realization of integrated photonic platforms based on ultra-high-Q resonators.

  5. The DELPHI distributed information system for exchanging LEP machine related information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönszelmann, M.; Gaspar, C.

    1994-12-01

    An information management system was designed and implemented to interchange information between the DELPHI experiment at CERN and the monitoring/control system for the LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) accelerator. This system is distributed and communicates with many different sources and destinations (LEP) using different types of communication. The system itself communicates internally via a communication system based on a publish-and-subscribe mechanism, DIM (Distributed Information Manager). The information gathered by this system is used for on-line as well as off-line data analysis. Therefore it logs the information to a database and makes it available to operators and users via DUI (DELPHI User Interface). The latter was extended to be capable of displaying "time-evolution" plots. It also handles a protocol, implemented using a finite state machine, SMI (State Management Interface), for (semi-)automatic running of the Data Acquisition System and the Slow Controls System.

  6. Habitat suitability index curves for paddlefish, developed by the delphi technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crance, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A Delphi exercise conducted with a panel of 11 experts on paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) and an evaluator resulted in 14 riverine habitat suitability index curves associating various life stages or activities of paddlefish with four variables: velocity, depth, substrate type, and temperature. The panel reached a consensus on six of the curves and eight to 10 panelists agreed on the others. Several panelists reported that they found the Delphi exercise to be a good learning experience, and they believed the technique is an appropriate interim method for developing suitability index curves when available data are inadequate for more conventional statistical analyses. Documentation of good paddlefish spawning habitat was the data need most commonly identified by the panelists.

  7. Recent results of the forward ring imaging Cherenkov detector of the DELPHI experiment at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E. ); Augustinus, A. )

    1994-08-01

    The Forward Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector covers both end-cap regions of the DELPHI experiment at LEP in the polar angel 15[degree] < [theta] < 35[degree] and 145[degree] < [theta] < 165[degree]. The detector combines a layer of liquid C[sub 6]F[sub 14] and a volume of gaseous C[sub 4]F[sub 10] into a single assembly. Ultraviolet photons from both radiators are converted in a single plane of photosensitive Time Projection Chambers. Identification of charged particles is provided for momenta up to 40 GeV/c. The design of the detector is briefly described. The detector is now fully installed in DELPHI and has participated in the 1993 data taking. The overall performance will be presented together with the expectations from Monte Carlo simulations. Results close to design values are obtained.

  8. Prioritisation of teaching topics in obstetrics and gynaecology: a Delphi survey of postgraduate trainees.

    PubMed

    Siraj, N; Benerjee, S; Cooper, J C; Ismail, K M K

    2011-11-01

    Topics for theoretical teaching during the obstetrics and gynaecology specialty training programme are often chosen by tutors, with little input from the trainees. However, it is important to actively involve adults in their learning process to maintain their learning ownership and motivation. The Delphi methodology is a generic social science technique used to aggregate views and opinions of experts, the community and service users. In this study, we conducted a two generational Delphi study to achieve consensus between a group of trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology, regarding what they considered important topics for inclusion in their protected teaching programme. A total of 25 trainees from one deanery, participated in this study. We were able to produce a list of 26 topics in obstetrics and 30 in gynaecology, prioritised according to their importance for inclusion in the specialty protected teaching programme, as viewed by these trainees.

  9. Delphi, Dice and Dominos: Techniques to Understand and Mitigate Technical Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Defense AT&L: November–December 2015 32 Delphi, Dice and Dominos Techniques to Understand and Mitigate Technical Risk David L. Gallop Gallop...interdepen- dency come both opportunity and technical risk. There are three simple techniques any program can use to understand and mitigate technical risk...These techniques take us beyond the common (yet important) “risk cube.” They can be used together or sepa- rately. They are designed to avoid

  10. Research needs and priorities in health informatics--early results of a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Brender, J; McNair, P; Nøhr, C

    1999-01-01

    A four-phased Delphi study has been performed on the topic of "research needs and priorities to implement the Information Society within Healthcare". This contribution presents the outcome of the first three phases. The biggest surprises are that 'Telemedicine' is relatively lower ranked than expected, and that 'Business Process Re-engineering' is the highest ranking topic, as judged from the number of issues and barriers raised by the expert panel.

  11. Advanced Use of Wolrd-Wide Web in the Online System of Delphi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DöNszelmann, M.; Carvalho, D.; Mundim, L. M.; Du, S.; Rodden, K.; TennebØ, F.

    The World-Wide Web technology is used by the DELPHI experiment at CERN to provide easy access to information of the `On-line System'. WWW technology on both client and server side is used in five different projects. The World-Wide Web has its advantages concerning the network technology, the practical user interface and its scalability. It however also demands a stateless protocol and format negotiation.

  12. Development of the Assessment Items of Debris Flow Using the Delphi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Yosep; Seong, Joohyun; Kim, Mingi; Park, Kyunghan; Yoon, Hyungkoo

    2016-04-01

    In recent years in Korea, Typhoon and the localized extreme rainfall caused by the abnormal climate has increased. Accordingly, debris flow is becoming one of the most dangerous natural disaster. This study aimed to develop the assessment items which can be used for conducting damage investigation of debris flow. Delphi method was applied to classify the realms of assessment items. As a result, 29 assessment items which can be classified into 6 groups were determined.

  13. DELPHI expert panel evaluation of Hanford high level waste tank failure modes and release quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, G.L.; Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30

    The Failure Modes and Release Quantities of the Hanford High Level Waste Tanks due to postulated accident loads were established by a DELPHI Expert Panel consisting of both on-site and off-site experts in the field of Structure and Release. The Report presents the evaluation process, accident loads, tank structural failure conclusion reached by the panel during the two-day meeting.

  14. Patient safety priorities in mental healthcare in Switzerland: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Mascherek, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identifying patient safety priorities in mental healthcare is an emerging issue. A variety of aspects of patient safety in medical care apply for patient safety in mental care as well. However, specific aspects may be different as a consequence of special characteristics of patients, setting and treatment. The aim of the present study was to combine knowledge from the field and research and bundle existing initiatives and projects to define patient safety priorities in mental healthcare in Switzerland. The present study draws on national expert panels, namely, round-table discussion and modified Delphi consensus method. Design As preparation for the modified Delphi questionnaire, two round-table discussions and one semistructured questionnaire were conducted. Preparative work was conducted between May 2015 and October 2015. The modified Delphi was conducted to gauge experts' opinion on priorities in patient safety in mental healthcare in Switzerland. In two independent rating rounds, experts made private ratings. The modified Delphi was conducted in winter 2015. Results Nine topics were defined along the treatment pathway: diagnostic errors, non-drug treatment errors, medication errors, errors related to coercive measures, errors related to aggression management against self and others, errors in treatment of suicidal patients, communication errors, errors at interfaces of care and structural errors. Conclusions Patient safety is considered as an important topic of quality in mental healthcare among experts, but it has been seriously neglected up until now. Activities in research and in practice are needed. Structural errors and diagnostics were given highest priority. From the topics identified, some are overlapping with important aspects of patient safety in medical care; however, some core aspects are unique. PMID:27496233

  15. Planning for chemical incidents by implementing a Delphi based consensus study

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, I; Mackway-Jones, K; Russell, D; Carley, S

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a practical approach to the difficulties surrounding planning for chemical incidents, based upon the results of a Delphi based consensus study. It is intended to offer advice, which can be implemented at regional and local prehospital and hospital level. The phases of the response that are covered include preparation, management of the incident, delivery of medical support during the incident, and recovery and support after the incident. PMID:14734368

  16. Defining the activities of publicness for Korea's public community hospitals using the Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kunsei; Kim, Hyun Joo; You, Myoungsoon; Lee, Jin-Seok; Eun, Sang Jun; Jeong, Hyoseon; Ahn, Hye Mi; Lee, Jin Yong

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to identify which activities of a public community hospital (PHC) should be included in their definition of publicness and tries to achieve a consensus among experts using the Delphi method. We conduct 2 rounds of the Delphi process with 17 panel members using a developed draft of tentative activities for publicness including 5 main categories covering 27 items. The questions remain the same in both rounds and the applicability of each of the 27 items to publicness is measured on a 9-point scale. If the participants believe government funding is needed, we ask how much they think the government should support each item on a 0% to 100% scale. After conducting 2 rounds of the Delphi process, 22 out of the 27 items reached a consensus as activities defining the publicness of the PHCs. Among the 5 major categories, in category C, activities preventing market failure, all 10 items were considered activities of publicness. Nine of these were evaluated as items that should be compensated at 100% of total financial loss by the Korean government. Throughout results, we were able to define the activities of the PCH that encompassed its publicness and confirm that there are "good deficits" in the context of the PCHs. Thus, some PCH deficits are unavoidable and not wasted as these monies support a necessary role and function in providing public health. The Korean government should therefore consider taking actions such as exempting such "good deficits" or providing additional financial aid to reimburse the PHCs for "good deficits."

  17. Anatomical Society core regional anatomy syllabus for undergraduate medicine: the Delphi process.

    PubMed

    Smith, C F; Finn, G M; Stewart, J; McHanwell, S

    2016-01-01

    A modified Delphi method was employed to seek consensus when revising the UK and Ireland's core syllabus for regional anatomy in undergraduate medicine. A Delphi panel was constructed involving 'expert' (individuals with at least 5 years' experience in teaching medical students anatomy at the level required for graduation). The panel (n = 39) was selected and nominated by members of Council and/or the Education Committee of the Anatomical Society and included a range of specialists including surgeons, radiologists and anatomists. The experts were asked in two stages to 'accept', 'reject' or 'modify' (first stage only) each learning outcome. A third stage, which was not part of the Delphi method, then allowed the original authors of the syllabus to make changes either to correct any anatomical errors or to make minor syntax changes. From the original syllabus of 182 learning outcomes, removing the neuroanatomy component (163), 23 learning outcomes (15%) remained unchanged, seven learning outcomes were removed and two new learning outcomes added. The remaining 133 learning outcomes were modified. All learning outcomes on the new core syllabus achieved over 90% acceptance by the panel.

  18. A Delphi-matrix approach to SEA and its application within the tourism sector in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, N.-W. . E-mail: ibis@ntcn.edu.tw; Hsiao, T.-Y.; Yu, Y.-H.

    2005-04-15

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is a procedural tool and within the framework of SEA, several different types of analytical methods can be used in the assessment. However, the impact matrix used currently in Taiwan has some disadvantages. Hence, a Delphi-matrix approach to SEA is proposed here to improve the performance of Taiwan's SEA. This new approach is based on the impact matrix combination with indicators of sustainability, and then the Delphi method is employed to collect experts' opinions. In addition, the assessment of National Floriculture Park Plan and Taiwan Flora 2008 Program is taken as an example to examine this new method. Although international exhibition is one of the important tourism (economic) activities, SEA is seldom about tourism sector. Finally, the Delphi-matrix approach to SEA for tourism development plan is established containing eight assessment topics and 26 corresponding categories. In summary, three major types of impacts: resources' usages, pollution emissions, and local cultures change are found. Resources' usages, such as water, electricity, and natural gas demand, are calculated on a per capita basis. Various forms of pollution resulting from this plan, such as air, water, soil, waste, and noise, are also identified.

  19. Measuring elimination of podoconiosis, endemicity classifications, case definition and targets: an international Delphi exercise

    PubMed Central

    Deribe, Kebede; Wanji, Samuel; Shafi, Oumer; Muheki Tukahebwa, Edridah; Umulisa, Irenee; Davey, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Background Podoconiosis is one of the major causes of lymphoedema in the tropics. Nonetheless, currently there are no endemicity classifications or elimination targets to monitor the effects of interventions. This study aimed at establishing case definitions and indicators that can be used to assess endemicity, elimination and clinical outcomes of podoconiosis. Methods This paper describes the result of a Delphi technique used among 28 experts. A questionnaire outlining possible case definitions, endemicity classifications, elimination targets and clinical outcomes was developed. The questionnaire was distributed to experts working on podoconiosis and other neglected tropical diseases in two rounds. The experts rated the importance of case definitions, endemic classifications, elimination targets and the clinical outcome measures. Median and mode were used to describe the central tendency of expert responses. The coefficient of variation was used to describe the dispersals of expert responses. Results Consensus on definitions and indicators for assessing endemicity, elimination and clinical outcomes of podoconiosis directed at policy makers and health workers was achieved following the two rounds of Delphi approach among the experts. Conclusions Based on the two Delphi rounds we discuss potential indicators and endemicity classification of this disabling disease, and the ongoing challenges to its elimination in countries with the highest prevalence. Consensus will help to increase effectiveness of podoconiosis elimination efforts and ensure comparability of outcome data. PMID:26185194

  20. Double Object Constructions in L3 English: An Exploratory Study of Morphological and Semantic Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agirre, Ainara Imaz; García Mayo, María del Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the acquisition of double object constructions (DOCs) ("Susan gave Peter an apple") by 90 Basque/Spanish learners of English as a third language (L3). The aim of this study was to explore whether (i) learners established a distinction when accepting DOCs vs. prepositional phrase constructions (PPCs)…

  1. Functional Scaffolds of Bicontinuous, Thermoresponsive L3-phase Silica/Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jeong H.; Park, Moo E.; Shin, Yongsoon; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Kim, Kyung J.; Lee, Sang Cheon; Oh, Kyung Sik

    2007-01-15

    The silicified L3-poly(N-sopropylacrylamide)/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites by the integration of thermosensitive polymer and heterogenious continuity in 3-D interconnected porous structure have been prepared for the highly controlled drug release without the burst release at the initial time during step-wised temperature changes, and demonstrated the in-vitro cytotoxicity test for biocompatibility.

  2. Experimental demonstration of analog signal transmission in a silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator.

    PubMed

    Gui, Chengcheng; Zhang, Yong; Du, Jing; Xia, Jinsong; Wang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We design and fabricate a silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator for chip-scale analog signal transmission. The lattice constant (a) is 420 nm, and the radius of holes (r) is 126 nm. The three holes adjacent to the cavity are laterally shifted by 0.175a, 0.025a and 0.175a, respectively. We experimentally evaluate the performance of silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator for chip-scale analog signal transmission. The spurious free dynamic ranges (SFDRs) of the second-order harmonic distortion (SHD) and the third-order harmonic distortion (THD), which are important factors to assess the analog link performance, are measured for the chip-scale analog signal transmission through the fabricated silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator. The SHD SFDR and THD SFDR are measured to be ~34.6 dB and ~52.2 dB even with the input optical carrier sitting at the dip resonance wavelength of the fabricated silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator. The influences of the optical carrier wavelength and input optical power on the SHD SFDR and THD SFDR are studied in the experiment. The impacts of geometric parameters of the cavity structure (lattice constant, radius of holes, shift of the hole) on the analog signal transmission are also analyzed, showing favorable analog link performance with relatively large fabrication tolerance to design parameters.

  3. What Variables Condition Syntactic Transfer? A Look at the L3 Initial State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates transfer at the third-language (L3) initial state, testing between the following possibilities: (1) the first language (L1) transfer hypothesis (an L1 effect for all adult acquisition), (2) the second language (L2) transfer hypothesis, where the L2 blocks L1 transfer (often referred to in the recent literature as the "L2…

  4. Inter- and Intralingual Lexical Influences in Advanced Learners' French L3 Oral Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindqvist, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates lexical inter- and intralingual influences in the oral production of 14 very advanced learners of French L3. Lexical deviances are divided into two main categories: formal influence and meaning-based influence. The results show that, as predicted with respect to advanced learners, meaning-based influence is the most…

  5. Local structure and La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra of lanthanum complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroyuki; Shishido, Tetsuya; Teramura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Tsunehiro

    2014-06-16

    La L1 and L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of various La oxides were classified according to the local configuration of La. We found a correlation between both of the areas of the pre-edge peaks of the La L1-edge XANES spectra and the full width at half-maximum of white line of La L3-edge XANES spectra and the local configuration of La. Theoretical calculation of the XANES spectra and local density of states reveals the difference of La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra of various La compounds is related to the p-d hybridization of the unoccupied band and broadening of the d band of La induced by the difference of local configuration. In addition, simplified bond angle analysis parameters defined by the angles of the La atom and the two adjacent oxygen atoms are correlated to the pre-edge peak intensity of the La L1-edge XANES spectra. These results indicate that quantitative analysis of La L1 and L3-edge XANES spectra could be an indicator of the local structure of La materials.

  6. L1/L2/L3 Writing Development: Longitudinal Case Study of a Japanese Multicompetent Writer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Hiroe; Rinnert, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal case study, supplemented by cross-sectional comparisons among five groups of writers with differing backgrounds, investigates how Natsu, a Japanese multilingual writer, developed her L1, L2 (English), and L3 (Chinese) writing competence over two and a half years. To create a comprehensive picture of this multilingual writer, the…

  7. Differential effect of L3T4+ cells on recovery from total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pantel, K.; Nakeff, A. )

    1990-09-01

    We have examined the importance of L3T4+ (murine equivalent to CD4+) cells for hematopoietic regulation in vivo in unperturbed mice and mice recovering from total-body irradiation (TBI) using a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody (MoAb) raised with the GK 1.5 hybridoma. Ablating L3T4+ cells in normal (unperturbed) B6D2F1 mice substantially decreased the S-phase fraction (determined by in vivo hydroxyurea suicide) of erythroid progenitor cells (erythroid colony-forming units, CFU-E) as compared to the pretreatment level (10% +/- 14.1% (day 3 following depletion) vs 79.8% +/- 15.9%, respectively) with a corresponding decrease in the marrow content of CFU-E at this time to approximately 1% of the pretreatment value. Although the S-phase fraction of CFU-GM was decreased to 2.2% +/- 3.1% 3 days after L3T4+ cell ablation from the 21.3% +/- 8.3% pretreatment value, CFU-GM cellularity showed little change over the 3 days following anti-L3T4 treatment. Anti-L3T4 MoAb treatment had little or no effect on either the S-phase fraction or the marrow content of hematopoietic stem cells (spleen colony-forming units, CFU-S) committed to myeloerythroid differentiation. Ablating L3T4+ cells prior to a single dose of 2 Gy TBI resulted in significantly reduced marrow contents of CFU-S on day 3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM) on day 6 following TBI, with little or no effect on the corresponding recovery of CFU-E. The present findings provide the first in vivo evidence that L3T4+ cells are involved in: (1) maintaining the proliferative activity of CFU-E and CFU-GM in unperturbed mice and (2) supporting the restoration of CFU-S and CFU-GM following TBI-induced myelosuppression.

  8. Loss, mutation and deregulation of L3MBTL4 in breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many alterations are involved in mammary oncogenesis, including amplifications of oncogenes and losses of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Losses may affect almost all chromosome arms and many TSGs remain to be identified. Results We studied 307 primary breast tumors and 47 breast cancer cell lines by high resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We identified a region on 18p11.31 lost in about 20% of the tumors and 40% of the cell lines. The minimal common region of loss (Chr18:6,366,938-6,375,929 bp) targeted the L3MBTL4 gene. This gene was also targeted by breakage in one tumor and in two cell lines. We studied the exon sequence of L3MBTL4 in 180 primary tumor samples and 47 cell lines and found six missense and one nonsense heterozygous mutations. Compared with normal breast tissue, L3MBTL4 mRNA expression was downregulated in 73% of the tumors notably in luminal, ERBB2 and normal-like subtypes. Losses of the 18p11 region were associated with low L3MBTL4 expression level. Integrated analysis combining genome and gene expression profiles of the same tumors pointed to 14 other potential 18p TSG candidates. Downregulated expression of ZFP161, PPP4R1 and YES1 was correlated with luminal B molecular subtype. Low ZFP161 gene expression was associated with adverse clinical outcome. Conclusion We have identified L3MBTL4 as a potential TSG of chromosome arm 18p. The gene is targeted by deletion, breakage and mutations and its mRNA is downregulated in breast tumors. Additional 18p TSG candidates might explain the aggressive phenotype associated with the loss of 18p in breast tumors. PMID:20698951

  9. Structural Setting and Upper Quaternary landscape evolution at Delphi, Central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranis, H.; Skourtsos, E.; Gouliotis, L.; Lozios, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present an alternative view of the active tectonics and landscape evolution of the Delphi archaeological site, located on the southern margin of Mt Parnassos, central Greece, based on detailed geological mapping. The tectonic grain of the area provides the key to understanding the nature and degree of tectonic activity and associated natural hazards in this worldwide famous site, on the northern margin of the Corinth Rift. The dominant structure is a gently north-dipping thrust fault (SPT), which marks the southern boundary of Mt Parnassos. This thrust brings the Mesozoic carbonates over the flysch members of the Parnassos Unit. Intense folding is observed at all scales and the hanging-wall of the thrust corresponds to an overturned anticline, thrusted over the flysch, the latter cropping out along the south-facing mountain slope and the adjacent valley of Pleistos. The hanging-wall block of the SPT is intensely fractured; a dominant set of steep discontinuities, east and west of the archaeological site has facilitated slope failure, with some of them accommodating minor amounts of dip-slip displacement. One of them is identified as an active structure ("Delphi Fault") exposed after road improvement works several years ago. This surface can be mapped for only ~150 m east and 1.3 km west of Delphi: detailed geological mapping showed that it invariably belongs to the hanging-wall of the SPT, which has a total length of ca 25 km. Slope failure processes, which appear to be dominant at least during the Upper Quaternary years have led to the accumulation of sizeable blocks (measuring from 0.2 - 3.5km2) which have slipped on the incompetent, impermeable clastics that form the footwall of the SPT. We therefore suggest that the structure identified as the "Delphi Fault" belongs to a set of subvertical discontinuities which have developed on the culmination of an overturned anticline, on the hanging-wall block of a major thrust fault. This surface is associated with

  10. Establishing key components of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions: a Delphi survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests yoga is a safe and effective intervention for the management of physical and psychosocial symptoms associated with musculoskeletal conditions. However, heterogeneity in the components and reporting of clinical yoga trials impedes both the generalization of study results and the replication of study protocols. The aim of this Delphi survey was to address these issues of heterogeneity, by developing a list of recommendations of key components for the design and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Methods Recognised experts involved in the design, conduct, and teaching of yoga for musculoskeletal conditions were identified from a systematic review, and invited to contribute to the Delphi survey. Forty-one of the 58 experts contacted, representing six countries, agreed to participate. A three-round Delphi was conducted via electronic surveys. Round 1 presented an open-ended question, allowing panellists to individually identify components they considered key to the design and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Thematic analysis of Round 1 identified items for quantitative rating in Round 2; items not reaching consensus were forwarded to Round 3 for re-rating. Results Thirty-six panellists (36/41; 88%) completed the three rounds of the Delphi survey. Panellists provided 348 comments to the Round 1 question. These comments were reduced to 49 items, grouped under five themes, for rating in subsequent rounds. A priori group consensus of ≥80% was reached on 28 items related to five themes concerning defining the yoga intervention, types of yoga practices to include in an intervention, delivery of the yoga protocol, domains of outcome measures, and reporting of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions. Additionally, a priori consensus of ≥50% was reached on five items relating to minimum values for intervention parameters. Conclusions Expert consensus has provided a non

  11. Revising the worksheet with L3: a language and environment foruser-script interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hohn, Michael H.

    2008-01-22

    This paper describes a novel approach to the parameter anddata handling issues commonly found in experimental scientific computingand scripting in general. The approach is based on the familiarcombination of scripting language and user interface, but using alanguage expressly designed for user interaction and convenience. The L3language combines programming facilities of procedural and functionallanguages with the persistence and need-based evaluation of data flowlanguages. It is implemented in Python, has access to all Pythonlibraries, and retains almost complete source code compatibility to allowsimple movement of code between the languages. The worksheet interfaceuses metadata produced by L3 to provide selection of values through thescriptit self and allow users to dynamically evolve scripts withoutre-running the prior versions. Scripts can be edited via text editors ormanipulated as structures on a drawing canvas. Computed values are validscripts and can be used further in other scripts via simplecopy-and-paste operations. The implementation is freely available underan open-source license.

  12. Solvothermal removal of the organic template from L 3 ("sponge") templated silica monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Mulders, Norbert; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2006-10-01

    We compare the methods of continuous solvent (Soxhlet) and supercritical solvent extractions for the removal of the organic template from nanostructured silica monoliths. Our monoliths are formed by templating the L 3 liquid crystal phase of cetylpyridinium chloride in aqueous solutions with tetramethoxy silane. The monoliths that result from both Soxhlet and supercritical extraction methods are mechanically robust, optically clear, and free of cracks. The Soxhlet method compares favorably with supercritical solvent extraction in that equivalent L 3-templated silica can be synthesized without the use of specialized reactor hardware or higher temperatures and high pressures, while avoiding noxious byproducts. The comparative effectiveness of various solvents in the Soxhlet process is related to the Hildebrand solubility parameter, determined by the effective surface area of the extracted silica.

  13. L1, L2, and L3 subshell fluorescence yields: Updated database and new empirical values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahnoune, Y.; Kahoul, A.; Kasri, Y.; Deghfel, B.; Medjadi, D. E.; Khalfallah, F.; Daoudi, S.; Aylikçi, V.; Küp Aylikçi, N.; Nekkab, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a summary of experimental data published in the period of time between 1955 to february-2016 was presented in a tabular form for Li subshell fluorescence yields (ωL1 ,ωL2 andωL3) taken from different sources. First, a critical examination of these data using the weighted average valuesωLi-W was presented. Then, an interpolation using the famous analytical function (ωLi-W / (1 -ωLi-W)) 1 / 4 vs the atomic number Z was proformed to deduce a new empirical Li subshell fluorescence yields for elements in the range 40≤Z≤96 for ωL1 and ωL2 and 23≤Z≤96 for ωL3 . At last, our calculated empirical Li subshell fluorescence yields have been compared with other theoretical and empirical values reported in the literature.

  14. Large High Performance Optics for Spaceborne Missions: L-3 Brashear Experience and Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canzian, Blaise; Gardopee, George; Clarkson, Andrew; Hull, Tony; Borucki, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Brashear is a division of L-3 Communications, Integrated Optical Systems. Brashear is well known for the ground-based telescopes it has manufactured at its facilities and delivered to satisfied customers. Optics from meter-class up to 8.3 meters diameter have been fabricated in Brashear's facilities. Brashear has demonstrated capabilities for large spaceborne optics. We describe in this paper both legacy and new Brashear capabilities for high performance spaceborne optics.

  15. The effect of symmetry on the U L3 NEXAFS of octahedral coordinated uranium(vi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2017-03-01

    We describe a detailed theoretical analysis of how distortions from ideal cubic or Oh symmetry to tetrahedral, D4h, symmetry affect the shape, in particular the width, of the U L3-edge NEXAFS for U(vi) in octahedral coordination. The full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the L3-edge white line decreases with increasing distortion from Oh symmetry. In particular, the FWHM of the white line narrows whether the tetragonal distortion is to compression or to extension. The origin of this decrease in the FWHM is analyzed in terms of the electronic structure of the excited levels arising from the unoccupied U(6d). The relative importance of ligand field and of spin-orbit effects is examined, where the dominant role of ligand field effects is established. Especially at higher distortions, the ligand splittings decrease rapidly and lead to an accelerated, quadratic decrease in the FWHM with increasing distortion. This is related to the increase of covalent character in the appropriate component of the Oh derived eg orbitals. Our ab initio theory uses relativistic wavefunctions for cluster models of the structures; empirical or semi-empirical parameters were not used to adjust prediction to experiment. A major advantage is that it provides a transparent approach for determining how the character and extent of the covalent mixing of the relevant U and O orbitals affect the U L3-edge white line.

  16. Cognition and Mood-Related Behaviors in L3mbtl1 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Erica Y.; Jiang, Yan; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Hock, Hanno; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in histone lysine methylation and epigenetic regulators of gene expression could play a role in the neurobiology and treatment of patients diagnosed with mood spectrum disorder, including depression and anxiety. Mutations and altered expression of various lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) and demethylases (KDMs) have been linked to changes in motivational and emotional behaviors in preclinical model systems. However, it is not known whether regulators operating downstream of histone lysine methylation could affect mood-related behavior. Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain ‘chromatin reader’ proteins bind to methylated histone lysine residues and associate with chromatin remodeling complexes to facilitate or repress gene expression. MBT proteins, including the founding member, L3mbtl1, maintain high levels of expression in neurons of the mature brain. Here, we exposed L3mbtl1 null mutant mice to a wide range of tests exploring cognition and mood-relevant behaviors at baseline and in the context of social isolation, as a stressor to elicit depression-related behavior in susceptible mice. L3mbtl1 loss-of-function was associated with significant decreases in depression and and anxiety in some of the behavioral paradigms. This was not associated with a more generalized neurological dysfunction because cognition and memory remained unaltered in comparison to controls. These findings warrant further investigations on the role of MBT chromatin reader proteins in the context of emotional and affective behaviors. PMID:25849281

  17. Determining the Essential Components of State and Institution Dual Credit Program Policy in New Mexico: A Delphi Study with High School and College Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Gregory Dean

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Delphi study was to determine the essential components of dual credit in New Mexico. Dual credit experts from colleges and high schools in New Mexico were asked to participate in a three-round Delphi study to determine what the future policy of dual credit should be, and why it should be that way. Definitions of dual credit may…

  18. Using the Internet to Improve HRD Research: The Case of the Web-Based Delphi Research Technique to Achieve Content Validity of an HRD-Oriented Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Colton, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to highlight the results of the online Delphi research project; in particular the procedures used to establish an online and innovative process of content validation and obtaining "rich" and descriptive information using the internet and current e-learning technologies. The online Delphi was proven to be an…

  19. A Research Study Using the Delphi Method to Define Essential Competencies for a High School Game Art and Design Course Framework at the National Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Nayo Corenus-Geneva

    2011-01-01

    This research study reports the findings of a Delphi study conducted to determine the essential competencies and objectives for a high school Game Art and Design course framework at the national level. The Delphi panel consisted of gaming, industry and educational experts from all over the world who were members of the International Game…

  20. Chromatin reader L(3)mbt requires the Myb–MuvB/DREAM transcriptional regulatory complex for chromosomal recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Daniel P.; Georlette, Daphne; Antoszewski, Lisa; Botchan, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal malignant brain tumors (lmbt) result from the loss of the conserved transcriptional repressor l(3)mbt, in Drosophila melanogaster. Similar mutations in the human homolog L3MBTL1 correlate with some cancers. The protein’s C-terminal MBT repeats bind mono and dimethylated histones in vitro, which could influence recruitment of L3MBTL1 to its target sites. The L(3)mbt chromatin targeting mechanism, however, is controversial and several studies suggest insufficiency or a minor role for histone methylation in determining the site specificity for recruitment. We report that L(3)mbt colocalizes with core members of the Myb–MuvB/DREAM (MMB/DREAM) transcriptional regulatory complex genome-wide, and that L(3)mbt-mediated repression requires this complex in salivary glands and larval brains. Loss of l(3)mbt or of MMB components through mutation cause similar spurious expression of genes, including the transposon regulatory gene piwi, in terminally differentiated cells. The DNA-binding MMB core component Mip120 (Lin54) is required for L(3)mbt recruitment to chromosomes, whereas Mip130 (Lin9) (an MMB core protein) and E2f2 (an MMB transcriptional repressor) are not, but are essential for repression. Cytolocalization experiments suggest the presence of site-specific differential composition of MMB in polytene chromosomes where some loci were bound by a Myb-containing or alternatively, an E2f2 and L(3)mbt form of the complex. PMID:25249635

  1. Terminology and definitions on groin pain in athletes: building agreement using a short Delphi method

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Adam; Hölmich, Per; Schache, Anthony G; Delahunt, Eamonn; de Vos, Robert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Groin pain in athletes occurs frequently and can be difficult to treat, which may partly be due to the lack of agreement on diagnostic terminology. Objective To perform a short Delphi survey on terminology agreement for groin pain in athletes by a group of experts. Methods A selected number of experts were invited to participate in a Delphi questionnaire. The study coordinator sent a questionnaire, which consisted of demographic questions and two ‘real-life’ case reports of athletes with groin pain. The experts were asked to complete the questionnaire and to provide the most likely diagnosis for each case. Questionnaire responses were analysed by an independent researcher. The Cohen's κ statistic was used to evaluate the level of agreement between the diagnostic terms provided by the experts. Results Twenty-three experts participated (96% of those invited). For case 1, experts provided 9 different terms to describe the most likely diagnosis; for case 2, 11 different terms were provided to describe the most likely diagnosis. With respect to the terms provided for the most likely diagnosis, the Cohen's κ was 0.06 and 0.002 for case 1 and 2, respectively. This heterogeneous taxonomy reflects only a slight agreement between the various diagnostic terms provided by the selected experts. Conclusions This short Delphi survey of two ‘typical, straightforward’ cases demonstrated major inconsistencies in the diagnostic terminology used by experts for groin pain in athletes. These results underscore the need for consensus on definitions and terminology on groin pain in athletes. PMID:25907180

  2. Determinants of Social Accountability in Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools: A Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Salehmoghaddam, Amir Reza; Mazloom, Seyed Reza; Sharafkhani, Mohammad; Gholami, Hassan; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Khorashadizadeh, Fatemeh; Emadzadeh, Ali

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Revising the medical education programs to meet the needs of society has become both a necessity and an important priority due to the considerable increase of population, changing patterns of diseases, and new health priorities. While this necessity has been highlighted in Iran’s Fifth Development Plan as well as its National 2025 Vision Plan, the determinants of social accountability have not been explained yet. This study aimed to develop determinants of social accountability in the Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools. Methods: This classic Delphi study included thirty experts in Nursing and Midwifery Education, Research and Services selected based on purposive sampling and three rounds of Delphi technique and conducted in Nursing and Midwifery School of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The primary data were collected using an initial structured questionnaire prepared through extensive review of literature. SPSS 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. The interquartile deviation and percentage of agreement were also used to study the consensus of opinion by experts. Results: Finding obtained from the rounds of Delphi resulted in selecting 69 determinants out of the initial pool of 128 primary determinants of social accountability. The items were selected based on experts’ consensus and categorized under three main activities of Nursing and Midwifery School, namely education, research, and service. Conclusion: Social accountability determinants were explained by 69 items for Schools of Nursing and Midwifery in Iran. The proposed determinants can be used by managers and authorities of Nursing and Midwifery School, policy makers, and evaluating institutions associated with them to ensure realizing social accountability goals.

