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Sample records for alert area southeastern

  1. 12. DETAIL OF ALERT TUNNELS ALONG SOUTHWEST SIDE ELEVATION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF ALERT TUNNELS ALONG SOUTHWEST SIDE ELEVATION OF BUILDING 8970 (CREW READINESS BUILDING). - Loring Air Force Base, Alert Area, Southeastern portion of base, east of southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  2. 1. VIEW OF NORTH END OF STRUCTURE NO. 540 (ALERT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF NORTH END OF STRUCTURE NO. 540 (ALERT AIRCRAFT PARKING APRON) LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM ROOF OF CREW READINESS BUILDING (BUILDING 8970). - Loring Air Force Base, Alert Area, Southeastern portion of base, east of southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  3. 2. VIEW OF SOUTH END OF STRUCTURE NO. 540 (ALERT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF SOUTH END OF STRUCTURE NO. 540 (ALERT AIRCRAFT PARKING APRON) LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE MASTER SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL TOWER (BUILDING 8990) WITH CREW READINESS BUILDING (BUILDING 8970) IN BACKGROUND. - Loring Air Force Base, Alert Area, Southeastern portion of base, east of southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  4. Pesticide residues in agricultural drains, southeastern desert area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eccles, Lawrence A.

    1979-01-01

    A study is being made to determine the occurrence and distribution of pesticides in the agricultural drains for approximately 3/4 million irrigated acres in the southeastern desert area of California. This report describes the results of the first year of sampling and analyzing (1) water in the drains , (2) bed material in the drains, (3) water from field tile-drainage lines, and (4) irrigation tailwater and water in the drains directly exposed to drift from aerial application of pesticides. Residues of almost all the pesticides selected for monitoring were found in water in the drains. Examination of the data to determine the probable source of pesticides indicated generally slight concentrations from bed material in the drains, usually no detectable concentrations from field tile-drainage lines, and apparently large concentrations from irrigation tailwater and drift from aerial application. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Socio-economic benefits from protected areas in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Heagney, E C; Kovac, M; Fountain, J; Conner, N

    2015-12-01

    International case studies of protected area performance increasingly report that conservation and socio-economic outcomes are interdependent. Effective conservation requires support and cooperation from local governments and communities, which in turn requires that protected areas contribute to the economic well-being of the communities in which they are sited. Despite increasing recognition of their importance, robust studies that document the socio-economic impacts of protected areas are rare, especially in the developed world context. We proposed 3 potential pathways through which protected areas might benefit local communities in the developed world: the improved local housing value, local business stimulus, and increased local funding pathways. We examined these pathways by undertaking a statistical longitudinal analysis of 110 regional and rural communities covering an area of approximately 600,000 km(2) in southeastern Australia. We compared trends in 10 socio-economic indicators describing employment, income, housing, business development and local government revenue from 2000 to 2010. New protected areas acquisitions led to an increased number of new dwelling approvals and associated developer contributions, increased local business numbers, and increased local government revenue from user-pays services and grants. Longer-term effects of established protected areas included increased local council revenue from a variety of sources. Our findings provide support for each of our 3 proposed benefit pathways and contribute new insights into the cycling of benefits from protected areas through the economy over time. The business and legislative models in our study are typical of those operating in many other developed countries; thus, the benefit pathways reported in our study are likely to be generalizable. By identifying and communicating socio-economic benefits from terrestrial protected areas in a developed world context, our findings represent an important

  6. Alcohol Alert

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  7. Providing accurate near real-time fire alerts for Protected Areas through NASA FIRMS: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilavajhala, S.; Davies, D.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Wong, M.; Murphy, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) is at the forefront of providing global near real-time (NRT) MODIS thermal anomalies / hotspot location data to end-users . FIRMS serves the data via an interactive Web GIS named Web Fire Mapper, downloads of NRT active fire, archive data downloads for MODIS hotspots dating back to 1999 and a hotspot email alert system The FIRMS Email Alerts system has been successfully alerting users of fires in their area of interest in near real-time and/or via daily and weekly email summaries, with an option to receive MODIS hotspot data as a text file (CSV) attachment. Currently, there are more than 7000 email alert subscriptions from more than 100 countries. Specifically, the email alerts system is designed to generate and send an email alert for any region or area on the globe, with a special focus on providing alerts for protected areas worldwide. For many protected areas, email alerts are particularly useful for early fire detection, monitoring on going fires, as well as allocating resources to protect wildlife and natural resources of particular value. For protected areas, FIRMS uses the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) supplied by United Nations Environment Program - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC). Maintaining the most up-to-date, accurate boundary geometry for the protected areas for the email alerts is a challenge as the WDPA is continuously updated due to changing boundaries, merging or delisting of certain protected areas. Because of this dynamic nature of the protected areas database, the FIRMS protected areas database is frequently out-of-date with the most current version of WDPA database. To maintain the most up-to-date boundary information for protected areas and to be in compliance with the WDPA terms and conditions, FIRMS needs to constantly update its database of protected areas. Currently, FIRMS strives to keep its database up to date by downloading the most recent

  8. Flood warnings in coastal areas: how do social and behavioural patterns influence alert services?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescaroli, G.; Magni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies discuss the economic and technical aspects of flood warnings. Less attention has been given to the social and psychological patterns that affect alert services. In particular, the literature focuses on warnings activated in river basins or marine environments without providing clear evidence of relevance to Mediterranean coastal areas, even though these are subjected to growing flood risk related to climate change. This paper is a first attempt to bridge this gap. Our research develops an in- depth analysis of the village of Cesenatico on the Adriatic Sea coast. Here the municipality adopted two complementary warning systems: a siren and an alert via Short Message Service (SMS). The analysis focuses on a survey conducted in 2011 and 2012 with 228 participants. The relationships between social and behavioural variables and warning services are investigated, and so are flood preparedness and information dissemination. Qualitative evidence from informal interviews is used to support the understanding of key responses. The conclusions show how different social and behavioural patterns can influence the effectiveness and use of warning systems, regardless of the technology adopted and the structural mitigation measures implemented. Education, training and accountability are seen to be critical elements for improvement. Finally, the statistical output is used to suggest new questions and new directions for research.

  9. Flood warnings in coastal areas: how do experience and information influence responses to alert services?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescaroli, G.; Magni, M.

    2015-04-01

    Many studies discuss the economic and technical aspects of flood warnings. Less attention has been given to the social and behavioural patterns that affect alert services. In particular, the literature focuses on warnings activated in river basins or marine environments without providing clear evidence on Mediterranean coastal areas, even though these are subjected to growing flood risk related to climate change. This paper is a first attempt to bridge this gap. Our research develops an in-depth analysis of the village of Cesenatico on the Adriatic Sea coast. Here the municipality adopted two complementary warning systems: a siren and an alert via short message service (SMS). The analysis focuses on a survey conducted in 2011 and 2012 with 228 participants. The relationships between social and behavioural variables and warning services are investigated as well as flood preparedness and information dissemination. Qualitative evidence from informal interviews is used to support the understanding of key responses. The conclusions show how different social and behavioural patterns can influence the effectiveness and use of warning systems, regardless of the technology adopted and the structural mitigation measures implemented. Education, training and accountability are seen to be critical elements for implementation. Finally, the statistical output is used to suggest new questions and new directions for research.

  10. Natural radionuclide analysis in chattarpur area of southeastern coastal area of Odisha, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautela, Bhagwat; Gusain, Gurupad; Yadav, Manjulata; Sahoo, Sarat; Tokonami, Shinji; Ramola, Rakesh

    2013-08-01

    The energy released in a spontaneous decay process of natural radionuclides is the main source of the total radiation dose to human beings. Natural radionuclides are widely distributed in soil, rocks, air, and groundwater. In present investigation, the analysis of terrestrial radionuclides such as 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K in soil and sand of Chattarpur area of southeastern coast of Odisha has been carried out using NaI(Tl) gamma ray detector. The higher activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides have been reported from the study area. The gamma radiationdose originating from the terrestrial radionuclides was found to vary from 95 to 1813 nGy/h with an average of 700 nGy/h. This study is important to generate a baseline data of radiation exposure in the area. Health hazard effects due to natural radiation exposure are discussed in details.

  11. SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE, FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE, AND THE BLAZAR SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sambruna, R. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Maraschi, L.

    2010-02-10

    Using public Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and Swift Burst Alert Telescope observations, we constructed the first sample of blazars selected at both hard X-rays and gamma rays. Studying its spectral properties, we find a luminosity dependence of the spectral slopes at both energies. Specifically, luminous blazars, generally classified as flat spectrum radio quasars, have hard continua in the medium-hard X-ray range but soft continua in the LAT gamma-ray range (photon indices GAMMA{sub X} {approx}< 2 and GAMMA{sub G} {approx}> 2), while lower luminosity blazars, classified as BL Lacs, have opposite behavior, i.e., soft X-ray and hard gamma-ray continua (GAMMA{sub X} {approx}> 2.4 and GAMMA{sub G} < 2). The trends are confirmed by detailed Monte Carlo simulations explicitly taking into account the observational biases of both instruments. Our results support the so-called blazar sequence which was originally based on radio samples of blazars and radio luminosities. We also argue that the X-ray-to-gamma-ray continua of blazars may provide independent insights into the physical conditions around the jet, complementing/superseding the ambiguities of the traditional classification based on optical properties.

  12. Language and Area Studies: East Central and Southeastern Europe. A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelavich, Charles, Ed.

    East Central and Southeastern Europe, considered as "Eastern Eruope," are the subject of a three-year survey of language and area studies undertaken by several committees of specialists of the American Council of Learned Societies. Four basic goals of the project include: (1) a survey of graduate training and research needs, (2) an evaluation of…

  13. 76 FR 21620 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... February 9, 2011 (76 FR 7119). Copies of the proposed rule were also mailed or sent via facsimile to all... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California... rule increases the assessment rate established for the California Desert Grape Administrative...

  14. 78 FR 28147 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...This proposed rule would increase the assessment rate established for the California Desert Grape Administrative Committee (Committee) for the 2013 and subsequent fiscal periods from $0.0150 to $0.0165 per 18-pound lug of grapes handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order that regulates the handling of grapes grown in a designated area of southeastern California. Assessments......

  15. 78 FR 39548 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... concerning this action was published in the Federal Register on May 14, 2013 (78 FR 28147). Copies of the... requirements and duplication by industry and public sector agencies. AMS is committed to complying with the E... in a designated area of southeastern California. Dated: June 25, 2013. Rex A. Barnes,...

  16. Malaria Situation in an Endemic Area, Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Sajjad; Vatandoost, Hassan; Daryanavard, Ali; Shahi, Mehran; Safari, Reza; Raeisi, Ahmad; Omar, Abdiqani Sheikh; Sharif, Mohammad; Azizi, Abdollah; Ali, Aref Ahmad; Nasser, Aboud; Hasaballah, Ibrahim; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malaria is an endemic infectious disease in southeastern parts of Iran. Despite years of efforts and intervention programs against malaria, transmission still occurs in Jask County. Methods: The epidemiological perspective of malaria in Jask County was conducted by gathering data from Jask County health center, during 2006–2010. A knowledge, attitude and practice study was also carried out. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS ver. 11.5. Results: A total of 2875 malaria cases were recorded, with highest and lowest numbers in 2007 and 2010, respectively. The number of cases had a decreasing trend from 1022 cases in 2006 to 114 cases in 2010. The main causative parasitic agent was Plasmodium vivax. Blood examination rate and slide positive rate were also decreased from 39.5% and 4.3% in 2006 to 15.6% and 1.4% in 2010, respectively. Most of people interviewed in the KAP study had a good knowledge about malaria transmission and symptoms but their use of the bed net for prevention was low (35%). Conclusion: Malaria incidence had significant reduction during the study years. The main reason for this may be due to changing environmental condition for Anopheline breeding and survival because of drought. Another reason may be integration of vector management by using long lasting insecticide treated bed nets, active case detection and treatment by implementation of mobile teams and increasing in financial sources of malaria control program. Knowledge, attitude and practice of people were good in malaria control and prevention, but needs to do more activities for health education and awareness. PMID:25629068

  17. Fusulinid marble from Wadi Heimur area, Southeastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abd-Elmohsen A.

    The discovery of Fusulina in the graphitic marble of Wadi Heimur area, located east of Lake Nasser has verified the Carboniferous age previously given by Ahmed and Mahmoud (1984) and Ahmed (1987) for the foraminiferal marble bands of the folded eugeosynclinal sequence outcropping in the Eastern Desert of Egypt.

  18. With Free Google Alert Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Alert services are a great way of keeping abreast of topics that interest you. Rather than searching the Web regularly to find new content about your areas of interest, an alert service keeps you informed by sending you notices when new material is added to the Web that matches your registered search criteria. Alert services are examples of push…

  19. Characteristics of Microearthquakes in the Southeastern Area of the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kang, T.

    2013-12-01

    We installed a temporary seismograph network which is consisted of 20 broadband seismic stations in the vicinity of Ulsan and Gyeongju to study the characteristics of microseismicity in the southeastern area of the Korean Peninsula. During the period from September 2011 to February 2013, we observed the seismicity occurred in the study area. As the result of automated process, a total of 1202 events were triggered initially. Then a set of 850 events occurred in the study area only was chosen for further analysis. This data set includes events from artificial source as well as those from natural sources, so the discrimination of events between artificial and natural sources was performed. Hourly variation of event distribution was considered to confirm the amount of the events in daytime because most of quarry blasts is performed in the time. Every event was classified into either a set of natural events or that of artificial events throughout checking all the waveforms by eye inspection. The discrimination results indicate about 70 percent artificial events of all triggered events, resulting in about 250 natural events. Most of the events classified into artificial sources were occurred in daytime, while natural events were evenly scattered in overall hours. The epicenter of the natural events is located predominantly in the southeastern area of Gyeongju and the northern area of Ulsan. we relocated these events using Velellipse location algorithm. The relocated events are distributed densely in the northeastern area of the so-called Ulsan fault. Focal mechanism analysis was performed for the relocated events, which explain a complex of various faulting senses with couple of strike-slip and dip-slip component. The pressure axes with the east-west direction in the focal mechanisms are compatible with the predominant stress field in the southeastern Korean Peninsula. Combination of the results of seismic analyses with the neotectonic features indicates that

  20. Determine utility of ERTS-1 to detect and monitor area strip mining and reclamation. [southeastern Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. H. (Principal Investigator); Pettyjohn, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Computer techniques were applied to process ERTS tapes acquired over coal mining operations in southeastern Ohio on 21 August 1972 and 3 September 1973. ERTS products obtained included geometrically correct map overlays showing stripped earth, partially reclaimed earth, water, and natural vegetation. Computer-generated tables listing the area covered by each land-water category in square kilometers and acres were produced. By comparing these mapping products, the study demonstrates the capability of ERTS to monitor changes in the extent of stripping, success of reclamation, and the secondary effects of mining on the environment.

  1. Real-time earthquake alert system for the greater San Francisco Bay Area: a prototype design to address operational issues

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.; Jarpe, S.; Hunter, S.

    1996-12-10

    The purpose of the earthquake alert system (EAS) is to outrun the seismic energy released in a large earthquake using a geographically distributed network of strong motion sensors that telemeter data to a rapid CPU-processing station, which then issues an area-wide warning to a region before strong motion will occur. The warning times involved are short, from 0 to 30 seconds or so; consequently, most responses must be automated. The San Francisco Bay Area is particularly well suited for an EAS because (1) large earthquakes have relatively shallow hypocenters (10- to 20-kilometer depth), giving favorable ray-path geometries for larger warning times than deeper from earthquakes, and (2) the active faults are few in number and well characterized, which means far fewer geographically distributed strong motion sensors are (about 50 in this region). An EAS prototype is being implemented in the San Francisco Bay Area. The system consists of four distinct subsystems: (1) a distributed strong motion seismic network, (2) a central processing station, (3) a warning communications system and (4) user receiver and response systems. We have designed a simple, reliable, and inexpensive strong motion monitoring station that consists of a three-component Analog Devices ADXLO5 accelerometer sensing unit, a vertical component weak motion sensor for system testing, a 16-bit digitizer with multiplexing, and communication output ports for RS232 modem or radio telemetry. The unit is battery-powered and will be sited in fire stations. The prototype central computer analysis system consists of a PC dam-acquisition platform that pipes the incoming strong motion data via Ethernet to Unix-based workstations for dam processing. Simple real-time algorithms, particularly for magnitude estimation, are implemented to give estimates of the time since the earthquake`s onset its hypocenter location, its magnitude, and the reliability of the estimate. These parameters are calculated and transmitted

  2. System designed for issuing landslide alerts in the San Francisco Bay area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finley, D.

    1987-01-01

    A system for forecasting landslides during major storms has been developed for the San Francisco Bay area by the U.S Geological Survey and was successfully tested during heavy storms in the bay area during February 1986. Based on the forecasts provided by the USGS, the National Weather Service (NWS) included landslide warnings in its regular weather forecasts or in special weather statements transmitted to local radio and television stations and other news media. USGS scientists said the landslide forecasting and warning system for the San Francisco Bay area can be used as a prototype in developing similar systems for other parts of the Nation susceptible to landsliding. Studies show damage from landslides in the United States averages an estimated $1.5 billion per year. 

  3. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Montezuma Creek-Aneth area, southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumsion, C.T.

    1975-01-01

    The Montezuma Creek-Aneth area is in the northeastern part of the Navajo Indian Reservation in southeastern Utah. It is a semiarid area along the San Juan River near the communities of Montezuma Creek and Aneth. Within the Blanding Basin, geologic formations exposed are of Jurassic and Quaternary age. The rock strata are nearly horizontal, dipping gently northeastward. Wells derive small quantities of mater for domestic use from aquifers in the Morrison Formation and the Bluff Sandstone of Jurassic age, but aquifers in deeper formations contain saline mater or brine. Alluvium consisting of sand and gravel along the San Juan River is a potential source of additional moderately large quantities of water to shallow wells for industrial use and public supply. The chemical quality of water in the alluvium is good and varies directly with the discharge of the San Juan River.

  4. Potash ore reserves in the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant area, Eddy County, southeastern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, Charles B.; Cheeseman, R.J.; Lorenz, J.C.; Millgate, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    The proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area includes about 18,960 acres in Tps. 22 and 23 S., Rs. 30 and 31 E., New Mexico Principal Meridian, Eddy County, southeastern New Mexico. It is located within the Carlsbad Mining District about 25 miles east of Carlsbad. The WIPP area is immediately south of the Capitan Limestone subcrop, which formed the northern margin of the Delaware basin in Permian time. During Late Permian (Ochoan) time, gypsum, anhydrite, and halite were deposited in the seas of the Delaware basin to form the Castile Formation. These deposits have a maximum thickness of about 2,000 feet and grade upward into the more argillaceous beds of the Salado Formation. The Salado Formation contains abundant sulfate minerals, notably anhydrite and polyhalite. The potash ore minerals, langbeinite and sylvite, occur in the upper part of the Salado Formation in the McNutt potash zone, a local name applied to a potassium-rich zone.

  5. Timing constraints on remote sensing of wildland fire burned area in the southeastern US

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picotte, J.J.; Robertson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery is increasingly used for mapping wildland fire burned area and burn severity, owing to its frequency of collection, relatively high resolution, and availability free of charge. However, rapid response of vegetation following fire and frequent cloud cover pose challenges to this approach in the southeastern US. We assessed these timing constraints by using a series of Landsat TM images to determine how rapidly the remotely sensed burn scar signature fades following prescribed burns in wet flatwoods and depression swamp community types in the Apalachicola National Forest, Florida, USA during 2006. We used both the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) of reflectance bands sensitive to vegetation and exposed soil cover, as well as the change in NBR from before to after fire (dNBR), to estimate burned area. We also determined the average and maximum amount of time following fire required to obtain a cloud-free image for burns in each month of the year, as well as the predicted effect of this time lag on percent accuracy of burn scar estimates. Using both NBR and dNBR, the detectable area decreased linearly 9% per month on average over the first four months following fire. Our findings suggest that the NBR and dNBR methods for monitoring burned area in common southeastern US vegetation community types are limited to an average of 78-90% accuracy among months of the year, with individual burns having values as low as 38%, if restricted to use of Landsat 5 TM imagery. However, the majority of burns can still be mapped at accuracies similar to those in other regions of the US, and access to additional sources of satellite imagery would improve overall accuracy. ?? 2011 by the authors.

  6. Timing constraints on remote sensing of wildland fire burned area in the southeastern US

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picotte, Joshua J.; Robertson, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery is increasingly used for mapping wildland fire burned area and burn severity, owing to its frequency of collection, relatively high resolution, and availability free of charge. However, rapid response of vegetation following fire and frequent cloud cover pose challenges to this approach in the southeastern US. We assessed these timing constraints by using a series of Landsat TM images to determine how rapidly the remotely sensed burn scar signature fades following prescribed burns in wet flatwoods and depression swamp community types in the Apalachicola National Forest, Florida, USA during 2006. We used both the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) of reflectance bands sensitive to vegetation and exposed soil cover, as well as the change in NBR from before to after fire (dNBR), to estimate burned area. We also determined the average and maximum amount of time following fire required to obtain a cloud-free image for burns in each month of the year, as well as the predicted effect of this time lag on percent accuracy of burn scar estimates. Using both NBR and dNBR, the detectable area decreased linearly 9% per month on average over the first four months following fire. Our findings suggest that the NBR and dNBR methods for monitoring burned area in common southeastern US vegetation community types are limited to an average of 78–90% accuracy among months of the year, with individual burns having values as low as 38%, if restricted to use of Landsat 5 TM imagery. However, the majority of burns can still be mapped at accuracies similar to those in other regions of the US, and access to additional sources of satellite imagery would improve overall accuracy.

  7. Effectiveness of Mosquito Magnet® trap in rural areas in the southeastern tropical Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Ana, Denise Cristina; de Sá, Ivy Luizi Rodrigues; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2014-01-01

    Traps are widely employed for sampling and monitoring mosquito populations for surveillance, ecological and fauna studies. Considering the importance of assessing other technologies for sampling mosquitoes, we addressed the effectiveness of Mosquito Magnet® Independence (MMI) in comparison with those of the CDC trap with CO2 and Lurex3® (CDC-A) and the CDC light trap (CDC-LT). Field collections were performed in a rural area within the Atlantic Forest biome, southeastern state of São Paulo, Brazil. The MMI sampled 53.84% of the total number of mosquitoes, the CDC-A (26.43%) and CDC-LT (19.73%). Results of the Pearson chi-squared test (χ2) showed a positive association between CDC-LT and species of Culicini and Uranotaeniini tribes. Additionally, our results suggested a positive association between CDC-A and representatives of the Culicini and Aedini tribes, whereas the MMI was positively associated with the Mansoniini and Sabethini as well as with Anophelinae species. The MMI sampled a greater proportion (78.27%) of individuals of Anopheles than either the CDC-LT (0.82%) or the CDC-A traps (20.91%). Results of the present study showed that MMI performed better than CDC-LT or CDC-A in sampling mosquitoes in large numbers, medically important species and assessing diversity parameters in rural southeastern Atlantic Forest. PMID:25424445

  8. Overview of granitic rocks in the Bradfield Canal area, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Granitic rocks in the Bradfield Canal area of southeastern Alaska are part of the Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex and include rocks representing several different periods of magmatic activity. Units belonging to the previously named Admiralty-Revillagigedo, great tonalite sill, Coast Mountains, and Groundhog Basin-Cone Mountain belts are present. The Texas Creek Granodiorite is located in the southeastern part of the area and is probably 212 Ma or somewhat older. It consists mainly of locally deformed and altered calc-alkalic biotite-hornblende granodiorite and is closely associated with important mineral deposits. Distinguishing features include primary epidote, accessory garnet, and locally a distinctive plagioclase-porphyritic texture. Northeast of the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt lies the northwest-trending great tonalite sill belt. These rocks are 58--55 Ma and consist of calc-alkalic, generally well-foliated and locally lineated biotite-hornblende and hornblende tonalite, quartz diorite, and granodiorite. The Coast Mountains belt granitic rocks are the most extensive in the area. The granite has been explored for U, Th, and REE deposits. The Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex records dynamothermal and regional contact metamorphic events related to the regional plutonism. Most of the lengthy and complicated magmatic and metamorphic history of the complex is related to Late Cretaceous collision of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes and juxtaposition of the Gravina overlap assemblage to the west (Superterrane II) against the Yukon prong and Stikine terrane to the east (Superterrane I). An exception is the Texas Creek Granodiorite, which is related to a pre-accretionary Jurassic arc in the Stikine terrane.

  9. Environmental studies for oilspill trajectory modeling in the southeastern U. S. Outer Continental Shelf leasing area

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfear, K.J.; Amstutz, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Oilspill trajectory modeling and physical oceanographic studies of areas off the southeastern coast of the United States have been in progress since 1976, and have been used in making decisions for two separate offshore lease sales. The initial oilspill trajectory model was modified to accommodate the findings of ongoing studies. Research has enlarged the data base and increased the understanding of oceanographic and meteorological processes observed in this region. Hypothesized ocean surface circulation patterns, originally based upon drift bottle returns, are now based upon a series of satellite observations. By correlating winds observed at data buoys with observed winds on land, correction factors have been developed to more accurately apply data from land-based meteorological stations for predicting winds on the ocean surface. 18 refs.

  10. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sagar, D V; Prasad, G; Shahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to radon, (222)Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, (220)Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to (220)Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of (220)Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha, India presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper. PMID:22908359

  11. Sand fly fauna (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Goytacazes National Forest and surrounding areas of southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    das Virgens, Thieres Marassati; Rezende, Helder Ricas; de Souza Pinto, Israel; Falqueto, Aloísio

    2015-06-01

    Most studies of the sand fly fauna in southeastern Brazil are conducted in the peridomiciliary environment of leishmaniasis endemic regions. Therefore, to increase the knowledge about diversity and richness of sand fly conservation areas, we describe here the sand fly fauna from the National Forest of Goytacazes (NFG), state of Espírito Santo, Brazil, and its surroundings areas. We also used sand fly fauna records from eight conservations units within the state of Espírito Santo to understand the similarity and relationships among them. The sand flies were simultaneously collected from June, 2008 to May, 2009 in two different environments: a preserved environment represented by the NFG and a modified environment represented by a peridomicile. To establish the similarity among the conservation units, we used a method very similar to parsimony analysis of endemism. We collected 2,466 sand fly specimens belonging to 13 species. Pressatia choti and Nyssomyia intermedia were the most abundant sand fly species. Ny. intermedia is a known vector of Leishmania braziliensis and epidemiological surveillance must be conducted in the area. We discuss aspects regarding the diversity of sand flies as well as the risk of transmission of Leishmania parasites in the area. We also provide for the first time a hypothesis of similarity relationships among conservation units within the state of Espírito Santo. PMID:26047181

  12. Helicopter electromagnetic survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Prinos, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a helicopter electromagnetic survey flown over the Model Land Area in southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, to map saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer. The survey, which is located south and east of Florida City, Florida, covers an area of 115 square kilometers with a flight-line spacing of 400 meters. A five-frequency, horizontal, coplanar bird with frequencies ranging from 400 to 100,000 Hertz was used. The data were interpreted using differential resistivity analysis and inversion to produce cross sections and resistivity depth-slice maps. The depth of investigation is as deep as 100 meters in freshwater-saturated portions of the Biscayne aquifer and the depth diminishes to about 50 meters in areas that are intruded by saltwater. The results compare favorably with ground-based, time-domain electromagnetic soundings and induction logs from observation wells in the area. The base of a high-resistivity, freshwater-saturated zone mapped in the northern 2 kilometers of the survey area corresponds quite well with the base of the surficial aquifer that has been determined by drilling. In general, saltwater in the survey area extends 9 to 12 kilometers inland from the coast; however, there is a long nose of saltwater centered along the Card Sound Road Canal that extends 15 kilometers inland. The cause of this preferential intrusion is likely due to uncontrolled surface flow along the canal and subsequent leakage of saltwater into the aquifer. Saltwater also extends farther inland in the area between U.S. Highway 1 and Card Sound Road than it does to the west of this area. Until 1944, a railroad grade occupied the current location of U.S. Highway 1. Borrow ditches associated with the railroad grade connected to Barnes Sound and allowed saltwater to flow during droughts and storm surges to within a few kilometers of Florida City. Relicts of this saltwater that settled to the bottom of the Biscayne aquifer can be seen in the helicopter

  13. Ectoparasitic flies (Diptera, Streblidae) of bats (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) in an Atlantic Forest area, southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    França, D S; Pereira, S N; Maas, A C S; Martins, M A; Bolzan, D P; Lima, I P; Dias, D; Peracchi, A L

    2013-11-01

    We studied infestation rates and parasite-host associations between streblid flies and phyllostomid bats in an Atlantic Forest area of Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil. We captured 301 individuals from seven Phyllostomidae bat species. Out of that total, 69 bats had been parasitised by nine Streblidae species; the most frequent species were Trichobius joblingi and Trichobius tiptoni. The species Paraeuctenodes longipes, associated with Anoura geoffroyi, was the most frequent species. The highest mean intensity was observed for Paraeuctenodes longipes, associated with A. geoffroyi, and Paratrichobius longicrus associated with Artibeus lituratus, both ectoparasite species with a mean intensity of five individuals per bat. Trichobius joblingi exhibited the highest mean abundance, which was over three on its host species. Streblid richness in the study area was similar to the richness found in other studies carried out in the Atlantic Forest. We observed that streblid richness in this biome depends more on inherent characteristics of each physiognomy and on the host-species than on the sampling effort. PMID:24789402

  14. A predictive computer model of the Lower Cretaceous aquifer, Franklin area, southeastern Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosner, O.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Aquifer of Southeastern Virginia is simulated in this study. The aquifer is only a few feet thick along the Fall Line, where it is near or at the surface, but it thickens and dips to the east. At Franklin where the top of the aquifer is 220 feet (67 metres) below sea level, it is about 600 feet (180 metres) thick. Thirty five miles (56 kilometres) east of Franklin, along the eastern boundary of the model area, the top is about 900 feet (270 metres) below sea level, and the thickness is estimated to be 2,000 feet (610 metres). The aquifer consists of an alternating series of permeable and semipermeable beds, which contain various mixtures of sand, gravel, silt and clay. The sediments are continental stream deposits in the western and central parts of the area, but grade to marine deposits in the eastern part. Transmissivity is zero at or near the Fall Line, and increases eastward to 19,000 cubic feet per day per foot (1,800 cubic metres per day per metre) at Franklin. Further eastward, transmissivity probably increases slightly, but then decreases as the marine phase is reached. The aquifer is overlain by a semipermeable confining layer and is underlain by relatively impermeable rocks of the pre-Cretaceous basement.

  15. Peridomiciliary Breeding Sites of Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in an Endemic Area of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Vivaldo Pim; Ferreira, Adelson Luiz; Biral dos Santos, Claudiney; Leite, Gustavo Rocha; Ferreira, Gabriel Eduardo Melim; Falqueto, Aloísio

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) in areas modified by humans indicates that phlebotomine sand fly vectors breed close to human habitations. Potential peridomiciliary breeding sites of phlebotomines were sampled in an area of transmission of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in Southeastern Brazil. Three concentric circles rounding houses and domestic animal shelters, with radii of 20, 40, and 60 m, defined the area to be monitored using adult emergence traps. Of the 67 phlebotomines collected, Lutzomyia intermedia comprised 71.6%; Lutzomyia schreiberi, 20.9%; and Lutzomyia migonei, 4.5%. The predominance of L. intermedia, the main species suspected of transmitting L. (V.) braziliensis in Southeastern Brazil, indicates its participation in the domiciliary transmission of ACL, providing evidence that the domiciliary ACL transmission cycle might be maintained by phlebotomines that breed close to human habitations. This finding might also help in planning measures that would make the peridomiciliary environment less favorable for phlebotomine breeding sites. PMID:23091196

  16. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Monument burn area, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.; Verdin, Kristine L.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the Monument wildfire in southeastern Arizona, in 2011. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain Western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volumes of debris flows for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, (2) 5-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, and (3) 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from a low of 26 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall to 100 percent in response to the 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. The high probabilities in all modeled drainage basins are likely due to the abundance of steep hillslopes and the extensive areas burned at moderately to high severities. The estimated volumes ranged from a low of about 2,000 cubic meters to a high of greater than 200,000 cubic meters.

  17. CHEMICAL SAFETY ALERTS-

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Safety Alerts are short publications which explain specific hazards that have become evident through chemical accident investigation efforts. EPA has produced over a dozen Alerts to date. This year's Alert: Managing Chemical Reactivity Hazards

  18. Accumulation of metals in fish from lead-zinc mining areas of southeastern Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The potential effects of proposed lead-zinc mining in an ecologically sensitive area were assessed by studying a nearby mining district that has been exploited for about 30 yr under contemporary environmental regulations and with modern technology. Blood and liver samples representing fish of three species (largescale stoneroller, Campostoma oligolepis, n=91; longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis, n=105; and northern hog sucker, Hypentelium nigricans, n=20) were collected from 16 sites representing a range of conditions relative to lead-zinc mining and ore beneficiation in southeastern Missouri. Samples were analyzed for lead, zinc, and cadmium, and for a suite of biomarkers (reported in a companion paper). A subset of the hog sucker (n=9) representing three sites were also analyzed for nickel and cobalt. Blood and liver lead concentrations were highly correlated (r=0.84-0.85, P<0.01) in all three species and were significantly (ANOVA, P<0.01) greater at sites <10 km downstream of active lead-zinc mines and mills and in a historical lead-zinc mining area than at reference sites, including a site in the area proposed for new mining. Correlations between blood and liver cadmium concentrations were less evident than for lead but were nevertheless statistically significant (r=0.26-0.69, P <0.01-0.07). Although blood and liver cadmium concentrations were highest in all three species at sites near mines, within-site variability was greater and mining-related trends were less evident than for lead. Blood and liver zinc concentrations were significantly correlated only in stoneroller (r=0.46, P<0.01) and mining-related trends were not evident. Concentrations of cobalt and nickel in blood and liver were significantly higher (ANOVA, P<0.01) at a site near an active mine than at a reference site and a site in the historical lead-zinc mining area. These findings confirm previous studies indicating that lead and other metals are released to streams from active lead-zinc mines and

  19. U-Pb zircon constraints on the tectonic evolution of southeastern Tibet, Namche Barwa area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, A.L.; Zeitler, P.K.; Kidd, W.S.F.; Wooden, J.; Liu, Yajing; Idleman, B.; Hren, M.; Chamberlain, C.P.

    2004-01-01

    The eastern syntaxis of the Himalayas is expressed in the crust as a pronounced southward bend in the orogen. The change in strike of geologic features coincides with the high topography of the Namche Barwa region, the exposure of granulite-grade metamorphic rocks, and a 180-degree bend in the Yalu Tsangpo. We have conducted a geochronologic and geochemical investigation of several suites of granitoids collected from the Namche Barwa massif and subjacent terranes of southeastern Tibet, ranging from cm-scale dikes and sills to larger, outcrop-scale intrusions. U-Pb SHRIMP-RG zircon ages establish at least five magmatic episodes: ???400 to 500 Ma, ???120 Ma, 40 to 70 Ma, 18 to 25 Ma, and 3 to 10 Ma. These episodes broadly correlate to spatial patterns in sample localities, as follows: 400 to 500 Ma ages occur in zircon cores collected from within the massif proper; ???120 Ma granites, related to early Gangdese arc plutonism, are primarily located northeast of Namche Barwa; later (40-70 Ma) Gangdese activity is expressed in granites west of Namche Barwa. 18 to 25 Ma granites occur both along the suture zone west of Gyala Peri, and directly north of Namche Barwa along the area of the Jiali fault zone, and are attributed both to shearing within the Jiali fault zone and to an early Miocene Gangdese Thrust event. Exceptionally young (<10 Ma) zircon ages are clustered near the core of the massif, along the Yalu Tsangpo gorge. Trace-element geochemical data indicates the presence of both fluid-present and fluid absent melts, with a fluid-absent (decompression) melting regime dominating near the core of Namche Barwa.

  20. Tick bites on humans in the agricultural and recreational areas in south-eastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Bartosik, Katarzyna; Sitarz, Monika; Szymańska, Jolanta; Buczek, Alicja

    2011-01-01

    The investigations were conducted in the Lublin province (south-eastern Poland) in areas of high agricultural and recreational value. Among the 418 patients admitted to medical clinics due to arthropod bites in the years 2003-2005, 184 people (44%) had been bitten by ticks. As shown by the research, high-risk groups include people whose stay in tick habitats is connected with their occupational work (54.5%) as well as recreation and tourism (45.5%). As many as 78.7% of the patients were attacked by Ixodes ricinus ticks in forests, and much fewer (31.3%) in other habitats located in urban and rural areas. In one case, a Dermacentor reticulatus female was attached to the skin. Ticks were most commonly located on the upper (28.8%) and lower (27.2%) extremities, and on the abdomen (15.8%). Local skin reactions (57.6%) with predominance of erythema were the most prevalent. Combined local and systemic symptoms were reported less frequently (20.1%). The general symptoms were headache (10.8% of patients), fever (5.4%), lymphadenitis (5.9%) and arthralgia (4.3%). No lesions produced by tick bites were reported in 22.3% of the patients. Field studies conducted in 2003-2004 demonstrated that I. ricinus is a common species in the southern part of the Lublin province, where the density of nymphs and adult forms in various localities during the period of peak seasonal activity (in May) ranges from 18.5-26 specimens/1 h of collection. Two tick species, I. ricinus and D. reticulatus, occur in the northern part of the province. The density of I. ricinus nymphs and adult forms as well as D. reticulatus adults is in the range of 2.5-42 specimens/1 hr of collection and 19.5-64.0 speciments/1 hr of collection, respectively. Due to the high risk of tick attacks in the study area, there arises the necessity to permanent the monitoring of ticks numbers and tick-borne diseases. PMID:21736280

  1. Hydrogeology and analysis of ground-water-flow system, Sagamore Marsh area, southeastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, D.A.; Masterson, J.P.; Barlow, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the hydrogeology and an analysis of the ground-water-flow system near Sagamore Marsh, southeastern Massachusetts, was undertaken with the cooperation of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The purpose of the study was to improve the understanding of the current (1994-95) hydrogeologic conditions near the marsh and how the ground-water system might respond to proposed changes in the tidal-stage regime of streams that flood and drain the marsh. A 5-day aquifer test at a public-supply well adjacent to the marsh gave a transmissivity of the regional aquifer of 9,300 to 10,900 feet squared per day and a hydraulic conductivity of 181 to 213 feet per day, assuming a saturated thickness of the aquifer of 51.3 feet. The regional aquifer became unconfined near the pumped well during the test. The ratio of tidal ranges in the tidal channel to the ranges in the underlying aquifer at two sites (the lower and upper marsh) indicated aquifer diffusivities for the marsh sediments of 380 and 170 feet squared per day; these values correspond to hydraulic conductivities of 2.5 x 10-3 and 1.7 x 10-3 feet per day, respectively. The maximum distances from the tidal channel at the lower and upper marsh sites where tidal ranges would exceed 0.01 foot, as calculated from aquifer diffusivities and current (1995) tidal ranges in the tidal channels, were 24.4 and 26.7 feet, respectively. The maximum distances from the tidal channel where tidal pulses in the ground water would exceed 0.01 foot, using potential increased tidal stages resulting from proposed tidal-stage modifications and predicted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, were 37.1 and 42.0 feet, respectively. A numerical model of the marsh and surrounding aquifer system indicated that the contributing area for the supply well adjacent to the marsh, for current (1994) pumping conditions, extends toward Great Herring Pond, about 2 miles northwest (upgradient) of the well, and does not extend beneath the marsh. The model also

  2. Self-potential Anomalies Around the Earthquake Swarm Area in the Southeastern Flank of Ontake Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, R.; Yamazaki, K.; Okada, Y.; Oshiman, N.

    2006-12-01

    Ontake Volcano is located in the southern end of the Norikura Volcanic Chain, central Japan, close to the junction of the Izu Bonin and Mariana and Southwestern Japan volcanic arcs. It is almost conical and made of andesite. Earthquake swarm activity has been continuously observed around the southeastern flank of Mt. Ontake since 1976. A phreatic explosion occurred in 1979 at a fissure on the southwestern slope of the Kengamine, the main peak of Mt. Ontake. And a large earthquake with the depth about 2 km and a magnitude of 6.8 occurred in 1984 in the southeastern flank of the volcano. Recently, Kimata et al. (2004) revealed uplift ground deformation above the earthquake swarm area by using repeated leveling. Furthermore, Magnetotelluric soundings estimated a low resistivity region with the depth about 2km beneath the uplift area [Kasaya et al., 2002]. In order to investigate a relationship between tectonic movements and subsurface low resistivity zone, we carried out self-potential(SP) measurements from 2003 and 2006 around the focal region of the 1984 Earthquake and the summit area of Mt. Ontake. The equipment for measuring surface self-potentials consists of a pair of non-polarizing copper-copper sulfate/silver-silver chloride electrodes, an insulated connecting conductor cable, and a high input impedance digital multimeter. In this survey, profiles totaling to about 90km length (982 sites) were made, with an average measurement interval of 100m. Two distinctive SP features are found around the active earthquake cluster and inside of the aseismic area of southeastern flank of Mt. Ontake. In this presentation, we will report a detail of SP measurements and results.

  3. Interpretation of detailed aerial gamma-ray survey, Jabal Ashirah area, southeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed aerial gamma-ray spectrometric survey of the Jabal Ashirah area in the southeastern Arabian Shield has been analyzed using computer-classification algorithms. The analysis resulted in maps that show radiometric map units and gamma-ray anomalies indicating the presence of possible concentrations of potassium and uranium. The radiometric-unit map was interpreted to 'produce a simplified radiolithic map that was correlated with the mapped geology. The gamma-ray data show uranium anomalies that coincide with a tin-bearing granite, but known gold and nickel mineralization do not have any associated gamma-ray signatures.

  4. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ... People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ...

  5. Divers Alert Network

    MedlinePlus

    Divers Alert Network is Your Dive Safety Association Divers Alert Network DAN is Divers Alert Network, the diving industry’s largest association ... Inc. All rights reserved. Site Map Advertise Privacy Policy Social Media Policy Logo Policy Terms & Conditions Contact Us ...

  6. Jetliner Alert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA research and design has significantly improved crew alert systems. The Engine Indication and Crew Alerting System (EICAS), developed by Psycho-Linguistic Research Associates, is technologically advanced and able to order alerts by priority. Ames has also developed computer controlled voice synthesizers for readouts during difficult landing approaches. This is available to airplane manufacturers.

  7. Rickettsia amblyommii infecting Amblyomma sculptum in endemic spotted fever area from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Emília de Carvalho; Vizzoni, Vinicius Figueiredo; Navarro, Daniel Leal; Iani, Felipe Campos de Melo; Durães, Liliane Silva; Daemon, Erik; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes; Gazeta, Gilberto Salles

    2015-12-01

    The Rickettsia bacteria include the aetiological agents for the human spotted fever (SF) disease. In the present study, a SF group Rickettsia amblyommii related bacterium was detected in a field collected Amblyomma sculptum (Amblyomma cajennense species complex) tick from a Brazilian SF endemic site in southeastern Brazil, in the municipality of Juiz de Fora, state of Minas Gerais. Genetic analysis based on genes ompA,ompB and htrA showed that the detected strain, named R. amblyommii str. JF, is related to the species R. amblyommii. PMID:26676317

  8. GIS INTERNET MAP SERVICE FOR DISPLAYING SELENIUM CONTAMINATION DATA IN THE SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO PHOSPHATE MINING RESOURCE AREA

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Mayes; Sera White; Randy Lee

    2005-04-01

    Selenium is present in waste rock/overburden that is removed during phosphate mining in southeastern Idaho. Waste rock piles or rock used during reclamation can be a source of selenium (and other metals) to streams and vegetation. Some instances (in 1996) of selenium toxicity in grazing sheep and horses caused public health and environmental concerns, leading to Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) involvement. The Selenium Information System Project is a collaboration among the DEQ, the United States Forest Service (USFS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Idaho Mining Association (IMA), Idaho State University (ISU), and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL)2. The Selenium Information System is a centralized data repository for southeastern Idaho selenium data. The data repository combines information that was previously in numerous agency, mining company, and consultants’ databases and web sites. These data include selenium concentrations in soil, water, sediment, vegetation and other environmental media, as well as comprehensive mine information. The Idaho DEQ spearheaded a selenium area-wide investigation through voluntary agreements with the mining companies and interagency participants. The Selenium Information System contains the results of that area-wide investigation, and many other background documents. As studies are conducted and remedial action decisions are made the resulting data and documentation will be stored within the information system. Potential users of the information system are agency officials, students, lawmakers, mining company personnel, teachers, researchers, and the general public. The system, available from a central website, consists of a database that contains the area-wide sampling information and an ESRI ArcIMS map server. The user can easily acquire information pertaining to the area-wide study as well as the final area-wide report. Future work on this project includes creating custom tools to increase the

  9. Water Management For Drip Irrigated Corn In The Arid Southeastern Anatolia Project Area In Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazar, A.; Gencel, B.

    Microirrigation has the potential to minimize application losses to evaporation, runoff and deep percolation; improve irrigation control with smaller, frequent applications; supply nutrients to the crop as needed; and improve crop yields. The Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP), when completed, 1.7 million ha of land will be irrigated. Wa- ter supplies are limited, and traditional irrigation practices result in high losses and low irrigation efficiences. This study was conducted to evaluate surface drip irrigation on crop performance. The effect of irrigation frequency and amount on crop yield, yield components, water use, and water use efficiency of corn (Zea mays L., PIO- 3267) were investigated in the Harran Plain in the arid Southeastern Turkey on a clay textured Harran Soil Series. Irrigation frequencies were once in three-day, and once in six-day; irrigation levels varied from full (I-100), medium (I-67; 2/3rd of full), and low (I-33; 1/3rd of full). The full irrigation treatment received 100% of the cumula- tive evaporation within the irrigation interval. Liquid nitrogen was injected into the irrigation water throughout the growing season. Treatments received the same amount of fertilizers. Highest average corn grain yield (11920 kg/ha) was obtained from the full irrigation treatment (I-100) with six-day irrigation interval. Irrigation intervals did not affect corn yields; however, deficit irrigation affected crop yields by reducing seed mass, and the seed number. Maximum water use efficiency (WUE) was found as 2.27 kg/m3 in the I-33 treatment plots with three-day irrigation interval. On the clay soil at Harran, irrigation frequencies are less critical than proper irrigation management for drip irrigation systems to avoid water deficits that have a greater effect on corn yields. The results revealed that about 40% water saving is possible with drip irrigation as compared to traditional surface irrigation methods in the region.

  10. Atmospheric wet deposition of nitrogen and sulfur in the agroecosystem in developing and developed areas of Southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Ying; He, Yuanqiu; Yang, Hao; Mao, Jingdong; Zhang, Mingli; Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Shuwei

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) deposition is a significant and growing issue for ecological environment in many parts of the world such as China. However, the study on atmospheric deposition, especially N deposition, is still at the initial stage and usually neglected in agro-ecosystems. To assess the characteristics of N and S wet deposition in agro-ecosystems, we selected Yingtan Station (YTS) located in the developing area and Changshu Station (CSS) in the developed area as typical, agricultural study sites in Southeastern China during 2010-2011. In the two areas, the total N and S wet deposition were in ranges of 30.49-37.37 kg ha-1 year-1 N and 56.02-59.06 kg ha-1 year-1 S, respectively, surpassing their corresponding critical loads in China. The annual means of NH4+-N, NO3--N and dissolved organic N (DON) deposition contributed 49.6%, 26.4% and 24.0% of the total deposition, respectively. Similar total N and S deposition data were observed in the two sites, but their N species, especially DON, were different due to different numbers of slaughter pigs and types of N fertilizers applied. In conclusion, DON was identified as an important contributor to the total N deposition and should also be monitored in the future. Such high N and S deposition would deteriorate agroecosystems in Southeastern China. Related political measures on livestock industries, managements of motor vehicles and technologies of coal and oil combustion should be improved timely and implemented effectively for reducing the regional N emission and deposition in the future.

  11. Visual Alert System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A visual alert system resulted from circuitry developed by Applied Cybernetics Systems for Langley as part of a space related telemetry system. James Campman, Applied Cybernetics president, left the company and founded Grace Industries, Inc. to manufacture security devices based on the Langley technology. His visual alert system combines visual and audible alerts for hearing impaired people. The company also manufactures an arson detection device called the electronic nose, and is currently researching additional applications of the NASA technology.

  12. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability on or Near the Airport Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. In this report, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). CAAT research is conducted jointly under NASA's Airspace Systems Program, Airportal Project and the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project.

  13. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  14. A phytolith index as a proxy of tree cover density in tropical areas: calibration with Leaf Area Index along a forest savanna transect in southeastern Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremond, Laurent; Alexandre, Anne; Hély, Christelle; Guiot, Joël

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the study is to calibrate the phytolith index of tree cover density, D/P (the ratio of ligneous dicotyledons phytoliths (D) over Poaceae phytoliths (P)) with Leaf Area Index (LAI) measurements. LAI is the vertically integrated surface of leaves per unit of ground area (m 2 leaves/m 2 ground). Modern soil samples from southeastern Cameroon, collected along a continuous forest-savanna transect, have been analyzed for phytoliths. Phytolith assemblages and D/P index clearly record the physiognomy of the forest and savanna communities and of the transition between both of them. A highly significant relationship was obtained between D/P and LAI. The relationship between phytolith data and the vegetation transect is also discussed and compared with existing palynological results obtained along the same transect.

  15. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  16. Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts area contingency plan, updated through change 4

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-27

    Change 4 updates the Area Contingency Plan, which describes the strategy for a coordinated Federal, State, and Local response to a discharge of oil or a release of a hazardous substance from a vessel, offshore facility, or onshore facility operating within the boundaries of the area of responsibility for Captain of the Port, Providence.

  17. Ecological characteristics of small mammals on a radioactive waste disposal area in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, C.R.; Keller, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Species composition, diversity, biomass and densities of small mammal populations were examined in crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) and Russian thistle (Salsola kali) habitats on a solid radioactive waste disposal area and in native sagebrush (Artemisia tridentala) habitat surrounding the disposal area. The 15-month live-trapping study resulted in the marketing of 2384 individuals representing 10 species of small mammals. The deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the most common rodent in both disposal area habitats and the adjacent sagebrush habitat; Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) was also an abundant rodent in all vegetation types. The montane vole (Microtus montanus) was common only in crested wheatgrass stands on the disposal area. Although the adjacent native sagebrush habitat had the highest species diversity and the Russian thistle habitat on the disposal area had the lowest, the total rodent density was not significantly different among the three vegetation types. Crested wheatgrass within the disposal area contained the largest rodent biomass throughout the study, in part due to an increasing M. montanus population. The peak small mammal biomass of 5000 g/ha in creasted wheatgrass and sagebrush habitats was considerably higher than previously reported for similar habitats. Differences in diversity and biomass between the disposal area and surrounding native habitat are most likely related to differences in soil compaction and vegetation between these two areas.

  18. Substrate conditions and abundance of lake trout eggs in a traditional spawning area in southeastern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorr, John A., III; O'Connor, Daniel V.; Foster, Neal R.; Jude, David J.

    1981-01-01

    Spawning by planted lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) was documented by sampling with a diver-assisted pump in a traditional spawning area in southeastern Lake Michigan near Saugatuck, Michigan in mid-November in 1978 and 1979. Bottom depths at the 11 locations sampled ranged from 3 to 12 m and substrate size from boulders to sand. Periphyton (Cladophora and associated biota) was several millimeters thick at most stations but sparse at the shallowest. The most eggs recovered from a single sample occurred at the shallowest depth (3 m). In both years, some of the small numbers of eggs collected (9 in 1978, 14 in 1979) were alive and fertilized. Laboratory incubation of viable eggs resulted in successful hatching of larvae. When compared with egg densities measured at spawning sites used by self-sustaining populations of lake trout in other lakes, densities in the study are (0-13/m2) appeared to be critically low. Insufficient numbers of eggs, combined with harsh incubation conditions (turbulence, ice scour, sedimentation), were implicated as prime causes for lake trout reproductive failure in the study area, although other factors, such as inappropriate spawning behavior (selection of suboptimal spawning location, depth, or substrate) also may have reduced survival of eggs and larvae.

  19. Trace Elements and Common Ions in Southeastern Idaho Snow: Regional Air Pollutant Tracers for Source Area Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Michael Lehman; Einerson, Jeffrey James; Schuster, Paul; Susong, David D.

    2002-09-01

    Snow samples were collected in southeastern Idaho over two winters to assess trace elements and common ions concentrations in air pollutant fallout across the region. The objectives were to: 1) develop sampling and analysis techniques that would produce accurate measurements of a broad suite of elements and ions in snow, 2) identify the major elements in regional fallout and their spatial and temporal trends, 3) determine if there are unique combinations of elements that are characteristic to the major source areas in the region (source profiles), and 4) use pattern recognition and multivariate statistical techniques (principal component analysis and classical least squares regression) to investigate source apportionment of the fallout to the major source areas. In the winter of 2000-2001, 250 snow samples were collected across the region over a 4-month period and analyzed in triplicate using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Thirty-nine (39) trace elements and 9 common ions were positively identified in most samples. The data were analyzed using pattern recognition tools in the software, Pirouette® (Infometrix, Inc.). These results showed a large crustal component (Al, Zn, Mn, Ba, and rare earth elements), an overwhelming contribution from phosphate processing facilities located outside Pocatello in the southern portion of the ESRP, some changes in concentrations over time, and no obvious source area profiles (unique chemical signatures) other than at Pocatello. Concentrations near a major U.S. Department of Energy industrial complex on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) were lower than those observed at major downwind communities. In the winter of 2001-2002, we tried a new sampling design (and collected 135 additional samples) in an attempt to estimate pure emission profiles from the major source areas in the region and used classical least squares regression (CLS) to source

  20. 76 FR 7119 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of... Grape Administrative Committee (Committee) for the 2011 and subsequent fiscal periods from $0.01 to $0.0125 per 18- pound lug of grapes handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order,...

  1. 77 FR 39184 - Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 925 Grapes Grown in Designated Area of... Grape Administrative Committee (Committee) for the 2012 and subsequent fiscal periods from $0.0125 to $0.0150 per 18- pound lug of grapes handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order,...

  2. Evaluation of groundwater contamination in a coastal area of south-eastern Sicily.

    PubMed

    Licciardello, Feliciana; Antoci, Maria Lucia; Brugaletta, Luana; Cirelli, Giuseppe Luigi

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was under taken to evaluate the groundwater resources contamination due to intensive agricultural practices (particularly greenhouses). The study-area is located in the coastal area of the Ragusa province (South-East Sicily), where numerous existing greenhouses may cause the contamination of groundwater systems (unconfined and confined aquifers) beneath the cropped land. The pollution risk is mainly related with the seepage process of macro-elements nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), held in the irrigation water and the massive use of fertilizers and pesticides, that may pass through the unsaturated zone of the soil profile. Moreover, the area is characterized by the presence of several wells (about 15 wells/km²) for agricultural use that cause the aquifer overexploitation and the consequent risk of seawater intrusion. The agriculture practices adopted in the study area (irrigation volumes, fertilizer concentrations, use of pesticides…) were monitored since February 2009; moreover, the pollution risk of the aquifers was evaluated through the analysis of groundwater water samples collected (monthly) in the monitoring wells; in particular, nitrogen compounds, soluble phosphorous (PO₄²⁻), potassium, as well as the main pesticides commonly used in the study area, were measured.The results show that electrical conductivity and chloride concentration values can cause reduction of production and leaf damage problems, respectively, for most of the monitored farm systems. The high nitrogen compounds concentrations observed in the monitored wells can cause health and environmental problems. Moreover high pesticide contamination of groundwater was found in two of the five monitored wells. PMID:21726148

  3. Landslide susceptibility mapping using a bivariate statistical model in a tropical hilly area of southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, J. P. C.; DA Silva, L. M.; Dourado, F. A. D.; Fernandes, N.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides are the most damaging natural hazard in the mountainous region of Rio de Janeiro State in Brazil, responsible for thousands of deaths and important financial and environmental losses. However, this region has currently few landslide susceptibility maps implemented on an adequate scale. Identification of landslide susceptibility areas is fundamental in successful land use planning and management practices to reduce risk. This paper applied the Bayes' theorem based on weight of evidence (WoE) using 8 landslide-related factors in a geographic information system (GIS) for landslide susceptibility mapping. 378 landslide locations were identified and mapped on a selected basin in the city of Nova Friburgo, triggered by the January 2011 rainfall event. The landslide scars were divided into two subsets: training and validation subsets. The 8 landslide-related factors weighted by WoE were performed using chi-square test to indicate which variables are conditionally independent of each other to be used in the final map. Finally, the maps of weighted factors were summed up to construct the landslide susceptibility map and validated by the validation landslide subset. According to the results, slope, aspect and contribution area showed the higher positive spatial correlation with landslides. In the landslide susceptibility map, 21% of the area presented very low and low susceptibilities with 3% of the validation scars, 41% presented medium susceptibility with 22% of the validation scars and 38% presented high and very high susceptibilities with 75% of the validation scars. The very high susceptibility class stands for 16% of the basin area and has 54% of the all scars. The approach used in this study can be considered very useful since 75% of the area affected by landslides was included in the high and very high susceptibility classes.

  4. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will be able to find. Medical identification products can help ensure proper treatment in an ...

  5. Sirens and Telephone Alerts

    MedlinePlus

    ... by the Cass (ND) and Clay (MN) Emergency Planning Partnerships. Adapted with funding provided by Fargo Cass Public Health through the Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI) English – Sirens and Telephone Alerts - ...

  6. [Reproduction of the Spanish sardine, Sardinella aurita (Clupeiformes: Clupeidae) from the south-eastern area of Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Gassman, Juan; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo W

    2008-12-01

    Sex ratio, sexual maturity, fecundity and time of spawning of the Spanish sardine (Sardinella aurita) from the south-eastern area of Margarita Island were determined through monthly samplings of commercial fisheries, from January 2004 to April 2005. A total of 3 736 individuals were examined. Sex ratio was 55.47% females and 44.53% males, with a 1:1.25 sexual proportion (chi2 = 44.454, p < 0.05). Length at first sexual maturity (L50) was 20 cm. Spawning of the species was confirmed to be partial and continuous throughout the year, with two peaks of intensity during the first and last quarters. Absolute fecundity ranged from 10,530 to 83,779 oocytes and it was proportional to body length (F = -100,900 + 6696.2 * L) and to body weight (F = 13,327 + 5666.3 * P). Relative fecundity ranged from 149 to 1020 oocytes/g and also was proportional to body length and weight. We concluded that the Spanish sardine exhibits two peaks of spawning activity per year with a very fluctuating partial fecundity which could possibly be explained by environmental variability. PMID:19419083

  7. Application of remote-sensing techniques to hydrologic studies in selected coal-mine areas of southeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, J.F.; McCauley, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Disturbances resulting from intensive coal mining in the Cherry Creek basin of southeastern Kansas were investigated using color and color-infrared aerial photography in conjunction with water-quality data from simultaneously acquired samples. Imagery was used to identify the type and extent of vegetative cover on strip-mined lands and the extent and success of reclamation practices. Drainage patterns, point sources of acid mine drainage, and recharge areas for underground mines were located for onsite inspection. Comparison of these interpretations with water-quality data illustrated differences between the eastern and western parts of the Cherry Creek basin. Contamination in the eastern part is due largely to circulation of water from unreclaimed strip mines and collapse features through the network of underground mines and subsequent discharge of acidic drainage through seeps. Contamination in the western part is primarily caused by runoff and seepage from strip-mined lands in which surfaces have frequently been graded and limed but are generally devoid of mature stands of soil-anchoring vegetation. The successful use of aerial photography in the study of Cherry Creek basin indicates the potential of using remote-sensing techniques in studies of other coal-mined regions. (USGS)

  8. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Horseshoe II burn area, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned in 2011 by the Horseshoe II wildfire in southeastern Arizona. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and debris-flows volumes for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, (2) 5-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall, and (3) 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall to a high of 100 percent in response to the 10-year-recurrence, 30-minute-duration rainfall. The high probabilities in all modeled drainage basins are likely due to the abundance of steep hillslopes and the extensive areas burned at moderate to high severities. The estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from a low of 20 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters.

  9. Built-up land mapping capabilities of the ASTER and Landsat ETM+ sensors in coastal areas of southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hanqiu; Huang, Shaolin; Zhang, Tiejun

    2013-10-01

    Worldwide urbanization has accelerated expansion of urban built-up lands and resulted in substantial negative impacts on the global environments. Precisely measuring the urban sprawl is becoming an increasing need. Among the satellite-based earth observation systems, the Landsat and ASTER data are most suitable for mesoscale measurements of urban changes. Nevertheless, to date the difference in the capability of mapping built-up land between the two sensors is not clear. Therefore, this study compared the performances of the Landsat-7 ETM+ and ASTER sensors for built-up land mapping in the coastal areas of southeastern China. The comparison was implemented on three date-coincident image pairs and achieved by using three approaches, including per-band-based, index-based, and classification-based comparisons. The index used is the Index-based Built-up Index (IBI), while the classification algorithm employed is the Support Vector Machine (SVM). Results show that in the study areas, ETM+ and ASTER have an overall similar performance in built-up land mapping but also differ in several aspects. The IBI values determined from ASTER were consistently higher than from ETM+ by up to 45.54% according to percentage difference. The ASTER also estimates more built-up land area than ETM+ by 5.9-6.3% estimated with the IBI-based approach or 3.9-6.1% with the SVM classification. The differences in the spectral response functions and spatial resolution between relative spectral bands of the two sensors are attributed to these different performances.

  10. Concentrations and potential health hazards of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in shallow groundwater of a metal smelting area in Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunfa; Zhu, Hao; Luo, Yongming; Wang, Jun

    2016-11-01

    A total of 20 shallow groundwater samples were collected from a metal smelting area in southeastern China to determine the concentrations of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), calculate their toxic equivalents (TEQs) to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and estimate the carcinogenic risk of drinking the shallow groundwater. The total concentrations of the 16PAHs (∑PAHs) in the shallow groundwater ranged from 9.62 to 1663.93ngL(-1), with a mean value of 312.63ngL(-1), and the total concentrations of the 7 potentially carcinogenic PAHs (∑PAHC7) ranged from 3.11 to 33.60ngL(-1), with a mean value of 9.61ngL(-1). Naphthalene and BaP, were the dominant PAH species and potentially carcinogenic PAH species in the shallow groundwater of the study area, and they account for 89.97% of ∑PAHs and 82.62% of ∑PAHC7, respectively. High molecular weight-PAHs (HM-PAHs) accounted for a relatively high proportion in the majority of shallow groundwater samples with lower concentrations of ΣPAHs, indicated that HM-PAHs were mainly from historical residues. The TEQs to BaP of the 16PAHs in the 20 shallow groundwater samples varied greatly from 2.55 to 32.73ngL(-1), with a mean value of 8.61ngL(-1), and BaP was the dominant contributor. The total carcinogenic risk levels caused by the 16PAHs in the shallow groundwater in majority of the area were found to be higher than the limit set by the US EPA, posing a potentially serious health risk to those who depend on shallow groundwater for drinking water. PMID:27396317

  11. Hepatozoon spp. infections in wild rodents in an area of endemic canine hepatozoonosis in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Demoner, Larissa de Castro; Magro, Natalia Mizuhira; da Silva, Maria Regina Lucas; de Paula Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo; Calabuig, Cecilia Irene Pérez; O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena

    2016-07-01

    Hepatozoon canis is a tick-borne parasite that occurs worldwide. In rural areas of Brazil, H. canis vectors remain unknown, which has led to speculation about alternative routes of transmission. Small rodents can play a role in the transmission (via predation) of Hepatozoon americanum, which led us to question whether predation might be an alternative mode of transmission for H. canis. Thus, this study investigated whether Hepatozoon spp. are present in wild small rodents in forest fragments that surround rural areas in Botucatu County, São Paulo, Brazil, where canine hepatozoonosis is endemic. The study included blood samples from 158 dogs, which were screened by microscopy and molecular analysis. Blood samples and tissues from 67 rodents were obtained for histopathology and molecular detection. The prevalence of H. canis was high (66.45%) in dogs from rural areas of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil. The molecular analysis showed that wild rodent species in Brazil were infected with Hepatozoon spp. other than H. canis. Therefore, although the hypothesis that sylvatic rodents act as reservoirs for H. canis was not supported, the presence of monozoic cysts in the rodents suggests that, in addition to intermediate hosts, wild small rodents in Brazil might act as paratenic hosts of Hepatozoon spp. because they harbor infective stages for intermediate host predators. PMID:27091081

  12. Availability and quality of ground water in the Lake George area, southeastern Park County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goddard, Kimball E.

    1978-01-01

    Water for domestic use in the Lake George area, Colo., is produced from four aquifers. Two of the aquifers, fractured-cyrstalline and volcanic rocks, have a water table ranging from 10 to 100 feet below land surface and well yields range from 0.08 to 6 gallons per minute. The consolidated sedimentary-rock and unconsolidated-alluvial aquifers have a water table ranging from near land surface to 60 feet below land surface and well yields range from 2 to 50 gallons per minute. The aquifers generally contain calcium bicarbonate water with concentrations of dissolved solids ranging from 101 to 636 milligrams per liter. In some areas, concentrations of iron as much as 18,000 micrograms per liter and concentrations of fluoride as much as 5.6 milligrams per liter affect suitability for domestic use. Chemical degradation of ground water has occurred in 18 of the 35 wells and in the 1 spring that were sampled. Bacterial contamination was found in water from six wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Population-Based Seroprevalence of Malaria in Hormozgan Province, Southeastern Iran: A Low Transmission Area

    PubMed Central

    Hatam, Gholam Reza; Nejati, Fatemeh; Mohammadzadeh, Tahereh; Shahriari Rad, Reza; Sarkari, Bahador

    2015-01-01

    The seroepidemiological condition of malaria in three main districts of Hormozgan Province, a low transmission area in southeast of Iran, was investigated. Methods. Sera samples (803) were collected from healthy volunteers from the three main districts (Bandar Lengeh in the west, Bandar Abbas in the center, and Bandar Jask in the east) of Hormozgan Province. A questionnaire was used to record the sociodemographic features of the participants during sample collecting. An in-house ELISA test, using crude antigens obtained from cell culture of Plasmodium falciparum, was adapted and used to detect anti-malaria antibodies in the sera. Results. The overall seroprevalence of malaria was 8.7% (70 out of 803 samples). A significant correlation was found between seropositivity and place of residence, where the highest rate of seropositivity was seen in Bandar Lengeh (west of the province). The highest seroprevalence of malaria (13.2%) was seen in the age group of 11–20 years and also in low educated individuals. Correlation between seropositivity and gender, age, and educational levels of the participants was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Findings of this study indicate that the rate of seropositivity to malaria in this area is not high and this might be linked to the success of malaria control programs during the last decades in the region. PMID:26543662

  14. Comparing Background and Recent Erosion Rates in Degraded Areas of Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, N.; Bierman, P. R.; Sosa-Gonzalez, V.; Rood, D. H.; Fontes, R. L.; Santos, A. C.; Godoy, J. M.; Bhering, S.

    2014-12-01

    Soil erosion is a major problem in northwestern Rio de Janeiro State where, during the last three centuries, major land-use changes took place, associated with the replacement of the original rainforest by agriculture and grazing. The combination of steep hillslopes, erodible soils, sparse vegetation, natural and human-induced fires, as well as downslope ploughing, led to an increase in surface runoff and surface erosion on soil-mantled hillslopes; together, these actions and responses caused a decline in soil productivity. In order to estimate changes in erosion rates over time, we compared erosion rates measured at different spatial and temporal scales, both background (natural) and short-term (human-induced during last few decades). Background long-term erosion rates were measured using in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be in the sand fraction quartz of active river channel sediment in four basins in the northwestern portion of Rio de Janeiro State. In these basins, average annual precipitation varies from 1,200 to 1,300 mm, while drainage areas vary from 15 to 7,200 km2. Short-term erosion rates were measured in one of these basins from fallout 210Pb in soil samples collected along a hillslope transect located in an abandoned agriculture field. In this transect, 190 undisturbed soil samples (three replicates) were collected from the surface to 0.50 m depth (5 cm vertical intervals) in six soil pits. 10Be average background, basin-wide, erosion rates in the area are ~ 13 m/My; over the last decades, time-integrated (210Pb) average hillslope erosion rates are around 1450 m/Myr, with maximum values at the steepest portion of convex hillslopes of about 2000 m/Myr. These results suggest that recent hillslope erosion rates are about 2 orders of magnitude above background rates of sediment generation integrated over many millennia. This unsustainable rate of soil loss has severely decreased soil productivity eventually leading to the abandonment of farming activities in

  15. Evaluation of nonpotable ground water in the desert area of southeastern California for powerplant cooling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinemann, Anne C.

    1989-01-01

    Powerplant siting is dependent upon many factors; in southern California the prevailing physical constraint is water availability. Increasing land-use and other environmental concerns preclude further sites along the coast. A review of available hydrologic data was made of 142 ground-water basins in the southeast California desert area to ascertain if any could be feasible sources of nonpotable powerplant cooling water. Feasibility implies the capacity to sustain a typical 1,000-megawatt electrical-power generating plant for 30 years with an ample supply of ground water for cooling. Of the 142 basins reviewed, 5 met or exceeded established hydrologic criteria for supplying the water demands of a typical powerplant. These basins are: (1) middle Amargosa valley, (2) Soda Lake valley, (3) Caves Canyon valley, (4) Chuckwalla Valley, and (5) Calzona-Vidal Valley. Geohydrologic evaluations of these five basins assessed the occurrence and suitability of ground water and effects of long-term pumping. An additional six basins met or exceeded hydrologic criteria, with qualifications, for providing powerplant cooling water. The remaining 131 basins either did not meet the criteria, or available data were insufficient to determine if the basins would meet the criteria.

  16. Groundwater quality assessment using geoelectrical and geochemical approaches: case study of Abi area, southeastern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebong, Ebong D.; Akpan, Anthony E.; Emeka, Chimezie N.; Urang, Job G.

    2016-06-01

    The electrical resistivity technique which involved the Schlumberger depth sounding method and geochemical analyses of water samples collected from boreholes was used to investigate the suitability of groundwater aquifers in Abi for drinking and irrigation purposes. Fifty randomly located electrical resistivity data were collected, modeled, and interpreted after calibration with lithologic logs. Ten borehole water samples were collected and analysed to determine anion, cation concentrations and some physical and chemical parameters, such as water colour, temperature, total dissolved solids, and electrical conductivity. The results show that the lithostratigraphy of the study area is composed of sands, sandstones (fractured, consolidated and loosed), siltstones, shales (compacted and fractured) of the Asu River Group, Eze-Aku Formation which comprises the aquifer units, and the Nkporo Shale Formation. The aquifer conduits are known to be rich in silicate minerals, and the groundwater samples in some locations show a significant amount of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+. These cations balanced the consumption of H+ during the hydrolytic alteration of silicate minerals. The geochemical analysis of groundwater samples revealed dominant calcium-magnesium-carbonate-bicarbonate water facies. Irrigation water quality parameters, such as sodium absorption ratio, percentage of sodium, and permeability index, were calculated based on the physico-chemical analyses. The groundwater quality was observed to be influenced by the interaction of some geologic processes but was classified to be good to excellent, indicating its suitability for domestic and irrigation purposes.

  17. Active tectonics of the southeastern Upper Rhine Graben, Freiburg area (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivière, B.; Bruestle, A.; Bertrand, G.; Carretier, S.; Behrmann, J.; Gourry, J.-C.

    2008-03-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben has two Plio-Quaternary depocentres usually interpreted as resulting from tectonic reactivation. The southern basin, near Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany), contains up to 250 m of sediments. Beneath the younger alluvial deposits related to the current drainage system, a former river network deeply entrenched in the substratum reveals a very low regional base level of early Pleistocene age. The offset of channels at faults allows us to infer a Pleistocene reactivation of the syn-rift fault pattern and the estimation of slip rates. Maximum vertical movements along the faults have not exceeded 0.1 mm/yr since the middle Pleistocene. Current activity is concentrated along the westernmost faults. Morphologic markers indicate late Pleistocene reactivation of the Rhine River fault, and geophysical prospecting suggests a near-surface offset of young sedimentary deposits. The size of the fault segments potentially reactivated suggests that earthquakes with magnitude larger than Mw=6.3 could be expected in the area with a return interval of about 8000 years. Extrapolated to the duration of the Plio-Pleistocene, the strain rate estimates reveal that the tectonic forcing may account for only one-third to one-half of the whole thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments of the basin fill. Thus other processes must be invoked to understand the growth of the Plio-Pleistocene basin. Especially the piracy of the Rhine River to the north during the early Pleistocene could explain these effects.

  18. Biomarkers of metals exposure in fish from lead-zinc mining areas of southeastern Missouri, USA.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christopher J; Whyte, Jeffrey J; Roberts, Aaron P; Annis, Mandy L; May, Thomas W; Tillitt, Donald E

    2007-05-01

    The potential effects of proposed lead-zinc mining in an ecologically sensitive area were assessed by studying a nearby mining district that has been exploited for about 30 y under contemporary environmental regulations and with modern technology. Blood and liver samples representing fish of three species (largescale stoneroller, Campostoma oligolepis, n=91; longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis, n=105; and northern hog sucker, Hypentelium nigricans, n=20) from 16 sites representing a range of conditions relative to mining activities were collected. Samples were analyzed for metals (also reported in a companion paper) and for biomarkers of metals exposure [erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) activity; concentrations of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), iron, and hemoglobin (Hb) in blood; and hepatic metallothionein (MT) gene expression and lipid peroxidation]. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher and ALA-D activity significantly lower in all species at sites nearest to active lead-zinc mines and in a stream contaminated by historical mining than at reference or downstream sites. ALA-D activity was also negatively correlated with blood lead concentrations in all three species but not with other metals. Iron and Hb concentrations were positively correlated in all three species, but were not correlated with any other metals in blood or liver in any species. MT gene expression was positively correlated with liver zinc concentrations, but neither MT nor lipid peroxidase differences among fish grouped according to lead concentrations were statistically significant. ZPP was not detected by hematofluorometry in most fish, but fish with detectable ZPP were from sites affected by mining. Collectively, these results confirm that metals are released to streams from active lead-zinc mining sites and are accumulated by fish. PMID:17335901

  19. Biomarkers of metals exposure in fish from lead-zinc mining areas of Southeastern Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Whyte, J.J.; Roberts, A.P.; Annis, M.L.; May, T.W.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    The potential effects of proposed lead-zinc mining in an ecologically sensitive area were assessed by studying a nearby mining district that has been exploited for about 30 y under contemporary environmental regulations and with modern technology. Blood and liver samples representing fish of three species (largescale stoneroller, Campostoma oligolepis, n=91; longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis, n=105; and northern hog sucker, Hypentelium nigricans, n=20) from 16 sites representing a range of conditions relative to mining activities were collected. Samples were analyzed for metals (also reported in a companion paper) and for biomarkers of metals exposure [erythrocyte ??-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) activity; concentrations of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), iron, and hemoglobin (Hb) in blood; and hepatic metallothionein (MT) gene expression and lipid peroxidation]. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher and ALA-D activity significantly lower in all species at sites nearest to active lead-zinc mines and in a stream contaminated by historical mining than at reference or downstream sites. ALA-D activity was also negatively correlated with blood lead concentrations in all three species but not with other metals. Iron and Hb concentrations were positively correlated in all three species, but were not correlated with any other metals in blood or liver in any species. MT gene expression was positively correlated with liver zinc concentrations, but neither MT nor lipid peroxidase differences among fish grouped according to lead concentrations were statistically significant. ZPP was not detected by hematofluorometry in most fish, but fish with detectable ZPP were from sites affected by mining. Collectively, these results confirm that metals are released to streams from active lead-zinc mining sites and are accumulated by fish. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Seismic Alert System of Mexico and their automatic Alert Signals broadcast improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Aranda, J.; Cuellar Martinez, A.; Garcia, A.; Ibarrola, G.; Islas, R.; Maldonado, S.

    2009-12-01

    Government of the Federal District through the Authority of the Historical Center, in 2008 to innovate the SAS installing VHF transmitters, similar to the communication technology like the National Weather Radio (NWR) and Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) called NWR-SAME, following the code standards of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Emergency Alert Systems (EAS) of United States to enhance the effectiveness in the Alert Signals required in real time communication . This technology also will be implemented in the SASO. The SASMEX seismic data base includes accelerations gathered during more than 2200 earthquakes detected since 1993.

  1. Transient Alerts in LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, J.

    During LSST observing, transient events will be detected and alerts generated at the LSST Archive Center at NCSA in Champaign-Illinois. As a very high rate of alerts is expected, approaching ˜ 10 million per night, we plan for VOEvent-compliant Distributor/Brokers (http://voevent.org) to be the primary end-points of the full LSST alert streams. End users will then use these Distributor/Brokers to classify and filter events on the stream for those fitting their science goals. These Distributor/Brokers are envisioned to be operated as a community service by third parties who will have signed MOUs with LSST. The exact identification of Distributor/Brokers to receive alerts will be determined as LSST approaches full operations and may change over time, but it is in our interest to identify and coordinate with them as early as possible. LSST will also operate a limited Distributor/Broker with a filtering capability at the Archive Center, to allow alerts to be sent directly to a limited number of entities that for some reason need to have a more direct connection to LSST. This might include, for example, observatories with significant follow-up capabilities whose observing may temporarily be more directly tied to LSST observing. It will let astronomers create simple filters that limit what alerts are ultimately forwarded to them. These user defined filters will be possible to specify using an SQL-like declarative language, or short snippets of (likely Python) code. We emphasize that this LSST-provided capability will be limited, and is not intended to satisfy the wide variety of use cases that a full-fledged public Event Distributor/Broker could. End users will not be able to subscribe to full, unfiltered, alert streams coming directly from LSST. In this session, we will discuss anticipated LSST data rates, and capabilities for alert processing and distribution/brokering. We will clarify what the LSST Observatory will provide versus what we anticipate will be a

  2. Seasonal variations and source identification of selected organic acids associated with PM10 in the coastal area of Southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shui-Ping; Schwab, James; Liu, Bi-Lian; Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin

    2015-03-01

    PM10 aerosols from the coastal area of Southeastern China were collected from April 2010 to March 2011 and were measured for C2-C10 dicarboxylic acids, phthalic acids (Ph) and five fatty acids (palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and elaidic acids). For all sites and seasons, molecular distributions of diacids were always characterized by a predominance of oxalic acid (C2), with a relative abundance of 68-87%, followed by malonic acid (C3) and by either succinic acid (C4) or phthalic acid (Ph). This observed molecular composition was different from that in Chinese megacities where Ph was significantly higher than C3 and C4 diacids, which was likely due to the less intensive traffic emissions in the coastal area. Seasonal means of total diacids ranged between 394 and 547 ng m- 3 at the coastal urban sites and between 163 and 245 ng m- 3 at off-island sites. These levels were much lower than those reported in Chinese megacities (668-1568 ng m- 3) and slightly lower than those in Jeju Island, Korea (464-744 ng m- 3) but higher than those in marine and continental background locations. In all seasons, saturated fatty acids were significantly higher than unsaturated fatty acids due to their greater photochemical stabilities in the atmosphere. Most organic acids showed higher levels in spring and winter and lower levels in summer and fall, which was likely due to the influence of transport and meteorology. The diagnostic ratios of malonic acid to succinic acid (C3/C4), adipic acid to azelaic acid (C6/C9) and phthalic acid to azelaic acid (Ph/C9) were significantly higher in summer than in winter. These diagnostic ratios in the sampled ambient aerosols were completely different from those in primary emissions, suggesting the importance of photochemical production - especially in summer. The diurnal variations of diacids and fatty acid as well as the diagnostic ratios are associated with higher solar radiation and anthropogenic activities during the daytime. Principal

  3. Late Holocene paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic evolution at Elaiussa Sebaste archeological area (South-Eastern Turkey): preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Romana; Bernasconi, Maria Pia; Colizza, Ester; Di Rita, Federico; Equini Schneider, Eugenia; Montenegro, Maria Eugenia; Pugliese, Nevio

    2013-04-01

    Geological disciplines are increasingly applied to archaeological research. Their potentialities are able to cover numerous fields of research, since they can become very interesting tools to define the ancient environments, the origin of the human settlements and the natural and anthropic processes which occurred through the evolution of the territory. Elaiussa Sebaste (Mersin region, South-Eastern coast of the Turkey), which was an important coastal town from the II century BC to VII century AD, may represent a noteworthy field of application of geological disciplines. This site was one of the main trading harbours of the Mediterranean (from the Augustan to the Byzantine era) growing in the Augustan period and maintaining its prestige until the late Empire and the Byzantine era. Actually it was the intersection of the most important shipping and land routes among Syria, Egypt and the Anatolian peninsula. The evolution of the coastal environment around this town has been continuously modified by men along its history. The most evident modification occurred North and South the promontory of Elaiussa-Sebaste bay, i.e. the construction of two harbours, which have been subsequently buried by not well defined events. The definition of the geological processes controlling the evolution of the coastal area during the last 3000 years, should become essential to reconstruct the succession of the palaeoenvironments of Elaiussa Sebaste, including the decline of the harbours. With regard to this topic, the geomorphologic analysis reveals the complex interactions among tectonics, erosion and sedimentation in this coastal area in both, emerged and in ancient times submerged settings facing the archaeological site. During the summer 2012, a geological survey allowed us to drill nine boreholes along the land-to-sea transects in both harbours. Preliminary observations indicate the stratigraphic evolution from restricted to open marine coastal environments. Sedimentology

  4. SOIL ORGANIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION SIMULATED BY EPIC IN COTTON ROTATIONS FROM THREE MAJOR LAND RESOURCE AREAS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the southeastern USA is perceived as occurring at a relatively low rate, because of the inherent low SOC content of most agricultural soils. However, recent field estimates of SOC sequestration in conservation management systems suggest that the sequest...

  5. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Simulated by EPIC in Cotton Rotations from Three Major Land Resource Areas in the Southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the southeastern USA is perceived as occurring at a relatively low rate, because of the inherent low SOC content of most agricultural soils. However, recent field estimates of SOC sequestration in conservation management systems suggest that the sequest...

  6. Seismic Computerized Alert Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1986-01-01

    In 1985 the USGS devised a model for a Seismic Computerized Alert Network (SCAN) that would use continuous monitoring of seismic data from existing types of instruments to provide automatic, highly-reliable early warnings of earthquake shaking. In a large earthquake, substantial damaging ground motions may occur at great distances from the earthquake's epicenter.

  7. Role of vegetation cover on soil water balance in two Mediterranean areas: semiarid and dry at southeastern of Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, Àngela; Ruiz, Samantha; Chirino, Esteban; Bellot, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Water is a limited resource in the semiarid areas, which affects both, the population services, the economic growth, like the natural ecosystems stability. In this context, an accurate knowledge of soil water balance and role of the vegetation cover contribute to improve the management of resources water and forest. These studies are increasingly important, if we consider the latest Assessment Reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In this paper the main objectives were focused on:(1)To determine the soil water balance on two different climatic conditions, semiarid and dry climate and(2) Assess the effect of vegetation (structure and cover) on soil water balance under the studied climatic conditions. For this purpose we used HYDROBAL ecohydrological model, which calculates at a daily resolution the water flows through of the vegetation canopy, estimates daily soil moisture and predicts deep drainage from the unsaturated soil layer into the aquifer. In order to achieve these objectives, we have selected two sites in the south-eastern of Spain, on soils calcareous and different climatic conditions. Ventós site in a semiarid Mediterranean area and Confrides site in a dry Mediterranean area, with 303 and 611 mm of annual precipitation respectively. Both sites, the predominant vegetation are afforestations with Pinus halepensis on dry grasslands with some patches of thorn shrublands and dwarf scrubs; but it show difference on trees density, cover and height of pines.Soil water balance was determined in each site using HYDROBAL ecohydrological model on one hydrological year (October 2012 and September 2013).Model inputs include climatic variables (daily rainfall and temperature), as well as soil and vegetation characteristics (soil field capacity, soil wilting point, initial soil water content and vegetation cover index). Model outputs are interception, net rainfall, runoff, soil water reserves, actual evapotranspiration, direct percolation, and deep

  8. Postwildfire debris flows hazard assessment for the area burned by the 2011 Track Fire, northeastern New Mexico and southeastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillery, Anne C.; Darr, Michael J.; Cannon, Susan H.; Michael, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In June 2011, the Track Fire burned 113 square kilometers in Colfax County, northeastern New Mexico, and Las Animas County, southeastern Colorado, including the upper watersheds of Chicorica and Raton Creeks. The burned landscape is now at risk of damage from postwildfire erosion, such as that caused by debris flows and flash floods. This report presents a preliminary hazard assessment of the debris-flow potential from basins burned by the Track Fire. A pair of empirical hazard-assessment models developed using data from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volume of debris flows at the outlets of selected drainage basins within the burned area. The models incorporate measures of burn severity, topography, soils, and storm rainfall to estimate the probability and volume of post-fire debris flows following the fire. In response to a design storm of 38 millimeters of rain in 30 minutes (10-year recurrence-interval), the probability of debris flow estimated for basins burned by the Track fire ranged between 2 and 97 percent, with probabilities greater than 80 percent identified for the majority of the tributary basins to Raton Creek in Railroad Canyon; six basins that flow into Lake Maloya, including the Segerstrom Creek and Swachheim Creek basins; two tributary basins to Sugarite Canyon, and an unnamed basin on the eastern flank of the burned area. Estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from 30 cubic meters to greater than 100,000 cubic meters. The largest volumes (greater than 100,000 cubic meters) were estimated for Segerstrom Creek and Swachheim Creek basins, which drain into Lake Maloya. The Combined Relative Debris-Flow Hazard Ranking identifies the Segerstrom Creek and Swachheim Creek basins as having the highest probability of producing the largest debris flows. This finding indicates the greatest post-fire debris-flow impacts may be expected to Lake Maloya

  9. Sequence Stratigraphic Characterization of Upper Miocene through Pleistocene Siliciclastic Aquifer Sediments, Baton Rouge Area, Southeastern Louisiana Gulf Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, E. L.; Hanor, J. S.; Tsai, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    Saltwater encroachment northward into freshwater sands of the Baton Rouge aquifer system, southeastern Louisiana, poses a serious environmental threat to this metropolitan municipal and industrial water source. The aquifer system consists of an 850-m thick succession of interbedded, unconsolidated south-dipping siliciclastic sandy units and mudstones of Upper Miocene through Pleistocene age. A geology-based understanding of the connectivity, geometry and depositional setting of this aquifer system is necessary for developing strategies to halt or control saltwater intrusion. Seventy five digitized spontaneous potential - resistivity logs for boreholes in the area provided data for interpreting environments of deposition, for correlating sand-rich and mudstone-rich zones, and for identifying periods of low and high rates of sediment aggradation. The sands have complex geometries representing braided stream, meandering channel fill, floodplain, levee, and crevasse splay facies. A high degree of lateral discontinuity of the sands makes visual correlation of units difficult. Therefore an assessment of lithology-depth relations was made by determining the frequency of occurrence of mudstone at discrete 0.15 m depth intervals in borehole logs along five 40-km long transects parallel to the strike of the aquifer units. Percent occurrence of mudstone was graphed as a function of depth using a 41-point centered moving average for smoothing, and mudstone-poor, sand-rich trends were correlated between transects. Ten major sand cycles were identified. Individual aquifer units are interpreted to be complex zones of amalgamated sand bodies deposited during times of low aggradation associated with sea-level falling-stages and lowstand system tracts. The amalgamation created a high degree of connectivity which results in these zones behaving as single hydrologic units. Mudstone-rich aquitard sequences are interpreted to be flood-plain sediments deposited during times of high

  10. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  11. Daily survival rates for nests of Black Skimmers from a core breeding area of the Southeastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Gillian L.; Sanders, Felicia J.; Gerard, Patrick D.; Jodice, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the reproductive success of Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger) throughout the southeastern USA where availability of undisturbed beaches for nesting is limited. Daily survival rates (DSR) of nests were examined at three nesting sites in Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge (CRNWR), South Carolina, USA, 2009–2010. The percent of successful nests (n  =  346 nests) ranged from 42–69% among colony sites when data were pooled across both years. The DSR of nests was primarily related to colony site, predation risk, height of high tide, and clutch size. Predation and overwash were the principal causes of identifiable nest loss, each accounting for ∼33% of nest failures during the two study years. Because of the challenges of resighting skimmer chicks, we were not able to measure chick survival effectively and therefore accurate measures of productivity remain elusive. High variability in nest success among sites within close proximity to each other (<20 km) suggests factors at local scales such as disturbance, predation, and overwash events strongly influenced nest success of Black Skimmers during these 2 years as opposed to more region-wide stressors such as tropical storms or food availability. Although time-intensive techniques to control predators do exist, management options to limit flooding and overwash are far more limited. Conservation of Black Skimmers in the southeastern USA would benefit from coordinated, multi-state efforts to measure nest and chick survival.

  12. Prioritizing earthquake and tsunami alerting efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Allen, S.; Aranha, M. A.; Chung, A. I.; Hellweg, M.; Henson, I. H.; Melgar, D.; Neuhauser, D. S.; Nof, R. N.; Strauss, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The timeline of hazards associated with earthquakes ranges from seconds for the strong shaking at the epicenter, to minutes for strong shaking at more distant locations in big quakes, to tens of minutes for a local tsunami. Earthquake and tsunami warning systems must therefore include very fast initial alerts, while also taking advantage of available time in bigger and tsunami-generating quakes. At the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory we are developing a suite of algorithms to provide the fullest possible information about earthquake shaking and tsunami inundation from seconds to minutes after a quake. The E-larmS algorithm uses the P-wave to rapidly detect an earthquake and issue a warning. It is currently issuing alerts to test users in as little as 3 sec after the origin time. Development of a new waveform detector may lead to even faster alerts. G-larmS uses permanent deformation estimates from GNSS stations to estimate the geometry and extent of rupture underway providing more accurate ground shaking estimates in big (M>~7) earthquakes. It performed well in the M6.0 2014 Napa earthquake. T-larmS is a new algorithm designed to extend alert capabilities to tsunami inundation. Rapid estimates of source characteristics for subduction zones event can not only be used to warn of the shaking hazard, but also the local tsunami inundation hazard. These algorithms are being developed, implemented and tested with a focus on the western US, but are also now being tested in other parts of the world including Israel, Turkey, Korea and Chile. Beta users in the Bay Area are receiving the alerts and beginning to implement automated actions. They also provide feedback on users needs, which has led to the development of the MyEEW smartphone app. This app allows beta users to receive the alerts on their cell phones. All these efforts feed into our ongoing assessment of directions and priorities for future development and implementation efforts.

  13. Discriminating between true-positive and false-positive clinical mastitis alerts from automatic milking systems.

    PubMed

    Steeneveld, W; van der Gaag, L C; Ouweltjes, W; Mollenhorst, H; Hogeveen, H

    2010-06-01

    Automatic milking systems (AMS) generate alert lists reporting cows likely to have clinical mastitis (CM). Dutch farmers indicated that they use non-AMS cow information or the detailed alert information from the AMS to decide whether to check an alerted cow for CM. However, it is not yet known to what extent such information can be used to discriminate between true-positive and false-positive alerts. The overall objective was to investigate whether selection of the alerted cows that need further investigation for CM can be made. For this purpose, non-AMS cow information and detailed alert information were used. During a 2-yr study period, 11,156 alerts for CM, including 159 true-positive alerts, were collected at one farm in The Netherlands. Non-AMS cow information on parity, days in milk, season of the year, somatic cell count history, and CM history was added to each alert. In addition, 6 alert information variables were defined. These were the height of electrical conductivity, the alert origin (electrical conductivity, color, or both), whether or not a color alert for mastitic milk was given, whether or not a color alert for abnormal milk was given, deviation from the expected milk yield, and the number of alerts of the cow in the preceding 12 to 96 h. Subsequently, naive Bayesian networks (NBN) were constructed to compute the posterior probability of an alert being truly positive based only on non-AMS cow information, based on only alert information, or based on both types of information. The NBN including both types of information had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC; 0.78), followed by the NBN including only alert information (AUC=0.75) and the NBN including only non-AMS cow information (AUC=0.62). By combining the 2 types of information and by setting a threshold on the computed probabilities, the number of false-positive alerts on a mastitis alert list was reduced by 35%, and 10% of the true-positive alerts would not

  14. Geological and InSAR surveys highlight tectonic hazard in densely inhabited areas on the lower southeastern flank of Mount Etna volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Sansosti, Eugenio; Casu, Francesco; Leonardi, Anna; Pepe, Antonio; Pepe, Susi; Solaro, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    A constant seaward sliding mechanism is affecting the eastern to southern flanks of Mt. Etna volcano, involving an overall on-shore area of >700 km2.The margins of this unstable area are marked by the Pernicana Fault System to the north and the Ragalna Fault System to the south-west. The unstable area is divided into several blocks characterized by different kinematics and delimited by active faults crossing, in several cases, urban areas, towns and villages. One of these structural discontinuities is the Trecastagni-S.G.La Punta-Aci Trezza fault system, a tectonic structure extending from the volcano summit (where it trends NNW-SSE), to the lower southeastern flank (trending NW-SE) and reaching the coast at the Aci Trezza village (WNW-ESE and E-W). The last segment of this tectonic system crosses several important roads and man-made structures within Aci Trezza, and continues for a few kilometers off-shore crossing the Faraglioni stacks-Lachea island. Recently, analysis of long-period InSAR data has added some details to the sliding motion on the lower south-eastern flank of the volcano, particularly on the S.G.La Punta-Aci Trezza fault segments. Field geological and instrumental data confirmed the slip activity and the extension of the tectonically disturbed areas, highlighting a transition zone between the two main fault segments. On the other hand, some of the features detected by InSAR are not clearly visible in the field and were never detected before by classical geological surveys. These results are of crucial importance in terms of hazard related to tectonic movements, especially in densely inhabited zones such as the south-eastern flank of Etna, where more than half a million people live. The structural details obtained through these kinds of studies may guide future land use planning appropriately also within towns and villages, where aseismic and seismogenic very active faults are evident at the surfaces.

  15. Implementing national patient safety alerts.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sally; Taylor, Natalie; Lawton, Rebecca; Slater, Beverley

    National patient safety alerts are sometimes difficult to implement in an effective way. All trusts have to declare compliance with alerts as part of a three-step process to improve patient safety. This article discusses an alternative way of implementing national patient safety alerts and describes how behaviour-change methods can be used to successfully implement lasting changes in practice at ward or departmental level. PMID:27145671

  16. Emergence or re-emergence of visceral leishmaniasis in areas of Somalia, north-eastern Kenya, and south-eastern Ethiopia in 2000-01.

    PubMed

    Marlet, M V L; Sang, D K; Ritmeijer, K; Muga, R O; Onsongo, J; Davidson, R N

    2003-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was known to be endemic in Somalia along the basins of the (Middle) Shebelle and (Lower) Juba rivers, and in Kenya in parts of the Rift Valley, on the border with Uganda and the Eastern Provinces. From May 2000 to August 2001, we diagnosed 904 patients with VL. The patients came from an area which spanned the Wajir and Mandera districts of north-eastern Kenya, southern Somalia, and south-eastern Ethiopia. Small numbers of patients were also seen in northern Somalia. These areas were either previously non-endemic for VL, or had only sporadic cases prior to the epidemic. We describe the features of the outbreak and review the history of VL in the region. Unusual rainfall patterns, malnutrition, and migration of a Leishmania-infected population seeking food and security may have contributed to this outbreak. PMID:15307414

  17. 14 CFR 25.1322 - Flightcrew alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... alerting. (a) Flightcrew alerts must: (1) Provide the flightcrew with the information needed to: (i... operating conditions, including conditions where multiple alerts are provided. (3) Be removed when the alerting condition no longer exists. (b) Alerts must conform to the following prioritization...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1322 - Flightcrew alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... alerting. (a) Flightcrew alerts must: (1) Provide the flightcrew with the information needed to: (i... operating conditions, including conditions where multiple alerts are provided. (3) Be removed when the alerting condition no longer exists. (b) Alerts must conform to the following prioritization...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1322 - Flightcrew alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... alerting. (a) Flightcrew alerts must: (1) Provide the flightcrew with the information needed to: (i... operating conditions, including conditions where multiple alerts are provided. (3) Be removed when the alerting condition no longer exists. (b) Alerts must conform to the following prioritization...