  3. Developing a guideline for clinical trial protocol content: Delphi consensus survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent evidence has highlighted deficiencies in clinical trial protocols, having implications for many groups. Existing guidelines for randomized clinical trial (RCT) protocol content vary substantially and most do not describe systematic methodology for their development. As one of three prespecified steps for the systematic development of a guideline for trial protocol content, the objective of this study was to conduct a three-round Delphi consensus survey to develop and refine minimum content for RCT protocols. Methods Panellists were identified using a multistep iterative approach, met prespecified minimum criteria and represented key stakeholders who develop or use clinical trial protocols. They were asked to rate concepts for importance in a minimum set of items for RCT protocols. The main outcome measures were degree of importance (scale of 1 to 10; higher scores indicating higher importance) and level of consensus for items. Results were presented as medians, interquartile ranges, counts and percentages. Results Ninety-six expert panellists participated in the Delphi consensus survey including trial investigators, methodologists, research ethics board members, funders, industry, regulators and journal editors. Response rates were between 88 and 93% per round. Overall, panellists rated 63 of 88 concepts of high importance (of which 50 had a 25th percentile rating of 8 or greater), 13 of moderate importance (median 6 or 7) and 12 of low importance (median less than or equal to 5) for minimum trial protocol content. General and item-specific comments and subgroup results provided valuable insight for further discussions. Conclusions This Delphi process achieved consensus from a large panel of experts from diverse stakeholder groups on essential content for RCT protocols. It also highlights areas of divergence. These results, complemented by other empirical research and consensus meetings, are helping guide the development of a guideline for

  4. A DELPHI STUDY OF RISK FACTORS FOR ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY- OPINIONS OF WORLD TENDON EXPERTS

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Paul J.; Barry, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Achilles tendinopathy can be a debilitating chronic condition for both active and inactive individuals. The identification of risk facors is important both in preventing but also treating tendinopathy, many factors have been proposed but there is a lack of primary epidemiological data. The purpose of this study was to develop a statement of expert consensus on risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy in active and sedentary patient populations to inform a primary epidemiological study. Study design Delphi study Methods and Measures An online Delphi study was completed inviting participation from world tendon experts. The consensus was developed using three rounds of the Delphi technique. The first round developed a complete list of potential risk factors, the second round refined this list but also separated the factors into two population groups – active/athletic and inactive/sedentary. The third round ranked this list in order of perceived importance. Results Forty-four experts were invited to participate, 16 participated in the first round (response rate 40%) and two dropped out in the second round (resulting in a response rate of 35%). A total of 27 intrinsic and eight extrinsic risk factors were identified during round one. During round two only 12 intrinsic and five extrinsic risk factors were identified as important in active/athletic tendinopathy while 14 intrinsic and three extrinsic factors were identified as important for inactive/sedentary tendinopathy. Conclusions Risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy were identified based on expert consensus, and these factors provide a basis for primary epidemiological studies. Plantarflexor strength was identified as the primary modifiable factor in the active/athletic group while systemic factors were identified as important in the inactive/sedentary group, many of the potential factors suggested for either group were non-modifiable. Non-modifiable factors include: previous tendinopathy

  5. Defining the activities of publicness for Korea's public community hospitals using the Delphi method

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kunsei; Kim, Hyun Joo; You, Myoungsoon; Lee, Jin-Seok; Eun, Sang Jun; Jeong, Hyoseon; Ahn, Hye Mi; Lee, Jin Yong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to identify which activities of a public community hospital (PHC) should be included in their definition of publicness and tries to achieve a consensus among experts using the Delphi method. We conduct 2 rounds of the Delphi process with 17 panel members using a developed draft of tentative activities for publicness including 5 main categories covering 27 items. The questions remain the same in both rounds and the applicability of each of the 27 items to publicness is measured on a 9-point scale. If the participants believe government funding is needed, we ask how much they think the government should support each item on a 0% to 100% scale. After conducting 2 rounds of the Delphi process, 22 out of the 27 items reached a consensus as activities defining the publicness of the PHCs. Among the 5 major categories, in category C, activities preventing market failure, all 10 items were considered activities of publicness. Nine of these were evaluated as items that should be compensated at 100% of total financial loss by the Korean government. Throughout results, we were able to define the activities of the PCH that encompassed its publicness and confirm that there are “good deficits” in the context of the PCHs. Thus, some PCH deficits are unavoidable and not wasted as these monies support a necessary role and function in providing public health. The Korean government should therefore consider taking actions such as exempting such “good deficits” or providing additional financial aid to reimburse the PHCs for “good deficits.” PMID:28296785

  6. ESPACOMP Medication Adherence Reporting Guidelines (EMERGE): a reactive-Delphi study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, R; Zullig, L L; Dunbar-Jacob, J; Hughes, D A; Vrijens, B; Wilson, I B; De Geest, S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Medication adherence is fundamental to achieving optimal patient outcomes. Reporting research on medication adherence suffers from some issues—including conceptualisation, measurement and data analysis—that thwart its advancement. Using the ABC taxonomy for medication adherence as the conceptual basis, a steering committee of members of the European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance, and Persistence (ESPACOMP) launched an initiative to develop ESPACOMP Medication Adherence Reporting Guidelines (EMERGE). This paper is a protocol for a Delphi study that aims to build consensus among a group of topic experts regarding an item list that will support developing EMERGE. Methods and analysis This study uses a reactive-Delphi design where a group of topic experts will be asked to rate the relevance and clarity of an initial list of items, in addition to suggesting further items and/or modifications of the initial items. The initial item list, generated by the EMERGE steering committee through a structured process, consists of 26 items distributed in 2 sections: 4 items representing the taxonomy-based minimum reporting criteria, and 22 items organised according to the common reporting sections. A purposive sample of experts will be selected from relevant disciplines and diverse geographical locations. Consensus will be achieved through predefined decision rules to keep, delete or modify the items. An iterative process of online survey rounds will be carried out until consensus is reached. Ethics and dissemination An ethics approval was not required for the study according to the Swiss federal act on research involving human beings. The participating experts will be asked to give an informed consent. The results of this Delphi study will feed into EMERGE, which will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences. Additionally, the steering committee will encourage their endorsement by registering the guidelines at

  7. Improving the care of older persons in Australian prisons using the Policy Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Karen; Newman, Claire; Doona, Katherine

    2016-09-01

    There are currently no internationally recognised and approved processes relating to the care of older persons with dementia in prison. This research aimed to develop tools and procedures related to managing the care of, including the identification and assessment of, older persons with dementia who are imprisoned in New South Wales, Australia. A modified approach to the Policy Delphi method, using both surveys and facilitated discussion groups, enabled experts to come together to discuss improving the quality of care provision for older persons with dementia in prison and achieve research aims.

  8. Development of a school nursing research agenda in Florida: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Shirley C; Barry, Charlotte D

    2006-04-01

    Research is important to the image, visibility, and viability of school nursing. Each state school nursing association should evaluate member commitment to school nursing research based on their unique set of financial, educational, and organizational resources. A 3-round Delphi study was conducted in which Florida school nurses identified research priorities. The 10 priority research topics were (a) obesity/nutrition, (b) role of the school nurse, (c) legal/ethical issues, (d) emergencies, (e) health education, (f) absenteeism/attendance, (g) diabetes and insulin, (h) injuries, (i) health services, and (j) asthma. These topics form the state research agenda and will be used to guide the development of multisite school nursing studies.

  9. Pulmonary angiomatosis and hemangioma in common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) stranded in Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Delgado, Josué; Arbelo, Manuel; Sacchini, Simona; Quesada-Canales, Óscar; Andrada, Marisa; Rivero, Miguel; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Vascular tumors and disorders, like angiomatosis, are rarely described in cetacean species. A retrospective histological study was carried out on lung samples from 35 common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) stranded in the Canary Islands coasts looking for morphological vascular changes and likely related causes. Twenty-five out of thirty-five (71%) common dolphins showed focal or multifocal angiomatosis-like lesions. A high association between this type of vascular proliferation and parasitic infestation was observed. In addition, a single pulmonary cavernous hemangioma not previously reported in common dolphins is presented.

  10. Measurement of the W mass with the DELPHI detector at LEP.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Chris

    1997-04-01

    In 1996 LEP ran at centre of mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV. An integrated luminosity of approx. 10 pb-1 was collected by the DELPHI experiment at each energy. These data are used to measure the cross-section for the doubly resonant WW process at these energies. At 161 GeV this cross-section may be interpreted, within the Standard Model, as a measurement of the W mass. The method of direct reconstruction is used to obtain a W mass using the 172 GeV data. Results on trilinear gauge couplings are also given.

  11. Key Features of Academic Detailing: Development of an Expert Consensus Using the Delphi Method

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, James S.; Van Hoof, Thomas J.; Fischer, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Academic detailing is an outreach education technique that combines the direct social marketing traditionally used by pharmaceutical representatives with unbiased content summarizing the best evidence for a given clinical issue. Academic detailing is conducted with clinicians to encourage evidence-based practice in order to improve the quality of care and patient outcomes. The adoption of academic detailing has increased substantially since the original studies in the 1980s. However, the lack of standard agreement on its implementation makes the evaluation of academic detailing outcomes challenging. Objective To identify consensus on the key elements of academic detailing among a group of experts with varying experiences in academic detailing. Methods This study is based on an online survey of 20 experts with experience in academic detailing. We used the Delphi process, an iterative and systematic method of developing consensus within a group. We conducted 3 rounds of online surveys, which addressed 72 individual items derived from a previous literature review of 5 features of academic detailing, including (1) content, (2) communication process, (3) clinicians targeted, (4) change agents delivering intervention, and (5) context for intervention. Nonrespondents were removed from later rounds of the surveys. For most questions, a 4-point ordinal scale was used for responses. We defined consensus agreement as 70% of respondents for a single rating category or 80% for dichotomized ratings. Results The overall survey response rate was 95% (54 of 57 surveys) and nearly 92% consensus agreement on the survey items (66 of 72 items) by the end of the Delphi exercise. The experts' responses suggested that (1) focused clinician education offering support for clinical decision-making is a key component of academic detailing, (2) detailing messages need to be tailored and provide feasible strategies and solutions to challenging cases, and (3) academic detailers need

  12. Evaluation dimensions for collaborative mental health services in primary care systems in latin america: results of a Delphi group.

    PubMed

    Sapag, Jaime C; Rush, Brian; Barnsley, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents the results of a Delphi group to identify the dimensions of an evaluation framework for collaborative mental health care (CMHC) in Latin America. A three-round Delphi process was implemented with 26 experts from Latin America and Canada to identify main areas of consensus, as well as disagreements, about the importance and feasibility of potential evaluation dimensions previously identified in Mexico, Nicaragua and Chile. Participants validated 40 evaluation dimensions. They strongly endorsed a comprehensive evaluation framework for CMHC in Latin America. This study represents a solid foundation for developing an evaluation framework for CMHC.

  13. Cost estimation: An expert-opinion approach. [cost analysis of research projects using the Delphi method (forecasting)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffalano, C.; Fogleman, S.; Gielecki, M.

    1976-01-01

    A methodology is outlined which can be used to estimate the costs of research and development projects. The approach uses the Delphi technique a method developed by the Rand Corporation for systematically eliciting and evaluating group judgments in an objective manner. The use of the Delphi allows for the integration of expert opinion into the cost-estimating process in a consistent and rigorous fashion. This approach can also signal potential cost-problem areas. This result can be a useful tool in planning additional cost analysis or in estimating contingency funds. A Monte Carlo approach is also examined.

  14. In vivo antagonism of the behavioral responses to L-3-,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine by L-3-,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine cyclohexyl ester in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Naoko; Misu, Yoshimi; Goshima, Yoshio

    2009-03-01

    To establish the neurotransmitter role(s) of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) in its own right, we attempted to clarify whether i.p. injection of a DOPA antagonist, DOPA cyclohexyl ester (CHE), would antagonize the behavioral responses of conscious rats to DOPA in the presence of 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD-1015) (100 mg/kg i.p.), a central aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) inhibitor. DOPA-CHE (40, 60 and 100 mg/kg) elicited a dose-dependent partial antagonism against the increase in locomotor activity induced by DOPA (100 mg/kg i.p.). A low dose of DOPA-CHE (10 mg/kg) elicited full antagonism against the potentiating effect of a non-effective dose of DOPA (20 mg/kg) on the increase in locomotor activity induced by a dopamine D(2) agonist quinpirole (0.3 mg/kg s.c.). DOPA-CHE (100 mg/kg) elicited full antagonism against licking behavior induced by DOPA (100 mg/kg). We confirmed that DOPA (100 mg/kg) increased the striatal dopamine content but elicited no effect on locomotor activity in the presence of benserazide (50 mg/kg i.p.), a peripheral AADC inhibitor. DOPA also increased the dopamine content in the presence of NSD-1015 to a maximal degree similar to that in the presence of benserazide. Thus, we conclude that DOPA-CHE is a suitable DOPA antagonist that would be available under in vivo experimental conditions. DOPA plays a role in the neuromodulation of behavior.

  15. Cross-Linguistic Influence in Third Language Perception: L2 and L3 Perception of Japanese Contrasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onishi, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the possible influence of language learners' second language (L2) on their perception of phonological contrasts in their third language (L3). Previous studies on Third Language Acquisition (TLA) suggest various factors as possible sources of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of an L3. This dissertation…

  16. Clitics and Object Expression in the L3 Acquisition of Brazilian Portuguese: Structural Similarity Matters for Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrul, Silvina; Dias, Rejanes; Santos, Helade

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the role of previously acquired languages in the acquisition of a third language (L3) in two experimental studies on object expression in Brazilian Portuguese (BP). Participants were English-speaking learners of BP as L3 with knowledge of Spanish as a second language (L2) and Spanish-speaking learners of BP with knowledge of…

  17. Taking L3 Learning by the Horns: Benefits of Computer-Mediated Intervention for Dyslexic School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfenninger, Simone E.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the interrelation of motivation, autonomy, metacognition, and L3 gains made as a function of three months of intervention with computer software specifically designed for the private use of dyslexic Swiss German learners of Standard German as a second language (L2) and English as a third language (L3). Based on…

  18. Charmonium Resonance Formation in γγ Collisions with the L3 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, S. C.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of the two-photon partial widths of the charmonium mesons χc2 and ηc from data collected by the L3 detector are presented. The data comprises 140 pb-1 at s ~ 91 GeV and 52 pb-1 at s ~ 183 GeV. The Q2 dependence of the ηc cross section is studied for Q2 < 9 GeV2. A J/ψ pole form factor in the VMD model is found to describe the data better than a ρ pole.

  19. Third-order nonlinearities and optical limiting properties of complex Co 2L 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sheng-Li; Li, Tie-Pan; Wang, Tie-Bang; Liu, Zhao-Sen; Cao, Tian-De

    2007-01-01

    With nanosecond pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm, we investigated the third-order optical nonlinearities of a dinuclear Co(II) triple-helical complex Co 2L 3 {L = bis[4-(2-pyridyl-methyleneamino) phenyl] methane} by a Z-scan technique. The optical limiting properties are measured by a transmission technique. The experimental data are theoretically fitted; the mechanism for the optical nonlinearities and the optical limiting properties is discussed. The absorption cross-sections of the ground state and the excited states are evaluated by a rate equation model.

  20. Automating the design of image processing pipelines for novel color filter arrays: local, linear, learned (L3) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qiyuan; Lansel, Steven; Farrell, Joyce E.; Wandell, Brian A.

    2014-03-01

    The high density of pixels in modern color sensors provides an opportunity to experiment with new color filter array (CFA) designs. A significant bottleneck in evaluating new designs is the need to create demosaicking, denoising and color transform algorithms tuned for the CFA. To address this issue, we developed a method(local, linear, learned or L3) for automatically creating an image processing pipeline. In this paper we describe the L3 algorithm and illustrate how we created a pipeline for a CFA organized as a 2×2 RGB/Wblock containing a clear (W) pixel. Under low light conditions, the L3 pipeline developed for the RGB/W CFA produces images that are superior to those from a matched Bayer RGB sensor. We also use L3 to learn pipelines for other RGB/W CFAs with different spatial layouts. The L3 algorithm shortens the development time for producing a high quality image pipeline for novel CFA designs.

  1. A human homolog of Drosophila lethal(3)malignant brain tumor (l(3)mbt) protein associates with condensed mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Koga, H; Matsui, S; Hirota, T; Takebayashi, S; Okumura, K; Saya, H

    1999-07-01

    The lethal(3)malignant brain tumor (D-l(3)mbt) gene is considered to be one of the tumor suppressor genes of Drosophila, and its recessive mutations are associated with malignant transformation of the neuroblasts in the larval brain. The structure of D-l(3)mbt protein is similar to Drosophila sex comb on midleg (Scm) protein which is a member of Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. We have isolated here the first human homolog of the D-l(3)mbt gene, designated h-l(3)mbt. Radiation hybrid mapping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis localized the h-l(3)mbt gene to chromosome 20q12. The h-l(3)mbt transcript is expressed in most of the human adult normal tissues and cultured cell lines. However, some cancer cells markedly reduce the h-l(3)mbt protein expression. Immunocytochemical study revealed that the h-l(3)mbt protein shows a speckled and scattered distribution in interphase nuclei and completely associates with condensed chromosomes in mitotic cells. This subcellular localization has been shown to be different from that of Bmi1 protein which is a component of PcG complex. Furthermore, overexpression of h-l(3)mbt protein by using a Cre-mediated gene activation system leads to failures of proper chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, which result in formation of multinuclei in U251MG cells. These observations suggest that h-l(3)mbt protein has functions distinct from those of PcG proteins and may play a role in proper progression of cell division.

  2. Expert Views on Biological Threat Characterization for the U.S. Government: A Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Watson, Crystal R; Watson, Matthew C; Ackerman, Gary; Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2017-03-17

    Biological threat characterization (BTC) involves laboratory research conducted for the purpose of biological defense. BTC research is important for improving biological risk assessment and informing resource prioritization. However, there are also risks involved in BTC work, including potential for escape from the laboratory or the misuse of research results. Using a modified Delphi study to gather opinions from U.S. experts in biosecurity and biodefense, this analysis explores what principles and safeguards can maximize the benefits of BTC research and ensure that it is conducted safely and securely. Delphi participants were asked to give their opinions about the need for BTC research by the U.S. government (USG); risks of conducting this research; rules or guidelines that should be in place to ensure that the work is safe and accurate; components of an effective review and prioritization process; rules for when characterization of a pathogen can be discontinued; and recommendations about who in the USG should be responsible for BTC prioritization decisions. The findings from this research reinforce the need for BTC research at the federal level as well as a need for continued review and oversight of this research to maximize its effectiveness and reduce the risks involved. It also demonstrates the need for further discussion of what would constitute a "red line" for biothreat characterization research-research that should not be performed for safety, ethical, or practical reasons-and guidelines for when there is sufficient research in a given topic area so that the research can be considered completed.

  3. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey.

    PubMed

    Colagiuri, Ruth; Boylan, Sinead; Morrice, Emily

    2015-10-16

    Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i) convened a workshop of academics (n = 25) from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii) conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii) convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation) were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities) was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms.

  4. A Delphi survey of evidence-based nursing priorities in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    French, Peter; Ho, Yin-Yu; Lee, Lan-Suen

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to inform an evidence-based nursing development project within the Hospital Authority, Hong Kong. It considered the specific question of: what are the nursing practice issues which need to be addressed as a matter of priority in order to improve nursing practice, the quality of care or develop some aspect of nursing practice. A three round Delphi survey was adopted. The methodological problems associated with the use of the Delphi method are addressed. An expert panel consisting of 190 Department Operations Managers (nurses) was identified. The data collection focused on issues related to nursing skills and client care and excluded management or educational issues. Agreed categories were prioritized in the final round by utilizing a 11-point rating scale. The group mean score for each category was calculated and rank ordered. The results provided 45 categories that reflected the nursing practice priorities that required more research evidence to guide practice. The top five ranked items were: nurse patient communication, resuscitation, administration of medicines, counselling and nursing documentation. The top 10 items were used to inform the advisory and selection processes for the evidence-based practice development project.

  5. Defining the sports medicine specialist in the United Kingdom: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, B; MacAuley, D; McNally, O; O'Neill, S

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To define the role and responsibilities of the sports medicine specialist using a recognised research technique. Methods: A Delphi technique was employed using anonymous postal questionnaires sent to a random sample of 300 members of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine. The questionnaire of 300 putative attributes was developed in a pilot study and the Delphi technique used allowed participants to modify their responses according to the responses of other participants. Results: There was a 53% response to both rounds of the study with 75.6% of the respondents being male, 39% having a higher qualification in sports medicine, and 45.6% being general practitioners. Some 86.3% strongly agreed that sport and exercise medicine should be a recognised speciality and 90% strongly agreed that it should be available on the National Health Service (NHS). The most important specialist attributes were orthopaedic and soft tissue medicine (83.6% strongly agreed) and emergency medical management (79.7% strongly agreed). More than 75% of respondents did not agree that either research or personal playing experience were relevant. Conclusion: Sports and exercise medicine is an evolving speciality in the United Kingdom. We believe this is the first systematic attempt to define the role and responsibilities of the sports medicine specialist and the findings are of relevance to the future development of a career pathway. PMID:15039262

  6. DelPhi webserver: Comprehensive suite for electrostatic calculations of biological macromolecules and their complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Shawn; Boylen, Brett; Owesen, Barr; Rocchia, Walter; Alexov, Emil

    2011-03-01

    Electrostatic forces and energies are two of the major components that contribute to the stability, function and interaction of biological macromolecules. The calculations of the electrostatic potential distribution in such systems, which are comprised of irregularly shaped objects immersed in a water phase, is not a trivial task. In addition, an accurate model requires any missing hydrogen atoms of the corresponding structural files (Protein Data Bank, or, PDB files) to be generated in silico and, if necessary, missing atoms or residues to be predicted as well. Here we report a comprehensive suite, an academic DelPhi webserver, which allows the users to upload their structural file, calculate the components of the electrostatic energy, generate the corresponding potential (and/or concentration/dielectric constant) distribution map, and choose the appropriate force field. The webserver utilizes modern technology to take user input and construct an algorithm that suits the users specific needs. The webserver uses Clemson University's Palmetto Supercomputer Cluster to handle the DelPhi calculations, which can range anywhere from small and short computation times, to extensive and computationally demanding runtimes. The work was supported by a grant from NIGMS, NIH, grant number 1R01GM093937-01.

  7. Alternative method of highway traffic safety analysis for developing countries using delphi technique and Bayesian network.

    PubMed

    Mbakwe, Anthony C; Saka, Anthony A; Choi, Keechoo; Lee, Young-Jae

    2016-08-01

    Highway traffic accidents all over the world result in more than 1.3 million fatalities annually. An alarming number of these fatalities occurs in developing countries. There are many risk factors that are associated with frequent accidents, heavy loss of lives, and property damage in developing countries. Unfortunately, poor record keeping practices are very difficult obstacle to overcome in striving to obtain a near accurate casualty and safety data. In light of the fact that there are numerous accident causes, any attempts to curb the escalating death and injury rates in developing countries must include the identification of the primary accident causes. This paper, therefore, seeks to show that the Delphi Technique is a suitable alternative method that can be exploited in generating highway traffic accident data through which the major accident causes can be identified. In order to authenticate the technique used, Korea, a country that underwent similar problems when it was in its early stages of development in addition to the availability of excellent highway safety records in its database, is chosen and utilized for this purpose. Validation of the methodology confirms the technique is suitable for application in developing countries. Furthermore, the Delphi Technique, in combination with the Bayesian Network Model, is utilized in modeling highway traffic accidents and forecasting accident rates in the countries of research.

  8. STEM integration in middle school career and technical education programs: A Delphi design study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu-Rorrer, Billy Ray

    The purpose of this qualitative method study with a Delphi research design sought to determine how STEM programs can be effectively integrated into middle school career and technical education programs by local, state, and national educators, administrators, directors, specialists, and curriculum writers. The significance of the study is to provide leaders in CTE with a greater awareness, insight, and strategies about how CTE programs can more effectively integrate academics into career and technical education programs through STEM-related programming. The findings will increase the limited amount of available literature providing best practice strategies for the integration of STEM curriculum into middle school CTE programs. One basic question has guided this research: How can STEM programs be effectively integrated into middle school career and technical education programs? A total of twelve strategies were identified. The strategies of real-world applications and administrative buy-in were the two predominant strategies consistently addressed throughout the review of literature and all three sub-questions in the research study. The Delphi design study consisted of pilot round and three rounds of data collection on barriers, strategies, and professional development for STEM integration in middle school career and technical education programs. Four panelists participated in the pilot round, and 16 panel members not involved in the pilot round participated in the three rounds of questioning and consensus building. In the future, more comprehensive studies can build upon this foundational investigation of middle school CTE programs.

  9. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey

    PubMed Central

    Colagiuri, Ruth; Boylan, Sinead; Morrice, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i) convened a workshop of academics (n = 25) from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii) conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii) convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation) were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities) was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms. PMID:26501301

  10. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: A technology assessment based on a two-stage Delphi study

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.L.

    1997-12-01

    To address the uncertainty regarding future costs and operating attributes of electric and hybrid electric vehicles, a two stage, worldwide Delphi study was conducted. Expert opinions on vehicle attributes, current state of the technology, possible advancements, costs, and market penetration potential were sought for the years 2000, 2010, and 2020. Opinions related to such critical components as batteries, electric drive systems, and hybrid vehicle engines, as well as their respective technical and economic viabilities, were also obtained. This report contains descriptions of the survey methodology, analytical approach, and results of the analysis of survey data, together with a summary of other factors that will influence the degree of market success of electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Responses by industry participants, the largest fraction among all the participating groups, are compared with the overall responses. An evaluation of changes between the two Delphi stages is also summarized. An analysis of battery replacement costs for various types is summarized, and variable operating costs for electric and hybrid vehicles are compared with those of conventional vehicles. A market penetration analysis is summarized, in which projected market shares from the survey are compared with predictions of shares on the basis of two market share projection models that use the cost and physical attributes provided by the survey. Finally, projections of market shares beyond the year 2020 are developed by use of constrained logit models of market shares, statistically fitted to the survey data.

  11. A Delphi exercise used to identify potential causes of variation in litter size of Ontario swine

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Catherine E.; Martin, S. Wayne; Friendship, Robert M.; Kennedy, Brain

    1992-01-01

    Forty-eight people, considered to the swine experts, were asked to collaborate in a Delphi exercise to identify the factors which they believed affect litter size in Ontario swine. The panel included 16 animal scientists, 16 pork producers, and 16 veterinarians in swine practice. The ten factors with the highest ratings were parity of the sow, mycotoxins in the feed, infections with porcine parvovirus or Leptospira spp., breeding gilts on their second versus first observed estrus, the timing of breeding with respect to the onset of estrus, purebred versus crossbred sows, boar overuse (bred by a boar that was mated more than six times per week), pen versus hand mating, age of gilt when first bred, and body condition of the sow at the time of conception. The experts did not agree about the effect on litter size of the sow's previous lactation, factors ensuring adequate nutrient intake during lactation, health of the sow and the boar, breed of a purebred sow, or the ease of mating the sow. Key items in the use of the Delphi technique to arrive at a consensus are discussed. PMID:17423928

  12. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Hiriscau, Elisabeta Ioana; Stingelin-Giles, Nicola; Wasserman, Danuta; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2016-05-11

    Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI) was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors.

  13. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Hiriscau, Elisabeta Ioana; Stingelin-Giles, Nicola; Wasserman, Danuta; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI) was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors. PMID:27187425

  14. TCM Pattern Questionnaire for Lateral Elbow Pain: Development of an Instrument via a Delphi Process

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Individualized acupuncture treatment has been practiced for pain therapy. This study used acupuncture treatment for lateral elbow pain (LEP) as an example to study the diagnostic practice of individualized acupuncture treatment. A provisional version of LEP pattern questionnaire was developed based on a recent systematic review on TCM pattern diagnosis for LEP. A Delphi panel of 33 clinical experts from seven different countries was formed, and the Delphi survey was conducted in Chinese and English language for two rounds. Consensus was achieved from all 26 panelists who responded to the second round on 243 items of the instrument, which included a 72-question-long questionnaire. The mean level of expert consensus on the items of the final questionnaire was 85%. Consensus was found on four TCM patterns that could underlie LEP, namely, the wind-cold-dampness pattern, the qi stagnation and blood stasis pattern, the dual deficiency of qi and blood pattern, and the retained dampness-heat pattern. A list of signs and symptoms indicating one of the four TCM patterns and a list of preferred treatment modalities for each pattern were also generated. Our instrument shows considerable content validity. Further validity and reliability studies are under way. PMID:27525024

  15. Guidelines for using the Delphi Technique to develop habitat suitability index curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crance, Johnie H.