  20. Toxic substances alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  1. 75 FR 67201 - Flightcrew Alerting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... are considered to be categories of alerts. \\1\\ Published in the Federal Register (41 FR 55467) on... proposed rulemaking (NPRM), Notice No. 09-05, published in the Federal Register on July 9, 2009 (74 FR... still exists. We believe an alert that is no longer relevant would add clutter to the display and...

  2. Investigation of thermostable metalloproteins in Perna perna mussels from differentially contaminated areas in Southeastern Brazil by bioanalytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Lavradas, Raquel Teixeira; Rocha, Rafael Christian Chávez; Saint' Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Godoy, José Marcus; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann

    2016-03-01

    Metallomic studies regarding environmental contamination by metals are of value in elucidating metal uptake, trafficking, accumulation and metabolism in biological systems. Many proven bioindicator species, such as bivalves, have not yet, however, been well-characterized regarding their metalloprotein expression in response to environmental contaminants. In this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate metalloprotein expressions in the thermostable protein fraction of muscle tissue and digestive glands from mussels (Perna perna) from three differentially metal-contaminated sites in Southeastern Brazil in comparison with a reference site. The thermostable protein fractions were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and SEC-HPLC-ICP-MS. Metal content was also determined in both the crude and the purified extracts. Several inter-organ differences were observed, which is to be expected, while inter-site differences regarding thermostable protein content were also verified, indicating accumulation of these elements in muscle tissue and digestive glands and disruption of homeostasis of essential elements, with detoxification attempts by metal-bound proteins, since all metalloproteins present in both matrices eluted bound to at least one non-essential metal. These results are also noteworthy with regard to the adopted reference site, that also seems to be contaminated by toxic metals. PMID:26854248

  3. Factors affecting the movement and persistence of nitrate and pesticides in the surficial and upper Floridan aquifers in two agricultural areas in the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Berndt, M.P.; Crandall, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the degree of confinement, redox conditions, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the main factors that control the persistence of nitrate and pesticides in the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) and overlying surficial aquifer beneath two agricultural areas in the southeastern US. Groundwater samples were collected multiple times from 66 wells during 1993–2007 in a study area in southwestern Georgia (ACFB) and from 48 wells in 1997–98 and 2007–08 in a study area in South Carolina (SANT) as part of the US Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. In the ACFB study area, where karst features are prevalent, elevated nitrate-N concentrations in the oxic unconfined UFA (median 2.5 mg/L) were significantly (p = 0.03) higher than those in the overlying oxic surficial aquifer (median 1.5 mg/L). Concentrations of atrazine and deethylatrazine (DEA; the most frequently detected pesticide and degradate) were higher in more recent groundwater samples from the ACFB study area than in samples collected prior to 2000. Conversely, in the SANT study area, nitrate-N concentrations in the UFA were mostly <0.06 mg/L, resulting from anoxic conditions and elevated DOC concentrations that favored denitrification. Although most parts of the partially confined UFA in the SANT study area were anoxic or had mixed redox conditions, water from 28 % of the sampled wells was oxic and had low DOC concentrations. Based on the groundwater age information, nitrate concentrations reflect historic fertilizer N usage in both the study areas, but with a lag time of about 15–20 years. Simulated responses to future management scenarios of fertilizer N inputs indicated that elevated nitrate-N concentrations would likely persist in oxic parts of the surficial aquifer and UFA for decades even with substantial decreases in fertilizer N inputs over the next 40 years.

  4. Factors Influencing Scanning for Alerts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft pilots (like operators in many domains) are required to monitor locations for rare events, while concurrently performing their everyday tasks. In many cases, the visual parameters of the alert are such that it is not visible unless directly fixated. For this reason, critical alerts should be designed to be visible in peripheral vision and/or augmented by an audio alarm. We use the term "conspicuity" to distinguish the attention-getting power of a visual stimulus from simple visibility in a single-task context. We have measured conspicuity in an experimental paradigm designed to test the N-SEEV model of attention and noticing (Steelman-Allen et al., HFES 2009). The subject performed a demanding central task while monitoring four peripheral locations for color change events. Visibility of the alerting stimuli was measured separately in a control experiment in which the subject maintained steady fixation without the central task. Thresholds in the dual-task experiments were lower than would be expected based on the results of the control experiment, due to the fact that the subjects actively sampled the alert locations with fixations while performing the central task. Locations of high-frequency alerts are generally sampled more often than locations of low-frequency alerts, and alert location sampling in general increases with practice, presumably because the demands of the central task are reduced.

  5. Susceptibility of Culicidae Mosquitoes to Some Insecticides Recommended by WHO in a Malaria Endemic Area of Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fathian, Mousa; Vatandoost, Hassan; Moosa-Kazemi, Seyed Hassan; Raeisi, Ahmad; Yaghoobi-Ershadi, Mohammad Reza; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to the national strategy plan on monitoring of insecticides resistance, this study was carried out to determine the base line susceptibility of the Culicidae mosquitoes to the WHO-recommended insecticides in an endemic focus of malaria in southeastern Iran. Methods: Larval collection was carried out by dipping method and adult collection occurred by suction tube from January to December 2010. The susceptibility test was assessed to DDT 4 %, malathion 5 %, propoxur 0.1 %, deltamethrin 0.05 %, lambda-cyhalothrin 0.05 %, and cyfluthrin 0.15 % at different interval times (discriminative dose) followed by 24 h recovery period. The LT50 and LT90 values were calculated for plotting the regression line using Microsoft office Excel software ver. 2007. Results: Anopheles stephensi was quite resistant to DDT and showed susceptible or tolerant to other insecticides. The LT50 and LT90 values to DDT in this species were 29.07, and 98.26 minutes, respectively. Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles dthali were found susceptible or tolerant to insecticides. Culex pipiens was found resistance to DDT, propoxur, lambda-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin whereas observed susceptible to malathion and tolerant to deltamethrin. Ochlerotatus caspius sl. was resistant to DDT, whereas found susceptible to other insecticides. Culisita longiareolata was susceptible to deltamethrin, whereas tolerant to other insecticides. The LT50 and LT90 values of Cs. longiareolata to DDT were 17.82, and 51.26 minutes. Conclusion: We suggested the same study in different parts of the country for monitoring and evaluation of control measures. PMID:26114141

  6. ALERTES EEWS for South Iberia: feasibility and prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Romeu, Nuria; Lozano, Lucia; Colom, Yolanda; López Mesa, Mireya; Goula, Xavier; Jara, Jose Antonio; Cantavella, Jose Vicente; Davila, Jose Martin; Zollo, Aldo; Hanka, Winfried; Carrilho, Fernando; Carranza, Marta; Buforn, Elisa; Civeria, Angel; Rioja, Carlos; Morgado, Arturo

    2015-04-01

    The Spanish ALERT-ES project was set up to study the feasibility of setting up an Earthquake Early Warning System to warn the potentially damaging earthquakes that can occur in the SW of Iberia peninsula, such as the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. Four events, located close to the epicentres of the largest earthquakes in the area, were simulated and the errors were analyzed. In addition, a study about the blind zone and the lead time at six selected targets was carried out. The results show a blind zone in the SW corner of Portugal for SV earthquakes and also a blind zone in the coastal area, from Portimao to Cadiz, for the GC earthquakes. Currently, an EEWS prototype, called ALERTES system, based on SeisComP3 software, is running on cuasi-real time under test for Ibero-Magrhebian region, in the frame of the ALERTES-RIM Spanish project.

  7. Alert Notification System Router

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurganus, Joseph; Carey, Everett; Antonucci, Robert; Hitchener, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Alert Notification System Router (ANSR) software provides satellite operators with notifications of key events through pagers, cell phones, and e-mail. Written in Java, this application is specifically designed to meet the mission-critical standards for mission operations while operating on a variety of hardware environments. ANSR is a software component that runs inside the Mission Operations Center (MOC). It connects to the mission's message bus using the GMSEC [Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC)] standard. Other components, such as automation and monitoring components, can use ANSR to send directives to notify users or groups. The ANSR system, in addition to notifying users, can check for message acknowledgements from a user and escalate the notification to another user if there is no acknowledgement. When a firewall prevents ANSR from accessing the Internet directly, proxies can be run on the other side of the wall. These proxies can be configured to access the Internet, notify users, and poll for their responses. Multiple ANSRs can be run in parallel, providing a seamless failover capability in the event that one ANSR system becomes incapacitated.

  8. Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950.

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. White

    2004-01-01

    White, D.L. 2004. Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950. Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 324 pp. Abstract: The history of land use for an area is the history of the way in which humans have manipulated or altered the environment. Most land use activities can be viewed as disturbance to ecosystems. Within a given climatic regime, the interaction of the disturbance regime with vegetation, soil, and landform factors largely determines the distribution and composition of plant and associated animal communities. For these reasons, a greater understanding of the ecological impacts of both human and non-human related disturbance is needed to improve our ability to make natural resource management decisions. This document outlines the land use history of the Savannah River Site and surrounding areas from about 1780 thru 1950, when the site was converted to a government facility for the purposes of national defense.

  9. Generating precipitation ensembles for flood alert and risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseri, Angelica; Javelle, Pierre; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Leblois, Etienne

    2015-04-01

    Floods represent one of the major natural disasters that are often responsible for fatalities and economic losses. Flood warning systems are needed to anticipate the arrival of severe events and mitigate their impacts. Flood alerts are particularly important for risk management and response in the nowcasting of flash floods. In this case, precipitation fields observed in real time play a crucial role and observational uncertainties must be taken into account. In this study, we investigate the potential of a framework which combines a geostatistical conditional simulation method that considers information from precipitation radar and rain gauges, and a distributed rainfall-runoff model to generate an ensemble of precipitation fields and produce probabilistic flood alert maps. We adapted the simulation method proposed by Leblois and Creutin (2013), based on the Turning Band Method (TBM) and a conditional simulation approach, to consider the temporal and spatial characteristics of radar data and rain gauge measurements altogether and generate precipitation ensembles. The AIGA system developed by Irstea and Météo-France for predicting flash floods in the French Mediterranean region (Javelle et al., 2014) was used to transform the generated precipitation ensembles into ensembles of discharge at the outlet of the studied catchments. Finally, discharge ensembles were translated into maps providing information on the probability of exceeding a given flood threshold. A total of 19 events that occurred between 2009 and 2013 in the Var region (southeastern France), a region prone to flash floods, was used to illustrate the approach. Results show that the proposed method is able to simulate an ensemble of realistic precipitation fields and capture peak flows of flash floods. This was shown to be particularly useful at ungauged catchments, where uncertainties on the evaluation of flood peaks are high. The results obtained also show that the approach developed can be used to

  10. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability On or Near the Airport Surface, Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. The term ATMA was created to reflect the fact that the CD&R concept area of operation is focused near the airport within the terminal maneuvering area. In the following, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS).

  11. Acute schistosomiasis outbreak in the metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais: alert about the risk of unnoticed transmission increased by growing rural tourism.

    PubMed

    Enk, Martin J; Amorim, Amanda; Schall, Virginia T

    2003-09-01

    The present article describes the occurrence of 17 cases of acute schistosomiasis in the metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. All individuals affected took a bath in a swimming pool of a holiday resort that was provided with water from a nearby brook. The apparently clean water and the absence of snails in the pool gave the wrong impression that there was no risk for infection. During a malacological survey at the site snails of the species Biomphalaria glabrata were found and tested positive for Schistosoma mansoni. All the patients live in the middle-class area of Barreiro, metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte and have medium grade school education. The difficulties in establishing the right diagnosis is expressed by the search for medical attention in 17 different medical facilities, the wide range of laboratory test and the inadequate treatment administration. A lack of knowledge about the disease was found in all groups studied. The booming rural tourism in endemic areas is identified as a probable risk factor for infection, especially for individuals of the non-immune middle and upper class parts of the society in urban centers. Special attention is given to a multidisciplinary approach to the complex issue of disease control and prevention. PMID:14595449

  12. Availability of ground water for large-scale use in the Malad Valley-Bear River areas of southeastern Idaho: an initial assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burnham, W.L.; Harder, A.H.; Dion, N.P.

    1969-01-01

    Five areas within the Bear River drainage of southeastern Idaho offer potential for further development of ground water--the valley north of Bear Lake, north of Soda Springs, Gem Valley, Cache Valley in Idaho, and Malad Valley in Idaho. Saturated deposits north of Bear Lake are too fine-textured to yield large quantities to wells; the areas north of Soda Springs and in Gem Valley would provide large yields, but at the expense of current beneficial discharge. Northern Cache Valley has small areas of high yield in the northwestern part, but total annual yield would be only about 20,000 acre-feet and seasonal water-level fluctuation would be large. Malad Valley contains a large aquifer system within valley fill underlying about 75 square miles. The aquifer system is several hundred feet thick, and contains about 1.8 million acre-feet of water in storage in the top 300 feet of saturated thickness. Average annual recharge to the valley-fill aquifer is about 64,000 acre-feet. Lowering of the water level 100 feet uniformly over the valley area would theoretically yield about 300,000 acre-feet from storage and salvage a present-day large nonbeneficial discharge. Sufficient water to irrigate all lands in a planned project near Samaria could be pumped with a maximum 200-foot pumping lift and then delivered by gravity flow. Such pumping would cause water-level lowering of a few feet to a few tens of feet in present artesian areas, and would cause many present-day artesian wells to cease flowing at land surface. Chemical-quality problems in Malad Valley seem not to be sufficient to prohibit development and use of the ground-water resource.

  13. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Communications § 80.1111 Distress alerting. (a) The transmission of a distress alert indicates that a mobile unit or person is in distress and requires immediate assistance. The distress alert is a... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be...

  14. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Safety Communications § 80.1111 Distress alerting. (a) The transmission of a distress alert indicates that a mobile unit or person is in distress and requires immediate assistance. The distress alert is a... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be...

  15. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Safety Communications § 80.1111 Distress alerting. (a) The transmission of a distress alert indicates that a mobile unit or person is in distress and requires immediate assistance. The distress alert is a... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Safety Communications § 80.1111 Distress alerting. (a) The transmission of a distress alert indicates that a mobile unit or person is in distress and requires immediate assistance. The distress alert is a... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be...

  17. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Safety Communications § 80.1111 Distress alerting. (a) The transmission of a distress alert indicates that a mobile unit or person is in distress and requires immediate assistance. The distress alert is a... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be...

  18. INITIATE: An Intelligent Adaptive Alert Environment.

    PubMed

    Jafarpour, Borna; Abidi, Samina Raza; Ahmad, Ahmad Marwan; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to a large volume of alerts generated by medical Alert Generating Systems (AGS) such as drug-drug interaction softwares or clinical decision support systems over-whelms users and causes alert fatigue in them. Some of alert fatigue effects are ignoring crucial alerts and longer response times. A common approach to avoid alert fatigue is to devise mechanisms in AGS to stop them from generating alerts that are deemed irrelevant. In this paper, we present a novel framework called INITIATE: an INtellIgent adapTIve AlerT Environment to avoid alert fatigue by managing alerts generated by one or more AGS. We have identified and categories the lifecycle of different alerts and have developed alert management logic as per the alerts' lifecycle. Our framework incorporates an ontology that represents the alert management strategy and an alert management engine that executes this strategy. Our alert management framework offers the following features: (1) Adaptability based on users' feedback; (2) Personalization and aggregation of messages; and (3) Connection to Electronic Medical Records by implementing a HL7 Clinical Document Architecture parser. PMID:26262056

  19. Mid-Tertiary structural evolution of the Old Woman Mountains area: Implications for crustal extension across southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, G.E.; Miller, C.F. ); Knoll, M.A. Univ. of Texas, El Paso )

    1990-01-10

    The Old Woman Mountains area is a moderately extended region that lies between two highly extended terranes, the Central Mojave Extensional Complex and the Colorado River Extensional Corridor. Two normal faults and a high-angle fault that the authors interpret to be a transfer structure divide the area into four distinct structural blocks. These blocks correspond to the four mountain ranges of the area: the Old Woman, Piute, Little Piute, and Ship mountains. Other major faults involved in tilting are inferred to be buried beneath alluvium in surrounding valleys. Deformation occurred in part before, but primarily after, deposition of the Peach Springs Tuff, an 18.5 Ma regional stratigraphic marker. Transport directions of hanging walls are westward on the west side of the Old Woman Mountains area and east-southeastward on the east side. The authors suggest that the Old Woman Mountains area is a less extended portion of a continuous extensional terrane that stretches from the central Mojave Desert across the Colorado River to the transition zone of the Colorado Plateau. Lower strain in the Old Woman Mountains area than in most of the Colorado River Extensional Corridor and Central Mojave Extensional Complex and age relations across the terrane can be explained by a model in which the principal locus of upper crustal breakaway to an east dipping low-angle simple shear zone shifted at about 18-20 Ma from a position far to the west to just east of the Old Woman Mountains area.

  20. The 1977 emissions inventory for southeastern Virginia. [environment model of air quality based on exhaust emission from urban areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, D. A.; Remsberg, E. E.; Woodbury, G. E.; Quinn, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Regional tropospheric air pollution modeling and data compilation to simulate the time variation of species concentrations in and around an urban area is discussed. The methods used to compile an emissions inventory are outlined. Emissions factors for vehicular travel in the urban area are presented along with an analysis of the emission gases. Emission sources other than vehicular including industrial wastes, residential solid waste disposal, aircraft emissions, and emissions from the railroads are investigated.

  1. Clear air turbulence - An airborne alert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, L. P.; Caracena, F.; Kuhn, P. M.; Kurkowski, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An infrared radiometer system has been developed that can alert a pilot of an aircraft 2 to 9 minutes in advance of an encounter with clear air turbulence. The time between the warning and the clear air turbulence event varies with the flight altitude of the aircraft. In turbulence-free areas, the incidence of false alarms is found to be less than one in 3.4 hours of flight time compared to less than one per 10 hours of flight time in areas with turbulence.

  2. Laramide alteration of proterozoic diabase: A likely contributor of copper to porphyry systems in the dripping spring mountains area, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Force, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Proterozoic diabase of the Dripping Spring range occurs as sills in the Proterozoic Apache Group and the Troy Quartzite and as intrusive sheets in basement rocks. The aggregate thickness of the diabase sills and intrusive sheets averages about 450 m in the part of the range showing little mid-Tertiary extension. Laramide alteration is of two types, dominated by chlorite and actinolite, respectively, and formed mostly from clinopyroxene. Actinolite-dominated assemblages are higher in Na and Ca. Hydrothermal biotite is common in the central areas of both alteration types. Laramide alteration forms two distribution patterns: a subequant pattern centered on Laramide intrusions and small porphyry deposits, characterized by actinolitic alteration, and a more extensive branching linear pattern that follows Laramide structures, centered on the larger Ray porphyry deposit, extending toward other Laramide districts and showing both alteration types. Alteration has apparently mobilized copper and other metals from diabase. The freshest diabase samples average about 120 ppm copper with little variation. In chloritic alteration, about 100 ppm of this copper is expelled in the most completely altered rocks. In actinolitic alteration, diabase may either gain or lose copper during alteration. Chloritic alteration constitutes roughly 70 percent of the diabase alteration in the study area, where alteration averages 41 percent complete. This implies liberation of about 9 ?? 106 tons (t) copper from diabase alteration, significantly less than the 16 ?? 106 t copper in Laramide mineral deposits of the superdistrict (Ray, Superior, Chilito, Christmas). However, diabase alteration may have been a significant component of the supply of copper to the Laramide mineral districts of the area. Synmineral magmatic sources of copper are not documented in this area. The distribution of Proterozoic diabase coincides with the central part of the southeastern Arizona copper province, which may thus

  3. Revealing the Functional Neuroanatomy of Intrinsic Alertness Using fMRI: Methodological Peculiarities

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Benjamin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Sack, Alexander; Heinecke, Armin; Willmes, Klaus; Sturm, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Clinical observations and neuroimaging data revealed a right-hemisphere fronto-parietal-thalamic-brainstem network for intrinsic alertness, and additional left fronto-parietal activity during phasic alertness. The primary objective of this fMRI study was to map the functional neuroanatomy of intrinsic alertness as precisely as possible in healthy participants, using a novel assessment paradigm already employed in clinical settings. Both the paradigm and the experimental design were optimized to specifically assess intrinsic alertness, while at the same time controlling for sensory-motor processing. The present results suggest that the processing of intrinsic alertness is accompanied by increased activity within the brainstem, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, right insula, and right parietal cortex. Additionally, we found increased activation in the left hemisphere around the middle frontal gyrus (BA 9), the insula, the supplementary motor area, and the cerebellum. Our results further suggest that rather minute aspects of the experimental design may induce aspects of phasic alertness, which in turn might lead to additional brain activation in left-frontal areas not normally involved in intrinsic alertness. Accordingly, left BA 9 activation may be related to co-activation of the phasic alertness network due to the switch between rest and task conditions functioning as an external warning cue triggering the phasic alertness network. Furthermore, activation of the intrinsic alertness network during fixation blocks due to enhanced expectancy shortly before the switch to the task block might, when subtracted from the task block, lead to diminished activation in the typical right hemisphere intrinsic alertness network. Thus, we cautiously suggest that – as a methodological artifact – left frontal activations might show up due to phasic alertness involvement and intrinsic alertness activations might be weakened due to contrasting with fixation blocks, when assessing

  4. Water pollution in relation to mineral exploration: a case study from Alayi-Ovim area of southeastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ibe, Kalu K; Akaolisa, Casmir C Zanders

    2012-05-01

    Water samples from rivers, streams, springs, and shallow wells in Alayi-Ovim area of southeast Nigeria have been analyzed for Pb, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mg, PO(4), NO(3), CO(3), SO(4), Cl, and pH. The analyses were carried out using atomic absorption spectrometer and Hach Direct Reading Equipment. Results of the analyses from the area conform to the WHO (1995) standards for drinking water. However, the results show relative enrichment of Ca, pH, Mg, CO(3), and Cl. Low values were obtained for Fe, SO(4), and NO(3). While the Cl and Pb enrichment in the area north of Alayi-Ovim axis is attributed to proximity to the lead-zinc and chloride-rich formations of the Turonian Eze-Aku and the Albian Asu River; the Ca, Mg, SO(4), and CO(3) enrichment in Southern part of Alayi-Ovim is due to the limestone-bearing Late Maastrichtian Nsukka Formation. Furthermore, the very low values of less than 5 ppm for these characters in water in the central region correlate well with the relatively clean Maastrichtian quartz arenite Ajali Sandstone Formation. The Pb-Zn and Cl incursions into the water system from the Older Albian Asu River/Turonian Eze-Aku Formations in the northern part of Alayi-Ovim area and the leaching of Mg, and Ca into the water system in the Maastrichtian limestone area in the south thus constitute geochemical indices for chemical pollution and mineral exploration for brine and dolomitic limestone in the area. PMID:21713493

  5. Paleoslope, sea-level and climate controls on Upper Miocene platform evolution, Las Negras area, southeastern Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Carbonate platforms in the Las Negras area evolved from onlapping ramps to fringing reef complexes later draped by cyclic shallow marine strata. Although sea-level history and paleoclimate had an effect on platform evolution, substrate topography played a dominant role. The strata are divided into five depositional sequences of Tortonian and Messinian age. The model of platform evolution provided by the Las Negras area exposures likely has applications for other Miocene carbonate complexes in the Mediterranean and could apply to other carbonate complexes in the rock record.

  6. Gender Integration of a Core Content Area Teacher/Athletic Coach in the Rural Southeastern United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Research on the occupational socialization of teachers and coaches has largely centered on physical education teachers and rarely on teachers from core content areas (i.e. English, foreign language, mathematics, science and social studies) who also coach athletics. The primary purpose of this single-case study was to explore the socialization of a…

  7. Potential effects of surface coal mining on the hydrology of the Cook Creek area, Ashland coal field, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Cook Creek area of the Ashland coal field contains large reserves of Federally owned coal that have been identified for potential lease sale. A hydrologic study has been conducted in the potential lease area to describe existing hydrologic systems and to assess potential impacts of surface coal mining on local water resources. Hydrogeologic data collected from wells, springs, and drill holes indicate that shallow aquifers exist within the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene age) and within valley alluvium (Pleistocene and Holocene age). Shallow aquifers within the Tonge River Member include coal beds, clinker, and lenses of sandstone and siltstone. The Knobloch coal bed, a principal shallow aquifer used for livestock watering in the area, averages about 55 feet in thickness and is completely saturated throughout most of its extent. Coarse alluvial deposits are the most productive aquifers and are a major source of stock water in the Cook Creek basin. Surface-water resources are limited to the upstream reach part of Cook Creek, which flows intermittently. The downstream reach part of Cook Creek, plus all other small drainages that originate in the study area, are ephemeral. Mining of the Knoblock and Sawyer coal beds would remove two alluvial springs, one bedrock spring, and two wells, which are all used for watering of livestock. The potentiometric surface within the Knobloch coal aquifer and the alluvial aquifer in the downstream part of the Cook Creek basin would be lowered during mining. Lowered water levels in these aquifers might substantially affect water levels in five wells outside the mine boundary. After mining, the alluvial aquifer downgradient from the mine area might show a long-term degradation in water quality as a result of leaching of soluble salts from overburden materials used to backfill mine pits. Although mining would alter the existing hydrologic systems and remove several springs and shallow wells, alternative

  8. Winter and summer home ranges and core use areas of double-crested cormorants captured near aquaculture facilities in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Migration patterns of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) wintering in the southeastern United States are poorly understood. Movement data was analyzed from 28 cormorants captured in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi and equipped with satellite transmitters. Four (3 immatur...

  9. The impact of vegetation on humus formation and morphology of brown forest soils in coastal areas of the southeastern part of Russian far east

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshenichnikov, B. F.; Pshenichnikova, N. F.

    2015-04-01

    Specific features of brown forest soils (burozems, Cambisols) in coastal areas of the southeastern part of Russian Far East are discussed. It is shown that the color of the illuvial horizons in these soils depends on the character of vegetation; it is reddish brown under oak forests and dark gray under herb-shrub and post-pyrogenic communities. These soils combine the features shaped by the humus-accumulative and humus-illuvial processes. In the soils under oak forests, the humate-fulvate type of humus predominates; in the soils under herb-shrub and post-pyrogenic communities, the fulvate-humate humus is formed. The dynamics of humus and its separate fractions in the soil profiles control the morphochromatic differentiation of brown forest soils under different vegetation communities. In the soils under oak forests, the maximum precipitation of the aggressive fraction of fulvic acids (fraction FA-1a) in the illuvial-humus horizons coincides with the maximum concentration of oxalate-extractable iron oxides; these substances ensure the reddish brown color of the illuvial horizons in these soils. In the brown forest soils under herb-shrub and post-pyrogenic communities, the illuvial horizon is the zone of accumulation of not only the aggressive fraction of fulvic acids but also the second (Ca-bound) fractions of fulvic and humic acids ensuring the dark gray color of this horizon.

  10. Middle-Late Devonian radiolarians from Klaeng District, Rayong Province, southeastern Thailand: Geotectonic significance of the Rayong area as a continental margin of the Sibumasu Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Yoshihito; Kato, Miyako; Ueno, Katsumi; Miyahigashi, Akira; Charoentitirat, Thasinee; Sardsud, Apsorn

    2015-05-01

    A fine clastics-siliceous succession exposed at Laem Krabang Phet, approximately 20 km southwest of Klaeng, Rayong area, southeastern Thailand was examined based on lithology, radiolarian biostratigraphy, and geological correlation. In the study section, thinly bedded chert layers are intercalated with black carbonaceous shale, light-colored tuffaceous shale, brown glassy tuff, and quartz-rich sandstone layers. A horizon of the chert in the section yielded poorly preserved radiolarians, however, several forms including Palaeoscenidium cladophorum Deflandre, Stigmosphaerostylus cf. pusilla (Hinde), and Entactiniidae gen. et spp. indet. were identified. This fauna is probably referable to the Middle-Late Devonian. The study section had been assigned to various stratigraphic units, such as Silurian-Devonian or Carboniferous-Permian, due to a poor fossil occurrence. However, the occurrence of the Devonian radiolarians in this study provides concrete evidence for the sedimentary age of the succession, and supports assignment to the Silurian-Devonian. Although the study succession exposed at Laem Krabang Phet is coeval with the Devonian part of the Fang chert, northern Thailand, the lithological assemblage is dissimilar, and the post-Devonian radiolarian chert is absent. These lithological, chronological, and stratigraphic results indicate that the depositional environment of the study section was close to the continental margin, such as a continental slope or rise.

  11. The perception, beliefs and practices toward genitourinary schistosomiasis by inhabitants of selected endemic areas (Edo/Delta States) in south-eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ukwandu, Nnamdi Callistus D; Nmorsi, O P G

    2004-01-01

    Well-structured questionnaire on the perception, impression and response to genitourinary bilharziasis (Genitourinary schistosomiasis) was administered and explained in local languages: 'Igbo' 'Esan' 'Ezon' Itshekiri and Bini to 33815 inhabitants of selected endemic areas in south-eastern Nigeria from January, 1999 to December, 2001. Out of this number, 3815 (11.3%) were properly filled and returned. About 42.0% of the inhabitants admitted knowledge of the disease, while 14 (0.4%) knew about the aetiologic agent. About 181 (5.0%) who responded, admitted procuring treatment, while 100 (5.0%) declined to seek treatment of any sort. The relationships between water-bodies and human activities, and infection were well discussed. Amongst those who admitted knowledge of the disease but no knowledge of its etiologic agent, declined seeking treatment of any kind, but believe the disease is a natural phenomenon in ones developmental stage and therefore of no morbidity and mortality. Laboratory analysis of urine, faeces, semen and HVS was employed to assess questionnaire responses, and in some cases, physical examination was utilized to augment laboratory analysis in confirming urinal diagnosis. Haematuria was only directly related to egg count in the early part of life. Females were significantly haematuric and excreted more ova than males (p < 0.05). Headache (43.0%) and fever (31.0%) were major clinical signs while sexual pains (22.0%) were the least. PMID:15361973

  12. Description and implementation of a surveillance network for bluetongue in the Balkans and in adjoining areas of south-eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, F; Paladini, C; Meiswinkel, R; Savini, L; Calistri, P

    2006-01-01

    During the recent severe outbreaks of bluetongue (BT) in the Mediterranean Basin, the BT virus (BTV) spread beyond its historical limits into the Balkan region. One of the primary impacts of BT is the cessation in livestock trade which can have severe economic and social consequences. The authors briefly describe the development of the collaborative East-BTnet programme which aims to assist all affected and at-risk Balkan states and adjoining countries in the management of BT, and in the development of individual national surveillance systems. The beneficiary countries involved, and led by the World organisation for animal health (Office International des Epizooties) Collaborating Centre for veterinary training, epidemiology, food safety and animal welfare of the Istituto Zooprofilattico dell'Abruzzo e del Molise 'G. Caporale' in collaboration with the Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, the European Commission Joint Research Centre (IPSC-JRC), were Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, the Former Yugoslavia Republic of Macedonia, Kosovo, Malta, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia and Turkey. A regional web-based surveillance network is a valuable tool for controlling and managing transboundary animal diseases such as BT. Its implementation in the Balkan region and in adjoining areas of south-eastern Europe is described and discussed. PMID:20429055

  13. Geochemical processes in ground water resulting from surface mining of coal at the Big Sky and West Decker Mine areas, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A potential hydrologic effect of surface mining of coal in southeastern Montana is a change in the quality of ground water. Dissolved-solids concen- trations in water in spoils aquifers generally are larger than concentrations in water in the coal aquifers they replaced; however, laboratory experiments have indicated that concentrations can decrease if ground water flows from coal-mine spoils to coal. This study was conducted to determine if decreases in concentrations occur onsite and, if so, which geochemical processes caused the decreases. Solid-phase core samples of spoils, unmined over- burden, and coal, and ground-water samples were collected from 16 observation wells at two mine areas. In the Big Sky Mine area, changes in ground- water chemistry along a flow path from an upgradient coal aquifer to a spoils aquifer probably were a result of dedolomitization. Dissolved-solids concentrations were unchanged as water flowed from a spoils aquifer to a downgradient coal aquifer. In the West Decker Mine area, dissolved-solids concentrations apparently decreased from about 4,100 to 2,100 milligrams per liter as water moved along an inferred flow path from a spoils aquifer to a downgradient coal aquifer. Geochemical models were used to analyze changes in water chemistry on the basis of results of solid-phase and aqueous geochemical characteristics. Geochemical processes postulated to result in the apparent decrease in dissolved-solids concentrations along this inferred flow path include bacterial reduction of sulfate, reverse cation exchange within the coal, and precipitation of carbonate and iron-sulfide minerals.

  14. Correlation of Upper Cretaceous strata from Lima Peaks area to Madison Range, southwestern Montana and southeastern Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Tysdal, R.G.; Perry, W.J., Jr.; Obradovich, J.D.; Haley, J.C.; Nichols, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar age of 85.81 Ma ?? 0.22 my was obtained on sanidine from a volcanic procellanite bed near the top of the 2135 + m-thick Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation in the Lima Peaks area of southwestern Montana. This early Santonian age, combined with previously determined age data including a palynological age of Cenomanian for the lower Frontier at Lima Peaks, and a U-Pb isotopic date of about 95 Ma for the base of the Frontier Formation in the eastern Pioneer Mountains north of the Lima Peaks area, provides an age range for this nonmarine formation. In the Madison Range, farther east in southwestern Montana, this age range corresponds to marine strata of not only the Frontier Formation, but also the overlying Cody Shale and Telegraph Creek Formation, a sequence that totals less than 760 m thick. The Upper Cretaceous marine formations of the Madison Range are closely zoned by molluscan faunas that are well constrained with radiometric dates. The 40Ar/39Ar age of 85.81 Ma ?? 0.22 my at Lima Peaks is bracketed by radiometric dates for the Scaphites depressus - Protexanites bourgeoisianus biozone and the overlying Clioscaphites saxitonianus - Inoceramus undulatoplicatus biozone of the Western Interior. Fossils of both of these biozones are present in the Cody Shale and the Telegraph Creek Formation in the Madison Range. The Telegraph Creek contains two units of volcanic ash that are approximate time equivalents of the volcanic procellanite of the Lima Peaks area. Clasts in the conglomerate of the upper part of the Frontier in the Lima Peaks area were shed during the initial stages of uplift of the Blacktail-Snowcrest highlands which rose to the north. The dated porcellanite lies above the conglomerates and indicates that the uplift was initiated by middle or late Coniacian, 87-88 Ma. ?? 1997 Academic Press Limited.

  15. Detection of Temporal Changes Using Remote Sensing Data in the Lacustrine Area of Montebello, Chiapas, Southeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, T.; Santillan-Espinoza, L. E.; Lopez-Caloca, A.

    2013-05-01

    A satellite images study was carried out in the lagoon system of Montebello National Park in order to detect temporal changes in water bodies. The area located in the "rio Grande Comitan "basin, presents a geologically complex environment. The study area covers over 6,000 hectares in the extreme southeast region called of the Central Plateau in Chiapas. Its topography is mountainous where there are many karstic valleys. The main attractions of the park are the set of about 50 -60 lakes of different sizes and colors. Part of the lagoon system is fed directly by water from the "Grande de Comitan" river. The Tepancoapan and San Lorenzo lagoons are outstanding because of their size. The other set of lagoons receives only inputs from groundwater flows. Although precipitation is abundant, the surface runoff is not significant, given the high permeability characteristics of the subsoil. The area has been affected mainly by activities of the city of Comitan de Dominguez and surrounding villages, outside the Park. The discharge of wastewater from these towns to the river enters the lagoon system in the region known as "desfiladero" .In the lagoons area exists also settlements and other human activities. We used satellite images (SPOT-5) and algorithms to enhance the spatial resolution. In order to highlight the bodies of water and identify qualitative changes of the water we used Normalized Difference Water Indices (NDWIs) and then compared them. The application of these methodologies has allowed identification of patterns of temporal variation in water bodies in Montebello Park lagoons. The study will be implemented later using other change detection methods.

  16. Summary and Trend Analysis of Water-Quality Data for the Oakes Test Area, Southeastern North Dakota, 1984-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, Karen R.

    2007-01-01

    The Oakes Test Area is operated and maintained by the Garrison Diversion Conservancy District, under a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Reclamation, to evaluate the effectiveness and environmental consequences of irrigation. As part of the evaluation, the Bureau of Reclamation collected water-quality samples from seven sites on the James River and the Oakes Test Area. The data were summarized and examined for trends in concentration. A nonparametric statistical test was used to test whether each concentration was increasing or decreasing with time for selected physical properties and constituents, and a trend slope was estimated for each constituent at each site. Trends were examined for two time periods, 1988-2004 and 1994-2004. Results varied by site and by constituent. All sites and all constituents tested had at least one statistically significant trend in the period 1988-2004. Sulfate, total dissolved solids, nitrate, and orthophosphate have significant positive trends at multiple sites with no significant negative trend at any site. Alkalinity and arsenic have single significant positive trends. Hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, sodium-adsorption ratio, potassium, and chloride have both significant positive and negative trends. Ammonia has a single significant negative trend. Fewer significant trends were identified in 1994-2004, and all but one were positive. The contribution to the James River from Oakes Test Area drainage appears to have little effect on water quality in the James River.

  17. Ground-water quality and vulnerability to contamination in selected agricultural areas of southeastern Michigan, northwestern Ohio, and northeastern Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Mary Ann

    2000-01-01

    Ground-water quality was assessed in the northeastern part of the Corn Belt, where tile-drained row crops are underlain by fractured glacial till. Data were collected from 30 shallow monitor wells and 18 co-located domestic wells as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment in the Lake Erie-Lake St. Clair Basin. Pesticides or pesticide degradates were detected in 41 percent of the monitor wells and 6 percent of the domestic wells. The pesticides detected closely correspond to those most heavily applied?herbicides used on corn and soybeans. Pesticide degradates were detected three times more frequently, and at higher concentrations, than were parent compounds. No pesticide concentration exceeded a USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), but MCL?s have not been established for 9 of the 11 compounds detected. Thirty-seven percent of monitor-well samples had nitrate concentrations indicative of human influences such as fertilizer, manure or septic systems. Nitrate was the only chemical constituent detected at a concentration greater than an MCL. The MCL was exceeded in 7 percent of samples from monitor wells which were too shallow to be used as a source of drinking water. Pesticide and nitrate concentrations in the study area are low relative to other agricultural areas of the Nation. Several authors have suggested that ground water in parts of the Upper Mid-west is minimally contaminated because it is protected by the surficial glacial till or tile drains. These ideas are examined in light of the relations between concentration, well depth, and ground-water age in the study area. Most of the shallow ground water is hydraulically connected to the land surface, based on the observations that 83 percent of waters from monitor wells were recharged after 1953, and 57 percent contained a pesticide or an elevated nitrate concentration. Fractures or sand-and-gravel stringers within the till are the probable pathways. In some areas, deeper parts of

  18. Estimating population and livestock density of mobile pastoralists and sedentary settlements in the south-eastern Lake Chad area.

    PubMed

    Jean-Richard, Vreni; Crump, Lisa; Abicho, Abbani Alhadj; Abakar, Ali Abba; Mahamat, Abdraman; Bechir, Mahamat; Eckert, Sandra; Engesser, Matthias; Schelling, Esther; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mobile pastoralists provide major contributions to the gross domestic product in Chad, but little information is available regarding their demography. The Lake Chad area population is increasing, resulting in competition for scarce land and water resources. For the first time, the density of people and animals from mobile and sedentary populations was assessed using randomly defined sampling areas. Four sampling rounds were conducted over two years in the same areas to show population density dynamics. We identified 42 villages of sedentary communities in the sampling zones; 11 (in 2010) and 16 (in 2011) mobile pastoralist camps at the beginning of the dry season and 34 (in 2011) and 30 (in 2012) camps at the end of the dry season. A mean of 64.0 people per km2 (95% confidence interval, 20.3-107.8) were estimated to live in sedentary villages. In the mobile communities, we found 5.9 people per km2 at the beginning and 17.5 people per km2 at the end of the dry season. We recorded per km2 on average 21.0 cattle and 31.6 small ruminants in the sedentary villages and 66.1 cattle and 102.5 small ruminants in the mobile communities, which amounts to a mean of 86.6 tropical livestock units during the dry season. These numbers exceed, by up to five times, the published carrying capacities for similar Sahelian zones. Our results underline the need for a new institutional framework. Improved land use management must equally consider the needs of mobile communities and sedentary populations. PMID:26054513

  19. Hydrogeochemical studies of the Rustler Formation and related rocks in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Area, Southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.D.; Lambert, S.J.; Robinson, K.L.

    1991-08-01

    Chemical, mineralogical, isotopic, and hydrological studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation and related rocks are used to delineate hydrochemical facies and form the basis for a conceptual model for post-Pleistocene groundwater flow and chemical evolution. Modern flow within the Culebra in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area appears to be largely north-to-south; however, these flow directions under confined conditions are not consistent with the salinity distribution in the region surrounding the WIPP Site. Isotopic, mineralogical, and hydrological data suggest that vertical recharge to the Culebra in the WIPP area and to the immediate east and south has not occurred for several thousand years. Eastward increasing {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios suggest recharge from a near-surface Pleistocene infiltration zone flowing from the west-northwest and imply a change in flow direction in the last 30,000 to 12,000 years. 49 refs., 34 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. The Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX): Performance and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Aranda, J.

    2013-05-01

    Cities, trough VHF and UHF radio signals, Fiber Optics, and Satellite technologies, to reach more reliability and availability SASMEX functions and services. To increase the seismic early warning efficiency the Mexico City Historical Center Authorities, promoted the installation of the NOAA VHF radio transmitters system to cover the Mexico City valley, operating with the Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) called NWR-SAME, and with the Emergency Alert Systems (EAS) protocol of United States. As an enhancement of the NOAA receiver protocol, it was innovated to permit fast Public Alert issue, in no more than 2 sec. The new receiver applied in Mexico is called SARMEX™. Local and federal authorities acquired 90,000 SARMEX™ receivers to be distributed manly in public schools of Mexican cities covered by the SASMEX™ signals; the measure with the aim to promote better natural hazard prevention attitude in the Mexican young population segment.

  1. Earthquake Alert System feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.

    1991-12-01

    An Earthquake Alert System (EAS) could give several seconds to several tens of seconds warning before the strong motion from a large earthquake arrives. Such a system would include a large network of sensors distributed within an earthquake-prone region. The sensors closest to the epicenter of a particular earthquake would transmit data at the speed of light to a central processing center, which would broadcast an area-wide alarm in advance of the spreading elastic wave energy from the earthquake. This is possible because seismic energy travels slowly (3--6 km/s) compared to the speed of light. Utilities, public and private institutions, businesses, and the general public would benefit from an EAS. Although many earthquake protection systems exist that automatically shut down power, gas mains, etc. when ground motion at a facility reaches damaging levels, not EAS -- that is, a system that can provide warning in advance of elastic wave energy arriving at a facility -- has ever been developed in the United States. A recent study by the National Academy of Sciences (NRC, 1991) concludes that an EAS is technically feasible and strongly recommends installing a prototype system that makes use of existing microseismic stations as much as possible. The EAS concept discussed here consists of a distributed network of remote seismic stations that measure weak and strong earth motion and transmit the data in real time to central facility. This facility processes the data and issues warning broadcasts in the form of information packets containing estimates of earthquake location, zero time (the time the earthquake began), magnitude, and reliability of the predictions. User of the warning broadcasts have a dedicated receiver that monitors the warning broadcast frequency. The user also has preprogrammed responses that are automatically executed when the warning information packets contain location and magnitude estimates above a facility`s tolerance.

  2. Earthquake Alert System feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.

    1991-12-01

    An Earthquake Alert System (EAS) could give several seconds to several tens of seconds warning before the strong motion from a large earthquake arrives. Such a system would include a large network of sensors distributed within an earthquake-prone region. The sensors closest to the epicenter of a particular earthquake would transmit data at the speed of light to a central processing center, which would broadcast an area-wide alarm in advance of the spreading elastic wave energy from the earthquake. This is possible because seismic energy travels slowly (3--6 km/s) compared to the speed of light. Utilities, public and private institutions, businesses, and the general public would benefit from an EAS. Although many earthquake protection systems exist that automatically shut down power, gas mains, etc. when ground motion at a facility reaches damaging levels, not EAS -- that is, a system that can provide warning in advance of elastic wave energy arriving at a facility -- has ever been developed in the United States. A recent study by the National Academy of Sciences (NRC, 1991) concludes that an EAS is technically feasible and strongly recommends installing a prototype system that makes use of existing microseismic stations as much as possible. The EAS concept discussed here consists of a distributed network of remote seismic stations that measure weak and strong earth motion and transmit the data in real time to central facility. This facility processes the data and issues warning broadcasts in the form of information packets containing estimates of earthquake location, zero time (the time the earthquake began), magnitude, and reliability of the predictions. User of the warning broadcasts have a dedicated receiver that monitors the warning broadcast frequency. The user also has preprogrammed responses that are automatically executed when the warning information packets contain location and magnitude estimates above a facility's tolerance.

  3. Effectiveness of highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt, Route 25, southeastern Massachusetts; description of study area, data collection programs, and methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, P.E.; Armstrong, D.S.; Granato, G.E.; Stone, V.J.; Smith, K.P.; Provencher, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    Four test sites along a 7-mile section of Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts, each representing a specific highway-drainage system, were instrumented to determine the effectiveness of the drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt. One of the systems discharges highway runoff onsite through local drainpipes. The other systems use trunkline drainpipes through which runoff from highway surfaces, shoulders, and median strips is diverted and discharged into either a local stream or a coastal waterway. Route 25 was completed and opened to traffic in the summer of 1987. Road salt was first applied to the highway in the winter of 1987-88. The study area is on a thick outwash plain composed primarily of sand and gravel. Water-table depths range from 15 to 60 feet below land surface at the four test sites. Ground-water flow is in a general southerly direction, approximately perpendicular to the highway. Streamflow in the study area is controlled primarily by ground-water discharge. Background concentrations of dissolved chloride, sodium, and calcium-the primary constituents of road salt-are similar in ground water and surface water and range from 5 to 20, 5 to 10, and 1 to 5 milligrams per liter, respectively. Data-collection programs were developed for monitoring the application of road salt to the highway, the quantity of road-salt water entering the ground water, diverted through the highway-drainage systems, and entering a local stream. The Massachusetts Highway Department monitored road salt applied to the highway and reported these data to the U.S. Geological Survey. The U.S. Geological Survey designed and operated the ground-water, highway- drainage, and surface-water data-collection programs. A road-salt budget will be calculated for each test site so that the effectiveness of the different highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt can be determined.

  4. The interaction of human activities and geological processes: a geo-environmental study in Southeastern Nigeria (Owerri urban area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, A. H. O.; Ibe, K. M.

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the mechanisms of interaction between the factors human activity, water, vegetation and related geological processes, like gully erosion or filling up of river beds. A surface water and land pollution survey of Owerri urban area, Nigeria, has been carried out in order to establish the current levels of pollution. An attempt has been made to show the relationships between population density, industrial and agricultural activities, environmental contamination, and soil erodibility. The spatial distribution of pollutants due to poor land use system and human activities were investigated, thus emphasizing the need for integrated planning development as a preventive measure for reducing environmental impacts in fast-growing urban centres of developing countries.