    1987-01-01

    Habitat Suitability Index (SI) curves are one method of presenting species habitat suitability criteria. The curves are often used with the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and are necessary components of the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) (Armour et al. 1984). Bovee (1986) described three categories of SI curves or habitat suitability criteria based on the procedures and data used to develop the criteria. Category I curves are based on professional judgment, with 1ittle or no empirical data. Both Category II (utilization criteria) and Category III (preference criteria) curves have as their source data collected at locations where target species are observed or collected. Having Category II and Category III curves for all species of concern would be ideal. In reality, no SI curves are available for many species, and SI curves that require intensive field sampling often cannot be developed under prevailing constraints on time and costs. One alternative under these circumstances is the development and interim use of SI curves based on expert opinion. The Delphi technique (Pill 1971; Delbecq et al. 1975; Linstone and Turoff 1975) is one method used for combining the knowledge and opinions of a group of experts. The purpose of this report is to describe how the Delphi technique may be used to develop expert-opinion-based SI curves.

  16. A True Delphi Approach: Developing a Tailored Curriculum in Response to Local Agriscience Need

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenstein, Eric; Thoron, Andrew; Burleson, Sarah

    2012-02-07

    The Delphi approach is a structured communication technique, developed as a systematic, interactive forecasting method which relies on a panel of experts. In this specific case experts from Industry, Education and Extension fields addressed needs for educational programs in a traditional agriculturally-based community, environmentally conscious practices in order to restore environmental integrity and multi-disciplinary approach to solve sustainability problems facing the agricultural industry. The experts were divided into two main groups, (A) Secondary and (B) Post-secondary, and answered questionnaires in three rounds: • 1st Round – Participants generated a list of knowledge, skills, and competencies followed • 2nd Round – Panelists rated each item • 3rd Round – Panelists were given the opportunity to combine and add additional items As a result, top six items from both groups were not found similar, secondary panelists centralized around employment skills and post-secondary panelists focused on content areas. Implications include a need for content-based curriculum for post-secondary graduates, utilization of true-Delphi technique for future curriculum development research and further examination of students that complete secondary and post-secondary programs in biofuels/sustainable agriculture.

  17. Criteria for Site Selection of Temporary Shelters after Earthquakes: a Delphi Panel

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ahmad; Ardalan, Ali; Darvishi Boloorani, Ali; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: After a devastating earthquake, the site selection for the sheltering of earthquake victims is an important task. In order to generate a list of appropriate criteria for deciding on temporary sheltering site selection, we systematically combined the experience of experts and the findings of published documents in this study. Methods: Having explored published papers, we generated a list of criteria for the selection of the best location for temporary sheltering. In the next step, all criteria were presented to a group of experts in Iran and after a scientific discussion, the list was updated. In the last step, the final list of criteria was developed using the Delphi method in three rounds. Results: Based on our previous systematic review, 27 criteria were presented for sheltering site selection. Expert interviews added 12 more items to them. The Delphi process approved 21 criteria of all proposed ones. These items then grouped into four categories: land suitability, socio-cultural considerations, service availability and disaster risk reduction. Discussion: After an earthquake, our list of criteria may help the disaster team to select the best locations for temporary sheltering with minimum confusion. The consent of the earthquake victims and cost reduction of the operation would be the minimum benefits of using the appropriate criteria. These criteria also could be used by researchers to make objective and reproducible assessments of temporary sheltering site selection. Key words: Criteria, Earthquake, Model, Site selection, Temporary shelter, PMID:26693079

  18. Assessment of abnormal personality in childhood: a Delphi survey of questionnaire data.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Tamara; Tyrer, Peter; Horwood, John; Fergusson, David

    2011-02-01

    As an investigation into the feasibility of recording personality status from questionnaire data in younger people we used a three phase Delphi survey to assess items from the Christchurch Health and Development Study, administered at ages 12 to 16 years. Twelve experts took part in Phase I, and 22 in Phases II and III, 16 of whom were experts in adult personality disorder (PD), and 6 were experts who work with children. In total, 189 questions (55% of the total (238) in the questionnaires) were identified as possibly being related to personality abnormality in one or more clusters with high consensus. Experts who work with children were less likely to label features as related to personality than experts in PD (p < 0.001), and the four personality factors (equivalent to Mulder and Joyce's antisocial, asocial, asthenic, and anankastic) chosen for assessment showed variable agreement. Confirmatory factor analysis showed the best fitting model of the data was a 3 factor solution involving asocial/asthenic, antisocial, and anankastic factors. This represents the first attempt to use existing recorded data to code personality status and the results of this Delphi survey give some grounds for optimism that this approach has potential in the early identification of personality features.

  19. The Electronic Properties and L3 XANES of Au and Nano-Au

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Y.M.; Zhang, P.; Sham, T.K.

    2004-04-20

    The electronic properties of Au crystal and nano Au have been investigated by theory and experiment. Molecularly capped nano-Au was synthesized using the two-phase method. Au nano-particles have been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They retain the fcc crystal structure. Their sizes have been determined to be in a range from 5.5 nm to 1.7 nm. The L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of nano-Au and Au foil have been recorded using synchrotron radiation, and examined by theoretical calculation based on the first principles. Both theory and experiment show that the nano-Au particles have essentially all the Au L3 XANES features of bulk Au in the near edge region with less pronounced resonance peaks. It is also shown that nano Au exhibits lower 4f binding energy than bulk Au in good agreement with quantum confined Au systems reported previously.

  20. In vitro radioisotopic labeling of the L-3 stage of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Lengemann, F W; Marchell, T F; Chmielewicz, M; Georgi, J R

    1986-07-01

    Ten radioisotopes (133Ba, 207Bi, 109Cd, 51Cr, 59Fe, 203Hg, 54Mn, 125Sb and 75Se) were used to label the L-3 stage of Brugia malayi. The in vitro uptake at 4 hours in a buffered salt solution was greatest for 207Bi and exceeded that of 203Hg, by a factor of 6 and the rest of the radionuclides by factors of 26 or more. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) (1%) in the medium only slightly enhanced the uptake of 207Bi but increased 203Hg uptake by a factor of 2.5. After incubation in non-radioactive medium only 2% of the 207Bi was retained; for 203Hg the retention was 70% or better. Increasing the labeling time increased total uptake and retention of the radionuclides. The retention of the 203Hg injected intraperitoneally into jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) in the form of labeled L-3s was followed over a 16 day period by counting the jirds in a whole animal NaI crystal detector. One L-4 stage of B malayi was recovered at the end of this period.

  1. In vitro radioisotopic labeling of the L-3 stage of Brugia malayi

    SciTech Connect

    Lengemann, F.W.; Marchell, T.F.; Chmielewicz, M.; Georgi, J.R.

    1986-07-01

    Ten radioisotopes (/sup 133/Ba, /sup 207/Bi, /sup 109/Cd, /sup 51/Cr, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 203/Hg, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 125/Sb and /sup 75/Se) were used to label the L-3 stage of Brugia malayi. The in vitro uptake at 4 hours in a buffered salt solution was greatest for /sup 207/Bi and exceeded that of /sup 203/Hg, by a factor of 6 and the rest of the radionuclides by factors of 26 or more. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) (1%) in the medium only slightly enhanced the uptake of /sup 207/Bi but increased /sup 203/Hg uptake by a factor of 2.5. After incubation in non-radioactive medium only 2% of the /sup 207/Bi was retained; for /sup 203/Hg the retention was 70% or better. Increasing the labeling time increased total uptake and retention of the radionuclides. The retention of the /sup 203/Hg injected intraperitoneally into jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) in the form of labeled L-3s was followed over a 16 day period by counting the jirds in a whole animal NaI crystal detector. One L-4 stage of B malayi was recovered at the end of this period.

  2. Transfers from Earth to Earth-Moon L3 halo orbits using accelerated manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kathryn; Parker, Jeffrey; Butcher, Eric

    2015-04-01

    This paper is concerned with two-impulse transfers from Earth to Earth-Moon L3 halo orbits. After an orbit injection maneuver from an Earth orbit, a spacecraft travels on a ballistic accelerated manifold trajectory to a position intersection with a halo orbit where an orbit injection maneuver is executed. Although many types of transfers are located, our primary concern is transfers that require either a low transfer time of flight or a small orbit injection maneuver. Several families of transfers lie along the edge of a time of flight/injection maneuver Pareto Front. These families share similar characteristics and are shown to be an extension of a transfer that utilizes a stable invariant manifold. The quickest family of transfers to L3 can be completed in 28.5-33 days with an injection maneuver of 61.75-130 m/s, with shorter duration transfers requiring a larger injection maneuver. The family of transfers with the smallest injection maneuvers given a duration limit of 140 days required 13.45 m/s.

  3. The solar flare of the 14th of July 2000 (L3+C detector results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achard, P.; Adrian, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; van den Akker, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bähr, J.; Baldew, S. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillère, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Böhm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J. G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chiarusi, T.; Chang, Y. H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Déglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degré, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Ding, L. K.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Duran, I.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Extermann, P.; Faber, G.; Falagan, M. A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Grenier, G.; Grimm, O.; Groenstege, H.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guida, M.; Guo, Y. N.; Gupta, S. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haas, D.; Haller, Ch.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, Y.; He, Z. X.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, A.; Hou, S. R.; Huo, A. X.; Ito, N.; Jin, B. N.; Jindal, P.; Jing, C. L.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberría, I.; Kantserov, V.; Kaur, M.; Kawakami, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kok, E.; Korn, A.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kräber, M.; Kuang, H. H.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krüger, A.; Kuijpers, J.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J. M.; Lei, Y.; Leich, H.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, Z. C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Ma, X. H.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R. R.; Meng, X. W.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G. B.; Monteleoni, B.; Muanza, G. S.; Muijs, A. J. M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumov, V. A.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Nowak, H.; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Parriaud, J.-F.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Qing, C. R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M. A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P. G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ravindran, K. C.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Rewiersma, P.; Riemann, S.; Rojkov, A.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schoeneich, B.; Schotanus, D. J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shen, C. Q.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X. W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Trowitzsch, G.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Unger, M.; Valente, E.; Verkooijen, H.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, X. W.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, M.; van Wijk, R.; Wijnen, T. A. M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Y. P.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, M.; Yang, X. F.; Yao, Z. G.; Yeh, S. C.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, S. J.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zöller, M.; Zwart, A. N. M.; L3 Collaboration

    2006-09-01

    Aims.Several experiments have reported observations on possible correlations between the flux of high energy muons and intense solar flares. If confirmed, these observations would have significant implications for acceleration processes in the heliosphere able to accelerate protons and other ions to energies of at least tens of GeV. Methods: The solar flare of the 14 of July 2000 offered a unique opportunity for the L3+C experiment to search for a correlated enhancement in the flux of muons using the L3 precision muon spectrometer. Its capabilities for observing a directional excess in the flux of muons above 15 GeV (corresponding to primary proton energies above 40 GeV) are presented along with observations made on the 14th of July 2000. Results: We report an excess which appeared at a time coincident with the peak increase of solar protons observed at lower energies. The probability that the excess is a background fluctuation is estimated to be 1%. No similar excess of the muon flux was observed up to 1.5 h after the solar flare time.

  4. Structure of the Ubiquitin Hydrolase UCH-L3 Complexed with a Suicide Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Misaghi, S.; Galardy, P.J.; Meester, W.J.; Ovaa, H.; Ploegh, H.L.; Gaudet, R.

    2009-03-24

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) comprise a family of small ubiquitin-specific proteases of uncertain function. Although no cellular substrates have been identified for UCHs, their highly tissue-specific expression patterns and the association of UCH-L1 mutations with human disease strongly suggest a critical role. The structure of the yeast UCH Yuh1-ubiquitin aldehyde complex identified an active site crossover loop predicted to limit the size of suitable substrates. We report the 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of human UCH-L3 in complex with the inhibitor ubiquitin vinylmethylester, an inhibitor that forms a covalent adduct with the active site cysteine of ubiquitin-specific proteases. This structure confirms the predicted mechanism of the inhibitor and allows the direct comparison of a UCH family enzyme in the free and ligand-bound state. We also show the efficient hydrolysis by human UCH-L3 of a 13-residue peptide in isopeptide linkage with ubiquitin, consistent with considerable flexibility in UCH substrate size. We propose a model for the catalytic cycle of UCH family members which accounts for the hydrolysis of larger ubiquitin conjugates.

  5. Structure of the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L3 complexed with a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Galardy, Paul J; Meester, Wim J N; Ovaa, Huib; Ploegh, Hidde L; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2005-01-14

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) comprise a family of small ubiquitin-specific proteases of uncertain function. Although no cellular substrates have been identified for UCHs, their highly tissue-specific expression patterns and the association of UCH-L1 mutations with human disease strongly suggest a critical role. The structure of the yeast UCH Yuh1-ubiquitin aldehyde complex identified an active site crossover loop predicted to limit the size of suitable substrates. We report the 1.45 A resolution crystal structure of human UCH-L3 in complex with the inhibitor ubiquitin vinylmethylester, an inhibitor that forms a covalent adduct with the active site cysteine of ubiquitin-specific proteases. This structure confirms the predicted mechanism of the inhibitor and allows the direct comparison of a UCH family enzyme in the free and ligand-bound state. We also show the efficient hydrolysis by human UCH-L3 of a 13-residue peptide in isopeptide linkage with ubiquitin, consistent with considerable flexibility in UCH substrate size. We propose a model for the catalytic cycle of UCH family members which accounts for the hydrolysis of larger ubiquitin conjugates.

  6. Sublingual vein parameters, AFP, AFP-L3, and GP73 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Guo, L-Y; Yang, J-M; Jia, J-W

    2015-06-26

    This study evaluated the diagnostic value of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), AFP heterogeneity 3 (AFP-L3), Golgi protein 73 (GP73), and sublingual vein parameters in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Levels of serum AFP, AFP-L3, GP73, and sublingual vein scores were measured in 34 patients with chronic hepatitis, 65 patients with post-hepatitis B cirrhosis, 71 patients with HCC, and 6 healthy controls. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore potential correlations. Sublingual vein grades in patients with HCC were higher than those in the other three groups; sublingual vein scores were also different between groups; combined diagnosis using AFP, GP73, and sublingual vein grade was superior to the individual parameters alone or when only two were used in different combinations. Thus, sublingual vein grade can be considered as an independent risk factor for diagnosis of HCC. Furthermore, combined detection with AFP, GP73, and sublingual vein grade is simple, inexpensive, and effective. It may therefore be suitable for screening high-risk populations for early diagnosis of HCC.

  7. The Future of Our Schools: An Example of the Delphi Technique in Action and the Case of Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianides, Marios; Pashiardis, Petros

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to investigate the future of education (pre-primary, primary and secondary education) in Cyprus until the year 2020. Design/methodology/approach: A three-round Delphi forecasting technique is used in order to make predictions about the future of schools and schooling in Cyprus based on the opinions of a…

  8. An Analysis of Factors that Inhibit Business Use of User-Centered Design Principles: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Tod M.

    2010-01-01

    The use of user-centered design (UCD) principles has a positive impact on the use of web-based interactive systems in customer-centric organizations. User-centered design methodologies are not widely adopted in organizations due to intraorganizational factors. A qualitative study using a modified Delphi technique was used to identify the factors…

  9. Identifying Areas of Tension in the Field of Technology-Enhanced Learning: Results of an International Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plesch, Christine; Kaendler, Celia; Rummel, Nikol; Wiedmann, Michael; Spada, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Despite steady progress in research in technology-enhanced learning (TEL), the translation of research findings and technology into educational practices falls short of expectations. We present five Areas of Tension which were identified and evaluated in an international Delphi study on TEL. These tensions might impede a more comprehensive…

  10. What Are We Aiming For?--A Delphi Study on the Development of Civic Scientific Literacy in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu; Rundgren, Carl-Johan

    2017-01-01

    Based on the EU FP 7 project, PROFILES, this article presents our findings from a three-round Delphi study conducted in Sweden that aimed at establishing a consensus on how science education should be developed for citizens to enhance civic scientific literacy. A total of 100 stakeholders (9th graders, school teachers, scientists, and science…

  11. A Study to Identify the Training Needs of Life Insurance Sales Representatives in Taiwan Using the Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Chiang Ku; Cheng, Chen-Liang

    2006-01-01

    This article reports a study conducted to identify the needs for continuing professional development for life insurance sales representatives and to examine the competencies needed by those sales representatives. A modified Delphi technique was used. Most life insurance companies in the USA implement an education and training plan advocated by the…

  12. 76 FR 46852 - Workers From Kelly Services, Working On-Site at Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Powertrain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Systems, LLC, Powertrain Division, El Paso, TX; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for... workers from Kelly Services working on-site at Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, El Paso, Texas. The workers... Automotive Systems, LLC, Powertrain Division, El Paso, Texas. Accordingly, the Department is amended...

  13. Essential Concepts of Nanoscale Science and Technology for High School Students Based on a Delphi Study by the Expert Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakhnini, Sohair; Blonder, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale science and technology (NST) is an important new field in modern science. In the current study, we seek to answer the question: "What are the essential concepts of NST that should be taught in high school"? A 3-round Delphi study methodology was applied based on 2 communities of experts in nanotechnology research and science…

  14. Identification of Response Options to Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining (ASGM) in Ghana via the Delphi Process

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Avik; Phipps, Sean; Long, Rachel; Essegbey, George; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    The Delphi technique is a means of facilitating discussion among experts in order to develop consensus, and can be used for policy formulation. This article describes a modified Delphi approach in which 27 multi-disciplinary academics and 22 stakeholders from Ghana and North America were polled about ways to address negative effects of small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. In early 2014, the academics, working in disciplinary groups, synthesized 17 response options based on data aggregated during an Integrated Assessment of ASGM in Ghana. The researchers participated in two rounds of Delphi polling in March and April 2014, during which 17 options were condensed into 12. Response options were rated via a 4-point Likert scale in terms of benefit (economic, environmental, and benefit to people) and feasibility (economic, social/cultural, political, and implementation). The six highest-scoring options populated a third Delphi poll, which 22 stakeholders from diverse sectors completed in April 2015. The academics and stakeholders also prioritized the response options using ranking exercises. The technique successfully gauged expert opinion on ASGM, and helped identify potential responses, policies and solutions for the sector. This is timely given that improvement to the ASGM sector is an important component within the UN Minamata Convention. PMID:26378557

  15. "Normal" and "Inappropriate" Childhood Sexual Behaviours: Findings from a Delphi Study of Professionals in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vosmer, Susanne; Hackett, Simon; Callanan, Margie

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a three-stage Delphi study examining the current level of consensus among 24 professionals in the United Kingdom regarding definitions of and distinctions between normal, inappropriate and sexually abusive behaviours in children under 10 years, as well as factors influencing their views. Although firm conclusions…

  16. Priorities in K-12 Distance Education: A Delphi Study Examining Multiple Perspectives on Policy, Practice, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The Delphi Method of group communication was used with experienced distance education stakeholders in the United States from the areas of research, policy, and practice to identify priorities in K-12 distance education over the next five years. Data from the three rounds of this study were organized and compared using descriptive statistics. The…

  17. The Underutilization of Information and Communication Technology-Assisted Collaborative Project-Based Learning among International Educators: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Barry S.; Walker, Andrew E.; Brill, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the barriers associated with teachers implementing information and communication technology-assisted collaborative project-based learning (ICTCPrjBL) as a classroom teaching methodology with students. We used a Web-based Delphi method to engage experienced educators in anonymous consensus building consisting of three rounds of…

  18. Identification of Response Options to Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining (ASGM) in Ghana via the Delphi Process.

    PubMed

    Basu, Avik; Phipps, Sean; Long, Rachel; Essegbey, George; Basu, Niladri

    2015-09-10

    The Delphi technique is a means of facilitating discussion among experts in order to develop consensus, and can be used for policy formulation. This article describes a modified Delphi approach in which 27 multi-disciplinary academics and 22 stakeholders from Ghana and North America were polled about ways to address negative effects of small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. In early 2014, the academics, working in disciplinary groups, synthesized 17 response options based on data aggregated during an Integrated Assessment of ASGM in Ghana. The researchers participated in two rounds of Delphi polling in March and April 2014, during which 17 options were condensed into 12. Response options were rated via a 4-point Likert scale in terms of benefit (economic, environmental, and benefit to people) and feasibility (economic, social/cultural, political, and implementation). The six highest-scoring options populated a third Delphi poll, which 22 stakeholders from diverse sectors completed in April 2015. The academics and stakeholders also prioritized the response options using ranking exercises. The technique successfully gauged expert opinion on ASGM, and helped identify potential responses, policies and solutions for the sector. This is timely given that improvement to the ASGM sector is an important component within the UN Minamata Convention.

  19. Identification of the Competencies Needed to Apply Social Marketing to Extension Programming: Results of a Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Laura A.; Stubbs, Eric; Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Huynh, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the specific competencies needed to apply social marketing, a promising approach to behavior change, to Extension programming. A modified Delphi study was used to achieve group consensus among a panel of experts on the skills, characteristics, and knowledge needed to successfully apply this behavior change…

  20. Convergence on the Guidelines for Designing a Web-Based Art-Teacher Education Curriculum: A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yu Nu

    The rise of the World Wide Web as a new information processing technology has attracted the attention of educators worldwide. The purpose of this study was to seek a consensus among art education experts regarding how the Web should be integrated into the art teacher education curricula. The Delphi Method was applied for seeking a consensus. A…

  1. Phylogeography of the human mitochondrial haplogroup L3e: a snapshot of African prehistory and Atlantic slave trade.

    PubMed

    Bandelt, H J; Alves-Silva, J; Guimarães, P E; Santos, M S; Brehm, A; Pereira, L; Coppa, A; Larruga, J M; Rengo, C; Scozzari, R; Torroni, A; Prata, M J; Amorim, A; Prado, V F; Pena, S D

    2001-11-01

    The mtDNA haplogroup L3e, which is identified by the restriction site +2349 MboI within the Afro-Eurasian superhaplogroup L3 (-3592 HpaI), is omnipresent in Africa but virtually absent in Eurasia (except for neighbouring areas with limited genetic exchange). L3e was hitherto poorly characterised in terms of HVS-I motifs, as the ancestral HVS-I type of L3e cannot be distinguished from the putative HVS-I ancestor of the entire L3 (differing from the CRS by a transition at np 16223). An MboI screening at np 2349 of a large number of Brazilian and Caribbean mtDNAs (encompassing numerous mtDNAs of African ancestry), now reveals that L3e is subdivided into four principal clades, each characterised by a single mutation in HVS-I, with additional support coming from HVS-II and partial RFLP analysis. The apparently oldest of these clades (transition at np 16327) occurs mainly in central Africa and was probably carried to southern Africa with the Bantu expansion(s). The most frequent clade (transition at np 16320) testifies to a pronounced expansion event in the mid-Holocene and seems to be prominent in many Bantu groups from all of Africa. In contrast, one clade (transition at np 16264) is essentially restricted to Atlantic western Africa (including Cabo Verde). We propose a tentative L3e phylogeny that is based on 197 HVS-I sequences. We conclude that haplogroup L3e originated in central or eastern Africa about 46,000 (+/-14,000) years ago, and was a hitchhiker of much later dispersal and local expansion events, with the rise of food production and iron smelting. Enforced migration of African slaves to the Americas translocated L3e mitochondria, the descendants of which in Brazil and the Caribbean still reflect their different regional African ancestries.

  2. Study plan to identify long term national telecommunications need and priorities applying Delphi techniques (handbook). [technological forecasting - United States of America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A handbook that explains the basic Delphi methodology and discusses modified Delphi techniques is presented. The selection of communications experts to participate in a study, the construction of questionnaires on potential communications developments, and requisite technology is treated. No two modified Delphi studies were the same, which reflects the flexibility and adaptability of the technique. Each study must be specifically tailored to a particular case, and consists of seeking a consensus of opinion among experts about a particular subject and attendant conditions that may prevail in the future.

  3. PIPc study: development of indicators of potentially inappropriate prescribing in children (PIPc) in primary care using a modified Delphi technique

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Emma; O'Brien, Kirsty; Cooper, Janine; Redmond, Patrick; Hughes, Carmel M; Bennett, Kathleen; Fahey, Tom; Smith, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence regarding the quality of prescribing for children in primary care. Several prescribing criteria (indicators) have been developed to assess the appropriateness of prescribing in older and middle-aged adults but few are relevant to children. The objective of this study was to develop a set of prescribing indicators that can be applied to prescribing or dispensing data sets to determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing in children (PIPc) in primary care settings. Design Two-round modified Delphi consensus method. Setting Irish and UK general practice. Participants A project steering group consisting of academic and clinical general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists was formed to develop a list of indicators from literature review and clinical expertise. 15 experts consisting of GPs, pharmacists and paediatricians from the Republic of Ireland and the UK formed the Delphi panel. Results 47 indicators were reviewed by the project steering group and 16 were presented to the Delphi panel. In the first round of this exercise, consensus was achieved on nine of these indicators. Of the remaining seven indicators, two were removed following review of expert panel comments and discussion of the project steering group. The second round of the Delphi process focused on the remaining five indicators, which were amended based on first round feedback. Three indicators were accepted following the second round of the Delphi process and the remaining two indicators were removed. The final list consisted of 12 indicators categorised by respiratory system (n=6), gastrointestinal system (n=2), neurological system (n=2) and dermatological system (n=2). Conclusions The PIPc indicators are a set of prescribing criteria developed for use in children in primary care in the absence of clinical information. The utility of these criteria will be tested in further studies using prescribing databases. PMID:27601499

  4. 2016 CSSE L3 Milestone: Deliver In Situ to XTD End Users

    SciTech Connect

    Patchett, John M.; Nouanesengsy, Boonthanome; Fasel, Patricia Kroll; Ahrens, James Paul

    2016-09-13

    This report summarizes the activities in FY16 toward satisfying the CSSE 2016 L3 milestone to deliver in situ to XTD end users of EAP codes. The Milestone was accomplished with ongoing work to ensure the capability is maintained and developed. Two XTD end users used the in situ capability in Rage. A production ParaView capability was created in the HPC and Desktop environment. Two new capabilities were added to ParaView in support of an EAP in situ workflow. We also worked with various support groups at the lab to deploy a production ParaView in the LANL environment for both desktop and HPC systems. . In addition, for this milestone, we moved two VTK based filters from research objects into the production ParaView code to support a variety of standard visualization pipelines for our EAP codes.

  5. Antihelmintic effects of nutmeg (Myristica fragans) on Anisakis simplex L3 larvae obtained from Micromesistius potassou.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Gerique, Javier; Langa, Elisa; Berzosa, César; Valero, Marta Sofía; Gómez-Rincón, Carlota

    2015-06-01

    Anisakis simplex is a foodborne pathogen that can produce human infections and allergic reactions due to the high consumption of raw fish. The seeds of Myristica fragans (Myristicaceae), popularly known as nutmeg, are worldwide used as a culinary spice due to its flavour and properties in food preservation. A nutmeg extract was prepared, analyzed, screened for cytotoxicity and tested against Anisakis simplex L3 larvae. In order to detect the biologically active constituents of the extract, myristicin was tested on the larvae. An acetylcholinesterase inhibition bioassay was also carried out to investigate the antihelmintic mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that nutmeg exerts antihelmintic effects on Anisakis simplex, being myristicin one of the active compounds. The extract induced a high rate of dead anisakis at concentrations between 0.5 and 0.7 mg/ml without being considered cytotoxic; however, an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was discarded as the molecular mechanism involved in the activity.

  6. Activity of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) essential oil against L3 larvae of Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Rincón, Carlota; Langa, Elisa; Murillo, Paula; Valero, Marta Sofía; Berzosa, César; López, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Nematicidal activity of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil, commonly known as tea tree oil (TTO), was assayed in vitro against L3 larvae of Anisakis simplex. The results showed a mortality of 100% for concentrations between 7 and 10 μL/mL after 48 h of incubation, obtaining an LD50 value of 4.53 μL/mL after 24 hours and 4.27 μL/mL after 48 hours. Concentration-dependent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was observed for tea tree essential oil showing inhibition values of 100% at 100 μL/mL. This fact suggests that TTO may act as an AChE inhibitor. Terpinen-4-ol was discarded as main larvicide compound as it did not show larvicidal or anticholinesterase activity. The data obtained suggest that the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia may have a great therapeutic potential for the treatment of human anisakiasis.

  7. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of K{sub l3}{sup {+-}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the model-independent radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of K{sub l3}{sup {+-}} decays to the order of ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}), where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the kaon. The final results are presented, first, with the triple integration over the variables of the bremsstrahlung photon ready to be performed numerically and, second, in an analytical form. These two forms are useful to cross-check on one another and with other calculations. This paper is organized to make it accessible and reliable in the analysis of the Dalitz plot of precision experiments and is not compromised to fixing the form factors at predetermined values. It is assumed that the real photons are kinematically discriminated. Otherwise, our results have a general model-independent applicability.

  8. Optimised Post-Exposure Image Sharpening Code for L3-CCD Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Leon K.; Butler, Raymond F.; Redfern, R. Michael; Sheehan, Brendan J.; McDonald, James

    2008-02-22

    As light from celestial bodies traverses Earth's atmosphere, the wavefronts are distorted by atmospheric turbulence, thereby lowering the angular resolution of ground-based imaging. Rapid time-series imaging enables Post-Exposure Image Sharpening (PEIS) techniques, which employ shift-and-add frame registration to remove the tip-tilt component of the wavefront error--as well as telescope wobble, thus benefiting all observations. Further resolution gains are possible by selecting only frames with the best instantaneous seeing--a technique sometimes calling 'Lucky Imaging'. We implemented these techniques in the 1990s, with the TRIFFID imaging photon-counting camera, and its associated data reduction software. The software was originally written for time-tagged photon-list data formats, recorded by detectors such as the MAMA. This paper describes our deep re-structuring of the software to handle the 2-d FITS images produced by Low Light Level CCD (L3-CCD) cameras, which have sufficient time-series resolution (>30 Hz) for PEIS. As before, our code can perform straight frame co-addition, use composite reference stars, perform PEIS under several different algorithms to determine the tip/tilt shifts, store 'quality' and shift information for each frame, perform frame selection, and generate exposure-maps for photometric correction. In addition, new code modules apply all 'static' calibrations (bias subtraction, dark subtraction and flat-fielding) to the frames immediately prior to the other algorithms. A unique feature of our PEIS/Lucky Imaging code is the use of bidirectional wiener-filtering. Coupled with the far higher sensitivity of the L3-CCD over the previous TRIFFID detectors, much fainter reference stars and much narrower time windows can be used.