  5. Suspended sediment and sediment-source areas in the Fountain Creek drainage basin upstream from Widefield, southeastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Guerard, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Suspended-sediment samples were collected from synoptic-sampling sites to determine suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, yields, and sediment-source areas in the Fountain Creek drainage basin upstream from Widefield, Colorado. Suspended-sediment yields ranged from 0.004 to 278 tons/sq mi/day. Twenty-four sites were sampled that represent urban and rural land use. The median suspended-sediment yield from urban drainage basins was 7.7 tons/sq mi/day and the median suspended-sediment yield from rural drainage basins was 0.46 ton/sq mi/day. Sediment-transport equations were derived for total suspended-sediment discharge and suspended-sand discharge at seven periodic-sampling sites. Annual suspended-sediment loads and yields were computed for the 1985 water year. Urbanization in the downstream parts of the Monument Creek drainage basin, the main tributary to Fountain Creek, affected sediment loads. The downstream 14% of the Monument Creek drainage basin contributed about 61% of the annual suspended-sediment load transported at the mouth of Monument Creek. About 73% of the annual suspended-sediment load for Fountain Creek at Colorado Springs was contributed by Monument Creek. Abandoned mill tailings along Fountain Creek contributed little to total suspended sediment load. Contributions of streambank erosion to basin sediment yields were not quantified. However, the measured rate of streambank erosion at a site on Fountain Creek has increased during a 37-year period. (USGS)

  6. Radioelement distributions in the Proterozoic granites and associated pegmatites of Gabal El Fereyid area, Southeastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Naby, H H; Saleh, G M

    2003-10-01

    Lithologically, the rock types in the Gabal El Fereyid area are dominantly granites with minor amounts of pegmatites. The granites range in composition from tonalite to granite-adamallite with minor acidic dikes, quartz and pegmatite veins. The granite-adamallite is peraluminous and formed as a result of partial melting of amphibole-bearing rocks at depths of approximately 24-30 km and at temperatures of 800-950 degrees C. Among the different rock types, the muscovite-rich pegmatites had the highest U and Th contents (66 and 38 ppm on average, respectively). The high level of radioactivity in pegmatites is attributed to the presence of the radioactive minerals thorianite, uranophane and allanite as confirmed by XRD analysis. Binary relations of Zr/U, Zr/Th, Ce/U and Ce/Th against either U or Th in the granite-adamellite exhibit significant negative correlations indicating that both elements are not preferentially hosted in the accessory minerals phases such as zircon and monazite, but could be associated with major forming minerals such as biotite, muscovite, plagioclase and quartz, or U is situated within labile sites within granite. The uranium and thorium enrichment in the pegmatites is a two-stage process. The primary stage is magmatic whereas the secondary enrichment is from hydrothermal concentration. The magmatic U and Th are indicated by the presence of thorianite and allanite, whereas evidence of hydrothermal mineralization is the alteration of rock-forming minerals such as feldspar and the formation of secondary minerals such as uranophane and pyrite. PMID:14522238

  7. Career Alert Planning. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina; And Others

    This instructor's guide to the Career Alert Planning (CAP) program is one of 14 components (see note) of a set of individualized materials designed to help participants find out about themselves and about the kind of work for which they are suited. In this program, participants become acquainted with occupations that are representative of 10 basic…

  8. Reader Survey for INSECT ALERTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mason E.; Sauer, Richard J.

    To determine what might be done to improve "Insect Alerts," which is a newsletter that carries "information on insect biology, abundance, activity and interpretation of control need," put out through the Michigan Cooperative Extension Service 26 weeks a year, a survey was conducted. A mail questionnaire was sent to all 120 county extension…

  9. Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System siren testing report

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, L.B.

    1997-08-13

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effective coverage of the proposed upgrades to the existing Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System (HSEAS). The upgrades are to enhance the existing HSEAS along the Columbia River from the Vernita Bridge to the White Bluffs Boat Launch as well as install a new alerting system in the 400 Area on the Hanford Site. Five siren sites along the Columbia River and two sites in the 400 Area were tested to determine the site locations that will provide the desired coverage.

  10. Southeastern Australia

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... green and blue, respectively. This display technique causes healthy vegetation to appear red and burnt areas to show as dark brown. The ... exhibit instead the pale yellow-brown of the underlying soils and geology. Significant reduction in the surface area of several large ...

  11. Winter precipitation fields in the Southeastern Mediterranean area as seen by the Ku-band spaceborne weather radar and two C-band ground-based radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabella, M.; Morin, E.; Notarpietro, R.; Michaelides, S.

    2013-01-01

    The spaceborne weather radar onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite can be used to adjust Ground-based Radar (GR) echoes, as a function of the range from the GR site. The adjustment is based on the average linear radar reflectivity in circular rings around the GR site, for both the GR and attenuation-corrected NearSurfZ TRMM Precipitation Radar (TPR) images. In previous studies, it was found that in winter, for the lowest elevation of the Cyprus C-band radar, the GR/TPR equivalent rain rate ratio was decreasing, on average, of approximately 8 dB per decade. In this paper, the same analysis has been applied to another C-band radar in the southeastern Mediterranean area. For the lowest elevation of the "Shacham" radar in Israel, the GR/TPR equivalent rain rate ratio is found to decrease of approximately 6 dB per decade. The average departure at the "reference", intermediate range is related to the calibration of the GR. The negative slope of the range dependence is considered to be mainly caused by an overshooting problem (increasing sampling volume of the GR with range combined with non-homogeneous beam filling and, on average, a decreasing vertical profile of radar reflectivity). To check this hypothesis, we have compared the same NearSurfZ TPR images versus GR data acquired using the second elevation. We expected these data to be affected more by overshooting, especially at distant ranges: the negative slope of the range dependence was in fact found to be more evident than in the case of the lowest GR elevation for both the Cypriot and Israeli radar.

  12. Humid tropical forest disturbance alerts using Landsat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Matthew C.; Krylov, Alexander; Tyukavina, Alexandra; Potapov, Peter V.; Turubanova, Svetlana; Zutta, Bryan; Ifo, Suspense; Margono, Belinda; Stolle, Fred; Moore, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    A Landsat-based humid tropical forest disturbance alert was implemented for Peru, the Republic of Congo and Kalimantan, Indonesia. Alerts were mapped on a weekly basis as new terrain-corrected Landsat 7 and 8 images were made available; results are presented for all of 2014 and through September 2015. The three study areas represent different stages of the forest land use transition, with all featuring a variety of disturbance dynamics including logging, smallholder agriculture, and agroindustrial development. Results for Peru were formally validated and alerts found to have very high user’s accuracies and moderately high producer’s accuracies, indicating an appropriately conservative product suitable for supporting land management and enforcement activities. Complete pan-tropical coverage will be implemented during 2016 in support of the Global Forest Watch initiative. To date, Global Forest Watch produces annual global forest loss area estimates using a comparatively richer set of Landsat inputs. The alert product is presented as an interim update of forest disturbance events between comprehensive annual updates. Results from this study are available for viewing and download at http://glad.geog.umd.edu/forest-alerts and www.globalforestwatch.org.

  13. 49 CFR 229.140 - Alerters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shall be equipped with a functioning alerter as described in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section... operated at speeds in excess of 25 mph on or after January 1, 2017. (b) The alerter on locomotives subject to paragraph (a) of this section shall be equipped with a manual reset and the alerter warning...

  14. 49 CFR 229.140 - Alerters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shall be equipped with a functioning alerter as described in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section... operated at speeds in excess of 25 mph on or after January 1, 2017. (b) The alerter on locomotives subject to paragraph (a) of this section shall be equipped with a manual reset and the alerter warning...

  15. 49 CFR 229.140 - Alerters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... shall be equipped with a functioning alerter as described in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section... operated at speeds in excess of 25 mph on or after January 1, 2017. (b) The alerter on locomotives subject to paragraph (a) of this section shall be equipped with a manual reset and the alerter warning...

  16. The Relationship between Alertness and Executive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbach, Noam; Henik, Avishai

    2012-01-01

    The current study focuses on the relationship between alerting and executive attention. Previous studies reported an increased flanker congruency effect following alerting cues. In the first two experiments, we found that the alertness-congruency interaction did not exist for all executive tasks (it appeared for a flanker task but not for a Stroop…

  17. Development and Implementation of Sepsis Alert Systems.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew M; Gajic, Ognjen; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-06-01

    Development and implementation of sepsis alert systems is challenging, particularly outside the monitored intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Barriers to wider use of sepsis alerts include evolving clinical definitions of sepsis, information overload, and alert fatigue, due to suboptimal alert performance. Outside the ICU, barriers include differences in health care delivery models, charting behaviors, and availability of electronic data. Current evidence does not support routine use of sepsis alert systems in clinical practice. Continuous improvement in the afferent and efferent aspects will help translate theoretic advantages into measurable patient benefit. PMID:27229639

  18. Alert!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Now more than ever, campus safety is of paramount importance. A reliable emergency mass notification system is one way to ensure the safety of constituents, and Brandeis University (MA) recently invested in a system that does the job. In this article, the author interviews John Turner, the school's director of networks and systems. Turner…

  19. 27 CFR 9.72 - Southeastern New England.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Southeastern New England. 9.72 Section 9.72 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.72 Southeastern New England. (a) Name. The...

  20. Hydrogeologic framework refinement, ground-water flow and storage, water-chemistry analyses, and water-budget components of the Yuma area, southwestern Arizona and southeastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Land, Michael; Faunt, Claudia C.; Leake, S.A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Fleming, John B.; Pool, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    The ground-water and surface-water system in the Yuma area in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California is managed intensely to meet water-delivery requirements of customers in the United States, to manage high ground-water levels in the valleys, and to maintain treaty-mandated water-quality and quantity requirements of Mexico. The following components in this report, which were identified to be useful in the development of a ground-water management model, are: (1) refinement of the hydrogeologic framework; (2) updated water-level maps, general ground-water flow patterns, and an estimate of the amount of ground water stored in the mound under Yuma Mesa; (3) review and documentation of the ground-water budget calculated by the Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior (Reclamation); and (4) water-chemistry characterization to identify the spatial distribution of water quality, information on sources and ages of ground water, and information about the productive-interval depths of the aquifer. A refined three-dimensional digital hydrogeologic framework model includes the following hydrogeologic units from bottom to top: (1) the effective hydrologic basement of the basin aquifer, which includes the Pliocene Bouse Formation, Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and pre-Tertiary metamorphic and plutonic rocks; (2) undifferentiated lower units to represent the Pliocene transition zone and wedge zone; (3) coarse-gravel unit; (4) lower, middle, and upper basin fill to represent the upper, fine-grained zone between the top of the coarse-gravel unit and the land surface; and (5) clay A and clay B. Data for the refined model includes digital elevation models, borehole lithology data, geophysical data, and structural data to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units. The top surface of the coarse-gravel unit, defined by using borehole and geophysical data, varies similarly to terraces resulting from the down cutting of the Colorado River. Clay A

  1. Skylab short-lived event alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Citron, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    During the three manned Skylab missions, the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena (CSLP) reported a total of 39 significant events to the Johnson Space Center (JSC) as part of the Skylab Short-Lived Event Alert Program. The telegraphed daily status reports included the names and locations of the events, the track number and revolution number during which the event could be observed, the time (GMT) to within plus or minus 2 sec when Skylab was closest to the event area, and the light condition (daylight or darkness) at that time and place. The messages sent to JSC during the Skylab 4 mission also included information pertaining to ground-truth studies and observations being conducted on the events. Photographic priorities were assigned for each event.

  2. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  3. Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats tabletop exercise: foodborne toxoplasmosis outbreak on college campuses.

    PubMed

    Morris, J Glenn; Greenspan, Allison; Howell, Kelly; Gargano, Lisa M; Mitchell, Joanne; Jones, Jeffrey L; Potter, Morris; Isakov, Alexander; Woods, Christopher; Hughes, James M

    2012-03-01

    The use of tabletop exercises as a tool in emergency preparedness and response has proven to be an effective means of assessing readiness for unexpected events. Whereas most exercise developers target a population in a defined space (eg, state, county, metropolitan area, hospital), the Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats (SECEBT) conducted an innovative tabletop exercise involving an unusual foodborne outbreak pathogen, targeting public health agencies and academic institutions in 7 southeastern states. The exercise tested the ability of participants to respond to a simulated foodborne disease outbreak affecting the region. The attendees represented 4 federal agencies, 9 state agencies, 6 universities, 1 nonprofit organization, and 1 private corporation. The goals were to promote collaborative relationships among the players, identify gaps in plans and policies, and identify the unique contributions of each organization-and notably academic institutions-to outbreak recognition, investigation, and control. Participants discussed issues and roles related to outbreak detection and management, risk communication, and coordination of policies and responsibilities before, during, and after an emergency, with emphasis on assets of universities that could be mobilized during an outbreak response. The exercise generated several lessons and recommendations identified by participants and evaluators. Key recommendations included a need to establish trigger points and protocols for information sharing and alerts among public health, academic, and law enforcement; to establish relationships with local, state, and federal stakeholders to facilitate communications during an emergency; and to catalogue and leverage strengths, assets, and priorities of academic institutions to add value to outbreak responses. PMID:22283568

  4. Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats Tabletop Exercise: Foodborne Toxoplasmosis Outbreak on College Campuses

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. Glenn; Greenspan, Allison; Howell, Kelly; Mitchell, Joanne; Jones, Jeffrey L.; Potter, Morris; Isakov, Alexander; Woods, Christopher; Hughes, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of tabletop exercises as a tool in emergency preparedness and response has proven to be an effective means of assessing readiness for unexpected events. Whereas most exercise developers target a population in a defined space (eg, state, county, metropolitan area, hospital), the Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats (SECEBT) conducted an innovative tabletop exercise involving an unusual foodborne outbreak pathogen, targeting public health agencies and academic institutions in 7 southeastern states. The exercise tested the ability of participants to respond to a simulated foodborne disease outbreak affecting the region. The attendees represented 4 federal agencies, 9 state agencies, 6 universities, 1 nonprofit organization, and 1 private corporation. The goals were to promote collaborative relationships among the players, identify gaps in plans and policies, and identify the unique contributions of each organization—and notably academic institutions—to outbreak recognition, investigation, and control. Participants discussed issues and roles related to outbreak detection and management, risk communication, and coordination of policies and responsibilities before, during, and after an emergency, with emphasis on assets of universities that could be mobilized during an outbreak response. The exercise generated several lessons and recommendations identified by participants and evaluators. Key recommendations included a need to establish trigger points and protocols for information sharing and alerts among public health, academic, and law enforcement; to establish relationships with local, state, and federal stakeholders to facilitate communications during an emergency; and to catalogue and leverage strengths, assets, and priorities of academic institutions to add value to outbreak responses. PMID:22283568

  5. The Liaonan metamorphic core complex, Southeastern Liaoning Province, North China: A likely contributor to Cretaceous rotation of Eastern Liaoning, Korea and contiguous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junlai; Davis, Gregory A.; Lin, Zhiyong; Wu, Fuyuan

    2005-09-01

    The Mesozoic Liaonan metamorphic core complex (mcc) of the southeastern Liaoning province, North China, is an asymmetric Cordilleran-style complex with a west-rooting master detachment fault, the Jinzhou fault. A thick sequence of lower plate, fault-related mylonitic and gneissic rocks derived from Archean and Early Cretaceous crystalline protoliths has been transported ESE-ward from mid-crustal depths. U-Pb ages of lower plate syntectonic plutons (ca. 130-120 Ma), 40Ar- 39Ar cooling ages in the mylonitic and gneissic sequence (ca. 120-110 Ma), and a Cretaceous supradetachment basin attest to the Early Cretaceous age of this extensional complex. The recent discovery of the coeval and similarly west-rooting Waziyu mcc in western Liaoning [Darby, B.J., Davis, G.A., Zhang, X., Wu, F., Wilde, S., Yang, J., 2004. The newly discovered Waziyu metamorphic core complex, Yiwulushan, western Liaoning Province, North China. Earth Science Frontiers 11, 145-155] indicates that the Gulf of Liaoning, which lies between the two complexes, was the center of a region of major crustal extension. Clockwise crustal rotation of a large region including eastern Liaoning province and the Korean Peninsula with respect to a non-rotated North China block has been conclusively documented by paleomagnetic studies over the past decade. The timing of this rotation and the reasons for it are controversial. Lin et al. [Lin, W., Chen, Y., Faure, M., Wang, Q., 2003. Tectonic implication of new Late Cretaceous paleomagnetic constraints from Eastern Liaoning Peninsula, NE China. Journal of Geophysical Research 108 (B-6) (EPM 5-1 to 5-17)] proposed that a clockwise rotation of 22.5° ± 10.2° was largely post-Early Cretaceous in age, and was the consequence of extension within a crustal domain that tapers southwards towards the Bohai Sea (of which the Gulf of Liaoning is the northernmost part). Paleomagnetic studies of Early Cretaceous strata (ca 134-120 Ma) in the Yixian-Fuxin supradetachment basin of

  6. Monitoring epidemic alert levels by analyzing Internet search volume.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xichuan; Li, Qin; Zhu, Zhenglin; Zhao, Han; Tang, Hao; Feng, Yujie

    2013-02-01

    The prevention of infectious diseases is a global health priority area. The early detection of possible epidemics is the first and important defense line against infectious diseases. However, conventional surveillance systems, e.g., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), rely on clinical data. The CDC publishes the surveillance results weeks after epidemic outbreaks. To improve the early detection of epidemic outbreaks, we designed a syndromic surveillance system to predict the epidemic trends based on disease-related Google search volume. Specifically, we first represented the epidemic trend with multiple alert levels to reduce the noise level. Then, we predicted the epidemic alert levels using a continuous density HMM, which incorporated the intrinsic characteristic of the disease transmission for alert level estimation. Respective models are built to monitor both national and regional epidemic alert levels of the U.S. The proposed system can provide real-time surveillance results, which are weeks before the CDC's reports. This paper focusses on monitoring the infectious disease in the U.S., however, we believe similar approach may be used to monitor epidemics for the developing countries as well. PMID:23192470

  7. Alerting of Laboratory Critical Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Paik, Hyeon Young; Lee, Chi Woo; Bang, Su Mi; Hong, Joon Seok; Lee, Hyun Joo; Cho, In-Sook; Kim, Jeong Ah; Kim, Hyun-Young; Kim, Yoon

    Critical value is defined as a result suggesting that the patient is in danger unless appropriate action is taken immediately. We designed an automated reporting system of critical values and evaluated its performance. Fifteen critical values were defined and 2-4 doctors were assigned to receive short message service (SMS).Laboratory results in LIS and EMR were called back to the DIA server. The rule engine named U-brain in the CDSS server was run in real-time and decision if the laboratory data was critical was made. The CDSS system for alerting of laboratory critical values was fast and stable without additional burden to the entire EMR system. Continuous communication with clinicians and feedback of clinical performance are mandatory for the refinement and development of user-friendly CDSS contents. Appropriate clinical parameters are necessary for demonstration of the usefulness of the system.

  8. 21 CFR 26.20 - Alert system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alert system. 26.20 Section 26.20 Food and Drugs... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.20 Alert system. (a) The details of an...

  9. School Bus Alert System Reduces Delays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleasnick, Stephen G.

    1985-01-01

    The school bus alert monitor is a computerized school bus alert and warning sytem that notifies parents of school bus arrival via radio frequency technology. The system also has been shown to enhance the self esteem of disabled transportation users. (CL)

  10. Evaluation of Helmet Mounted Display Alerting Symbology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMaio, Joe; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Proposed helicopter helmet mounted displays will be used to alert the pilot to a variety of conditions, from threats to equipment problems. The present research was performed under the NASA Safe All-weather Flight Operations Research (SAFOR) program supported by a joint Army/NASA research agreement. The purpose of the research was to examine ways to optimize the alerting effectiveness of helmet display symbology. The research used two approaches to increasing the effectiveness of alerts. One was to increase the ability of the alert to attract attention by using the entire display surface. The other was to include information about the required response in the alert itself. The investigation was conducted using the NASA Ames Research Center's six-degree-of-freedom vertical motion simulator (VMS) with a rotorcraft cockpit. Helmet display symbology was based on the AH-64's pilot night vision system (PNVS), cruise mode symbology. A standardized mission was developed, that consisted of 11 legs. The mission included four tasks, which allowed variation in the frequency of alerts. The general trend in the data points to a small benefit from both the full-screen alert and the partial information alert.

  11. 21 CFR 26.20 - Alert system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alert system. 26.20 Section 26.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.20 Alert system. (a) The details of an...

  12. 21 CFR 26.20 - Alert system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alert system. 26.20 Section 26.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.20 Alert system. (a) The details of an...

  13. 21 CFR 26.20 - Alert system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alert system. 26.20 Section 26.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.20 Alert system. (a) The details of an...

  14. Auditory alert systems with enhanced detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and systems for distinguishing an auditory alert signal from a background of one or more non-alert signals. In a first embodiment, a prefix signal, associated with an existing alert signal, is provided that has a signal component in each of three or more selected frequency ranges, with each signal component in each of three or more selected level at least 3-10 dB above an estimated background (non-alert) level in that frequency range. The alert signal may be chirped within one or more frequency bands. In another embodiment, an alert signal moves, continuously or discontinuously, from one location to another over a short time interval, introducing a perceived spatial modulation or jitter. In another embodiment, a weighted sum of background signals adjacent to each ear is formed, and the weighted sum is delivered to each ear as a uniform background; a distinguishable alert signal is presented on top of this weighted sum signal at one ear, or distinguishable first and second alert signals are presented at two ears of a subject.

  15. A review of the geochronology and geochemistry of Late Yanshanian (Cretaceous) plutons along the Fujian coastal area of southeastern China: Implications for magma evolution related to slab break-off and rollback in the Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Qiu, Jian-Sheng; Yang, Xue-Mei

    2014-01-01

    The Cretaceous plutonic suites in the Fujian coastal area include abundant I-type and A-type granitoids and lesser gabbroids. They are important components of the Late Yanshanian magmatic belt along the southeastern coast of China, and define a linear NNE-SSW-trending belt of magmatism. Geochronological, geochemical and geological data from thirty intrusions are summarised in this paper, and the data provide distinct magmatic, geochemical and tectonic patterns in the area. A compilation of geochronological data for these intrusive rocks indicates emplacement mainly from around 125 to 90 Ma, with a major peak from 115 to 90 Ma, and a subordinate peak from 125 to 115 Ma. Besides their temporal and spatial coexistence, all these intrusive rocks have similar geochemical patterns which point to involvement of components from a depleted asthenospheric mantle source for the parental magmas, most probably by magma mixing. The first appearance of sparse I-type granitoids with post-collisional extensional granite affinities, and the emplacement of the Baijuhuajian and Suzhou A-type granites, mark the beginning of extension during the Early Cretaceous at ca. 125 to 119 Ma. The subsequent development of bimodal magmatism at 115 to 90 Ma, with numerous arc-related mafic gabbros and I-type granites, together with some A-type granites, suggests that this major igneous event took place as a response to back-arc extension. On the basis of petrology, geochronology, tectonics, and elemental and isotopic geochemistry, we speculate that break-off and rollback of the subducting Palaeo-Pacific Plate during the Cretaceous were responsible for the Late Yanshanian regional tectono-magmatic evolution in the area. We suggest that this process facilitated a strong and rapid linear upwelling of the asthenospheric mantle beneath the coastal area of southeastern China, with consequential extension of the overlying continental lithosphere, and ultimately the large-scale Late Yanshanian magmatism

  16. 78 FR 42818 - SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With Liquid Petroleum (LP) Gas Odor Fade

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration ] SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With...), DOT. ACTION: Safety Alert Notice. SUMMARY: PHMSA is issuing this safety alert to notify the public of... purpose of this alert is to advise shippers and carriers of the recommended procedures to ensure that...

  17. Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation Through Mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kumar, S. Magesh; Mohan, K.; Kadirvelu, G.; Muruganandam, S.

    2012-08-01

    Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation with Generative Data Stream Modeling is a generative modeling approach using probabilistic methods. Assuming that attack instances can be regarded as random processes ìproducingî alerts, we aim at modeling these processes using approximative maximum likelihood parameterestimation techniques. Thus, the beginning as well as the completion of attack instances can be detected. In the proposed scheme of Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation, we extend our idea of sending Intrusion alerts to the mobile. This makes the process easier and comfortable. Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation with Generative Data Stream Modeling does not degrade system performance as individual layers are independent and are trained with only a small number of features, thereby, resulting in an efficient system

  18. Predictive Information: Status or Alert Information?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Bruneau, Daniel; Press, Hayes N.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research investigating the efficacy of predictive information for detecting and diagnosing aircraft system failures found that subjects like to have predictive information concerning when a parameter would reach an alert range. This research focused on where the predictive information should be located, whether the information should be more closely associated with the parameter information or with the alert information. Each subject saw 3 forms of predictive information: (1) none, (2) a predictive alert message, and (3) predictive information on the status display. Generally, subjects performed better and preferred to have predictive information available although the difference between status and alert predictive information was minimal. Overall, for detection and recalling what happened, status predictive information is best; however for diagnosis, alert predictive information holds a slight edge.

  19. Outlier Detection for Patient Monitoring and Alerting

    PubMed Central

    Hauskrecht, Milos; Batal, Iyad; Valko, Michal; Visweswaran, Shyam; Cooper, Gregory F.; Clermont, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We develop and evaluate a data-driven approach for detecting unusual (anomalous) patient-management decisions using past patient cases stored in electronic health records (EHRs). Our hypothesis is that a patient-management decision that is unusual with respect to past patient care may be due to an error and that it is worthwhile to generate an alert if such a decision is encountered. We evaluate this hypothesis using data obtained from EHRs of 4,486 post-cardiac surgical patients and a subset of 222 alerts generated from the data. We base the evaluation on the opinions of a panel of experts. The results of the study support our hypothesis that the outlier-based alerting can lead to promising true alert rates. We observed true alert rates that ranged from 25% to 66% for a variety of patient-management actions, with 66% corresponding to the strongest outliers. PMID:22944172

  20. Medical alert management: a real-time adaptive decision support tool to reduce alert fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Wu, Tsung-Lin; Senior, Tal; Jose, James

    2014-01-01

    With the adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs), drug safety alerts are increasingly recognized as valuable tools for reducing adverse drug events and improving patient safety. However, even with proper tuning of the EMR alert parameters, the volume of unfiltered alerts can be overwhelming to users. In this paper, we design an adaptive decision support tool in which past cognitive overriding decisions of users are learned, adapted and used for filtering actions to be performed on current alerts. The filters are designed and learned based on a moving time window, number of alerts, overriding rates, and monthly overriding fluctuations. Using alerts from two separate years to derive filters and test performance, predictive accuracy rates of 91.3%-100% are achieved. The moving time window works better than a static training approach. It allows continuous learning and capturing of the most recent decision characteristics and seasonal variations in drug usage. The decision support system facilitates filtering of non-essential alerts and adaptively learns critical alerts and highlights them prominently to catch providers' attention. The tool can be plugged into an existing EMR system as an add-on, allowing real-time decision support to users without interfering with existing EMR functionalities. By automatically filtering the alerts, the decision support tool mitigates alert fatigue and allows users to focus resources on potentially vital alerts, thus reducing the occurrence of adverse drug events. PMID:25954391

  1. ESTIMATING AND PROJECTING IMPERVIOUS COVER IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban/suburban land use constitutes the fastest growing land use class in the Southeastern United States. Predominant development practices increase impervious surface--areas preventing infiltration of water into the underlying soil. Uncontrolled increase of impervious areas (ro...

  2. ESTIMATING AND PROJECTING IMPERVIOUS COVER IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban/suburban land constitutes the fastest growing land use class in the Southeastern United States. Predominant development practices increase impervious surface--areas preventing infiltration of water into the underlying soil. Uncontrolled increase of impervious areas (roads,...

  3. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  4. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  5. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway....

  6. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway....

  7. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway....

  8. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  9. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway....

  10. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  11. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  12. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway....

  13. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in southeastern New England.

    PubMed

    Crowley, J P; Zaroulis, C G; O'Shea, P A; Clark, D D

    1983-05-01

    Eight patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) originating within a 25-mile radius had their conditions diagnosed in a three-year period at a community teaching hospital in southeastern New England. In the preceding ten years, only one case of TTP had occurred in the same hospital. A niece-uncle relationship was present in two patients, and lymphocyte typing showed that they both shared an HLA haplotype. In the remaining patients, no social, familial, or environmental connection was established. Three patients died, all of whom were female. Six patients received exchange plasmapheresis with excellent responses in five. Autopsies in the three fatal cases showed widespread organ involvement with TTP but did not disclose evidence of any common underlying disease. This unusual occurrence should alert physicians to the possibility of localized outbreaks of TTP and the necessity of considering this diagnosis in all patients with unexplained thrombocytopenia. PMID:6383244

  14. Pass Over Southeastern Asia

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video over Southeastern Asia was taken by the crew of Expedition 29 aboard the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was taken on Oct. 7, 2011, from 12:41:10 to 12:50:46 GMT, on ...

  15. Alertness function of thalamus in conflict adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangpeng; Zhao, Xiaoyue; Xue, Gui; Chen, Antao

    2016-05-15

    Conflict adaptation reflects the ability to improve current conflict resolution based on previously experienced conflict, which is crucial for our goal-directed behaviors. In recent years, the roles of alertness are attracting increasing attention when discussing the generation of conflict adaptation. However, due to the difficulty of manipulating alertness, very limited progress has been made in this line. Inspired by that color may affect alertness, we manipulated background color of experimental task and found that conflict adaptation significantly presented in gray and red backgrounds but did not in blue background. Furthermore, behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging results revealed that the modulation of color on conflict adaptation was implemented through changing alertness level. In particular, blue background eliminated conflict adaptation by damping the alertness regulating function of thalamus and the functional connectivity between thalamus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). In contrast, in gray and red backgrounds where alertness levels are typically high, the thalamus and the right IFG functioned normally and conflict adaptations were significant. Therefore, the alertness function of thalamus is determinant to conflict adaptation, and thalamus and right IFG are crucial nodes of the neural circuit subserving this ability. Present findings provide new insights into the neural mechanisms of conflict adaptation. PMID:26908318

  16. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  17. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  18. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  19. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  20. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  1. Baseline Survey of Educational Technology Access and Application in Southeastern Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyner, Kathleen; And Others

    Utah's Southeastern Education Service Center has devised a five-phase vision plan for improving the educational technology infrastructure in the southeastern region of the state. The fourth phase involves the creation of the Southeastern Utah Regional Wide Area Network (SURWAN), which will link all K-12 schools to the Internet by 1996. This…

  2. Delta Alerts: Changing Outcomes in Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Lynn L; Day, Mark D; Harris, LeAnna

    2016-01-01

    Geriatric trauma patients (GTPs) suffering minor injuries have suboptimal outcomes compared with younger populations. Patients 65 years or older account for 10% of all traumas but 28% of all trauma deaths. This trauma center established a third tier trauma alert specifically targeting GTPs at risk for poor outcomes. A Delta Alert is activated when GTPs suffer injuries that fall outside traditional trauma alert guidelines. Early identification and treatment of injuries and expedited referral to specialty groups have improved our GTPs' outcomes including decreased mortality and length of stay and increased percentage of GTPs who are discharged home. PMID:27414140

  3. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert

    2004-02-01

    Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version supports interactive selection and graphical display of data generated by the Sandia Cognitive Framework, which simulates the examination of security data by experts of various specialties. Insider Alert also encompasses the configuration and data files input to the Cognitive Framework for this application. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version is a computer program for analyzing data indicative of possible espionage or improper handling of data by employees at Sandia National Laboratories (or other facilities with comparable policies and procedures for managing sensitive information) It prioritizes and displays information for review by security analysts.

  4. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version

    2004-02-01

    Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version supports interactive selection and graphical display of data generated by the Sandia Cognitive Framework, which simulates the examination of security data by experts of various specialties. Insider Alert also encompasses the configuration and data files input to the Cognitive Framework for this application. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version is a computer program for analyzing data indicative of possible espionage or improper handling of data by employees at Sandia National Laboratoriesmore » (or other facilities with comparable policies and procedures for managing sensitive information) It prioritizes and displays information for review by security analysts.« less

  5. Detecting alerts, notifying the physician, and offering action items: a comprehensive alerting system.

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, G. J.; Teich, J. M.; Bates, D. W.; Hiltz, F. L.; Hurley, J. M.; Lee, R. Y.; Paterno, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a system to automatically identify serious clinical conditions in inpatients. The system notifies the patient's covering physician via his pager that an alert is present and offers potential therapies for the patient's condition (action items) at the time he views the alert information. Over a 6 month period, physicians responded to 1214 (70.2%) of 1730 alerts for which they were paged; they responded to 1002 (82.5% of the 1214) in less than 15 minutes. They said they would take action in 71.5% of the alerts, and they placed an order directly from the alert display screen in 39.4%. Further study is needed to determine if this alerting system improves processes or outcomes of care. PMID:8947756

  6. Prototype Conflict Alerting Logic for Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Lee C.; Kuchar, James K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a prototype alerting system for a conceptual Free Flight environment. The concept assumes that datalink between aircraft is available and that conflicts are primarily resolved on the flight deck. Four alert stages are generated depending on the likelihood of a conflict. If the conflict is not resolved by the flight crews, Air Traffic Control is notified to take over separation authority. The alerting logic is based on probabilistic analysis through modeling of aircraft sensor and trajectory uncertainties. Monte Carlo simulations were used over a range of encounter situations to determine conflict probability. The four alert stages were then defined based on probability of conflict and on the number of avoidance maneuvers available to the flight crew. Preliminary results from numerical evaluations and from a piloted simulator study at NASA Ames Research Center are summarized.

  7. An Obstacle Alerting System for Agricultural Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMaio, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Wire strikes are a significant cause of helicopter accidents. The aircraft most at risk are aerial applicators. The present study examines the effectiveness of a wire alert delivered by way of the lightbar, a GPS-based guidance system for aerial application. The alert lead-time needed to avoid an invisible wire is compared with that to avoid a visible wire. A flight simulator was configured to simulate an agricultural application helicopter. Two pilots flew simulated spray runs in fields with visible wires, invisible wires, and no wires. The wire alert was effective in reducing wire strikes. A lead-time of 3.5 sec was required for the alert to be effective. The lead- time required was the same whether the pilot could see the wire or not.

  8. Tone-activated, remote, alert communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. D.; Couvillon, L. A.; Hubbard, W. P.; Kollar, F. J.; Postal, R. B.; Tegnelia, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Pocket sized transmitter, frequency modulated by crystal derived tones, with integral loop antenna provides police with easy operating alert signal communicator which uses patrol car radio to relay signal. Communication channels are time shared by several patrol units.

  9. 21 CFR 26.20 - Alert system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS, AND CERTAIN... Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.20 Alert system. (a) The details of an...

  10. IP telephony based danger alert communication system and its implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, Filip; Safarik, Jakub; Voznak, Miroslav; Tomala, Karel; Partila, Pavol

    2013-05-01

    This article discusses a danger alert system created as a part of the research project at Department of Telecommunications of Technical University of Ostrava. The aim of the system is to distribute pre-recorded voice messages in order to alert the called party in danger. This article describes individual technologies, which the application uses for its operation as well as issues relating to hardware requirements and transfer line bandwidth load. The article also describes new algorithms, which had to be developed in order to ensure the reliability of the system. Our intent is focused on disaster management, the message, which should be delivered within specified time span, is typed in the application and text-to-speech module ensures its transformation to a speech format, after that a particular scenario or warned area is selected and a target group is automatically unloaded. For this purpose, we have defined XML format for delivery of phone numbers which are located in the target area and these numbers are obtained from mobile BTS's (Base transmission stations). The benefit of such communication compared to others, is the fact, that it uses a phone call and, therefore, it is possible to get feedback who accepted the message and to improve efficiency of alert system. Finally, the list of unanswered calls is exported and these users can be informed via SMS.

  11. Emergency vehicle alert system (EVAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Bill; Crump, Roger; Harper, Warren; Myneni, Krishna

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Vehicle Alert System (EVAS) program is sponsored by the NASA/MSFC Technology Utilization (TU) office. The program was conceived to support the needs of hearing impaired drivers. The objective of the program is to develop a low-cost, small device which can be located in a personal vehicle and warn the driver, via a visual means, of the approach of an emergency vehicle. Many different technologies might be developed for this purpose and each has its own advantages and drawbacks. The requirements for an acoustic detection system, appear to be pretty stringent and may not allow the development of a reliable, low-cost device in the near future. The problems include variations in the sirens between various types of emergency vehicles, distortions due to wind and surrounding objects, competing background noise, sophisticated signal processing requirements, and omni-directional coverage requirements. Another approach is to use a Radio Frequency (RF) signal between the Emergency Vehicle (EV) and the Personal Vehicle (PV). This approach requires a transmitter on each EV and a receiver in each PV, however it is virtually assured that a system can be developed which works. With this approach, the real technology issue is how to make a system work as inexpensively as possible. This report gives a brief summary of the EVAS program from its inception and concentrates on describing the activities that occurred during Phase 4. References 1-3 describe activities under Phases 1-3. In the fourth phase of the program, the major effort to be expended was in development of the microcontroller system for the PV, refinement of some system elements and packaging for demonstration purposes. An EVAS system was developed and demonstrated which used standard spread spectrum modems with minor modifications.

  12. Alert generation and cockpit presentation for an integrated microburst alerting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Alert generation and cockpit presentation issues for low level wind shear (microburst) alerts are investigated. Alert generation issues center on the development of a hazard criterion which allows integration of both ground based and airborne wind shear detection systems to form an accurate picture of the aviation hazard posed by a particular wind shear situation. A methodology for the testing of a hazard criteria through flight simulation has been developed, and has been used to examine the effectiveness and feasibility of several possible criteria. Also, an experiment to evaluate candidate graphical cockpit displays for microburst alerts using a piloted simulator has been designed.

  13. Alertness can be improved by an interaction between orienting attention and alerting attention in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Attention is impaired in schizophrenia. Early attention components include orienting and alerting, as well as executive control networks. Previous studies have shown mainly executive control deficits, while few of them found orienting and alerting abnormalities. Here we explore the different attentive networks, their modulation and interactions in patients with schizophrenia. Methods Twenty-one schizophrenic patients (DSMIV), compared to 21 controls, performed a modified version of the Attention Network Task, in which an orienting paradigm (with valid, invalid and no cues) was combined with a flanker task (congruent/incongruent) and an alerting signal (tone/no tone), to assess orienting, executive control and alerting networks independently. Results Patients showed an abnormal alerting effect and slower overall reaction time compared to controls. Moreover, there was an interaction between orienting and alerting: patients are helped more than controls by the alerting signal in a valid orientation to solve the incongruent condition. Conclusion These results suggest that patients with schizophrenia have altered alerting abilities. However, the orienting and alerting cues interact to improve their attention performance in the resolution of conflict, creating possibilities for cognitive remediation strategies. PMID:21729299

  14. Alert generation and cockpit presentation for an integrated microburst alerting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Alert generation and cockpit presentation issues for low-level wind shear (microburst) alerts are investigated. Alert generation issues center on development of a hazard criterion which allows integration of both ground-based and airborne wind shear detection systems to form an accurate picture of the aviation hazard posed by a particular wind shear situation. A methodology for testing of hazard criteria through flight simulation has been developed, and has been used to examine the effectiveness and feasibility of several possible criteria. Also, an experiment to evaluate candidate graphical cockpit displays for microburst alerts using a piloted simulator has been designed.

  15. Individual alerting efficiency modulates time perception

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peiduo; Yang, Wenjing; Yuan, Xiangyong; Bi, Cuihua; Chen, Antao; Huang, Xiting

    2015-01-01

    Time perception plays a fundamental role in human perceptual and motor activities, and can be influenced by various factors, such as selective attention and arousal. However, little is known about the influence of individual alerting efficiency on perceived duration. In this study, we explored this question by running two experiments. The Attentional Networks Test was used to evaluate individual differences in alerting efficiency in each experiment. Temporal bisection (Experiment 1) and time generalization task (Experiment 2) were used to explore the participants’ perception of duration. The results indicated that subjects in the high alerting efficiency group overestimated interval durations and estimated durations more accurately compared with subjects in the low alerting efficiency group. The two experiments showed that the sensitivity of time was not influenced by individual alerting efficiency. Based on previous studies and current findings, we infer that individual differences in alerting efficiency may influence time perception through modulating the latency of the attention-controlled switch and the speed of the peacemaker within the framework of the internal clock model. PMID:25904881

  16. Southeastern Europe: A Guide to Basic Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horecky, Paul L., Ed.

    This annotated area guide presents a judicious evaluation of those writings which are particularly relevant to the contemporary political, socio-economic, and intellectual life of Southeastern Europe. It contains more than 3,000 bibliographic entries, together with additional citations for collateral reading. The entries include basic publications…

  17. The Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, John S.; Drury, Patrick; Arthur, Ray R.; Ryan, Michael J.; Grein, Thomas; Slattery, Raphael; Suri, Sameera; Domingo, Christine Tiffany; Bejtullahu, Armand

    2014-01-01

    The Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) was established in 2000 as a network of technical institutions, research institutes, universities, international health organisations and technical networks willing to contribute and participate in internationally coordinated responses to infectious disease outbreaks. It reflected a recognition of the need to strengthen and coordinate rapid mobilisation of experts in responding to international outbreaks and to overcome the sometimes chaotic and fragmented operations characterising previous responses. The network partners agreed that the World Health Organization would coordinate the network and provide a secretariat, which would also function as the operational support team. The network has evolved to comprise 153 institutions/technical partners and 37 additional networks, the latter encompassing a further 355 members and has been directly involved in 137 missions to 79 countries, territories or areas. Future challenges will include supporting countries to achieve the capacity to detect and respond to outbreaks of international concern, as required by the International Health Regulations (2005). GOARN's increasing regional focus and expanding geographic composition will be central to meeting these challenges. The paper summarises some of network's achievements over the past 13 years and presents some of the future challenges. PMID:25186571

  18. 78 FR 16806 - The Commercial Mobile Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 10 The Commercial Mobile Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS) to Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA). This is intended to conform the name used for the wireless alert system regulated under Commission rules to the name used by the...

  19. 47 CFR 80.334 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.334 Section 80.334... § 80.334 False distress alerts. A distress alert is false if it was transmitted without any indication... distress alert is prohibited and may be subject to the provisions of part 1, subpart A of this chapter...

  20. 16 CFR 613.1 - Duration of active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duration of active duty alerts. 613.1 Section 613.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT DURATION OF ACTIVE DUTY ALERTS § 613.1 Duration of active duty alerts. The duration of an active duty alert shall...

  1. 44 CFR 208.36 - Reimbursement for Alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement for Alert. 208... Cooperative Agreements § 208.36 Reimbursement for Alert. (a) Allowable costs. DHS will reimburse costs incurred during an Alert, up to the dollar limit specified in the Alert Order, for the following...

  2. 44 CFR 208.36 - Reimbursement for Alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reimbursement for Alert. 208... Cooperative Agreements § 208.36 Reimbursement for Alert. (a) Allowable costs. DHS will reimburse costs incurred during an Alert, up to the dollar limit specified in the Alert Order, for the following...

  3. 47 CFR 80.334 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.334 Section 80.334... § 80.334 False distress alerts. A distress alert is false if it was transmitted without any indication... distress alert is prohibited and may be subject to the provisions of part 1, subpart A of this chapter...

  4. 44 CFR 208.36 - Reimbursement for Alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reimbursement for Alert. 208... Cooperative Agreements § 208.36 Reimbursement for Alert. (a) Allowable costs. DHS will reimburse costs incurred during an Alert, up to the dollar limit specified in the Alert Order, for the following...

  5. 47 CFR 80.334 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.334 Section 80.334... § 80.334 False distress alerts. A distress alert is false if it was transmitted without any indication... distress alert is prohibited and may be subject to the provisions of part 1, subpart A of this chapter...

  6. 44 CFR 208.36 - Reimbursement for Alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reimbursement for Alert. 208... Cooperative Agreements § 208.36 Reimbursement for Alert. (a) Allowable costs. DHS will reimburse costs incurred during an Alert, up to the dollar limit specified in the Alert Order, for the following...

  7. 47 CFR 80.334 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.334 Section 80.334... § 80.334 False distress alerts. A distress alert is false if it was transmitted without any indication... distress alert is prohibited and may be subject to the provisions of part 1, subpart A of this chapter...

  8. 44 CFR 208.36 - Reimbursement for Alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Reimbursement for Alert. 208... Cooperative Agreements § 208.36 Reimbursement for Alert. (a) Allowable costs. DHS will reimburse costs incurred during an Alert, up to the dollar limit specified in the Alert Order, for the following...

  9. 47 CFR 80.334 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.334 Section 80.334... § 80.334 False distress alerts. A distress alert is false if it was transmitted without any indication... distress alert is prohibited and may be subject to the provisions of part 1, subpart A of this chapter...

  10. 16 CFR 613.1 - Duration of active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Duration of active duty alerts. 613.1 Section 613.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT DURATION OF ACTIVE DUTY ALERTS § 613.1 Duration of active duty alerts. The duration of an active duty alert shall...

  11. 16 CFR 613.1 - Duration of active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Duration of active duty alerts. 613.1 Section 613.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT DURATION OF ACTIVE DUTY ALERTS § 613.1 Duration of active duty alerts. The duration of an active duty alert shall...

  12. Processes of Terrace Formation on the Piedmont of the Santa Cruz River Valley During Quaternary Time, Green Valley-Tubac Area, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    In this report we describe a series of stepped Quaternary terraces on some piedmont tributaries of the Santa Cruz River valley in southeastern Arizona. These terraces began to form in early Pleistocene time, after major basin-and-range faulting ceased, with lateral planation of basin fill and deposition of thin fans of alluvium. At the end of this cycle of erosion and deposition, tributaries of the Santa Cruz River began the process of dissection and terrace formation that continues to the present. Vertical cutting alternated with periods of equilibrium, during which streams cut laterally and left thin deposits of channel fill. The distribution of terraces was mapped and compiled with adjacent mapping to produce a regional picture of piedmont stream history in the middle part of the Santa Cruz River valley. For selected tributaries, the thickness of terrace fill was measured, particle size and lithology of gravel were determined, and sedimentary features were photographed and described. Mapping of terrace stratigraphy revealed that on two tributaries, Madera Canyon Wash and Montosa Canyon Wash, stream piracy has played an important role in piedmont landscape development. On two other tributaries, Cottonwood Canyon Wash and Josephine Canyon Wash, rapid downcutting preempted piracy. Two types of terraces are recognized: erosional and depositional. Gravel in thin erosional terraces has Trask sorting coefficients and sedimentary structures typical of streamflood deposits, replete with bar-and-swale surface topography on young terraces. Erosional-terrace fill represents the channel fill of the stream that cuts the terrace; the thickness of the fill indicates the depth of channel scour. In contrast to erosional terraces, depositional terraces show evidence of repeated deposition and net aggradation, as indicated by their thickness (as much as 20+ m) and weakly bedded structure. Depositional terraces are common below mountain-front canyon mouths where streams drop their

  13. The Rare ospC Allele L of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto, Commonly Found among Samples Collected in a Coastal Plain Area of the Southeastern United States, Is Associated with Ixodes affinis Ticks and Local Rodent Hosts Peromyscus gossypinus and Sigmodon hispidus

    PubMed Central

    Golovchenko, Maryna; Grubhoffer, Libor; Oliver, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The rare ospC allele L was detected in 30% of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strains cultured from a tick species, Ixodes affinis, and two rodent host species, Peromyscus gossypinus and Sigmodon hispidus, collected in a coastal plain area of Georgia and South Carolina, in the southeastern United States. PMID:23220965

  14. NMOC, ozone, and organic aerosol in the southeastern United States, 1999-2007: 3. Origins of organic aerosol in Atlanta, Georgia, and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, C. L.; Hidy, G. M.; Tanenbaum, S.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2011-02-01

    Carbonaceous compounds constitute a major fraction of the fine particle mass at locations throughout North America; much of the condensed-phase organic carbon (OC) is produced in the atmosphere from NMOC reactions as "secondary" OC (SOC). Ten years of particulate carbon and speciated non-methane organic compound (NMOC) data combined with other measurements from Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) and other sites provide insight into the association between elemental carbon (EC), OC and NMOCs. Data are analyzed to characterize the OC and SOC contrasts between urban Atlanta, Georgia, and nearby non-urban conditions in the Southeast. Analysis of the monitoring record indicates that the mean Atlanta urban excess of total carbon (TC) is 2.1-2.8 μg m -3. The OC/EC ratio of the Atlanta urban excess is in the range 1.3 to 1.8, consistent with OC/EC ratios observed in motor vehicle emissions and a fossil carbon source of urban excess TC. Carbon isotope analysis of a subset of particle samples demonstrates that the urban excess is mainly fossil in origin, even though the majority of the TC is modern at both urban and non-urban sites. Temperature-dependent partitioning of OC between gas and condensed phases cannot explain the observed diurnal and seasonal variations of OC/CO, EC/CO, and OC/EC ratios. Alternatively, a hypothesis involving vertical mixing of OC-enriched air from aloft is supported by the seasonal and diurnal OC, isopentane, aromatic and isoprene observations at the ground. A statistical model is applied to indicate the relative significance of aerometric factors affecting OC and EC concentrations, including meteorological and pollutant associations. The model results demonstrate strong linkages between fine particle carbon and pollutant indicators of source emissions compared with meteorological factors; the model results show weaker dependence of OC on meteorological factors than is the case for ozone (O 3) concentrations.