  9. Development of a Heat-Illness Screening Instrument Using the Delphi Panel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Eberman, Lindsey E.; Cleary, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Exertional heat illness (EHI) is the third leading cause of death among athletes, but with preparticipation screening, risk factors can be identified, and some EHIs can be prevented. Objective: To establish content validity of the Heat Illness Index Score (HIIS), a 10-item screening instrument designed to identify athletes at risk for EHI during a preparticipation examination. Design: Delphi study. Setting: The Delphi technique included semistructured face-to-face or telephone interviews and included electronic questionnaires administered via e-mail. Patients or Other Participants: Six individuals with extensive research experience and/or clinical expertise in EHI participated as expert panelists. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used a Delphi panel technique (3 rounds) to evaluate the HIIS with the consensus of expert opinions. For round 1, we conducted face-to-face interviews with the panelists. For round 2, we solicited panelists' feedback of the transcribed data to ensure trustworthiness, then provided the participants with the revised HIIS and a questionnaire eliciting their levels of agreement for each revision from the previous round on a visual analog scale (11.4 cm) with extreme indicators of strongly disagree and strongly agree. We calculated the mean and SD for each revision and accepted when the mean was greater than 7.6 cm (agree) and the SD still permitted a positive response (>5.7 cm), suggesting consensus. For round 3, we instructed participants to indicate their levels of agreement with each final, revised item and their levels of agreement with the entire instrument on a 4-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = strongly agree). Results: In round 1, panelists supported all 10 items but requested various revisions. In round 2, 16.3% (7 of 43) revisions were rejected, and 2 revisions were modified. In round 3, 100% of panelists reported agreeing (n = 3 of 6) or strongly agreeing (n = 3 of 6) with the final instrument

  10. A national Delphi to determine developmental progression of quality and safety competencies in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Barton, Amy J; Armstrong, Gail; Preheim, Gayle; Gelmon, Sherril B; Andrus, Lynne C

    2009-01-01

    Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) faculty outlined 6 competency domains: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. In this study, 18 subject matter experts participated in a web-based modified Delphi survey between October 2008 and February 2009 to determine whether there was consensus on the developmental progression of knowledge, skill, and attitude elements within the QSEN competencies. Support for creation of curricular threads to facilitate student progressive achievement of the QSEN competencies was validated. Competency development related to the individual patient was emphasized early in the curriculum, whereas teams and systems were emphasized later. Complex concepts such as teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and informatics were emphasized in advanced courses. Experts outlined a developmental approach in curriculum design, which would potentially encourage practice, reinforcement of learning, and recognition of context of care.

  11. Bioaccumulation of trace element concentrations in common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Sílvia S; Pereira, Andreia T; Costa, Élia; Torres, Jordi; Oliveira, Isabel; Bastos-Santos, Jorge; Araújo, Helder; Ferreira, Marisa; Vingada, José; Eira, Catarina

    2016-12-15

    The common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) is one of the most abundant species in Atlantic Iberia, representing a potentially important tool to assess the bioaccumulation of trace elements in the Iberian marine ecosystem. Nine elements (As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn) were evaluated in 36 dolphins stranded in continental Portugal. Dolphins had increasing Hg concentrations (16.72μg·g(-1) ww, liver) compared with previous studies in Atlantic Iberia, whereas Cd concentrations (2.26μg·g(-1) ww, kidney) fell within reported ranges. The concentrations of some trace elements (including Cd and Hg) presented positive relationships with dolphin length, presence of parasites and gross pathologies. Common dolphins may help biomonitoring more offshore Atlantic Iberian areas in future studies, which would otherwise be difficult to assess.

  12. Messaging standard requirements for electronic health records in Islamic Republic of Iran: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M; Foozonkhah, S; Shahmoradi, L; Mahmodabadi, A D

    2017-02-01

    The present descriptive-comparative study was conducted to give an overview of the messaging standards that are necessary for interoperable electronic health records (EHRs). We designed a preliminary model after data collection and compared the messaging standards of Health Level Seven (HL7) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The data were assessed with the Delphi technique. A comprehensive model for the messaging standards of EHRs in the Islamic Republic of Iran was presented in three pivots: structural characteristics (standard for all EHRs, XML-based and object-oriented messages, and dual model); model specifications (reference model, archetypes and classes of reference model), and general features (distinct ontology, mapping with other standards, and using reference archetypes for exchanging documents). In conclusion, we gave an overview of messaging standards for the interoperability of EHRs and experts selected ISO13606 as a suitable standard for the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  13. GPU linear and non-linear Poisson–Boltzmann solver module for DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Colmenares, José; Ortiz, Jesús; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Summary: In this work, we present a CUDA-based GPU implementation of a Poisson–Boltzmann equation solver, in both the linear and non-linear versions, using double precision. A finite difference scheme is adopted and made suitable for the GPU architecture. The resulting code was interfaced with the electrostatics software for biomolecules DelPhi, which is widely used in the computational biology community. The algorithm has been implemented using CUDA and tested over a few representative cases of biological interest. Details of the implementation and performance test results are illustrated. A speedup of ∼10 times was achieved both in the linear and non-linear cases. Availability and implementation: The module is open-source and available at http://www.electrostaticszone.eu/index.php/downloads. Contact: walter.rocchia@iit.it Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online PMID:24292939

  14. Search for one large extra dimension with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2009-03-01

    Single photons detected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP2 in the years 1997-2000 are reanalysed to investigate the existence of a single extra dimension in a modified ADD scenario with slightly warped large extra dimensions. The data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 180 and 209 GeV for an integrated luminosity of ˜650 pb-1 agree with the predictions of the Standard Model and allow a limit to be set on graviton emission in one large extra dimension. The limit obtained on the fundamental mass scale M D is 1.69 TeV/ c 2 at 95% CL, with an expected limit of 1.71 TeV/ c 2.

  15. Future directions in clinical child and adolescent psychology: a Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    James, Rochelle L; Roberts, Michael C

    2009-10-01

    This study sought to identify the future directions in three domains: clinical practice, research, and training of clinical child and adolescent psychologists in the upcoming decade. Doctoral-level active members in the field were surveyed via a two-round Delphi survey (45 in round 1; 35 in round 2). Evidence-based practice received the greatest consensus by the participants and highest rank in each of the three domains. Other highly ranked clinical practice directions included prevention and early diagnosis and treatment, and clinical services for specific psychological problems. Research directions focused on biological and social factors interactions in the etiology and treatment and specific child and adolescent disorders. In the training domain, major directions included the pursuit of specialty training in child and adolescent psychology and training emphasizing the biological basis of behavior. Implications of these future directions are discussed.

  16. Project evaluation and selection using fuzzy Delphi method and zero - one goal programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, Suriana; Adna, Nofarziah; Arsad, Roslah; Soid, Siti Khuzaimah; Ali, Zaileha Md

    2014-12-01

    Project evaluation and selection is a factor affecting the impotence of board director in which is trying to maximize all the possible goals. Assessment of the problem occurred in organization plan is the first phase for decision making process. The company needs a group of expert to evaluate the problems. The Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM) is a systematic procedure to evoke the group's opinion in order to get the best result to evaluate the project performance. This paper proposes an evaluation and selection of the best alternative project based on combination of FDM and Zero - One Goal Programming (ZOGP) formulation. ZOGP is used to solve the multi-criteria decision making for final decision part by using optimization software LINDO 6.1. An empirical example on an ongoing decision making project in Johor, Malaysia is implemented for case study.

  17. Identifying the critical financial ratios for stocks evaluation: A fuzzy delphi approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Mazura; Shuib, Adibah; Mohamad, Daud

    2014-12-01

    Stocks evaluation has always been an interesting and challenging problem for both researchers and practitioners. Generally, the evaluation can be made based on a set of financial ratios. Nevertheless, there are a variety of financial ratios that can be considered and if all ratios in the set are placed into the evaluation process, data collection would be more difficult and time consuming. Thus, the objective of this paper is to identify the most important financial ratios upon which to focus in order to evaluate the stock's performance. For this purpose, a survey was carried out using an approach which is based on an expert judgement, namely the Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM). The results of this study indicated that return on equity, return on assets, net profit margin, operating profit margin, earnings per share and debt to equity are the most important ratios.

  18. Integrated multi-criteria flood vulnerability approach using fuzzy TOPSIS and Delphi technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G.; Jun, K.-S.; Chung, E.-S.

    2013-05-01

    This study aims to develop a new procedure that combines multi-criteria spatial vulnerability analysis with the traditional linear probabilistic risk approach. This approach is named integrated fuzzy flood vulnerability assessment because it combines the watershed-based vulnerability framework with stream-based risk analysis. The Delphi technique and pressure-state-impact-response framework are introduced to objectively select evaluation criteria, and the fuzzy TOPSIS technique is proposed to address the uncertainty of weights to all criteria and crisp input data of all spatial units. ArcGIS is used to represent the spatial results to all criteria. This framework is applied to the south Han River basin in South Korea. As a result, the flood vulnerability ranking was derived and vulnerability characteristics of all spatial units were compared. This framework can be used to conduct a prefeasibility study for flood mitigation projects when various stakeholders should be included.

  19. The development of the Suicidal Patient Observation Chart (SPOC): Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Björkdahl, A; Nyberg, U; Runeson, B; Omérov, P

    2011-08-01

    Constant observation is a method used to insure the safety of suicidal inpatients. It involves structure and control as well as flexibility and the development of a relationship between the observer and the patient. It has been found that important observations may go unnoticed by the observer or fail to be communicated to the multidisciplinary team because of a lack of sufficient training and systematic documentation. We therefore conducted a Delphi survey to collect opinions on what would be important to observe during constant observation of suicidal patients. A panel of experienced clinicians, service users and researchers reached consensus on 37 of 40 observation items (92%). Of these, 28 were rated as the most important. As a result, we developed a form for systematic observer documentation in clinical practice, the Suicidal Patient Observation Chart. The Suicidal Patient Observation Chart includes the 28 items and covers 24 separate observation periods.

  20. LUC7L3/CROP inhibits replication of hepatitis B virus via suppressing enhancer II/basal core promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Ito, Masahiko; Sun, Suofeng; Chida, Takeshi; Nakashima, Kenji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The core promoter of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome is a critical region for transcriptional initiation of 3.5 kb, pregenome and precore RNAs and for the viral replication. Although a number of host-cell factors that potentially regulate the viral promoter activities have been identified, the molecular mechanisms of the viral gene expression, in particular, regulatory mechanisms of the transcriptional repression remain elusive. In this study, we identified LUC7 like 3 pre-mRNA splicing factor (LUC7L3, also known as hLuc7A or CROP) as a novel interacting partner of HBV enhancer II and basal core promoter (ENII/BCP), key elements within the core promoter, through the proteomic screening and found that LUC7L3 functions as a negative regulator of ENII/BCP. Gene silencing of LUC7L3 significantly increased expression of the viral genes and antigens as well as the activities of ENII/BCP and core promoter. In contrast, overexpression of LUC7L3 inhibited their activities and HBV replication. In addition, LUC7L3 possibly contributes to promotion of the splicing of 3.5 kb RNA, which may also be involved in negative regulation of the pregenome RNA level. This is the first to demonstrate the involvement of LUC7L3 in regulation of gene transcription and in viral replication. PMID:27857158

  1. Crystal structure of a deubiquitinating enzyme (human UCH-L3) at 1.8 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, S C; Larsen, C N; Cook, W J; Wilkinson, K D; Hill, C P

    1997-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases catalyze the removal of adducts from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. We have determined the crystal structure of the recombinant human Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase (UCH-L3) by X-ray crystallography at 1.8 A resolution. The structure is comprised of a central antiparallel beta-sheet flanked on both sides by alpha-helices. The beta-sheet and one of the helices resemble the well-known papain-like cysteine proteases, with the greatest similarity to cathepsin B. This similarity includes the UCH-L3 active site catalytic triad of Cys95, His169 and Asp184, and the oxyanion hole residue Gln89. Papain and UCH-L3 differ, however, in strand and helix connectivity, which in the UCH-L3 structure includes a disordered 20 residue loop (residues 147-166) that is positioned over the active site and may function in the definition of substrate specificity. Based upon analogy with inhibitor complexes of the papain-like enzymes, we propose a model describing the binding of ubiquitin to UCH-L3. The UCH-L3 active site cleft appears to be masked in the unliganded structure by two different segments of the enzyme (residues 9-12 and 90-94), thus implying a conformational change upon substrate binding and suggesting a mechanism to limit non-specific hydrolysis. PMID:9233788

  2. Characterizing substrate selectivity of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L3 using engineered α-linked ubiquitin substrates.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Mario F; Carmody, Lisa; Romo-Fewell, Octavio; Lokensgard, Melissa E; Love, John J

    2014-12-30

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is highly complex and entails the concerted actions of many enzymes that function to ubiquitinate proteins targeted to the proteasome as well as enzymes that remove and recycle ubiquitin for additional rounds of proteolysis. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L3 (UCH-L3) is a human cytosolic deubiquitinase whose precise biological function is not known. It is believed to hydrolyze small peptides or chemical adducts from the C-terminus of ubiquitin that may be remnant from proteasomal processing. In addition, UCH-L3 is a highly effective biotechnological tool that is used to produce small or unstable peptides/proteins recalcitrant to production in Escherichia coli expression systems. Previous research, which explored the substrate selectivity of UCH-L3, demonstrated a substrate size limitation for proteins/peptides expressed as α-linked C-terminal fusions to ubiquitin and also suggested that an additional substrate property may affect UCH-L3 hydrolysis [ Larsen , C. N. et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37 , 3358 - 3368 ]. Using a series of engineered protein substrates, which are similar in size yet differ in secondary structure, we demonstrate that thermal stability is a key factor that significantly affects UCH-L3 hydrolysis. In addition, we show that the thermal stabilities of the engineered substrates are not altered by fusion to ubiquitin and offer a possible mechanism as to how ubiquitin affects the structural and unfolding properties of natural in vivo targets.

  3. Terminology, Taxonomy, and Facilitation of Motor Learning in Clinical Practice: Protocol of a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Bleijlevens, Michel HC; Beurskens, Anna JHM; Rasquin, Sascha M; Halfens, Jos; Wilson, Mark R; Masters, Rich S; Lexis, Monique A; Braun, Susy M

    2013-01-01

    Background Facilitating motor learning in patients during clinical practice is complex, especially in people with cognitive impairments. General principles of motor learning are available for therapists to use in their practice. However, the translation of evidence from the different fields of motor learning for use in clinical practice is problematic due to lack of uniformity in definition and taxonomy of terms related to motor learning. Objective The objective of this paper was to describe the design of a Delphi technique to reach consensus on definitions, descriptions, and taxonomy used within motor learning and to explore experts’ opinions and experiences on the application of motor learning in practice. Methods A heterogeneous sample of at least 30 international experts on motor learning will be recruited. Their opinions regarding several central topics on motor learning using a Delphi technique will be collected in 3 sequential rounds. The questionnaires in the 3 rounds will be developed based on the literature and answers of experts from earlier rounds. Consensus will be reached when at least 70% of the experts agree on a certain topic. Free text comments and answers from open questions on opinions and experiences will be described and clustered into themes. Results This study is currently ongoing. It is financially supported by Stichting Alliantie Innovatie (Innovation Alliance Foundation), RAAK-international (Registration number: 2011-3-33int). Conclusions The results of this study will enable us to summarize and categorize expert knowledge and experiences in a format that should be more accessible for therapists to use in support of their clinical practice. Unresolved aspects will direct future research. PMID:23685621

  4. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Japanese public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. Methods The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of 32 Japanese mental health professionals to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms). Responses to these open-ended questions were used to generate new items. Results The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 38 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 176 items, 56 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this article. Conclusions There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the Japanese public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to health professionals working in health and welfare settings who do not have clinical mental health training. PMID:21592409

  5. Consensus in controversy: The modified Delphi method applied to Gynecologic Oncology practice

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, David E.; Havrilesky, Laura J.; Osann, Kathryn; Lipscomb, Joseph; Hsieh, Susie; Walker, Joan L.; Wright, Alexi A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Bristow, Robert E.; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Morgan, Robert; Mukamel, Dana B.; Wenzel, Lari

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the degree of consensus regarding the probabilities of outcomes associated with IP/IV and IV chemotherapy. Methods A survey was administered to an expert panel using the Delphi method. Ten ovarian cancer experts were asked to estimate outcomes for patients receiving IP/IV or IV chemotherapy. The clinical estimates were: 1) probability of completing six cycles of chemotherapy, 2) probability of surviving five years, 3) median survival, and 4) probability of ER/hospital visits during treatment. Estimates for two patients, one with a low comorbidity index (patient 1) and the other with a moderate index (patient 2), were included. The survey was administered in three rounds, and panelists could revise their subsequent responses based on review of the anonymous opinions of their peers. Results The ranges were smaller for IV compared with IP/IV therapy. Ranges decreased with each round. Consensus converged around outcomes related to IP/IV chemotherapy for: 1) completion of 6 cycles of therapy (type 1 patient, 62%, type 2 patient, 43%); 2) percentage of patients surviving 5 years (type 1 patient, 66%, type 2 patient, 47%); and 3) median survival (type 1 patient, 83 months, type 2 patient, 58 months). The group required three rounds to achieve consensus on the probabilities of ER/hospital visits (type 1 patient, 24%, type 2 patient, 35%). Conclusions Initial estimates of survival and adverse events associated with IP/IV chemotherapy differ among experts. The Delphi process works to build consensus and may be a pragmatic tool to inform patients of their expected outcomes. PMID:26177553

  6. The influences on and experiences of becoming nurse entrepreneurs: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Averis, Andrea; Walsh, Ken

    2003-08-01

    There is little known about private practice nursing as an area of advanced practice. As more nurses take the option to develop private practice, the experiences of and influences on nurses currently in private practice might be a useful guide to the pitfalls and difficulties which might be encountered. In addition, an understanding of the experiences of and influences might assist nursing organizations and health services to provide support to nurses who play an integral part in health care delivery in the community. A research study was undertaken utilizing a two-round Delphi Technique to elicit and assess consensus on the reasons for nurses going into business and the experiences they encountered in becoming and being a nurse entrepreneur. The study instrument in round one comprised a questionnaire with statement headings inviting opinions on the influences and experiences of nurses in business. In the second round, levels of agreement were elicited from responders on collated opinions from round one, including statements formed from comments written in round one. The initial questionnaire also included closed questions to obtain a profile of nurses in private practice. Responders were 59 nurses in private practice in round one and 54 nurses in round two. The themes raised could be grouped under headings of influences, advantages/disadvantages, education/experience, skills/knowledge, characteristics and barriers. The level of agreement on the themes was reasonably high. Dissent occurred on issues of increased income, professional image and support structures. This Delphi study has identified key areas of consensus on the experiences of nurses in private practice who have extended their career into the business arena. It has also identified areas in which further work needs to be carried out to understand this work of nurse entrepreneurs.

  7. Self-management programmes in temporomandibular disorders: results from an international Delphi process.

    PubMed

    Durham, J; Al-Baghdadi, M; Baad-Hansen, L; Breckons, M; Goulet, J P; Lobbezoo, F; List, T; Michelotti, A; Nixdorf, D R; Peck, C C; Raphael, K; Schiffman, E; Steele, J G; Story, W; Ohrbach, R

    2016-12-01

    Self-management (SM) programmes are commonly used for initial treatment of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The programmes described in the literature, however, vary widely with no consistency in terminology used, components of care or their definitions. The aims of this study were therefore to construct an operationalised definition of self-management appropriate for the treatment of patients with TMD, identify the components of that self-management currently being used and create sufficiently clear and non-overlapping standardised definitions for each of those components. A four-round Delphi process with eleven international experts in the field of TMD was conducted to achieve these aims. In the first round, the participants agreed upon six principal concepts of self-management. In the remaining three rounds, consensus was achieved upon the definition and the six components of self-management. The main components identified and agreed upon by the participants to constitute the core of a SM programme for TMD were as follows: education; jaw exercises; massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. This Delphi process has established the principal concepts of self-management, and a standardised definition has been agreed with the following components for use in clinical practice: education; self-exercise; self-massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. The consensus-derived concepts, definitions and components of SM offer a starting point for further research to advance the evidence base for, and clinical utility of, TMD SM.

  8. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment.

  9. Using a Delphi process to define priorities for prison health research in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdjian, Fiona G; Schuler, Andrée; McIsaac, Kathryn E; Pivnick, Lucie; Matheson, Flora I; Brown, Glenn; Kiefer, Lori; Silva, Diego; Hwang, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A large number of Canadians spend time in correctional facilities each year, and they are likely to have poor health compared to the general population. Relatively little health research has been conducted in Canada with a focus on people who experience detention or incarceration. We aimed to conduct a Delphi process with key stakeholders to define priorities for research in prison health in Canada for the next 10 years. Setting We conducted a Delphi process using an online survey with two rounds in 2014 and 2015. Participants We invited key stakeholders in prison health research in Canada to participate, which we defined as persons who had published research on prison health in Canada since 1994 and persons in the investigators’ professional networks. We invited 143 persons to participate in the first round and 59 participated. We invited 137 persons to participate in the second round and 67 participated. Primary and secondary outcome measures Participants suggested topics in the first round, and these topics were collated by investigators. We measured the level of agreement among participants that each collated topic was a priority for prison health research in Canada for the next 10 years, and defined priorities based on the level of agreement. Results In the first round, participants suggested 71 topics. In the second round, consensus was achieved that a large number of suggested topics were research priorities. Top priorities were diversion and alternatives to incarceration, social and community re-integration, creating healthy environments in prisons, healthcare in custody, continuity of healthcare, substance use disorders and the health of Aboriginal persons in custody. Conclusions Generated in an inclusive and systematic process, these findings should inform future research efforts to improve the health and healthcare of people who experience detention and incarceration in Canada. PMID:26769790

  10. Small bowel entrapment and ureteropelvic junction disruption associated with L3 Chance fracture-dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Pesenti, Sebastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Faure, Alice; Peltier, Emilie; Launay, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Chance fracture are rare lesions but often associated with abdominal injuries. We herein present the case of a seven years old patient who sustained an entrapment of small bowel and an ureteropelvic disruption associated with a Chance fracture and spine dislocation following a traffic accident. Initial X-rays and computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a Chance fracture with dislocation of L3 vertebra, with an incarceration of a small bowel loop in the spinal canal and a complete section of the left lumbar ureter. Paraplegia was noticed on the initial neurological examination. A posterior L2-L4 osteosynthesis was performed firstly. In a second time she underwent a sus umbilical laparotomy to release the incarcerated jejunum loop in the spinal canal. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed on a JJ probe to suture the left injured ureter. One month after the traumatism, she started to complain of severe headaches related to a leakage of cerebrospinalis fluid. Three months after the traumatism there was a clear regression of the leakage. One year after the trauma, an anterior intervertebral fusion was done. At final follow-up, no neurologic recovery was noticed. In case of Chance fracture, all physicians should think about abdominal injuries even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial abdominal CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging provide in such case crucial info for management of the spine and the associated lesions. PMID:27672641

  11. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal HydrolaseL3 Correlates with Human Sperm Count, Motility and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijiao; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina; Cheng, Zhi; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCHL3) belongs to the group of deubiquitinating enzymes and plays a part in apoptosis of germ cells and the differentiation of spermatocytes into spermatids. However, the exact role of UCHL3 in human spermatogenesis and sperm function remains unknown. Here we examined the level and activity of UCHL3 in spermatozoa from men with asthenozoospermia (A), oligoasthenozoospermia (OA) or normozoospermia (N). Immunofluorescence indicated that UCHL3 was mainly localized in the acrosome and throughout the flagella, and western blotting revealed a lower level in A or OA compared with N (p < 0.05). The catalytic activity of UCHL3 was decreased in spermatozoa from A or OA (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). The level and activity of UCHL3 were positively correlated with sperm count, concentration and motility. The UCHL3 level was positively correlated with the normal fertilization rate (FR) and percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation of in vitro fertilization (IVF). The UCHL3 activity was also positively correlated with FR, the percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation and high-quality embryos rate of IVF. Aforementioned correlations were not manifested in intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These findings suggest that UCHL3 may play a role in male infertility. PMID:27780264

  12. Design and Development of the Liquid Lithium Limiter (L3) for CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraydarian, R. P.; Chousal, L.; Doerner, R. P.; Luckhardt, S. C.; Lynch, T.

    2000-10-01

    --- This poster describes experiments with liquid Li that informed the design of a Liquid Lithium Limter (L3) built by UCSD for installation on the CDX-U spherical torus at PPPL. It was necessary to resort to wetting liquid Li to textured structures in order for the limiter to intercept 2-3 density e-folding lengths of the scrape off layer (3 cm) of the CDX-U plasma. Since Li is chemically active and corrodes rapidly in all but the driest air, we carried out wetting experiments in vacuum (10-7 - 10-8 torr) and also in Ar at near atmospheric pressure. Wetting of steel occurred reliably at substrate temperatures near 500 ^oC under all conditions, but this high temperature presented special problems of rapid material loss through evaporation, especially under vacuum. Once the surface is wetted, however, lost Li can be replenished at ~ 200 ^oC (just above the melting temperature) where evaporation is negligible. A wetted limiter can even be cooled to room temperature and then reheated many hours later as long as clean conditions are maintained. Surface textures, heating techniques, effective seal materials for piston-driven liquid Li reservoirs, and other aspects of the limiter system design will be presented. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER54301

  13. Local label learning (L3) for multi-atlas based segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yongfu; Liu, Jieqiong; Duan, Yunyun; Zhang, Xinqing; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi; Fan, Yong

    2012-02-01

    For subcortical structure segmentation, multi-atlas based segmentation methods have attracted great interest due to their competitive performance. Under this framework, using deformation fields generated for registering atlas images to the target image, labels of the atlases are first propagated to the target image space and further fused somehow to get the target segmentation. Many label fusion strategies have been proposed and most of them adopt predefined weighting models which are not necessarily optimal. In this paper, we propose a local label learning (L3) strategy to estimate the target image's label using statistical machine learning techniques. Specifically, we use Support Vector Machine (SVM) to learn a classifier for each of the target image voxels using its neighboring voxels in the atlases as a training dataset. Each training sample has dozens of image features extracted around its neighborhood and these features are optimally combined by the SVM learning method to classify the target voxel. The key contribution of this method is the development of a locally specific classifier for each target voxel based on informative texture features. The validation experiment on 57 MR images has demonstrated that our method generates segmentation results of hippocampal with a dice overlap of 0.908+/-0.023 to manual segmentations, statistically significantly better than state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms.

  14. Ultralow bias power all-optical photonic crystal memory realized with systematically tuned L3 nanocavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramochi, Eiichi Nozaki, Kengo; Shinya, Akihiko; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Takeda, Koji; Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari

    2015-11-30

    An InP photonic crystal nanocavity with an embedded InGaAsP active region is a unique technology that has realized an all-optical memory with a sub-micro-watt operating power and limitless storage time. In this study, we employed an L3 design with systematic multi-hole tuning, which realized a higher loaded Q factor (>40 000) and a lower mode volume (0.9 μm{sup 3}) than a line-defect-based buried-heterostructure nanocavity (16 000 and 2.2 μm{sup 3}). Excluding the active region realized a record loaded Q factor (210 000) in all for InP-based nanocavities. The minimum bias power for bistable memory operation was reduced to 2.3 ± 0.3 nW, which is about 1/10 of the previous record of 30 nW. This work further established the capability of a bistable nanocavity memory for use in future ultralow-power-consumption on-chip integrated photonics.

  15. The ultrastructure of infective larvae (L3) of Wuchereria bancrofti after treatment with diethylcarbamazine.

    PubMed

    Alves, L C; Brayner, F A S; Silva, L F; Peixoto, C A

    2005-01-01

    Although the large use of diethylcarbamazine (DEC), as the major anti-filaricide drug, its mechanism of action remains a matter of controversy. Several authors defend the hypothesis that DEC has no direct effect on nematodes. This study demonstrated that infective larvae (L3) of Wuchereria bancrofti treated in vitro with DEC presented several behaviour and morphological changes. The first alteration produced by treatment for 2 h with 3, 5, 10 microg/ml of DEC was the reduction of motility. Larvae treated with 5, 10 microg/ml DEC showed severely affected organelles, formation of several vacuoles, mainly in neurocytes and in the muscle cells, and dissolution of cytoplasm. Some larvae showed extreme cellular disorganization with abundance of large and dense mitochondria and numerous large vacuoles containing residual organelles. Lamellar bodies, probably related to an assembly of hipodermal membranes, were also observed in some damaged larvae. Thus, undoubtedly in vitro treatment with concentrations of DEC similar to therapeutic conditions, which are 1-5 microg/ml (Hawking, 1979), had a direct effect on infective larvae of W. bancrofti by causing, primarily neuromuscular alterations with subsequent damage to organelles.

  16. Association of low race performance with mtDNA haplogroup L3b of Australian thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Davie, Allan; Zhou, Shi; Wen, Li; Meng, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Aladaer, Qimude; Liu, Bin; Liu, Wu-Jun; Yao, Xin-Kui

    2017-01-27

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes the genes for respiratory chain sub-units that determine the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. The aim of this study was to determine if there were any haplogroups and variants in mtDNA that could be associated with athletic performance of Thoroughbred horses. The whole mitochondrial genomes of 53 maternally unrelated Australian Thoroughbred horses were sequenced and an association study was performed with the competition histories of 1123 horses within their maternal lineages. A horse mtDNA phylogenetic tree was constructed based on a total of 195 sequences (including 142 from previous reports). The association analysis showed that the sample groups with poor racing performance history were enriched in haplogroup L3b (p = .0003) and its sub-haplogroup L3b1a (p = .0007), while those that had elite performance appeared to be not significantly associated with haplogroups G2 and L3a1a1a (p > .05). Haplogroup L3b and L3b1a bear two and five specific variants of which variant T1458C (site 345 in 16s rRNA) is the only potential functional variant. Furthermore, secondary reconstruction of 16s RNA showed considerable differences between two types of 16s RNA molecules (with and without T1458C), indicating a potential functional effect. The results suggested that haplogroup L3b, could have a negative association with elite performance. The T1458C mutation harboured in haplogroup L3b could have a functional effect that is related to poor athletic performance.

  17. EPB41L3, TSP-1 and RASSF2 as new clinically relevant prognostic biomarkers in diffuse gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Janices, Noemi; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Tuñón, Maria Teresa; Barba-Ramos, Edurne; Ibáñez, Berta; Zazpe-Cenoz, Idoya; Martinez-Aguillo, Maria Teresa; Hernandez, Berta; Martínez-Lopez, Enrique; Fernández, Agustin F.; Mercado, Maria Roasario; Cabada, Teresa; Escors, David; Megias, Diego; Guerrero-Setas, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is one of the hallmarks in the progression of brain tumors. Our objectives were to analyze the presence of the hypermethylation of EPB41L3, RASSF2 and TSP-1 genes in 132 diffuse gliomas (astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors) and in 10 cases of normal brain, and to establish their association with the patients’ clinicopathological characteristics. Gene hypermethylation was analyzed by methylation-specific-PCR and confirmed by pyrosequencing (for EPB41L3 and TSP-1) and bisulfite-sequencing (for RASSF2). EPB41L3, RASSF2 and TSP-1 genes were hypermethylated only in tumors (29%, 10.6%, and 50%, respectively), confirming their cancer-specific role. Treatment of cells with the DNA-demethylating-agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restores their transcription, as confirmed by quantitative-reverse-transcription-PCR and immunofluorescence. Immunohistochemistry for EPB41L3, RASSF2 and TSP-1 was performed to analyze protein expression; p53, ki-67, and CD31 expression and 1p/19q co-deletion were considered to better characterize the tumors. EPB41L3 and TSP-1 hypermethylation was associated with worse (p = 0.047) and better (p = 0.037) prognosis, respectively. This observation was confirmed after adjusting the results for age and tumor grade, the role of TSP-1 being most pronounced in oligodendrogliomas (p = 0.001). We conclude that EPB41L3, RASSF2 and TSP-1 genes are involved in the pathogenesis of diffuse gliomas, and that EPB41L3 and TSP-1 hypermethylation are of prognostic significance. PMID:25621889

  18. Study of multi-muon bundles in cosmic ray showers detected with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delphi Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2007-11-01

    The DELPHI detector at LEP has been used to measure multi-muon bundles originating from cosmic ray interactions with air. The cosmic events were recorded in “parasitic mode” between individual e+e- interactions and the total live time of this data taking is equivalent to 1.6 × 106 s. The DELPHI apparatus is located about 100 m underground and the 84 metres rock overburden imposes a cutoff of about 52 GeV/c on muon momenta. The data from the large volume Hadron Calorimeter allowed the muon multiplicity of 54,201 events to be reconstructed. The resulting muon multiplicity distribution is compared with the prediction of the Monte Carlo simulation based on CORSIKA/QGSJET01. The model fails to describe the abundance of high multiplicity events. The impact of QGSJET internal parameters on the results is also studied.

  19. Evidence-based algorithm for diagnosis and assessment in psoriatic arthritis: results by Italian DElphi in psoriatic Arthritis (IDEA).

    PubMed

    Lapadula, G; Marchesoni, A; Salaffi, F; Ramonda, R; Salvarani, C; Punzi, L; Costa, L; Caso, F; Simone, D; Baiocchi, G; Scioscia, C; Di Carlo, M; Scarpa, R; Ferraccioli, G

    2016-12-16

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease involving skin, peripheral joints, entheses, and axial skeleton. The disease is frequently associated with extrarticular manifestations (EAMs) and comorbidities. In order to create a protocol for PsA diagnosis and global assessment of patients with an algorithm based on anamnestic, clinical, laboratory and imaging procedures, we established a DElphi study on a national scale, named Italian DElphi in psoriatic Arthritis (IDEA). After a literature search, a Delphi poll, involving 52 rheumatologists, was performed. On the basis of the literature search, 202 potential items were identified. The steering committee planned at least two Delphi rounds. In the first Delphi round, the experts judged each of the 202 items using a score ranging from 1 to 9 based on its increasing clinical relevance. The questions posed to experts were How relevant is this procedure/observation/sign/symptom for assessment of a psoriatic arthritis patient? Proposals of additional items, not included in the questionnaire, were also encouraged. The results of the poll were discussed by the Steering Committee, which evaluated the necessity for removing selected procedures or adding additional ones, according to criteria of clinical appropriateness and sustainability. A total of 43 recommended diagnosis and assessment procedures, recognized as items, were derived by combination of the Delphi survey and two National Expert Meetings, and grouped in different areas. Favourable opinion was reached in 100% of cases for several aspects covering the following areas: medical (familial and personal) history, physical evaluation, imaging tool, second level laboratory tests, disease activity measurement and extrarticular manifestations. After performing PsA diagnosis, identification of specific disease activity scores and clinimetric approaches were suggested for assessing the different clinical subsets. Further, results showed the need for

  20. Essential Concepts of Nanoscale Science and Technology for High School Students Based on a Delphi Study by the Expert Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Sohair; Blonder, Ron

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale science and technology (NST) is an important new field in modern science. In the current study, we seek to answer the question: 'What are the essential concepts of NST that should be taught in high school'? A 3-round Delphi study methodology was applied based on 2 communities of experts in nanotechnology research and science education. Eight essential concepts in NST were identified. Each concept is accompanied by its explanation, definition, importance and includes subcategories that compose it. Three concepts emerged in the Delphi study, which were not identified before: functionality, classification of nanomaterials, and the making of nanotechnology. Differences between the concepts suggested by the 2 communities of experts were found. The results of this study serve as a tool to examine different nanotechnology programs that were reported thus far and to make recommendations for designing a NST program for high school students that includes the essential concepts.

  1. A Delphi Study Using Value-Focused Thinking for United States Air Force Mission Dependency Index Values

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    management in and out of the classroom . I would also like to thank the AFCEC/CPAD staff and the Delphi panel for dedicating their time and...DEPENDENCY INDEX VALUES THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of systems Engineering and Management Graduate School of Engineering...and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the

  2. From ignorance to evidence? The use of programme evaluation in conservation: Evidence from a Delphi survey of conservation experts.

    PubMed

    Curzon, Hannah Fay; Kontoleon, Andreas

    2016-09-15

    Persistent gaps in the evidence base regarding the performance of conservation policies has put pressure on the conservation policy field to adopt 'best practice' programme evaluation methods. These are methods that account for the counterfactual and are able to attribute causality between a conservation policy and specific observable environmental and social impacts. Despite this pressure, use of such methods continues to be rare. This paper uses the Delphi technique to provide the first systematic assessment of the reasons behind the apparent hesitation of conservation practitioners to adopt rigorous policy impact evaluation methods. The Delphi study consisted of two online questionnaires conducted on conservation policy experts. The results presented confirm that the use of rigorous impact evaluation methods in conservation is still very limited but this, crucially, is not because conservationists are ignorant of these methods or their advantages. In fact, considerable effort is being made to develop and improve evidence standards but these efforts have largely been thwarted by large financial and time related constraints that mean even elementary evaluations are hard to achieve. The results from this Delphi study allow us to provide more realistic recommendations on how impact evaluation studies can be more widely embraced and implemented in conservation practice.

  3. Estimating the incidence of food-borne Salmonella and the effectiveness of alternative control measures using the Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Henson, S

    1997-04-15

    The paper describes the use of the Delphi method to estimate the incidence of food-borne Salmonella in the UK and the effectiveness of alternative control measures. A panel of experts of food-borne Salmonella participated in the Delphi survey, which involved five rounds of questioning taking place in the period July 1993 to January 1994. Participants were asked to give initial estimates for a number of parameters and invited to revise these estimates through progressive rounds of the survey at which the group responses were reported back. This process resulted in a reduction in the variation between the estimates given by individual experts. The final estimated annual incidence of food-borne Salmonella in the UK was 537,000, although significant variation remained between, individual estimates. The foods judged to be the most important modes of transmission were poultry and poultry products (50% of cases) and eggs and egg products (26% of cases). The panel was also requested to estimate the effectiveness of strategies available to reduce the incidence of food-borne Salmonella from all sources. The most effective methods were judged to be food irradiation and mandatory application of HACCP, although there were significant differences in the judged effectiveness of these technologies for individual respondents. The paper demonstrates the efficacy of the Delphi method as a mechanism for reconciling differences between expert judgements of the incidence of food-borne disease and the effectiveness of alternative control strategies.

  4. Active faulting at Delphi, Greece: Seismotectonic remarks and a hypothesis for the geologic environment of a myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, Luigi

    2000-07-01

    Historical data are fundamental to the understanding of the seismic history of an area. At the same time, knowledge of the active tectonic processes allows us to understand how earthquakes have been perceived by past cultures. Delphi is one of the principal archaeological sites of Greece, the main oracle of Apollo. It was by far the most venerated oracle of the Greek ancient world. According to tradition, the mantic proprieties of the oracle were obtained from an open chasm in the earth. Delphi is directly above one of the main antithetic active faults of the Gulf of Corinth Rift, which bounds Mount Parnassus to the south. The geometry of the fault and slip-parallel lineations on the main fault plane indicate normal movement, with minor right-lateral slip component. Combining tectonic data, archaeological evidence, historical sources, and a reexamination of myths, it appears that the Helice earthquake of 373 B.C. ruptured not only the master fault of the Gulf of Corinth Rift at Helice, but also the antithetic fault at Delphi, similarly to the Corinth earthquake of 1981. Moreover, the presence of an active fault directly below the temples of the oldest sanctuary suggests that the mythological oracular chasm might well have been an ancient tectonic surface rupture.

  5. Exploring health literacy competencies towards patient education programme for Chinese-speaking healthcare professionals: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Chun; Chen, Yu-Chi; Wu, Fei Ling; Liao, Li-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To achieve consensus on a set of competencies in health literacy practice based on a literature review and expert consultation. Setting Hospitals and community health centres in Taiwan. Method A 2-stage modified Delphi study involving a literature review was conducted, followed by qualitative interviews and 3 rounds of email-based data collection over a 3-month period in 2011. Participants 15 Chinese healthcare practitioners with more than 6 months’ experience in patient education were interviewed to collect data on health literacy practice. 24 experts (12 academic scholars in health literacy and 12 professionals with training related to health literacy practice) were invited to participate in the Delphi process. Results Qualitative data from the interviews were analysed and summarised to form 99 competency items for health literacy practice, which were categorised into 5 domains of health literacy practice including those pertaining to knowledge and skills. Consensus was reached on 92 of 99 competencies, using a modified Delphi technique. Conclusions The 92 competencies in health literacy practice embraced core components of patient education in the Chinese healthcare profession. PMID:28093428

  6. Expert consensus document: Semantics in active surveillance for men with localized prostate cancer - results of a modified Delphi consensus procedure.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Sophie M; Roobol, Monique J; Carroll, Peter R; Klotz, Laurence; Pickles, Tom; Moore, Caroline M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J; Villers, Arnauld; Rannikko, Antti; Valdagni, Riccardo; Frydenberg, Mark; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Filson, Christopher P; Bangma, Chris H

    2017-03-14

    Active surveillance (AS) is broadly described as a management option for men with low-risk prostate cancer, but semantic heterogeneity exists in both the literature and in guidelines. To address this issue, a panel of leading prostate cancer specialists in the field of AS participated in a consensus-forming project using a modified Delphi method to reach international consensus on definitions of terms related to this management option. An iterative three-round sequence of online questionnaires designed to address 61 individual items was completed by each panel member. Consensus was considered to be reached if ≥70% of the experts agreed on a definition. To facilitate a common understanding among all experts involved and resolve potential ambiguities, a face-to-face consensus meeting was held between Delphi survey rounds two and three. Convenience sampling was used to construct the panel of experts. In total, 12 experts from Australia, France, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Japan, the UK, Canada and the USA participated. By the end of the Delphi process, formal consensus was achieved for 100% (n = 61) of the terms and a glossary was then developed. Agreement between international experts has been reached on relevant terms and subsequent definitions regarding AS for patients with localized prostate cancer. This standard terminology could support multidisciplinary communication, reduce the extent of variations in clinical practice and optimize clinical decision making.

  7. USING THE DELPHI TECHNIQUE TO DEVELOP EFFECTIVENESS INDICATORS FOR SOCIAL MARKETING COMMUNICATION TO REDUCE HEALTH-RISK BEHAVIORS AMONG YOUTH.

    PubMed

    Vantamay, Nottakrit

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to develop effectiveness indicators for social marketing communication to reduce health-risk behaviors among Thai youth by using the Delphi technique. The Delphi technique is a research approach used to gain consensus through a series of two or more rounds of questionnaire surveys where information and results are fed back to panel members between each round and it has been extensively used to generate many indicators relevant to health behaviors. The Delphi technique was conducted in 3 rounds by consulting a panel of 15 experts in the field of social marketing communication for public health campaigns in Thailand. We found forty-nine effectiveness indicators in eight core components reached consensus. These components were: 1) attitude about health-risk behavior reduction, 2) subjective norms, 3) perceived behavioral control, 4) intention to reduce health-risk behaviors, 5) practices for reducing health-risk behaviors, 6) knowledge about the dangers and impact of health-risk behaviors, 7) campaign brand equity, and 8) communication networks. These effectiveness indicators could be applied by health promotion organizations for evaluating the effectiveness of social marketing communication to effectively reduce health-risk behaviors among youth.

  8. Highly efficient and exact method for parallelization of grid-based algorithms and its implementation in DelPhi.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Alexov, Emil

    2012-09-15

    The Gauss-Seidel (GS) method is a standard iterative numerical method widely used to solve a system of equations and, in general, is more efficient comparing to other iterative methods, such as the Jacobi method. However, standard implementation of the GS method restricts its utilization in parallel computing due to its requirement of using updated neighboring values (i.e., in current iteration) as soon as they are available. Here, we report an efficient and exact (not requiring assumptions) method to parallelize iterations and to reduce the computational time as a linear/nearly linear function of the number of processes or computing units. In contrast to other existing solutions, our method does not require any assumptions and is equally applicable for solving linear and nonlinear equations. This approach is implemented in the DelPhi program, which is a finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver to model electrostatics in molecular biology. This development makes the iterative procedure on obtaining the electrostatic potential distribution in the parallelized DelPhi several folds faster than that in the serial code. Further, we demonstrate the advantages of the new parallelized DelPhi by computing the electrostatic potential and the corresponding energies of large supramolecular structures.

  9. Highly efficient and exact method for parallelization of grid-based algorithms and its implementation in DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    The Gauss-Seidel method is a standard iterative numerical method widely used to solve a system of equations and, in general, is more efficient comparing to other iterative methods, such as the Jacobi method. However, standard implementation of the Gauss-Seidel method restricts its utilization in parallel computing due to its requirement of using updated neighboring values (i.e., in current iteration) as soon as they are available. Here we report an efficient and exact (not requiring assumptions) method to parallelize iterations and to reduce the computational time as a linear/nearly linear function of the number of CPUs. In contrast to other existing solutions, our method does not require any assumptions and is equally applicable for solving linear and nonlinear equations. This approach is implemented in the DelPhi program, which is a finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver to model electrostatics in molecular biology. This development makes the iterative procedure on obtaining the electrostatic potential distribution in the parallelized DelPhi several folds faster than that in the serial code. Further we demonstrate the advantages of the new parallelized DelPhi by computing the electrostatic potential and the corresponding energies of large supramolecular structures. PMID:22674480

  10. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(3)-1 - Termination of agreement by domestic corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership. 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Internal... OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE CONTRACT COVERAGE OF EMPLOYEES OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(3)-1... domestic corporation. (1) A domestic corporation which has entered into an agreement under section...

  11. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(3)-1 - Termination of agreement by domestic corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership. 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Internal... OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE CONTRACT COVERAGE OF EMPLOYEES OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(3)-1... domestic corporation. (1) A domestic corporation which has entered into an agreement under section...

  12. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(3)-1 - Termination of agreement by domestic corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership. 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Internal... OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE CONTRACT COVERAGE OF EMPLOYEES OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(3)-1... domestic corporation. (1) A domestic corporation which has entered into an agreement under section...

  13. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(3)-1 - Termination of agreement by domestic corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporation or by reason of change in stock ownership. 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Section 36.3121(l)(3)-1 Internal... OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE CONTRACT COVERAGE OF EMPLOYEES OF FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES § 36.3121(l)(3)-1... domestic corporation. (1) A domestic corporation which has entered into an agreement under section...

  14. Framework and components for effective discharge planning system: a delphi methodology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To reduce avoidable hospital readmissions, effective discharge planning and appropriate post discharge support care are key requirements. This study is a 3-staged process to develop, pretest and pilot a framework for an effective discharge planning system in Hong Kong. This paper reports on the methodology of Delphi approach and findings of the second stage on pre-testing the framework developed so as to validate and attest to its applicability and practicability in which consensus was sought on the key components of discharge planning. Methods Delphi methodology was adopted to engage a group of experienced healthcare professionals to rate and discuss the framework and components of an effective discharge planning. The framework was consisted 36 statements under 5 major themes: initial screening, discharge planning process, coordination of discharge, implementation of discharge, and post discharge follow-up. Each statement was rated independently based on 3 aspects including clarity, validity and applicability on a 5-point Likert-scale. Statement with 75% or above of participants scoring 4–5 on all 3 aspects would be included in the discharge planning framework. For those statements not reaching 75% of consensus in any one of the aspect, it would be revised or discarded following the group discussion, and be re-rated in another round. Results A total of 24 participants participated in the consensus-building process. In round one rating, consensus was achieved in 25 out of 36 statements. Among those 11 statements not reaching consensus, the major concern was related to the “applicability” of the statements. The participants expressed a lack of manpower, skills and time in particular during weekends and long holidays in carrying out assessment and care plans within 24 h after admission. There were also timeliness and availability issue in providing transportation and necessary equipment to the patients. To make the statements more applicable, the

  15. Limits on the electromagnetic and weak dipole moments of the tau-lepton in a 331 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A.; Hernández-Ruíz, M. A.; Castañeda-Almanza, C. P.; Espinoza-Garrido, A.; Chubykalo, A.

    2014-08-01

    Using as an input the data obtained by the L3 and OPAL Collaborations for the reaction e+e- →τ+τ- γ at the Z1-pole, we obtained bounds on the electromagnetic and weak dipole moments of the tau-lepton in the context of a 331 model. Our bounds on the electromagnetic moments are consistent with the bounds obtained by the L3 and OPAL Collaborations for the reaction e+e- →τ+τ- γ. We also obtained bounds on the tau weak dipole moments which are consistent with the bounds obtained recently by the DELPHI, ALEPH and BELLE Collaborations from the reaction e+e- →τ+τ-. Our work complements other studies on the electromagnetic and weak dipole moments of the tau-lepton.

  16. Diagnostic value of alpha-fetoprotein-L3 and Golgi protein 73 in hepatocellular carcinomas with low AFP levels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wan-Ju; Guo, Bao-Li; Han, Yu-Gang; Shi, Lei; Ma, Wan-Shan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical values of serum alpha-fetoprotein-L3 (AFP-L3) and Golgi protein 73 (GP73) in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with low alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). From January 2011 to December 2013, 50 low-AFP HCC patients confirmed by the color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) and pathological examinations were collected. Forty-five patients with chronic liver diseases were also selected, including 29 liver cirrhosis patients, 15 chronic hepatitis B patients, and one severe hepatitis patient. Furthermore, 100 health volunteers with no evidence of benign or malignant liver diseases were included. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was applied to the GP73 quantitative assay. Serum AFP concentrations were determined using immunoassays utilizing enhanced chemiluminescence. Diagnostic accuracy of GP73 and AFP-L3 assays for low-AFP HCC was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Statistical analyses were conducted with the GraphPad Prism 5.0 software. Low-AFP HCC patients (35/50) exhibited higher positive rates of AFP-L3 than non-HCC patients (5/45) and healthy controls (2/100) (both P < 0.05). There were also significant differences in the positive rate of GP73 of low-AFP HCC patients (40/50) compared to those of non-HCC patients (3/45) and healthy controls (1/100) (both P < 0.05). However, no obvious differences in the positive rates of AFP-L3 and GP73 were observed between non-HCC patients and healthy controls (both P > 0.05). ROC curves showed that the area under the curve (AUC) of AFP-L3 for the diagnosis of low-AFP HCC was 0.6994 (sensitivity [Sen] = 70.0 %, specificity [Spe] = 95.2 %, accuracy = 88.7 %), while the AUC of GP73 was 0.8411 (Sen = 80.0 %, Spe = 97.2 %, accuracy = 92.8 %). Compared with single detection, the combination of AFP-L3 and GP73 levels for the diagnosis of low-AFP HCC showed higher Sen (94.0 %), Spe (93.1 %), and

  17. Economic instruments for obesity prevention: results of a scoping review and modified delphi survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Comprehensive, multi-level approaches are required to address obesity. One important target for intervention is the economic domain. The purpose of this study was to synthesize existing evidence regarding the impact of economic policies targeting obesity and its causal behaviours (diet, physical activity), and to make specific recommendations for the Canadian context. Methods Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) methodological framework for conducting scoping reviews was adopted for this study and this consisted of two phases: 1) a structured literature search and review, and 2) consultation with experts in the research field through a Delphi survey and an in-person expert panel meeting in April 2010. Results Two key findings from the scoping review included 1) consistent evidence that weight outcomes are responsive to food and beverage prices. The debate on the use of food taxes and subsidies to address obesity should now shift to how best to address practical issues in designing such policies; and 2) very few studies have examined the impact of economic instruments to promote physical activity and clear policy recommendations cannot be made at this time. Delphi survey findings emphasised the relatively modest impact any specific economic instrument would have on obesity independently. Based on empirical evidence and expert opinion, three recommendations were supported. First, to create and implement an effective health filter to review new and current agricultural polices to reduce the possibility that such policies have a deleterious impact on population rates of obesity. Second, to implement a caloric sweetened beverage tax. Third, to examine how to implement fruit and vegetable subsidies targeted at children and low income households. Conclusions In terms of economic interventions, shifting from empirical evidence to policy recommendation remains challenging. Overall, the evidence is not sufficiently strong to provide clear policy direction. Additionally

  18. Flood-inundation maps for the Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menke, Chad D.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Kim, Moon H.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 11-mile reach of the Tippecanoe River that extends from County Road W725N to State Road 18 below Oakdale Dam, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03333050, Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgages in Indiana may be obtained online at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/current/?type=flow. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, water-surface profiles were simulated for the stream reach by means of a hydraulic one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03333050, Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Ind., and USGS streamgage 03332605, Tippecanoe River below Oakdale Dam, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to simulate 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals reference to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the

  19. A Delphi study to determine baseline informatics competencies for nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research study was to produce a job-specific list of informatics competencies for generic nurse manager positions. In 2002, Staggers et al (Nurs Res. 2002;51(6):383-390) identified a list of core nursing informatics competencies at four levels of nursing practice but concluded that job-specific competencies still needed to be developed. An expert panel utilized the Master List of Nursing Informatics Competencies produced in the 2002 study by Staggers et al to define the job-specific informatics competencies appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. A three-round Delphi study was utilized to establish the core competencies appropriate for this job-specific position. Participants were expert informatics nurses in the US Veterans' Healthcare System. Based on the Four Levels of Practice defined in the 2002 study by Staggers et al, the panel identified the level 2 experienced nurse as most appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. For the purposes of review, each practice level was considered to include the competencies of the levels below it. Therefore, having selected level 2 experienced nurse, this necessitated the review of levels 1 and 2, which totaled 69 competencies. From the available 69 competencies, the panel selected a total of 49 core competencies appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. This Delphi research study chose to focus on a single job-specific position to take one small step toward the recommendation of Staggers et al to identify job-specific competencies. The generic nurse manager position was selected as it is a vital position in providing leadership and support within all institutions. While the study raises several questions about how the panel elected some competencies over others, it also begins to define which levels of competencies and categories are most appropriate. With this information at hand, the next logical step would be to establish associated tools for competency development and

  20. Microwave window breakdown experiments and simulations on the UM/L-3 relativistic magnetron.

    PubMed

    Hoff, B W; Mardahl, P J; Gilgenbach, R M; Haworth, M D; French, D M; Lau, Y Y; Franzi, M

    2009-09-01

    Experiments have been performed on the UM/L-3 (6-vane, L-band) relativistic magnetron to test a new microwave window configuration designed to limit vacuum side breakdown. In the baseline case, acrylic microwave windows were mounted between three of the waveguide coupling cavities in the anode block vacuum housing and the output waveguides. Each of the six 3 cm deep coupling cavities is separated from its corresponding anode cavity by a 1.75 cm wide aperture. In the baseline case, vacuum side window breakdown was observed to initiate at single waveguide output powers close to 20 MW. In the new window configuration, three Air Force Research Laboratory-designed, vacuum-rated directional coupler waveguide segments were mounted between the coupling cavities and the microwave windows. The inclusion of the vacuum side power couplers moved the microwave windows an additional 30 cm away from the anode apertures. Additionally, the Lucite microwave windows were replaced with polycarbonate windows and the microwave window mounts were redesigned to better maintain waveguide continuity in the region around the microwave windows. No vacuum side window breakdown was observed in the new window configuration at single waveguide output powers of 120+MW (a factor of 3 increase in measured microwave pulse duration and factor of 3 increase in measured peak power over the baseline case). Simulations were performed to investigate likely causes for the window breakdown in the original configuration. Results from these simulations have shown that in the original configuration, at typical operating voltage and magnetic field ranges, electrons emitted from the anode block microwave apertures strike the windows with a mean kinetic energy of 33 keV with a standard deviation of 14 keV. Calculations performed using electron impact angle and energy data predict a first generation secondary electron yield of 65% of the primary electron population. The effects of the primary aperture electron

  1. Characterization and differential expression of cathepsin L3 alleles from Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Zawistowska-Deniziak, A; Wasyl, K; Norbury, L J; Wesołowska, A; Bień, J; Grodzik, M; Wiśniewski, M; Bąska, P; Wędrychowicz, H

    2013-07-01

    Fasciola hepatica infections cause significant global problems in veterinary and human medicine, including causing huge losses in cattle and sheep production. F. hepatica host infection is a multistage process and flukes express papain-like cysteine proteases, termed cathepsins, which play pivotal roles in virulence through host entry, tissue migration and immune evasion. Expression of these proteases is developmentally regulated. Recent studies indicate that excystment of infective larvae is dependent on cysteine proteases and together FhCL3 and FhCB account for over 80% of total protease activity detectable in newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) fluke. This paper focuses on members of the cathepsin L gene family, specifically those belonging to the CL3 clade. The cDNA of two novel cathepsin L3 proteases--FhCL3-1 and FhCL3-2 were cloned. The mRNA transcript expression levels for these enzymes were significantly different at various time points in life development stages obtained in vitro, from dormant metacercariae to NEJ 24h after excystment. Maximum expression levels were observed in NEJ immediately after excystment. In all stages examined by Real Time PCR, FhCL3-2 was expressed at a higher level compared to FhCL3-1 which was expressed only at very low levels. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis also indicated higher expression of the FhCL3-2 allele and its secretory nature. The ability of antibody responses from rats and sheep challenged with F. hepatica to recognize recombinant FhCL3-1 and FhCL3-2 was shown to differ. Differences were also confirmed through the use of anti-rFhCL3-1 and anti-rFhCL3-2 sera in Western blot analysis of juvenile excretory/secretory (ES) material separated by 2D electrophoresis. These results indicate analysis of relative expression of parasite virulence factors from different populations is required, as this will likely impact the effectiveness of vaccines based on these antigens.

  2. Hg L3 XANES study of mercury methylation in shredded Eichhornia crassipes.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Michael; Darrow, Jeannine; Hua, Michael; Barnett, Brandy; Mendoza, Miguel; Greenfield, Ben K; Andrews, Joy C

    2008-08-01

    Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth) is a non-native plant found in abundance in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (hereafter called Delta). This species has become a problem, clogging waterways and wetlands. Water hyacinth are also known to accumulate mercury. Recent attempts to curb its proliferation have included shredding with specialized boats. The purpose of this research is to better understand the ability of water hyacinth to phytoremediate mercury and to determine the effect of shredding and anoxic conditions on mercury speciation in plant tissue. In the field assessment, total mercury levels in sediment from the Dow Wetlands in the Delta were found to be 0.273 +/- 0.070 ppm Hg, and levels in hyacinth roots and shoots from this site were 1.17 +/- 0.08 ppm and 1.03 +/- 0.52 ppm, respectively, indicating bioaccumulation of mercury. Plant samples collected at this site were also grown in nutrient solution with 1 ppm HgCl2 under (1) aerobic conditions, (2) anaerobic conditions, and (3)with shredded plant material only. The greatest accumulation was found in the roots of whole plants. Plants grown in these conditions were also analyzed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory using Hg L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), a method to examine speciation that is element-specific and noninvasive. Least-squares fitting of the XANES data to methylated and inorganic mercury(II) model compounds revealed that in plants grown live and aerobically, 5 +/- 3% of the mercury was in the form of methylmercury, in a form similar to methylmercury cysteine. This percentage increased to 16 +/- 4% in live plants grown anaerobically and to 22 +/- 6% in shredded anaerobic plants. We conclude that shredding of the hyacinth plants and, in fact, subjection of plants to anaerobic conditions (e.g., as in normal decay, or in crowded growth conditions) increases mercury methylation. Mechanical removal of the entire plant is significantly more expensive than

  3. Small-Molecule Ligands of Methyl-Lysine Binding Proteins: Optimization of Selectivity for L3MBTL3

    PubMed Central

    James, Lindsey I.; Korboukh, Victoria K.; Krichevsky, Liubov; Baughman, Brandi M.; Herold, J. Martin; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Jin, Jian; Kireev, Dmitri B.; Janzen, William P.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Frye, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Lysine methylation is a key epigenetic mark, the dysregulation of which is linked to many diseases. Small molecule antagonism of methyl-lysine (Kme) binding proteins that recognize such epigenetic marks can improve our understanding of these regulatory mechanisms and potentially validate Kme binding proteins as drug discovery targets. We previously reported the discovery of 1 (UNC1215), the first potent and selective small molecule chemical probe of a methyl-lysine reader protein, L3MBTL3, which antagonizes the mono- and dimethyl-lysine reading function of L3MBTL3. The design, synthesis, and structure activity relationship studies that led to the discovery of 1 are described herein. These efforts established the requirements for potent L3MBTL3 binding and enabled the design of novel antagonists, such as compound 2 (UNC1679), that maintain in vitro and cellular potency with improved selectivity against other MBT-containing proteins. The antagonists described were also found to effectively interact with unlabeled endogenous L3MBTL3 in cells. PMID:24040942

  4. Small-molecule ligands of methyl-lysine binding proteins: optimization of selectivity for L3MBTL3.

    PubMed

    James, Lindsey I; Korboukh, Victoria K; Krichevsky, Liubov; Baughman, Brandi M; Herold, J Martin; Norris, Jacqueline L; Jin, Jian; Kireev, Dmitri B; Janzen, William P; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frye, Stephen V

    2013-09-26

    Lysine methylation is a key epigenetic mark, the dysregulation of which is linked to many diseases. Small-molecule antagonism of methyl-lysine (Kme) binding proteins that recognize such epigenetic marks can improve our understanding of these regulatory mechanisms and potentially validate Kme binding proteins as drug-discovery targets. We previously reported the discovery of 1 (UNC1215), the first potent and selective small-molecule chemical probe of a methyl-lysine reader protein, L3MBTL3, which antagonizes the mono- and dimethyl-lysine reading function of L3MBTL3. The design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship studies that led to the discovery of 1 are described herein. These efforts established the requirements for potent L3MBTL3 binding and enabled the design of novel antagonists, such as compound 2 (UNC1679), that maintain in vitro and cellular potency with improved selectivity against other MBT-containing proteins. The antagonists described were also found to effectively interact with unlabeled endogenous L3MBTL3 in cells.

  5. Examining Teachers' Views on the Implementation of English as L3 into Primary Schools: A Case of Kazakhstan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhetpisbayeva, Bakhytgul A.; Shelestova, Tatyana Y.; Abildina, Saltanat K.