  15. Southeastern Science Policy Colloquium

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, F.

    1995-06-22

    This conference covers four main topics: (1) Southeastern Labor Market and its Impact on Corporate/Industry Development; (2) New Issues for Science and Technology in the Year 2000 and Beyond; (3) The Role of Academia in Developing the Labor Force of the Southeast; and (4) K-12 Education: Challenges for the 21st Century.

  16. Subjective alertness rhythms in elderly people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related changes in the circadian rhythm of subjective alertness and to explore the circadian mechanisms underlying such changes. Using a visual analogue scale (VAS) instrument, 25 older men and women (71 y and older; 15 female, 10 male) rated their subjective alertness about 7 times per day during 5 baseline days of temporal isolation during which habitual bedtimes and waketimes were enforced. Comparisons were made with 13 middle-aged men (37-52 y) experiencing the same protocol. Advancing age (particularly in the men) resulted in less rhythmic alertness patterns, as indicated by lower amplitudes and less reliability of fitted 24-h sinusoids. This appeared in spite of the absence of any reliable age-related diminution in circadian temperature rhythm amplitude, thus suggesting the effect was not due to SCN weakness per se, but to weakened transduction of SCN output. In a further experiment, involving 36 h of constant wakeful bedrest, differences in the amplitude of the alertness rhythm were observed between 9 older men (79 y+), 7 older women (79 y+), and 17 young controls (9 males, 8 females, 19-28 y) suggesting that with advancing age (particularly in men) there is less rhythmic input into subjective alertness from the endogenous circadian pacemaker. These results may explain some of the nocturnal insomnia and daytime hypersomnia that afflict many elderly people.

  17. Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2012 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 5.4 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 487 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled about $263 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeastern’s customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2012. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in funding infrastructure renewal efforts of powerplants feeding the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems. This funding, which totaled more than $71 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeastern’s marketing area. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rainfall strained our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2012 in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System totaled approximately $29 million. About $8 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeastern’s customer contract requirements. Southeastern’s goal is to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeastern’s employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We

  18. Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-31

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern) fiscal year (FY) 2011 Annual Report for your review. This report reflects our agency’s programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. This past year, Southeastern marketed approximately 6.2 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 489 wholesale customers in 10 southeastern states. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled more than $264 million. With the financial assistance and support of Southeastern’s customers, funding for capitalized equipment purchases and replacements at hydroelectric facilities operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) continued in FY 2011. This funding, which totaled more than $45 million, provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging projects in Southeastern’s marketing area. Currently, there are more than 214 customers participating in the funding efforts in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina, Kerr-Philpott, and Cumberland Systems of projects. Drought conditions continued in the southeastern region of the United States this past year, particularly in the Savannah River Basin. Lack of rain placed strains on our natural and financial resources. Power purchases for FY 2011 totaled approximately $38 million. About $9 million of this amount was for replacement power, which is purchased only during adverse water conditions in order to meet Southeastern’s customer contract requirements. Southeastern’s goal is to maximize the benefits of our region’s water resources. Competing uses of these resources will present another challenging year for Southeastern’s employees. With the cooperation and communication among the Department of Energy (DOE), preference customers, and Corps, I am certain Southeastern is positioned to meet these challenges in the future. We are committed to providing reliable hydroelectric power to

  19. Geology and evaluation of tungsten anomalies, Buhairan-Abu Khurg area, southeastern part of the Uyaijah ring structure, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, F.C.W.

    1973-01-01

    Previous geochemical exploration has indicated areas in the Precambrian Al Uyaijah ring structure for further investigation. This report encompasses the results of geologic and geochemical investigations made in a 40 square kilometer area located on the southeast perimeter of the ring structure, an area where previous geochemical exploration revealed anomalous tungsten and molybdenum values. Igneous rocks exposed in the area include batholithic plutonic rocks, intrusive rocks of the ring dike, hypabyssal dike rocks, and late epithermal quartz veins; remnants of metamorphosed, prebatholithic rocks are also exposed. About two-thirds of the area is covered with a veneer of surficial debris. Structural patterns of the area are dominated by the ring structure. The principal mineralization consists of powellite and scheelite in high-temperature, quartz-rich veinlets and pods and in contact metamorphic rocks. Although the areas of metallization account for the previously discovered sediment geochemical anomalies, mineralization is sparse, and no currently valuable mineral deposits are known or thought to be present in the area.

  20. Presentation of Social and Academic Factors That Encourage Persistence in Secondary Schools in Rural, Low Socioeconomic Areas of Two Selected Southeastern States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Patricia C.; And Others

    This paper describes the development of a predictive model to determine potential high school dropouts and identify areas for intensified assistance at the individual or group level. V. Tinto's (1975, 1987) model of college attrition was validated for use with high school students in rural, low socioeconomic areas of the Southeast. Ex post facto…

  1. Radar-based alert system to operate a sewerage network: relevance and operational effectiveness after several years of use.

    PubMed

    Faure, D; Payrastre, O; Auchet, P

    2005-01-01

    Since January 2000, the sewerage network of a very urbanised catchment area in the Greater Nancy Urban Community has been operated according to the alarms generated in real time by a storm alert system using weather radar data. This alert system is based on an automatic identification of intense rain cells in the radar images. This paper presents the characteristics of this alert system and synthesises the main results of two complementary studies realised in 2002 in order to estimate the relevance and the operational effectiveness of the alert system. The first study consisted in an off-line analysis of almost 50,000 intense rain cells detected in four years of historical radar data. The second study was an analysis of the experience feedback after two years of operational use of this alert system. The results of these studies are discussed in function of the initial operational objectives. PMID:15790245

  2. Responder Technology Alert (February 2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-04-10

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  3. ALERT-ES EEWS in Southwest Iberia: feasibility and lead-time estimations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Colom, Yolanda; Lozano, Lucía; Romeu, Nuria; Matín Davila, José; Carranza, Marta; Zollo, Aldo; Buforn, Elisa; Goula, Xavier; Carrilho, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) should provide quick earthquake information and predict ground motion prior to the destructive S-waves arrive. One objective of the Spanish ALERT-ES project (CGL2010-19803-C03) is to study the feasibility of an EEWS for the SW of Iberian Peninsula, selecting two test sites (the S. Vicente cape area and the Gulf of Cádiz). These regions are characterized by the occurrence of large and damaging earthquakes such as the 1755 Lisbon (Imax=X) or 1969 S. Vicente Cape (Ms=8,1) shocks. In this work, we have used three different software packages (Earthworm, SeiscomP3 and PRESTo) to compare the efficiency of their different modules (picking, binder and location modules) in order to be used as an EEWS (new modules for Earthworms and SeiscomP3 are being developed, mainly a quick magnitude estimation module based in the analysis of the first few seconds of the the P-wave arrival). This pilot experience was carried out on four previously selected events (two in each test site). We analyse the origin time and location error using several software and seismic net configurations. A study about the blind zone and the available lead-time to selected targets (Huelva, Seville, Cádiz in Spain and Faro and Portimao in Portugal) was also performed. The results, using the existing seismic BB stations in the area, shown a blind zone in SW Portugal for earthquakes in S. Vicente and a blind zone in the Huelva and Cádiz (SW Spain) region for earthquakes in the Gulf of Cádiz. A 6 station binder provided the best compromise between the location error and available lead- time to targets, mainly due to the bad azimuthal coverage. For S. Vicente earthquakes, the lead-time time is 30/40 seconds for Huelva, 50/60 seconds for Cádiz, 60/70 seconds for Seville, about 10 seconds for Faro and Portimao follows inside the blind zone. For the Gulf of Cádiz earthquakes, Huelva, Cádiz and Faro are inside the blind zone, and lead-time is around 10/15 seconds for

  4. Drug Interaction Alert Override Rates in the Meaningful Use Era

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, A.D.; Fletcher, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Interruptive drug interaction alerts may reduce adverse drug events and are required for Stage I Meaningful Use attestation. For the last decade override rates have been very high. Despite their widespread use in commercial EHR systems, previously described interventions to improve alert frequency and acceptance have not been well studied. Objectives (1) To measure override rates of inpatient medication alerts within a commercial clinical decision support system, and assess the impact of local customization efforts. (2) To compare override rates between drug-drug interaction and drug-allergy interaction alerts, between attending and resident physicians, and between public and academic hospitals. (3) To measure the correlation between physicians’ individual alert quantities and override rates as an indicator of potential alert fatigue. Methods We retrospectively analyzed physician responses to drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction alerts, as generated by a common decision support product in a large teaching hospital system. Results (1) Over four days, 461 different physicians entered 18,354 medication orders, resulting in 2,455 visible alerts; 2,280 alerts (93%) were overridden. (2) The drug-drug alert override rate was 95.1%, statistically higher than the rate for drug-allergy alerts (90.9%) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in override rates between attendings and residents, or between hospitals. (3) Physicians saw a mean of 1.3 alerts per day, and the number of alerts per physician was not significantly correlated with override rate (R2 = 0.03, p = 0.41). Conclusions Despite intensive efforts to improve a commercial drug interaction alert system and to reduce alerting, override rates remain as high as reported over a decade ago. Alert fatigue does not seem to contribute. The results suggest the need to fundamentally question the premises of drug interaction alert systems. PMID:25298818

  5. IR panoramic alerting sensor concepts and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Schwering, Piet B. W.

    2003-09-01

    During the last decade, protection of military and civilian operational platforms against weapons like guns, grenades, missiles, Unmanned Combat Aerial (and surface) Vehicles (UCAV's) and mines, has been an issue of increased importance due to the improved kill-probability of these threats. The standard countermeasure package of armour, guns, decoys, jammers, camouflage nets and smokes is inadequate when not accompanied by a suitable sensor package, primarily consisting of an alerting device, triggering consecutive steps in the countermeasure-chain. In this process of alert four different detection techniques are considered: pre-alert, giving the directions of possible attack, detection of an action of attack, identification of the threat and finally the precise localization (3-D). The design of the alerting device is greatly depending on the platform, on which it will be used, the associated and affordable cost and the nature of the threat. A number of sensor packages, considered, developed and evaluated at TNO-FEL is presented for simple, medium size and large and expensive platforms. In recent years the requirements for these sensors have become more and more strigent due to the growing number of scenarios. The attack can practically be from any direction, implying the need for a large Field of Regard (FOR), the attack range can vary considerably and the type of threat can be very diverse, implying great flexibility and dynamic range and rapid response of the sensor. Especially the localization at short ranges is a challenging issue. Various configurations including advantages and drawbacks are discussed.

  6. Alerting or Somnogenic Light: Pick Your Color

    PubMed Central

    Bourgin, Patrice; Hubbard, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, light exerts pervasive effects on physiology and behavior in two ways: indirectly through clock synchronization and the phase adjustment of circadian rhythms, and directly through the promotion of alertness and sleep, respectively, in diurnal and nocturnal species. A recent report by Pilorz and colleagues describes an even more complex role for the acute effects of light. In mice, blue light acutely causes behavioral arousal, whereas green wavelengths promote sleep. These opposing effects are mediated by melanopsin-based phototransduction through different neural pathways. These findings reconcile nocturnal and diurnal species through a common alerting response to blue light. One can hypothesize that the opposite responses to natural polychromatic light in night- or day-active animals may reflect higher sensitivity of nocturnal species to green, and diurnals to blue wavelengths, resulting in hypnogenic and alerting effects, respectively. Additional questions remain to be clarified. How do different light wavelengths affect other behaviors such as mood and cognition? How do those results apply to humans? How does light pose either a risk or benefit, depending on whether one needs to be asleep or alert? Indeed, in addition to timing, luminance levels, and light exposure duration, these findings stress the need to understand how best to adapt the color spectrum of light to our needs and to take this into account for the design of daily lighting concepts—a key challenge for today’s society, especially with the emergence of LED light technology. PMID:27525420

  7. Innovative Software Tools Measure Behavioral Alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To monitor astronaut behavioral alertness in space, Johnson Space Center awarded Philadelphia-based Pulsar Informatics Inc. SBIR funding to develop software to be used onboard the International Space Station. Now used by the government and private companies, the technology has increased revenues for the firm by an average of 75 percent every year.

  8. 77 FR 41331 - Commercial Mobile Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... at 73 FR 47550, August 14, 2008, are effective July 13, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Leslie..., FCC 08- 164, published at 73 FR 47550, August 14, 2008. The OMB Control Number is 3060-1126. The... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 10 Commercial Mobile Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission....

  9. Assessment in Education. IBE Special Alert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNESCO International Bureau of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    As another year is approaching, the time seems appropriate to look back and reflect on all the things that have been done, and more importantly learned during 2014. Along the same lines, and in order to offer further food for thought, the IBE is happy to share with you its latest Thematic alert on the topic of assessment in education. More…

  10. Self-Regulation: Calm, Alert, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanker, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing awareness among developmental scientists that the better a child can self-regulate, the better she can rise to the challenge of mastering ever more complex skills and concepts. In the simplest terms, self-regulation can be defined as the ability to stay calmly focused and alert, which often involves--but cannot be reduced…

  11. CEI-PEA Alert, Summer 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Innovation - Public Education Association, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "CEI-PEA Alert" is an advocacy newsletter that deals with topics of interest to all concerned with the New York City public schools. This issue includes: (1) Practical Skills & High Academic Standards: Career Technical Education; (2) Parents: Help Your Children Gain "Soft Skills" for the Workforce; (3) Culinary Arts Motivate High School…

  12. CEI-PEA Alert, Fall 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Innovation - Public Education Association, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The "CEI-PEA Alert" is an advocacy newsletter that deals with topics of interest to all concerned with the New York City public schools. This issue includes: (1) Chancellor Joel I. Klein Announces New Accountability System for NYC Schools; (2) Students Achieve Record-High Scores!; (3) Use Data to Help Your Child Improve Performance; (4) Are…

  13. [Health alert management and emerging risk].

    PubMed

    Pillonel, J

    2010-12-01

    Following health crisis that have occurred in the nineties (contaminated blood, mad cow, asbestos, etc.) and more recently those generated by the heat wave in 2003 or by emerging infectious pathogens (SARS, West Nile, Chikungunya, H5N1, H1N1…), a real health vigilance system has been progressively developed in France. After a brief historical overview of the health alert system, this article will give the guiding principles of its current organization in France and will present two examples of recent health alerts (Chikungunya in the Reunion Island in 2005-2006 and hepatitis A outbreak in the Côtes-d'Armor in August 2007), that have needed the implementation of preventive measures regarding the blood donor selection. These two examples have shown that the position of the alert in the French health vigilance system needs to be very close to the event. In that case, health alert is a very useful tool for decision making especially when measures have to be taken to prevent transfusion-transmitted pathogens. PMID:21051258

  14. Alerts of forest disturbance from MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Dan; Kraft, Robin; Wheeler, David

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the methodology and computational strategy for a forest cover disturbance alerting system. Analytical techniques from time series econometrics are applied to imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor to detect temporal instability in vegetation indices. The characteristics from each MODIS pixel's spectral history are extracted and compared against historical data on forest cover loss to develop a geographically localized classification rule that can be applied across the humid tropical biome. The final output is a probability of forest disturbance for each 500 m pixel that is updated every 16 days. The primary objective is to provide high-confidence alerts of forest disturbance, while minimizing false positives. We find that the alerts serve this purpose exceedingly well in Pará, Brazil, with high probability alerts garnering a user accuracy of 98 percent over the training period and 93 percent after the training period (2000-2005) when compared against the PRODES deforestation data set, which is used to assess spatial accuracy. Implemented in Clojure and Java on the Hadoop distributed data processing platform, the algorithm is a fast, automated, and open source system for detecting forest disturbance. It is intended to be used in conjunction with higher-resolution imagery and data products that cannot be updated as quickly as MODIS-based data products. By highlighting hotspots of change, the algorithm and associated output can focus high-resolution data acquisition and aid in efforts to enforce local forest conservation efforts.

  15. Alerting or Somnogenic Light: Pick Your Color.

    PubMed

    Bourgin, Patrice; Hubbard, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, light exerts pervasive effects on physiology and behavior in two ways: indirectly through clock synchronization and the phase adjustment of circadian rhythms, and directly through the promotion of alertness and sleep, respectively, in diurnal and nocturnal species. A recent report by Pilorz and colleagues describes an even more complex role for the acute effects of light. In mice, blue light acutely causes behavioral arousal, whereas green wavelengths promote sleep. These opposing effects are mediated by melanopsin-based phototransduction through different neural pathways. These findings reconcile nocturnal and diurnal species through a common alerting response to blue light. One can hypothesize that the opposite responses to natural polychromatic light in night- or day-active animals may reflect higher sensitivity of nocturnal species to green, and diurnals to blue wavelengths, resulting in hypnogenic and alerting effects, respectively. Additional questions remain to be clarified. How do different light wavelengths affect other behaviors such as mood and cognition? How do those results apply to humans? How does light pose either a risk or benefit, depending on whether one needs to be asleep or alert? Indeed, in addition to timing, luminance levels, and light exposure duration, these findings stress the need to understand how best to adapt the color spectrum of light to our needs and to take this into account for the design of daily lighting concepts-a key challenge for today's society, especially with the emergence of LED light technology. PMID:27525420

  16. For Emergency Alerts, Some Colleges Try Sirens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Colleges and universities, ever more mindful of campus safety, are installing outdoor sirens. The systems can blast spoken messages or tone alerts of danger--and one of the preset messages on many of the public-address systems warns: "There is a shooter on campus. Seek shelter immediately." As college officials reviewed their…

  17. Alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) while driving.

    PubMed

    Oron-Gilad, Tal; Ronen, Adi; Shinar, David

    2008-05-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) on driver performance, subjective feelings, and psychophysiological state in monotonous simulated driving in two experiments. In the first experiment, 12 professional truck drivers participated in five sessions of simulated driving: driving only, driving with one of three AMTs (counterbalanced), and driving while listening to music. AMTs were not equally effective in maintaining alertness. The trivia AMT prevented driving performance deterioration, and increased alertness (measured by standardized HRV). The choice reaction time AMT was least demanding but also increased subjective sleepiness and reduced arousal (measured by alpha/beta ratio). The working memory AMT caused a significant decrement in driving speed, increased subjective fatigue, and was regarded by the participants as detrimental to driving. Trivia was preferred by the majority of the drivers over the other two AMTs. Experiment 2 further examined the utility of the trivia AMT. When the drivers engaged in the trivia AMT they maintained better driving performance and perceived the driving duration as shorter than the control condition. The two experiments demonstrated that AMTs can have a positive effect on alertness. The effect is localized in the sense that it does not persist beyond the period of the AMT activation. PMID:18460351

  18. Land use pattern, socio-economic development, and assessment of their impacts on ecosystem service value: study on natural wetlands distribution area (NWDA) in Fuzhou city, southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuan-Bin; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Wen-Bin; Chen, Yan-Hong; Wang, Xiang-Rong

    2013-06-01

    This paper quantifies the allocation of ecosystem services value (ESV) associated with land use pattern and qualitatively examined impacts of land use changes and socio-economic factors on spatiotemporal variation of ESV in the Natural Wetland Distribution Area (NWDA), Fuzhou city, China. The results showed that total ESV of the study area decreased from 4,332.16 × 10(6) RMB Yuan in 1989 to 3,697.42 × 10(6) RMB Yuan in 2009, mainly due to the remarkable decreases in cropland (decreased by 55.3 %) and wetland (decreased by 74.2 %). Forest, water, and wetland played major roles in providing ecosystem services, accounting for over 90 % of the total ESV. Based on time series Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery, geographic information system, and historical data, analysis of the spatiotemporal variation of ESV from 1989 to 2009 was performed. It indicated that rapid expansion of urban areas along the Minjiang River resulted in significant changes in land use types, leading to a dramatic decline in ecosystem services. Meanwhile, because of land scarcity and unique ecosystem functions, the emergency of wetland and cropland protection in built-up area has become an urgent task of local authorities to the local government. Furthermore, there was still a significant negative correlation between ESV of cropland and wetland and the GDP. The results suggest that future planning of land use pattern should control encroachment of urban areas into cropland and wetland in addition to scientific and rational policies towards minimizing the adverse effects of urbanization. PMID:23054291

  19. Subsurface geology and porosity distribution, Madison Limestone and underlying formations, Powder River basin, northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, James A.

    1978-01-01

    To evaluate the Madison Limestone and associated rocks as potential sources for water supplies in the Powder River Basin and adjacent areas, an understanding of the geologic framework of these units, their lithologic facies patterns, the distribution of porosity zones, and the relation between porosity development and stratigraphic facies is necessary. Regionally the Madison is mainly a fossiliferous limestone. However, in broad areas of the eastern Rocky Mountains and western Great Plains, dolomite is a dominant constituent and in places the Madison is almost entirely dolomite. Within these areas maximum porosity development is found and it seems to be related to the coarser crystalline dolomite facies. The porosity development is associated with tabular and fairly continuous crystalline dolomite beds separated by non-porous limestones. The maximum porosity development in the Bighorn Dolomite, as in the Madison, is directly associated with the occurrence of a more coarsely crystalline sucrosic dolomite facies. Well data indicate, however, that where the Bighorn is present in the deeper parts of the Powder River Basin, it may be dominated by a finer crystalline dolomite facies of low porosity. The 'Winnipeg Sandstone' is a clean, generally well-sorted, medium-grained sandstone. It shows good porosity development in parts of the northern Powder River Basin and northwestern South Dakota. Because the sandstone is silica-cemented and quartzitic in areas of deep burial, good porosity is expected only where it is no deeper than a few thousand feet. The Flathead Sandstone is a predominantly quartzose, slightly feldspathic sandstone, commonly cemented with iron oxide. Like the 'Winnipeg Sandstone,' it too is silica-cemented and quartzitic in many places so that its porosity is poor in areas of deep burial. Illustrations in this report show the thickness, percent dolomite, and porosity-feet for the Bighorn Dolomite and the Madison Limestone and its subdivisions. The

  20. 2. Missile Alert Facility, south side, view from baseball bleachers. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Missile Alert Facility, south side, view from baseball bleachers. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  1. 1. Missile Alert Facility, east side, view from bleachers on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Missile Alert Facility, east side, view from bleachers on athletic field. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  2. 6. Missile Alert Facility, west side. Thalheimer Whiteman Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Missile Alert Facility, west side. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  3. 5. Missile Alert Facility, east and north sides, looking southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Missile Alert Facility, east and north sides, looking southwest. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  4. 29. Launch Control Center, view looking in, alert crew mannequin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Launch Control Center, view looking in, alert crew mannequin at end of Launch Control Center. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  5. 4. Missile Alert Facility, outside gate, view looking southwest. Thalheimer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Missile Alert Facility, outside gate, view looking southwest. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  6. 8. Missile Alert Facility, northeast corner. Lyon Whiteman Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Missile Alert Facility, northeast corner. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  7. 3. Missile Alert Facility, northwest corner, view from bleachers. Lyon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Missile Alert Facility, northwest corner, view from bleachers. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  8. Brominated flame retardants in the hair and serum samples from an e-waste recycling area in southeastern China: the possibility of using hair for biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Si; Xu, Feng; Tang, Weibiao; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Lili; Wang, Junxia; Lin, Kuangfei

    2016-08-01

    Hair samples and paired serum samples were collected from e-waste and urban areas in Wenling of Zhejiang Province, China. The PBDE and DBDPE concentrations in hair and serum samples from e-waste workers were significantly higher than those of non-occupational residents and urban residents. BDE209 was the dominating BFRs in hair and serum samples from the e-waste area, while DBDPE was the major BFRs from the urban area. Statistically significant correlations were observed between hair level and serum level for some substances (BDE209, DBDPE, BDE99, BDE47, BDE28, and BDE17), although the PBDE congener profiles in hair were different from those in the serum. A statistically significant positive correlation between the PBDE concentrations and the working age, as well as gender difference, was observed in e-waste workers. Different sources of PBDEs and DBDPE in three groups were identified by principal component analysis and spearman correlation coefficient. Hair is suggested to be a useful matrix for biomonitoring the PBDE exposure in humans. PMID:27072035

  9. Potential effects of surface coal mining on the hydrology of the Horse Creek area, Sheridan and Moorehead coal fields, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClymonds, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Horse Creek area of the Sheridan and Moorhead coal fields, 16 miles east of the Decker Coal Mines near the Tongue River, contains large reserves of Federally owned coal that have been identified for potential lease sale. A hydrologic study was conducted in the area to describe existing hydrologic systems and to assess potential impacts of surface coal mining on local water resources. Hydrologic data collected from private wells, observation wells, test holes, and springs indicate that the aquifers are primarily coal and sandstone beds in the upper part of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene age) and sand and gravel of valley alluvium (Pleistocene and Holocene age). Surface-water resources are mostly limited to a few stock ponds receiving discharge from springs in the higher ports of the area. Two stock wells, one spring, and three stock ponds receiving discharge from springs supply most of the water used within the Horse Creek basin; the only use is watering of livestock. Mining of the Anderson and Dietz coal beds would destroy one stock well and two ponds receiving discharge from springs, and would lower the potentiometric surface within the coal and sandstone aquifers. Although mining would alter existing hydrologic systems, alternative deeper water supplies are available. (USGS)

  10. A progress report on results of test drilling and ground-water investigations of the Snake Plain aquifer, southeastern Idaho: Part 3: Lake Walcott-Bonanza Lake area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosthwaite, E.G.

    1974-01-01

    Direct-current resistivity soundings and exploratory drilling suggest that the basalt of the Snake River Group is relatively thin in the area along the Snake River that is topographically suitable for pumping large quantities of ground water in exchange for surface water. The formations underlying the Snake River Group appear to have low permeability and probably would not yield large amounts of water. Previous studies have indicated that the southern edge of the Snake Plain aquifer extended to the Snake River. Data presented in this report implies that, in general, the southern boundary should, in fact, be several miles north of the river.

  11. Evaluation of the Early Alert Program, Spring 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartnal, Ryan; Hagen, Peter F.

    This report evaluates the Early Alert program at Cuesta College (California). The report is divided into four main sections: services accessed, accessibility, actions taken as a result of receiving an Early Alert letter, and timing and utility of the Early Alert program. These are followed by the demography of the respondents, a brief background…

  12. 76 FR 12600 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... its rules governing the Emergency Alert System (EAS) to provide for national EAS testing and... a national Presidential alert. DATES: Effective March 8, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  13. 78 FR 22270 - Special Fraud Alert: Physician-Owned Entities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... correction to the OIG Federal Register ] notice published on March 29, 2012 (78 FR 19271), on our recently issued Special Fraud Alert on Physician-Owned Entities. Specifically, the Special Fraud Alert addressed... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Inspector General Special Fraud Alert: Physician-Owned Entities AGENCY:...

  14. 76 FR 35810 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... EB Docket No. 04-296, 72 FR 62123, November 2, 2007, which incorporated certain Common Alerting... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... (Commission) seeks comment on proposed changes to its rules governing the Emergency Alert System (EAS)...

  15. 77 FR 26701 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... its rules governing the Emergency Alert System (EAS) rules so that EAS Participants may, but are not... adopted rules specifying the manner in which EAS Participants must be able to receive alert...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1114 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.1114 Section 80.1114... Safety Communications § 80.1114 False distress alerts. The provisions of §§ 80.334 and 80.335 apply to false distress alerts....

  17. 47 CFR 11.11 - The Emergency Alert System (EAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Emergency Alert System (EAS). 11.11 Section 11.11 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.11 The Emergency Alert System (EAS). (a) The EAS is composed of analog radio broadcast stations including AM, FM, and Low-power FM...

  18. 47 CFR 11.11 - The Emergency Alert System (EAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false The Emergency Alert System (EAS). 11.11 Section 11.11 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.11 The Emergency Alert System (EAS). (a) The EAS is composed of analog radio broadcast stations including AM, FM, and Low-power FM...

  19. 47 CFR 11.11 - The Emergency Alert System (EAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Emergency Alert System (EAS). 11.11 Section 11.11 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.11 The Emergency Alert System (EAS). (a) The EAS is composed of analog radio broadcast stations including AM, FM, and Low-power FM...

  20. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121... Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration. The duration of an active duty alert shall be twelve months. (b)...

  1. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121... Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration. The duration of an active duty alert shall be twelve months....

  2. Experimental evaluation of candidate graphical microburst alert displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. John

    1992-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) experimental evaluation of candidate graphical microburst displays; (2) microburst detection and alerting; (3) previous part-task simulator experiment-comparison of presentation modes; (4) presentation mode comparison-results; (5) advantages of graphical mode of presentation; (6) graphical microburst alert experiment-objectives; and graphical microburst alert experiment-overview; and (7) candidate display design.

  3. 47 CFR 80.1114 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.1114 Section 80.1114... Safety Communications § 80.1114 False distress alerts. The provisions of §§ 80.334 and 80.335 apply to false distress alerts....

  4. 47 CFR 80.1114 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.1114 Section 80.1114... Safety Communications § 80.1114 False distress alerts. The provisions of §§ 80.334 and 80.335 apply to false distress alerts....

  5. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121... Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration. The duration of an active duty alert shall be twelve months....

  6. 47 CFR 80.1114 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.1114 Section 80.1114... Safety Communications § 80.1114 False distress alerts. The provisions of §§ 80.334 and 80.335 apply to false distress alerts....

  7. 47 CFR 80.1114 - False distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false False distress alerts. 80.1114 Section 80.1114... Safety Communications § 80.1114 False distress alerts. The provisions of §§ 80.334 and 80.335 apply to false distress alerts....

  8. 47 CFR 10.320 - Provider alert gateway requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... protocols between the Federal alert gateway and the CMS provider gateway. (d) Geographic targeting. The CMS... provide profile information on the CMS provider for the Federal alert gateway to maintain at the Federal alert gateway. This profile information must be provided by an authorized CMS provider representative...

  9. 47 CFR 10.320 - Provider alert gateway requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... protocols between the Federal alert gateway and the CMS provider gateway. (d) Geographic targeting. The CMS... provide profile information on the CMS provider for the Federal alert gateway to maintain at the Federal alert gateway. This profile information must be provided by an authorized CMS provider representative...

  10. 47 CFR 10.320 - Provider alert gateway requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... protocols between the Federal alert gateway and the CMS provider gateway. (d) Geographic targeting. The CMS... provide profile information on the CMS provider for the Federal alert gateway to maintain at the Federal alert gateway. This profile information must be provided by an authorized CMS provider representative...

  11. 47 CFR 10.320 - Provider alert gateway requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... protocols between the Federal alert gateway and the CMS provider gateway. (d) Geographic targeting. The CMS... provide profile information on the CMS provider for the Federal alert gateway to maintain at the Federal alert gateway. This profile information must be provided by an authorized CMS provider representative...

  12. 47 CFR 80.1113 - Transmission of a distress alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmission of a distress alert. 80.1113... Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1113 Transmission of a distress alert. (a) The... stations that a ship is in distress. These alerts are based on the use of transmissions via...

  13. 47 CFR 80.1113 - Transmission of a distress alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmission of a distress alert. 80.1113... Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1113 Transmission of a distress alert. (a) The... stations that a ship is in distress. These alerts are based on the use of transmissions via...

  14. 47 CFR 80.1113 - Transmission of a distress alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmission of a distress alert. 80.1113... Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1113 Transmission of a distress alert. (a) The... stations that a ship is in distress. These alerts are based on the use of transmissions via...

  15. 47 CFR 10.320 - Provider alert gateway requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provider alert gateway requirements. 10.320 Section 10.320 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.320 Provider alert gateway requirements. This section specifies the...

  16. Potential effects of surface coal mining on the hydrology of the upper Otter Creek-Pasture Creek Area, Moorehead coal field, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClymonds, N.E.; Moreland, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The combined upper Otter Creek-Pasture Creek area, south of Ashland, Montana, contains large reserves of Federal coal for potential lease sale. A hydrologic study was conducted in the area to describe existing hydrologic systems and generalized groundwater quality, to assess potential effects of surface mining on local water resources, and to evaluate the potential for reclamation of those water resources. Principal aquifers are coal beds and sandstone in the upper Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene age), and sand and gravel in alluvium (Pleistocene and Holocene age). Hydraulic conductivity determined from aquifer tests was about 0.004 to 16 ft/d for coal or sandstone aquifers and 1 to 290 ft/d for alluvial aquifers. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from bedrock ranged from 1,160 to 4,390 mg/L. In alluvium, the concentrations were 1,770 to 12,600 mg/L. Surface water is available from interrupted flow along downstream reaches of Otter and Pasture Creeks, from stock ponds, and from springs. Most stock ponds are dry by midsummer. Mining of coal in the Anderson, Dietz, and Canyon beds would lower the potentiometric surface within coal and sandstone aquifers. Alluvium along Otter Creek, its main tributaries, and Pasture Creek would be removed at the mines. Planned structuring of the spoils and reconstruction of alluvial aquifers could minimize downstream changes in water quality. Although mining would alter the existing hydrologic systems and destroy several shallow wells and stock ponds, alternative water supplies are available. (USGS)

  17. Validation of Landsat 8 satellite-derived LAI from field measurements in a durum-wheat cropped area in south-eastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrignano, A.; Buttafuoco, G.; Toscano, P.; Rinaldi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the key biophysical variables to describe land surface processes of fundamental importance for vegetation, such as photosynthesis, transpiration and energy balance. Current spatial missions allow to estimate LAI at global scale, however product validation is needed for its reliable use. In this paper, a methodology is described to derive reference LAI maps from ground-based measurements at the JECAM site of Capitanata using Landsat 8 imagery as auxiliary information and to estimate prediction uncertainty. LAI was measured with LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer (LI-COR) in 30 experimental sampling units (ESU) of 10 m by 10 m size within a polygon of about 3 km by 3 km size. Two surveys were carried out in 2014: on March 18-20 and on May 9-13. To integrate secondary finer-resolution information in primary sparse variable modelling, multicollocated cokriging was used, where the secondary variable for cokriging estimate is used at the target location and also at all the locations where the primary variable is defined within the neighbourhood of interpolation. To assess prediction uncertainty, Confidence Interval (CI) was calculated and in order to make the values comparable the relative CI was calculated by dividing by the corresponding LAI estimation and assumed as a quality index of LAI product. LAI maps were produced for the two selected dates and from a comparison between radiometric and estimated LAI maps, it results a general high consistency with Landsat 8 imagery. The quality maps derived from LAI estimator for the two dates with overlaid the locations of the sample data points show that to the pixels located near the samples are attributed a quality index of about 40-50% but, as the distance increases, the uncertainty becomes too large. The poor results are probably due to the too coarse sampling, with large areas without any ground-truth data of LAI.

  18. Education and Training Module in Alertness Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallis, M. M.; Brandt, S. L.; Oyung, R. L.; Reduta, D. D.; Rosekind, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training module (ETM) in alertness management has now been integrated as part of the training regimen of the Pilot Proficiency Awards Program ("WINGS") of the Federal Aviation Administration. Originated and now maintained current by the Fatigue Countermeasures Group at NASA Ames Research Center, the ETM in Alertness Management is designed to give pilots the benefit of the best and most recent research on the basics of sleep physiology, the causes of fatigue, and strategies for managing alertness during flight operations. The WINGS program is an incentive program that encourages pilots at all licensing levels to participate in recurrent training, upon completion of which distinctive lapel or tie pins (wings) and certificates of completion are awarded. In addition to flight training, all WINGS applicants must attend at least one FAA-sponsored safety seminar, FAA-sanctioned safety seminar, or industry recurrent training program. The Fatigue Countermeasures Group provides an FAA-approved industry recurrent training program through an on-line General Aviation (GA) WINGS ETM in alertness management to satisfy this requirement. Since 1993, the Fatigue Countermeasures Group has translated fatigue and alertness information to operational environments by conducting two-day ETM workshops oriented primarily toward air-carrier operations subject to Part 121 of the Federal Aviation Regulations pertaining to such operations. On the basis of the information presented in the two-day ETM workshops, an ETM was created for GA pilots and was transferred to a Web-based version. To comply with the requirements of the WINGS Program, the original Web-based version has been modified to include hypertext markup language (HTML) content that makes information easily accessible, in-depth testing of alertness-management knowledge, new interactive features, and increased informational resources for GA pilots. Upon successful completion of this training module, a participant

  19. Optimizing the real-time ground level enhancement alert system based on neutron monitor measurements: Introducing GLE Alert Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvatzoglou, G.; Papaioannou, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Dimitroulakos, J.; Sarlanis, C.

    2014-11-01

    Whenever a significant intensity increase is being recorded by at least three neutron monitor stations in real-time mode, a ground level enhancement (GLE) event is marked and an automated alert is issued. Although, the physical concept of the algorithm is solid and has efficiently worked in a number of cases, the availability of real-time data is still an open issue and makes timely GLE alerts quite challenging. In this work we present the optimization of the GLE alert that has been set into operation since 2006 at the Athens Neutron Monitor Station. This upgrade has led to GLE Alert Plus, which is currently based upon the Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB). We have determined the critical values per station allowing us to issue reliable GLE alerts close to the initiation of the event while at the same time we keep the false alert rate at low levels. Furthermore, we have managed to treat the problem of data availability, introducing the Go-Back-N algorithm. A total of 13 GLE events have been marked from January 2000 to December 2012. GLE Alert Plus issued an alert for 12 events. These alert times are compared to the alert times of GOES Space Weather Prediction Center and Solar Energetic Particle forecaster of the University of Málaga (UMASEP). In all cases GLE Alert Plus precedes the GOES alert by ≈8-52 min. The comparison with UMASEP demonstrated a remarkably good agreement. Real-time GLE alerts by GLE Alert Plus may be retrieved by http://cosray.phys.uoa.gr/gle_alert_plus.html, http://www.nmdb.eu, and http://swe.ssa.esa.int/web/guest/space-radiation. An automated GLE alert email notification system is also available to interested users.

  20. An outbreak of type C botulism in Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in Southeastern Sweden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neimanis, A.; Gavier-Widen, D.; Leighton, F.; Bollinger, T.; Rocke, T.; Morner, T.

    2007-01-01

    From 2000 to 2004, over 10,000 seabirds, primarily Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus), died from an undetermined cause in the Blekinge archipelago in southeastern Sweden. In June 2004, 24 affected Herring Gulls were examined clinically, killed humanely, and 23 were examined by necropsy. Seven and 10 unaffected Herring Gulls collected from a local landfill site and from Iceland, respectively, served as controls. All affected birds showed similar neurologic signs, ranging from mild incoordination and weakness to severe flaccid paralysis of legs and wings, but generally were alert and responsive. All affected gulls were in normal nutritional condition, but were dehydrated and had empty stomachs. No gross or microscopic lesions, and no bacterial or viral pathogens were identified. Type C botulinum toxin was detected in the sera of 11 of 16 (69%) affected gulls by mouse inoculation. Type C botulism was the proximate cause of disease in 2004. Sera from 31% of birds tested from outbreaks in 2000 to 2003 also had detectable type C botulinum toxin by mouse inoculation. No large-scale botulism outbreak has been documented previously in this area. The source of toxin, initiating conditions, and thus, the ultimate cause of this outbreak are not known. This epidemic might signal environmental change in the Baltic Sea. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  1. Southeastern Community College: Catalyzing Economic Development in Rural North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    Virginia's Southeastern Community College (SCC) examined its service area and performance in the late 1980s and found that its enrollments had dropped while area unemployment rates were rising. Local officials estimated that nearly 2,000 manufacturing jobs had been lost in the service area--Columbus County--since the passage of the North American…

  2. Disparities in Discontinuing Rosiglitazone Following the 2007 FDA Safety Alert

    PubMed Central

    Qato, Danya M.; Trivedi, Amal N.; Mor, Vincent; Dore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Responsiveness to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rosiglitazone safety alert, issued on May 21, 2007, has not been examined among vulnerable subpopulations of the elderly. Objective To compare time to discontinuation of rosiglitazone after the safety alert between black and white elderly persons, and across sociodemographic and economic subgroups. Research Design A cohort study. Subjects Medicare fee-for-service enrollees in 2007 who were established users of rosiglitazone identified from a 20% national sample of pharmacy claims. Measures Outcome of interest was time to discontinuation of rosiglitazone after the May alert. We modeled the number of days following the warning to the end of the days’ supply for the last rosiglitazone claim during the study period (May 21, 2007–December 31, 2007) using multivariable proportional hazards models. Results More than 67% of enrollees discontinued rosiglitazone within six months of the advisory. In adjusted analysis, white enrollees (hazard ratio = 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.86–0.94) discontinued rosiglitazone later than the comparison group of black enrollees. Enrollees with a history of low personal income also discontinued later than their comparison group (hazard ratio = 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.81–0.87). There were no observed differences across quintiles of area-level socioeconomic status. Conclusions White race and a history of low personal income modestly predicted later discontinuation of rosiglitazone after the FDA’s safety advisory in 2007. The impact of FDA advisories can vary among sociodemographic groups. Policymakers should continue to monitor whether risk management policies reach their intended populations. PMID:26978569

  3. Assessment of potential migration of radionuclides and trace elements from the White Mesa uranium mill to the Ute Mountain Ute Reservation and surrounding areas, southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, David L.; Ranalli, Anthony J.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Marston, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Geological Survey conduct an independent evaluation of potential offsite migration of radionuclides and selected trace elements associated with the ore storage and milling process at an active uranium mill site near White Mesa, Utah. Specific objectives of this study were (1) to determine recharge sources and residence times of groundwater surrounding the mill site, (2) to determine the current concentrations of uranium and associated trace elements in groundwater surrounding the mill site, (3) to differentiate natural and anthropogenic contaminant sources to groundwater resources surrounding the mill site, (4) to assess the solubility and potential for offsite transport of uranium-bearing minerals in groundwater surrounding the mill site, and (5) to use stream sediment and plant material samples from areas surrounding the mill site to identify potential areas of offsite contamination and likely contaminant sources. The results of age-dating methods and an evaluation of groundwater recharge temperatures using dissolved-gas samples indicate that groundwater sampled in wells in the surficial aquifer in the vicinity of the mill is recharged locally by precipitation. Tritium/helium age dating methods found a "modern day" apparent age in water samples collected from springs in the study area surrounding the mill. This apparent age indicates localized recharge sources that potentially include artificial recharge of seepage from constructed wildlife refuge ponds near the mill. The stable oxygen isotope-ratio, delta oxygen-18, or δ(18O/16O), known as δ18O, and hydrogen isotope-ratio, delta deuterium, or δ(2H/1H), known as δD, data indicate that water discharging from Entrance Spring is isotopically enriched by evaporation and has a similar isotopic fingerprint as water from Recapture Reservoir, which is used as facilities water on the mill site. Water from Recapture

  4. From Demonstration System to Prototype: ShakeAlert Beta Users Provide Feedback to Improve Alert Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, J. A.; Vinci, M.; Steele, W. P.; Allen, R. M.; Hellweg, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) is a system that can provide a few to tens of seconds to minutes of warning prior to ground shaking at a given location. The goal and purpose of such a system is to reduce the damage, costs, and casualties resulting from an earthquake. A prototype earthquake early warning system (ShakeAlert) is in development by the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, Caltech, ETH Zurich, University of Washington, and the USGS. Events are published to the UserDisplay--ShakeAlert's Java based graphical interface, which is being tested by a small group of beta users throughout California. The beta users receive earthquake alerts in real-time and are providing feedback on their experiences. For early warning alerts to be useful, people, companies, and institutions must know beforehand what actions they will perform when they receive the information. Beta user interactions allow the ShakeAlert team to discern: which alert delivery options are most effective, what changes would make the UserDisplay more useful in a pre-disaster situation, and most importantly, what actions users plan to take for various scenarios. We also collect feedback detailing costs of implementing actions and challenges within the beta user organizations, as well as anticipated benefits and savings. Thus, creating a blueprint for a fully operational system that will meet the needs of the public. New California users as well as the first group of Pacific Northwest users are slated to join the ShakeAlert beta test group in the fall of 2013.

  5. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  6. Report Details Solar Radiation Alert and Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staedter, Tracy

    2006-06-01

    High-energy particles from the Sun and from regions beyond the solar system constantly bombard Earth. Thanks to the planet's atmosphere and magnetic field, comsic radiation is not a significant threat to those rooted on terra firma. But airline crew and passengers flying at high altitudes, or over the poles where the Earth's magnetic field provides no protection, are particularly vulnerable to unpredictable flares on the Sun's surface that launch streams of sub-atomic particles toward Earth. The report, ``Solar Radiation Alert System,'' published by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in July 2005 (www.faa.gov/library/reports/medical/oamtechreports/2000s/media/0514.pdf) details in alert system designed to estimate the ionizing radiation at aircraft flight altitudes and, depending on the resulting dose rate, issue a warning.

  7. Integrative Indicator for Assessing the Alert Levels of Algal Bloom in Lakes: Lake Taihu as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinqin; Hu, Weiping; Zhai, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    Algal blooms have recently become one of the most serious environmental problems in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Although many observation and simulation approaches have been applied to predict algal blooms, few studies have addressed the alert levels of algal blooms using integrative indicators in a large lake with multiple service function and significant horizontal heterogeneity. This study developed an integrative indicator assessment system (IIAS) to rank the alert level of algal blooms. In the IIAS, algal biomass, area percentage, distance from drinking water intake points, distance from scenic zones and duration of algal bloom were used as indicators to calculate a comprehensive alert level, which was classified into five grades (Vigilance, Low, Moderate, High, and Severe). Lake Taihu was taken as a case study to assess the comprehensive alert level of algal blooms in 2007 and 2010. The comprehensive alert level showed obvious spatial-temporal patterns, with an acceptable accuracy in Lake Taihu. The comprehensive alert levels were relatively higher in typical phytoplankton subzones than typical hydrophytes subzones and are more sensitive to weight factor in the northern and western subzones where high biomass usually occurs. Case study showed a very good application of the proposed comprehensive alert level assessment methodology, which can be adjusted to predict the degree of hazard of algal blooms in multi-service function large lakes to help the government and decision makers to act to prevent the disaster from algal bloom spreading.

  8. Integrative Indicator for Assessing the Alert Levels of Algal Bloom in Lakes: Lake Taihu as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinqin; Hu, Weiping; Zhai, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    Algal blooms have recently become one of the most serious environmental problems in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Although many observation and simulation approaches have been applied to predict algal blooms, few studies have addressed the alert levels of algal blooms using integrative indicators in a large lake with multiple service function and significant horizontal heterogeneity. This study developed an integrative indicator assessment system (IIAS) to rank the alert level of algal blooms. In the IIAS, algal biomass, area percentage, distance from drinking water intake points, distance from scenic zones and duration of algal bloom were used as indicators to calculate a comprehensive alert level, which was classified into five grades (Vigilance, Low, Moderate, High, and Severe). Lake Taihu was taken as a case study to assess the comprehensive alert level of algal blooms in 2007 and 2010. The comprehensive alert level showed obvious spatial-temporal patterns, with an acceptable accuracy in Lake Taihu. The comprehensive alert levels were relatively higher in typical phytoplankton subzones than typical hydrophytes subzones and are more sensitive to weight factor in the northern and western subzones where high biomass usually occurs. Case study showed a very good application of the proposed comprehensive alert level assessment methodology, which can be adjusted to predict the degree of hazard of algal blooms in multi-service function large lakes to help the government and decision makers to act to prevent the disaster from algal bloom spreading. PMID:26296739

  9. Alerts Visualization and Clustering in Network-based Intrusion Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dr. Li; Gasior, Wade C; Dasireddy, Swetha

    2010-04-01

    Today's Intrusion detection systems when deployed on a busy network overload the network with huge number of alerts. This behavior of producing too much raw information makes it less effective. We propose a system which takes both raw data and Snort alerts to visualize and analyze possible intrusions in a network. Then we present with two models for the visualization of clustered alerts. Our first model gives the network administrator with the logical topology of the network and detailed information of each node that involves its associated alerts and connections. In the second model, flocking model, presents the network administrator with the visual representation of IDS data in which each alert is represented in different color and the alerts with maximum similarity move together. This gives network administrator with the idea of detecting various of intrusions through visualizing the alert patterns.

  10. Louisiana Ground-Water Map No. 22: Generalized Potentiometric Surface of the Amite Aquifer and the "2,800-Foot" Sand of the Baton Rouge Area in Southeastern Louisiana, June-August 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The Amite aquifer and the '2,800-foot' sand of the Baton Rouge area (hereafter referred to as the '2,800-foot' sand) are principal sources of fresh ground water in southeastern Louisiana. Both the Amite aquifer and the '2,800-foot' sand are part of the Jasper equivalent aquifer system. The Amite aquifer is heavily pumped in the Bogalusa area, and the '2,800-foot' sand is one of the most heavily pumped aquifers in East Baton Rouge Parish. The Baton Rouge fault zone, which acts as a barrier to flow, trends approximately west-northwest from a point just south of The Rigolets through southern West Baton Rouge Parish, and is the approximate southern limit of freshwater in the aquifers. For the purposes of this report, freshwater is defined as water having less than 250 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of chloride, and most of the water withdrawals described in this report were assumed to be fresh. In 2005, about 18 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) was withdrawn from the Amite aquifer, primarily for public-supply use (8.4 Mgal/d) and industrial use (9.6 Mgal/d). During this same period, about 32 Mgal/d was withdrawn from the '2,800-foot' sand, primarily for public-supply use (13 Mgal/d) and industrial use (19 Mgal/d). Public-supply and industrial withdrawals from the Amite aquifer and the '2,800-foot' sand are listed in table 1. According to data from the Louisiana State Census Data Center, some of the largest population increases in the State during the period 1990 to 2000 occurred in St. Tammany (32.4 percent), Livingston (30.2 percent), and Tangipahoa (17.4 percent) Parishes. These population increases have been accompanied by increased withdrawals of ground water during the same period: 40 percent in St. Tammany Parish, 63 percent in Livingston Parish, and 35 percent in Tangipahoa Parish. An increase in population in these parishes is expected from population displacement due to damages from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita crossing the Louisiana coast in August and September

  11. The Effect of Computer Science Instruction on Critical Thinking Skills and Mental Alertness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cathleen; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Pretests measuring critical thinking ability and mental alertness were administered to 72 first-year college students at the beginning of an introductory computer programing course. Posttests administered at the end of the semester showed significant improvement in both areas, indicating that instruction in programing improves students' critical…

  12. Computing and Engineering in Afterschool. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 62

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This Afterschool Alert Issue Brief explores how afterschool programs are offering innovative, hands-on computing and engineering education opportunities. Both these subjects have emerged as priority areas within the "STEM" fields. Computing is one of the fastest growing industries, and yet current rates of college graduation in computer…

  13. Runway Safety Monitor Algorithm for Runway Incursion Detection and Alerting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F., Jr.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Runway Safety Monitor (RSM) is an algorithm for runway incursion detection and alerting that was developed in support of NASA's Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) research conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision System element. The RSM algorithm provides pilots with enhanced situational awareness and warnings of runway incursions in sufficient time to take evasive action and avoid accidents during landings, takeoffs, or taxiing on the runway. The RSM currently runs as a component of the NASA Integrated Display System, an experimental avionics software system for terminal area and surface operations. However, the RSM algorithm can be implemented as a separate program to run on any aircraft with traffic data link capability. The report documents the RSM software and describes in detail how RSM performs runway incursion detection and alerting functions for NASA RIPS. The report also describes the RIPS flight tests conducted at the Dallas-Ft Worth International Airport (DFW) during September and October of 2000, and the RSM performance results and lessons learned from those flight tests.

  14. Earth alert: a NASA Goddard tech transfer success story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Thomas F.

    1994-10-01

    The historically high toll in human lives lost to natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and other progressive events signals the need for some type of personal warning that alerts people to the need to evacuate or otherwise protect themselves in the face of an advancing threat. Traditional warning services, which rely on broadcasts by the mass media in the metropolitan areas of the United States, achieve measurable success in disseminating warnings. However, warnings to isolated populations that exist in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world may be poor to effectively nonexistent, especially in the many archipelagoes. Earth Alert, a joint project of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Scientific and Commercial Systems Corporation, is targeted at development of a simple, low-cost means for providing timely warning to otherwise isolated populations. The project uses appropriate relay capabilities of U.S. satellites already in orbit, and thus avoids the high-cost development and launch of dedicated resources.

  15. Using Supervised Machine Learning to Classify Real Alerts and Artifact in Online Multi-signal Vital Sign Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lujie; Dubrawski, Artur; Wang, Donghan; Fiterau, Madalina; Guillame-Bert, Mathieu; Bose, Eliezer; Kaynar, Ata M.; Wallace, David J.; Guttendorf, Jane; Clermont, Gilles; Pinsky, Michael R.; Hravnak, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Use machine-learning (ML) algorithms to classify alerts as real or artifacts in online noninvasive vital sign (VS) data streams to reduce alarm fatigue and missed true instability. METHODS Using a 24-bed trauma step-down unit’s non-invasive VS monitoring data (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], peripheral oximetry [SpO2]) recorded at 1/20Hz, and noninvasive oscillometric blood pressure [BP] less frequently, we partitioned data into training/validation (294 admissions; 22,980 monitoring hours) and test sets (2,057 admissions; 156,177 monitoring hours). Alerts were VS deviations beyond stability thresholds. A four-member expert committee annotated a subset of alerts (576 in training/validation set, 397 in test set) as real or artifact selected by active learning, upon which we trained ML algorithms. The best model was evaluated on alerts in the test set to enact online alert classification as signals evolve over time. MAIN RESULTS The Random Forest model discriminated between real and artifact as the alerts evolved online in the test set with area under the curve (AUC) performance of 0.79 (95% CI 0.67-0.93) for SpO2 at the instant the VS first crossed threshold and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.95) at 3 minutes into the alerting period. BP AUC started at 0.77 (95%CI 0.64-0.95) and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.98), while RR AUC started at 0.85 (95%CI 0.77-0.95) and increased to 0.97 (95% CI 0.94–1.00). HR alerts were too few for model development. CONCLUSIONS ML models can discern clinically relevant SpO2, BP and RR alerts from artifacts in an online monitoring dataset (AUC>0.87). PMID:26992068

  16. How Regrouping Alerts in Computerized Physician Order Entry Layout Influences Physicians’ Prescription Behavior: Results of a Crossover Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bediang, Georges; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background As demonstrated in several publications, low positive predictive value alerts in computerized physician order entry (CPOE) induce fatigue and may interrupt physicians unnecessarily during prescription of medication. Although it is difficult to increase the consideration of medical alerts by physician through an improvement of their predictive value, another approach consists to act on the way they are presented. The interruption management model inspired us to propose an alternative alert display strategy of regrouping the alerts in the screen layout, as a possible solution for reducing the interruption in physicians’ workflow. Objective In this study, we compared 2 CPOE designs based on a particular alert presentation strategy: one design involved regrouping the alerts in a single place on the screen, and in the other, the alerts were located next to the triggering information. Our objective was to evaluate experimentally whether the new design led to fewer interruptions in workflow and if it affected alert handling. Methods The 2 CPOE designs were compared in a controlled crossover randomized trial. All interactions with the system and eye movements were stored for quantitative analysis. Results The study involved a group of 22 users consisting of physicians and medical students who solved medical scenarios containing prescription tasks. Scenario completion time was shorter when the alerts were regrouped (mean 117.29 seconds, SD 36.68) than when disseminated on the screen (mean 145.58 seconds, SD 75.07; P=.045). Eye tracking revealed that physicians fixated longer on alerts in the classic design (mean 119.71 seconds, SD 76.77) than in the centralized alert design (mean 70.58 seconds, SD 33.53; P=.001). Visual switches between prescription and alert areas, indicating interruption, were reduced with centralized alerts (mean 41.29, SD 21.26) compared with the classic design (mean 57.81, SD 35.97; P=.04). Prescription behavior (ie, prescription changes

  17. Presenting Multiple Drug Alerts in an Ambulatory Electronic Prescribing System

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, M.B.; Gregg, W.M.; Johnson, K.B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study explores alternative approaches to the display of drug alerts, and examines whether and how human-factors based interface design can be used to improve the prescriber’s perception about drug alert presentation, signal detection from noisy alert data, and their comprehension of clinical decision support during electronic prescribing. Methods We reviewed issues with presenting multiple drug alerts in electronic prescribing systems. User-centered design, consisting of iterative usability and prototype testing was applied. After an iterative design phase, we proposed several novel drug alert presentation interfaces; expert evaluation and formal usability testing were applied to access physician prescribers’ perceptions of the tools. We mapped drug alert attributes to different interface constructs. We examined four different interfaces for presenting multiple drug alerts. Results A TreeDashboard View was better perceived than a text-based ScrollText View with respect to the ability to detect critical information, the ability to accomplish tasks, and the perceptional efficacy of finding information. Conclusion A robust model for studying multiple drug-alert presentations was developed. Several drug alert presentation interfaces were proposed. The TreeDashboard View was better perceived than the text-based ScrollText View in delivering multiple drug alerts during a simulation of electronic prescribing. PMID:25024753

  18. FastAlert--an automatic search system to alert about new entries in biological sequence databanks.

    PubMed

    Eggenberger, F; Redaschi, N; Doelz, R

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a new tool enabling awareness of new sequence databank entries of interest. The FastAlert system relieves the researcher from the burden of repeating FASTA searches in order to keep up with the rapidly growing amount of information found in biological sequence databanks. The query sequence can be submitted from any computer connected to the Internet. Upon registration, the databank, including the updates, is scanned at periodic intervals with the sequence provided. The results, so-called FastAlert reports, are delivered via electronic mail. The reports contain the FASTA best-scores list and the similarity statistics for each entry listed. PMID:8744775

  19. Stratigraphy and vertical hydraulic conductivity of the St. Francois Confining Unit in the Viburnum Trend and evaluation of the Unit in the Viburnum Trend and exploration areas, southeastern Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleeschulte, Michael J.; Seeger, Cheryl M.

    2003-01-01

    The confining ability of the St. Francois confining unit (Derby-Doerun Dolomite and Davis Formation) was evaluated in ten townships (T. 31?35 N. and R. 01?02 W.) along the Viburnum Trend of southeastern Missouri. Vertical hydraulic conductivity data were compared to similar data collected during two previous studies 20 miles south of the Viburnum Trend, in two lead-zinc exploration areas that may be a southern extension of the Viburnum Trend. The surficial Ozark aquifer is the primary source of water for domestic and public-water supplies and major springs in southern Missouri. The St. Francois confining unit lies beneath the Ozark aquifer and impedes the movement of water between the Ozark aquifer and the underlying St. Francois aquifer (composed of the Bonneterre Formation and Lamotte Sandstone). The Bonneterre Formation is the primary host formation for lead-zinc ore deposits of the Viburnum Trend and potential host formation in the exploration areas. For most of the more than 40 years the mines have been in operation along the Viburnum Trend, about 27 million gallons per day were being pumped from the St. Francois aquifer for mine dewatering. Previous studies conducted along the Viburnum Trend have concluded that no large cones of depression have developed in the potentiometric surface of the Ozark aquifer as a result of mining activity. Because of similar geology, stratigraphy, and depositional environment between the Viburnum Trend and the exploration areas, the Viburnum Trend may be used as a pertinent, full-scale model to study and assess how mining may affect the exploration areas. Along the Viburnum Trend, the St. Francois confining unit is a complex series of dolostones, limestones, and shales that generally is 230 to 280 feet thick with a net shale thickness ranging from less than 25 to greater than 100 feet with the thickness increasing toward the west. Vertical hydraulic conductivity values determined from laboratory permeability tests were used to

  20. OBS FOMAR POOL: Gibraltar and ALERTES-RIM experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Martín Davila, Jose; Buforn, Elisa; Cabieces, Roberto; Santos, Jose; Sandoval, Nicolas; Roca, Antoni; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    The Eurasian-African plate boundary crosses the called "Ibero-Maghrebian" region from the San Vicente Cape (SW Portugal) to Tunisia including the south Iberia, Alboran Sea, and northern of Morocco and Algeria. The low convergence rate at this plate boundary produces a continuous moderate seismic activity of low magnitude and shallow depth, where the occurrence of large earthquakes is separated by long time intervals, even with associated tsunamis, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. In this region, there are also intermediate and very deep earthquakes. Due to the fact that part of the seismic activity is located at marine areas, and also because of the poor geographic azimuthal coverage at some zones provided by the land stations (specially in the SW of the San Vicente Cape area), Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) acquired three "LOSTERN" broad band (CMG-40T sensors) OBS, manufactured by KUM (Kiel, Germany), and, more recently (2014), the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) acquired another three with Trillium 120 sensors. All of them conform the OBS FOMAR pool. Since January to November 2014, the FOMAR pool has been deployed along the Gibraltar strait (Gibraltar experiment), in collaboration with SECEGSA (Spanish society to study the fix communication through the Gibraltar Strait), to study the local microseismicity in the Gibraltar strait area. Also, since September 2015, the FOMAR pool has been deployed for 8 months in SW of the San Vicente Cape with an hexagonal array configuration as a part of ALERTES-RIM project. In this work the some preliminary results of the Gibraltar strait and ALERTES-RIM OBS experiment are shown.

  1. Public health communications and alert fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health care providers play a significant role in large scale health emergency planning, detection, response, recovery and communication with the public. The effectiveness of health care providers in emergency preparedness and response roles depends, in part, on public health agencies communicating information in a way that maximizes the likelihood that the message is delivered, received, deemed credible and, when appropriate, acted on. However, during an emergency, health care providers can become inundated with alerts and advisories through numerous national, state, local and professional communication channels. We conducted an alert fatigue study as a sub-study of a larger randomized controlled trial which aimed to identify the most effective methods of communicating public health messages between public health agencies and providers. We report an analysis of the effects of public health message volume/frequency on recall of specific message content and effect of rate of message communications on health care provider alert fatigue. Methods Health care providers enrolled in the larger study (n=528) were randomized to receive public health messages via email, fax, short message service (SMS or cell phone text messaging) or to a control group that did not receive messages. For 12 months, study messages based on real events of public health significance were sent quarterly with follow-up telephone interviews regarding message receipt and topic recall conducted 5–10 days after the message delivery date. During a pandemic when numerous messages are sent, alert fatigue may impact ability to recall whether a specific message has been received due to the “noise” created by the higher number of messages. To determine the impact of “noise” when study messages were sent, we compared health care provider recall of the study message topic to the number of local public health messages sent to health care providers. Results We calculated the mean number of

  2. CAT: the INGV Tsunami Alert Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, A.

    2014-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra earthquake, the tsunami threat posed by large earthquakes occurring in the Mediterranean sea was formally taken into account by many countries around the Mediterranean basin. In the past, large earthquakes that originated significant tsunamis occurred nearly once per century (Maramai et al., 2014, Annals of Geophysics). The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC-UNESCO) received a mandate from the international community to coordinate the establishment of the ICG/NEAMTWS (http://neamtic.ioc-unesco.org) through Resolution IOC-XXIII-14. Since then, several countries (France, Turkey, Greece) have started operating as candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (cTWP) in the Mediterranean. Italy started operating as cTWP on October 1st, 2014. The Italian cTWP is formed by INGV ("Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia)", DPC ("Dipartimento di Protezione Civile") and ISPRA ("Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale"). INGV is in charge of issuing the alert for potentially tsunamigenic earthquakes, ISPRA provides the sea level recordings and DPC is in charge of disseminating the alert. INGV established the tsunami alert center (CAT, "Centro di Allerta Tsunami") at the end of 2013. CAT is co-located with the INGV national seismic surveillance center operated since many years. In this work, we show the technical and personnel organization of CAT, its response to recent earthquakes, and the new procedures under development for implementation. (*) INGV-CAT WG: Amato A., Basili R., Bernardi F., Bono A., Danecek P., De Martini P.M., Govoni A., Graziani L., Lauciani V., Lomax, A., Lorito S., Maramai A., Mele F., Melini D., Molinari I., Nostro C., Piatanesi A., Pintore S., Quintiliani M., Romano F., Selva J., Selvaggi G., Sorrentino D., Tonini R.

  3. Southeastern Power Administration 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-28

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am proud to submit Southeastern Power Administration’s (Southeastern’s) fiscal year (FY) 2007 Annual Report for your review. The information included in this report reflects Southeastern’s programs, accomplishments, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2006 and ending September 30, 2007. Southeastern marketed more than 5 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to 492 wholesale Federal power customers in an 11-state marketing area in FY 2007. Revenues from the sale of this power totaled approximately $219 million. Drought conditions continued to plague the southeast region of the United States during 2007 placing strains on our natural and financial resources. Southeastern purchased more than $40 million in replacement power to meet customer contract requirements to ensure the continued reliability of our nation’s power grid. With the financial assistance and support of our Federal power customers, continued funding for capitalized equipment replacements at various Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) hydroelectric projects provided much needed repairs and maintenance for aging facilities. Southeastern’s cyber and physical security program continued to be reviewed and updated to meet Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and requirements. Plans for the upcoming year include communication and cooperation with DOE, Federal power customers, and the Corps to maximize the benefits of our nation’s water resources. Competition for the use of water and the prolonged drought conditions will present another challenging year for our agency. The employees at Southeastern will be proactive in meeting these challenges and providing reliable hydroelectric power to the people in the southeast. Sincerely, Kenneth E. Legg Administrator

  4. ToxAlerts: A Web Server of Structural Alerts for Toxic Chemicals and Compounds with Potential Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a Web-based platform for collecting and storing toxicological structural alerts from literature and for virtual screening of chemical libraries to flag potentially toxic chemicals and compounds that can cause adverse side effects. An alert is uniquely identified by a SMARTS template, a toxicological endpoint, and a publication where the alert was described. Additionally, the system allows storing complementary information such as name, comments, and mechanism of action, as well as other data. Most importantly, the platform can be easily used for fast virtual screening of large chemical datasets, focused libraries, or newly designed compounds against the toxicological alerts, providing a detailed profile of the chemicals grouped by structural alerts and endpoints. Such a facility can be used for decision making regarding whether a compound should be tested experimentally, validated with available QSAR models, or eliminated from consideration altogether. The alert-based screening can also be helpful for an easier interpretation of more complex QSAR models. The system is publicly accessible and tightly integrated with the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu). The system is open and expandable: any registered OCHEM user can introduce new alerts, browse, edit alerts introduced by other users, and virtually screen his/her data sets against all or selected alerts. The user sets being passed through the structural alerts can be used at OCHEM for other typical tasks: exporting in a wide variety of formats, development of QSAR models, additional filtering by other criteria, etc. The database already contains almost 600 structural alerts for such endpoints as mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, skin sensitization, compounds that undergo metabolic activation, and compounds that form reactive metabolites and, thus, can cause adverse reactions. The ToxAlerts platform is accessible on the Web at http://ochem.eu/alerts, and it is constantly

  5. A process-based model for the definition of hydrological alert systems in landslide risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; De Agostini, A.; Stevan, G.; Tessari, G.; Genevois, R.

    2012-11-01

    The definition of hydrological alert systems for rainfall-induced landslides is strongly related to a deep knowledge of the geological and geomorphological features of the territory. Climatic conditions, spatial and temporal evolution of the phenomena and characterization of landslide triggering, together with propagation mechanisms, are the key elements to be considered. Critical steps for the development of the systems consist of the identification of the hydrological variable related to landslide triggering and of the minimum rainfall threshold for landslide occurrence. In this paper we report the results from a process-based model to define a hydrological alert system for the Val di Maso Landslide, located in the northeastern Italian Alps and included in the Vicenza Province (Veneto region, NE Italy). The instability occurred in November 2010, due to an exceptional rainfall event that hit the Vicenza Province and the entire NE Italy. Up to 500 mm in 3-day cumulated rainfall generated large flood conditions and triggered hundreds of landslides. During the flood, the Soil Protection Division of the Vicenza Province received more than 500 warnings of instability phenomena. The complexity of the event and the high level of risk to infrastructure and private buildings are the main reasons for deepening the specific phenomenon occurred at Val di Maso. Empirical and physically-based models have been used to identify the minimum rainfall threshold for the occurrence of instability phenomena in the crown area of Val di Maso landslide, where a retrogressive evolution by multiple rotational slides is expected. Empirical models helped in the identification and in the evaluation of recurrence of critical rainfall events, while physically-based modelling was essential to verify the effects on the slope stability of determined rainfall depths. Empirical relationships between rainfall and landslide consist of the calculation of rainfall Depth-Duration-Frequency (DDF) curves

  6. CISN Testing Center ShakeAlert Performance Summaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Liukis, M.; Jordan, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    SCEC and CISN ShakeAlert researchers have developed an operational testing system for the CISN ShakeAlert system called the CISN Testing Center (CTC). The CTC generates two main types of ShakeAlert performance summaries: (1) Event Summaries (for each significant California event), and (2) Cumulative Summaries (for ShakeAlert system performance over a specific period of time). Event Summaries are generated for each M3.0 and larger ANSS catalog California earthquake. Event Summaries show performance of the individual ShakeAlert algorithms, and the performance of the Decision Module that sends the public communications. Cumulative Summaries show ShakeAlert performance for a given earthquake catalog. In general, CTC Cumulative Summaries compare ShakeAlert forecast parameters, such as location and magnitude, against final observed parameters in the ANSS earthquake catalog. The CTC processing system uses the SCEC CSEP open-source scientific testing framework to automate the test processing. This testing framework provides tools to retrieve catalog data retrieval for ANSS and other catalog sources, software utilities for filtering earthquake catalogs by region and magnitude, and utilities for automating performance summary generation. The CTC system calculates performance summaries for the CISN ShakeAlert system on a daily basis. Each day, twenty-four hours of California earthquakes are retrieved from the ANSS catalog, and the testing center retrieves ShakeAlert logs for each event, and compares the forecasts to the observations. The CTC testing approach is intended to be open, transparent, and well defined so that all testing center results can be reproduced externally. The CTC ShakeAlert testing system provides standardized, and repeatable, testing of the ShakeAlert algorithms and decision modules, along with overall ShakeAlert system performance evaluation, providing robust testing capabilities with low development and operations cost by leveraging the capabilities of

  7. Description of the AILS Alerting Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanant, Paul; Jackson, Mike

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a complete description of the Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) alerting algorithms. The purpose of AILS is to provide separation assurance between aircraft during simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runways. AILS will allow independent approaches to be flown in such situations where dependent approaches were previously required (typically under Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC)). This is achieved by providing multiple levels of alerting for pairs of aircraft that are in parallel approach situations. This document#s scope is comprehensive and covers everything from general overviews, definitions, and concepts down to algorithmic elements and equations. The entire algorithm is presented in complete and detailed pseudo-code format. This can be used by software programmers to program AILS into a software language. Additional supporting information is provided in the form of coordinate frame definitions, data requirements, calling requirements as well as all necessary pre-processing and post-processing requirements. This is important and required information for the implementation of AILS into an analysis, a simulation, or a real-time system.

  8. Interactions between phasic alerting and consciousness in the fronto-striatal network.

    PubMed

    Chica, Ana B; Bayle, Dimitri J; Botta, Fabiano; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M

    2016-01-01

    Only a small fraction of all the information reaching our senses can be the object of conscious report or voluntary action. Although some models propose that different attentional states (top-down amplification and vigilance) are necessary for conscious perception, few studies have explored how the brain activations associated with different attentional systems (such as top-down orienting and phasic alerting) lead to conscious perception of subsequent visual stimulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neural mechanisms associated with endogenous spatial attention and phasic alertness, and their interaction with the conscious perception of near-threshold stimuli. The only region demonstrating a neural interaction between endogenous attention and conscious perception was the thalamus, while a larger network of cortical and subcortical brain activations, typically associated with phasic alerting, was highly correlated with participants' conscious reports. Activation of the anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, frontal eye fields, thalamus, and caudate nucleus was related to perceptual consciousness. These data suggest that not all attentional systems are equally effective in enhancing conscious perception, highlighting the importance of thalamo-cortical circuits on the interactions between alerting and consciousness. PMID:27555378

  9. Interactions between phasic alerting and consciousness in the fronto-striatal network

    PubMed Central

    Chica, Ana B.; Bayle, Dimitri J.; Botta, Fabiano; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Paz-Alonso, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Only a small fraction of all the information reaching our senses can be the object of conscious report or voluntary action. Although some models propose that different attentional states (top-down amplification and vigilance) are necessary for conscious perception, few studies have explored how the brain activations associated with different attentional systems (such as top-down orienting and phasic alerting) lead to conscious perception of subsequent visual stimulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neural mechanisms associated with endogenous spatial attention and phasic alertness, and their interaction with the conscious perception of near-threshold stimuli. The only region demonstrating a neural interaction between endogenous attention and conscious perception was the thalamus, while a larger network of cortical and subcortical brain activations, typically associated with phasic alerting, was highly correlated with participants’ conscious reports. Activation of the anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, frontal eye fields, thalamus, and caudate nucleus was related to perceptual consciousness. These data suggest that not all attentional systems are equally effective in enhancing conscious perception, highlighting the importance of thalamo-cortical circuits on the interactions between alerting and consciousness. PMID:27555378

  10. Visual cues keep treatment team alert.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    At Good Samaritan Medical Center in West Palm Beach, FL, a throughput initiative that uses colored magnets to indicate anticipated discharges has cut emergency department holding time and increased the number of discharges by 2 p.m. The charge nurse, case manager, and discharge planner meet daily, make their best clinical guess about the patient's discharge and place a red, yellow, or green magnet on a white board at the nurses station. When team members pass the board, they are alerted to anticipated discharges and know to make patients with a green magnet a priority. The case managers and nurses write the expected discharge on a white board in the patient rooms and initiate a discussion with patients and family members to prepare them for discharge. PMID:25134274

  11. NAPS as an Alertness Management Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Smith, Roy M.; Miller, Donna L.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Gander, Philippa H.; Lebacqz, J. Victor

    2001-01-01

    Today, 24-hour operations are necessary to meet the demands of our society and the requirements of our industrialized global economy. These around-the-clock demands pose unique physiological challenges for the humans who remain central to safe and productive operations. Optimal alertness and performance are critical factors that are increasingly challenged by unusual, extended, or changing work/rest schedules. Technological advancements and automated systems can exacerbate the challenges faced by the human factor in these environments. Shift work, transportation demands, and continuous operations engender sleep loss and circadian disruption. Both of these physiological factors can lead to increased sleepiness, decreased performance, and a reduced margin of safety. These factors can increase vulnerability to incidents and accidents in operational settings. The consequences can have both societal effects (e.g., major destructive accidents such as Three Mile Island, Exxon Valdez, Bhopal) and personal effects (e.g., an accident driving home after a night shift).

  12. Fire Alerts for the Geospatial Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFerren, Graeme; Roos, Stacey; Terhorst, Andrew

    The Advanced Fire Information System (AFIS) is a joint initiative between CSIR and Eskom, the South African electricity utility. AFIS infers fire occurrences from processed, remotely sensed data and triggers alarms to Eskom operators based on the proximity of fire events to Eskom's infrastructure. We intend on migrating AFIS from a narrowly focussed “black-box” application to one servicing users in multiple fire-related scenarios, enabling rapid development and deployment of new applications through concept-based queries of data and knowledge repositories. Future AFIS versions would supply highly tuned, meaningful and customized fire alerts to users based on an open framework of Geo-spatial Web services, ontologies and software agents. Other Geospatial Web applications may have to follow a similar path via Web services and standards-based architectures, thereby providing the foundation for the Geospatial Web.

  13. 75 FR 4760 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ...) by filing paper copies. See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... seeking comment on its proposal to amend the Commission's rules governing the Emergency Alert System...

  14. Silver Alerts and the Problem of Missing Adults with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Dawn; Muschert, Glenn W.; Kinney, Jennifer; Robbins, Emily; Petonito, Gina; Manning, Lydia; Brown, J. Scott

    2010-01-01

    In the months following the introduction of the National AMBER (America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alert plan used to locate missing and abducted children, Silver Alert programs began to emerge. These programs use the same infrastructure and approach to find a different missing population, cognitively impaired older adults. By late…

  15. An Evaluation of Alert Services: Quantity versus Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandian, Fatemeh; Riahinia, Nosrat; Azimi, Ali; Poursalehi, Nastaran

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Online information vendors currently offer a variety of additional services; among these are alert services which present requested information on recent publications to registered users. This paper aims to investigate a variety of alert services provided by four online information vendors. Design/methodology/approach: A comparison of the…

  16. 76 FR 80780 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (Third FNPRM), 76 FR 35810-01, June 20, 2011, in this docket sufficiently... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Alert System (EAS) rules to extend the deadline for EAS Participants to be able to receive...

  17. Good "Geofences" Make Good Neighbors in Age of Mobile Alerts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Jim

    2013-01-01

    For every institution of higher education, the safety and protection of its campus community is of primary importance. Recent events have shown an increase in campus crime, assaults and even a tragic loss of life. Apps such as Ping4alerts! allow campuses to send hyperlocal smartphone alerts related to public safety, school closings, local events,…

  18. R&D Alert. Volume 7, Number 2, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Noel, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "R&D Alert" covers issues affecting schools in the Western Regional Educational Laboratory's four-state region--Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah--and throughout the United States. This issue of "R&D Alert" shares what WestEd is learning from a sample of their latest work, focusing on three points in the process: preservice, inservice, and…

  19. R&D Alert. Volume 7, Number 1, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Noel, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "R&D Alert" covers issues affecting schools in the Western Regional Educational Laboratory's four-state region--Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah--and throughout the United States. WestEd researchers and assistance providers have been focused on secondary education for many years. This issue of "R&D Alert" goes beyond describing the problem…

  20. Development of ShakeAlert Performance Evaluation Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Liukis, M.; Jordan, T. H.; CISN EEW Team

    2011-12-01

    The CISN Testing Center (CTC) is designed to provide automated and interactive performance evaluations of ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system performance. The CTC software consists of two main parts: (1) software programs that input ShakeAlert EEW performance reports, match ShakeAlert forecasts to observational data, and generate a variety of EEW system performance summaries, and (2) an automated testing framework that can input ShakeAlert EEW performance reports, retrieve ANSS observational data, and produce performance summaries on a daily, or event, basis. The interactive capabilities of the CTC software may be useful for offline testing of ShakeAlert system. The automated capabilities of the CTC software are designed to support ongoing ShakeAlert performance evaluations. The CTC software implements a number of standard EEW performance summaries including magnitude forecast error and location forecast error with evaluation of ShakeAlert ground motion forecasts such as peak velocity under development. The CTC software is distributed as open-source scientific software to support transparency in evaluation processing and to support testing software re-use within ShakeAlert development groups.

  1. Delivering Alert Messages to Members of a Work Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftis, Julia; Nickens, Stephanie; Pell, Melissa; Pell, Vince

    2008-01-01

    Global Alert Resolution Network (GARNET) is a software system for delivering emergency alerts as well as less-urgent messages to members of the Goddard Space Flight Center work force via an intranet or the Internet, and can be adapted to similar use in other large organizations.

  2. Peak Alert Time and Rapport between Residence Hall Roommates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined whether peak alert time is related to compatibility for college roommates. Data from 66 male pairs and from 55 female pairs of roommates revealed that pairs who were similar on self-reported peak circadian alertness had higher levels of rapport. (Author/NB)

  3. 47 CFR 80.1113 - Transmission of a distress alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of these... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmission of a distress alert. 80.1113... Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1113 Transmission of a distress alert. (a)...

  4. 47 CFR 80.1113 - Transmission of a distress alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of these... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission of a distress alert. 80.1113... Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1113 Transmission of a distress alert. (a)...

  5. Imaging crustal structure variation across southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian L. N.

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band seismic network of 28 three-component seismometers was deployed in southeastern Australia to examine variations in crustal thickness across the transition between Precambrian and Phanerozoic lithosphere. Receiver function observations and modelling of P-to-S conversions at the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) have been employed to investigate: (i) the variations in the Moho depth across southeastern Australia, and (ii) the nature of the transition between crust and mantle. Data from temporary deployments were used together with data from the few permanent broad-band stations in the region. The extraction of P-receiver functions from high-quality seismic data recorded on these stations has enabled the determination of the crustal thickness across the region. The crustal thicknesses lie in the range 28-48 km. The Moho depth is generally well correlated with the Earth surface elevation in the southeastern Australia. The Moho estimates from receiver functions are in good agreement with results from reflection profiling. The average crustal thickness is found to be around 39 km beneath the Precambrian area in the west and even thicker beneath the Lachlan Orogen in the east (~ 43 km). The average crustal thickness in between, beneath the Murray Basin is thinner ~ 32 km. Interestingly, the crust in the Mount Gambier volcanic area is rather thick ~ 41 km, suggesting that the limit between the Delamerian and western Lachlan orogens is located east of Mount Gambier. Our results favour a position for the Tasman Line generally consistent with the interpretation by Direen and Crawford (2003) and thus to the east of the location favoured by many authors. The broader crust-mantle transition and thicker crust beneath the Lachlan Orogen suggest the presence of magmatic underplating at the base of the lower crust. The intermediate nature of the crust-mantle transition also suggests magmatic underplating beneath the Gawler Craton and the Curnamona Province.

  6. Alert Messaging in the CMS Distributed Workflow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxa, Zdenek

    2012-12-01

    WMAgent is the core component of the CMS workload management system. One of the features of this job managing platform is a configurable messaging system aimed at generating, distributing and processing alerts: short messages describing a given alert-worthy information or pathological condition. Apart from the framework's sub-components running within the WMAgent instances, there is a stand-alone application collecting alerts from all WMAgent instances running across the CMS distributed computing environment. The alert framework has a versatile design that allows for receiving alert messages also from other CMS production applications, such as PhEDEx data transfer manager. We present implementation details of the system, including its Python implementation using ZeroMQ, CouchDB message storage and future visions as well as operational experiences. Inter-operation with monitoring platforms such as Dashboard or Lemon is described.

  7. Summer soil moisture spatiotemporal variability in southeastern Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil moisture is important for many applications, but its measurements are lacking globally and even regionally. The Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona has measured nearsurface 5-cm soil moisture with 19 in situ probes since 2002 within its 150km2 area. Using various ...

  8. HUMAN BODY BURDEN OF MIREX IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirex is an organochlorine chemical with pesticidal and other industrial usages. Biologically, mirex was used as an insecticide for the control of imported fire ants in large areas of the southeastern U.S. Evidence of mirex survey exposure in a national survey of chemicals in adi...

  9. A fresh look at runway incursions: onboard surface movement awareness and alerting system based on SVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleken, Christoph; Mihalic, Lamir; Güttler, Mathias; Klingauf, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Increasing traffic density on the aerodrome surface due to the continuous worldwide growth in the number of flight operations does not only cause capacity and efficiency problems, but also increases the risk of serious incidents and accidents on the airport movement area. Of these, Runway Incursions are the by far most safety-critical. In fact, the worst-ever accident in civil aviation, the collision of two Boeing B747s on Tenerife in 1977 with 583 fatalities, was caused by a Runway Incursion. Therefore, various Runway Safety programs have recently been initiated around the globe, often focusing on ground-based measures such as improved surveillance. However, as a lack of flight crew situational awareness is a key causal factor in many Runway Incursion incidents and accidents, there is a strong need for an onboard solution, which should be capable of interacting cooperatively with ground-based ATM systems, such as A-SMGCS where available. This paper defines the concept of preventive and reactive Runway Incursion avoidance and describes a Surface Movement Awareness & Alerting System (SMAAS) designed to alert the flight crew if they are at risk of infringing a runway. Both the SVS flight deck displays and the corresponding alerting algorithms utilize an ED 99A/RTCA DO-272A compliant aerodrome database, as well as airport operational, traffic and clearance data received via ADS-B or other data links, respectively. The displays provide the crew with enhanced positional, operational, clearance and traffic awareness, and they are used to visualize alerts. A future enhancement of the system will provide intelligent alerting for conflicts caused by surrounding traffic.

  10. ALERTES-SC3 Early Warning System prototype for South Iberian Peninsula: on-site approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Gallego Carrasco, Javier; Martín Davila, José; Rioja del Rio, Carlos; Morgado, Arturo; Vera, Angel; Ciberia, Angel; Cabieces, Roberto; Strollo, Angelo; Hanka, Winfried; Carranza, Marta

    2016-04-01

    In recent years several Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) have been developed for different parts of the world. The area between SW Cape St. Vicente and the Strait of Gibraltar is one of the most seismically active zones in the Ibero-Maghrebian region, with predominantly moderate and superficial seismicity, but also big events with associated tsunamis are well documented in the area, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. In the frame of the ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) Spanish projects, the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS, regional approach, prototype has been developed at the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and is being tested in near real time for south Iberia. This prototype, based on the SeisComP3 software package, is largely based on algorithms derived from the analysis of the first seconds of the P wave records. Calculation of several parameters are carried out, mainly the characteristic period (τc) and the displacement peak (Pd), but also the velocity peak (Pv), the maximum period (τPmáx), among others. In order to warm the areas closest to the hypocentre, places located inside the "blind zone", a on-site EEWS has also been developed by ROA and integrated in the ALERTES-SC3 prototype. From the on-site approach, a warm level is declared from one station as a function of the estimated characteristic period (τc) and the displacement Peak (Pd), although the earthquake location and therefore the lead time available remains unknown. This on-site EEWS is being tested in several Western Mediterranean net (WM) stations as ARNO (Arenosillo, Huelva,Spain) or CHAS (Chafarinas island, North Africa, Spain). Also an on-site low cost station is being developed based in low cost accelerometers. In this work the current state of the on-site EEWS developed, its integration in the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS system and the low cost seismic stations are shown.

  11. De-Alerting and De-Activating Strategic Nuclear Weapons

    SciTech Connect

    KARAS, THOMAS H.

    2001-04-01

    Despite the end of the Cold War, the US and Russia continue to maintain their ICBMs and many SLBMs in a highly alerted state--they are technically prepared to launch the missiles within minutes of a command decision to do so. Some analysts argue that, particularly in light of the distressed condition of the Russian military, these high alert conditions are tantamount to standing on the edge of a nuclear cliff from which we should now step back. They have proposed various bilateral ''de-alerting'' measures, to be taken prior to and outside the context of the formal strategic arms reduction treaty (START) process. This paper identifies several criteria for a stable de-alerting regime, but fails to find de-alerting measures that convincingly satisfy the criteria. However, some de-alerting measures have promise as de-activation measures for systems due for elimination under the START II and prospective START III treaties. Moreover, once these systems are deactivated, a considerable part of the perceived need to keep nuclear forces on high alert as a survivability hedge will be reduced. At the same time, the U.S. and Russia could consider building on their earlier cooperative actions to reduce the risk of inadvertent nuclear war by enhancing their communications links and possibly joining in efforts to improve early warning systems.

  12. Perceptual evaluation of visual alerts in surveillance videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Topkara, Mercan; Pfeiffer, William; Hampapur, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Visual alerts are commonly used in video monitoring and surveillance systems to mark events, presumably making them more salient to human observers. Surprisingly, the effectiveness of computer-generated alerts in improving human performance has not been widely studied. To address this gap, we have developed a tool for simulating different alert parameters in a realistic visual monitoring situation, and have measured human detection performance under conditions that emulated different set-points in a surveillance algorithm. In the High-Sensitivity condition, the simulated alerts identified 100% of the events with many false alarms. In the Lower-Sensitivity condition, the simulated alerts correctly identified 70% of the targets, with fewer false alarms. In the control condition, no simulated alerts were provided. To explore the effects of learning, subjects performed these tasks in three sessions, on separate days, in a counterbalanced, within subject design. We explore these results within the context of cognitive models of human attention and learning. We found that human observers were more likely to respond to events when marked by a visual alert. Learning played a major role in the two alert conditions. In the first session, observers generated almost twice as many False Alarms as in the No-Alert condition, as the observers responded pre-attentively to the computer-generated false alarms. However, this rate dropped equally dramatically in later sessions, as observers learned to discount the false cues. Highest observer Precision, Hits/(Hits + False Alarms), was achieved in the High Sensitivity condition, but only after training. The successful evaluation of surveillance systems depends on understanding human attention and performance.

  13. Gaia Science Alerts: Early Validation Phase Data from Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Nicholas; Hodgkin, Simon; van Leeuwen, Floor

    2015-08-01

    The ESA Gaia satellite launched Dec 2013, and after successful completion of its in orbit commissioning in July 2014, begun routine operations, with the aim to accurately measure the astrometric and astrophysical properties of more than a billion stars in our Milky Way.As a significant by product of its observational scanning law, where each point on the sky is observed multiple times (~80 revisits on average) over the nominal 5 year mission, Gaia has significant utility in detecting new transients, both flux (e.g. Supernovae, Flare stars) and positional (e.g. Asteroids).We will present the current status of the Gaia Photometric Science Alerts (PSA) system that has been developed within the Gaia DPAC. The PSA pipeline provides a quick look analysis of the daily data stream from Gaia, and identifies new photometric alerts, from analysis of the object photometric and the low resolution spectro-photometric data. Via a set of filters, those identified as astrophysical in nature, are published to the community. The information provided currently includes positional and flux information.The Gaia Alerts working group has organised a significant early stage followup campaign, providing access to a wide variety of followup facilities. These have been used to provide classification spectra of the Gaia alert candidates, with the early phase data confirming that the alerts issued are indeed largely astrophysical transients, with only a small contamination rate.The presentation will address the early phase issues that have been addressed in localising and classifying alerts in the early phase of Gaia observations (for instance, how lack of early knowledge of the sky as seen by Gaia was mitigated by reference to external image data), and how the alert rate published by the PSA will ramp up towards the end of 2015, with the availability of more Gaia sky data.Information concerning the Gaia alerts system can be found at http://gaia.ac.uk/selected-gaia-science-alerts

  14. Technical features of a low-cost Earthquake Alert System

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.

    1991-08-01

    The concept and features of an Earthquake Alert System (EAS) involving a distributed network of strong motion sensors is discussed. The EAS analyzes real-time data telemetered to a central facility and issues an areawide warning of a large earthquake in advance of the spreading elastic wave energy. A low-cost solution to high-cost estimates for installation and maintenance of a dedicated EAS is presented that makes use of existing microseismic stations. Using the San Francisco Bay area as an example, we show that existing US Geological Survey microseismic monitoring stations are of sufficient density to form the elements of a prototype EAS. By installing strong motion instrumentation and a specially developed switching device, strong ground motion can be telemetered in real-time to the central microseismic station on the existing communication channels. When a large earthquake occurs, a dedicated real-time central processing unit at the central microseismic station digitizes and analyses the incoming data and issues a warning containing location and magnitude estimations. A 50-station EAS of this type in the San Francisco Bay area should cost under $70,000 to install and less than $5000 annually to maintain.

  15. Considerations in missile reductions and de-alerting

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-04-01

    Earlier analyses assumed that all survivable forces could withstand first strikes and retaliate. Only those on alert, at sea, or capable of launching under attack meet that assumption. The sensitivity of those results to non-alert forces is discussed. Reduced alert rates decrease stability indices, primarily by reducing second strikes. Survivable, mobile Russian ICBMs could increase both sides stability. Dealerting hastens expected reductions and raises the possibility of abuse. And the low-force goal of arms reductions has some poorly understood and awkward attributes.

  16. Seismicity alert probabilities at Parkfield, California, revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, A.J.; Jones, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    For a decade, the US Geological Survey has used the Parkfield Earthquake Prediction Experiment scenario document to estimate the probability that earthquakes observed on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield will turn out to be foreshocks followed by the expected magnitude six mainshock. During this time, we have learned much about the seismogenic process at Parkfield, about the long-term probability of the Parkfield mainshock, and about the estimation of these types of probabilities. The probabilities for potential foreshocks at Parkfield are reexamined and revised in light of these advances. As part of this process, we have confirmed both the rate of foreshocks before strike-slip earthquakes in the San Andreas physiographic province and the uniform distribution of foreshocks with magnitude proposed by earlier studies. Compared to the earlier assessment, these new estimates of the long-term probability of the Parkfield mainshock are lower, our estimate of the rate of background seismicity is higher, and we find that the assumption that foreshocks at Parkfield occur in a unique way is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. While the exact numbers vary depending on the assumptions that are made, the new alert probabilities are lower than previously estimated. Considering the various assumptions and the statistical uncertainties in the input parameters, we also compute a plausible range for the probabilities. The range is large, partly due to the extra knowledge that exists for the Parkfield segment, making us question the usefulness of these numbers.

  17. Fatigue Countermeasures: Alertness Management in Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Co, E. L.; Rosekind, M. R.; Johnson, J. M.; Weldon, K. J.; Smith, R. M.; Gregory, K. G.; Miller, D. L.; Gander, P. H.; Lebacqz, J. V.; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Since 1980, the NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has studied the effects and impact of fatigue on flight operations . Sleep loss and circadian disruption are two of the primary physiological factors that underlie fatigue in flight operations. The Program has developed an array of fatigue countermeasure recommendations that can be used to combat the effects of fatigue and continues to research potential new countermeasures. For example, one such strategy involved a NASA/FAA study on the effects of planned cockpit rest to improve crewmember alertness and performance. Based partly on the study results, the FAA is currently reviewing a proposed Advisory Circular for controlled rest on the flight deck. Since there is no simple answer to the issue of fatigue in aviation, an Education and Training Module has been developed to provide the industry with pertinent information on sleep, circadian rhythms, how flight operations affect these physiological factors, and recommendations for fatigue countermeasures. The Module will be updated as the Program's continued research efforts uncover new information and develop new countermeasure strategies,

  18. Adherence to drug–drug interaction alerts in high-risk patients: a trial of context-enhanced alerting

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Jon D; Li, Xiaochun; Dexter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drug–drug interaction (DDI) alerting is an important form of clinical decision support, yet physicians often fail to attend to critical DDI warnings due to alert fatigue. We previously described a model for highlighting patients at high risk of a DDI by enhancing alerts with relevant laboratory data. We sought to evaluate the effect of this model on alert adherence in high-risk patients. Methods A 6-month randomized controlled trial involving 1029 outpatient physicians was performed. The target interactions were all DDIs known to cause hyperkalemia. Alerts in the intervention group were enhanced with the patient's most recent potassium and creatinine levels. The control group received unmodified alerts. High -risk patients were those with baseline potassium >5.0 mEq/l and/or creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dl (132 μmol/l). Results We found no significant difference in alert adherence in high-risk patients between the intervention group (15.3%) and the control group (16.8%) (p=0.71). Adherence in normal risk patients was significantly lower in the intervention group (14.6%) than in the control group (18.6%) (p<0.01). In neither group did physicians increase adherence in patients at high risk. Conclusions Physicians adhere poorly to hyperkalemia-associated DDI alerts even in patients with risk factors for a clinically significant interaction, and the display of relevant laboratory data in these alerts did not improve adherence levels in the outpatient setting. Further research is necessary to determine optimal strategies for conveying patient-specific DDI risk. PMID:23161895

  19. Parts, Materials, and Processes Experience Summary. Volume 1; [Catalog of ALERT and Other Information on Basic Design, Reliability, Quality and Applications Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The ALERT program, a system for communicating common problems with parts, materials, and processes, is condensed and catalogued. Expanded information on selected topics is provided by relating the problem area (failure) to the cause, the investigations and findings, the suggestions for avoidance (inspections, screening tests, proper part applications), and failure analysis procedures. The basic objective of ALERT is the avoidance of the recurrence of parts, materials, and processed problems, thus improving the reliability of equipment produced for and used by the government.

  20. Discussion Regarding Sources and Ages of Groundwater in Southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.

    2000-03-03

    A planned groundwater storage project for future drought relief has been assessed in the Fenner Gap area of the Fenner, Cadiz, and Bristol watershed region of southeastern California. Questions regarding the source and age of groundwater beneath the proposed project area were resolved using natural isotope abundances measured at LLNL. The report presents data, briefly summarizes conclusions of that data, and records correspondence with the sponsor Geosciences Support Services Inc.

  1. Experimental evaluation of candidate graphical microburst alert displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig R.; Hansman, R. John

    1992-01-01

    A piloted flight simulator experiment was conducted to evaluate issues related to the display of microburst alerts on electronic cockpit instrumentation. Issues addressed include display clarity, usefulness of multilevel microburst intensity information, and whether information from multiple sensors should be presented separately or 'fused' into combined alerts. Nine active airline pilots of 'glass cockpit' aircraft participated in the study. Microburst alerts presented on a moving map display were found to be visually clear and useful to pilots. Also, multilevel intensity information coded by colors or patterns was found to be important for decision making purposes. Pilot opinion was mixed on whether to 'fuse' data from multiple sensors, and some resulting design tradeoffs were identified. The positional information included in the graphical alert presentation was found useful by the pilots for planning lateral missed approach maneuvers, but may result in deviations which could interfere with normal airport operations. A number of flight crew training issues were also identified.

  2. Using Language Experience to ALERT Pupils' Critical Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Elizabeth Godwin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the "ALERT" procedure, whereby teachers may combine the language experience approach with the use of radio, television, newspaper, and magazine advertisements in a strategy that is useful for developing critical thinking skills, even in very young students. (ARH)

  3. ISS Update: e-Textiles, Alerting Future Astronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lynnette Madison talks with students from the University of Minnesota about wearable technology, or e-textiles, containing visual, tactile and audio sensors to alert fut...

  4. Stay Alert for Child Drowning Dangers This Summer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159631.html Stay Alert for Child Drowning Dangers This Summer More than half of ... not keeping a close eye on any specific child. They are trained to enforce pool rules, scan, ...

  5. Experimental evaluation of candidate graphical microburst alert displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A piloted flight simulator experiment has been conducted to evaluate issues related to the display of microburst alerts on electronic cockpit instrumentation. Issues addressed include display clarity, usefulness of multilevel microburst intensity information, and whether information from multiple sensors should be presented separately or 'fused' into combined alerts. Nine active airline pilots of 'glass-cockpit' aircraft participated in the study. Microburst alerts presented on a moving map display were found to be visually clear and useful to pilots. Also, multilevel intensity information coded by colors or patterns was found to be important for decision-making purposes. Inconclusive results were obtained on whether to 'fuse' data from multiple sensors. The positional information included in the graphical alert presentation was found useful by the pilots for planning lateral missed-approach maneuvers, but may result in deviations which could interfere with normal airport operations.

  6. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy

    1997-01-01

    This research project examined the effects of consonance between cockpit displays and alerting system as a technique to encourage pilots to conform to alerting system commands. An experiment used the task of collision avoidance during closely spaced parallel approaches as a case study, building upon previous experiments which identified instances of non-conformance and conflicts between the alerting criteria preferred by pilots, compared to that used by alerting systems. Using a workstation based, part-task simulator, each of 45 subjects completed 45 experiment runs. In each run, the subjects were told they were flying an approach. Their primary task was to keep their wings level despite turbulence through the use of a sidestick. The sidestick commands did not affect the path of the aircraft, however, so that consistent approach paths were be followed. Their secondary task was to indicate when an aircraft on a parallel approach is blundering towards them, as evidenced by the traffic display. Subjects were asked to press different buttons indicating whether they feel an avoidance maneuver is required by the traffic situation or not. At the completion of each run, subjects were asked to rate their confidence in their decision and, if appropriate, to rate the timeliness of automatic alerts when had been given. Three different automatic alert conditions were tested. The "No Automatic Alerts Given" condition is self-explanatory. In the "Automatic Alerts Based on NTZ Criteria" condition, an automatic alert was given when the NTZ criteria was triggered; this criteria is consistent with subject reactions in other studies, in which subjects were found to react, on average, when the other aircraft was 1350 min to the side of the own aircraft. In the "Automatic Alerts Based on MIT Criteria" condition, an automatic alert was given when the MIT criteria was triggered; this criteria was developed by Carpenter and Kuchar for parallel approaches to have better performance, at the

  7. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system. PMID:25991099

  8. Alert management for home healthcare based on home automation analysis.

    PubMed

    Truong, T T; de Lamotte, F; Diguet, J-Ph; Said-Hocine, F

    2010-01-01

    Rising healthcare for elder and disabled people can be controlled by offering people autonomy at home by means of information technology. In this paper, we present an original and sensorless alert management solution which performs multimedia and home automation service discrimination and extracts highly regular home activities as sensors for alert management. The results of simulation data, based on real context, allow us to evaluate our approach before application to real data. PMID:21096576

  9. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Hullinger, D.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. In this talk, we describe the BAT instrument response as determined to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies. We will also discuss the public data analysis tools developed to calculate the BAT response to sources at different energies and locations in the FOV. The level of accuracy required for the BAT instrument response used for the hard x-ray survey is significantly higher because this response must be used in the iterative clean algorithm for finding fainter sources. Because the bright sources add a lot of coding noise to the BAT sky image, fainter sources can be seen only after the counts due to the bright sources are removed. The better we know the BAT response, the lower the noise in the cleaned spectrum and thus the more sensitive the survey. Since the BAT detector plane consists of 32768 individual, 4 mm square CZT gamma-ray detectors, the most accurate BAT response would include 32768 individual detector response functions to separate mask modulation effects from differences in detector efficiencies! We describe OUT continuing work to improve the accuracy of the BAT instrument response and will present the current results of Monte Carlo simulations as well as BAT ground calibration data.

  10. The Performance of the H.E.S.S.Target of Opportunity Alert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, A.; Füßling, M.; Hofverberg, P.; Parsons, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) is an array of five imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located in the Khomas Highland in Namibia. Very high energy gamma rays are detected using the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique. Using the fifth, larger telescope of the array with a huge mirror area of 600 m2, it was possible to lower the energy threshold down to ≈ 30 GeV. With this unique ability to observe large amounts of gamma rays in the high energy gamma-ray regime (< 100 GeV) by using the large effective area of the fifth telescope at these energies, the H.E.S.S. experiment is ideally suited to observe short time scale transient events like gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Originally detected by the Vela satellites in 1967, GRBs are among the most energetic processes in the known Universe. Extrapolating the spectrum of long duration GRBs (i.e. a GRB duration of the order of a few seconds or above) measured by current satellite experiments like Fermi, which measured gamma rays up to 95 GeV for GRB 130427A, a detection of these phenomena with the H.E.S.S. array is possible. This paper will give an update on the H.E.S.S. Target of Opportunity (ToO) alert system. It is used for an immediate and fully automatic response to a prompt GRB alert received via the Gamma-Ray Coordinates Network (GCN). The key feature of this system is a fast repointing of the whole array to a new observation position. We will discuss the implementation of the ToO alert system as well as its overall performance. Moreover, we will show that software improvements alone reduced the average response time to a ToO alert to below 60s on average, a decrease by more than 50%.

  11. Real-time monitoring of the human alertness level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Robin; del Pozo, Francisco; Hernando, Elena; Gomez, Eduardo; Jimenez, Antonio

    2003-04-01

    Many accidents are associated with a driver or machine operator's alertness level. Drowsiness often develops as a result of repetitive or monotonous tasks, uninterrupted by external stimuli. In order to enhance safety levels, it would be most desirable to monitor the individual's level of attention. In this work, changes in the power spectrum of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) are associated with the subject's level of attention. This study reports on the initial research carried out in order to answer the following important questions: (i) Does a trend exist in the shape of the power spectrum, which will indicate the state of a subject's alertness state (drowsy, relaxed or alert)? (ii) What points on the cortex are most suitable to detect drowsiness and/or high alertness? (iii) What parameters in the power spectrum are most suitable to establish a workable alertness classification in human subjects? In this work, we answer these questions and combine power spectrum estimation and artificial neural network techniques to create a non-invasive and real - time system able to classify EEG into three levels of attention: High, Relaxed and Drowsiness. The classification is made every 10 seconds o more, a suitable time span for giving an alarm signal if the individual is with insufficient level of alertness. This time span is set by the user. The system was tested on twenty subjects. High and relaxed attention levels were measured in randomise hours of the day and drowsiness attention level was measured in the morning after one night of sleep deprivation.

  12. Modeling Pilot State in Next Generation Aircraft Alert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, Alan S.; Alexander, Amy L.; Schurr, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System will introduce new, advanced sensor technologies into the cockpit that must convey a large number of potentially complex alerts. Our work focuses on the challenges associated with prioritizing aircraft sensor alerts in a quick and efficient manner, essentially determining when and how to alert the pilot This "alert decision" becomes very difficult in NextGen due to the following challenges: 1) the increasing number of potential hazards, 2) the uncertainty associated with the state of potential hazards as well as pilot slate , and 3) the limited time to make safely-critical decisions. In this paper, we focus on pilot state and present a model for anticipating duration and quality of pilot behavior, for use in a larger system which issues aircraft alerts. We estimate pilot workload, which we model as being dependent on factors including mental effort, task demands. and task performance. We perform a mathematically rigorous analysis of the model and resulting alerting plans. We simulate the model in software and present simulated results with respect to manipulation of the pilot measures.

  13. Southeastern Scarp of Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    -day meteorite hunters. When scientists analyzed the ages and chemical composition of several meteorites, they were able to determine that these ancient space rocks came from Mars, were volcanic in origin, and were around 180 million years old. So, where on Mars did they come from? Geologists had to turn the Martian globe, looking for volcanic areas that were relatively recent in their formation. Believe it or not, 'recent' in geological terms can actually mean '180 million years young.' So, where did their fingers point? To the Tharsis region, home to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in our solar system. The above THEMIS image hints at the young age of the lava flows around Olympus Mons. Since the surfaces of the lava flows are virtually uncratered, that means these lava flows were 'relatively recent,' forming within the last 500 million years or so. While no one knows for sure if the Mars meteorites came from this area, this lava-rich region seems likely as a possibility. Always in search of relative ages of geological happenings on the red planet, geologists can also tell that the high-standing mountains in the area are older than the lava flows. You can follow the evidence too. Take a look at the mountains and the lava flows near them. The narrow, flowing lava lines throughout the image are called levees, and outline the supple contours of the channel walls that formed as the lava flows became solid and built up at the edges. Now solid, cool, and still, these lava flows once moved dramatically down the slope of the volcano's southeastern flank. It couldn't have been an entirely free flow: the mountains must have stood in their way, because it's clear that the layered flows of molten rock had to change direction and move around them. That's not the only dramatic movement that took place here. Look also for the pear-shaped bowl on a hill in the lower right third of the image. It was formed when a huge mass of material collapsed and moved downslope, forming a debris pile below

  14. Southeastern Scarp of Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    -day meteorite hunters. When scientists analyzed the ages and chemical composition of several meteorites, they were able to determine that these ancient space rocks came from Mars, were volcanic in origin, and were around 180 million years old. So, where on Mars did they come from? Geologists had to turn the Martian globe, looking for volcanic areas that were relatively recent in their formation. Believe it or not, 'recent' in geological terms can actually mean '180 million years young.' So, where did their fingers point? To the Tharsis region, home to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in our solar system. The above THEMIS image hints at the young age of the lava flows around Olympus Mons. Since the surfaces of the lava flows are virtually uncratered, that means these lava flows were 'relatively recent,' forming within the last 500 million years or so. While no one knows for sure if the Mars meteorites came from this area, this lava-rich region seems likely as a possibility. Always in search of relative ages of geological happenings on the red planet, geologists can also tell that the high-standing mountains in the area are older than the lava flows. You can follow the evidence too. Take a look at the mountains and the lava flows near them. The narrow, flowing lava lines throughout the image are called levees, and outline the supple contours of the channel walls that formed as the lava flows became solid and built up at the edges. Now solid, cool, and still, these lava flows once moved dramatically down the slope of the volcano's southeastern flank. It couldn't have been an entirely free flow: the mountains must have stood in their way, because it's clear that the layered flows of molten rock had to change direction and move around them. That's not the only dramatic movement that took place here. Look also for the pear-shaped bowl on a hill in the lower right third of the image. It was formed when a huge mass of material collapsed and moved downslope, forming a debris pile below

  15. Clinical Decision Support Alert Appropriateness: A Review and Proposal for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Thomas, Eric J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Sittig, Dean F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many healthcare providers are adopting clinical decision support (CDS) systems to improve patient safety and meet meaningful use requirements. Computerized alerts that prompt clinicians about drug-allergy, drug-drug, and drug-disease warnings or provide dosing guidance are most commonly implemented. Alert overrides, which occur when clinicians do not follow the guidance presented by the alert, can hinder improved patient outcomes. Methods We present a review of CDS alerts and describe a proposal to develop novel methods for evaluating and improving CDS alerts that builds upon traditional informatics approaches. Our proposal incorporates previously described models for predicting alert overrides that utilize retrospective chart review to determine which alerts are clinically relevant and which overrides are justifiable. Results Despite increasing implementations of CDS alerts, detailed evaluations rarely occur because of the extensive labor involved in manual chart reviews to determine alert and response appropriateness. Further, most studies have solely evaluated alert overrides that are appropriate or justifiable. Our proposal expands the use of web-based monitoring tools with an interactive dashboard for evaluating CDS alert and response appropriateness that incorporates the predictive models. The dashboard provides 2 views, an alert detail view and a patient detail view, to provide a full history of alerts and help put the patient's events in context. Conclusion The proposed research introduces several innovations to address the challenges and gaps in alert evaluations. This research can transform alert evaluation processes across healthcare settings, leading to improved CDS, reduced alert fatigue, and increased patient safety. PMID:24940129

  16. ALERTES-SC3: an EEWS prototype for south Iberia peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Martín Davila, José; Gallego Carrasco, Javier; Rioja del Rio, Carlos; Morgado, Arturo; Hanka, Winfried; Strollo, Angelo; Cibeira, Angel; Cabieces, Roberto; Carranza, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Since several decades Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) have been developed for different parts of the world based on the hypothesis of the earthquake characteristics can be derived from the analysis of the low energy P-wave prior to the arrival of more energetic S-waves and later phases. Thereby a time ("lead time") is available to evaluate a warning and perform automatic or semi -automatic actions on certain systems and deliver and alert to the authorities involved in emergency. The South Iberia peninsula area, between SW San Vicente Cape to the East of the Alboran sea, is one of the most seismically active zones in the Ibero-Maghrebian region, with predominantly moderate and superficial seismicity, but also big events with associated tsunamis are well documented in the area, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. The main goal of the ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) Spanish projects has been to develop an EEWS for South Iberia region (ALERTES-SC3 EEWS) from a regional and also an on-site approach, and the study of the scaling laws for this area to estimate the moment magnitude (Mw) and predict the expected PGV (peak ground velocity) and Pd (peak displacement) among other parameters. The ALERTES-SC3 EEWS, regional approach, prototype has been developed at the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and is being tested in near real time for South Iberia area. This prototype, based on the SeisComP3 software package, is largely based on algorithms derived from the analysis of the first seconds of the P wave records. Calculation of several parameters are carried out, mainly the characteristic period (τc), Peak displacement and velocity (Pd, Pv) and maximum period (τPmáx), among others, from which correlations with corresponding earthquake magnitude, peak ground velocities , etc. are derived. Decision tables have been developed in order to deliver warnings (Buforn et al, 2012). The algorithms have been implemented by ROA in the seismic data system Seis

  17. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM... emergency alert system is capable of initiating EAS messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol...

  18. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM... emergency alert system is capable of initiating EAS messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol...

  19. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM... emergency alert system is capable of initiating EAS messages formatted in the Common Alerting Protocol...

  20. Reactions of nurses to the use of electronic health record alert features in an inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, Abbey C; Collins, Beverly; Winden, Tamara J; Knutson, Asha; Britt, Heather R

    2012-04-01

    While studies have been conducted to assess nurse perception of electronic health records, once electronic health record systems are up and running, there is little to guide the use of features within the electronic health record for nursing practice. Alerts are a promising tool for implementing best practice for patient care in inpatient settings. Yet the use of alerts for inpatient nursing is understudied. This study examined nurse attitudes and reactions to alerts in the inpatient setting. Focus groups were conducted at three hospitals with 50 nurses. Nurses were asked about five different alert features. For each alert, participants were asked about their feelings and reactions to the alert, how alerts help or hinder work, and suggestions for improvements. Findings include clear preferences for alert types and content. Nurses preferred a dashboard style alert with functions included to accomplish tasks directly in the alert. While nurses reported positive reactions to certain alert pages, they also reported low use of those features and occasional distrust of the data included in alerts. Findings provide guidance for future use of alerts and design of new alerts. Findings also identify the important challenge of designing and implementing alerts for integration with nursing workflow. PMID:22045117

  1. The LOFT burst alert system and its burst onboard trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, Stéphane; Götz, Diego; Le Provost, Hervé; Château, Frédéric; Bozzo, Enrico; Brandt, Søren

    2014-07-01

    The ESA M3 candidate mission LOFT (Large Observatory For x-ray Timing) has been designed to study strong gravitational fields by observing compact objects, such as black-hole binaries or neutron-star systems and supermassive black-holes, based on the temporal analysis of photons collected by the primary instrument LAD (Large Area Detector), sensitive to X-rays from 2 to 50 keV, offering a very large effective area (>10 m2), but a small field of view (ø<1°). Simultaneously the second instrument WFM (Wide Field Monitor), composed of 5 coded-mask camera pairs (2-50 keV), monitors a large part of the sky, in order to detect and localize eruptive sources, to be observed with the LAD after ground-commanded satellite repointing. With its large field of view (>π sr), the WFM actually detects all types of transient sources, including Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), which are of primary interest for a world-wide observers community. However, observing the quickly decaying GRB afterglows with ground-based telescopes needs the rapid knowledge of their precise localization. The task of the Loft Burst Alert System (LBAS) is therefore to detect in near-real- time GRBs (about 120 detections expected per year) and other transient sources, and to deliver their localization in less than 30 seconds to the observers, via a VHF antenna network. Real-time full resolution data download to ground being impossible, the real-time data processing is performed onboard by the LBOT (LOFT Burst On-board Trigger system). In this article we present the LBAS and its components, the LBOT and the associated ground-segment.

  2. Modeling, Analyzing, and Mitigating Dissonance Between Alerting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Lixia; Kuchar, James K.

    2003-01-01

    Alerting systems are becoming pervasive in process operations, which may result in the potential for dissonance or conflict in information from different alerting systems that suggests different threat levels and/or actions to resolve hazards. Little is currently available to help in predicting or solving the dissonance problem. This thesis presents a methodology to model and analyze dissonance between alerting systems, providing both a theoretical foundation for understanding dissonance and a practical basis from which specific problems can be addressed. A state-space representation of multiple alerting system operation is generalized that can be tailored across a variety of applications. Based on the representation, two major causes of dissonance are identified: logic differences and sensor error. Additionally, several possible types of dissonance are identified. A mathematical analysis method is developed to identify the conditions for dissonance originating from logic differences. A probabilistic analysis methodology is developed to estimate the probability of dissonance originating from sensor error, and to compare the relative contribution to dissonance of sensor error against the contribution from logic differences. A hybrid model, which describes the dynamic behavior of the process with multiple alerting systems, is developed to identify dangerous dissonance space, from which the process can lead to disaster. Methodologies to avoid or mitigate dissonance are outlined. Two examples are used to demonstrate the application of the methodology. First, a conceptual In-Trail Spacing example is presented. The methodology is applied to identify the conditions for possible dissonance, to identify relative contribution of logic difference and sensor error, and to identify dangerous dissonance space. Several proposed mitigation methods are demonstrated in this example. In the second example, the methodology is applied to address the dissonance problem between two air

  3. SPECIES PROFILE: SOUTHEASTERN MYOTIS (MYOTIS AUSTRORIPARIUS) ON MILITARY INSTALLATIONS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) is a medium-sized bat with grayish-brown, woolly fur. This species primarily is found in the southeastern United States. Its range extends from southeastern North Carolina south to peninsular Florida, west to eastern Texas and Oklah...

  4. The Internet Alert Project: spreading the word about high-risk sexual activities advertised on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Kachur, R E

    2004-11-01

    The Internet is an emerging venue for facilitating high-risk sexual behavior; in particular, use of the Internet to seek out sex partners has been shown to be associated with high-risk sexual behaviors, such as an increase in number of sexual partners and an increase in anal sex, which can increase the risk of contracting and transmitting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV. In an effort to assist health departments around the country, the Internet Alert Project was developed to provide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) project officers and field staff with information about Internet-advertised, high-risk sexual activities in areas that do not have access to sexually explicit material on the Internet. An evaluation was conducted to determine the utility of the Internet Alert Project, its effect on knowledge and awareness of recipients and on public health efforts. Results of the evaluation show the alerts are a useful and valuable tool. The alerts have helped to increase knowledge about sexually-related uses of the Internet and have also driven public health efforts in the field. The results also indicate the need for project areas to access information found on the Internet in order to keep up with the ever-changing behaviors of at-risk populations. PMID:15511729

  5. Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (p<.001). The implementation of the alert was shown to significantly reduce associated costs of duplicated AHP tests (p≤.001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency. PMID:22963261

  6. Alert signals enhance animal communication in “noisy” environments

    PubMed Central

    Ord, Terry J.; Stamps, Judy A.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental noise that reduces the probability that animals will detect communicative signals poses a special challenge for long-range communication. The application of signal-detection theory to animal communication lead to the prediction that signals directed at distant receivers in noisy environments will begin with conspicuous “alerting” components to attract the attention of receivers, before delivery of the information-rich portion of the signal. Whether animals actually adopt this strategy is not clear, despite suggestions that alerts might exist in a variety of taxa. By using a combination of behavioral observations and experimental manipulations with robotic lizard “playbacks,” we show that free-living territorial Anolis lizards add an “alert” to visual displays when communicating to distant receivers in situations of poor visibility, and that these introductory alerts in turn enhance signal detection in adverse signaling conditions. Our results show that Anolis lizards are able to evaluate environmental conditions that affect the degradation of long-distance signals and adjust their behavior accordingly. This study demonstrates that free-living animals enhance the efficiency of long-range communication through the modulation of signal design and the facultative addition of an alert. Our findings confirm that alert signals are an important strategy for communicating in “noisy” conditions and suggest a reexamination of the existence of alerts in other animals relying on long-range communication. PMID:19033197

  7. Flood alert system based on bayesian techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliver, Z.; Herrero, J.; Viesca, C.; Polo, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The problem of floods in the Mediterranean regions is closely linked to the occurrence of torrential storms in dry regions, where even the water supply relies on adequate water management. Like other Mediterranean basins in Southern Spain, the Guadalhorce River Basin is a medium sized watershed (3856 km2) where recurrent yearly floods occur , mainly in autumn and spring periods, driven by cold front phenomena. The torrential character of the precipitation in such small basins, with a concentration time of less than 12 hours, produces flash flood events with catastrophic effects over the city of Malaga (600000 inhabitants). From this fact arises the need for specific alert tools which can forecast these kinds of phenomena. Bayesian networks (BN) have been emerging in the last decade as a very useful and reliable computational tool for water resources and for the decision making process. The joint use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and BN have served us to recognize and simulate the two different types of hydrological behaviour in the basin: natural and regulated. This led to the establishment of causal relationships between precipitation, discharge from upstream reservoirs, and water levels at a gauging station. It was seen that a recurrent ANN model working at an hourly scale, considering daily precipitation and the two previous hourly values of reservoir discharge and water level, could provide R2 values of 0.86. BN's results slightly improve this fit, but contribute with uncertainty to the prediction. In our current work to Design a Weather Warning Service based on Bayesian techniques the first steps were carried out through an analysis of the correlations between the water level and rainfall at certain representative points in the basin, along with the upstream reservoir discharge. The lower correlation found between precipitation and water level emphasizes the highly regulated condition of the stream. The autocorrelations of the variables were also

  8. Verification of the structural alerts for Michael acceptors.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Wayne; Yarbrough, Jason W; Hunter, Robert S; Aptula, Aynur O

    2007-09-01

    A diverse series of polarized alpha,beta-unsaturated and related compounds were evaluated for reactivity with a spectrophotometric assay using the sulfhydryl group in the form of the cysteine residue of the tripeptide GSH as a model nucleophile. The reactive end point (RC 50) calculations were compared to previously described structural alerts based on conventional organic chemistry. This comparison focused on polarized alpha,beta-unsaturates, including ones containing an aldehyde, ketone, ester, sulfoxide, sulfone, sulfonate, nitro, or cyano moiety as well as ortho- and para-pyridino compounds and ortho- and para-quinones. The alerts were coded by substructure and are available in open-source software ( http://sourceforge.net/projects/chemeval). Comparisons of reactivity between selected analogues revealed that only the polarized alpha,beta-unsaturates were reactive. These results verified the coded structural alerts that define the applicability domain for Michael acceptor electrophiles. PMID:17672510

  9. Climate Dynamics of Regional US Southeastern drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, J.

    2008-12-01

    The phenomena of droughts both regional and continental have received considerable attention from both science and policy. Understanding the larger scale dynamics of these events is critical to improving predictability, management and mitigation strategies. The history of drought in the United States shows both long (multi-decadal) and short (seasonal or yearly) droughts in various regions. Some of the most severe droughts, such as those with the largest economic losses or that have received the most attention both from the scientific and broader communities have occurred in the Midwest/Great Plains (e.g. the "Dust Bowl" years, the 1988 drought) and generally correlate with continent-wide anomalies. The Southeast region of the US, while generally having a more humid temperature climate than the rest of the country, also is subject to periods of drought conditions. In this study we analyze long term records of PDSI in the southeastern United States. While some occurrences correlate with larger continental scale droughts, many severe southeastern droughts occur during a synoptic pattern correlating with wetter conditions through the greater Midwest, have a seasonal pattern different than larger continental scale anomalies, and show correlations with patterns in Atlantic tropical activity. While winter and spring deficits may initiate a drought, we find a proportionally larger decrease in summertime precipitation during severe drought periods. Some of this decrease may be related to the contribution of tropical systems, which increases in the periods following droughts. We suggest that the dynamics of drought in this region differ from the larger US pattern, and particularly need to account for the interaction between continental and tropical contributions. With an increasing population and areas of high agricultural productivity, we argue this region deserves further attention from both the scientific and larger community, that understanding these dynamics will

  10. A Metrics Taxonomy and Reporting Strategy for Rule-Based Alerts

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Michael; Gerace, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Context: Because institutions rely on rule-based alerts as an important component of their safety and quality strategies, they should determine whether the alerts achieve the expected benefit. Objective: To develop and to test a method of reporting outcome metrics for rule-based electronic health record alerts on a large scale. Methods: We empirically developed an action-oriented alerts taxonomy according to structure, actions, and implicit intended process outcomes using a set of 333 rule-based alerts at Kaiser Permanente Northwest. Next we developed a method for producing metrics reports for alert classes. Finally, we applied this method to alert taxa. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures were the successful development of a rule-based alerts taxonomy and the demonstration of its application in a reporting strategy. Results: We identified 9 major and 17 overall classes of alerts. We developed a specific metric approach for 5 of these classes, including the 3 most numerous ones in our institution, accounting for 224 (67%) of our alerts. Some alert classes do not readily lend themselves to this approach. Conclusions: We developed a taxonomy for rule-based alerts and demonstrated its application in developing outcome metrics reports on a large scale. This information allows tuning or retiring alerts and may inform the need to develop complementary or alternative approaches to address organizational imperatives. A method that assigns alerts to classes each amenable to a particular reporting strategy could reduce the difficulty of producing metrics reports. PMID:26057684

  11. The AGILE Alert System for Gamma-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Beneventano, D.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E.; Longo, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pucella, G.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conforti, V.; Tempesta, P.; Cerone, M.; Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Valentini, G.; Salotti, L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  12. CISN ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning System Monitoring Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, I. H.; Allen, R. M.; Neuhauser, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    CISN ShakeAlert is a prototype earthquake early warning system being developed and tested by the California Integrated Seismic Network. The system has recently been expanded to support redundant data processing and communications. It now runs on six machines at three locations with ten Apache ActiveMQ message brokers linking together 18 waveform processors, 12 event association processes and 4 Decision Module alert processes. The system ingests waveform data from about 500 stations and generates many thousands of triggers per day, from which a small portion produce earthquake alerts. We have developed interactive web browser system-monitoring tools that display near real time state-of-health and performance information. This includes station availability, trigger statistics, communication and alert latencies. Connections to regional earthquake catalogs provide a rapid assessment of the Decision Module hypocenter accuracy. Historical performance can be evaluated, including statistics for hypocenter and origin time accuracy and alert time latencies for different time periods, magnitude ranges and geographic regions. For the ElarmS event associator, individual earthquake processing histories can be examined, including details of the transmission and processing latencies associated with individual P-wave triggers. Individual station trigger and latency statistics are available. Detailed information about the ElarmS trigger association process for both alerted events and rejected events is also available. The Google Web Toolkit and Map API have been used to develop interactive web pages that link tabular and geographic information. Statistical analysis is provided by the R-Statistics System linked to a PostgreSQL database.

  13. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Pellizzoni, A.; and others

    2014-01-20

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  14. Diurnal Spectral Sensitivity of the Acute Alerting Effects of Light

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shadab A.; Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Aeschbach, Daniel; Brainard, George C.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated short-wavelength sensitivity for the acute alerting response to nocturnal light exposure. We assessed daytime spectral sensitivity in alertness, performance, and waking electroencephalogram (EEG). Design: Between-subjects (n = 8 per group). Setting: Inpatient intensive physiologic monitoring unit. Participants: Sixteen healthy young adults (mean age ± standard deviation = 23.8 ± 2.7 y). Interventions: Equal photon density exposure (2.8 × 1013 photons/cm2/s) to monochromatic 460 nm (blue) or 555 nm (green) light for 6.5 h centered in the middle of the 16-h episode of wakefulness during the biological day. Results were compared retrospectively to 16 individuals who were administered the same light exposure during the night. Measurements and Results: Daytime and nighttime 460-nm light exposure significantly improved auditory reaction time (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) and reduced attentional lapses (P < 0.05), and improved EEG correlates of alertness compared to 555-nm exposure. Whereas subjective sleepiness ratings did not differ between the two spectral conditions during the daytime (P > 0.05), 460-nm light exposure at night significantly reduced subjective sleepiness compared to 555-nm light exposure at night (P < 0.05). Moreover, nighttime 460-nm exposure improved alertness to near-daytime levels. Conclusions: The alerting effects of short-wavelength 460-nm light are mediated by counteracting both the circadian drive for sleepiness and homeostatic sleep pressure at night, but only via reducing the effects of homeostatic sleep pressure during the day. Citation: Rahman SA; Flynn-Evans EE; Aeschbach D; Brainard GC; Czeisler CA; Lockley SW. Diurnal spectral sensitivity of the acute alerting effects of light. SLEEP 2014;37(2):271-281. PMID:24501435

  15. View of southeastern Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A vertical view of southeastern Washington States as photographed from Earth orbit by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment aboard the Skylab space station. The Snake River flows into the Columbia River in the most southerly corner of the picture. The Wallula Lake is below the junction of the two rivers. The Yakima Valley is at the southwestern edge of the photograph. The Columbia Basin is in the center of the picture. The Cascade Range extends across the northwest corner of the photograph.

  16. MAXI Nova Alert System and the Latest Scientific Results

    SciTech Connect

    Negoro, H.; Miyoshi, S.; Ozawa, H.; Ishiwata, R.; Nakajima, N.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawasaki, K.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Suzuki, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Mihara, T.; Kohama, M.; Sugizaki, M.; Nakagawa, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Kawai, N.; Morii, M.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.

    2010-07-15

    MAXI, Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image, is the first astronomical telescope onboard the ISS. One of the main goals of our mission is to discover new transient objects by scanning more than 95% of the sky every {approx}92 min with two types of X-ray cameras, Gas Slit Camera (GSC) and Solid-state Slit Camera (SSC). We have developed a completely new data analysis system, a nova alert system, to find transient objects and send alerts to the world as soon as possible. Here we describe the current status of the system, and transient objects discovered with the system.

  17. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  18. Possible Late Quaternary faulting in the Benton Hills, southeastern Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.R.; Hoffman, D. . Dept. of Natural Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Geologic mapping in the 1930's by Dan Stewart and Lyle McManamy identified numerous faults in the Thebes Gap area of the Benton Hills, including two post-late Quaternary faults (max. of 10 m displacement) along the southeastern escarpment. Recent geologic mapping (Richard Harrison, pers. comm.) suggests dextral strike-slip displacement on most of these faults; some deformation post-dates the Pliocene-Pleistocene Mounds gravel. Small historical earthquake epicenters have been recorded in the Benton Hills area. Review of these data and analysis of the geologic and structural relationships to small- and large-scale drainage and alluvial features suggest tectonic control of the southeastern escarpment of the Benton Hills. The authors propose the coincidence of geologic structures and landforms resembles tectonically active alluvial basin margins, with the Benton Hills southeastern margin representing a fault block uplift escarpment. Future seismic reflection, drilling and trenching studies are planned to determine if the escarpment is fault controlled and of recent origin.

  19. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (January 2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  20. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (December 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-02-13

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  1. Geothermometric evaluation of geothermal resources in southeastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, G.; Mattson, E. D.; McLing, T. L.; Palmer, C. D.; Smith, R. W.; Wood, T. R.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water from oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from chemical composition of thermal waters in southeastern Idaho using an inverse geochemical modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. The temperature estimates in the region varied from moderately warm (59 °C) to over 175 °C. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho, resulted in the highest reservoir temperature estimates in the region.

  2. The NAS Alert System: a look at the first eight years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Pam L.; Neilson, Matt; Huge, Dane H.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) database program (http://nas.er.usgs.gov) tracks the distribution of introduced aquatic organisms across the United States. Awareness of, and timely response to, novel species introductions by those involved in nonindigenous aquatic species management and research requires a framework for rapid dissemination of occurrence data as it is incorporated into the NAS database. In May 2004, the NAS program developed an alert system to notify registered users of new introductions as part of a national early detection/rapid response system. This article summarizes information on system users and dispatched alerts from the system's inception through the end of 2011. The NAS alert system has registered over 1,700 users, with approximately 800 current subscribers. A total of 1,189 alerts had been transmitted through 2011. More alerts were sent for Florida (134 alerts) than for any other state. Fishes comprise the largest taxonomic group of alerts (440), with mollusks, plants, and crustaceans each containing over 100 alerts. Most alerts were for organisms that were intentionally released (414 alerts), with shipping, escape from captivity, and hitchhiking also representing major vectors. To explore the archive of sent alerts and to register, the search and signup page for the alert system can be found online at http://nas.er.usgs.gov/AlertSystem/default.aspx.

  3. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Convention or 33 CFR 101.310 may utilize: (1) Equipment that complies with RTCM Paper 110-2004/SC110-STD...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of these standards can be inspected at the Federal Communications Commission... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS)....

  4. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Convention or 33 CFR 101.310 may utilize: (1) Equipment that complies with RTCM 11020.1 (incorporated by... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.277...

  5. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Convention or 33 CFR 101.310 may utilize: (1) Equipment that complies with RTCM 11020.1 (incorporated by... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.277...

  6. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Convention or 33 CFR 101.310 may utilize: (1) Equipment that complies with RTCM Paper 110-2004/SC110-STD...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of these standards can be inspected at the Federal Communications Commission... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS)....

  7. 47 CFR 80.277 - Ship Security Alert System (SSAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Convention or 33 CFR 101.310 may utilize: (1) Equipment that complies with RTCM 11020.1 (incorporated by... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship Security Alert System (SSAS). 80.277... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.277...

  8. Eisenhower's Farewell Call: Arguing for an Alert and Knowledgeable Citizenry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapanen, Larry

    In his January 17, 1961 farewell address, President Dwight D. Eisenhower warned Americans to be wary of the "military-industrial complex." He called for "an alert and knowledgeable citizenry" which would assure the proper meshing of the military and industrial defense machinery with peaceful methods and goals. Eisenhower's comments reflected his…

  9. Early Alert: Academic Achievement as the Focus of Intrusive Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, P. Roberto L.

    At Santa Fe Community College (SFCC), a proactive, "intrusive" approach to counseling has been developed to identify students who may be at the point of dropping out of classes due to anxiety and frustration. Under this approach, termed the Early Alert Referral System, the advisor takes responsibility for establishing contact with the students and…

  10. Developing, Implementing, and Assessing an Early Alert System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampke, Dale R.

    2013-01-01

    Early alert systems offer institutions systematic approaches to identifying and intervening with students exhibiting at-risk behaviors. Many of these systems rely on a common format for student referral to central receiving point. Systems at larger institutions often use web-based technology to allow for a scalable (available campus wide) approach…

  11. New research and tools lead to improved earthquake alerting protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.

    2009-01-01

    What’s the best way to get alerted about the occurrence and potential impact of an earthquake? The answer to that question has changed dramatically of late, in part due to improvements in earthquake science, and in part by the implementation of new research in the delivery of earthquake information

  12. 78 FR 19271 - Special Fraud Alert: Physician-Owned Entities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Venture Arrangements (August 1989), reprinted at 59 FR 65,372, 65,374 (Dec. 19, 1994). \\3\\ Letter from... financial considerations on the physician's medical judgment. See 64 FR 63,518, 63,536 (Nov. 19, 1999... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Inspector General Special Fraud Alert: Physician-Owned Entities AGENCY:...

  13. 77 FR 33661 - Review of the Emergency Alert System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ....42, 11.54(b)(13), and 11.55 published at 77 FR 16688, March 22, 2012, are effective June 7, 2012. FOR... requirements contained in the Commission's Order, FCC 11-92, published at 77 FR 16688, March 22, 2012. The OMB... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 11 Review of the Emergency Alert System AGENCY: Federal Communications...

  14. FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior Strategies) to Improve Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior) Strategies approach to improve behavior in children and adolescents with complex behavioral challenges. FAB Strategies include evidence-based environmental adaptations, sensory modulation, positive behavioral support, and physical self-regulation strategies. FAB Strategies can be used by…

  15. Visual Alertness in Neonates as Evoked by Maternal Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korner, Anneliese F.; Thoman, Evelyn B.

    1970-01-01

    Forty crying and 24 sleeping 2- to 3-day-old healthy, full-term newborns were given six interventions whichentailed contact and/or vestibular stimulation. Scores obtained on a six-point scale assessing levels of alertness imply that the vestibular stimulation which attends maternal caretaking activities is crucial, at least during the neonatal…

  16. An Operational Alert System for the European-Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazet-Roux, G.; Bossu, R.; Carreno, E.; Guilbert, J.; Godey, S.

    2003-12-01

    The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) has been running for several years an operational alert system for potentially damaging earthquakes which occur in the European-Mediterranean region. This alert system, - sub-part of the EMSC real time information service available on the web site (www.emsc-csem.org) - is based on parametric data provided through the Internet by 40 different networks representing 800 stations in the Euro.-Med. region. In case of potentially damaging earthquake, the seismologist on duty connects to EMSC facilities, merges and processes all available data and, as soon as a reliable solution is available, disseminates alert messages by fax and email. Alert messages are sent by fax to official organisations (e.g., Civil Protection Agency, rescue teams, Council of Europe, ECHO, etc.), to the seismological community and to the public by emails (800 emails). Furthermore, data and results are made automatically available in real time on the web. In case of technical problems or maintenance activities, the duty is taken over by IGN (Madrid, Spain), which runs full back-up procedures. EMSC commits itself to a maximum dissemination time (time lag between the occurrence of the earthquake and the messages' dissemination) of 1 hour. This delay is respected in the vast majority of cases with a median dissemination time of less than 40 minutes. We will give an overview of this system and its performances and put a special emphasis on the processing of the recent earthquake in Algeria.

  17. Evaluation in Adult Literacy Research. Project ALERT. [Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne Williams, Ed.

    The Adult Literacy and Evaluation Research Team (also known as Project ALERT) was a project conducted by the Detroit Literacy Coalition (DLC) at Wayne State University in 1993-1994 to develop and pilot a user-friendly program model for evaluating literacy operations of community-based organizations throughout Michigan under the provisions of…

  18. Evaluation in Adult Literacy Research. Project ALERT. Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne Williams, Ed.

    This document contains an evaluation handbook for adult literacy programs and feedback from/regarding the evaluation instruments developed during the project titled Adult Literacy and Evaluation Research Team (also known as Project ALERT), a two-phase project initiated by the Detroit Literacy Coalition (DLC) for the purpose of developing and…

  19. Alerting, Orienting, and Executive Attention in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullane, Jennifer C.; Corkum, Penny V.; Klein, Raymond M.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth N.; Lawrence, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the alerting, orienting, and executive attention abilities of children with ADHD and their typically developing (TD) peers using a modified version of the adult attention network test (ANT-I). Method: A total of 25 children with ADHD, Combined Type (ADHD-C, mean age = 9.20 years), 20 children with ADHD,…

  20. A Real-Time Screening Alert Improves Patient Recruitment Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua; Batres, Candido; Borda, Tomas; Weiskopf, Nicole G.; Wilcox, Adam B.; Bigger, J Thomas; Davidson, Karina W.

    2011-01-01

    The scarcity of cost-effective patient identification methods represents a significant barrier to clinical research. Research recruitment alerts have been designed to facilitate physician referrals but limited support is available to clinical researchers. We conducted a retrospective data analysis to evaluate the efficacy of a real-time patient identification alert delivered to clinical research coordinators recruiting for a clinical prospective cohort study. Data from log analysis and informal interviews with coordinators were triangulated. Over a 12-month period, 11,295 were screened electronically, 1,449 were interviewed, and 282 were enrolled. The enrollment rates for the alert and two other conventional methods were 4.65%, 2.01%, and 1.34% respectively. A taxonomy of eligibility status was proposed to precisely categorize research patients. Practical ineligibility factors were identified and their correlation with age and gender were analyzed. We conclude that the automatic prescreening alert improves screening efficiency and is an effective aid to clinical research coordinators. PMID:22195213

  1. Changing Adolescent Propensities to Use Drugs: Results from Project ALERT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation with over 4,000 seventh and eighth graders in California and Oregon showed that Project ALERT, a curriculum to curb drug use by teaching resistance to pressures, successfully dampened cognitive risk factors for cigarette and marijuana use but had limited impact on beliefs about alcohol. (SK)

  2. Sensitivity to alert rates at moderate force levels

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-07-01

    This analysis extends previous studies of sensitivity to survivability and alert rates to low force levels. Stability and first strike considerations favor reduction of both survivable and vulnerable forces for a range of conditions. Reductions in the number of weapons per vulnerable missile always increases first strike costs, and would have to be offset by non-stability considerations.

  3. Detection Algorithms of the Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuellar Martinez, A.; Espinosa Aranda, J.; Ramos Perez, S.; Ibarrola Alvarez, G.; Zavala Guerrero, M.; Sasmex

    2013-05-01

    The importance of a rapid and reliable detection of an earthquake, allows taking advantage with more opportunity time of any possible opportunity warnings to the population. Thus detection algorithms in the sensing field station (FS) of an earthquake early earning system, must have a high rate of correct detection; this condition lets perform numerical processes to obtain appropriate parameters for the alert activation. During the evolution and continuous service of the Mexican Seismic Alert System (SASMEX) in more than 23 operation years, it has used various methodologies in the detection process to get the largest opportunity time when an earthquake occurs and it is alerted. In addition to the characteristics of the acceleration signal observed in sensing field stations, it is necessary the site conditions reducing urban noise, but sometimes it is not present through of the first operation years, however, urban growth near to FS cause urban noise, which should be tolerated while carrying out the relocation process of the station, and in the algorithm design should be contemplating the robustness to reduce possible errors and false detections. This work presents some results on detection algorithms used in Mexico for early warning systems for earthquakes considering recent events and different opportunity times obtained depending of the detections on P and S phases of the earthquake detected in the station. Some methodologies are reviewed and described in detail in this work and the main features implemented in The Seismic Alert System of Mexico City (SAS), in continuous operation since 1991, and the Seismic Alert System of Oaxaca City (SASO), today both comprise the SASMEX.

  4. Physician Alerts to Prevent Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Rosenbaum, Erin J.; Pendergast, William; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Pendleton, Robert C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Elliott, C. Gregory; Stevens, Scott M.; Patton, William F.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Catapane, Elaine; Li, Zhongzhen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis remains underutilized among hospitalized patients. We designed and carried out a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that an alert from a hospital staff member to the Attending Physician will reduce the rate of symptomatic VTE among high-risk patients not receiving prophylaxis. Methods and Results We enrolled patients using a validated point score system to detect hospitalized patients at high risk for symptomatic VTE who were not receiving prophylaxis. 2,493 patients (82% on Medical Services) from 25 study sites were randomized to the intervention group (n=1,238), in which the responsible physician was alerted by another hospital staff member, versus the control group (n=1,255), in which no alert was issued. The primary end point was symptomatic, objectively confirmed VTE within 90 days. Patients whose physicians were alerted were more than twice as likely to receive VTE prophylaxis as controls (46.0% versus 20.6%, p<0.0001). The symptomatic VTE rate was lower in the intervention group (2.7% versus 3.4%; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.25), but the difference did not achieve statistical significance. The rate of major bleeding at 30 days in the alert group was similar to the control group (2.1% versus 2.3%, p=0.68). Conclusions A strategy of direct staff member to physician notification increases prophylaxis utilization and leads toward reducing the rate of symptomatic VTE in hospitalized patients. However, VTE prophylaxis continues to be underutilized even after physician notification, especially among Medical Service patients. PMID:19364975

  5. Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who ... a medical ID card and wear a Medic-Alert bracelet to tell emergency workers that you lack ...

  6. Characterization of the geothermal resources of southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.B.; Ruscetta, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    Much of southeastern Idaho displays the complex geology of the overthrust belt and the Basin and Range geomorphic province. Thrust and normal faults are important in controlling groundwater movement, however, the thrust faults do not appear to create layers of either significantly higher or lower permeability. The hottest thermal discharges in the region are associated with deep normal faults. The hottest waters in the area have Na and Cl as the dominant ions, while lower temperature hydrothermal waters are characteristically Ca/Mg and HCO/sub 3/ waters. Limited data from deep drill holes in the area do not indicate a high geothermal gradient.

  7. V-Alert: Description and Validation of a Vulnerable Road User Alert System in the Framework of a Smart City.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; De-la-Iglesia, Idoia; Perez, Jagoba

    2015-01-01

    V-Alert is a cooperative application to be deployed in the frame of Smart Cities with the aim of reducing the probability of accidents involving Vulnerable Road Users (VRU) and vehicles. The architecture of V-Alert combines short- and long-range communication technologies in order to provide more time to the drivers and VRU to take the appropriate maneuver and avoid a possible collision. The information generated by mobile sensors (vehicles and cyclists) is sent over this heterogeneous communication architecture and processed in a central server, the Drivers Cloud, which is in charge of generating the messages that are shown on the drivers' and cyclists' Human Machine Interface (HMI). First of all, V-Alert has been tested in a simulated scenario to check the communications architecture in a complex scenario and, once it was validated, all the elements of V-Alert have been moved to a real scenario to check the application reliability. All the results are shown along the length of this paper. PMID:26230695

  8. V-Alert: Description and Validation of a Vulnerable Road User Alert System in the Framework of a Smart City

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Jayo, Unai; De-la-Iglesia, Idoia; Perez, Jagoba

    2015-01-01

    V-Alert is a cooperative application to be deployed in the frame of Smart Cities with the aim of reducing the probability of accidents involving Vulnerable Road Users (VRU) and vehicles. The architecture of V-Alert combines short- and long-range communication technologies in order to provide more time to the drivers and VRU to take the appropriate maneuver and avoid a possible collision. The information generated by mobile sensors (vehicles and cyclists) is sent over this heterogeneous communication architecture and processed in a central server, the Drivers Cloud, which is in charge of generating the messages that are shown on the drivers’ and cyclists’ Human Machine Interface (HMI). First of all, V-Alert has been tested in a simulated scenario to check the communications architecture in a complex scenario and, once it was validated, all the elements of V-Alert have been moved to a real scenario to check the application reliability. All the results are shown along the length of this paper. PMID:26230695

  9. Implementation of an Alert and Response System in Haiti during the Early Stage of the Response to the Cholera Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Santa-Olalla, Patricia; Gayer, Michelle; Magloire, Roc; Barrais, Robert; Valenciano, Marta; Aramburu, Carmen; Poncelet, Jean Luc; Gustavo Alonso, Juan Carlos; Van Alphen, Dana; Heuschen, Florence; Andraghetti, Roberta; Lee, Robert; Drury, Patrick; Aldighieri, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The start of the cholera epidemic in Haiti quickly highlighted the necessity of the implementation of an Alert and Response (A&R) System to complement the existing national surveillance system. The national system had been able to detect and confirm the outbreak etiology but required external support to monitor the spread of cholera and coordinate response, because much of the information produced was insufficiently timely for real-time monitoring and directing of a rapid, targeted response. The A&R System was designed by the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization in collaboration with the Haiti Ministry of Health, and it was based on a network of partners, including any institution, structure, or individual that could identify, verify, and respond to alerts. The defined objectives were to (1) save lives through early detection and treatment of cases and (2) control the spread through early intervention at the community level. The operational structure could be broken down into three principle categories: (1) alert (early warning), (2) verification and assessment of the information, and (3) efficient and timely response in coordination with partners to avoid duplication. Information generated by the A&R System was analyzed and interpreted, and the qualitative information was critical in qualifying the epidemic and defining vulnerable areas, particularly because the national surveillance system reported incomplete data for more than one department. The A&R System detected a number of alerts unrelated to cholera and facilitated rapid access to that information. The sensitivity of the system and its ability to react quickly was shown in May of 2011, when an abnormal increase in alerts coming from several communes in the Sud-Est Department in epidemiological weeks (EWs) 17 and 18 were noted and disseminated network-wide and response activities were implemented. The national cholera surveillance system did not register the increase until EWs 21 and

  10. Project ALERT: Forging New Partnerships to Improve Earth System Science Education for Pre-Service and In-Service Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, E. P.; Ambos, E. L.; Ng, E. W.; Skiles, J.; Simila, G.; Garfield, N.

    2002-05-01

    Project ALERT (Augmented Learning Environment and Renewable Teaching) was founded in 1998, with funding from NASA and the California State University (CSU), to improve earth system science education for pre-service teachers. Project ALERT has formed linkages between ten campuses of the CSU, which prepares about 60 percent of California's teachers, and two NASA centers, Ames Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ALERT has also fostered alliances between earth science and science education faculty. The combined expertise of Project ALERT's diverse partners has led to a wide array of activities and products, including: 1) incorporation in university classrooms of NASA-developed imagery, data, and educational resources; 2) creation and/or enhancement of several courses that bring earth systems science to pre-service teachers; 3) fellowships for CSU faculty to participate in collaborative research and education projects at the NASA Centers; 4) development of teaching modules on such varied topics as volcanoes, landslides, and paleoclimate; and 5) a central web site that highlights resources for teaching introductory Earth system science. An outgrowth of Project ALERT is the increased interest on the part of CSU earth scientists in education issues. This has catalyzed their participation in other projects, including NASA's Project NOVA, Earth System Science Education Alliance, and Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum, the Digital Library for Earth System Science Education, and the California Science Project. Project ALERT has also expanded to provide professional development opportunities for in-service teachers, as exemplified by its support of the Bay Area Earth Science Institute (BAESI) at San Jose State University. Each year, BAESI offers 10-15 full-day workshops that supply teachers and teachers-to-be with a blend of science concepts and classroom activities, free instructional materials, and the opportunity to earn inexpensive university credit. These

  11. A Metrics Taxonomy and Reporting Strategy for Rule-Based Alerts.

    PubMed

    Krall, Michael; Gerace, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    An action-oriented alerts taxonomy according to structure, actions, and implicit intended process outcomes using a set of 333 rule-based alerts at Kaiser Permanente Northwest (KPNW) was developed. The authors identified 9 major and 17 overall classes of alerts and developed a specific metric approach for 5 of these classes, including the 3 most numerous ones in KPNW, accounting for 224 (67%) of the alerts. PMID:26057684

  12. Dissolved phosphorus retention and release from southeastern USA Coastal Plain in-stream wetlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the southeastern USA Coastal Plain region, many inland surface water systems will meander through flat or depressional landscape areas prior to discharge into coastal estuaries. Slow water flow through these areas often causes flooding that promotes formation of in-stream wetlands with dense vege...

  13. Clinically Inconsequential Alerts: The Characteristics of Opioid Drug Alerts and Their Utility in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Genco, Emma K.; Forster, Jeri E.; Flaten, Hanna; Goss, Foster; Heard, Kennon J.; Hoppe, Jason; Monte, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Study objective We examine the characteristics of clinical decision support alerts triggered when opioids are prescribed, including alert type, override rates, adverse drug events associated with opioids, and preventable adverse drug events. Methods This was a retrospective chart review study assessing adverse drug event occurrences for emergency department (ED) visits in a large urban academic medical center using a commercial electronic health record system with clinical decision support. Participants include those aged 18 to 89 years who arrived to the ED every fifth day between September 2012 and January 2013. The main outcome was characteristics of opioid drug alerts, including alert type, override rates, opioid-related adverse drug events, and adverse drug event preventability by clinical decision support. Results Opioid drug alerts were more likely to be overridden than nonopioid alerts (relative risk 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21 to 1.50). Opioid drug-allergy alerts were twice as likely to be overridden (relative risk 2.24; 95% CI 1.74 to 2.89). Opioid duplicate therapy alerts were 1.57 times as likely to be overridden (95% CI 1.30 to 1.89). Fourteen of 4,581 patients experienced an adverse drug event (0.31%; 95% CI 0.15% to 0.47%), and 8 were due to opioids (57.1%). None of the adverse drug events were preventable by clinical decision support. However, 46 alerts were accepted for 38 patients that averted a potential adverse drug event. Overall, 98.9% of opioid alerts did not result in an actual or averted adverse drug event, and 96.3% of opioid alerts were overridden. Conclusion Overridden opioid alerts did not result in adverse drug events. Clinical decision support successfully prevented adverse drug events at the expense of generating a large volume of inconsequential alerts. To prevent 1 adverse drug event, providers dealt with more than 123 unnecessary alerts. It is essential to refine clinical decision support alerting systems to eliminate

  14. 78 FR 49292 - American Medical Alert Corporation, DBA Tunstall, Clovis, New Mexico; Amended Certification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration American Medical Alert Corporation, DBA Tunstall, Clovis, New Mexico..., applicable to workers of American Medical Alert Corporation, doing business as Tunstall, Long Island City... of American Medical Alert Corporation, doing business as Tunstall, Clovis, New Mexico, who...

  15. Developing an Early-Alert System to Promote Student Visits to Tutor Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Qijie; Lewis, Carrie L.; Higdon, Jude

    2015-01-01

    An early-alert system (MavCLASS) was developed and piloted in a large gateway math class with 611 freshman students to identify academically at-risk students and provide alert messages. It was found that there was significant association between the alert messages students received and their visits to the university's tutor center. Further, the…

  16. 75 FR 26196 - Publication of OIG Updated Special Fraud Alert on Telemarketing by Durable Medical Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... published on January 10, 2010 (75 FR 2105), addressing our recently issued Updated Special Fraud Alert. Specifically, the Updated Special Fraud Alert addressed the statutory provision prohibiting durable medical... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Inspector General Publication of OIG Updated Special Fraud Alert...

  17. Living with the Active Alert Child: Groundbreaking Strategies for Parents. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Linda S.

    Bright, controlling, fearful, and highly energetic, active alert children are frequently misdiagnosed as hyperactive or learning disabled. This book offers guidance for the special challenge of parenting the active alert infant, child, and adolescent. Part 1 of the book profiles the active alert child and examines 11 traits that characterize…

  18. 75 FR 26269 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the Integrated Public Alert and Warning Program's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Public Alert and Warning Program's Construction Projects AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS... Public Alert and Warning Program (IPAWS). The construction actions will be taken to ensure that FEMA meets its responsibilities under Executive Order 13407, Public Alert and Warning System, by...

  19. 75 FR 2105 - Publication of OIG Updated Special Fraud Alert on Telemarketing by Durable Medical Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Alert on Telemarketing by Durable Medical Equipment Suppliers AGENCY: Office of Inspector General (OIG... Special Fraud Alert addressing telemarketing by durable medical equipment (DME) suppliers. For the most part, OIG Special Fraud Alerts address national trends in health care fraud, including...

  20. 47 CFR 80.335 - Procedures for canceling false distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for canceling false distress alerts..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.335 Procedures for canceling false distress alerts. If a distress alert is inadvertently transmitted, the following steps shall be taken to cancel the...

  1. 47 CFR 11.56 - EAS Participants receive CAP-formatted alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EAS Participants receive CAP-formatted alerts. 11.56 Section 11.56 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Emergency Operations § 11.56 EAS Participants receive CAP-formatted alerts....

  2. 47 CFR 76.1711 - Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and... § 76.1711 Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation. Every cable system of 1,000 or more subscribers shall keep a record of each test and activation of the Emergency Alert System (EAS)...

  3. 14 CFR 91.221 - Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Traffic alert and collision avoidance... RULES Equipment, Instrument, and Certificate Requirements § 91.221 Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use. (a) All airspace: U.S.-registered civil aircraft. Any traffic alert...

  4. 14 CFR 135.180 - Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.180 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System. (a) Unless otherwise... equipped with an approved traffic alert and collision avoidance system. If a TCAS II system is...

  5. 47 CFR 11.56 - EAS Participants receive CAP-formatted alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false EAS Participants receive CAP-formatted alerts. 11.56 Section 11.56 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Emergency Operations § 11.56 EAS Participants receive CAP-formatted alerts....

  6. 14 CFR 91.221 - Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Traffic alert and collision avoidance... RULES Equipment, Instrument, and Certificate Requirements § 91.221 Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use. (a) All airspace: U.S.-registered civil aircraft. Any traffic alert...

  7. 14 CFR 135.180 - Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.180 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System. (a) Unless otherwise... equipped with an approved traffic alert and collision avoidance system. If a TCAS II system is...

  8. 47 CFR 80.335 - Procedures for canceling false distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for canceling false distress alerts..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.335 Procedures for canceling false distress alerts. If a distress alert is inadvertently transmitted, the following steps shall be taken to cancel the...

  9. 47 CFR 80.1117 - Procedure for receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... distress alerts. 80.1117 Section 80.1117 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts. (a) Normally, distress calls received using digital... transmit a distress alert relay to the coast station. Upon advice from the Rescue Coordination Center,...

  10. 47 CFR 76.1711 - Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and... § 76.1711 Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation. Every cable system of 1,000 or more subscribers shall keep a record of each test and activation of the Emergency Alert System (EAS)...

  11. 47 CFR 80.335 - Procedures for canceling false distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for canceling false distress alerts..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.335 Procedures for canceling false distress alerts. If a distress alert is inadvertently transmitted, the following steps shall be taken to cancel the...

  12. 47 CFR 76.1711 - Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and... § 76.1711 Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation. Every cable system of 1,000 or more subscribers shall keep a record of each test and activation of the Emergency Alert System (EAS)...

  13. 47 CFR 76.1711 - Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and... § 76.1711 Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation. Every cable system of 1,000 or more subscribers shall keep a record of each test and activation of the Emergency Alert System (EAS)...

  14. 47 CFR 76.1711 - Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and... § 76.1711 Emergency alert system (EAS) tests and activation. Every cable system of 1,000 or more subscribers shall keep a record of each test and activation of the Emergency Alert System (EAS)...

  15. 14 CFR 91.221 - Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Traffic alert and collision avoidance... RULES Equipment, Instrument, and Certificate Requirements § 91.221 Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use. (a) All airspace: U.S.-registered civil aircraft. Any traffic alert...

  16. 14 CFR 91.221 - Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Traffic alert and collision avoidance... RULES Equipment, Instrument, and Certificate Requirements § 91.221 Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use. (a) All airspace: U.S.-registered civil aircraft. Any traffic alert...

  17. 47 CFR 80.335 - Procedures for canceling false distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for canceling false distress alerts..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.335 Procedures for canceling false distress alerts. If a distress alert is inadvertently transmitted, the following steps shall be taken to cancel the...

  18. 47 CFR 80.335 - Procedures for canceling false distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for canceling false distress alerts..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.335 Procedures for canceling false distress alerts. If a distress alert is inadvertently transmitted, the following steps shall be taken to cancel the...

  19. 14 CFR 91.221 - Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Traffic alert and collision avoidance... RULES Equipment, Instrument, and Certificate Requirements § 91.221 Traffic alert and collision avoidance system equipment and use. (a) All airspace: U.S.-registered civil aircraft. Any traffic alert...

  20. 14 CFR 135.180 - Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.180 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System. (a) Unless otherwise... equipped with an approved traffic alert and collision avoidance system. If a TCAS II system is...

  1. 47 CFR 80.1117 - Procedure for receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... distress alerts. 80.1117 Section 80.1117 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts. (a) Normally, distress calls received using digital... transmit a distress alert relay to the coast station. Upon advice from the Rescue Coordination Center,...

  2. 14 CFR 135.180 - Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.180 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System. (a) Unless otherwise... equipped with an approved traffic alert and collision avoidance system. If a TCAS II system is...

  3. 47 CFR 80.1117 - Procedure for receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... distress alerts. 80.1117 Section 80.1117 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... receipt and acknowledgement of distress alerts. (a) Normally, distress calls received using digital... transmit a distress alert relay to the coast station. Upon advice from the Rescue Coordination Center,...

  4. 14 CFR 135.180 - Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.180 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System. (a) Unless otherwise... equipped with an approved traffic alert and collision avoidance system. If a TCAS II system is...

  5. Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection

    DOEpatents

    Clapp, Ned E.; Hively, Lee M.

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness.

  6. Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection

    DOEpatents

    Clapp, N.E.; Hively, L.M.

    1997-05-06

    Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness. 4 figs.

  7. Self-Alert Training: Volitional Modulation of Autonomic Arousal Improves Sustained Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Redmond G.; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Dockree, Paul M.; Lau, Adam; Fitzgerald, Michael; Robertson, Ian H.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines a new alertness training strategy (Self-Alert Training, SAT) designed to explore the relationship between the top-down control processes governing arousal and sustained attention. In order to maximally target frontal control systems SAT combines a previously validated behavioural self-alerting technique [Robertson, I.…

  8. Wet snow hazard for power lines: a forecast and alert system applied in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, P.; Lacavalla, M.; Marcacci, P.; Mariani, G.; Stella, G.

    2011-09-01

    Wet snow icing accretion on power lines is a real problem in Italy, causing failures on high and medium voltage power supplies during the cold season. The phenomenon is a process in which many large and local scale variables contribute in a complex way and not completely understood. A numerical weather forecast can be used to select areas where wet snow accretion has an high probability of occurring, but a specific accretion model must also be used to estimate the load of an ice sleeve and its hazard. All the information must be carefully selected and shown to the electric grid operator in order to warn him promptly. The authors describe a prototype of forecast and alert system, WOLF (Wet snow Overload aLert and Forecast), developed and applied in Italy. The prototype elaborates the output of a numerical weather prediction model, as temperature, precipitation, wind intensity and direction, to determine the areas of potential risk for the power lines. Then an accretion model computes the ice sleeves' load for different conductor diameters. The highest values are selected and displayed on a WEB-GIS application principally devoted to the electric operator, but also to more expert users. Some experimental field campaigns have been conducted to better parameterize the accretion model. Comparisons between real accidents and forecasted icing conditions are presented and discussed.

  9. Provider acceptance of an automated electronic alert for acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Janice; Bia, Joshua R.; Ubaid-Ullah, Muhamad; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Wilson, Francis Perry

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support systems, including electronic alerts, ideally provide immediate and relevant patient-specific information to improve clinical decision-making. Despite the growing capabilities of such alerts in conjunction with an expanding electronic medical record, there is a paucity of information regarding their perceived usefulness. We surveyed healthcare providers' opinions concerning the practicality and efficacy of a specific text-based automated electronic alert for acute kidney injury (AKI) in a single hospital during a randomized trial of AKI alerts. Methods Providers who had received at least one electronic AKI alert in the previous 6 months, as part of a separate randomized controlled trial (clinicaltrials.gov #01862419), were asked to complete a survey concerning their opinions about this specific AKI alert system. Individual approval of the alert system was defined by a provider's desire to continue receiving the alert after termination of the trial. Results A total of 98 individuals completed the survey, including 62 physicians, 27 pharmacists and 7 non-physician providers. Sixty-nine percent of responders approved the alert, with no significant difference among the various professions (P = 0.28). Alert approval was strongly correlated with the belief that the alerts improved patient care (P < 0.0001), and negatively correlated with the belief that alerts did not provide novel information (P = 0.0001). With each additional 30 days of trial duration, odds of approval decreased by 20% (3–35%) (P = 0.02). Conclusions The alert system was generally well received, although approval waned with time. Approval was correlated with the belief that this type of alert improved patient care. These findings suggest that perceived efficacy is critical to the success of future alert trials. PMID:27478598

  10. Terminal Area Conflict Detection and Resolution Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Savita Arora

    2011-01-01

    This poster will describe analysis of a conflict detection and resolution tool for the terminal area called T-TSAFE. With altitude clearance information, the tool can reduce false alerts to as low as 2 per hour.

  11. Channel degradation in southeastern Nebraska Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, Kenneth L.; Weiss, Linda S.

    1995-01-01

    Many stream channels in southeastern Nebraska were dredged and straightened during 1904-15. The resulting channels were both shorter and steeper than the original channels. Tests for time trends were conducted using the nonparametric Kendall tau test to see if the channels have responded to these changes. Tests were conducted on the stages associated with specific discharges and on measurement characteristics at gaging stations. Tests also were conducted on hydrologic forcing variables (annual mean precipitation, annual peak discharges, annual mean discharge, and annual mean base flows). The null hypothesis (that the data were free from trend) was rejected for stages associated with the mean of the annual discharges for 6 of 7 gaging stations in the study area, but was accepted for all 3 gages on the main stem of the Missouri River. The trends at the 6 streamflow gaging stations were for decreasing stages (degrading channels) for specific discharges. The rates of change ranged from about 0.2 to 0.5 m per decade. Mean stream bed elevations computed for individual discharge measurements at these streamflow gaging stations confirmed that the channels are degrading. However, neither the precipitation nor flow variables show evidence of trends. The tendency for the channels to degrade thus cannot be attributed to changes in runoff characteristics and are assumed to be a response to the channel modifications in the early 1900's. Indications are that the channels presently are continuing to degrade.

  12. Karst in evaporites in southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, G.O.

    1987-09-01

    Permian evaporites in southeastern New Mexico include gypsum, anhydrite, and salt, which are subject to both blanket and local, selective dissolution. Dissolution has produced many hundreds of individual karst features including collapse sinks, karst valleys, blind valleys, karst plains, caves, and breccia pipes. Dissolution began within some formations during Permian time and has been intermittent but continual ever since. Karst features other than blanket deposits of breccia are not preserved from the early episodes of dissolution, but some karst features preserved today - such as breccia pipes - are remnants of karst activity that was active at least as early as mid-Pleistocene time. Rainfall was much more abundant during Late Pleistocene time, and many features visible today may have been formed then. The drainage history of the Pecos River is related to extensive karstification of the Pecos Valley during mid-Pleistocene time. Large-scale stream piracy and dissolution of salt in the subsurface resulted in major shifts and excavations in the channel. In spite of intensive groundwater studies that have been carried out in the region, major problems in near-surface evaporite karst remain to be solved. Among these are determination of recharge areas and time of recharge. 109 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Migration behavior of pronghorn in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskinson, R.L.; Tester, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-four pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) were radio-collared out of 232 captured on 3 winter ranges in southeastern Idaho. Radioed pronghorn were followed for up to 21 months each, from December 1975 through August 1977. Winter home ranges showed a difference (P < 0.005) in size among valleys the 1st winter and were different in size and location within valleys between years. Snow covered the ground 1 week earlier and lasted 3 weeks longer in 1975 to 1976 than in 1976 to 1977. Spring migration began more than 1 month earlier in 1977 than 1976, and appeared related to loss of snow cover on the winter ranges in both years. Distances that pronghorn migrated in spring 1976 were different among valleys (P < 0.05) but directions were, in general, upward to areas near the heads of the valleys. Summer home ranges of all radioed pronghorn averaged 2033 +- 322 (SE) ha. Yearlings wandered during summer and their home ranges were 2 to 5 times as large as ranges of adults. Fall migration in 1976 began after 1 October and was not prompted by snowfall. Percent moisture in vegetation is suggested as a stimulus for onset of fall migration, and snowfall is suggested as a factor influencing distance migrated and location of winter.

  14. BacT/Alert: an automated colorimetric microbial detection system.

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, T C; Wilson, M L; Turner, J E; DiGuiseppi, J L; Willert, M; Mirrett, S; Reller, L B

    1990-01-01

    BacT/Alert (Organon Teknika Corp., Durham, N.C.) is an automated microbial detection system based on the colorimetric detection of CO2 produced by growing microorganisms. Results of an evaluation of the media, sensor, detection system, and detection algorithm indicate that the system reliably grows and detects a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. Results of a limited pilot clinical trial with a prototype research instrument indicate that the system is comparable to the radiometric BACTEC 460 system in its ability to grow and detect microorganisms in blood. On the basis of these initial findings, large-scale clinical trials comparing BacT/Alert with other commercial microbial detection systems appear warranted. PMID:2116451

  15. Piezoelectric Vibrational and Acoustic Alert for a Personal Communication Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Daugherty, Robert H. (Inventor); Scholz, Raymond C. (Inventor); Little, Bruce D. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Denhardt, Gerald A. (Inventor); Jang, SeGon (Inventor); Balein, Rizza (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An alert apparatus for a personal communication device includes a mechanically prestressed piezoelectric wafer positioned within the personal communication device and an alternating voltage input line coupled at two points of the wafer where polarity is recognized. The alert apparatus also includes a variable frequency device coupled to the alternating voltage input line, operative to switch the alternating voltage on the alternating voltage input line at least between an alternating voltage having a first frequency and an alternating voltage having a second frequency. The first frequency is preferably sufficiently high so as to cause the wafer to vibrate at a resulting frequency that produces a sound perceptible by a human ear, and the second frequency is preferably sufficiently low so as to cause the wafer to vibrate at a resulting frequency that produces a vibration readily felt by a holder of the personal communication device.

  16. Centralized Alert-Processing and Asset Planning for Sensorwebs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castano, Rebecca; Chien, Steve A.; Rabideau, Gregg R.; Tang, Benyang

    2010-01-01

    A software program provides a Sensorweb architecture for alert-processing, event detection, asset allocation and planning, and visualization. It automatically tasks and re-tasks various types of assets such as satellites and robotic vehicles in response to alerts (fire, weather) extracted from various data sources, including low-level Webcam data. JPL has adapted cons iderable Sensorweb infrastructure that had been previously applied to NASA Earth Science applications. This NASA Earth Science Sensorweb has been in operational use since 2003, and has proven reliability of the Sensorweb technologies for robust event detection and autonomous response using space and ground assets. Unique features of the software include flexibility to a range of detection and tasking methods including those that require aggregation of data over spatial and temporal ranges, generality of the response structure to represent and implement a range of response campaigns, and the ability to respond rapidly.

  17. DAIDALUS: Detect and Avoid Alerting Logic for Unmanned Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Narkawicz, Anthony; Hagen, George; Upchurch, Jason; Dutle, Aaron; Consiglio, Maria; Chamberlain, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DAIDALUS (Detect and Avoid Alerting Logic for Unmanned Systems), a reference implementation of a detect and avoid concept intended to support the integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems into civil airspace. DAIDALUS consists of self-separation and alerting algorithms that provide situational awareness to UAS remote pilots. These algorithms have been formally specified in a mathematical notation and verified for correctness in an interactive theorem prover. The software implementation has been verified against the formal models and validated against multiple stressing cases jointly developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, and NASA. The DAIDALUS reference implementation is currently under consideration for inclusion in the appendices to the Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Unmanned Aircraft Systems presently being developed by RTCA Special Committee 228.

  18. Alert Distribution Network And Public Data Of The SVOM Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Claret, A.

    2008-05-22

    SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) has been designed to detect all known types of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), to provide fast and reliable GRB positions, to measure the broadband spectral shape and temporal properties of the GRB prompt emission, and to quickly identify the optical afterglows, including those which are highly redshifted. In this paper, we focus on the alert distribution network and the public data which will be available to the GRB community.

  19. Hazard alerting and situational awareness in advanced air transport cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. J.; Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Mykityshyn, Mark; Hahn, Edward; Midkiff, Alan

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the Advanced Cockpit Simulation Facility at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is presented. Though detailed results depend on the specific application, graphical presentation of flight control and alert information has generally been found to be effective for situational awareness and subjectively selected by flight crews. Graphical display is most effective when it is consistent with the pilots cognitive map of the process being displayed or of the situation.

  20. Pertussis Outbreak, Southeastern Minnesota, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Theofiles, Alexander G.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio R.; Quest, Daniel J.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical and laboratory findings from the 2012 southeastern Minnesota pertussis outbreak. Patients and Methods Patients were selected for 2 parts of the study. In the first part, nasopharyngeal swabs from a convenience sample of 265 unique patients were used for both the clinician-requested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and culture. B pertussis isolates were tested for macrolide susceptibility and typed using whole genome sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Pertactin gene sequences were analyzed to identify pertactin-deficient B pertussis. In the second part, all patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who had PCR results positive for Bordetella pertussis or Bordetella parapertussis between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2012, were analyzed for patient demographic features and vaccination records. Results One hundred sixty patients had results positive for B pertussis, and 21 patients had results positive for B parapertussis. Among the 265 swabs cultured, B pertussis was detected by both culture and PCR in 11. One swab was positive for B pertussis by culture alone, and 13 were positive by PCR alone. Polymerase chain reaction detected B pertussis more frequently than did culture (P=.001). No macrolide resistance was detected. All 12 isolates tested had an altered pertactin gene, including 9 with a signal sequence deletion, 2 with insertion sequence disruptions, and 1 with a premature stop codon. Nine and 3 isolates were pertactin types prn1 and prn2, respectively. Whole genome sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis detected the presence of multiple B pertussis strains. The mean age of patients with pertussis was younger than that of those without pertussis (15.6 and 25.5 years, respectively; P=.002). Compared with those whose test results were negative for B pertussis, fewer patients with positive results had received whole-cell pertussis vaccine (P=.02). In the subgroup who had received acellular

  1. An evaluation of alertness training for older adults

    PubMed Central

    Milewski-Lopez, Agnieszka; Greco, Eleonora; van den Berg, Flip; McAvinue, Laura P.; McGuire, Sarah; Robertson, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    We present an evaluation of a self-administered, biofeedback-aided, alertness training programme called the Alertness: Training for Focused Living (ATFL) Programme, which was developed as part of the Technology Research for Independent Living (TRIL) collaboration. We conducted two studies in order to evaluate the programme. A randomized controlled trial was, first of all, conducted with 40 older adults aged between 60 and 83. A series of five single case studies was then conducted to examine the suitability of the programme for use with people with more severe memory difficulties. In the randomized controlled trial, participants were assigned to the ATFL Programme or to a placebo programme. Aspects of participants' memory, attention and executive functioning were assessed via telephone prior to and following completion of the training programmes and at 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up sessions. Significant improvements in sustained attention and verbal fluency were noted in the ATFL group. The series of single case studies illustrated the importance of tailoring a programme to the needs and abilities of the clients in question. The potential benefits of the ATFL programme in terms of periodically boosting alertness and aiding executive functioning are discussed. PMID:24782764

  2. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    PubMed Central

    Seheult, J. N.; Pazderska, A.; Gaffney, P.; Fogarty, J.; Sherlock, M.; Gibney, J.; Boran, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose. PMID:26290664

  3. Real-Time Mapping alert system; user's manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has an extensive hydrologic network that records and transmits precipitation, stage, discharge, and other water- related data on a real-time basis to an automated data processing system. Data values are recorded on electronic data collection platforms at field monitoring sites. These values are transmitted by means of orbiting satellites to receiving ground stations, and by way of telecommunication lines to a U.S. Geological Survey office where they are processed on a computer system. Data that exceed predefined thresholds are identified as alert values. These alert values can help keep water- resource specialists informed of current hydrologic conditions. The current alert status at monitoring sites is of critical importance during floods, hurricanes, and other extreme hydrologic events where quick analysis of the situation is needed. This manual provides instructions for using the Real-Time Mapping software, a series of computer programs developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for quick analysis of hydrologic conditions, and guides users through a basic interactive session. The software provides interactive graphics display and query of real-time information in a map-based, menu-driven environment.

  4. Discovering structural alerts for mutagenicity using stable emerging molecular patterns.

    PubMed

    Métivier, Jean-Philippe; Lepailleur, Alban; Buzmakov, Aleksey; Poezevara, Guillaume; Crémilleux, Bruno; Kuznetsov, Sergei O; Le Goff, Jérémie; Napoli, Amedeo; Bureau, Ronan; Cuissart, Bertrand

    2015-05-26

    This study is dedicated to the introduction of a novel method that automatically extracts potential structural alerts from a data set of molecules. These triggering structures can be further used for knowledge discovery and classification purposes. Computation of the structural alerts results from an implementation of a sophisticated workflow that integrates a graph mining tool guided by growth rate and stability. The growth rate is a well-established measurement of contrast between classes. Moreover, the extracted patterns correspond to formal concepts; the most robust patterns, named the stable emerging patterns (SEPs), can then be identified thanks to their stability, a new notion originating from the domain of formal concept analysis. All of these elements are explained in the paper from the point of view of computation. The method was applied to a molecular data set on mutagenicity. The experimental results demonstrate its efficiency: it automatically outputs a manageable number of structural patterns that are strongly related to mutagenicity. Moreover, a part of the resulting structures corresponds to already known structural alerts. Finally, an in-depth chemical analysis relying on these structures demonstrates how the method can initiate promising processes of chemical knowledge discovery. PMID:25871768

  5. Flight controller alertness and performance during MOD shiftwork operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Rosekind, Mark R.; Dinges, David F.; Miller, Donna L.; Gillen, Kelly A.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Aguilar, Ronald D.; Smith, Roy M.

    1994-01-01

    Decreased alertness and performance associated with fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption are issues faced by a diverse range of shiftwork operations. During STS operations, MOD personnel provide 24 hr. coverage of critical tasks. A joint JSC and ARC project was undertaken to examine these issues in flight controllers during MOD shiftwork operations. An initial operational test of procedures and measures was conducted during STS-53 in Dec. 1992. The study measures included a background questionnaire, a subjective daily logbook completed on a 24 hr. basis (to report sleep patterns, work periods, etc.), and an 8 minute performance and mood test battery administered at the beginning, middle, and end of each shift period. Seventeen Flight controllers representing the 3 Orbit shifts participated. The initial results clearly support further data collection during other STS missions to document baseline levels of alertness and performance during MOD shiftwork operations. These issues are especially pertinent for the night shift operations and the acute phase advance required for the transition of day shift personnel into the night for shuttle launch. Implementation and evaluation of the countermeasure strategies to maximize alertness and performance is planned. As STS missions extend to further extended duration orbiters, timelines and planning for 24 circadian disruption will remain highly relevant in the MOD environment.

  6. Healthcare-associated infection surveillance and bedside alerts.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Berger, Angelika; Koller, Walter; Blacky, Alexander; Mandl, Harald; Unterasinger, Lukas; Rappelsberger, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Expectations and requirements concerning the identification and surveillance of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are increasing, calling for differentiated automated approaches. In an attempt to bridge the "definition swamp" of these infections and serve the needs of different users, we improved the monitoring of nosocomial infections (MONI) software to create better surveillance reports according to consented national and international definitions, as well as produce infection overviews on complex clinical matters including alerts for the clinician's ward and bedside work. MONI contains and processes surveillance definitions for intensive-care-unit-acquired infections from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Sweden, as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA. The latest release of MONI also includes KISS criteria of the German National Reference Center for Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections. In addition to these "classic" surveillance criteria, clinical alert criteria--which are similar but not identical to the surveillance criteria--were established together with intensivists. This is an important step to support both infection control and clinical personnel; and--last but not least--to foster co-evolution of the two groups of definitions: surveillance and alerts. PMID:24825687

  7. Black tea improves attention and self-reported alertness.

    PubMed

    De Bruin, E A; Rowson, M J; Van Buren, L; Rycroft, J A; Owen, G N

    2011-04-01

    Tea has previously been demonstrated to better help sustain alertness throughout the day in open-label studies. We investigated whether tea improves attention and self-reported alertness in two double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. Participants received black tea (made from commercially available tea bags) in one condition and placebo tea (hot water with food colours and flavours) similar in taste and appearance to real tea in the other condition. Attention was measured objectively with attention tests (the switch task and the intersensory-attention test) and subjectively with a self-report questionnaire (Bond-Lader visual analogue scales). In both studies, black tea significantly enhanced accuracy on the switch task (study 1 p<.002, study 2 p=.007) and self-reported alertness on the Bond-Lader questionnaire (study 1 p<.001, study 2 p=.021). The first study also demonstrated better auditory (p<.001) and visual (p=.030) intersensory attention after black tea compared to placebo. Simulation of theanine and caffeine plasma time-concentration curves indicated higher levels in the first study compared to the second, which supports the finding that tea effects on attention were strongest in the first study. Being the second most widely consumed beverage in the world after water, tea is a relevant contributor to our daily cognitive functioning. PMID:21172396

  8. Alert-QSAR. Implications for Electrophilic Theory of Chemical Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Ionaşcu, Cosmin; Putz, Ana-Maria; Ostafe, Vasile

    2011-01-01

    Given the modeling and predictive abilities of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) for genotoxic carcinogens or mutagens that directly affect DNA, the present research investigates structural alert (SA) intermediate-predicted correlations ASA of electrophilic molecular structures with observed carcinogenic potencies in rats (observed activity, A = Log[1/TD50], i.e., ASA=f(X1SA,X2SA,…)). The present method includes calculation of the recently developed residual correlation of the structural alert models, i.e., ARASA=f(A−ASA,X1SA,X2SA,…). We propose a specific electrophilic ligand-receptor mechanism that combines electronegativity with chemical hardness-associated frontier principles, equality of ligand-reagent electronegativities and ligand maximum chemical hardness for highly diverse toxic molecules against specific receptors in rats. The observed carcinogenic activity is influenced by the induced SA-mutagenic intermediate effect, alongside Hansch indices such as hydrophobicity (LogP), polarizability (POL) and total energy (Etot), which account for molecular membrane diffusion, ionic deformation, and stericity, respectively. A possible QSAR mechanistic interpretation of mutagenicity as the first step in genotoxic carcinogenesis development is discussed using the structural alert chemoinformation and in full accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development QSAR guidance principles. PMID:21954348

  9. A Successful Model and Visual Design for Creating Context-Aware Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Jon D.; Bolchini, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the potential harm of a drug-drug interaction (DDI) requires knowledge of a patient’s relevant co-morbidities and risk factors. Current DDI alerts lack such patient-specific contextual data. In this paper, we present an efficient model for integrating pertinent patient data into DDI alerts. This framework is designed to be interoperable across multiple drug knowledge bases and clinical information systems. To evaluate the model, we generated a set of contextual DDI data using our local drug knowledge base then conducted an evaluation study of a prototype contextual alert design. The alert received favorable ratings from study subjects, who agreed it was an improvement over traditional alerts and was likely to support clinical management and save physician time. This framework may ultimately help reduce alert fatigue through the dynamic display of DDI alerts based on patient risk. PMID:22195086

  10. Longitudinal Analysis of Computerized Alerts for Laboratory Monitoring of Post-liver Transplant Immunosuppressive Care

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jason; Narus, Scott P.; Evans, R. Scott; Staes, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Post-liver transplant patients require lifelong immunosuppressive care and monitoring. Computerized alerts can aid laboratory monitoring, but it is unknown how the distribution of alerts changes over time. We describe the changes over time of the distribution of computerized alerts for laboratory monitoring of post-liver transplant immunosuppressive care. Data were collected for post-liver transplant patients transplanted and managed at Intermountain Healthcare between 2005 and 2012. Alerts were analyzed based on year triggered, time since transplantation, hospitalization status, alert type, action taken (accepted or rejected), reason given for the action taken, and narrative comments. Alerts for overdue laboratory testing became more prevalent as time since transplantation increased. There is an increased need to support monitoring for overdue laboratory testing as the time since transplantation increases. Alerts should support providers as they monitor the evolving needs of post-transplant patients over time. We identify opportunities for improving laboratory monitoring of post-liver transplant patients. PMID:26958291

  11. Response Times in Correcting Non-Normal System Events When Collocating Status, Alerts and Procedures, and Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, most of the displays in control rooms can be categorized as status, alerts/procedures, or control screens. With the advent and use of CRTs and the associated computing power available to compute and display information, it is now possible to combine these different elements of information and control onto a single display. An experiment was conducted to determine which, if any, of these functions should be collocated in order to better handle simple anticipated non-normal system events. The results indicated that there are performance benefits and subject preferences to combining all the information onto one screen or combining the status and alert/procedure information onto one screen and placing the controls in another area.

  12. Southeastern Alaska tectonostratigraphic terranes revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Brew, D.A.; Ford, A.B.

    1985-04-01

    The presence of only three major tectonostratigraphic terranes (TSTs) in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia (Chugach, Wrangell, and Alexander) is indicated by critical analysis of available age, stratigraphic, and structural data. A possible fourth TST (Stikine) is probably an equivalent of part or all of the Alexander. The Yakutat block belongs to the Chugach TST, and both are closely linked to the Wrangell and Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs; the Gravina TST is an overlap assemblage. THe Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs is subdivided on the basis of age and facies. The subterranes within it share common substrates and represent large-scale facies changes in a long-lived island-arc environment. The Taku TSTs is the metamorphic equivalent of the upper part (Permian and Upper Triassic) of the Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs with some fossil evidence preserved that indicates the age of protoliths. Similarly, the Tracy Arm TST is the metamorphic equivalent of (1) the lower (Ordovician to Carboniferous) Alexander TST without any such fossil evidence and (2) the upper (Permian to Triassic) Alexander(-Stikine) with some newly discovered fossil evidence. Evidence for the ages of juxtaposition of the TSTs is limited. The Chugach TST deformed against the Wrangell and Alexander TSTs in late Cretaceous. Gravina rocks were deformed at the time and also earlier. The Wrangell TST was stitched to the Alexander(-Stikine) by middle Cretaceous plutons but may have arrived before its Late Jurassic plutons were emplaced. The Alexander(-Stikine) and Cache Creek TSTs were juxtaposed before Late Triassic.

  13. Chinese Tallow: Invading the Southeastern Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2000-01-01

    Chinese tallow is an ornamental tree with colorful autumn foliage that can survive full sunlight and shade, flooding, drought, and in some cases fire. To horticulturists this kind of tree sounds like a dream, but to ecologists, land managers, and land owners this kind of tree can be a nightmare, especially when it invades an area and takes over native vegetation. Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera), a nonnative tree from China, is currently transforming the southeastern Coastal Plain. Over the last 30 years, Chinese tallow has become a common tree in old fields and bottomland swamps of coastal Louisiana. Several studies at the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC), Lafayette, Louisiana, are aimed at understanding the factors that contribute to Chinese tallow growth, spread, and management. When tallow invades, it eventually monopolizes an area, creating a forest without native animal or plant species. This tree exhibits classic traits of most nonnative invaders: it is attractive so people want to distribute it, it has incredible resiliency, it grows quickly and in a variety of soils, and it is resistant to pests. In the coastal prairie of Louisiana and Texas, Chinese tallow can grow up to 30 feet and shade out native sun-loving prairie species. The disappearing of prairie species is troublesome because less than 1% of original coastal prairie remains, and in Louisiana, less than 500 of the original 2.2 million acres still exist. Tallow reproduces and grows quickly and can cause large-scale ecosystem modification (fig. 1). For example, when it completely replaces native vegetation, it has a negative effect on birds by degrading the habitat. Besides shading out grasses that cattle like to eat, it can also be potentially harmful to humans and animals because of its berries (fig. 2) and plant sap that contain toxins. There is some concern its leaves may shed toxins that change the soil chemistry and make it difficult for other plants to grow.

  14. Time to Detection with BacT/Alert FA Plus Compared to BacT/Alert FA Blood Culture Media.

    PubMed

    Nutman, A; Fisher Even-Tsur, S; Shapiro, G; Braun, T; Schwartz, D; Carmeli, Y

    2016-09-01

    Rapid identification of the causative pathogen in patients with bacteremia allows adjustment of antibiotic therapy and improves patient outcomes. We compared in vitro and real-life time to detection (TTD) of two blood culture media, BacT/Alert FA (FA) and BacT/Alert FA Plus (FA Plus), for the nine most common species of bacterial pathogens recovered from blood samples. Experimental data from simulated cultures was compared with microbiology records of TTD for both culture media with growth of the species of interest in clinical blood cultures. In the experimental conditions, median TTD was 3.8 hours (23.9 %) shorter using FA Plus media. The magnitude of reduction differed between species. Similarly, in real life data, FA Plus had shorter TTD than FA media; however, the difference between culture media was smaller, and median TTD was only 1 hour (8.5 %) less. We found shorter TTD with BacT/Alert FA Plus culture media, both experimentally and in real-life conditions and unrelated to antibiotic neutralization, highlighting the importance of appropriate blood culture media selection. PMID:27272123

  15. Tectonostratigraphy and depositional history of the Neoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary sequences in Kid area, southeastern Sinai, Egypt: Implications for intra-arc to foreland basin in the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, E. A.; Obeid, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a stratigraphic and sedimentary study of Neoproterozoic successions of the South Sinai, at the northernmost segment of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), including the Kid complex. This complex is composed predominantly of thick volcano-sedimentary successions representing different depositional and tectonic environments, followed by four deformational phases including folding and brittle faults (D1-D4). The whole Kid area is divisible from north to south into the lower, middle, and upper rock sequences. The higher metamorphic grade and extensive deformational styles of the lower sequence distinguishes them from the middle and upper sequences. Principal lithofacies in the lower sequence include thrust-imbricated tectonic slice of metasediments and metavolcanics, whereas the middle and upper sequences are made up of clastic sediments, intermediate-felsic lavas, volcaniclastics, and dike swarms. Two distinct Paleo- depositional environments are observed: deep-marine and alluvial fan regime. The former occurred mainly during the lower sequence, whereas the latter developed during the other two sequences. These alternations of depositional conditions in the volcano-sedimentary deposits suggest that the Kid area may have formed under a transitional climate regime fluctuating gradually from warm and dry to warm and humid conditions. Geochemical and petrographical data, in conjunction with field relationships, suggest that the investigated volcano-sedimentary rocks were built from detritus derived from a wide range of sources, ranging from Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic continental crust. Deposition within the ancient Kid basin reflects a complete basin cycle from rifting and passive margin development, to intra-arc and foreland basin development and, finally, basin closure. The early phase of basin evolution is similar to various basins in the Taupo volcanics, whereas the later phases are similar to the Cordilleran-type foreland basin. The

  16. Drought and Burn Scars in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More than 2 million acres were consumed by hundreds of fires between December 2002 and February 2003 in southeastern Australia's national parks, forests, foothills and city suburbs. These images were acquired on February 14, 2002 (left) and February 17, 2003 (right) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite. The year 2002 was one of Australia's hottest and driest on record, and the acreage burnt during the summer 2002-2003 fire season in Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory and southern New South Wales, is the largest since 1938-1939, when more than 3 million acres were scorched.

    The extent of the burnt area and the dry conditions as of February 2003 are indicated by these contrasting false-color views. Both image panels display data from the near-infrared, red and blue spectral bands of MISR's downward-viewing (nadir) camera, as red, green and blue, respectively. This display technique causes healthy vegetation to appear red and burnt areas to show as dark brown. The data displayed from the two dates were processed identically to preserve relative brightness variations. Vegetation changes related to the dry conditions (not related to the brown burn scars) are also indicated in the February 2003 panel, where many previously red areas exhibit instead the pale yellow-brown of the underlying soils and geology. Significant reduction in the surface area of several large and important water bodies are also apparent. The diminished extent of Lake Hume (along the left-hand edge) in the later date provides a good example.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 14999 and 16858. The panels cover an area of about 208 kilometers x 286 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 118 to

  17. A radar-based regional extreme rainfall analysis to derive the thresholds for a novel automatic alert system in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panziera, Luca; Gabella, Marco; Zanini, Stefano; Hering, Alessandro; Germann, Urs; Berne, Alexis

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a regional extreme rainfall analysis based on 10 years of radar data for the 159 regions adopted for official natural hazard warnings in Switzerland. Moreover, a nowcasting tool aimed at issuing heavy precipitation regional alerts is introduced. The two topics are closely related, since the extreme rainfall analysis provides the thresholds used by the nowcasting system for the alerts. Warm and cold seasons' monthly maxima of several statistical quantities describing regional rainfall are fitted to a generalized extreme value distribution in order to derive the precipitation amounts corresponding to sub-annual return periods for durations of 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. It is shown that regional return levels exhibit a large spatial variability in Switzerland, and that their spatial distribution strongly depends on the duration of the aggregation period: for accumulations of 3 h and shorter, the largest return levels are found over the northerly alpine slopes, whereas for longer durations the southern Alps exhibit the largest values. The inner alpine chain shows the lowest values, in agreement with previous rainfall climatologies. The nowcasting system presented here is aimed to issue heavy rainfall alerts for a large variety of end users, who are interested in different precipitation characteristics and regions, such as, for example, small urban areas, remote alpine catchments or administrative districts. The alerts are issued not only if the rainfall measured in the immediate past or forecast in the near future exceeds some predefined thresholds but also as soon as the sum of past and forecast precipitation is larger than threshold values. This precipitation total, in fact, has primary importance in applications for which antecedent rainfall is as important as predicted one, such as urban floods early warning systems. The rainfall fields, the statistical quantity representing regional rainfall and the frequency of alerts issued in case of

  18. Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in Southeastern Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Mattson, Earl D.; McLing, Travis L.; Palmer, Carl D.; Smith, Robert W.; Wood, Thomas R.; Podgorney, Robert K.

    2015-03-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water within oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. Although the area exhibits several thermal expressions, the measured geothermal gradients vary substantially (19 – 61 ºC/km) within this area, potentially suggesting a redistribution of heat in the overlying ground water from deeper geothermal reservoirs. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. Compositions of a selected group of thermal waters representing southeastern Idaho hot/warm springs and wells were used for the development of temperature estimates. The temperature estimates in the the region varied from moderately warm (59 ºC) to over 175 ºC. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho resulted in the highest temperature estimates in the region.

  19. Agricultural Burning in the Southeastern United States Detected by MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, J. L.; Justice, C. O.; Korontzi, S.

    2005-12-01

    The southeastern United States, including the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, has a high occurrence of fire activity as detected by MODIS. The spatio-temporal analysis of the 1 km MODIS TERRA Active Fire Product (MOD 14) from 2001 to 2004 shows that agricultural burning in the southeastern United States accounts for an average of 16 percent of annual fire activity. In addition, the southeastern region contributes an average of 33 percent of all agricultural burning in the contiguous United States. Crop types that most likely burn in the southeast include rice, winter wheat, sugarcane, soybean and cotton. Much of the agricultural burning occurs in June and from October to January and is related to the harvest of winter wheat and rice in the spring and the harvest of sugarcane, soybean and cotton in the fall and winter. The results show that cropland burning is spatially dependent on crop type and temporally dependent on management practices (planting/harvesting). Three states represent more than 75 percent of all agricultural burning in the southeast: Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana. A 250 m MODIS land cover map cover was created for these three states using a decision tree classification. Compared to the MODIS 1 km Land Cover Dataset (MOD 12) (Friedl et al., 2002), the 250m classified images contain on average 50 percent more cropland area and improve the estimation of cropland area based on validation from ground control sites of croplands. Results from the decision tree classification for each state suggest that in 2004 agricultural burning contributed 73 percent, 54 percent, and 33 percent of total fires for Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana, respectively.

  20. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy Ruth; Hansman, R. John; Corker, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cockpit alerting systems monitor potentially hazardous situations, both inside and outside the aircraft. When a hazard is projected to occur, the alerting system displays alerts and/or command decisions to the pilot. However, pilots have been observed to not conform to alerting system commands by delaying their response or by not following the automatic commands exactly. This non-conformance to the automatic alerting system can reduce its benefit. Therefore, a need exists to understand the causes and effects of pilot non-conformance in order to develop automatic alerting systems whose commands the pilots are more likely to follow. These considerations were examined through flight simulator evaluations of the collision avoidance task during closely spaced parallel approaches. This task provided a useful case-study because the effects of non-conformance can be significant, given the time-critical nature of the task. A preliminary evaluation of alerting systems identified non-conformance in over 40% of the cases and a corresponding drop in collision avoidance performance. A follow-on experiment found subjects' alerting and maneuver selection criteria were consistent with different strategies than those used by automatic systems, indicating the pilot may potentially disagree with the alerting system if the pilot attempts to verify automatic alerts and commanded avoidance maneuvers. A final experiment found supporting automatic alerts with the explicit display of its underlying criteria resulted in more consistent subject reactions. In light of these experimental results, a general discussion of pilot non-conformance is provided. Contributing factors in pilot non-conformance include a lack of confidence in the automatic system and mismatches between the alerting system's commands and the pilots' own decisions based on the information available to them. The effects of non-conformance on system performance are discussed. Possible methods of reconciling mismatches are