    2016-01-01

    The Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan changed the State Educational Program for primary education and the curriculum for teaching English as a third language (L3) to grades 1-4 in 2013. As with many changes in the curriculum, English language teaching has also been changed and the starting age for learning of English…

  6. The Effect of a Formal Instruction Context on the Lexico-Grammatical Development of Advanced Learners of L3 English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garau, Maria Juan; Prieto Arranz, José Igor; Salazar Noguera, Joana

    2007-01-01

    In the present article two different L3 learning contexts are distinguished: formal instruction (FI) and study abroad (SA). We analyze the effect of a formal instruction learning context (FI) on students of English as a foreign language. The main objective is to study the impact of FI on the students' lexico-grammatical development. A study was…

  7. The Multilingual Reader: Advantages in Understanding and Decoding German Sentence Structure when Reading German as an L3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyer, Elisabeth; Kaiser, Irmtraud; Berthele, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates Italian and French students' grammatical problems while reading in German as an L3 or L4. For the study, we developed a reading test which consists of invented encyclopaedia articles on imaginary animals. These articles enabled us to test various grammatical structures for their receptive difficulty. This paper discusses…

  8. LNO3 AND L3 Are Associated With Antiproliferative And Pro-Apoptotic Action In Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanelatto, Leonardo Campos; da Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves; Sartori, Daniele; Panis, Carolina; Lepri, Sandra; de Fátima, Ângelo; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The identification of antitumoral substances is the focus of intense biomedical research. Two structural analogues of thalidomide, LNO3 and L3, are two synthetic compounds that might possess such antitumor properties. We evaluated the toxicological effects of these substances, including cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and induction of apoptosis in HTC cells. Additionally, the production of free radicals (nitric oxide and superoxide) was investigated, and the expression of caspases genes 3, 8, and 9 were determined by RT-qPCR. The compounds exhibited cytotoxic effects that resulted in inhibited cell proliferation. LNO3 showed to be more effective and toxic than L3 in all assays. LNO3 stimulated the release of NO and superoxide, which was accompanied by the formation of peroxynitrite. Apoptosis was induced in a dose-dependent manner by both compounds; however, the expression of caspases 3, 8 and 9 was unchanged. These results suggested that L3 and LNO3 possess antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in HTC cells. Additionally, although they exhibited cytotoxicity, L3 and LNO3 might be useful coadjuvants in tumor treatment studies. PMID:27303908

  9. Branching ratio and L2 + L3 intensities of 3d-transition metals in phthalocyanines and the amine complexes

    PubMed

    Koshino; Kurata; Isoda; Kobayashi

    2000-08-01

    L(2,3) inner-shell excitation spectra were obtained by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for the divalent first transition series metals in phthalocyanine complexes (MPc) such as titanium oxide phthalocyanine (TiOPc), fluoro-chromium phthalocyanine (CrFPc), manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc), iron phthalocyanine (FePc), cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc), nickel phthalocyanine (NiPc) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc). It was found that the value of normalized total intensity of I(L2 + L3) was nearly proportional to the formal electron vacancies of each 3d-state, and the values of the branching ratio, I(L3)/I((L2 + L3), represented a high-spin-state rather than low-spin-state for MnPc, FePc and NiPc. EELS was also applied to charge-transfer complexes of FePc with an amine such as pyridine or gamma-picoline. It was concluded that their I(L2 + L3) intensity of Fe showed the decrease in vacancies of 3d-states on the formation of the charge-transfer complex with these amines, which suggests some electron transfer from the amine to Fe in phthalocyanine. The EELS study provides beneficial information for investigating the electronic states of the specific metal sites in organic materials.

  10. Ethical challenges facing veterinary professionals in Ireland: results from Policy Delphi with vignette methodology.

    PubMed

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, M; More, S J; Morton, D B; Hanlon, A

    2016-10-29

    Ethics is key to the integrity of the veterinary profession. Despite its importance, there is a lack of applied research on the range of ethical challenges faced by veterinarians. A three round Policy Delphi with vignette methodology was used to record the diversity of views on ethical challenges faced by veterinary professionals in Ireland. Forty experts, comprising veterinary practitioners, inspectors and nurses, accepted to participate. In round 1, twenty vignettes describing a variety of ethically challenging veterinary scenarios were ranked in terms of ethical acceptability, reputational risk and perceived standards of practice. Round 2 aimed at characterising challenges where future policy development or professional guidance was deemed to be needed. In round 3, possible solutions to key challenges were explored. Results suggest that current rules and regulations are insufficient to ensure best veterinary practices and that a collective approach is needed to harness workable solutions for the identified ethical challenges. Challenges pertaining mostly to the food chain seem to require enforcement measures whereas softer measures that promote professional discretion were preferred to address challenges dealing with veterinary clinical services. These findings can support veterinary representative bodies, advisory committees and regulatory authorities in their decision making, policy and regulation.

  11. Developing a driving Safety Index using a Delphi stated preference experiment.

    PubMed

    Jamson, Samantha; Wardman, Mark; Batley, Richard; Carsten, Oliver

    2008-03-01

    Whilst empirical evidence is available concerning the effect of some aspects of driving behaviour on safety (e.g. speed choice), there is scant knowledge about safety thresholds, i.e. the point at which behaviour can be considered unsafe. Furthermore, it is almost impossible to ascertain the interaction between various aspects of driving behaviour. For example, how might drivers' lateral control of a vehicle be mediated by their speed choice-are the effects additive or do they cancel each other out. Complex experimental or observational studies would need to be undertaken to establish the nature of such effects. As an alternative, a Delphi study was undertaken to use expert judgement as a way of deriving a first approximation of these threshold and combinatory effects. Using a stated preference technique, road safety professionals make judgements about drivers' safe or unsafe behaviour. The aim was to understand the relative weightings that are assigned to a number of driver behaviours and thereby to construct a Safety Index. As expected, experts were able to establish thresholds, above (or below) which changes to the behavioural parameters had minimal impact on safety. This provided us with a Safety Index, based on a model that had face validity and a convincing range of values. However, the experts found the task of combining these driver behaviours more difficult, reflecting the elusive nature of safety estimates. Suggestions for future validation of our Safety Index are provided.

  12. Common dolphin ( Delphinus delphis) habitat preferences using data from two platforms of opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, André E.; Sillero, Neftalí; Rodrigues, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Cetaceans are difficult to observe in the wild, and demand complex logistics for dedicated collection of biological data. As such, the distribution of most cetacean species is still poorly understood. Ecological niche models are useful in studying species distributions and their ecological determinants, and platforms of opportunity (e.g. commercial nautical operators) can provide an alternative source for that data in cetaceans. In this study, we modelled common dolphin ( Delphinus delphis) habitat preferences using ecological niche modelling and presence data obtained from distinct platforms of opportunity in two different areas in the Portuguese coast (west and south mainland Portugal) for the period 2005-2007. Models from southern Portugal were projected to western Portugal and vice-versa, to check for robustness in predicting the species ecological niche. Our results show that data from platforms of opportunity can result in robust ecological models and provide extremely useful information on cetacean ecology. We found that common dolphins exhibit a patchy distribution pattern over the Portuguese coastline, and identified key habitats for their occurrence. The most important variable associated with this species' distribution was chlorophyll concentration which, given the results from previous research, we hypothesise reflects an ecological specialisation on pelagic schooling fish. Given that the most abundant schooling fish species in Portugal is increasingly overexploited and in constant decline, more attention should be given to the conservation of common dolphin in Portuguese waters.

  13. Development and validation of algorithms for heart failure patient care: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Cynthia Priyadarshini; Ranga, Asri; Joseph, Kevin Louis; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although heart failure (HF) management is available at primary and secondary care facilities in Malaysia, the optimisation of drug therapy is still suboptimal. Although pharmacists can help bridge the gap in optimising HF therapy, pharmacists in Malaysia currently do not manage and titrate HF pharmacotherapy. The aim of this study was to develop treatment algorithms and monitoring protocols for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta-blockers and spironolactone based on extensive literature review for validation and utilisation by pharmacists involved in HF management. METHODS A Delphi survey involving 32 panellists from private and government hospitals that provide cardiac services in Malaysia was conducted to obtain a consensus of opinion on the treatment protocols. The panellists completed two rounds of self-administered questionnaires to determine their level of agreement with all the components in the protocols. RESULTS Consensus was achieved for most of the sections of the protocols for the four classes of drugs. The panellists’ opinions were taken into consideration when amending the components of the protocols that did not achieve consensus of opinion. Full consensus was achieved with the second survey conducted, enabling the finalisation of the drug titration protocols. CONCLUSION The resulting validated HF titration protocols can be used as a guide for pharmacists when recommending the initiation and titration of HF drug therapy in daily clinical practice. Recommendations should be made in collaboration with the patient’s treating physician, with concomitant monitoring of the patient’s response to the drugs. PMID:25532514

  14. What are the needs of adolescents and young adults after a cancer treatment? A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Galán, S; de la Vega, R; Tomé Pires, C; Racine, M; Solé, E; Jensen, M P; Miró, J

    2017-03-01

    Advances in the early detection of cancer and the development of more effective treatments have resulted in a larger number of adolescents and young adults (AYAs), becoming cancer survivors. However, knowledge regarding their needs and if those needs are adequately addressed remains limited. The aims of this study were to: (1) better understand the needs of AYAs after cancer treatment; (2) analyse the importance of those needs; (3) determine which needs are not adequately addressed; and (4) test the hypothesis that AYA cancer survivors have different needs than adult survivors. Twenty-nine health oncology professionals, 17 AYA survivors and 12 relatives of AYA survivors participated in the Delphi study. The needs identified could be classified into six categories, and all were rated as highly important by all participants. The category perceived as least adequately addressed across the three groups was 'Counselling and psychological support.' The findings provide important new information regarding the needs of AYA cancer survivors that can inform the development of interventions to improve the quality of life of these individuals.

  15. Clarifying concepts of food parenting practices. A Delphi study with an application to snacking behavior.

    PubMed

    Gevers, D W M; Kremers, S P J; de Vries, N K; van Assema, P

    2014-08-01

    Inconsistencies in measurements of food parenting practices continue to exist. Fundamental to this problem is the lack of clarity about what is understood by different concepts of food parenting practices. The purpose of this study was to clarify food parenting practice concepts related to snacking. A three round Delphi study among an international group of experts (n = 63) was conducted. In the first round, an open-ended survey was used to collect food parenting practice descriptions and concept labels associated with those practices. In the second round, participants were asked to match up descriptions with the appropriate concept labels. The third and final round allowed participants to reconsider how descriptions and concept labels were matched, taking into account the opinions expressed in round two. Round one produced 408 descriptions of food parenting practices and 110 different concept names. Round two started with 116 descriptions of food parenting practices and 20 concept names. On 40 descriptions, consensus regarding the underlying concept name was reached in round two. Of the remaining 76 descriptions, consensus on 47 descriptions regarding the underlying concept name was reached in round three. The present study supports the essential process of consensus development with respect to food parenting practices concepts.

  16. A Modified Delphi Process to Define Competencies for Assessment Leads Supporting a Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    PubMed

    Janke, Kristin K; Kelley, Katherine A; Sweet, Burgunda V; Kuba, Sarah E

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To define the competencies for individuals designated as assessment leads in colleges and schools of pharmacy. Methods. Twenty-three assessment experts in pharmacy participated in a modified Delphi process to describe competencies for an assessment lead, defined as the individual responsible for curricular assessment and assessment-related to doctor of pharmacy program accreditation. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Round 2 grouped responses for comment and rating for consensus, which was prospectively set at 80%. Results. Twelve competencies were defined and grouped into 3 areas: Context for Assessment, Managing the Process of Assessment, and Leadership of Assessment Activities. In order to verify the panel's work, assessment competencies from other disciplines were reviewed and compared. Conclusions. The competencies describe roles for assessment professionals as experts, managers, and leaders of assessment processes. They can be used by assessment professionals in self-assessing areas for professional development and by administrators in selecting, developing, and supporting designated leads.

  17. DELPHI: A Pathfinder to LCAS on board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; Laurent, G. T.; Diller, J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's venerable LCAS sounding rocket program has been the primary means to test new space instrumentation for space physics, for over 60 years. Recently, new LCAS pathways have been introduced for instruments and science that require longer exposure than a sounding rocket affords. The International Space Station (ISS) offers similar infrastructure to a sounding rocket, with ample mass and volume, controlled attitude, and predefined and generous power and telemetry interfaces. The DEmonstration LEO Polarizing Heliospheric Imager is an LCAS mission that pioneers replacing the SPARCS+black brant stack with the ISS itself, to exploit the environment afforded by the ISS and demonstrate new instrumentation on-orbit. DELPHI is a solar off-pointed heliospheric imager that demonstrates the use of pB/B and quantitative photometry to locate solar wind features in 3-D with high spatial resolution, in a few-month mission. It makes use of the stable environment and high telemetry volume (1Mbps) on ISS to improve image quality with ground postprocessing. It is built on the ISS-standard ExPA interface and robotically deployed from the Space-X Dragon trunk to an external mount location. We will discuss some of the engineering and programmatic trades go with designing an orbital sounding-rocket-class instrument, and advocate using ISS as a future platform for instrument development.

  18. Developing a diagnostic checklist of traditional Chinese medicine symptoms and signs for psoriasis: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a genetic basis. Its ill-defined causes make it difficult to diagnose. This study aims to develop a diagnostic checklist for psoriasis classification in the context of traditional Chinese medicine. Methods A Delphi study was conducted with three rounds by a panel of 16 dermatology experts to develop a checklist for traditional Chinese medicine symptoms and signs of psoriasis. Dermatology experts in psoriasis research, nine in Yunnan and seven in Beijing, were selected as the expert panel. The initial list of symptoms and signs in psoriasis was developed by reviewing the literature retrieved from Chinese and English journals. Experts rated each item of the list on a 5-point Likert scale. The list was revised and re-evaluated in the same manner for a total of 3 rounds before it was finalized. Results One hundred and thirty items were extracted from the literature review. After three rounds of expert ratings, 96 items were retained with eight domains: color, type and shape of skin lesion, physical expression, tongue and coating, pulse, associated factors, and living environment. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Kappa statistics indicated an inter-rater agreement in the final checklist. Conclusion A checklist containing 96 items in 8 domains was developed for psoriasis diagnosis using traditional Chinese medicine symptoms and signs. PMID:23663296

  19. Batteries for electric drive vehicles: Evaluation of future characteristics and costs through a Delphi study

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A.D.; Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

    1997-07-01

    Uncertainty about future costs and operating attributes of electric drive vehicles (EVs and HEVs) has contributed to considerable debate regarding the market viability of such vehicles. One way to deal with such uncertainty, common to most emerging technologies, is to pool the judgments of experts in the field. Data from a two-stage Delphi study are used to project the future costs and operating characteristics of electric drive vehicles. The experts projected basic vehicle characteristics for EVs and HEVs for the period 2000-2020. They projected the mean EV range at 179 km in 2000, 270 km in 2010, and 358 km in 2020. The mean HEV range on battery power was projected as 145 km in 2000, 212 km in 2010, and 244 km in 2020. Experts` opinions on 10 battery technologies are analyzed and characteristics of initial battery packs for the mean power requirements are presented. A procedure to compute the cost of replacement battery packs is described, and the resulting replacement costs are presented. Projected vehicle purchase prices and fuel and maintenance costs are also presented. The vehicle purchase price and curb weight predictions would be difficult to achieve with the mean battery characteristics. With the battery replacement costs added to the fuel and maintenance costs, the conventional ICE vehicle is projected to have a clear advantage over electric drive vehicles through the projection period.

  20. DARE Train-the-Trainer Pedagogy Development Using 2-Round Delphi Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Kua, Phek Hui Jade; Soon, Swee Sung

    2016-01-01

    The Dispatcher-Assisted first REsponder programme aims to equip the public with skills to perform hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). By familiarising them with instructions given by a medical dispatcher during an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest call, they will be prepared and empowered to react in an emergency. We aim to formalise curriculum and standardise the way information is conveyed to the participants. A panel of 20 experts were chosen. Using Delphi methodology, selected issues were classified into open-ended and close-ended questions. Consensus for an item was established at a 70% agreement rate within the panel. Questions that had 60%–69% agreement were edited and sent to the panel for another round of voting. After 2 rounds of voting, 70 consensus statements were agreed upon. These covered the following: focus of CPR; qualities and qualifications of trainers; recognition of agonal breathing; head-tilt-chin lift; landmark for chest compression; performance of CPR when injuries are present; trainers' involvement in training lay people; modesty of female patients during CPR; AED usage; content of trainer's manual; addressing of questions and answers; updates-dissemination to trainers and attendance of refresher courses. Recommendations for pedagogy for trainers of dispatcher-assisted CPR programmes were developed. PMID:27660757

  1. Designing a balanced scorecard for a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan: a modified Delphi group exercise.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Fauziah; Jafri, Syed M Wasim; Abbas, Farhat; Shah, Mairaj; Azam, Syed Iqbal; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem; Brommels, Mats; Tomson, Goran

    2010-01-01

    Balanced Scorecards (BSC) are being implemented in high income health settings linking organizational strategies with performance data. At this private university hospital in Pakistan an elaborate information system exists. This study aimed to make best use of available data for better performance management. Applying the modified Delphi technique an expert panel of clinicians and hospital managers reduced a long list of indicators to a manageable size. Indicators from existing documents were evaluated for their importance, scientific soundness, appropriateness to hospital's strategic plan, feasibility and modifiability. Panel members individually rated each indicator on a scale of 1-9 for the above criteria. Median scores were assigned. Of an initial set of 50 indicators, 20 were finally selected to be assigned to the four BSC quadrants. These were financial (n = 4), customer or patient (n = 4), internal business or quality of care (n = 7) and innovation/learning or employee perspectives (n = 5). A need for stringent definitions, international benchmarking and standardized measurement methods was identified. BSC compels individual clinicians and managers to jointly work towards improving performance. This scorecard is now ready to be implemented by this hospital as a performance management tool for monitoring indicators, addressing measurement issues and enabling comparisons with hospitals in other settings.

  2. Consensus on the Definition of Advanced Parkinson's Disease: A Neurologists-Based Delphi Study (CEPA Study).

    PubMed

    Luquin, Maria-Rosario; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Mir, Pablo; Tolosa, Eduardo S

    2017-01-01

    To date, no consensus exists on the key factors for diagnosing advanced Parkinson disease (APD). To obtain consensus on the definition of APD, we performed a prospective, multicenter, Spanish nationwide, 3-round Delphi study (CEPA study). An ad hoc questionnaire was designed with 33 questions concerning the relevance of several clinical features for APD diagnosis. In the first-round, 240 neurologists of the Spanish Movement Disorders Group participated in the study. The results obtained were incorporated into the questionnaire and both, results and questionnaire, were sent out to and fulfilled by 26 experts in Movement Disorders. Review of results from the second-round led to a classification of symptoms as indicative of "definitive," "probable," and "possible" APD. This classification was confirmed by 149 previous participating neurologists in a third-round, where 92% completely or very much agreed with the classification. Definitive symptoms of APD included disability requiring help for the activities of daily living, presence of motor fluctuations with limitations to perform basic activities of daily living without help, severe dysphagia, recurrent falls, and dementia. These results will help neurologists to identify some key factors in APD diagnosis, thus allowing users to categorize the patients for a homogeneous recognition of this condition.

  3. Core outcome domains for controlled trials and clinical recordkeeping in eczema: international multiperspective Delphi consensus process.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Langan, Sinéad; Stamm, Tanja; Williams, Hywel C

    2011-03-01

    There is wide variation in the use of outcome measures for eczema. We performed a three-stage web-based international Delphi exercise to develop consensus-based sets of core outcome domains for eczema for "controlled trials" and "clinical recordkeeping". A total of 57 individuals from four stakeholder groups (consumers, clinical experts, regulatory agency representatives, and journal editors) representing 13 countries were asked to rate the importance of 19 outcome domains for eczema and to choose which domains should be included in two core sets of outcomes. Forty-six individuals (81%) participated. Participants received standardized feedback, including the group median, interquartile range, and previous responses, and the assessment was repeated in two subsequent rounds. We defined consensus a priori if at least 60% of the members of at least three stakeholder groups, including consumers, recommended domain inclusion in the core set. Consensus was achieved for inclusion of symptoms, physician-assessed clinical signs, and a measurement for long-term control of flares in the core set of outcome domains for eczema trials. We recommend including these three core outcomes in future eczema trials in order to enhance clinical interpretability and to enable meta-analyses across different studies. For recordkeeping, consensus was reached to regularly monitor eczema symptoms in clinical practice. Future work is needed to select which existing or new scales should be used to measure the domains identified as relevant for the core set.

  4. Environmental and occupational health research and training needs in Colombia: A Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura A.; González, Beatriz Elena; Vera, Lina María; Patz, Jonathan; Bautista, Leonelo E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Environmental factors contribute with 16% of the burden of disease in Colombia. A main obstacle in implementing national and regional environmental and occupational health policies is the limited knowledge on the local ability to study and control the impact of harmful exposures on health. Objective To identify needs for research and training in environmental and occupational health in Colombia. Materials and methods We conducted a three-round hybrid Delphi study. A group of environmental and occupational health Colombian experts (n=16) from government agencies, universities, and research centers was recruited to participate in the study. Expert’s opinions on research and training needs were gathered through online questionnaires, followed by an in-person meeting. The percentage of agreement and the coefficient of variation were used to measure consensus. Results Air pollution and chemical products were considered the most important environmental and occupational exposures, due to their significant impact on chronic non-communicable diseases, such as respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Research on the effects of outdoor air pollution on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases was considered of the greatest importance. Priority training areas included environmental and occupational health risk assessment, exposure modeling, advanced statistical methods, urban planning, occupational safety and hygiene, and epidemiology and toxicology. Conclusions These findings provide a valuable input for the definition and implementation of national environmental and occupational health policies and for the development of a regional hub aimed at strengthening the capacity for research and training in Colombia. PMID:26535742

  5. Nurses' expert opinions of workplace interventions for a healthy working environment: a Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    Doran, Diane; Clarke, Sean; Hayes, Laureen; Nincic, Vera

    2014-09-01

    Much has been written about interventions to improve the nursing work environment, yet little is known about their effectiveness. A Delphi survey of nurse experts was conducted to explore perceptions about workplace interventions in terms of feasibility and likelihood of positive impact on nurse outcomes such as job satisfaction and nurse retention. The interventions that received the highest ratings for likelihood of positive impact included: bedside handover to improve communication at shift report and promote patient-centred care; training program for nurses in dealing with violent or aggressive behaviour; development of charge nurse leadership team; training program focused on creating peer-supportive atmospheres and group cohesion; and schedule that recognizes work balance and family demands. The overall findings are consistent with the literature that highlights the importance of communication and teamwork, nurse health and safety, staffing and scheduling practices, professional development and leadership and mentorship. Nursing researchers and decision-makers should work in collaboration to implement and evaluate interventions for promoting practice environments characterized by effective communication and teamwork, professional growth and adequate support for the health and well-being of nurses.

  6. Desirable attributes of the ambulance technician, paramedic, and clinical supervisor: findings from a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Kilner, T

    2004-01-01

    Methods: The Delphi technique was used to gain a consensus view from a panel of experts. The first round of the study asked the experts to list the attributes they believed were desirable for the ambulance technician, the ambulance paramedic, and the clinical supervisor. The first round of the study generated 3403 individual statements that were collapsed into 25 broad categories, which were returned to the experts, who were required to rate each of the attributes along a visual analogue scale in respect of each of the identified occupational groups. Results: On completion of the second round the data were analysed to demonstrate rank ordering of desirable attributes by occupational group. The level of agreement within each group was determined by analysis using the Kendall coefficient of concordance. This showed high levels of agreement within the technician group but less agreement within the paramedic and clinical supervisor group. All were highly significant p<0.0001. Conclusions: There was significant agreement among the experts as to the desirable attributes of ambulance staff, many of which do not feature in existing ambulance training curriculums. The findings of this study may therefore be of value in informing future curriculum development and in providing guidance for the selection of staff for each of the occupational groups. PMID:15107388

  7. Target outcomes for long-term oral health care in dementia: a Delphi approach.

    PubMed

    Jones, J A; Brown, E J; Volicer, L

    2000-01-01

    This study developed a list of target outcomes for long-term oral health care in persons with dementia. A three-round Delphi study was used to develop a list of target outcomes. Participants included 99 staff and 171 family members associated with the Dementia Special Care Unit in Bedford, MA. In Round 1 participants were asked to list five outcomes for long-term oral health care. Items were grouped, redundancies removed, and fed back in Round 2, when participants scored the items from 1 (least important) to 10 (most important). Round 2 responses were tabulated and the top 20 were fed back for scoring in Round 3. The top 10 target outcomes in decreasing order of importance were: patient will be free from oral pain, patient will not be at risk for aspiration, emergency dental treatment will be available when needed, prevent mouth infections, daily mouth care is as much a part of daily care as shaving or brushing hair, prevent discomfort from loose teeth or sore gums, teeth will be brushed thoroughly once a day, staff will be able to provide oral hygiene care as needed, provide dental care to prevent problems eating, and recognize oral problems early. Family and professional caregivers were remarkably consistent in their identification of the top 10 outcomes. Further work is needed to ensure broad international and interdisciplinary acceptance (including families and the long-term care residents themselves) of target outcomes for long-term oral health care in persons with dementia.

  8. The application of fuzzy Delphi and fuzzy inference system in supplier ranking and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahriri, Farzad; Mousavi, Maryam; Hozhabri Haghighi, Siamak; Zawiah Md Dawal, Siti

    2014-06-01

    In today's highly rival market, an effective supplier selection process is vital to the success of any manufacturing system. Selecting the appropriate supplier is always a difficult task because suppliers posses varied strengths and weaknesses that necessitate careful evaluations prior to suppliers' ranking. This is a complex process with many subjective and objective factors to consider before the benefits of supplier selection are achieved. This paper identifies six extremely critical criteria and thirteen sub-criteria based on the literature. A new methodology employing those criteria and sub-criteria is proposed for the assessment and ranking of a given set of suppliers. To handle the subjectivity of the decision maker's assessment, an integration of fuzzy Delphi with fuzzy inference system has been applied and a new ranking method is proposed for supplier selection problem. This supplier selection model enables decision makers to rank the suppliers based on three classifications including "extremely preferred", "moderately preferred", and "weakly preferred". In addition, in each classification, suppliers are put in order from highest final score to the lowest. Finally, the methodology is verified and validated through an example of a numerical test bed.

  9. A decision-making framework for total ownership cost management of complex systems: A Delphi study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Russel J.

    This qualitative study, using a modified Delphi method, was conducted to develop a decision-making framework for the total ownership cost management of complex systems in the aerospace industry. The primary focus of total ownership cost is to look beyond the purchase price when evaluating complex system life cycle alternatives. A thorough literature review and the opinions of a group of qualified experts resulted in a compilation of total ownership cost best practices, cost drivers, key performance factors, applicable assessment methods, practitioner credentials and potential barriers to effective implementation. The expert panel provided responses to the study questions using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Data were analyzed and provided to the panel members for review and discussion with the intent to achieve group consensus. As a result of the study, the experts agreed that a total ownership cost analysis should (a) be as simple as possible using historical data; (b) establish cost targets, metrics, and penalties early in the program; (c) monitor the targets throughout the product lifecycle and revise them as applicable historical data becomes available; and (d) directly link total ownership cost elements with other success factors during program development. The resultant study framework provides the business leader with incentives and methods to develop and implement strategies for controlling and reducing total ownership cost over the entire product life cycle when balancing cost, schedule, and performance decisions.

  10. Ensuring that ecological science contributes to natural resource management using a Delphi-derived approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Amy K; Dale, Virginia H; Arthur, Taryn A; Baskaran, Latha Malar

    2017-01-01

    This chapter approaches participatory modeling in environmental decision making from an atypical perspective. It broadly addresses the question of how to assure that science conducted to assist practitioners improves resource management. More specifically, it describes a case involving environmental science and natural resource management at Fort Benning, a U.S. Army installation in the southeastern United States where disparate environmental research projects were funded by a single federal agency to enhance the ability of Fort Benning resource managers to achieve their resource management goals. The role of our effort was to integrate the scientific studies in a manner that would be meaningful and useful for resource managers. Hence we assembled a team consisting of an anthropologist, ecologist, microbiologist, statistician, and geographic information systems specialist who developed a common framework that served as the basis for this integration. The team first used a Delphi expert elicitation, which evolved into an approach more akin to facilitated negotiation. This second approach arose organically, particularly when our team took advantage of an opportunity for face-to-face interaction. Although the shift in our approach was unplanned, it proved to be highly productive. We discuss the potential utility of our approach for other situations and suggest that it would be useful to initiate at the beginning of research where the aim is to produce scientific results that meet practitioners needs, specifically in the realm of environmental science and resource management.

  11. Study of b-quark mass effects in multijet topologies with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2008-06-01

    The effect of the heavy b-quark mass on the two, three and four-jet rates is studied using LEP data collected by the DELPHI experiment at the Z peak in 1994 and 1995. The rates of b-quark jets and light quark jets (ℓ=uds) in events with n=2, 3, and 4 jets, together with the ratio of two and four-jet rates of b-quarks with respect to light-quarks, Rn bℓ, have been measured with a double-tag technique using the CAMBRIDGE jet-clustering algorithm. A comparison between experimental results and theory (matrix element or Monte Carlo event generators such as PYTHIA, HERWIG and ARIADNE) is done after the hadronisation phase. Using the four-jet observable R4 bℓ, a measurement of the b-quark mass using massive leading-order calculations gives:m_b(M_Z) = 3.76 ±0.32 ({text{stat}}) ±0.17 ({text{syst}}) ±0.22 ({text{had}}) ±0.90 ({text{theo}}) text{GeV}/c^2 . This result is compatible with previous three-jet determinations at the MZ energy scale and with low energy mass measurements evolved to the MZ scale using QCD renormalisation group equations.

  12. Investigation of Colour Reconnection in WW events with the DELPHI detector at LEP-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2007-07-01

    In the reaction e+e-→WW→(q1q¯2)(q3q¯4) the usual hadronization models treat the colour singlets q1q¯2 and q3q¯4 coming from two W bosons independently. However, since the final state partons may coexist in space and time, cross-talk between the two evolving hadronic systems may be possible during fragmentation through soft gluon exchange. This effect is known as colour reconnection. In this article the results of the investigation of colour reconnection effects in fully hadronic decays of W pairs in DELPHI at LEP are presented. Two complementary analyses were performed, studying the particle flow between jets and W mass estimators, with negligible correlation between them, and the results were combined and compared to models. In the framework of the SK-I model, the value for its κ parameter most compatible with the data was found to be: κSK-I=2.2+2.5 -1.3 corresponding to the probability of reconnection mathcal{P}_{text{reco}} to be in the range 0.31

  13. Research priorities in occupational medicine: a survey of United Kingdom medical opinion by the Delphi technique.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, J M

    1994-01-01

    An attempt to achieve an agreed set of priorities for research in occupational medicine was undertaken by the Delphi technique. Fifty three senior practitioners of occupational medicine in academe (25) and industry or government (28) were canvassed about their views and choices for priority activity. Forty six (86%) responded to the initial enquiry and 48 (91%) provided rank order choices from a second, more detailed questionnaire. The first priority for more research on the natural history of work related ill health identified musculoskeletal disorders of the back and upper limbs followed by asthma, accidents, skin disorders, vibration induced disease, suicide and depression, and finally hearing loss. The second priority area was audit and particularly the need for its use in occupational health screening procedures. Environmental impact of industrial activity was third with the community health effects being more important than individual health effects. Stress related disease was fourth with emphasis on risk factors. The fifth area was neuropsychological effects of work exposures particularly the need for more research on diagnostic tests. Other assorted areas of concern were the cost effectiveness of occupational health, risk assessment, reproductive hazards, the effects of pharmacological agents, and the development of biomarkers as early evidence of an exposure effect. The remarkable degree of unanimity on the issues and choices and the general agreement between physicians from academe and industry on what constitute the priorities warrants further discussion and positive action. PMID:8199676

  14. Ethical challenges facing veterinary professionals in Ireland: results from Policy Delphi with vignette methodology

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, M.; More, S. J.; Morton, D. B.; Hanlon, A.

    2016-01-01

    Ethics is key to the integrity of the veterinary profession. Despite its importance, there is a lack of applied research on the range of ethical challenges faced by veterinarians. A three round Policy Delphi with vignette methodology was used to record the diversity of views on ethical challenges faced by veterinary professionals in Ireland. Forty experts, comprising veterinary practitioners, inspectors and nurses, accepted to participate. In round 1, twenty vignettes describing a variety of ethically challenging veterinary scenarios were ranked in terms of ethical acceptability, reputational risk and perceived standards of practice. Round 2 aimed at characterising challenges where future policy development or professional guidance was deemed to be needed. In round 3, possible solutions to key challenges were explored. Results suggest that current rules and regulations are insufficient to ensure best veterinary practices and that a collective approach is needed to harness workable solutions for the identified ethical challenges. Challenges pertaining mostly to the food chain seem to require enforcement measures whereas softer measures that promote professional discretion were preferred to address challenges dealing with veterinary clinical services. These findings can support veterinary representative bodies, advisory committees and regulatory authorities in their decision making, policy and regulation. PMID:27613779

  15. A modified Delphi consensus study to identify UK osteopathic profession research priorities.

    PubMed

    Rushton, A B; Fawkes, C A; Carnes, D; Moore, A P

    2014-10-01

    There is an increasing emphasis to take an evidence-based approach to healthcare. To obtain evidence relevant to the osteopathic profession a clear research direction is required based on the views of stakeholders in the osteopathic profession. A modified Delphi consensus approach was conducted to explore the views of osteopaths and patients regarding research priorities for osteopathy. Osteopaths and patients were invited to complete an online questionnaire survey (n = 145). Round 1 requested up to 10 research priority areas and the rationale for their selection. All of the themes from Round 1 were fed back verbatim, and in Round 2 participants were asked to rank the importance of the research priorities on a 5-point Likert scale. Finally, in Round 3 participants were asked to rank the importance of a refined list of research topics which had reached consensus. Descriptive analysis and use of Kendall's coefficient of concordance enabled interpretation of consensus. The response rate for Round 1 was 87.9% and identified 610 research priority areas. Round 2 identified 69 research themes as important, and Round 3 identified 20 research priority topic areas covering four themes: effectiveness of osteopathic treatment (7 areas prioritised), role of osteopathy: the management of four conditions were prioritised, risks with osteopathic treatment (two areas prioritised) and outcomes of osteopathic treatment (two areas prioritised). The findings will be taken forward to develop the research strategy for osteopathy.

  16. Quality issues concerning genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing: a European Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Paneque, Milena; Sequeiros, Jorge; Skirton, Heather

    2015-11-01

    Genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing is complex, bringing both ethical and practical questions. There are protocols for counselling but a scarcity of literature regarding quality assessment of such counselling practice. Generic quality assessment tools for genetic services are not specific to presymptomatic testing (PST). Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify aspects of effective counselling practice in PST for late-onset neurological disorders. We used the Delphi method to ascertain the views of relevant European experts in genetic counselling practice, ascertained via published literature and nomination by practitioners. Ethical approval was obtained. Questionnaires were sent electronically to a list of 45 experts, (Medical Doctors, Geneticists, Genetic Counsellors and Genetic Nurses), who each contributed to one to three rounds. In the first round, we provided a list of relevant indicators of quality of practice from a literature review. Experts were requested to evaluate topics in four domains: (a) professional standards; (b) service standards; (c) the consultant's perspective; and (d) protocol standards. We then removed items receiving less than 65% approval and added new issues suggested by experts. The second round was performed for the refinement of issues and the last round was aimed at achieving final consensus on high-standard indicators of quality, for inclusion in the assessment tool. The most relevant indicators were related to (1) consultant-centred practice and (2) advanced counselling and interpersonal skills of professionals. Defined high-standard indicators can be used for the development of a new tool for quality assessment of PST counselling practice.

  17. Innovations and trends in meat consumption: an application of the Delphi method in Spain.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Antonio; Miranda, Francisco J; Rubio, Sergio; Valero, Víctor

    2012-12-01

    The meat sector in Spain is an important industry. However, traditional consumption is changing as a result of the country's economic crisis and the new structure of households. The objective of the present study was to identify trends in meat consumption in Spain extrapolated to 2016, and the main innovations that should be of interest to firms in the sector. The study was conducted in 2011 using the Delphi method with the participation of 26 experts. The results showed that, while the demand for meat will not vary significantly in amount, it will do so in composition, with chicken replacing beef as the meat of most importance in the shopping basket. In addition, significant growth is expected in certified meat, but the demand for organic meat will not take off. Neither will there be no significant changes in end purchase formats, but there will be a clear trend in consumers' purchasing decision criteria away from price, external appearance and origin towards quality certification and the attributes of the packaging. With respect to end purchase channels, the experts estimate that the current trend will be accentuated with increasing market share for large supermarkets and major distribution brands.

  18. Consensus on the Definition of Advanced Parkinson's Disease: A Neurologists-Based Delphi Study (CEPA Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kulisevsky, Jaime; Tolosa, Eduardo S.

    2017-01-01

    To date, no consensus exists on the key factors for diagnosing advanced Parkinson disease (APD). To obtain consensus on the definition of APD, we performed a prospective, multicenter, Spanish nationwide, 3-round Delphi study (CEPA study). An ad hoc questionnaire was designed with 33 questions concerning the relevance of several clinical features for APD diagnosis. In the first-round, 240 neurologists of the Spanish Movement Disorders Group participated in the study. The results obtained were incorporated into the questionnaire and both, results and questionnaire, were sent out to and fulfilled by 26 experts in Movement Disorders. Review of results from the second-round led to a classification of symptoms as indicative of “definitive,” “probable,” and “possible” APD. This classification was confirmed by 149 previous participating neurologists in a third-round, where 92% completely or very much agreed with the classification. Definitive symptoms of APD included disability requiring help for the activities of daily living, presence of motor fluctuations with limitations to perform basic activities of daily living without help, severe dysphagia, recurrent falls, and dementia. These results will help neurologists to identify some key factors in APD diagnosis, thus allowing users to categorize the patients for a homogeneous recognition of this condition. PMID:28239501

  19. A Modified Delphi Process to Define Competencies for Assessment Leads Supporting a Doctor of Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Sweet, Burgunda V.; Kuba, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To define the competencies for individuals designated as assessment leads in colleges and schools of pharmacy. Methods. Twenty-three assessment experts in pharmacy participated in a modified Delphi process to describe competencies for an assessment lead, defined as the individual responsible for curricular assessment and assessment-related to doctor of pharmacy program accreditation. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Round 2 grouped responses for comment and rating for consensus, which was prospectively set at 80%. Results. Twelve competencies were defined and grouped into 3 areas: Context for Assessment, Managing the Process of Assessment, and Leadership of Assessment Activities. In order to verify the panel’s work, assessment competencies from other disciplines were reviewed and compared. Conclusions. The competencies describe roles for assessment professionals as experts, managers, and leaders of assessment processes. They can be used by assessment professionals in self-assessing areas for professional development and by administrators in selecting, developing, and supporting designated leads. PMID:28179716

  20. Building Responsive Health Systems to Help Communities Affected by Migration: An International Delphi Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Pottie, Kevin; Hui, Charles; Rahman, Prinon; Ingleby, David; Akl, Elie A.; Russell, Grant; Ling, Li; Wickramage, Kolitha; Mosca, Davide; Brindis, Claire D.

    2017-01-01

    Persons affected by migration require health systems that are responsive and adaptable to the needs of both disadvantaged migrants and non-migrant populations. The objective of this study is to support health systems for populations affected by migration. Materials and Methods: An international Delphi consensus process was used to identify policy approaches to improve health systems for populations affected by migration. Participants were leading migrant health experts from Americas, Europe, Middle East, Asia, and Australasia. We calculated average ranking scores and qualitatively analyzed open-ended questions. Results: Participants identified the following key areas as priorities for policy development: health inequities, system discrimination, migrant related health data, disadvantaged migrant sub-groups, and considerations for disadvantaged non-migrant populations. Highly ranked items to improve health systems were: Health Equity Impact Assessment, evidence based guidelines, and the International Organization for Migration annual reports. Discussion: Policy makers need tools, data and resources to address health systems challenges. Policies need to avoid preventable deaths of migrants and barriers to basic health services. PMID:28165380

  1. Delphi definition of the EADC-ADNI Harmonized Protocol for hippocampal segmentation on magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Boccardi, Marina; Bocchetta, Martina; Apostolova, Liana G.; Barnes, Josephine; Bartzokis, George; Corbetta, Gabriele; DeCarli, Charles; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Firbank, Michael; Ganzola, Rossana; Gerritsen, Lotte; Henneman, Wouter; Killiany, Ronald J.; Malykhin, Nikolai; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Pruessner, Jens C.; Redolfi, Alberto; Robitaille, Nicolas; Soininen, Hilkka; Tolomeo, Daniele; Wang, Lei; Watson, Craig; Wolf, Henrike; Duvernoy, Henri; Duchesne, Simon; Jack, Clifford R.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to have international experts converge on a harmonized definition of whole hippocampus boundaries and segmentation procedures, to define standard operating procedures for magnetic resonance (MR)-based manual hippocampal segmentation. Methods The panel received a questionnaire regarding whole hippocampus boundaries and segmentation procedures. Quantitative information was supplied to allow evidence-based answers. A recursive and anonymous Delphi procedure was used to achieve convergence. Significance of agreement among panelists was assessed by exact probability on Fisher’s and binomial tests. Results Agreement was significant on the inclusion of alveus/fimbria (P =.021), whole hippocampal tail (P =.013), medial border of the body according to visible morphology (P =.0006), and on this combined set of features (P =.001). This definition captures 100% of hippocampal tissue, 100% of Alzheimer’s disease-related atrophy, and demonstrated good reliability on preliminary intrarater (0.98) and inter-rater (0.94) estimates. Discussion Consensus was achieved among international experts with respect to hippocampal segmentation using MR resulting in a harmonized segmentation protocol. PMID:25130658

  2. Prioritization of future genetics education for general practitioners: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Houwink, Elisa J.F.; Henneman, Lidewij; Westerneng, Myrte; van Luijk, Scheltus J.; Cornel, Martina C.; Dinant, Jan Geert; Vleuten, Cees van der

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: General practitioners (GPs) are increasingly expected to deliver genetics services in daily patient care. Education in primary care genetics is considered suboptimal and in urgent need of revision and innovation. The aim of this study was to prioritize topics for genetics education for general practice. Methods: A Delphi consensus procedure consisting of three rounds was conducted. A purposively selected heterogeneous panel (n = 18) of experts, comprising six practicing GPs who were also engaged in research, five GP trainers, four clinical genetics professionals, and three representatives of patient organizations, participated. Educational needs regarding genetics in general practice in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes were rated and ranked in a top-10 list. Results: The entire panel completed all three rounds. Kendall's coefficient of concordance indicated significant agreement regarding the top 10 genetic education needs (P < 0.001). “Recognizing signals that are potentially indicative of a hereditary component of a disease” was rated highest, followed by “Evaluating indications for referral to a clinical genetics centre” and “Knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of genetic tests.” Conclusions: The priorities resulting from this study can inform the development of educational modules, including input for case-based education, to improve GP performance in genetic patient care. PMID:22241093

  3. Surgical referral criteria for degenerative rotator cuff tears: a Delphi questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Stephanie; Yohannes, A M

    2014-06-01

    Selecting the most appropriate patients to refer for surgery is crucial for high-quality and efficient clinical care. However, there are no specific referral criteria to guide the referral of appropriate patients for rotator cuff repair surgery. The aim of the present study was to design robust surgical referral criteria for patients with degenerative rotator cuff tears using consensus methodology. A two-round Delphi questionnaire was undertaken with a nationally representative sample of 41 specialist shoulder surgeons experienced in rotator cuff repair. Surgical referral criteria for degenerative rotator cuff tear were developed where consensus of at least 70% agreement was achieved. The initial questionnaire consisted of 24 items. Consensus was reached on 14 items, including: severity of pain, functional limitation, the identification of fat atrophy, agreement that a course of physiotherapy should be attempted before surgical referral, and exclusion for those with an active frozen shoulder. However, there was no consensus with regard to the dimensions of the tear. The surgical referral criteria developed were novel and promising for patients with degenerative rotator cuff tears, and further research is required to examine their efficacy.

  4. Development, characterization, and biological properties of meningococcal immunotype L3,7,(8),9-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, A F; Kuipers, A J; Braat, A K; Dekker, H A; Peeters, C C; Snippe, H; Poolman, J T

    1994-01-01

    In this study, we characterize the properties of nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize meningococcal lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The following three specific MAbs that had not been described previously were elicited in BALB/c mice by using an immunotype L3,7,9 oligosaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugate in combination with Quil A: 4D1-B3, 3A12-E1, and 4A8-B2. These MAbs reacted with L3,7,9 LPS on immunoblots and in the LPS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and recognised strains containing L3, L3,7, L8 (except 3A12-E1), or L9 LPS in the whole-cell ELISA. The six other MAbs have been described in previous studies (K. Saukkonen, M. Leinonen, H. Abdillahi, and J.T. Poolman, Vaccine 7:325-328, 1989; R.J.P.M. Scholten, B. Kuipers, H.A. Valkenburg, J. Danjert, W.D. Zollinger, and J.T. Poolman, J. Med. Microbiol., in press) and were obtained after immunization with outer membrane protein complexes containing LPS: MN15A11, MN15A8-1, MN15A17-1, MN11A11G, MN14F20-11, and MN14F21-11. MN15A11 was specific for L3,7,9 LPS and displayed properties similar to those of 3A12-E1. MN15A17-1, MN14F20-1, and MN11A11G were cross-reactive, and MN14F21-11 was specific for the L1,8 immunotype. Epitope specificities of MAbs reacting with L3,7,(8),9 strains were analyzed. MAbs 4D1-B3, 3A12-E1, and 4A8-B2 recognized phosphoethanolamine group-containing oligosaccharide-specific epitopes. MN15A11 and MN15A17-1 were probably directed against a conformational epitope, although for MN5A11 recognition of an unknown L3,7,9-specific epitope in the 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid (KDO)-lipid A region cannot be excluded. MN15A8-1, a strongly cross-reactive MAb, recognized a determinant which included the KDO-lipid A region and the more terminal saccharides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8556528

  5. Usefulness of AFP, AFP-L3, and PIVKA-II, and their combinations in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Joon; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won; Cho, Young Kyu; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Sang Gyune; Cha, Sang-Woo; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Boo Sung; Park, Suyeon; Bang, Hae In

    2017-03-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Lens culinaris-agglutinin-reactive fraction of AFP (AFP-L3), and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) are widely used as tumor markers for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study compared the diagnostic values of AFP, AFP-L3, and PIVKA-II individually and in combination to find the best biomarker or biomarker panel.Seventy-nine patients with newly diagnosed HCC and 77 non-HCC control patients with liver cirrhosis were enrolled. AFP, AFP-L3, and PIVKA-II were measured in the same serum samples using microchip capillary electrophoresis and a liquid-phase binding assay on an automatic analyzer. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses were also applied to all combinations of the markers.When the 3 biomarkers were analyzed individually, AFP showed the largest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.751). For combinations of the biomarkers, the AUC was highest (0.765) for "PIVKA-II > 40 mAU/mL and AFP > 10 ng/mL." The combination of "PIVKA-II > 40 mAU/mL and AFP > 10 ng/mL and AFP-L3 > 10%" had worse sensitivity and lower AUC (P = 0.001). The highest AUC of a single biomarker was highest for AFP and of a combination was "PIVKA-II > 40 mAU/mL and AFP > 10 ng/mL," with this also being the case when the cut-off value of AFP and AFP-L3 was changed.Alpha-fetoprotein showed the best diagnostic performance as a single biomarker for HCC. The diagnostic value of AFP was improved by combining it with PIVKA-II, but adding AFP-L3 did not contribute to the ability to distinguish between HCC and non-HCC liver cirrhosis. These findings were not altered when the cut-off value of AFP and AFP-L3 was changed.

  6. Usefulness of AFP, AFP-L3, and PIVKA-II, and their combinations in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Joon; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won; Cho, Young Kyu; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Sang Gyune; Cha, Sang-Woo; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Boo Sung; Park, Suyeon; Bang, Hae In

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Lens culinaris-agglutinin-reactive fraction of AFP (AFP-L3), and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) are widely used as tumor markers for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study compared the diagnostic values of AFP, AFP-L3, and PIVKA-II individually and in combination to find the best biomarker or biomarker panel. Seventy-nine patients with newly diagnosed HCC and 77 non-HCC control patients with liver cirrhosis were enrolled. AFP, AFP-L3, and PIVKA-II were measured in the same serum samples using microchip capillary electrophoresis and a liquid-phase binding assay on an automatic analyzer. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses were also applied to all combinations of the markers. When the 3 biomarkers were analyzed individually, AFP showed the largest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.751). For combinations of the biomarkers, the AUC was highest (0.765) for “PIVKA-II > 40 mAU/mL and AFP > 10 ng/mL.” The combination of “PIVKA-II > 40 mAU/mL and AFP > 10 ng/mL and AFP-L3 > 10%” had worse sensitivity and lower AUC (P = 0.001). The highest AUC of a single biomarker was highest for AFP and of a combination was “PIVKA-II > 40 mAU/mL and AFP > 10 ng/mL,” with this also being the case when the cut-off value of AFP and AFP-L3 was changed. Alpha-fetoprotein showed the best diagnostic performance as a single biomarker for HCC. The diagnostic value of AFP was improved by combining it with PIVKA-II, but adding AFP-L3 did not contribute to the ability to distinguish between HCC and non-HCC liver cirrhosis. These findings were not altered when the cut-off value of AFP and AFP-L3 was changed. PMID:28296720

  7. Enhancement of 5-FU sensitivity by the proapoptotic rpL3 gene in p53 null colon cancer cells through combined polymer nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Maiolino, Sara; Pagliara, Valentina; Ungaro, Francesca; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Leone, Alessandra; Scalia, Giulia; Budillon, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and the therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is mainly limited due to resistance. Recently, we have demonstrated that nucleolar stress upon 5-FU treatment leads to the activation of ribosome-free rpL3 (L3) as proapoptotic factor. In this study, we analyzed L3 expression profile in colon cancer tissues and demonstrated that L3 mRNA amount decreased with malignant progression and the intensity of its expression was inversely related to tumor grade and Bcl-2/Bax ratio. With the aim to develop a combined therapy of 5-FU plus plasmid encoding L3 (pL3), we firstly assessed the potentiation of the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU on colon cancer cells by L3. Next, 10 μM 5-FU and 2 μg of pL3 were encapsulated in biocompatible nanoparticles (NPs) chemically conjugated with HA to achieve active tumor-targeting ability in CD44 overexpressing cancer cells. We showed the specific intracellular accumulation of NPs in cells and a sustained release for 5-FU and L3. Analysis of cytotoxicity and apoptotic induction potential of combined NPs clearly showed that the 5-FU plus L3 were more effective in inducing apoptosis than 5-FU or L3 alone. Furthermore, we show that the cancer-specific chemosensitizer effect of combined NPs may be dependent on L3 ability to affect 5-FU efflux by controlling P-gp (P-glycoprotein) expression. These results led us to propose a novel combined therapy with the use of 5-FU plus L3 in order to establish individualized therapy by examining L3 profiles in tumors to yield a better clinical outcomes. PMID:27835895

  8. A single amino acid in the helicase domain of PMMoV-S is responsible for its enhanced accumulation in C. chinense (L(3)L(3)) plants at 32°C.

    PubMed

    Tena, Fátima; Molina-Galdeano, Myriam; Serra, Maria Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel

    2012-05-25

    In Capsicum chinense (L(3)L(3)) plants a higher accumulation of the tobamovirus Pepper mild mottle virus strain S (PMMoV-S) as compared to the Italian strain PMMoV-I is detected when plants are grown at 32°C. By using a reverse genetic approach, we have established that a single amino acid at position 898 in the helicase domain of the polymerase protein, outside of the conserved regions of the helicase, is critical for the higher accumulation of PMMoV-S observed. It also is necessary for both increased accumulation of viral RNA of both polarities in pepper protoplasts and enhanced cell-to-cell movement in C. chinense plants. The influence of thermoresistance of PMMoV-S, a P(1,2) pathotype, and its prevalence on pepper cultivars over PMMoV-I, a P(1,2,3), pathotype, is discussed.

  9. A Distinctive Silica-Rich, Sodium-Poor Igneous Clast in the Bovedy (L3) Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Boynton, W. V.

    1992-07-01

    Description of Bo-1. One slab of the Bovedy (L3) chondrite contains a large (~ 4 x 7 mm) white object that in hand specimen resembles the generally chondritic lithic fragment studied by Rubin et al. (1981). However, SEM, and EMPA studies of this object, designated Bo-1, reveal an unusually Si-rich, Na-poor bulk composition that is manifested by the presence of a silica mineral, the complete absence of olivine, and feldspar that is less sodic than usual for ordinary chondrites. The clast is a highly crystalline igneous rock and exhibits a well-defined crystallization sequence. Orthopyroxene (opx) comprises 83.8 vol% of Bo-1 and is zoned from En(sub)92-85 Wo(sub)0.1-0.2 to En(sub)74 Wo(sub)1.9-2.9. The more magnesian, less calcic opx was the first phase to crystallize in Bo-1. A silica mineral (SiO2, 6.2 vol%), probably either tridymite or cristobalite, crystallized next and appears slightly "corroded" (and veined) by clinopyroxene, suggesting minor reaction between the silica mineral and its surroundings. A small amount (1 vol%) of euhedral-subhedral pigeonite (pig) also crystallized about this time. Plagioclase (plag) was the last phase to join the crystallization sequence and consists of a fine-scale, often lamellar, intergrowth of bytownite-labradorite (5.8 vol%, mainly An(sub)70- 75Or(sub)1-03) and oligoclase (3.1 vol%, mainly An(sub)15-24 Or(sub)13-6). The latter deviates from feldspar stoichiometry and may be partly amorphous. Volumetrically insignificant augite (aug) occurs as (exsolution?) patches within opx, as thin veinlets crossing SiO(sub)2 grains, and as thin rims at the interface of SiO(sub)2 and plag. The rimming and veining aug may have crystallized together with plag from the last liquid in the rock. Minor chromite (0.2 vol%) and trace metal and sulfide are also present. Bulk composition of Bo-1. The composition of the clast was determined by combining SEM modal data with EMPA data for each phase. The calculated composition (in wt%) is: SiO2, 57

  10. Study of rare decays of the b quark with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marco

    The b quark is the heaviest fermion producing bound hadronic states. The study of their production and decays provides important data for the understanding of the processes responsible for the weak decays of fundamental fermions. In addition, due to the small value of the | Vcb| element, suppressed and rare b-->u and b-->s, d transitions are not completely obliterated by the CKM favoured b-->c decays. This makes B hadrons an ideal laboratory for the study of rare decay processes. The sensitivity of these decays to the Standard Model structure, through suppressions proportional to the square of the elements in the quark mixing matrix and through loops that may reveal contributions of new particles, opens a new window on precision tests of the Standard Model and also on possible new physics beyond it. The DELPHI detector, equipped with a precise silicon vertex tracker surrounding the beam interaction region and with Ping Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detectors providing efficient hadron identification, at the LEP e +e- collider, is well suited for precise studies of B decays. This thesis presents the results of the analysis of the date, collected with DELPHI at centre-of-mass energies around the Z0 pole from 1990 to 1995 for the studies of rare decays of beauty hadrons. These studies have promoted the development of new techniques for the topological reconstruction of the B decay chain and for hadron identification based on the response of the RICH detectors. Rare decays of the b quarks have been studied in several decay processes. Tree level b-->u transitions have been studied mainly in the semileptonic b-->uln channel. A new technique that discriminate them from the favoured b-->c transitions based on the reconstructed mass of the hadronic system recoiling against the lepton has been developed and applied. Evidence for the decay has been obtained and its rate has been used to extract an accurate determination of the |Vub| element in the quark mixing matrix. Hadronic

  11. Assessment tool for total laparoscopic hysterectomy: a Delphi consensus survey among international experts.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Catherine; Grantcharov, Teodor; Urquia, Marcelo L; Satkunaratnam, Abheha

    2014-11-01

    Objectif : Parvenir à un consensus parmi les spécialistes quant aux étapes essentielles devant être incluses dans un outil d’évaluation pour ce qui est de l’hystérectomie laparoscopique totale. Méthodes : En utilisant un processus de consensus Delphi, nous avons créé un sondage initial fondé sur la littérature actuelle et l’expertise locale en matière de chirurgie laparoscopique, puis nous l’avons fait parvenir à des spécialistes internationaux du domaine de la gynécologie laparoscopique. Ces spécialistes ont été sélectionnés en fonction de critères particuliers. Nous avons formulé un deuxième sondage, en fonction des réponses et des commentaires issus de la mise en œuvre du premier sondage, et l’avons ensuite fait parvenir à tous les spécialistes qui avaient participé au premier sondage. Le consensus a été défini comme étant un coefficient alpha de Cronbach ≥ 0,80. Un taux d’agrément ≥ 0,70 a été utilisé pour identifier les sous-étapes devant faire partie de l’outil final. Résultats : Des 85 spécialistes dont nous avons sollicité la participation, 53 (62 %) ont accepté l’invitation et 51 d’entre eux ont participé aux deux rondes de sondage. L’instrument final permettant d’évaluer l’hystérectomie laparoscopique totale a été créé au moyen des rubriques s’étant méritées un taux élevé d’accord après les deux rondes de sondage. Cet outil final comptait une bonne cohérence interne parmi les spécialistes (coefficient alpha de Cronbach de 0,90). Conclusion : En ayant recours à la méthodologie Delphi, nous sommes parvenus (dans un court délai et en n’occasionnant que des coûts minimes) à un consensus international parmi les spécialistes du domaine de la gynécologie laparoscopique. L’outil d’évaluation de l’hystérectomie laparoscopique totale qui est issu de ce consensus pourrait servir dans le cadre de l’évaluation des compétences chirurgicales à l

  12. Management of problematic behaviours among individuals on long-term opioid therapy: protocol for a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Jessica S; Young, Sarah R; Azari, Soraya; Becker, William C; Liebschutz, Jane M; Pomeranz, Jamie; Roy, Payel; Saini, Shalini; Starrels, Joanna L; Edelman, E Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Given the sharp rise in opioid prescribing and heightened recognition of opioid addiction and overdose, opioid safety has become a priority. Clinical guidelines on long-term opioid therapy (LTOT) for chronic pain consistently recommend routine monitoring and screening for problematic behaviours. Yet, there is no consensus definition regarding what constitutes a problematic behaviour, and recommendations for appropriate management to inform front-line providers, researchers and policymakers are lacking. This creates a barrier to effective guideline implementation. Thus, our objective is to present the protocol for a Delphi study designed to: (1) elicit expert opinion to identify the most important problematic behaviours seen in clinical practice and (2) develop consensus on how these behaviours should be managed in the context of routine clinical care. Methods/analysis We will include clinical experts, defined as individuals who provide direct patient care to adults with chronic pain who are on LTOT in an ambulatory setting, and for whom opioid prescribing for chronic non-malignant pain is an area of expertise. The Delphi study will be conducted online in 4 consecutive rounds. Participants will be asked to list problematic behaviours and identify which behaviours are most common and challenging. They will then describe how they would manage the most frequently occurring common and challenging behaviours, rating the importance of each management strategy. Qualitative analysis will be used to categorise behaviours and management strategies, and consensus will be based on a definition established a priori. Ethics/dissemination This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). This study will generate Delphi-based expert consensus on the management of problematic behaviours that arise in individuals on LTOT, which we will publish and disseminate to appropriate professional societies

  13. Determination of French influenza outbreaks periods between 1985 and 2011 through a web-based Delphi method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assessing the accuracy of influenza epidemic periods determined by statistical models is important to improve the performance of algorithms used in real-time syndromic surveillance systems. This is a difficult problem to address in the absence of a reliable gold standard. The objective of this study is to establish an expert-based determination of the start and the end of influenza epidemics in France. Methods A three-round international web-based Delphi survey was proposed to 288 eligible influenza experts. Fifty-seven (20%) experts completed the three-rounds of the study. The experts were invited to indicate the starting and the ending week of influenza epidemics, on 32 time-series graphs of influenza seasons drawn using data from the French Sentinelles Network (Influenza-like illness incidence rates) and virological data from the WHO-FluNet. Twenty-six of 32 time-series graphs proposed corresponded to each of the French influenza seasons observed between 1985 and 2011. Six influenza seasons were proposed twice at each round to measure variation among expert responses. Results We obtained consensual results for 88% (23/26) of the epidemic periods. In two or three rounds (depending on the season) answers gathered around modes, and the internal control demonstrated a good reproducibility of the answers. Virological data did not appear to have a significant impact on the answers or the level of consensus, except for a season with a major mismatch between virological and incidence data timings. Conclusions Thanks to this international web-based Delphi survey, we obtained reproducible, stable and consensual results for the majority of the French influenza epidemic curves analysed. The detailed curves together with the estimates from the Delphi study could be a helpful tool for assessing the performance of statistical outbreak detection methods, in order to optimize them. PMID:24364926

  14. Diagnostic needs for rare diseases and shared prediagnostic phenomena: Results of a German-wide expert Delphi survey

    PubMed Central

    Blöß, Susanne; Klemann, Christian; Rother, Ann-Katrin; Mehmecke, Sandra; Schumacher, Ulrike; Mücke, Urs; Mücke, Martin; Stieber, Christiane; Klawonn, Frank; Kortum, Xiaowei; Lechner, Werner; Grigull, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    Background Worldwide approximately 7,000 rare diseases have been identified. Accordingly, 4 million individuals live with a rare disease in Germany. The mean time to diagnosis is about 6 years and patients receive several incorrect diagnoses during this time. A multiplicity of factors renders diagnosing a rare disease extremely difficult. Detection of shared phenomena among individuals with different rare diseases could assist the diagnostic process. In order to explore the demand for diagnostic support and to obtain the commonalities among patients, a nationwide Delphi survey of centers for rare diseases and patient groups was conducted. Methods A two-step Delphi survey was conducted using web-based technologies in all centers for rare diseases in Germany. Moreover, the leading patient support group, the German foundation for rare diseases (ACHSE), was contacted to involve patients as experts in their disease. In the survey the experts were invited to name rare diseases with special need for diagnostic improvement. Secondly, communal experiences of affected individuals were collected. Results 166 of 474 contacted experts (35%) participated in the first round of the Delphi process and 95 of 166 (57%) participated in the second round. Metabolic (n = 74) and autoimmune diseases (n = 39) were ranked the highest for need for diagnostic support. For three diseases (i.e. scleroderma, Pompe’s disease, and pulmonary arterial hypertension), a crucial need for diagnostic support was explicitly stated. A typical experience of individuals with a rare disease was stigmatization of having psychological or psychosomatic problems. In addition, most experts endured an ‘odyssey’ of seeing many different medical specialists before a correct diagnosis (n = 38) was confirmed. Conclusion There is need for improving the diagnostic process in individuals with rare diseases. Shared experiences in individuals with a rare disease were observed, which could possibly be utilized for

  15. Loss of l(3)mbt leads to acquisition of the ping-pong cycle in Drosophila ovarian somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Tetsutaro; Sato, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Iwasaki, Yuka W.; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C.

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila germ cells, PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are amplified through a PIWI slicer-dependent feed-forward loop termed the ping-pong cycle, yielding secondary piRNAs. However, the detailed mechanism remains poorly understood, largely because an ex vivo model system amenable to biochemical analyses has not been available. Here, we show that CRISPR-mediated loss of function of lethal (3) malignant brain tumor [l(3)mbt] leads to ectopic activation of the germ-specific ping-pong cycle in ovarian somatic cells. Perinuclear foci resembling nuage, the ping-pong center, appeared following l(3)mbt mutation. This activation of the ping-pong machinery in cultured cells will greatly facilitate elucidation of the mechanism underlying secondary piRNA biogenesis in Drosophila. PMID:27474440

  16. Application of RELAP5/MOD3.1 code to the LOFT test L3-6

    SciTech Connect

    Pylev, S.S.; Roginskaja, V.L.

    1998-02-01

    A calculation of LOFT Experiment L3-6, a small break equivalent to a 4-in diameter rupture in the cold leg of a four-loop commercial pressurized water reactor, has been performed to help validate RELAP5/MOD3.1 for this application. The version of the code to be used is SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1.8d0. Three calculations were carried out in order to study the sensitivity to change break nozzle superheated discharge coefficient. Conducted comparative analysis of the LOFT L3-6 experiment shows on the whole a reasonable agreement between calculated data. Some discrepancies in the system pressure do not distort a picture of the transient. 6 refs.

  17. USCA, a codeveloped piece of technology, is presented to Bridges, KSC Director, by Saputo, L-3 Commu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    William Saputo, L-3 Communications, presents a new piece of technology, developed through a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnership with industry, to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Director Roy Bridges, Jr. (second from left). The piece of technology being presented, the Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), is a key component of the codeveloped Automated Data Acquisition System (ADAS) that measures temperature, pressure and vibration at KSC's launch pads. The breakthrough technology is expected to reduce sensor setup and configuration times from hours to seconds. KSC teamed up with Florida's Technological Research and Development Authority and manufacturer L-3 Communications to produce a system that would benefit the aerospace industry and other commercial markets.

  18. Management of Helicobacter pylori infection in Latin America: A Delphi technique-based consensus

    PubMed Central

    Rollan, Antonio; Arab, Juan Pablo; Camargo, M Constanza; Candia, Roberto; Harris, Paul; Ferreccio, Catterina; Rabkin, Charles S; Gana, Juan Cristóbal; Cortés, Pablo; Herrero, Rolando; Durán, Luisa; García, Apolinaria; Toledo, Claudio; Espino, Alberto; Lustig, Nicole; Sarfatis, Alberto; Figueroa, Catalina; Torres, Javier; Riquelme, Arnoldo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To optimize diagnosis and treatment guidelines for this geographic region, a panel of gastroenterologists, epidemiologists, and basic scientists carried out a structured evaluation of available literature. METHODS: Relevant questions were distributed among the experts, who generated draft statements for consideration by the entire panel. A modified three-round Delphi technique method was used to reach consensus. Critical input was also obtained from representatives of the concerned medical community. The quality of the evidence and level of recommendation supporting each statement was graded according to United States Preventive Services Task Force criteria. RESULTS: A group of ten experts was established. The survey included 15 open-ended questions that were distributed among the experts, who assessed the articles associated with each question. The levels of agreement achieved by the panel were 50% in the first round, 73.3% in the second round and 100% in the third round. Main consensus recommendations included: (1) when available, urea breath and stool antigen test (HpSA) should be used for non-invasive diagnosis; (2) detect and eradicate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in all gastroscopy patients to decrease risk of peptic ulcer disease, prevent o retard progression in patients with preneoplastic lesions, and to prevent recurrence in patients treated for gastric cancer; (3) further investigate implementation issues and health outcomes of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer in high-risk populations; (4) prescribe standard 14-d triple therapy or sequential therapy for first-line treatment; (5) routinely assess eradication success post-treatment in clinical settings; and (6) select second- and third-line therapies according to antibiotic susceptibility testing. CONCLUSION: These achievable steps toward better region-specific management can be expected to improve clinical health outcomes. PMID:25152601

  19. Identifying Markers of Dignity-Conserving Care in Long-Term Care: A Modified Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Genevieve N.; McArthur, Jennifer; Doupe, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring that people living in nursing homes (NHs) are afforded with dignity in their daily lives is an essential and humane concern. Promoting dignity-conserving care is fundamentally important. By nature, however, this care is all-encompassing and holistic, and from current knowledge it is challenging to create explicit strategies for measuring dignity-conserving care. In practice the majority of current NH indicators of quality care are derived from information that is routinely collected on NH residents using the RAI-Minimum Data Set (MDS). In this regard, issues that are more tangible to resident dignity such as being treated with respect, compassion, and having opportunities to engage with others are not adequately captured in current NH quality of care indicators. An initial set of markers was created by conducting an integrative literature review of existing markers and indicators of dignity in the NH setting. A modified Delphi process was used to prioritize essential dignity-conserving care markers for use by NH providers, based on factors such as the importance to fostering a culture of dignity, the impact it may have on the residents, and how achievable it is in practice. Through this consensus building technique, we were able to develop a comprehensive set of markers that capture the range and diversity of important dignity-conserving care strategies for use in NHs. The final 10 markers were judged as having high face validity by experts in the field and have explicit implications for enhancing the provision of daily dignified care to NH residents. These markers make an important addition to the traditional quality indicators used in the NH setting and as such, bridge an important gap in addressing the psychosocial and the less easily quantified needs of NH residents. PMID:27304853

  20. Faculty Development for Metro New York City Postdoctoral Dental Program Directors: Delphi Assessment and Program Response.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Marcie S; Millery, Mari; Edelstein, Burton L

    2017-03-01

    Faculty development for dental academicians is essential to cultivate a continuous faculty workforce, retain existing faculty members, enhance their teaching skill sets, and remain responsive to changing program requirements and curricular reforms. To maximize the utility of dental faculty development, it is important to systematically assess and address faculty members' perceived training needs. The aims of this study were to determine priority topics among one group of postdoctoral program directors and to translate those topics into faculty development programs as part of Columbia University's Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-sponsored faculty training program for primary care educators. The study was conducted in 2013-16. A Delphi consensus technique was implemented with three sequential surveys of 26 New York City metropolitan area general, pediatric, and public health dentistry residency program directors. On the first survey, the five respondents (19% response rate) identified 31 topics. On the second survey, 17 respondents (response rate 65%) rated the 15 most important topics. In the third and final round, 19 respondents (73% response rate) ranked teaching research methods and teaching literature reviews as the topics of greatest interest. Overall, the responses highlighted needs for faculty development on teaching research methods, motivating trainees, trainee evaluation, and clinical care assessment. Based on these results, a series of six Faculty Forums was developed and implemented for dental educators in the metropolitan area, starting with the topic of teaching research methods. The process flow used for assessing training needs and developing and evaluating training can be applied to a variety of populations of educators.

  1. Finding consensus on frailty assessment in acute care through Delphi method

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective We seek to address gaps in knowledge and agreement around optimal frailty assessment in the acute medical care setting. Frailty is a common term describing older persons who are at increased risk of developing multimorbidity, disability, institutionalisation and death. Consensus has not been reached on the practical implementation of this concept to assess clinically and manage older persons in the acute care setting. Design Modified Delphi, via electronic questionnaire. Questions included ranking items that best recognise frailty, optimal timing, location and contextual elements of a successful tool. Intraclass correlation coefficients for overall levels of agreement, with consensus and stability tested by 2-way ANOVA with absolute agreement and Fisher's exact test. Participants A panel of national experts (academics, front-line clinicians and specialist charities) were invited to electronic correspondence. Results Variables reflecting accumulated deficit and high resource usage were perceived by participants as the most useful indicators of frailty in the acute care setting. The Acute Medical Unit and Care of the older Persons Ward were perceived as optimum settings for frailty assessment. ‘Clinically meaningful and relevant’, ‘simple (easy to use)’ and ‘accessible by multidisciplinary team’ were perceived as characteristics of a successful frailty assessment tool in the acute care setting. No agreement was reached on optimal timing, number of variables and organisational structures. Conclusions This study is a first step in developing consensus for a clinically relevant frailty assessment model for the acute care setting, providing content validation and illuminating contextual requirements. Testing on clinical data sets is a research priority. PMID:27742633

  2. Stratigraphy, structure, and zonation of large Silurian reef at Delphi, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, A.W.; Bottjer, D.J.; Droste, J.B.; Horowitz, A.S.; Kelly, S.M.; Krisher, D.L.; Shaver, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A Silurian reef complex at Delphi, Indiana, consists of two subcircular reefs occupying an area of about 4 sq mi (10.6 sq km). The reef is more than 400 ft (62 m) thick, has a volume of about 0.15 cu mi (0.64 cu km), and effected as much as 75 ft (23 m) of compaction-induced drape in the overlying Middle Devonian strata. Stratigraphically, the complex extends upward from Salamonie (Middle Silurian) into Salina rocks (Upper Silurian). Growth of the complex proceeded through alternating periods of lateral expansion and restriction as reflected in the cross-sectional geometry of at least one of the reefs. These growth characteristics probably reflect the conditions that led to cyclic deposition of carbonate and evaporite rocks in the Michigan basin during Middle to Late Silurian time. Present dips along reef flanks locally exceed 35/sup 0/ but structural and stratigraphic analyses suggest that original depositional slopes may have been more gentle, that reef tops were never appreciably more than 200 ft (60 m) above the seafloor (although reef thicknesses of several hundred feet were attained before erosion), and that the central parts of the main reef masses were occupied by relatively rigid and volumetrically litle changing structural cores. Biozones include: two central areas of highest organic-framework buildup characterized by corals and stromatoporoids and flanking zones characterized separately by echinodermal and other debris, pentamerid brachiopods, gastropods, and fine debris and chert. The zonal distribution is similar to that already proposed for the large Silurian reef at Monon, Indiana, and somewhat resembles that proposed for the reef at Thornton, Illinois. These similarities and the fact of zonation in itself help to support the conclusion that the often debated Silurian buildups in the Great Lakes area satisfy all but the most rigid definitions of ecologic (organic-framework) reefs. 8 figures, 1 table.

  3. CATALISE: A Multinational and Multidisciplinary Delphi Consensus Study. Identifying Language Impairments in Children.

    PubMed

    Bishop, D V M; Snowling, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul A; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    Delayed or impaired language development is a common developmental concern, yet there is little agreement about the criteria used to identify and classify language impairments in children. Children's language difficulties are at the interface between education, medicine and the allied professions, who may all adopt different approaches to conceptualising them. Our goal in this study was to use an online Delphi technique to see whether it was possible to achieve consensus among professionals on appropriate criteria for identifying children who might benefit from specialist services. We recruited a panel of 59 experts representing ten disciplines (including education, psychology, speech-language therapy/pathology, paediatrics and child psychiatry) from English-speaking countries (Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, United Kingdom and USA). The starting point for round 1 was a set of 46 statements based on articles and commentaries in a special issue of a journal focusing on this topic. Panel members rated each statement for both relevance and validity on a seven-point scale, and added free text comments. These responses were synthesised by the first two authors, who then removed, combined or modified items with a view to improving consensus. The resulting set of statements was returned to the panel for a second evaluation (round 2). Consensus (percentage reporting 'agree' or 'strongly agree') was at least 80 percent for 24 of 27 round 2 statements, though many respondents qualified their response with written comments. These were again synthesised by the first two authors. The resulting consensus statement is reported here, with additional summary of relevant evidence, and a concluding commentary on residual disagreements and gaps in the evidence base.

  4. Therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome: A Delphi technique-based consensus

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Juan P; Claro, Juan C; Arancibia, Juan P; Contreras, Jorge; Gómez, Fernando; Muñoz, Cristian; Nazal, Leyla; Roessler, Eric; Wolff, Rodrigo; Arrese, Marco; Benítez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To propose several alternatives treatment of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS-1) what is the most severe expression of circulatory dysfunction on patients with portal hypertension. METHODS A group of eleven gastroenterologists and nephrologists performed a structured analysis of available literature. Each expert was designated to review and answer a question. They generated draft statements for evaluation by all the experts. Additional input was obtained from medical community. In order to reach consensus, a modified three-round Delphi technique method was used. According to United States Preventive Services Task Force criteria, the quality of the evidence and level of recommendation supporting each statement was graded. RESULTS Nine questions were formulated. The available evidence was evaluated considering its quality, number of patients included in the studies and the consistency of its results. The generated questions were answered by the expert panel with a high level of agreement. Thus, a therapeutic algorithm was generated. The role of terlipressin and norepinephrine was confirmed as the pharmacologic treatment of choice. On the other hand the use of the combination of octreotide, midodrine and albumin without vasoconstrictors was discouraged. The role of several other options was also evaluated and the available evidence was explored and discussed. Liver transplantation is considered the definitive treatment for HRS-1. The present consensus is an important effort that intends to organize the available strategies based on the available evidence in the literature, the quality of the evidence and the benefits, adverse effects and availability of the therapeutic tools described. CONCLUSION Based on the available evidence the expert panel was able to discriminate the most appropriate therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of HRS-1. PMID:27660674

  5. CATALISE: A Multinational and Multidisciplinary Delphi Consensus Study. Identifying Language Impairments in Children

    PubMed Central

    Snowling, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul A.; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    Delayed or impaired language development is a common developmental concern, yet there is little agreement about the criteria used to identify and classify language impairments in children. Children's language difficulties are at the interface between education, medicine and the allied professions, who may all adopt different approaches to conceptualising them. Our goal in this study was to use an online Delphi technique to see whether it was possible to achieve consensus among professionals on appropriate criteria for identifying children who might benefit from specialist services. We recruited a panel of 59 experts representing ten disciplines (including education, psychology, speech-language therapy/pathology, paediatrics and child psychiatry) from English-speaking countries (Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, United Kingdom and USA). The starting point for round 1 was a set of 46 statements based on articles and commentaries in a special issue of a journal focusing on this topic. Panel members rated each statement for both relevance and validity on a seven-point scale, and added free text comments. These responses were synthesised by the first two authors, who then removed, combined or modified items with a view to improving consensus. The resulting set of statements was returned to the panel for a second evaluation (round 2). Consensus (percentage reporting 'agree' or 'strongly agree') was at least 80 percent for 24 of 27 round 2 statements, though many respondents qualified their response with written comments. These were again synthesised by the first two authors. The resulting consensus statement is reported here, with additional summary of relevant evidence, and a concluding commentary on residual disagreements and gaps in the evidence base. PMID:27392128

  6. Quality issues concerning genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing: a European Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Paneque, Milena; Sequeiros, Jorge; Skirton, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Genetic counselling for presymptomatic testing is complex, bringing both ethical and practical questions. There are protocols for counselling but a scarcity of literature regarding quality assessment of such counselling practice. Generic quality assessment tools for genetic services are not specific to presymptomatic testing (PST). Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify aspects of effective counselling practice in PST for late-onset neurological disorders. We used the Delphi method to ascertain the views of relevant European experts in genetic counselling practice, ascertained via published literature and nomination by practitioners. Ethical approval was obtained. Questionnaires were sent electronically to a list of 45 experts, (Medical Doctors, Geneticists, Genetic Counsellors and Genetic Nurses), who each contributed to one to three rounds. In the first round, we provided a list of relevant indicators of quality of practice from a literature review. Experts were requested to evaluate topics in four domains: (a) professional standards; (b) service standards; (c) the consultant's perspective; and (d) protocol standards. We then removed items receiving less than 65% approval and added new issues suggested by experts. The second round was performed for the refinement of issues and the last round was aimed at achieving final consensus on high-standard indicators of quality, for inclusion in the assessment tool. The most relevant indicators were related to (1) consultant-centred practice and (2) advanced counselling and interpersonal skills of professionals. Defined high-standard indicators can be used for the development of a new tool for quality assessment of PST counselling practice. PMID:25689925

  7. Incorporating the Delphi Technique to investigate renewable energy technology transfer in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otaibi, Nasir K.

    Saudi Arabia is a major oil-producing nation facing a rapidly-growing population, high unemployment, climate change, and the depletion of its natural resources, potentially including its oil supply. Technology transfer is regarded as a means to diversify countries' economies beyond their natural resources. This dissertation examined the opportunities and barriers to utilizing technology transfer successfully to build renewable energy resources in Saudi Arabia to diversify the economy beyond oil production. Examples of other developing countries that have successfully used technology transfer to transform their economies are explored, including Japan, Malayasia, and the United Arab Emirates. Brazil is presented as a detailed case study to illustrate its transition to an economy based to a much greater degree than before on renewable energy. Following a pilot study, the Delphi Method was used in this research to gather the opinions of a panel of technology transfer experts consisting of 10 heterogeneous members of different institutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, including aviation, telecommunication, oil industry, education, health systems, and military and governmental organizations. In three rounds of questioning, the experts identified Education, Dependence on Oil, and Manpower as the 3 most significant factors influencing the potential for success of renewable energy technology transfer for Saudi Arabia. Political factors were also rated toward the "Very Important" end of a Likert scale and were discussed as they impact Education, Oil Dependence, and Manpower. The experts' opinions are presented and interpreted. They form the basis for recommended future research and discussion of how in light of its political system and its dependence on oil, Saudi Arabia can realistically move forward on renewable energy technology transfer and secure its economic future.

  8. Determining an Imaging Literacy Curriculum for Radiation Oncologists: An International Delphi Study

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, Meredith E.; Gillan, Caitlin; Milne, Robin A.; Uchino, Minako; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Catton, Pamela

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Rapid evolution of imaging technologies and their integration into radiation therapy practice demands that radiation oncology (RO) training curricula be updated. The purpose of this study was to develop an entry-to-practice image literacy competency profile. Methods and Materials: A list of 263 potential imaging competency items were assembled from international objectives of training. Expert panel eliminated redundant or irrelevant items to create a list of 97 unique potential competency items. An international 2-round Delphi process was conducted with experts in RO. In round 1, all experts scored, on a 9-point Likert scale, the degree to which they agreed an item should be included in the competency profile. Items with a mean score ≥7 were included, those 4 to 6 were reviewed in round 2, and items scored <4 were excluded. In round 2, items were discussed and subsequently ranked for inclusion or exclusion in the competency profile. Items with >75% voting for inclusion were included in the final competency profile. Results: Forty-nine radiation oncologists were invited to participate in round 1, and 32 (65%) did so. Participants represented 24 centers in 6 countries. Of the 97 items ranked in round 1, 80 had a mean score ≥7, 1 item had a score <4, and 16 items with a mean score of 4 to 6 were reviewed and rescored in round 2. In round 2, 4 items had >75% of participants voting for inclusion and were included; the remaining 12 were excluded. The final list of 84 items formed the final competency profile. The 84 enabling competency items were aggregated into the following 4 thematic groups of key competencies: (1) imaging fundamentals (42 items); (2) clinical application (27 items); (3) clinical management (5 items); and (4) professional practice (10 items). Conclusions: We present an imaging literacy competency profile which could constitute the minimum training standards in radiation oncology residency programs.

  9. A modified Delphi approach to standardize low back pain recurrence terminology.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Tasha R; Latimer, Jane; Maher, Chris G; Hancock, Mark J

    2011-05-01

    Lack of standardization of terminology in low back pain (LBP) research has significantly impeded progress in this area. The diversity in existing definitions for a 'recurrence of an episode of LBP' and 'recurrent LBP' is an important example. The variety of definitions used by researchers working in this area has prevented comparison of results between trials and made meta-analyses of this data unfeasible. The aim of this study was to use a modified Delphi approach to gain consensus on definitions for a 'recurrence of an episode of LBP' (e.g. outcome event) and for 'recurrent LBP' (e.g. patient population). Existing definitions for both constructs were classified into the main features comprising the definition (e.g. 'duration of pain') and the items that defined each feature (e.g. 'pain lasting at least 24 h'). In each round, participants were asked to rate the importance of each feature to a definition of a 'recurrence of an episode of LBP', and a definition of 'recurrent LBP' and rank the items (defining each feature) in order of decreasing importance. Forty-six experts in LBP research, from nine different countries, participated in this study. Four rounds were completed with responses rates of 94, 91, 83, and 97% in rounds 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Consensus definitions were reached in both areas with 95% of panel members supporting the definition of a 'recurrence of an episode of LBP' and 92% of panel members supporting the definition of 'recurrent LBP'. Future research is necessary to evaluate these definitions.

  10. Common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) bycatch in New Zealand commercial trawl fisheries.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Finlay N; Abraham, Edward R; Berkenbusch, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammals are regularly reported as bycatch in commercial and artisanal fisheries, but data are often insufficient to allow assessment of these incidental mortalities. Observer coverage of the mackerel trawl fishery in New Zealand waters between 1995 and 2011 allowed evaluation of common dolphin Delphinus delphis bycatch on the North Island west coast, where this species is the most frequently caught cetacean. Observer data were used to develop a statistical model to estimate total captures and explore covariates related to captures. A two-stage Bayesian hurdle model was used, with a logistic generalised linear model predicting whether any common dolphin captures occurred on a given tow of the net, and a zero-truncated Poisson distribution to estimate the number of dolphin captures, given that there was a capture event. Over the 16-year study period, there were 119 common dolphin captures reported on 4299 observed tows. Capture events frequently involved more than one individual, with a maximum of nine common dolphin observed caught in a single tow. There was a peak of 141 estimated common dolphin captures (95% c.i.: 56 to 276; 6.27 captures per 100 tows) in 2002-03, following the marked expansion in annual effort in this fishery to over 2000 tows. Subsequently, the number of captures fluctuated although fishing effort remained relatively high. Of the observed capture events, 60% were during trawls where the top of the net (headline) was <40 m below the surface, and the model determined that this covariate best explained common dolphin captures. Increasing headline depth by 21 m would halve the probability of a dolphin capture event on a tow. While lack of abundance data prevents assessment of the impact of these mortalities on the local common dolphin population, a clear recommendation from this study is the increasing of headline depth to reduce common dolphin captures.

  11. Practice patterns in venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in thoracic surgery: a comprehensive Canadian Delphi survey

    PubMed Central

    Agzarian, John; Linkins, Lori-Ann; Schneider, Laura; Hanna, Waël C.; Finley, Christian J.; Schieman, Colin; De Perrot, Marc; Crowther, Mark; Douketis, James

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) after resection of thoracic malignancies can reach 15%, but prophylaxis guidelines are yet to be established. We aimed to survey Canadian practitioners regarding perioperative risk factors for VTE, impact of those factors on extended prophylaxis selection, type of preferred prophylaxis, and timing of initiation and duration of thromboprophylaxis. Methods A modified Delphi survey was undertaken over three rounds with thoracic surgeons, thoracic anesthesiologists and thrombosis experts across Canada. Participants were asked to rate each parameter on a ten-point scale. Agreement was determined a priori as an item reaching a coefficient of variation of ≤30% (0.3), with the item then discontinued from later rounds. Results In total, 72, 57 and 50 respondents participated in three consecutive rounds, respectively. Consensus was reached on previous VTE, age, cancer diagnosis, thrombophilia, poor mobilization, extended resections, and pre-operative chemotherapy as risk factors. Consensus on risk factors impacting extended prophylaxis decisions was achieved on cancer diagnosis, obesity, previous VTE and poor mobilization. With respect to perioperative prophylaxis, once daily low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was the only parameter that demonstrated agreement as a common practice pattern. No agreement was achieved regarding the role of mechanical prophylaxis, unfractionated heparin (UFH) or timing of initiation of peri-operative treatment. VTE prophylaxis until discharge reached agreement but there was substantial variability regarding the role of extended prophylaxis. Conclusions There is agreement between Canadian clinicians treating patients with thoracic malignancies regarding most risk factors for VTE, but there is no agreement on timing of initiation of prophylaxis, the agents used or factors mandating usage of extended prophylaxis. PMID:28203409

  12. Development of Health Equity Indicators in Primary Health Care Organizations Using a Modified Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sabrina T.; Browne, Annette J.; Varcoe, Colleen; Lavoie, Josée; Fridkin, Alycia; Smye, Victoria; Godwin, Olive; Tu, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a core set of indicators that could be used for measuring and monitoring the performance of primary health care organizations' capacity and strategies for enhancing equity-oriented care. Methods Indicators were constructed based on a review of the literature and a thematic analysis of interview data with patients and staff (n = 114) using procedures for qualitatively derived data. We used a modified Delphi process where the indicators were circulated to staff at the Health Centers who served as participants (n = 63) over two rounds. Indicators were considered part of a priority set of health equity indicators if they received an overall importance rating of>8.0, on a scale of 1–9, where a higher score meant more importance. Results Seventeen indicators make up the priority set. Items were eliminated because they were rated as low importance (<8.0) in both rounds and were either redundant or more than one participant commented that taking action on the indicator was highly unlikely. In order to achieve health care equity, performance at the organizational level is as important as assessing the performance of staff. Two of the highest rated “treatment” or processes of care indicators reflects the need for culturally safe and trauma and violence-informed care. There are four indicators that can be used to measure outcomes which can be directly attributable to equity responsive primary health care. Discussion These indicators and subsequent development of items can be used to measure equity in the domains of treatment and outcomes. These areas represent targets for higher performance in relation to equity for organizations (e.g., funding allocations to ongoing training in equity-oriented care provision) and providers (e.g., reflexive practice, skill in working with the health effects of trauma). PMID:25478914

  13. The prospects for hybrid electric vehicles, 2005-2020 : results of a Delphi Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, H. K.; Santini, D. J.; Vyas, A. D.

    1999-07-22

    The introduction of Toyota's hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), the Prius, in Japan has generated considerable interest in HEV technology among US automotive experts. In a follow-up survey to Argonne National Laboratory's two-stage Delphi Study on electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) during 1994-1996, Argonne researchers gathered the latest opinions of automotive experts on the future ''top-selling'' HEV attributes and costs. The experts predicted that HEVs would have a spark-ignition gasoline engine as a power plant in 2005 and a fuel cell power plant by 2020. The projected 2020 fuel shares were about equal for gasoline and hydrogen, with methanol a distant third. In 2020, HEVs are predicted to have series-drive, moderate battery-alone range and cost significantly more than conventional vehicles (CVs). The HEV is projected to cost 66% more than a $20,000 CV initially and 33% more by 2020. Survey respondents view batteries as the component that contributes the most to the HEV cost increment. The mean projection for battery-alone range is 49 km in 2005, 70 km in 2010, and 92 km in 2020. Responding to a question relating to their personal vision of the most desirable HEV and its likely characteristics when introduced in the US market in the next decade, the experts predicted their ''vision'' HEV to have attributes very similar to those of the ''top-selling'' HEV. However, the ''vision'' HEV would cost significantly less. The experts projected attributes of three leading batteries for HEVs and projected acceleration times on battery power alone. The resulting battery packs are evaluated, and their initial and replacement costs are analyzed. These and several other opinions are summarized.

  14. International perspective on common core competencies for occupational physicians: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Lalloo, Drushca; Demou, Evangelia; Kiran, Sibel; Cloeren, Marianne; Mendes, René; Macdonald, Ewan B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The competencies required of occupational physicians (OPs) have been the subject of peer-reviewed research in Europe and individual countries around the world. In the European Union (EU), there has been development of guidance on training and common competencies, but little research has extended beyond this. The aim of this study was to obtain consensus on and identify the common core competencies required of OPs around the world. Methods A modified Delphi study was carried out among representative organisations and networks of OPs in a range of countries around the world. It was conducted in 2 rounds using a questionnaire based on the specialist training syllabus of a number of countries, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Responses were received from 51 countries around the world, with the majority from Europe (60%; 59%) and North and South America (24%; 32%) in rounds 1 and 2, respectively. General principles of assessment and management of occupational hazards to health and good clinical care were jointly considered most important in ranking when compared with the other topic areas. Assessment of disability and fitness for work, communication skills and legal and ethical issues completed the top five. In both rounds, research methods and teaching and educational supervision were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established the current priorities among OPs across 51 countries of the common competencies required for occupational health (OH) practice. These findings can serve as a platform for the development of common core competencies/qualifications within specific geographical regions or internationally. This is particularly pertinent with globalisation of commerce and free movement within the EU. PMID:27076063

  15. Delphi Method Validation of a Procedural Performance Checklist for Insertion of an Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Central Line.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Nicholas; Wittler, Mary; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David

    2016-01-01

    Placement of ultrasound-guided central lines is a critical skill for physicians in several specialties. Improving the quality of care delivered surrounding this procedure demands rigorous measurement of competency, and validated tools to assess performance are essential. Using the iterative, modified Delphi technique and experts in multiple disciplines across the United States, the study team created a 30-item checklist designed to assess competency in the placement of ultrasound-guided internal jugular central lines. Cronbach α was .94, indicating an excellent degree of internal consistency. Further validation of this checklist will require its implementation in simulated and clinical environments.

  16. Search for Pentaquarks in the Hadronic Decays of the Z Boson with the DELPHI Detector at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gavillet, Ph.

    2006-02-11

    Recent evidence for pentaquark states has been published, in particular for a strange pentaquark {theta}+(1540), for a double-strange state called {xi}(1862)-- and for a charmed state {theta}c(3100)0. Such states should be produced in e+e- annihilations in Z decays. In this paper a search for pentaquarks using the DELPHI detector is described. Preliminary upper limits at 95% C.L. are set on the production rates per Z decay of such particles and their charge-conjugate state.

  17. A Novel Biosurfactant Produced by Aureobasidium pullulans L3-GPY from a Tiger Lily Wild Flower, Lilium lancifolium Thunb.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Shik; Lee, In Kyoung; Yun, Bong Sik

    2015-01-01

    Yeast biosurfactants are important biotechnological products in the food industry, and they have medical and cosmeceutical applications owing to their specific modes of action, low toxicity, and applicability. Thus, we have isolated and examined biosurfactant-producing yeast for various industrial and medical applications. A rapid and simple method was developed to screen biosurfactant-producing yeasts for high production of eco-friendly biosurfactants. Using this method, several potential niches of biosurfactant-producing yeasts, such as wild flowers, were investigated. We successfully selected a yeast strain, L3-GPY, with potent surfactant activity from a tiger lily, Lilium lancifolium Thunb. Here, we report the first identification of strain L3-GPY as the black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans. In addition, we isolated a new low-surface-tension chemical, designated glycerol-liamocin, from the culture supernatant of strain L3-GPY through consecutive chromatography steps, involving an ODS column, solvent partition, silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, and an ODS Sep-Pak cartridge column. The chemical structure of glycerol-liamocin, determined by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, indicates that it is a novel compound with the molecular formula C33H62O12. Furthermore, glycerol-liamocin exhibited potent biosurfactant activity (31 mN/m). These results suggest that glycerol-liamocin is a potential novel biosurfactantfor use in various industrial applications. PMID:25849549

  18. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mailliot, Justine; de Loubresse, Nicolas Garreau; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D.; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a “WT-like” configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome. PMID:26906928

  19. Ribosomal protein L3 bound to 23S precursor rRNA stimulates its maturation by Mini-III ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Redko, Yulia; Condon, Ciarán

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are processed from larger primary transcripts in every living system known. The maturation of 23S rRNA in Bacillus subtilis is catalysed by Mini-III, a member of the RNase III family of enzymes that lacks the characteristic double-stranded RNA binding domain of its relatives. We have previously shown that Mini-III processing of 23S precursor rRNA in assembled 50S ribosomal subunits is much more efficient than a substrate with no ribosomal proteins bound, suggesting that one or more large subunit proteins act as a cofactor for Mini-III cleavage. Here we show that this cofactor is ribosomal protein L3. Stimulation of the Mini-III cleavage reaction is through L3 binding to its normal site at the 3' end of 23S rRNA. We present indirect evidence that suggests that L3 acts at the level of substrate, rather than enzyme conformation. We also discuss the potential implication of using ribosomal protein cofactors in rRNA processing for ribosome quality control.

  20. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mailliot, Justine; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a "WT-like" configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome.