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Sample records for alexander city fault

  1. Correlation of Emkuckfaw Group metagraywackes with the Wedowee Group, Northern Piedmont, Alabama: Implications for the interpretation of the Alexander City fault

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, D.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Recent field studies to clarify stratigraphic relationships between the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite Gneiss and the Brevard zone lead to the interpretation that part of the Emuckfaw Group is correlative with, and probably structurally continuous with, part of the Wedowee Group. The Josie Leg formation of Bieler and Deininger (1987) is a sequence of metagraywackes and interbedded metapelites; it is here interpreted as a coarse submarine fan facies. The northwestern contact of the unit, frequently mapped as the Alexander City fault, maps into the Wadley Line in the New Site and Daviston quadrangles. The southeastern contact is a sheared contact with structurally overlying migmatitic rocks that include quartzites and calcsilicates. The Josie Leg and Wedowee rocks form a southwesterly plunging synform in which the Elkahatchee lies. Where the contact between the units is gently dipping it is mapped as the Wadley line. Where the contact has been folded and dips steeply, it is highly sheared and is mapped as the Alexander City fault. It is impossible to determine at this time how much the section has been attenuated during the shearing. Although the contact has been interpreted as structural, the data are not unambiguous. The Josie Leg/Wedowee contact may be a stratigraphic contact with the apparent structural discordance reflecting the different mechanical behavior of the contrasting lithologies.

  2. Alexander Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... mice have been engineered to produce the same mutant forms of GFAP found in individuals with Alexander ... mice have been engineered to produce the same mutant forms of GFAP found in individuals with Alexander ...

  3. Robert Alexander and His Passionate Philosophy (Profile).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosseau, Remi Barclay

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the passionate philosophy of Robert Alexander, founder and director of living stage theater company and his views of art, creativity, the entire process of learning, politics, philosophy, and hope. Presents several excerpts from Alexander's presentations for artists and teachers during Living Stage residencies in cities around the…

  4. Is there really an active fault (Cibyra Fault?) cutting the Stadion of the ancient city of Cibyra? (Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk

    2013-04-01

    The Cibyra segment of the Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone (BFFZ) is in a tectonically very active region of southwestern Anatolia. The presence of the Cibyra Fault was firstly suggested by Akyüz and Altunel (1997, 2001). Researchers identified traces of historical earthquakes in Cibyra by taking into account the collapsed seat rows on the east side of the stadion as reference. They claimed that the NNE-SSW left lateral fault Cibyra Fault (related to Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone) continues through Pliocene sediments on both eastern and western sides of the stadion of Cibyra. The questionable left-lateral fault had been examined in detail by ourselves during our 60-days accommodation in the ancient city of Cibyra excavations for the Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone Project in 2008, 2009 and 2012. A left-lateral offset on the Stadion was firstly mentioned in a study whose aim is to find the traces of Burdur-Fethiye Fault (Akyüz and Altunel, 2001) and many researchers accepted this fault by reference (for example Alçiçek et al. 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006 and Karabacak, 2011). However as a result of the field observations it is understood that there is no fault cutting the Stadion. By the reason of the fact that there are a lot of faults in the region, however the fault that devastated the ancient city is unknown. The deformation traces on the ruins of the ancient city display a seismic movement occured in the region. It is strongly possible that this movement is related to the NE-SW left lateral oblique normal fault named as Cibyra Fault at the northwestern side of the city. Especially the ravages in the eastern part of the city indicate that the deformations are related to ground properties. If the rotation and overturn movement are considered and if both movements are the product of the same earthquake, the real Cibyra Fault is compatible with normal fault with left lateral compenent. After the 2011 excavations and 2012 field studies, the eastern wall of the Stadion showed that

  5. Remembering Alexander Meiklejohn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tussman, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    A former student of Alexander Meiklejohn, a member of the Experimental College movement on the 1930s, describes his impressions of Meiklejohn's life, leadership qualities, and personal characteristics. (MSE)

  6. Alexander I. Ignatowski

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.; Jankovic, Gradimir M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1908, Alexander I. Ignatowski (1875–1955) published his pioneering work that first revealed a relationship between cholesterol-rich food and experimental atherosclerosis. This early experimental work paved a way to the metabolic study of the mechanism of atherosclerosis. Herein, we present a brief account of Ignatowski's work and life. PMID:23914012

  7. Subsidence Induced Faulting Hazard risk maps in Mexico City and Morelia, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Solano-Rojas, D.; Hernández-Espriu, J.; Cigna, F.; Wdowinski, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Falorni, G.; Bohane, A.; Colombo, D.

    2012-12-01

    Subsidence and surface faulting have affected urban areas in Central Mexico for decades and the process has intensified as a consequence of urban sprawl and economic growth. This process causes substantial damages to the urban infrastructure and housing structures and in several cities it is becoming a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies in the next decades. Subsidence is usually associated with aggressive groundwater extraction rates and a general decrease of aquifer static level that promotes soil consolidation, deformation and ultimately, surface faulting. However, local stratigraphic and structural conditions also play an important role in the development and extension of faults. Despite its potential for damaging housing, and other urban infrastructure, the economic impact of this phenomena is poorly known, in part because detailed, city-wide subsidence induced faulting risk maps have not been published before. Nevertheless, modern remote sensing techniques are most suitable for this task. We present the results of a risk analysis for subsidence induced surface faulting in two cities in central Mexico: Morelia and Mexico City. Our analysis in Mexico City and Morelia is based on a risk matrix using the horizontal subsidence gradient from a Persistent Scatterer InSAR (Morelia) and SqueeSAR (Mexico City) analysis and 2010 census population distribution data from Mexico's National Institute of Statistics and Geography. Defining subsidence induced surface faulting vulnerability within these urbanized areas is best determined using both magnitude and horizontal subsidence gradient. Our Morelia analysis (597,000 inhabitants with localized subsidence rates up to 80 mm/yr) shows that 7% of the urbanized area is under a high to very high risk level, and 14% of its population (11.7% and 2.3% respectively) lives within these areas. In the case of the Mexico City (15'490,000 inhabitants for the

  8. Offset ancient city wall yields plausible slip rate for the Sagaing fault, Burma (Myanmar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Aung, T.; Min, S.; Lin, K.; Tun, S.; Sieh, K.; Myint, U.

    2008-12-01

    The Sagaing fault offers great potential for paleoseismology study, because it traverses a region with a long history and high rates of sedimentation. Buddhist documents from ancient Pegu (Bago), in southern Myanmar, record 34 strong earthquakes in the past 2.3 millennia. The latest of these is the 1930 Pegu earthquake (M 7.3), which had high intensities along a 90 km stretch from Pegu to the southern coastline of the country. We have found evidences for surface rupture in 1930 in the stories of village elders and in offset paddy fields. These reports and offsets suggest that coseismic displacement decreased from several meters in Pegu to liquefaction without faulting near Payagyi Township, 15 km farther north. West of Payagyi, the fault trace cuts through and offsets an ancient city wall. The age of the ancient city is uncertain, but descriptions from Burmese history indicate it was built in the late 16th century, probably about 440 yrs ago. Determination of the offset of the 440-year-old city wall is possible, but not simple, in part because vertical displacements across the fault have resulted in differential sedimentation on the flanks of the wall. After accounting geomorphologically for the differential sedimentation, the offset of both the outer and inner edges of the city wall appear to have sustained a right-lateral offset of about 6 meters. This yields an approximate slip rate of 14 mm/yr, which is slightly lower than the slip rate determined by others from GPS geodesy. The number of earthquakes involved in creating the 6-meter offset is currently unknown, but paleoseismic excavations within the ancient city may well yield evidence of discrete offsets that we will be able to ascribe to specific large earthquakes in the historical record. Candidates include historical earthquakes 1582, 1644, 1768, 1830, 1888, 1913 and 1917 C.E.

  9. Probability distribution on faults near the city of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradisopoulou, P.; Papadimitriou, E.; Mirek, J.; Karakostas, V.

    2012-04-01

    Many studies found that stress triggering and fault interaction theories can be incorporated into quantitative earthquake probability estimates. Using two methods of time dependent probability estimates this work aims at the evaluation of the occurrence probability of anticipated earthquakes in the city of Thessaloniki, an urban center of 1 million people located in northern Greece, conditional to the time elapsed since the last stronger event on each fault of the study area and to the history of the following events on adjacent active faults. The city of Thessaloniki was chosen as a case study because is the second largest city in the territory of Greece surrounded by several small towns. The latest destructive earthquake occurred in 1978 (M=6.5) and caused the collapse of buildings and loss of life in the city and nearby villages. In this study we start from the estimate of the probability of occurrence for the stronger known earthquake on a fault in the period 2011-2041 (30 years) based on a time-dependent renewal model. For this probabilistic earthquake forecast the coseismic stress changes of strong earthquakes (M≥6.5) that occurred since the beginning of 20th century in the study area are calculated. The coseismic stress changes are translated into earthquake probability using an earthquake nucleation constitutive relation. According to this the occurrence rate of the anticipated earthquake is calculated taking into account both permanent (clock advance) and temporary (rate-and-state) perturbations. Earthquake probability on a fault is lowest after the last event but as tectonic stress grows the odds of another earthquake increase. For all needed calculations a probability density function for the time of failure for an earthquake of defined magnitude on the fault of interest must be taken into account along with the calculated stress changes on the fault. The technique for incorporating stress changes into the estimation of earthquake probability has

  10. Seismic characterization of the Wasatch fault system beneath Salt Lake City using a land streamer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, B.; Liberty, L. M.; Gribler, G.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the active Wasatch fault system beneath downtown Salt Lake City by measuring p- and s-wave velocities and seismic reflection profiling. Our focus was on the segment boundary between the Warm Springs and East Bench faults. We collected 14.5 km along 9 west-east profiles in 3 field days using a 60 m aperture seismic land streamer and 200 kg weight drop system. From a p-wave refraction analysis, we measure velocities from 230-3900 m/s for the upper 20-25 meters. Shear wave velocities for the upper 30 m, derived from a multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) approach, show velocities that range from 100-1800 m/s. P-wave reflection images from the upper 100 m depth indicate offset and truncated (mostly) west-dipping strata (Bonneville Lake deposits?) that suggest active faults extend beneath the downtown urban corridor. We identify saturated sediments on the lower elevation (western) portions of the profiles and shallow high velocity (dry) strata to the east of the mapped faults. We observe slow p-wave velocities near identified faults that may represent the fault's colluvial wedge. These velocity results are best highlighted with Vp/Vs ratios. Analyzing shear wave velocities by NEHRP class, we estimate soft soil (NEHRP D) limited less than 1 m depth along most profiles, and stiff soil (NEHRP C) to up to 25 m depth in some locations. However near steep topographic slopes (footwall deposits), we identify NEHRP Class D stiff soil velocities to less than 2 m depth before transition to NEHRP Class C soft rock. Depth to hard rock (velocities >760 m/s) are as shallow as 20 m below the land surface on some steep slopes beneath north Salt Lake City and greater than our imaging depths along the western portions of our profiles. Our findings suggest large variations in seismic velocities beneath the Salt Lake City corridor and that multiple fault strands related to the Warm Springs fault segment extend beneath downtown.

  11. Characterising Active Fault Earthquake Sources Beneath the Coastal Environments of Christchurch and Wellington Cities, New Zealand, Using Seismic Reflection Profiles and Fault Displacement Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Nodder, S.; Gorman, A. R.; Woelz, S.; Orpin, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal cities of Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, lie in different tectonic settings within the obliquely convergent Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone. Both cities have experienced damaging earthquakes in the last three years, which highlight the importance of locating and characterising hidden active faults close to urban areas. The devastating and geologically complex Canterbury earthquake sequence of 2010-2012 developed on the periphery of the plate boundary, and reactivated several previously unidentified strike-slip and reverse faults. Major aftershocks initially beneath land, generally migrated eastward over time, and finally advanced offshore into Pegasus Bay. A study of active submarine faulting beneath the bay highlights the role of inherited crustal structure and inversion tectonics. Marine seismic reflection data reveals that faults have very low slip rate and negligible post-glacial (<15 ka) deformation, which is consistent with inferred long recurrence intervals between large magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. Wellington City is surrounded by numerous high-slip rate strike-slip faults overlying the Hikurangi subduction zone. A dense network of secondary basement structures previously recognised throughout the region, mainly from tectonic geomorphology, have, until recently, been considered mostly inactive and excluded from seismic hazard models. We used high-resolution geophysical, bathymetric and sediment-core data to determine the structure, earthquake history and earthquake potential of a newly discovered active reverse fault beneath the inner reaches of Wellington Harbour. The fault has a slip rate of ~0.6 ± 0.3 mm/y, and a vertical displacement history indicating at least two large magnitude (Mw 6.3-7.1), surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 10 ka. We infer that the fault extends southwards onshore beneath the city and potentially into Cook Strait, and represents a significant previously unrecognised seismic hazard.

  12. Alexander's Law revisited.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoat, Benjamin; Shelukhin, Alexander; Fong, Alex; Mustain, William; Zhou, Wu

    2008-07-01

    Alexander's Law states that the slow-phase velocity of the nystagmus caused by unilateral vestibular lesion increases with gaze in the beat direction. Two studies have shown that this gaze effect is generalized to the nystagmus caused by unilateral cold water irrigation. This indicates that the gaze effect is not the result of central changes associated with a peripheral lesion but rather because of unilateral vestibular peripheral inhibition. In this study, we show that there is a similar gaze effect on the nystagmus produced by unilateral warm water ear irrigation. Furthermore, we examined the two hypotheses of Alexander's Law proposed in the two studies. One hypothesis is based on the gaze-dependent modulation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) response to unbalanced canal input. The other hypothesis, however, is based on the leaky neural integrator caused by unilateral vestibular peripheral inhibition. These two hypotheses predict the same gaze effect on the nystagmus produced by cold water irrigation, but opposite gaze effects on the nystagmus produced by warm water irrigation. Our results support the first hypothesis and suggest that the second hypothesis needs to be modified.

  13. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Alexander disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... up study of 22 Chinese children with Alexander disease and analysis of parental origin of de novo GFAP mutations. J Hum Genet. 2013 Apr;58(4):183-8. doi: 10.1038/jhg.2012.152. Epub 2013 Jan 31. Citation on ... GS. Alexander disease: ventricular garlands and abnormalities of the medulla and ...

  15. Risk Assessment of Surface Faulting on Eastern Mexico City by Using Gephysical Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R. E.; Diaz, O.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Correa-Mora, F.

    2003-12-01

    The accelerated urban growth in Mexico City, one of the world's largest metropolis has led to increasing environmental changes. Several low-income communities have settled on high-risk zones of the metropolitan area due to poor development regulations enforcement. Such conditions have contributed to increase the vulnerability of these areas where natural disasters such as flooding or landslides may occur. One of these areas is located in the eastern portion of Mexico City, within the Iztapalapa County. These urban settlements are located on top of non-consolidated lacustrine sediments. Ground conditions and an over exploitation of the local aquifer have caused fracturing, faulting and subsidence, affecting houses and public buildings in this area. In order to perform a risk assessment in this heavily urbanised area, a geophysical study was carried out to determine the location of shallow fractures. Several GPR and high-resolution gravity profiles were surveyed along selected roads. A shallow-surface faulting risk map was then constructed taking into account fault location and geometry, land use and other geological variables. This analysis allowed the study area to be divided into five vulnerability risk zones which can be used by local decision-making authorities for hazard prevention and planning of mitigation activities.

  16. InSAR Evidence for an active shallow thrust fault beneath the city of Spokane Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicks, Charles W.; Weaver, Craig S.; Bodin, Paul; Sherrod, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, a nearly five month long sequence of shallow, mostly small magnitude earthquakes occurred beneath the city of Spokane, a city with a population of about 200,000, in the state of Washington. During most of the sequence, the earthquakes were not well located because seismic instrumentation was sparse. Despite poor-quality locations, the earthquake hypocenters were likely very shallow, because residents near the city center both heard and felt many of the earthquakes. The combination of poor earthquake locations and a lack of known surface faults with recent movement make assessing the seismic hazards related to the earthquake swarm difficult. However, the potential for destruction from a shallow moderate-sized earthquake is high, for example Christchurch New Zealand in 2011, so assessing the hazard potential of a seismic structure involved in the Spokane earthquake sequence is important. Using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the European Space Agency ERS2 and ENVISAT satellites and the Canadian Space Agency RADARSAT-1, satellite we are able to show that slip on a shallow previously unknown thrust fault, which we name the Spokane Fault, is the source of the earthquake sequence. The part of the Spokane Fault that slipped during the 2001 earthquake sequence underlies the north part of the city, and slip on the fault was concentrated between ~0.3 and 2 km depth. Projecting the buried fault plane to the surface gives a possible surface trace for the Spokane Fault that strikes northeast from the city center into north Spokane.

  17. Localization and characterization of the Zhangdian-Renhe fault zone in Zibo city, Shandong province, China, using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Zhou, J.; Wang, H.

    2017-01-01

    A 2D ERT survey is performed along 10 cross-sections intersecting with the trace of Zhangdian-Renhe fault zone, a Quaternary active normal fault zone going from south to north across Zibo city, Shandong province, China. During the survey, the Wenner-α array with the strongest anti-electrical disturbance ability is adopted, and some ways to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of apparent resistivity data are performed. The reconstructed resistivity tomograms illustrate that Zhangdian-Renhe fault zone in Zibo city consists of 4 NW-striking normal faults which are the west branch (F1), the secondary fault of west branch (F1-1), the secondary fault of east branch (F2-1) and the east branch (F2). Fault F1 has NE apparent dip direction and 67° -75° apparent dip angle, and fault F2 SW and 60° -63°. The two faults are the main faults of Zhangdian-Renhe fault zone and form a graben. Subsequent geologic drilling records prove our inference. Our results present an important basis for the definition of seismic fortification level and new city planning in Zibo city.

  18. Were Holocene large slumps in Lake Geneva off the city of Lausanne caused by fault activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia Demand, Jehanne; Marillier, François; Kremer, Katrina; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    Lake Geneva is set in an area where glacier advances and retreats have carved Tertiary Molasse rocks in front of the Alpine units. Glacial and lacustrine sediments have accumulated in the lake on top of the Molasse. Within Holocene sedimentary layers, seismic studies in the central part of Lake Geneva ("Grand-Lac") have shown the presence of several mass transport deposits (MTD). A large one, MTD A, is observed off the city of Lausanne. The depth of the associated failure scars (100 m water depth), its volume (~ 0.13 km3), and the occurrence of other smaller MTDs that were possibly co-deposited with MTD A point to the occurrence of a major slide event in the lake, most likely associated with an earthquake. Based on 14C dating, the sediment age model for MTD A gives an age interval of 1865-1608 BC (Kremer et al. 2014). To resolve the details of the MTDs off Lausanne, and to better understand its geological context different seismic systems were used. These were a 3.5 KHz pinger with a theoretical vertical resolution of 0.15 m and a multichannel system with water-gun or air-gun seismic sources with vertical resolution of 0.6 m and 1.1 m, respectively. After a first pass processing, the multi-channel data were reprocessed in order to take into account the shape of the streamer in the water and to enhance the results of migration. In addition to typical seismic images of MTDs observed in other alpine lakes such as chaotic or transparent seismic character between well-organized reflections, two intriguing positive water-bottom topographic features associated with apparent sub-vertical offsets are revealed by the seismic data. They are located in the near vicinity of the depot centers of the MTDs and conspicuously located near faults in the Tertiary Molasse. These are thrust faults that are offset by small strike-slip faults, and we suggest that the positive topographic features are linked to a compressive component within the sediments due to displacements along these

  19. Imaging the concealed section of the Whakatane fault below Whakatane city, New Zealand, with a shear wave land streamer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, Ulrich; Mueller, Christof; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The Mw 7.1 Darfield Earthquake in September 2010 ruptured the surface along the Greendale Fault that was not known prior to the earthquake. The subsequent Mw 6.3 Christchurch earthquake in February 2011 demonstrated that concealed active faults have a significant risk potential for urban infrastructure and human life in New Zealand if they are located beneath or close to such areas. Mapping exposures and analysis of active faults incorporated into the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) suggests that several thousands of these active structures are yet to be identified and have the potential to generate moderate to large magnitude earthquakes (i.e. magnitudes >5). Geological mapping suggests that active faults pass beneath, or within many urban areas in New Zealand, including Auckland, Blenheim, Christchurch, Hastings/Napier, Nelson, Rotorua, Taupo, Wellington, and Whakatane. Since no established methodology for routinely locating and assessing the earthquake hazard posed by concealed active faults is available, the principal objective of the presented study was to evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution shear wave seismic reflection profiling using a land streamer to locate buried faults in urban areas of New Zealand. During the survey carried out in the city of Whakatane in February 2015, the method was first tested over a well known surface outcrop of the Edgecumbe Fault 30 km south-west of Whakatane city. This allowed further to investigate the principle shear wave propagation characteristics in the unknown sediments, consisting mainly of effusive rock material of the Taupo volcanic zone mixed with marine transgression units. Subsequently the survey was continued within Whakatane city using night operation time slots to reduce the urban noise. In total, 11 profiles of 5.7 km length in high data quality were acquired, which clearly show concealed rupture structures of obviously different age in the shallow sediments down to 100 m depth. Subject to depth

  20. Tectonic Morphology of the Hustai Fault (Northern Mongolia) : A Source of Seismic Hazard for the city of Ulaanbaatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Schlupp, Antoine; Ulzibat, Munkhuu; Munschy, Marc; Fleury, Simon; Baatarsuren, G.; Erdenezula, D.; Munkhsaikhan, A.; Ankhtsetseg, D.

    2010-05-01

    Beside the famous series of M 8 earthquakes that struck western Mongolia in the first half of the 20th c., the Hustai fault in northern Mongolia presents a more directly concerning picture in terms of hazard and risk. With its northeastern tip located ~10 km from the city of Ulaanbaatar (1 M inhabitants), the 92-km-long fault may produce consequential M 7+ earthquakes. No known historical earthquake occurred on the Hustai Fault in the last 500 yrs while instrumental seismicity shows continuous activity with five M 4+ since 1974 and a M 5.4 event in that same year. Most events occur in the shallow crust above 10-20 km. We present preliminary results of a multi-disciplinary study of the Hustai Fault in order to assess its seismogenic potential. By combining high-resolution satellite images, digital elevation models, magnetic mapping, geomorphology and trenching, we provide a detailed map of the fault's active trace as well as insight on its recent episodes of surface faulting. The Hustai Fault is more than 92 km long and divided into three segments. The northern segment is 23 km long and oriented N 68; the central segment is 33 km long and oriented N 55; and the southern segment is at least 36 km long and oriented N23. Overall, the Hustai Fault forms a wide W-shape open to the southeast. The active trace runs along the foot of the main topography of the Hustai Range and is outlined by exhumed chert slabs, contrasts in water content and vegetation reflecting changing soil conditions, right-laterally offset streams and elongated sag basins. The latter are 600- to 800-m-wide and bounded at their SE edge by antithetic faults. Stream bed topographic profiles show a systematic uplift of the NW block by 20-30 m and high-resolution satellite images document right-lateral offsets in the range of 20-30 m, thus suggesting an oblique regime. Antithetic faults only exhibit dip-slip movement in the order of a few meters (< 10 m). An exploratory 106-m-long trench dug across the

  1. Dancers' Application of the Alexander Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Sylvie; Girard, Fernande

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the experience of professional contemporary dancers studying and applying the Alexander Technique to their dancing. This study was motivated by: 1. years of teaching both dance and somatics, 2. a strong desire to better understand how the Alexander Technique can be applied by dancers, and 3. a gap that the…

  2. The Alexander Technique: An Acting Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Sarah A.

    2002-01-01

    Notes the discrepancy between students' use of the Alexander Technique in class and on stage. Discusses three fundamental self-use objectives of the Alexander Technique: the reduction of excess physical compression and muscularity; the unification of body/voice and thought; and the expansion of the field of attention. Demonstrates how each…

  3. Modelling of Seismic Ground Motion in Santiago de Cuba City from Earthquakes in Oriente Fault Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, L.; Panza, G. F.; Vaccari, F.; González, B. E.

    We present the results of complete P-SV and SH waves modelling, up to a maximum frequency of 1Hz, along two profiles in Santiago de Cuba city. The seismic sources are located in the depth range from 10 to 40km on the Oriente fault zone at distances of several tens of kilometres from the city. The calculation has been made by a hybrid method: Modal summation in the regional anelastic model (one-dimensional) where the source is buried, and finite differences in the local sedimentary anelastic models (two-dimensional). The analysis of the influence of the depth and of the distance of the source on the site effects shows that standard traditional methods, based on the deconvolution analysis of the rock outcrop motion, can lead to erroneous results.

  4. An unusual presentation of juvenile Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Maria Joana; Risen, Sarah; Alper, Gulay

    2012-04-01

    Alexander disease is a rare leukodystrophy that most often presents in infancy but also includes neonatal, juvenile, and adult variants. Juvenile Alexander disease presents primarily with bulbar symptoms between 2 and 12 years of age. The diagnosis is often suggested by the clinical course and brain magnetic resonance image pattern and then confirmed by the presence of a mutation in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. A young girl presented with globus sensation and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed abnormalities mainly involving white matter tracts of the medulla oblongata and cerebellum. The presence of a mutation in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile Alexander disease. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary for the diagnosis of late-onset presentations of Alexander disease.

  5. The Haunting Influence of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sue H.

    1971-01-01

    The article examines the significance that Alexander Graham Bell's attitude and actions had on the social and economic conditions experienced by deaf people during his lifetime and into the present. (CD)

  6. [On Alexander's pneumothorax: A critical appraisal].

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Guillermo; Villarreal-Alarcón, Miguel Ángel; Estañol-Vidal, Bruno

    According to the testimony of Ptolemy, which we know through Arrian, it has been assumed that Alexander the Great suffered a pneumothorax during his campaign against the Malli. In general, this assumption has been interpreted as a historical fact in medical literature. We consulted the same sources and concluded that it is unlikely that Alexander's arrow wound had given him a pneumothorax. In addition, we stressed the extra-historical content of classical sources.

  7. Expedition 35/36 Crew Departs Star City

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 35 Flight Enginners Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov and Alexander Misurkin participated in traditional ceremonies at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia outside Mo...

  8. Alexander Graham Bell: Teacher of the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Robert V.

    The lecture on Alexander Graham Bell by Dr. Robert V. Bruce, the author of a biography of Bell, focuses on Bell's association with the Clarke School for the Deaf in Massachusetts. Noted are Bell's employment by the school at 25 years of age and the preceding period during which Bell taught elocution at a boys' school in Scotland and used his…

  9. The Remarkable Journey of Lloyd Alexander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnel, Michael O.; Jacobs, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This article features Lloyd Alexander, an author who has produced some of the most elegant and powerful prose in the history of modern children's literature. Lloyd began writing seriously in high school, and though he wrote and submitted many poems and short stories, his only success was being named a finalist in the "Writer's Digest" Short Story…

  10. High Resistant Sand Injected Marl and Low Resistant Damaged Marl to Locate and Characterize the Thénia Fault Zone in Boumerdes City (North-Central Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulouel, Hakim; Bensalem, Rabah; Machane, Djamel; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Gharbi, Sofiane; Oubaiche, El-Hadi; Ousalem, Hassane; Skendri, Walid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to locate and characterize the Thénia Fault Zone (TFZ) in the urban area of Boumerdes city; geological and electrical resistivity tomography surveys have targeted the Plaisancian marl and its Quaternary cover. As a whole, data indicate a complex near-vertical fault zone with an asymmetric and zoned internal structure of at least 150 m wide and with a straight N120° overall trending. The fault zone is traversed with two elongated parallel fault branches (FB1 and FB2), generally, 70 m distant from each other. These fault branches locate two intense damage zones (IDZs) of 10-15 m thick each, situated at the margin of two damage zones each having a thickness of several tens of meters. Downward sand injections into IDZs during Pleistocene epoch, possible pulverization of Plaisancian marl rocks, systematic deflection of actual stream channels, and vertical displacement of at least 30 m affecting Quaternary alluvial deposits show that the area would have undergone active tectonic driven by the TFZ.

  11. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an ≈1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated ≈8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1–2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system. PMID:17517668

  12. Geomorphic features of surface ruptures associated with the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake in and around the downtown of Kumamoto City, and implications on triggered slip along active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hideaki; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Toda, Shinji; Kumahara, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-01

    The 30-km-long surface ruptures associated with the M w 7.0 ( M j 7.3) earthquake at 01:25 JST on April 16 in Kumamoto Prefecture appeared along the previously mapped 100-km-long active fault called the Futagawa-Hinagu fault zone (FHFZ). The surface ruptures appeared to have extended further west out of the main FHFZ into the Kumamoto Plain. Although InSAR analysis by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) indicated coseismic surface deformation in and around the downtown of Kumamoto City, the surface ruptures have not been clearly mapped in the central part of the Kumamoto Plain, and whether there are other active faults other than the Futagawa fault in the Kumamoto Plain remained unclear. We produced topographical stereo images (anaglyph) from 5-m-mesh digital elevation model of GSI, which was generated from light detection and ranging data. We interpreted them and identified that several SW-sloping river terraces formed after the deposition of the pyroclastic flow deposits related to the latest large eruption of the Aso caldera (86.8-87.3 ka) are cut and deformed by several NW-trending flexure scarps down to the southwest. These 5.4-km-long scarps that cut across downtown Kumamoto were identified for the first time, and we name them as the Suizenji fault zone. Surface deformation such as continuous cracks, tilts, and monoclinal folding associated with the main shock of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake was observed in the field along the fault zone. The amount of vertical deformation ( 0.1 m) along this fault associated with the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake was quite small compared to the empirically calculated coseismic slip (0.5 m) based on the fault length. We thus suggest that the slip on this fault zone was triggered by the Kumamoto earthquake, but the fault zone has potential to generate an earthquake with larger slip that poses a high seismic risk in downtown Kumamoto area.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Alexander Böhm (1971-2012).

    PubMed

    Boos, Winfried; Parkinson, John S; Jenal, Urs; Vogel, Jörg; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-01

    On November 28, 2012 Alexander (Alex) Böhm, a bacterial geneticist, died at age 41, only a few months after taking up a position as an assistant professor at the LOEWE Center for Synthetic Microbiology in Marburg, Germany. Earlier in 2012 Alex had been diagnosed with an aggressive form of thyroid cancer that left him little time to live his scientific and personal dreams.

  14. Dr Elizabeth Alexander: First Female Radio Astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    During March-April 1945, solar radio emission was detected at 200 MHz by operators of a Royal New Zealand Air Force radar unit located on Norfolk Island. Initially dubbed the `Norfolk Island Effect', this anomalous radiation was investigated throughout 1945 by British-born Elizabeth Alexander, head of the Operational Research Section of the Radio Development Laboratory in New Zealand. Alexander prepared a number of reports on this work, and in early 1946 she published a short paper in the newly-launched journal, Radio & Electronics. A geologist by training, Elizabeth Alexander happened to be in the right place at the right time, and unwittingly became the first woman in the world to work in the field that would later become known as radio astronomy. Her research also led to further solar radio astronomy projects in New Zealand in the immediate post-war year, and in part was responsible for the launch of the radio astronomy program at the Division of Radiophysics, CSIRO, in Sydney.

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 MASSACHUSETTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE FACADE, 1971 - James C. Hooe House, 2230 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 DETAIL OF BASEMENT FIREPLACE - Indian Trading Post, Second & Merchant Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 DETAIL OF STONEWORK (WEST ELEVATION) - Indian Trading Post, Second & Merchant Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  18. "Most brilliant in judgment": Alexander the Great and Aristotle.

    PubMed

    Lainas, Panagiotis; Panutsopulos, Dimitrios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Zoras, Odysseas; Skandalakis, John E

    2005-03-01

    From historical sources, it is evident that Alexander the Great was indebted to one of his teachers, Aristotle of Stagira. It was the teaching of Aristotle that evoked all the nascent talents of young Alexander and turned him into a great man. Alexander was extremely interested in the secrets of medicine and considered it an art. The medical knowledge he acquired from Aristotle may have saved his life and the lives of his troops on many occasions. If Alexander did not possess medical knowledge and if his everyday life had not been so greatly influenced by medicine, he might never have been able to create his empire.

  19. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 VIEW FROM SITTING ROOM INTO DRAWING ROOM - Joseph Beale House, 2301 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 DETAIL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 DETAIL, ENTRANCE STOOP (LION FIGURE) - Joseph Beale House, 2301 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Integrated geophysical investigations in a fault zone located on southwestern part of İzmir city, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drahor, Mahmut G.; Berge, Meriç A.

    2017-01-01

    Integrated geophysical investigations consisting of joint application of various geophysical techniques have become a major tool of active tectonic investigations. The choice of integrated techniques depends on geological features, tectonic and fault characteristics of the study area, required resolution and penetration depth of used techniques and also financial supports. Therefore, fault geometry and offsets, sediment thickness and properties, features of folded strata and tectonic characteristics of near-surface sections of the subsurface could be thoroughly determined using integrated geophysical approaches. Although Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Seismic Refraction Tomography (SRT) methods are commonly used in active tectonic investigations, other geophysical techniques will also contribute in obtaining of different properties in the complex geological environments of tectonically active sites. In this study, six different geophysical methods used to define faulting locations and characterizations around the study area. These are GPR, ERT, SRT, Very Low Frequency electromagnetic (VLF), magnetics and self-potential (SP). Overall integrated geophysical approaches used in this study gave us commonly important results about the near surface geological properties and faulting characteristics in the investigation area. After integrated interpretations of geophysical surveys, we determined an optimal trench location for paleoseismological studies. The main geological properties associated with faulting process obtained after trenching studies. In addition, geophysical results pointed out some indications concerning the active faulting mechanism in the area investigated. Consequently, the trenching studies indicate that the integrated approach of geophysical techniques applied on the fault problem reveals very useful and interpretative results in description of various properties of faulting zone in the investigation site.

  2. Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 crane flies (Diptera: Pediciidae) of Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija; Byun, Hye-Woo

    2015-08-25

    The Korean crane fly species of the genus Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 (Diptera: Pediciidae) is taxonomically revised. H. gloriosus gloriosus (Alexander, 1924) is redescribed. A new species Heterangaeus koreanus n. sp., which is the first species of Pediciidae from South Korea, is described and illustrated.

  3. Recognizing the Presidents: Was Alexander Hamilton President?

    PubMed

    Roediger, Henry L; DeSoto, K Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Studies over the past 40 years have shown that Americans can recall about half the U.S. presidents. Do people know the presidents even though they are unable to access them for recall? We investigated this question using the powerful cues of a recognition test. Specifically, we tested the ability of 326 online subjects to recognize U.S. presidents when presented with their full names among various types of lures. The hit rate for presidential recognition was .88, well above the proportion produced in free recall but far from perfect. Presidents Franklin Pierce and Chester Arthur were recognized less than 60% of the time. Interestingly, four nonpresidents were falsely recognized at relatively high rates, and Alexander Hamilton was more frequently identified as president than were several actual presidents. Even on a recognition test, knowledge of American presidents is imperfect and prone to error. The false alarm data support the theory that false fame can arise from contextual familiarity.

  4. Holocene and latest Pleistocene paleoseismology of the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch Fault Zone, Utah, at the Penrose Drive Trench Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Hylland, Michael D.; McDonald, Greg N.; Crone, Anthony J.; Personius, Stephen F.; Gold, Ryan D.; Mahan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    The Salt Lake City segment (SLCS) of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) and the West Valley fault zone (WVFZ) compromise Holocene-active normal faults that bound a large intrabasin graben in northern Salt Lake Valley and have evidence of recurrent, large-magnitude (M ~6-7) surface-faulting earthquakes. However, at the time of this investigation, questions remained regarding the timing, displacement, and recurrence of latest Pleistocene and Holocene earthquakes on the northern SLCS and WVFZ , and whether the WVFZ is seismically independent of, or moves coseismically with, the SLCS. To improve paleoseismic data for the SLCS, we conducted a fault-trench investigation at the Penrose Drive site on the northern SLCS. Two trenches, excavated across an 11-m-high scarp near the northern end of the East Bench fault, exposed colluvial-wedge evidence for fize of six (preferred) surface-faulting earthquakes postdating to Provo-phase shoreline of Lake Bonneville (~14-18 ka). Radiocarbon and luminescence ages support earthquake times at 4.0 ± 0.5 ka (2σ) (PD1), 5.9 ± 0.7 ka (PD2), 7.5 ± 0.8 ka (PD3a), 9.7 ± 1.1 ka (PD3b), 10.9 ± 0.2 ka (PD4), and 12.1 ± 1.6 ka (PD5). At least one additional earthquake occurred at 16.5 ± 1.9 ka (PD6) based on an erosional unconformity that separates deformed Lake Bonneville sily and flat-lying Provo-phase shoreline gravel. Earthquakes PD5-PD1 yield latest Pleistocene (post-Provo) and Holocene mean recurrence intervals of ~1.6 kyr and ~1.7-1.9 kyr, respectively. Using 1.0-1.4 m of per-event vertical displacement for PD5-PD3b corroborate previously identified SLCS earthquakes at 4-10 ka. PD4 and PD5 occurred within an ~8-kyr *17-9 ka) time interval on the SLCS previously interpreted as a period of seismic quiescence, and PD6 possibly corresponds with a previously identified earthquake at ~17 ka (although both events have large timing uncertainties). The Penrose data, when combined with previous paleoseismic results, improve the latest Pleistocene

  5. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 FIRST FLOOR NORTH PARLOR, FIREPLACE - Smith-Morton Row House, 3034 P Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer April 1969 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer April 1969 3034 P STREET (right) AND ADJOINING ROWHOUSES, LOOKING EAST - Smith-Morton Row House, 3034 P Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 VIEW OF SOUTH PARLOR FROM NORTH PARLOR - Smith-Morton Row House, 3034 P Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  9. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM NORTH - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  10. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  11. Alexander F. Chamberlain: a life's work.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Julia M

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the life and work of Alexander Francis Chamberlain. Though he has received little attention since the early 1900s, the importance of this scholar should not be underestimated. Chamberlain made notable contributions to the body of knowledge in anthropology-a discipline that, at the time, was a combination of anthropological and psychological inquiry. His early work began with investigations into the cultures and languages of two Indian tribes indigenous to Canada and the northern United States and, within a few decades, positioned Chamberlain as the leading scholar in this domain. Beyond his ethnographic insights, Chamberlain queried the development of the child and wrote on the subject of childhood in world folklore. He concerned himself with a scope of worthwhile subjects ranging from linguistics to women's suffrage. No topic was out of range as all forms of human study addressed the need for seeing each group as a contributing force to humanity at large. Chamberlain emphasized that no single racial, ethnic, or religious group should be singled out as inherently superior to another, a belief far ahead of his time. This article is an attempt at drawing a picture of a man whose scholarly achievements and strength of character are captured in the depth and breadth of his writing.

  12. 'Mind in general' by Sir Alexander Crichton.

    PubMed

    Berrios, G E

    2006-12-01

    The history of the 'philosophies of psychiatry' can be defined as the contextualized study of past theoretical views on the nature, understanding and management of madness and related notions. The application of an hermeneutic apparatus to past psychiatric narratives gives rise to the history of psychiatry; its application to current narrative gives origin to the philosophy of psychiatry. If the latter employs off-the-shelf, ready-made, external philosophies, it follows a centripetal approach; if it starts from the inside of psychiatry and generates its own tools and meta-language, it follows a centrifugal approach. Psychiatry is burdened by intrinsic and extrinsic philosophical problems. The former result from its hybrid nature, i.e., from the fact that psychiatry unsteadily straddles the natural and human sciences. The latter are borrowed from the conceptual frames into which psychiatry has been inscribed since the 19th century. The philosophy of psychiatry may anticipate or follow empirical research. The ante rem mode is based on the idea that empirical research requires conceptual supervision, audit and guidance, for it is always ideology- and theory-laden. The post rem mode is based on the view that science is the only way to 'truth' and hence all that the philosophy of psychiatry can (or should) do is facilitate, interpret, justify, defend or glorify empirical findings. The Classic Text that follows was written by Sir Alexander Crichton at the end of the 18th century, and is a good example of the centripetal mode of philosophy-making.

  13. Naval Weapons Center Active Fault Map Series.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ’MiS PACE NWC TP 6828 CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 2 Active Fault Definition ...established along the trace of the Little Take fault zone, within the City of Ridgecrest. ACTIVE FAULT DEFINITION Although it is a commonly used term...34active fault" lacks a pre- cise and universally accepted definition . Most workers, however, accept the following: "Active fault - a fault along

  14. Astrocytic TDP-43 pathology in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Adam K; Daniels, Christine M LaPash; Goldman, James E; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Messing, Albee

    2014-05-07

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by the presence of eosinophilic inclusions known as Rosenthal fibers (RFs) within astrocytes, and is caused by dominant mutations in the coding region of the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). GFAP is the major astrocytic intermediate filament, and in AxD patient brain tissue GFAP is a major component of RFs. TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is the major pathological protein in almost all cases of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ∼50% of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), designated as FTLD-TDP. In ALS and FTLD-TDP, TDP-43 becomes insoluble, ubiquitinated, and pathologically phosphorylated and accumulates in cytoplasmic inclusions in both neurons and glia of affected brain and spinal cord regions. Previously, TDP-43 was detected in RFs of human pilocytic astrocytomas; however, involvement of TDP-43 in AxD has not been determined. Here we show that TDP-43 is present in RFs in AxD patient brains, and that insoluble phosphorylated full-length and high molecular weight TDP-43 accumulates in white matter of such brains. Phosphorylated TDP-43 also accumulates in the detergent-insoluble fraction from affected brain regions of Gfap(R236H/+) knock-in mice, which harbor a GFAP mutation homologous to one that causes AxD in humans, and TDP-43 colocalizes with astrocytic RF pathology in Gfap(R236H/+) mice and transgenic mice overexpressing human wild-type GFAP. These findings suggest common pathogenic mechanisms in ALS, FTLD, and AxD, and this is the first report of TDP-43 involvement in a neurological disorder primarily affecting astrocytes.

  15. Zanvil Alexander Cohn 1926-1993

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Zanvil Alexander Cohn, an editor of this Journal since 1973, died suddenly on June 28, 1993. Cohn is best known as the father of the current era of macrophage biology. Many of his scientific accomplishments are recounted here, beginning with seminal studies on the granules of phagocytes that were performed with his close colleague and former editor of this Journal, James Hirsch. Cohn and Hirsch identified the granules as lysosomes that discharged their contents of digestive enzymes into vacuoles containing phagocytosed microbes. These findings were part of the formative era of cell biology and initiated the modern study of endocytosis and cell-mediated resistance to infection. Cohn further explored the endocytic apparatus in pioneering studies of the mouse peritoneal macrophage in culture. He described vesicular inputs from the cell surface and Golgi apparatus and documented the thoroughness of substrate digestion within lysosomal vacuoles that would only permit the egress of monosaccharides and amino acids. These discoveries created a vigorous environment for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior and visiting faculty. Some of the major findings that emerged from Cohn's collaborations included the radioiodination of the plasma membrane for studies of composition and turnover; membrane recycling during endocytosis; the origin of the mononuclear phagocyte system in situ; the discovery of the dendritic cell system of antigen-presenting cells; the macrophage as a secretory cell, including the release of proteases and large amounts of prostaglandins and leukotrienes; several defined parameters of macrophage activation, especially the ability of T cell-derived lymphokines to enhance killing of tumor cells and intracellular protozoa; the granule discharge mechanism whereby cytotoxic lymphocytes release the pore-forming protein perforin; the signaling of macrophages via myristoylated substrates of protein kinase C; and a tissue culture model in which

  16. Holocene behavior of the Brigham City segment: implications for forecasting the next large-magnitude earthquake on the Wasatch fault zone, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; DuRoss, Christopher B.; Crone, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The Brigham City segment (BCS), the northernmost Holocene‐active segment of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ), is considered a likely location for the next big earthquake in northern Utah. We refine the timing of the last four surface‐rupturing (~Mw 7) earthquakes at several sites near Brigham City (BE1, 2430±250; BE2, 3490±180; BE3, 4510±530; and BE4, 5610±650 cal yr B.P.) and calculate mean recurrence intervals (1060–1500  yr) that are greatly exceeded by the elapsed time (~2500  yr) since the most recent surface‐rupturing earthquake (MRE). An additional rupture observed at the Pearsons Canyon site (PC1, 1240±50 cal yr B.P.) near the southern segment boundary is probably spillover rupture from a large earthquake on the adjacent Weber segment. Our seismic moment calculations show that the PC1 rupture reduced accumulated moment on the BCS about 22%, a value that may have been enough to postpone the next large earthquake. However, our calculations suggest that the segment currently has accumulated more than twice the moment accumulated in the three previous earthquake cycles, so we suspect that additional interactions with the adjacent Weber segment contributed to the long elapse time since the MRE on the BCS. Our moment calculations indicate that the next earthquake is not only overdue, but could be larger than the previous four earthquakes. Displacement data show higher rates of latest Quaternary slip (~1.3  mm/yr) along the southern two‐thirds of the segment. The northern third likely has experienced fewer or smaller ruptures, which suggests to us that most earthquakes initiate at the southern segment boundary.

  17. Trace element analysis of Alexander the Great's silver tetradrachms minted in Macedonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.; Katsanos, A. A.; Touratsoglou, J.

    2000-11-01

    The coinage of Alexander the Great presents a special interest because of its international character in the frame of the ancient times. At least 31 mints (from Aigai to Babylon and from Pella to Alexandreia) operated in the vast state, which was created by Alexander in just over 10 years (334-323 BC). Impressive quantities of tetradrachms were consequently minted for the economic affairs of an expanding state. The mints continued to be active and after the premature death of the Macedonian king, producing among others and tetradrachms in his name. The elemental chemical composition of silver tetradrachms minted in Amphipolis as well as in other Macedonian Greek cities was analysed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), and 12 elements were determined. The problem of the patina (silver corrosion layer) effects on the results was examined by analysis before and after the corrosion product removal. From the results of the chemical composition, a similar numismatic policy is deduced for all the analysed coin as well as metal provenance indications for some of the coins.

  18. 8. View of southwest rear and southeast side of AlexanderAlmon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of southwest rear and southeast side of Alexander-Almon House with cement block outbuilding to far left, facing north. - Alexander-Almon House, 130 Philip Almon Road, Roopville, Carroll County, GA

  19. 12. Detail view of southeast side window of AlexanderAlmon House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view of southeast side window of Alexander-Almon House with rain barrel at lower left and roof rafter tails at top, facing northwest. - Alexander-Almon House, 130 Philip Almon Road, Roopville, Carroll County, GA

  20. Obituary: Walter Alexander Feibelman, 1930-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oergerle, William

    2005-12-01

    Walter Alexander Feibelman, 79, an astronomer who discovered the E-ring of Saturn, died of a heart attack 19 November 2004 at his home at Riderwood Village in Silver Spring, Maryland. Walter was born 30 October 1925 in Berlin, Germany to Bernard and Dora Feibelman. He came to the United States with his parents in 1941. They were some of the last German Jews to flee Nazi Germany. Years later, he reported his experiences in an account contributed to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. As a youth, he worked at a cleaning shop and as a soda jerk before taking a course in tool and die making. He worked at the Abbey Photo Corp. in New York and in a model-making firm, where he constructed models of aircraft for use in identification courses by the Army Air Forces. After high school, he attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology and received his BS degree in 1956. Until 1969, he was a research scientist at the University of Pittsburgh. While working as an assistant research professor in physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh in 1967, he examined a photo of Saturn taken a year earlier at the university's Allegheny Observatory. The E-ring -- unlike the bright main rings, A, B, C, D and F -- is faint and not easily spotted. He paired his observation with calculations and announced his discovery, which remained unconfirmed until the Pioneer 11 flyby in 1979. Walter joined the Optical Astronomy Division of Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt in 1969, and worked there until 2002, when he became an emeritus astronomer at NASA. He became associated with the International Ultraviolet Explorer project, and worked on developing detectors for the orbiting observatory's spectrograph. The project turned out to be one of NASA's most successful observatories, operating from 1978 to 1996. In his scientific career, he published more than 200 refereed articles, mainly on hot stars and planetary nebulae. He also wrote papers in the fields of photography, spectroscopy

  1. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  2. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David R. Lapp

    2008-01-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and…

  3. All Aboard the Engine of Reform: Lamar Alexander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1991-01-01

    Transformation of schools is the key to America 2000, an ambitious amalgam of ideas that Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander and his advisers have developed. The program's centerpiece is the creation of 535 "New American Schools" receiving a 1-time $1 million federal grant to develop exemplary programs. A sidebar describes the…

  4. The Century-Old Wisdom of Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Orin

    1990-01-01

    This article reflects on Alexander Graham Bell's 1888 testimony before the Royal Commission of the United Kingdom on the Condition of the Deaf and Dumb, Etc. Excerpts are grouped by reference to (1) language education for the hearing impaired; (2) speechreading; (3) methods of teaching; (4) speech; and (5) sign language. (Author/PB)

  5. Journalism and the Educational Views of Alexander Meiklejohn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Mack R.

    Alexander Meiklejohn, who died in 1964 at the age of 92, was a constitutional scholar whose major interest was education. Among Meiklejohn's beliefs were the following: the social good should take precedence over individual achievement; the liberal arts college is the institution best suited to carry out an affirmative reading of the First…

  6. The Making of the Liberal College: Alexander Meiklejohn at Amherst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Surveys the history and curricular changes of Amherst College from its founding in 1821 through the administration of Alexander Meiklejohn in 1912. Assesses Meiklejohn's impact upon the development of Amherst as a liberal arts college, and analyses the events surrounding his dismissal. (SLM)

  7. 46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's Last Street Cars, Daily Press, January 15, 1956) photographer unknown. The first streetcar (with dignitaries) to make the run from Newport News to a new housing development named Hilton Village in September 1918. - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  8. A complex-network perspective on Alexander's wholeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin

    2016-12-01

    The wholeness, conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander, is what exists to some degree or other in space and matter, and can be described by precise mathematical language. However, it remains somehow mysterious and elusive, and therefore hard to grasp. This paper develops a complex network perspective on the wholeness to better understand the nature of order or beauty for sustainable design. I bring together a set of complexity-science subjects such as complex networks, fractal geometry, and in particular underlying scaling hierarchy derived by head/tail breaks - a classification scheme and a visualization tool for data with a heavy-tailed distribution, in order to make Alexander's profound thoughts more accessible to design practitioners and complexity-science researchers. Through several case studies (some of which Alexander studied), I demonstrate that the complex-network perspective helps reduce the mystery of wholeness and brings new insights to Alexander's thoughts on the concept of wholeness or objective beauty that exists in fine and deep structure. The complex-network perspective enables us to see things in their wholeness, and to better understand how the kind of structural beauty emerges from local actions guided by the 15 fundamental properties, and in particular by differentiation and adaptation processes. The wholeness goes beyond current complex network theory towards design or creation of living structures.

  9. View west of the James and Lucy Alexander gravestone and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west of the James and Lucy Alexander gravestone and family plot among other demarcated family plots in the Female Union Band Cemetery. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. The alexander surgical technique for the treatment of severe burns

    PubMed Central

    Gasperoni, M.; Neri, R.; Carboni, A.; Purpura, V.; Morselli, P.G.; Melandri, D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The extensive loss of skin in burned patients is a critical clinical condition, and the choice of an effective technique to cover and protect the damaged area has always been a challenge in the surgical field. Despite its wide clinical use, there is little data in the literature on using the Alexander technique to treat severe burns, while several studies have focused on alternative approaches. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the Alexander surgical technique on 117 patients with severe burns. The characteristics of the burned patients, factors related to etiology of burns as well as adverse prognostic factors and their incidence in discharged versus deceased patients were also taken into account. Finally, a comparison is made with an alternative surgical procedure described in the literature. Our results show a satisfactory level of survival for patients with severe burns surgically treated with the Alexander technique, accounting for 63% of all clinical cases reported here. This treatment is also less expensive and more rapid than the alternative approach we compared it with. The Alexander technique is a lifesaving method for the treatment of severe burns that provides a satisfactory chance of survival at lower cost than the alternative surgical procedure examined. PMID:28289363

  11. Alexander Meiklejohn in Search of Freedom and Dignity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tony W.

    1982-01-01

    Assesses the contributions of the philosopher/educator Alexander Meiklejohn. Discusses the influences of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and the U.S. Constitution on Meiklejohn's educational theories, which stressed that human freedom and dignity can be enhanced by rigorous examination of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and the meaning of…

  12. Lamar Alexander and the Politics of School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, George R.

    1992-01-01

    Although U.S. Education Secretary Lamar Alexander's forceful presence on the educational scene has compelled attention and eclipsed his predecessors, we are a long way from knowing whether this consummate politician and his espoused causes (such as America 2000) are destined to make a serous difference in U.S. education. (MLH)

  13. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  14. Alexander the Great and West Nile Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Marr, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning, assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander’s death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile encephalitis. PMID:14725285

  15. Interacting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Nixon, C. W.; Rotevatn, A.; Sanderson, D. J.; Zuluaga, L. F.

    2017-04-01

    The way that faults interact with each other controls fault geometries, displacements and strains. Faults rarely occur individually but as sets or networks, with the arrangement of these faults producing a variety of different fault interactions. Fault interactions are characterised in terms of the following: 1) Geometry - the spatial arrangement of the faults. Interacting faults may or may not be geometrically linked (i.e. physically connected), when fault planes share an intersection line. 2) Kinematics - the displacement distributions of the interacting faults and whether the displacement directions are parallel, perpendicular or oblique to the intersection line. Interacting faults may or may not be kinematically linked, where the displacements, stresses and strains of one fault influences those of the other. 3) Displacement and strain in the interaction zone - whether the faults have the same or opposite displacement directions, and if extension or contraction dominates in the acute bisector between the faults. 4) Chronology - the relative ages of the faults. This characterisation scheme is used to suggest a classification for interacting faults. Different types of interaction are illustrated using metre-scale faults from the Mesozoic rocks of Somerset and examples from the literature.

  16. Dr Alexander Graham Bell--audiologist and speech therapist.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, R C

    1976-09-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is best known for his role in the invention of the telephone. However, he had a lifelong involvement in speech therapy and audiology besides many other medical investigations. He was also awarded an honorary MD degree from Heidelberg University. In this, the 100th anniversary of his invention of the telephone, his life and some of his medical interests are briefly reviewed.

  17. Effect of surrounding fault on distributed fault of blind reverse fault in sedimentary basin - Uemachi Faults, Osaka Basin, Southwest Japan -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.

    2012-12-01

    Several large cities and metropolitan areas, such as Osaka and Kobe are located in the Osaka basin, which has been filled by the Pleistocene Osaka group and the later sediments. The basin is surrounded by E-W trending strike slip faults and N-S trending reverse faults. The N-S trending 42-km-long Uemachi faults traverse in the central part of the Osaka city. The various geological, geophysical surveys, such as seismic reflection, micro tremor, gravity surveys and deep boreholes, revealed the complex basement configuration along the Uemachi faults. The depth of the basement is shallow in the central part of the Osaka plain. The Uemachi faults are locates on the western side of the basement upland. In the central part of the Uemachi faults, the displacement decreases. The fault model of the Uemachi faults consists of the two parts, the north and south parts. The NE-SW trending branch faults, Suminoe and Sakuragawa flexures, are also recognized based on various surveys around the central part. Kusumoto et al. (2001) reported that surrounding faults enable to form the basement configuration without the Uemachi faults model based on a dislocation model. Inoue et al. (2011) performed various parameter studies for dislocation model and gravity changes based on simplified faults model, which were designed based on the distribution of the real faults. The model was consisted of 7 faults including the Uemachi faults. In this study, the Osaka-wan fault was considered for the dislocation model. The results show the basement configuration including NE-SW branch faults. The basement configuration differs from the subsurface structure derived from the investigation of abundance geotechnical borehole data around the central part of the Uemachi faults. The tectonic developing process including the erosion and sea level change are require to understanding the structure from the basement to the surface of the Uemachi Fault Zone. This research is partly funded by the Comprehensive

  18. >From alexander of aphrodisias to young and airy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. D.

    1999-10-01

    A didactic discussion of the physics of rainbows is presented, with some emphasis on the history, especially the contributions of Thomas Young nearly 200 years ago. We begin with the simple geometrical optics of Descartes and Newton, including the reasons for Alexander's dark band between the main and secondary bows. We then show how dispersion produces the familiar colorful spectacle. Interference between waves emerging at the same angle, but traveling different optical paths within the water drops, accounts for the existence of distinct supernumerary rainbows under the right conditions (small drops, uniform in size). Young's and Airy's contributions are given their due.

  19. In memoriam. Alexander Hollaender 1898-1986. [Radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Alexander Hollaender gave an early clue that there might be recovery or repair mechanisms in bacteria, although at the time the target for cell target for cell killing was not known. As one of the early investigators who used action spectra for the identification of the targets in biological systems, he was able to show that the wavelengths producing mutations were just those absorbed by nucleic acids, even though in those days nucleic acids were not known to be the genetic material. This result was the first clear indication that radiation and environmental biologists should concentrate on changes in DNA and not in proteins.

  20. CSF and Blood Levels of GFAP in Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jany, Paige L.; Agosta, Guillermo E.; Benko, William S.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Keller, Stephanie R.; Köehler, Wolfgang; Mar, Soe; Naidu, Sakkubai; Marie Ness, Jayne; Renaud, Deborah L.; Salsano, Ettore; Schiffmann, Raphael; Simon, Julie; Vanderver, Adeline; Eichler, Florian; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alexander disease is a rare, progressive, and generally fatal neurological disorder that results from dominant mutations affecting the coding region of GFAP, the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein, the major intermediate filament protein of astrocytes in the CNS. A key step in pathogenesis appears to be the accumulation of GFAP within astrocytes to excessive levels. Studies using mouse models indicate that the severity of the phenotype correlates with the level of expression, and suppression of GFAP expression and/or accumulation is one strategy that is being pursued as a potential treatment. With the goal of identifying biomarkers that indirectly reflect the levels of GFAP in brain parenchyma, we have assayed GFAP levels in two body fluids in humans that are readily accessible as biopsy sites: CSF and blood. We find that GFAP levels are consistently elevated in the CSF of patients with Alexander disease, but only occasionally and modestly elevated in blood. These results provide the foundation for future studies that will explore whether GFAP levels can serve as a convenient means to monitor the progression of disease and the response to treatment. PMID:26478912

  1. [Alexander Borodin--physician, chemist, scientist, teacher and composer].

    PubMed

    Vik, T

    1998-12-10

    Concert programmes and CD covers suggest that the Russian composer Alexander Borodin (1833-87) was also a great scientist. In this article we examine this proposition. Borodin was born in St. Petersburg as the illegitimate son of a Russian nobleman. As a boy his talents ranged from music to chemistry and languages. Borodin studied medicine at the Medico-Surgical Academy in St. Petersburg from 1850 to 1855 and defended his doctoral thesis on the similarity between arsenic and phosphoric acid in 1858. He did not, however, feel comfortable in his role as a doctor, and soon started to work as a chemist. In 1864 he was appointed professor of chemistry at the Medico-Surgical Academy. In 1861, Borodin attended the first international congress of chemistry in Karlsruhe, and he was among the founders of the Russian Chemical Society in 1868. He published 42 articles and was a friend of Dmitri Mendeleev, the scientist who described the periodic system. In 1872, Borodin started the first medical courses for women in Russia. It seems warranted to conclude that Alexander Borodin was indeed a great scientist and university teacher, though his immortality was earned by his leisure time activities.

  2. Fault finder

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  3. Tertiary and Quaternary tectonic faulting in southernmost Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Devera, J.A.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Tertiary and/or Quaternary tectonic faulting is documented in three areas of southernmost Illinois: the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in Pope and Massac Counties, the Ste. Genevieve Fault Zone (SGFZ) in Alexander and Union Counties, and the Commerce Fault Zone (CFZ) in Alexander County. In the FAFC, faults that strike NE and NNE displace Mounds Gravel (late Miocene to early Pleistocene) and, locally, the Metropolis terrace gravel (Pleistocene; pre-Woodfordian). No Woodfordian or younger deposits are deformed. Faults typically outline narrow, linear grabens that formed under tension with a component of strike slip. North-south to NW-trending vertical faults near the southeast end of the SGFZ displace Eocene sediments. Again, faults outline narrow grabens and show indications of strike slip. Deformed Quaternary sediments have not been observed. The CFZ, which trends northeast, displaces Mounds Gravel in Illinois and units as young as Peoria Silt (Woodfordian) in Missouri. Quaternary movement has been interpreted as right-lateral strike-slip. The CFZ coincides with a subtle gravity and magnetic lineament and seems to reflect a major feature in the basement. Surface expression in Illinois is subtle, but mafic and ultramafic intrusions, hydrothermal alteration and small faults align with the Commerce geophysical lineament. Earthquake foci in Missouri and Illinois lie on or close to the CFZ; some focal mechanisms fit the fault trend. Among these structures, only the CFZ exhibits slip that conforms to the current stress field (principal compressive stress axis E-W to ENE-WSW). Possibly, the stress field changed during Neogene time. Alternatively, high fluid pressures or local stress concentrations may have induced slip on less favorably oriented fractures. Tighter constraints are needed on timing, magnitude, and direction of Neogene displacement. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Late Holocene earthquake history of the Brigham City segment of the Wasatch fault zone at the Hansen Canyon, Kotter Canyon, and Pearsons Canyon trench sites, Box Elder County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; McDonald, Greg N.; Briggs, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Of the five central segments of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) having evidence of recurrent Holocene surface-faulting earthquakes, the Brigham City segment (BCS) has the longest elapsed time since its most recent surface-faulting event (~2.1 kyr) compared to its mean recurrence time between events (~1.3 kyr). Thus, the BCS has the highest time-dependent earthquake probability of the central WFZ. We excavated trenches at three sites––the Kotter Canyon and Hansen Canyon sites on the north-central BCS and Pearsons Canyon site on the southern BCS––to determine whether a surface-faulting earthquake younger than 2.1 ka occurred on the BCS. Paleoseismic data for Hansen Canyon and Kotter Canyon confirm that the youngest earthquake on the north-central BCS occurred before 2 ka, consistent with previous north-central BCS investigations at Bowden Canyon and Box Elder Canyon. At Hansen Canyon, the most recent earthquake is constrained to 2.1–4.2 ka and had 0.6–2.5 m of vertical displacement. At Kotter Canyon, we found evidence for two events at 2.5 ± 0.3 ka and 3.5 ± 0.3 ka, with an average displacement per event of 1.9–2.3 m. Paleoseismic data from Pearsons Canyon, on the previously unstudied southern BCS, indicate that a post-2 ka earthquake ruptured this part of the segment. The Pearsons Canyon earthquake occurred at 1.2 ± 0.04 ka and had 0.1–0.8 m of vertical displacement, consistent with our observation of continuous, youthful scarps on the southern 9 km of the BCS having 1–2 m of late Holocene(?) surface offset. The 1.2-ka earthquake on the southern BCS likely represents rupture across the Weber–Brigham City segment boundary from the penultimate Weber-segment earthquake at about 1.1 ka. The Pearsons Canyon data result in a revised length of the BCS that has not ruptured since 2 ka (with time-dependent probability implications), and provide compelling evidence of at least one segment-boundary failure and multi-segment rupture on the central WFZ. Our

  5. Kinesthetic Ventures Informed by the Work of F. M. Alexander, Stanislavski, Peirce, and Freud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Ed; Wright, Ben; Protzel, Michael, Ed.

    This book is about education harvested from self-observation. F. Matthias Alexander (1869-1955) studied the experience of self formation, working with motor habits. His method is used in performing arts training to enhance bodily and vocal expression. Like Alexander, Konstantine Stanislavski (1863-1938) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) studied human…

  6. 76 FR 28226 - Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander; and AIR 7 Seas... ``Complainant,'' against African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia, ALCO Logistics, LLC; Brenda Alexander; and Air 7 Seas Transport Logistics, Inc.; hereinafter ``Respondents''. Complainant asserts that she is acting agent...

  7. The death of Alexander the Great--a spinal twist of fate.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Hutan

    2004-06-01

    Alexander the Great died in 323 B.C. from an unknown cause. Physical depictions of this historical figure reveal the likelihood of a cervical scoliotic deformity. This is substantiated with the medical history and is correlated with his untimely death. For the first time, it is concluded that Alexander's death may have ensued from the sequelae of congenital scoliotic syndrome.

  8. Active Fault Characterization in the Urban Area of Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Kurt; Grupe, Sabine; Hintersberger, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The identification of active faults that lie beneath a city is of key importance for seismic hazard assessment. Fault mapping and characterization in built-up areas with strong anthropogenic overprint is, however, a challenging task. Our study of Quaternary faults in the city of Vienna starts from the re-assessment of a borehole database of the municipality containing several tens of thousands of shallow boreholes. Data provide tight constraints on the geometry of Quaternary deposits and highlight several locations with fault-delimited Middle to Late Pleistocene terrace sediments of the Danube River. Additional information is obtained from geological descriptions of historical outcrops which partly date back to about 1900. The latter were found to be particularly valuable by providing unprejudiced descriptions of Quaternary faults, sometimes with stunning detail. The along-strike continuations of some of the identified faults are further imaged by industrial 2D/3D seismic acquired outside the city limits. The interpretation and the assessment of faults identified within the city benefit from a very well constrained tectonic model of the active Vienna Basin fault system which derived from data obtained outside the city limits. This data suggests that the urban faults are part of a system of normal faults compensating fault-normal extension at a releasing bend of the sinistral Vienna Basin Transfer Fault. Slip rates estimated for the faults in the city are in the range of several hundredths of millimetres per year and match the slip rates of normal faults that were trenched outside the city. The lengths/areas of individual faults estimated from maps and seismic reach up to almost 700 km² suggesting that all of the identified faults are capable of producing earthquakes with magnitudes M>6, some with magnitudes up to M~6.7.

  9. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapp, David R.

    2008-03-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and terrible three-week illness. Having the story continue to unfold throughout the next two weeks of the new unit provided a daily opportunity for students to see the relevance of what we were doing in class. My students were able to have meaningful and informed conversations with their peers and parents over an important international event. They even began to feel a bit like authorities themselves when listening to experts respond to media questions about polonium-210 and nuclear radiation in general. This paper discusses some of the ways that the story of Litvinenko was used while presenting the topic of nuclear radiation.

  10. Alexander von Humboldt's perceptions of colonial Spanish America.

    PubMed

    Rebok, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    This study presents an in-depth analysis of Alexander von Humboldt's descriptions and critical comments on the colonial society of the different regions he visited during his well-known expedition through the Americas (1799-1804). The criticisms of colonialism that he expressed, reflecting his personal convictions, have already been the focal point of many studies, but Humboldt also was able to offer a more differentiated assessment through comparisons of regional and local traditions and developments. This essay focuses on his personal diaries, which offer many interesting comments on colonial societies. These considerations and impressions made during the expedition are of particular scholarly value since they were not subject to censorship of any kind.

  11. The Astronomer Alexander I. Postoiev (1900-1976)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, P. M.; Matsuura, O. T.

    This is a biographical note on the life of Dr Alexander I. Postoiev, a victim of Stalin's purge of Soviet astronomers in 1936-1937 (McCutcheon, 1985). Along with his family, he left the Soviet Union in 1943, and lived in Germany as a refugee and "displaced person" until 1952, when he moved to Brazil. Then he started the second part of his professional career. Thanks to his efforts the Astronomical and Geophysical Institute (IAG) from the University of Sao Paulo (USP) was involved, for the first time, in programme of international cooperation, thus contributing to the institutional consolidation of IAG/USP as a leading centre of astronomical research and teaching today in Brazil.

  12. Silurian Gastropoda from the Alexander terrane, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Gastropods are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska. They are part of a diverse megabenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. Heceta Limestone gastropods with Uralian affinities include Kirkospira glacialis, which closely resembles "Pleurotomaria" lindstromi Oehlert of Chernyshev, 1893, Retispira cf. R. volgulica (Chernyshev, 1893), and Medfracaulus turriformis (Chernyshev, 1893). Medfracaulus and similar morphotypes such as Coelocaulus karlae are unknown from rocks that are unquestionably part of the North American continent (Laurentia) during Late Silurian time. Beraunia is previously known only from the Silurian of Bohemia. Pachystrophia has previously been reported only from western North American terranes (Eastern Klamath, York, and Farewell terranes) and Europe. Bathmopterus Kirk, 1928, is resurrected and is only known from the Silurian of southeast Alaska. Newly described taxa include Hecetastoma gehrelsi n. gen. and n. sp. and Baichtalia tongassensis n. gen. and n. sp. ??2008 The Geological Society of America.

  13. Adaptive autophagy in Alexander disease-affected astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guomei; Yue, Zhenyu; Tallóczy, Zsolt; Goldman, James E

    2008-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosomal pathways are the two main routes of protein and organelle clearance in eukaryotic cells. The proteasome system is responsible for unfolded, short-lived proteins, which precludes the clearance of oligomeric and aggregated proteins, whereas macroautophagy, a process generally referred to as autophagy, mediates mainly the bulk degradation of long-lived cytoplasmic proteins, large protein complexes or organelles.(1) Recently, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders as an important pathway for the clearance of abnormally accumulated intracellular proteins, such as huntingtin, tau, and mutant and modified α-synuclein.(1-6) Our recent study illustrated the induction of adaptive autophagy in response to mutant glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) accumulation in astrocytes, in the brains of patients with Alexander disease (AxD), and in mutant GFAP knock-in mouse brains.(7) This autophagic response is negatively regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The activation of p38 MAPK by GFAP accumulation is responsible for mTOR inactivation and the induction of autophagy. We also found that the accumulation of GFAP impairs proteasome activity.(8) In this commentary we discuss the potential compensatory relationship between an impaired proteasome and activated autophagy, and propose that the MLK-MAPK (mixed lineage kinase-mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascade is a regulator of this crosstalk. Addendum to: Tang G, Yue Z, Talloczy, Z, Hagemann T, Cho W, Sulzer D, Messing A, Goldman JE. Alexander disease-mutant GFAP accumulation stimulates autophagy through p38 MAPK and mTOR signaling pathways. Hum Mol Genetics 2008; In press.

  14. Fault Branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Poliakov, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    Theoretical stress analysis for a propagating shear rupture suggests that the propensity of the rupture path to branch is determined by rupture speed and by the preexisting stress state. See Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice (JGR, submitted April 2001, URL below). Deviatoric stresses near a mode II rupture tip are found to be much higher to both sides of the fault plane than directly ahead, when rupture speed becomes close to the Rayleigh speed. However, the actual pattern of predicted Coulomb failure on secondary faults is strongly dependent on the angle between the fault and the direction of maximum compression Smax in the pre-stress field. Steep Smax angles lead to more extensive failure on the extensional side, whereas shallow angles give comparable failure regions on both. Here we test such concepts against natural examples. For crustal thrust faults we may assume that Smax is horizontal. Thus nucleation on a steeply dipping plane, like the 53 ° dip for the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, is consistent with rupture path kinking to the extensional side, as inferred. Nucleation on a shallow dip, like for the 12 ° -18 ° of the 1985 Kettleman Hills event, should activate both sides, as seems consistent with aftershock patterns. Similarly, in a strike slip example, Smax is inferred to be at approximately 60 ° with the Johnson Valley fault where it branched to the extensional side onto the Landers-Kickapoo fault in the 1992 event, and this too is consistent. Further, geological examination of the activation of secondary fault features along the Johnson Valley fault and the Homestead Valley fault consistently shows that most activity occurs on the extensional side. Another strike-slip example is the Imperial Valley 1979 earthquake. The approximate Smax direction is north-south, at around 35 ° with the main fault, where it branched, on the extensional side, onto Brawley fault, again interpretable with the concepts developed.

  15. Naval weapons center active fault map series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, G. R.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1987-08-01

    The NWC Active Fault Map Series shows the locations of active faults and features indicative of active faulting within much of Indian Wells Valley and portions of the Randsburg Wash/Mojave B test range areas of the Naval Weapons Center. Map annotations are used extensively to identify criteria employed in identifying the fault offsets, and to present other valuable data. All of the mapped faults show evidence of having moved during about the last 12,500 years or represent geologically young faults that occur within seismic gaps. Only faults that offset the surface or show other evidence of surface deformation were mapped. A portion of the City of Ridgecrest is recommended as being a Seismic Hazard Special Studies Zone in which detailed earthquake hazard studies should be required.

  16. The Berlin tradition in Chicago: Franz Alexander and the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Erika S

    2010-01-01

    Freud considered Franz Alexander, the first graduate of the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute and an assistant in the Berlin Polyclinic, to be "one of our strongest hopes for the future." Alexander went on to become the first director of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis in 1932 and modeled some of the Chicago Institute's mission on his Berlin experiences. He was also a researcher in psychosomatic medicine, a prolific writer about psychoanalysis and prominent in psychoanalytic organizations. As he proposed modifications in psychoanalytic technique, he became a controversial figure, especially in the elaboration of his ideas about brief therapy and the corrective emotional experience. This paper puts Alexander's achievements in historical context, draws connections between the Berlin and Chicago Institutes and suggests that, despite his quarrels with traditional psychoanalysis, Alexander's legacy may be in his attitude towards psychoanalysis, characterized by a commitment to scientific study, a willingness to experiment, and a conviction about the role of psychoanalysis within the larger culture.

  17. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  18. Expedition 8 Crew Interviews: Alexander Y. Kaleri - FE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Russian cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Flight Engineer on Expedition 8 to the International Space Station (ISS), answers interview questions on this video, either himself or with the help of an interpreter. The questions cover: 1) The goal of the expedition; 2) The place in history of Mir; 3) The reaction to the loss of Columbia in Houston; 4) Why the rewards of spaceflight are worth the risks; 5) Why he decided to become a cosmonaut; 6) His memory of Yuri Gagarin's first flight; 7) What happens on a Soyuz capsule during launch and flight; 8) Are Soyuz maneuvers automatic or manual; 8) How the ISS science mission will be advanced during his stay; 9) The responsibilities of a Flight Engineer onboard the ISS; 10) Extravehicular activity (EVA) plans at that time; 11) The Shuttle Return to Flight and his preference for a Shuttle or Soyuz landing; 12) Why the last Soyuz landing was too rough; 13) The most valueable contribution of the ISS program.

  19. Personal reflections on the life and legacy of Alexander Hollaender.

    PubMed

    Gaulden, Mary Esther; Jagger, John; White, Virginia P

    2007-01-01

    Mary Esther Gaulden presents a personal summary of the activities of Alexander Hollaender, from his days at the National Institutes of Health to his becoming Director of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1947. This appealing story deals with many of her reactions to his personality and organizational style. It reflects the atmosphere of science in those days, and her enthusiasm in this vibrant milieu. Next is a brief account by John Jagger of his first meeting with Dr. Hollaender, arrival in Oak Ridge in April 1956, and wedding to Mary Esther six months later at the house of the Hollaenders in Oak Ridge. The third section is an account by Virginia P. White of how she came to Oak Ridge in 1955 and became Dr. Hollaender's Laboratory Administrator. She gives a personal account of the many facets of his managerial style, as well as of the personality of his wife, Henrietta. She also describes one of Hollaender's many avocations, the collection of fossils on Sunday morning hikes in the Cumberland Mountains, accompanied by lab and visiting personnel, and finally comments on the annual research conferences in Gatlinburg TN, for which Hollaender and the lab became very well known, with some closing vignettes on his leadership style.

  20. Alexander Robertson (1834-1908): Glasgow's pioneer aphasiologist and epileptologist.

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Alexander Robertson (1834-1908) was a Glasgow physician whose professional career was involved mainly with institutional-based practice but who published significant insights into the anatomical background to aphasia (1867) and the mechanisms of focal epileptogenesis (1869). His aphasiology ideas, including his suggestion that disconnection between cerebral centers involved in speech was responsible for the phenomenon, made him one of the earliest members of the late-nineteenth-century school of aphasia diagram makers. His view of epileptogenesis was that contralateral convulsing arose from irritation in a local area of pathology on the surface of the cerebral cortex after the irritation spread to a cortical motor center and then down the motor pathway to the striatum, while spreading within the cortex itself caused loss of consciousness. This interpretation contains much of the essence of the present-day understanding of cortical epileptogenesis. The origin of this interpretation is often attributed to John Hughlings Jackson, but Robertson published the idea in full a year or two prior to Jackson. However, Robertson's original insights were hardly noticed at the time they were published and have since almost entirely been ignored.

  1. Alexander Forbes, Walter Cannon, and science-based literature.

    PubMed

    Garson, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The Harvard physiologists Alexander Forbes (1882-1965) and Walter Bradford Cannon (1871-1945) had an enormous impact on the physiology and neuroscience of the twentieth century. In addition to their voluminous scientific output, they also used literature to reflect on the nature of science itself and its social significance. Forbes wrote a novel, The Radio Gunner, a literary memoir, Quest for a Northern Air Route, and several short stories. Cannon, in addition to several books of popular science, wrote a literary memoir in the last year of his life, The Way of an Investigator. The following will provide a brief overview of the life and work of Forbes and Cannon. It will then discuss the way that Forbes used literature to express his views about the changing role of communications technology in the military, and his evolving view of the nervous system itself as a kind of information-processing device. It will go on to discuss the way that Cannon used literature to articulate the horrors he witnessed on the battlefield, as well as to contribute to the philosophy of science, and in particular, to the logic of scientific discovery. Finally, it will consider the historical and philosophical value of deeper investigation of the literary productions of scientists.

  2. Groundwater flow in a transboundary fault-dominated aquifer and the importance of regional modeling: the case of the city of Querétaro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Hernández, J. J.; Carreón-Freyre, D.; Cerca-Martínez, M.; Levresse, G.

    2016-03-01

    The city of Querétaro, located near the political boundary of the Mexican states of Querétaro and Guanajuato, relies on groundwater as it sole water supply. Groundwater extraction in the city increased from 21 × 106 m3/yr in 1970 to 104 × 106 m3/yr in 2010, with an associated drawdown of 100 m in some parts of the aquifer. A three-dimensional numerical groundwater-flow model has been developed that represents the historical evolution of the aquifer's potentiometric levels and is used to simulate the effect of two scenarios: (1) a 40 % reduction in the extraction rate from public water supply wells in early 2011 (thus reducing the extraction to 62 × 106 m3/yr), and (2) a further reduction in 2021 to 1 × 106 m3/yr. The modeling results project a temporary recovery of the potentiometric levels after the 40 % reduction of early 2011, but a return to 2010 levels by 2020. If scenario 2 is implemented in 2021, the aquifer will take nearly 30 years to recover to the simulated levels of 1995. The model also shows that the wells located in the city of Querétaro started to extract water from part of the aquifer beneath the State of Guanajuato in the late 1970s, thus showing that the administrative boundaries used in Mexico to study and develop water resources are inappropriate, and consideration should be given to physical boundaries instead. A regional approach to studying aquifers is needed in order to adequately understand groundwater flow dynamics.

  3. Fault mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational, experimental, and theoretical modeling studies of fault mechanics are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include interseismic strain accumulation, coseismic deformation, postseismic deformation, and the earthquake cycle; long-term deformation; fault friction and the instability mechanism; pore pressure and normal stress effects; instability models; strain measurements prior to earthquakes; stochastic modeling of earthquakes; and deep-focus earthquakes. Maps, graphs, and a comprehensive bibliography are provided. 220 refs.

  4. Increased dynamic regulation of postural tone through Alexander Technique training

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, TW; Gurfinkel, VS; Horak, FB; Cordo, PJ; Ames, KE

    2010-01-01

    Gurfinkel and colleagues (2006) recently found that healthy adults dynamically modulate postural muscle tone in the body axis during anti-gravity postural maintenance and that this modulation is inversely correlated with axial stiffness. Our objective in the present study was to investigate whether dynamic modulation of axial postural tone can change through training. We examined whether teachers of the Alexander Technique (AT), who undergo “long-term” (3-year) training, have greater modulation of axial postural tone than matched control subjects. In addition, we performed a longitudinal study on the effect of “short-term” (10-week) AT training on the axial postural tone of individuals with low back pain (LBP), since short term AT training has previously been shown to reduce LBP. Axial postural tone was quantified by measuring the resistance of the neck, trunk and hips to small (±10°), slow (1°/s) torsional rotation during stance. Modulation of tone was determined by the torsional resistance to rotation (peak-to-peak, phase-advance, and variability of torque) and axial muscle activity (EMG). Peak-to-peak torque was lower (~50%), while phase-advance and cycle-to-cycle variability were enhanced for AT teachers compared to matched control subjects at all levels of the axis. In addition, LBP subjects decreased trunk and hip stiffness following short-term AT training compared to a control intervention. While changes in static levels of postural tone may have contributed to the reduced stiffness observed with the AT, our results suggest that dynamic modulation of postural tone can be enhanced through long-term training in the AT, which may constitute an important direction for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21185100

  5. The life and death of Alexander Bogdanov, physician.

    PubMed

    Huestis, D W

    1996-08-01

    It was early in April in 1928 when the word went out in Moscow that Alexander Bogdanov had died. He was a controversial figure, an old Bolshevik who had left that party long before the 1917 revolution and never returned. All the same, he had had Lenin's respect as a scientist (as long as he stayed out of politics). More recently, he also had the support of the new party strong man, Stalin. Bogdanov opposed the growing despotism of the "dictatorship of the proletariat", under which slogan Communist autocracy was being developed. But he was respected as a tireless propagandist for the socialist cause, an enthusiastic teacher of the proletariat, and a writer of arcane science and philosophy. Bogdanov was held in such respect that Communist bigwigs spoke glowingly at the funeral, praising his intellect, courage, and dedication to science and humanity. They did not fail to point out that he had split with his one-time friend, Lenin, and had succumbed to ideological "errors". Indeed, he had powerful enemies in the early Soviet state. Bogdanov was a physician, economist, philosopher, natural scientist, writer of utopian science fiction, poet, teacher, politician (unsuccesful), lifelong revolutionary, forerunner of what we now call cybernetics and organizational science, and founder of the world's first institution devoted entirely to the field of blood transfusion. You could call him a Renaissance man. Although he clearly fitted the category of the late-nineteenth-century Russian intellectual revolutionary, Bogdanov differed from most of them in being no dilettante. More than just a theorist, he was an active scientist and physician. As a teacher, he firmly believed that education and indoctrination could alter people's ways of thinking and behaving, and that humanity could be perfected under socialism. Like many revolutionaries, Bogdanov tried to keep ahead of the Tsar's police by using a variety of pseudonyms, among them Riadavoy, Werner, Maximov, and Bogdanov. After

  6. Cyclicity in Silurian island-arc carbonates, Alexander terrane, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kittredge, L.E.; Soja, C.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Silurian carbonates from Alaska (Alexander terrane) record the evolution of a submarine platform during waning volcanism in an island arc. A detailed stratigraphic analysis of a 47 meter-thick sequence revealed the existence of cyclically repeated limestones: coral-stromatoporoid wackestones alternate with oncoid packstones and bioturbated, silty lime mudstones. The coral-stromatoporoid deposits are characterized by a low-diversity assemblage of dendroid corals, massive stromatoporoids, Atrypoidea brachiopods, and rare occurrences of biostromes associated with Solenopora, high-spired gastropods, and crinoids. Oncoids typically are 2-6 mm in diameter and form massive, meter-thick units. Coated grains are symmetrically developed, have a shell or algal nucleus, and are also a minor component of coral-stromatoporoid beds. These lithologic units form seven, shallowing-upwards cycles (parasequences) that range in thickness from 3-9 meters. Coral-stomatoporoid wackestones form the base of each cycle and grade upwards into oncoid packstones with silty, lime mudstones at the top. This succession of lithofacies within each cycle reflects an increase in energy levels from relatively deeper water environments to relatively shallower ones. The lack of abrasion in the corals and stromatoporoids suggests predominantly quiet-water conditions in shallow subtidal areas affected by periodic turbulence. Comparison with correlative sections in Alaska and lack of correspondence with global sea level curves suggest that the primary cause of cyclicity was tectonic perturbations with secondary eustatic effects. Cyclic deposition in peri/subtidal sites was terminated by rapid drowning of the carbonate platform during late Silurian orogenesis.

  7. The Cannery Formation--Devonian to Early Permian arc-marginal deposits within the Alexander Terrane, Southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, Susan M.; Layer, Paul W.; Harris, Anita G.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Murchey, Benita L.

    2011-01-01

    cherts on both Admiralty and Kupreanof Islands contain radiolarians as young as Permian, the age of the Cannery Formation is herein extended to Late Devonian through early Permian, to include the early Permian rocks exposed in its type locality. The Cannery Formation is folded and faulted, and its stratigraphic thickness is unknown but inferred to be several hundred meters. The Cannery Formation represents an extended period of marine deposition in moderately deep water, with slow rates of deposition and limited clastic input during Devonian through Pennsylvanian time and increasing argillaceous, volcaniclastic, and bioclastic input during the Permian. The Cannery Formation comprises upper Paleozoic rocks in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. In the pre-Permian upper Paleozoic, the tectonic setting of the Alexander terrane consisted of two or more evolved oceanic arcs. The lower Permian section is represented by a distinctive suite of rocks in the Alexander terrane, which includes sedimentary and volcanic rocks containing early Permian fossils, metamorphosed rocks with early Permian cooling ages, and intrusive rocks with early Permian cooling ages, that form discrete northwest-trending belts. After restoration of 180 km of dextral displacement of the Chilkat-Chichagof block on the Chatham Strait Fault, these belts consist, from northeast to southwest, of (1) bedded chert, siliceous argillite, volcaniclastic turbidites, pillow basalt, and limestone of the Cannery Formation and the Porcupine Slate of Gilbert and others (1987); (2) greenschist-facies Paleozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks that have Permian cooling ages; (3) silty limestone and calcareous argillite interbedded with pillow basalt and volcaniclastic rocks of the Halleck Formation and the William Henry Bay area; and (4) intermediate-composition and syenitic plutons. These belts correspond to components of an accretionary complex, contemporary metamorphic rocks, forearc-basin deposits,

  8. An adult form of Alexander disease: a novel mutation in glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Ohnari, K; Yamano, M; Uozumi, T; Hashimoto, T; Tsuji, S; Nakagawa, M

    2007-10-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mutation has been reported in Alexander disease. We report a patient with the adult form of Alexander disease who shows a novel mutation in GFAP. This case presented with progressive dysarthria, dysphagia and spastic gait on the right side. Brain and spinal cord MRI showed marked atrophy of the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. Abnormal high signal intensities in the ventral medulla oblongata were detected bilaterally. There were no white matter lesions or contrast enhancing lesions. Recently, there have been reports of patients with a juvenile form of Alexander disease presenting with atrophy or signal abnormalities of the medulla or spinal cord. Atrophy of the medulla and spinal cord have specifically been described as suggestive of Alexander disease [1]. Sequence analysis of the GFAP gene of this patient showed a heterozygous c.221T>C mutation, predicting a p.M74T amino acid change. In all patients suspected of Alexander disease on the basis of MRI findings, GFAP analysis is necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

  9. Obituary: Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, 1956-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc William

    2006-12-01

    Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, Program Coordinator at the Space Telescope Science Institute, was diagnosed with cancer of the gallbladder, pancreas, and liver in May 2005 and died on 29 September 2005. He was forty-nine. Andy was born to Bodo and Helen Lubenow in St. Paul, Minnesota on 4 January 1956. In 1964 at the age of eight, he moved with his family to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and attended the American Community School there until returning with his family in 1973 to St. Paul. Argentina had a big impact on Andy's future as an astronomer. He later recalled how he had observed and was puzzled by the "upside-down" appearance of the Moon in the southern hemisphere. In Argentina, he built his first telescope using a mirror he had ground himself. He never parted ways with that instrument. Andy did not follow a standard educational track. He spent two years at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, before transferring to the University of Minnesota, where he earned his bachelor's degree and began work towards a master's degree in astrophysics. Later he transferred to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he remained until Dr. Peter Stockman hired him to work on the Hubble Space Telescope project. While in school, he worked as a teacher's assistant, taught night school, and gave demonstrations of stargazing. He was an excellent teacher and had a flair for writing. He later wrote articles for a sailing magazine and a pilot's magazine. Andy was a very practical, meticulous, and steady worker, attributes that he combined with an understated and dry sense of humor. He was always able to find a way through a problem, no matter how sticky. If a job required him to roll up his sleeves and get it done through hard work, he would persevere. Nevertheless, he was always on the lookout for an easier way. He had no patience for being forced to deal with stupid things for stupid reasons. At work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Andy was

  10. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson. Wilson's disease, Queen Square and neurology.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Trocello, J-M; Woimant, F; Lachaux, A; Quinn, N

    2013-12-01

    This historical article describes the life and work of the British physician Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson (1878-1937), who was one of the world's greatest neurologists of the first half of the 20th century. Early in his career, Wilson spent one year in Paris in 1903 where he learned from Pierre-Marie at Bicêtre Hospital. He subsequently retained uninterrupted links with French neurology. He also visited in Leipzig the German anatomist Paul Flechsig. In 1904, Wilson returned to London, where he worked for the rest of his life at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic (later the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, and today the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery) in Queen Square, and also at Kings' College Hospital. He wrote on 'the old motor system and the new', on disorders of motility and muscle tone, on the epilepsies, on aphasia, apraxia, tics, and pathologic laughing and crying, and most importantly on Wilson's disease. The other objective of our paper is to commemorate the centenary of Wilson's most important work published in 1912 in Brain, and also in Revue Neurologique, on an illness newly recognized and characterized by him entitled "Progressive lenticular degeneration, a familial nervous disease associated with liver cirrhosis". He analyzed 12 clinical cases, four of whom he followed himself, but also four cases previously published by others and a further two that he considered in retrospect had the same disease as he was describing. The pathological profile combined necrotic damage in the lenticular nuclei of the brain and hepatic cirrhosis. This major original work is summarized and discussed in the present paper. Wilson not only delineated what was later called hepato-lenticular degeneration and Wilson's disease, but also introduced for the first time the terms extrapyramidal syndrome and extrapyramidal system, stressing the role of the basal ganglia in motility. The present historical work emphasizes the special

  11. IN MEMORIAM: In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    In Memoriam of Alexander A Golovin (1962-2008) Alexander (Sasha) Golovin passed away on 10 September 2008. Sasha's scientific heritage includes seminal works in different fields of physics, from Marangoni convection to self-assembly of quantum dots, and from combustion fronts to anomalous diffusion in flows and on a crystal surface. A graduate of the Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, he had very broad scientific interests and a unique ability to identify and solve new, intellectually challenging and technologically important problems. One of the basic fields of Sasha's research was the fluid dynamics in systems with interfaces. His favorite subject was the motion of droplets, bubbles and particles in the presence of heat and mass transfer. Sasha's early works contained the discovery of the spontaneous motion of droplets due to the Marangoni effect and the investigation of the interaction between solid particles, bubbles and droplets caused by the Marangoni effect, which is a crucial factor that determines the effect of heat/mass transfer on the rate of coalescence. In both cases, Sasha's work was the first in a long sequence of papers written by different authors. Later, Sasha returned to that field when studying such fascinating subjects as levitation of droplets above the surface of an evaporating liquid and encapsulation of particles and bubbles by an advancing solidification front. The subject of interfacial hydrodynamics overlaps with another basic field of Sasha's research, the theory of pattern formation. The contribution of Sasha's work to the modern understanding of the variety of pattern formation phenomena is significant. It includes the analysis of the interaction between long-wave and short-wave instability modes in Marangoni convection, investigation of the large-scale Marangoni convection that led to the prediction of different patterns including quasipatterns, and the description of various non-potential effects in Marangoni convection

  12. Geoheritage, Geodiversity and natural landscape enhanced and protected through anthropogenic activity: a case study using the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne Fault, Afar and Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Hagos, Miruts; Guilbaud, Marie-Noelle

    2015-04-01

    The UNESCO World Heritage (WH) committee called in 2014 for all thematic geological and volcanological studies to be revised in light of a widening gap between current dogma and the progressive geoheritage science views. We discuss question of natural sites and anthropogenic activity. The Chaîne des Puys and Limagne fault UNESCO WH project is the basis of this presentation, but we also the Afar Region of Ethiopia and UNAM campus, Mexico City. It is now difficult to find any totally 'natural' (devoid of human influence) landscape. This very definition of natural ignores that humankind is a geological force, and humans are part of the natural process. The UNESCO WH guidelines recognise this in paragraph 90: 'it is recognized that no area is totally pristine and that all natural areas are in a dynamic state, and to some extent involve contact with people'. A geological landscape, may be large enough to accommodate human occupation without significantly changing landforms: this is the case of the Chaîne des Puys and Limagne fault. Human activity works in some ways to protect geological landscape: regulating vegetation and erosion. The aesthetic nature of humans may work to enhance the landscape's visibility by organisation of land use, and ceremonial use based on the sense of place. Humans also exercise economic activity such as quarrying and mining, which if uncontrolled can seriously modify a landscape. However, isolated works may not have an impact, or may even enhance the value of the site by uncovering geological features that would not naturally be seen. In the Chaîne des Puys only 0,3% of the land surface has been worked by artisanal methods and certain sites, like the Lemptégy volcano have been extracted with the view of enhancing the landscape's scientific value without detracting from the aesthetic. The site preserves its natural, scientific and aesthetic qualities, because of the human presence. The local population have always been and continue to be

  13. Geophysical characterization of buried active faults: the Concud Fault (Iberian Chain, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Óscar; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Liesa, Carlos L.; Simón, José L.

    2016-11-01

    The Concud Fault is a 14-km-long active fault that extends close to Teruel, a city with about 35,000 inhabitants in the Iberian Range (NE Spain). It shows evidence of recurrent activity during Late Pleistocene time, posing a significant seismic hazard in an area of moderate-to-low tectonic rates. A geophysical survey was carried out along the mapped trace of the southern branch of the Concud Fault to evaluate the geophysical signature from the fault and the location of paleoseismic trenches. The survey identified a lineation of inverse magnetic dipoles at residual and vertical magnetic gradient, a local increase in apparent conductivity, and interruptions of the underground sediment structure along GPR profiles. The origin of these anomalies is due to lateral contrast between both fault blocks and the geophysical signature of Quaternary materials located above and directly south of the fault. The spatial distribution of anomalies was successfully used to locate suitable trench sites and to map non-exposed segments of the fault. The geophysical anomalies are related to the sedimentological characteristics and permeability differences of the deposits and to deformation related to fault activity. The results illustrate the usefulness of geophysics to detect and map non-exposed faults in areas of moderate-to-low tectonic activity where faults are often covered by recent pediments that obscure geological evidence of the most recent earthquakes. The results also highlight the importance of applying multiple geophysical techniques in defining the location of buried faults.

  14. Old Age, the Ancient Military, and Alexander's Army: Positive Examples for a Graying America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebric, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents examples from ancient Greece and Rome illustrating working aged and intergenerational dependence. Describes normal active participation of elderly as officers and common soldiers in ancient military as example of their capabilities. Notes that Alexander the Great's army, in particular, depended on contributions of older men. (Author/NB)

  15. Connect the Book. Always Inventing: A Photobiography of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2004-01-01

    Cell phones, video phones, voice messaging?one wonders what Alexander Graham Bell would have thought about the many venues today for electronic communication with one another. Bell's March 10, 1876 invention is now 128 years old, but there is no doubt that Bell's "talking machine" changed the world. This article presents a brief review of the…

  16. Friendly Letters on the Correspondence of Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Burton

    1985-01-01

    Excerpts from the letters between Alexander Graham Bell and Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller are given to illustrate the educational and personal growth of Helen Keller as well as the educational philosophy of Bell regarding the education of the deaf blind. (DB)

  17. Alexander Cameron Rutherford: A Gentleman and a Scholar. Documents in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodysh, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information about Alexander Cameron Rutherford, a provincial politician. Includes a letter written by Rutherford in 1912 that provides insights into his responsibilities to the general public, information about Rutherford himself, the economic conditions of Alberta, Canada in 1912, and information about the individual to whom it was…

  18. The Doors to Home and History: Post-Colonial Identities in Meena Alexander and Bharati Mukherjee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Shilpa

    1993-01-01

    Examines postcolonial inquiry and studies of identity in Asians of Indian descent, focusing on the works of Meena Alexander and Bharati Mukherjee. Their commentaries on India and immigrant cultures are constantly influenced by a history dependent on Western tradition, although both authors resist the stereotypical definitions imposed by the West.…

  19. Russia's Literary Genius Alexander Pushkin: The Great-Grandson of an African Slave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lounsbery, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Pushkin, Russia's most celebrated literary figure, descended from an African slave. On both parents' sides, he was related to Avram Petrovich Gannibal, who was born to an African prince and abducted to become a slave to a Russian diplomat. Pushkin chose to pride himself on both his aristocratic life and his African ancestry. (SM)

  20. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. 162.250 Section 162.250 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.250...

  1. 76 FR 54800 - Sandy Alexander, Clifton, NJ; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sandy Alexander, Clifton, NJ; Notice of Negative Determination on... resulted in a negative determination based on the findings that the petitioning worker group did not meet... or the law. Conclusion After reconsideration, I affirm the original notice of negative...

  2. Progressive Pioneer: Alexander James Inglis (1879-1924) and American Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wraga, William G.

    2006-01-01

    Alexander James Inglis's transformation from an academic traditionalist devoted to Latin pedagogy to an influential progressive-experimentalist and advocate of the comprehensive high school during the early twentieth century has received insufficient attention from educational and curriculum historians. A reconstruction of Inglis's career leads to…

  3. Another View of Dynamic Criteria: A Critical Reanalysis of Barrett, Caldwell, and Alexander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, James T.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A critical reanalysis of Barrett, Caldwell, and Alexander's (1985) critique of dynamic criteria. Summarizes and questions Barrett, et al.'s three definitions of dynamic criteria and their conclusion that reported temporal changes in criteria could be explained by methodological artifacts. A greater focus on dynamic criteria as constructs is…

  4. The Election of 1800: Alexander Hamilton and the Death of the Federalist Party.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook-DeFeo, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Describes the significance of the election of 1800 in the development of political parties in the United States. Contends that Alexander Hamilton's view of the United States Constitution was dangerous for the new nation and led to a permanent split in the Federalist Party. Includes a resource bibliography for teachers wishing to incorporate this…

  5. Alexander Hamilton: Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution. A Bicentennial Series No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC.

    Alexander Hamilton was among the most intellectually gifted of the Founding Fathers and a brilliant political theorist, but he lacked practical political experience, and his major political contributions occurred only when his specific policies were adopted and carried forward by others with broader vision. This booklet on Hamilton is one in a…

  6. What Matters to Alexander Astin? A Conversation with Higher Education's Senior Scholar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    About Campus, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Since the mid-1960s, the work of Alexander Astin--Allan M. Cartter Professor of Higher Education at the University of California-Los Angeles and director of the Higher Education Research Institute--has served as both bellwether for and mirror of the American college and university system. He was there to study and shed light on the student…

  7. The effect of Alexander technique training program: A qualitative study of ordinary behavior application

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Baek, Soon Gi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to configure and apply the Alexander technique training program and assess the effect of program through physical, emotional and behavioral aspects. To achieve the research aims, qualitative research method had been conducted, subjecting 8 people, who were participating in Alexander Technique training program for this study. The study used focus group interview method for collecting date and employed for the interview method by mixing the semi-structured and unstructured questionnaire. The results were followings. First, one could develop body awareness and body consciousness through experiencing lived bodily sensation. Second, from Alexander Technique training program, people experienced psycho & physical’s equilibrium. Third, one could change not only the manner of use of body but also the attitude to the life from conscious attention to daily ordinary movement. The results provided empirical evidence of Alexander Technique training program’s functions in terms of physical, emotional and behavioral aspect through the process of consciousness control from lived body education. PMID:25610819

  8. Identification of metapopulation dynamics among Northern Goshawks of the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and Coastal British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; McClaren, Erica L.; Doyle, Frank I.; Titus, K.; Sage, George K.; Wilson, Robert E.; Gust, Judy R.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Northern Goshawks occupying the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and coastal British Columbia nest primarily in old-growth and mature forest, which results in spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of individuals across the landscape. We used microsatellite and mitochondrial data to infer genetic structure, gene flow, and fluctuations in population demography through evolutionary time. Patterns in the genetic signatures were used to assess predictions associated with the three population models: panmixia, metapopulation, and isolated populations. Population genetic structure was observed along with asymmetry in gene flow estimates that changed directionality at different temporal scales, consistent with metapopulation model predictions. Therefore, Northern Goshawk assemblages located in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia interact through a metapopulation framework, though they may not fit the classic model of a metapopulation. Long-term population sources (coastal mainland British Columbia) and sinks (Revillagigedo and Vancouver islands) were identified. However, there was no trend through evolutionary time in the directionality of dispersal among the remaining assemblages, suggestive of a rescue-effect dynamic. Admiralty, Douglas, and Chichagof island complex appears to be an evolutionarily recent source population in the Alexander Archipelago. In addition, Kupreanof island complex and Kispiox Forest District populations have high dispersal rates to populations in close geographic proximity and potentially serve as local source populations. Metapopulation dynamics occurring in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia by Northern Goshawks highlight the importance of both occupied and unoccupied habitats to long-term population persistence of goshawks in this region.

  9. The Language of Teaching Coordination: Suzuki Training Meets the Alexander Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Details an investigation of the language of Suzuki instruction and the students' interpretation of that language. Describes the Alexander Technique and Suzuki training and provides specific examples illustrating the interaction of language and coordination in this context. Proposes that teachers of movement, voice and acting can benefit from these…

  10. A Disciplinary Immigrant. Alexander Smith at the University of Chicago, 1894-1911

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The publication in 1906 of Alexander Smith's "Introduction to general inorganic chemistry" inaugurated a decisive change in chemical pedagogy in the US, the effects of which are still evident. The nature and extent of Smith's innovations are described through a comparison of his text to its source material and contemporaries. His…

  11. Seismic images and fault relations of the Santa Monica thrust fault, West Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Okaya, D.

    2001-01-01

    In May 1997, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of Southern California (USC) acquired high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction images on the grounds of the Wadsworth Veterans Administration Hospital (WVAH) in the city of Los Angeles (Fig. 1a,b). The objective of the seismic survey was to better understand the near-surface geometry and faulting characteristics of the Santa Monica fault zone. In this report, we present seismic images, an interpretation of those images, and a comparison of our results with results from studies by Dolan and Pratt (1997), Pratt et al. (1998) and Gibbs et al. (2000). The Santa Monica fault is one of the several northeast-southwest-trending, north-dipping, reverse faults that extend through the Los Angeles metropolitan area (Fig. 1a). Through much of area, the Santa Monica fault trends subparallel to the Hollywood fault, but the two faults apparently join into a single fault zone to the southwest and to the northeast (Dolan et al., 1995). The Santa Monica and Hollywood faults may be part of a larger fault system that extends from the Pacific Ocean to the Transverse Ranges. Crook et al. (1983) refer to this fault system as the Malibu Coast-Santa Monica-Raymond-Cucamonga fault system. They suggest that these faults have not formed a contiguous zone since the Pleistocene and conclude that each of the faults should be treated as a separate fault with respect to seismic hazards. However, Dolan et al. (1995) suggest that the Hollywood and Santa Monica faults are capable of generating Mw 6.8 and Mw 7.0 earthquakes, respectively. Thus, regardless of whether the overall fault system is connected and capable of rupturing in one event, individually, each of the faults present a sizable earthquake hazard to the Los Angeles metropolitan area. If, however, these faults are connected, and they were to rupture along a continuous fault rupture, the resulting hazard would be even greater. Although the Santa Monica fault represents

  12. Colorado Regional Faults

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. The Use of "Ability" Measures as Controls for Concurrent or Subsequent Achievement (Comment on Alexander et al., ASR, October 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, James S.

    1982-01-01

    Comments upon a 1981 article by Alexander, Pallas, and Cook. Discusses whether particular standardized tests measure achievement or ability and the implications of this issue for school effects research. (GC)

  14. Protein misfolding and oxidative stress promote glial-mediated neurodegeneration in an Alexander disease model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Colodner, Kenneth J.; Feany, Mel B.

    2011-01-01

    Although alterations in glial structure and function commonly accompany death of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, the role glia play in modulating neuronal loss is poorly understood. We have created a model of Alexander disease in Drosophila by expressing disease-linked mutant versions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in fly glia. We find aggregation of mutant human GFAP into inclusions bearing the hallmarks of authentic Rosenthal fibers. We also observe significant toxicity of mutant human GFAP to glia, which is mediated by protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Both protein aggregation and oxidative stress contribute to activation of a robust autophagic response in glia. Toxicity of mutant GFAP to glial cells induces a non-cell autonomous stress response and subsequent apoptosis in neurons, which is dependent on glial glutamate transport. Our findings thus establish a simple genetic model of Alexander disease and further identify cellular pathways critical for glial-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21414908

  15. Paleozoic paleomagnetism and northward drift of the Alexander Terrane, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Der Voo, Rob; Jones, Meridee; Gromme, C. Sherman; Eberlein, G. Donald; Churkin, Michael, Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Paleozoic limestone, graywacke, sandstone, milestone, red beds and volcanic rocks of the Alexander terrane, southeastern Alaska, have yielded six paleomagnetic pole positions after thermal and alternating-field demagnetization. These poles are from sample groups of late Middle Ordovician, Late Ordovician, Devonian, Late Devonian, and early and late Carboniferous age. To test various tectonic models for the structural development of this part of western North America, the paleomagnetic results are compared to those for the North American craton. It is found that the observed inclination and declination values deviate significantly from the values predicted for the present-day position of the Alexander terrane (55.5N, 133.5W). Better matching can be obtained for a paleoposition of the terrane at about 40N, 120W, in the present position of western Nevada and northeastern California. In addition, an in situ 25° clockwise rotation of the terrane is required to restore it to its original position.

  16. Pennsylvanian pluton stitching of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.C.; Bergman, S.C.; Cushing, G.W. ); Plafker, G. ); Campbell, R.B.; Dodds, C.J. ); McClelland, W.C. ); Mueller, P.A. ); MacKevett, E.M. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    A quartz monzonite-syenite-alkali granite plutonic complex in eastern Alaska crosscuts the contact of the Alexander terrane and Wrangellia and intrudes the basement rocks of both terranes. Zircon U-Pb data indicate an intrusion age of 309 {plus minus} 5 Ma (Middle Pennsylvanian) for the pluton, and {sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar age for hornblende separates indicate cooling to about 450 C during Middle Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time. The new field relations and age data demonstrate the Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane were contiguous during the Middle Pennsylvanian. This conclusion provides an important new constraint on paleogeographic reconstructions of the northwest Cordillera, and necessitates reassessment of stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data that were cited as evidence that the terranes evolved separately until the late Mesozoic.

  17. Clinical Experience in Late Antiquity: Alexander of Tralles and the Therapy of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouras-vallianatos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Alexander of Tralles, writing in the late sixth century, combined his wide-ranging practical knowledge with earlier medical theories. This article shows how clinical experience is used in Alexander’s works by concentrating on his therapeutic advice on epilepsy and, in particular, on pharmacology and the group of so-called natural remedies. I argue that clinical testing is used not only for the introduction of new medicines but also as an instrument for checking the therapeutic effect of popular healing practices. On another level, this article discusses Alexander’s role as the author of a medical compendium; it suggests that by marking the cases of clinical testing with a set of recurrent expressions, Alexander leads his audience to reflect on his medical authority and personal contribution. PMID:25045178

  18. [Urology and National Socialism: the fate of Alexander von Lichtenberg 1880-1949].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Krischel, M; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2010-09-01

    Alexander von Lichtenberg (1880-1949) was one of the famous members of the German Urological Society (DGU) in pre-war Germany. He introduced excretion urography and a special TURP Instrument. In 1928 he was president of the 8th meeting held in the German capital Berlin. His Handbook of Urology, released by Ferdinand Springer publishing house, was a trendsetter in establishing urology as a specialty in Germany and bringing together the whole wisdom of all aspects of urology. He was the founder of the famous Maximilian Nitze Award of the DGU. As a Jew he-like many others-was forced to leave Nazi Germany after 1933. Even in Hungary, his native country, he again had to resist anti-Semitic hostility. Later on he lived in Mexico. Alexander von Lichtenberg has to be remembered with special focus on the exodus of German Jewish scientists during the Nazi time.

  19. Flight elements: Fault detection and fault management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Edge, J. T.; Lawler, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fault management for an intelligent computational system must be developed using a top down integrated engineering approach. An approach proposed includes integrating the overall environment involving sensors and their associated data; design knowledge capture; operations; fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration; testability; causal models including digraph matrix analysis; and overall performance impacts on the hardware and software architecture. Implementation of the concept to achieve a real time intelligent fault detection and management system will be accomplished via the implementation of several objectives, which are: Development of fault tolerant/FDIR requirement and specification from a systems level which will carry through from conceptual design through implementation and mission operations; Implementation of monitoring, diagnosis, and reconfiguration at all system levels providing fault isolation and system integration; Optimize system operations to manage degraded system performance through system integration; and Lower development and operations costs through the implementation of an intelligent real time fault detection and fault management system and an information management system.

  20. Scaphopoda from the Alexander Terrane, Southeast Alaska-The first occurrence of Scaphopoda in the Silurian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.; Baichtal, J.

    2006-01-01

    The scaphopods Dentalium hecetaensis n. sp. and Rhytiodentalium cf. kentuckyensis Pojeta et Runnegar, 1979, are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. This is the first occurrence of Silurian scaphopods known to date. They are part of a diverse macrobenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted southern Alaskan terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. ?? 2006 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  1. PLC/PRF/5 (Alexander) hepatoma cell line: further characterization and studies of infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Daemer, R J; Feinstone, S M; Alexander, J J; Tully, J G; London, W T; Wong, D C; Purcell, R H

    1980-01-01

    The Alexander hepatoma cell line, PLC/PRF/5, was studied for evidence of hepatitis B virus markers and alpha-fetoprotein. Only hepatitis B surface antigen and alpha-fetoprotein were detected. Induction experiments with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine and inoculation of chimpanzees with whole cells or tissue culture fluid did not reveal evidence of synthesis of additional hepatitis B virus markers or of production of infectious virus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6160110

  2. Lithium Decreases Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in a Mouse Model of Alexander Disease.

    PubMed

    LaPash Daniels, Christine M; Paffenroth, Elizabeth; Austin, Elizabeth V; Glebov, Konstantin; Lewis, Diana; Walter, Jochen; Messing, Albee

    2015-01-01

    Alexander disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the astrocyte intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by elevated levels of GFAP and the formation of protein aggregates, known as Rosenthal fibers, within astrocytes. Lithium has previously been shown to decrease protein aggregates by increasing the autophagy pathway for protein degradation. In addition, lithium has also been reported to decrease activation of the transcription factor STAT3, which is a regulator of GFAP transcription and astrogliogenesis. Here we tested whether lithium treatment would decrease levels of GFAP in a mouse model of Alexander disease. Mice with the Gfap-R236H point mutation were fed lithium food pellets for 4 to 8 weeks. Four weeks of treatment with LiCl at 0.5% in food pellets decreased GFAP protein and transcripts in several brain regions, although with mild side effects and some mortality. Extending the duration of treatment to 8 weeks resulted in higher mortality, and again with a decrease in GFAP in the surviving animals. Indicators of autophagy, such as LC3, were not increased, suggesting that lithium may decrease levels of GFAP through other pathways. Lithium reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT3, suggesting this as one pathway mediating the effects on GFAP. In conclusion, lithium has the potential to decrease GFAP levels in Alexander disease, but with a narrow therapeutic window separating efficacy and toxicity.

  3. The Border Ranges fault system in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska: Evidence for major early Cenozoic dextral strike-slip motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smart, K.J.; Pavlis, T.L.; Sisson, V.B.; Roeske, S.M.; Snee, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Border Ranges fault system of southern Alaska, the fundamental break between the arc basement and the forearc accretionary complex, is the boundary between the Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia terrane and the Chugach terrane. The fault system separates crystalline rocks of the Alexander terrane from metamorphic rocks of the Chugach terrane in Glacier Bay National Park. Mylonitic rocks in the zone record abundant evidence for dextral strike-slip motion along north-northwest-striking subvertical surfaces. Geochronologic data together with regional correlations of Chugach terrane rocks involved in the deformation constrain this movement between latest Cretaceous and Early Eocene (???50 Ma). These findings are in agreement with studies to the northwest and southeast along the Border Ranges fault system which show dextral strike-slip motion occurring between 58 and 50 Ma. Correlations between Glacier Bay plutons and rocks of similar ages elsewhere along the Border Ranges fault system suggest that as much as 700 km of dextral motion may have been accommodated by this structure. These observations are consistent with oblique convergence of the Kula plate during early Cenozoic and forearc slivering above an ancient subduction zone following late Mesozoic accretion of the Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia terrane to North America.

  4. Integration of InSAR and GIS in the Study of Surface Faults Caused by Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Olivera, Jorge A.; Farina, Paolo; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.

    2008-05-07

    In Celaya city, Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes (SCFP) began to become visible at the beginning of the 1980s with the sprouting of the crackings that gave rise to the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Poniente'. At the present time, the city is being affected by five surface faults that display a preferential NNW-SSE direction, parallel to the regional faulting system 'Taxco-San Miguel de Allende'. In order to study the SCFP in the city, the first step was to obtain a map of surface faults, by integrating in a GIS field survey and an urban city plan. The following step was to create a map of the current phreatic level decline in city with the information of deep wells and using the 'kriging' method in order to obtain a continuous surface. Finally the interferograms maps resulted of an InSAR analysis of 9 SAR images covering the time interval between July 12 of 2003 and May 27 of 2006 were integrated to a GIS. All the maps generated, show how the surface faults divide the city from North to South, in two zones that behave in a different way. The difference of the phreatic level decline between these two zones is 60 m; and the InSAR study revealed that the Western zone practically remains stable, while sinkings between the surface faults 'Oriente' and 'Universidad Pedagogica' are present, as well as in portions NE and SE of the city, all of these sinkings between 7 and 10 cm/year.

  5. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    This investigation represents an in-depth understanding of teacher professional development at the Alexander Science Center School, a dependent charter museum school established through a partnership between the California Science Center and Los Angeles Unified School District. Three methods of data collection were used. A survey was distributed and collected from the school's teachers, resulting in a prioritized list of teacher professional development needs, as well as a summary of teachers' opinions about the school's existing professional development program. In addition, six key stakeholders in the school's professional development program were interviewed for the study. Finally, documents related to the school's professional development program were analyzed. Data collected from the interviews and documents were used to develop an understand various components of the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program. Teachers identified seven areas that had a high-priority for future professional development including developing skills far working with below-grade-level students, improving the analytical skills of student in mathematics, working with English Language Learners, improving students' overall reading ability levels, developing teachers' content-area knowledge for science, integrating science across the curriculum, and incorporating hands-on activity-based learning strategies to teach science. Professional development needs identified by Alexander Science Center School teachers were categorized based on their focus on content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, or curricular knowledge. Analysis of data collected through interviews and documents revealed that the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program consisted of six venues for providing professional development for teachers including weekly "banked time" sessions taking place within the standard school day, grade-level meetings, teacher support

  6. Mega-city and great earthquake distributions: the search of basic links.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Boris; Sasorova, Elena; Domanski, Andrej

    2013-04-01

    The ever-increasing population density in large metropolitan cities near major active faults (e.g. Tokyo, Lisbon, San-Francisco, et al.) and recent catastrophic earthquakes in Japan, Indonesia and Haiti (loss of life more 500000), highlight the need for searching of causal relationships between distributions of earthquake epicenters and mega-cities at the Earth [1]. The latitudinal distribution of mega-cities calculated with using Internet data base, discovers a curious peculiarity: the density of large city numbers, related to 10-degree latitude interval, demonstrates two maximums in middle latitudes (±30-40°) on both sides of the equator. These maximums are separated by clean local minimum near equator, and such objects (mega-cities) are practically absent in the high latitudes. In the last two decades, it was shown [2, 3, 4] that a seismic activity of the Earth is described by the similar bimodal latitudinal distribution. The similarity between bimodal distributions for geophysical phenomena and mega-city locations attracts common attention. The peak values in the both distributions (near ±35°) correspond to location of well-known "critical latitudes" at the planet. These latitudes were determined [5], as the lines of intersection of a sphere and a spheroid of equal volume (±35°15'52″). Increasing of the angular velocity of a celestial body rotation leads to growth of oblateness of planet, and vice versa, the oblateness is decreasing with reducing of velocity of rotation. So, well-known effect of the Earth rotation instability leads to small pulsations of the geoid. In the critical latitudes, the geoid radius-vector is equal to the radius of sphere. The zones of near critical latitudes are characterized by high density of faults in the Earth crust and manifestation of some geological peculiarities (hot spot distribution, large ore deposit distribution, et al.). The active faults existence has led to an emanation of depth fluids, which created the good

  7. FINITE FAULT MODELING OF FUTURE LARGE EARTHQUAKE FROM NORTH TEHRAN FAULT IN KARAJ, IRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaei, Meghdad; Miyajima, Masakatsu; Saffari, Hamid; Tsurugi, Masato

    The main purpose of this study is to predict strong ground motions from future large earthquake for Karaj city, the capital of Alborz province of Iran. This city is an industrialized city having over one million populations and is located near several active faults. Finite fault modeling with a dynamic corner frequency has adopted here for simulation of future large earthquake. Target fault is North Tehran fault with the length of 110 km and rupture of west part of the fault which is closest to Karaj, assumed for this simulation. For seven rupture starting points, acceleration time series in the site of Karaj Caravansary -historical building- are predicted. Peak ground accelerations for those are vary from 423 cm/s2 to 584 cm/s2 which is in the range of 1990 Rudbar earthquake (Mw=7.3) . Results of acceleration simulations in different distances are also compared with attenuation relations for two types of soil. Our simulations show general agreement with one of the most well known world attenuation relations and also with one of the newest attenuation relation that hase developed for Iranian plateau.

  8. Origin of Silurian reefs in the Alexander Terrane of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lower to Upper Silurian (upper Llandovery-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation record several episodes of reef growth in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. As the oldest carbonates of wide-spread distribution in the region, the Heceta limestones represent the earliest development of a shallow-marine platform within the Alexander arc and the oldest foundation for reef evolution. These deposits provide important insights into the dynamic processes, styles, and bathymetry associated with reef growth in tectonically active oceanic islands. Massive stromatoporoids, corals, and red algae are preserved in fragmental rudstones and represent a fringing reef that formed at the seaward edge of the incipient marine shelf. Accessory constituents in this reef include crinoids and the cyanobacterium Girvanella. Small biostromes were constructed by ramose corals and stromatoporoids on oncolitic substrates in backreef or lagoonal environments. These buildups were associated with low-diversity assemblages of brachiopods and with gastropods, amphiporids, calcareous algae and cyanobacteria. Microbial boundstones reflect the widespread encrustation of cyanobacteria and calcified microproblematica on shelly debris as stromatolitic mats that resulted in the development of a stromatactoid-bearing mud mound and a barrier reef complex. Epiphytaceans, other microbes, and aphrosalpingid sponges were the primary frame-builders of the barrier reefs. These buildups attained significant relief at the shelf margin and shed detritus as slumped blocks and debris flows into deep-water sites along the slope. The similarity of these stromatolitic-aphrosalpingid reefs to those from Siluro-Devonian strata of autochthonous southwestern Alaska suggests paleobiogeographic ties of the Alexander terrane to cratonal North America during the Silurian.

  9. The remarkable medical lineage of the Monro family: contributions of Alexander primus, secundus, and tertius.

    PubMed

    Wu, Osmond C; Manjila, Sunil; Malakooti, Nima; Cohen, Alan R

    2012-06-01

    Among the families that have influenced the development of modern medicine into what it is today, the Monro lineage stands as one of the most notable. Alexander Monro primus (1697-1767) was the first of 3 generations with the same name, a dynasty that spanned 126 years occupying the Chair of Anatomy one after the other at the University of Edinburgh. After becoming Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh in 1719, Monro primus played a principal role in the establishment of the University of Edinburgh School of Medicine and the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. In 1726, he published The Anatomy of the Humane Bones, of which 8 editions were printed during his lifetime. His son, Alexander Monro secundus (1733-1817), arguably the most notable of the 3 men, succeeded him as Professor of Anatomy. A highly regarded lecturer and anatomist, Monro secundus studied under many great physicians, including William Hunter and Johann Friedrich Meckel the Elder, and was also teacher to other well-known figures at the time, such as Joseph Black and Thomas Trotter. His most notable contributions include his work with the lymphatic system, the interventricular foramen (of Monro), and the Monro-Kellie doctrine. Alexander Monro tertius (1773-1859), the last of the dynasty, also succeeded his father as Professor of Anatomy. His work included insights into abdominal aortic aneurysms and the anatomy of the genitourinary system. The prominent association of the Monro family with the University of Edinburgh and the effects of a tenured professorship under the concept of "Ad vitam aut culpam" over successive generations are also described. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this historical review of the Monro family is among the few published in neurosurgical literature. A vivid historical overview of the medical contributions of the most famous and influential dynasty of physicians in Edinburgh at that time is provided, with relevant excerpts from original publications.

  10. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  11. Alexander the Great: A Strategy Review in the Context of the ACSC strategy Process Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    observe the development of both political and military strategies in support of a specific national objective. As ruler of Greece and later of a massive...was born in 356 B.C. in Macedonia (the northern part of modern Greece ), the son of Philip II, the king of Macedonia. At the age of 16 Alexander...left wing of his father’s army at the dec ive battle of Chaeronea in which Philip defeated the allied Greek forces 1 won control of Greece . Philip

  12. Familial Adult-onset Alexander Disease: Clinical and Neuroradiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    ELMALI, Ayşe Deniz; ÇETİNÇELİK, Ümran; IŞLAK, Civan; UZUN ADATEPE, Nurten; KARAALİ SAVRUN, Feray; YALÇINKAYA, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) dramatically differs from the early onset AD with respect to clinical and neuroradiological findings. Herein we report the detailed clinical and neuroradiological findings of a Turkish family with AOAD. In all three cases, magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked atrophy of the mesencephalon, bulbus, and cervical spinal cord accompanied with signal abnormalities in the same regions along with supratentorial white matter. Basal ganglia were affected in two cases. Molecular genetic analysis revealed heterozygous mutation in the 8th exon of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene M451I (c.1245G>A), leading to the diagnosis of AOAD in all cases. PMID:28360791

  13. The San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Sandra S.; Wallace, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of the San Andreas fault was brought dramatically to world attention on April 18, 1906, when sudden displacement along the fault produced the great San Francisco earthquake and fire. This earthquake, however, was but one of many that have resulted from episodic displacement along the fault throughout its life of about 15-20 million years.

  14. Education Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaked, Haim

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several cities in Israel have labeled themselves "Education Cities," concentrating on education as their central theme. Employing qualitative techniques, this article aims to describe, define, and conceptualize this phenomenon as it is being realized in three such cities. Findings show that Education Cities differ from…

  15. The ocular motor features of adult-onset alexander disease: a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Abegg, Mathias; Vertinsky, A Talia; Ceccherini, Isabella; Caroli, Francesco; Barton, Jason J S

    2011-06-01

    A 51-year-old Chinese man presented with gaze-evoked nystagmus, impaired smooth pursuit and vestibular ocular reflex cancellation, and saccadic dysmetria, along with a family history suggestive of late-onset autosomal dominant parkinsonism. MRI revealed abnormalities of the medulla and cervical spinal cord typical of adult-onset Alexander disease, and genetic testing showed homozygosity for the p.D295N polymorphic allele in the gene encoding the glial fibrillary acidic protein. A review of the literature shows that ocular signs are frequent in adult-onset Alexander disease, most commonly gaze-evoked nystagmus, pendular nystagmus, and/or oculopalatal myoclonus, and less commonly ptosis, miosis, and saccadic dysmetria. These signs are consistent with the propensity of adult-onset Alexander disease to cause medullary abnormalities on neuroimaging.

  16. Fault-Tree Compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Fault-Tree Compiler (FTC) program, is software tool used to calculate probability of top event in fault tree. Gates of five different types allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language easy to understand and use. In addition, program supports hierarchical fault-tree definition feature, which simplifies tree-description process and reduces execution time. Set of programs created forming basis for reliability-analysis workstation: SURE, ASSIST, PAWS/STEM, and FTC fault-tree tool (LAR-14586). Written in PASCAL, ANSI-compliant C language, and FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  17. Possible refugia in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, P.E.; Ager, T.A.; Baichtal, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of the extent of late Wisconsin glaciation in southeastern Alaska has varied between geologists and biologists. Maps and reports of the region prepared by geologists commonly indicated that late Wisconsin ice extended as a large uniform front west to the edge of the continental shelf. However, the distribution of plants and animals in the region has led many biologists to suggest that there may have been ice-free areas that served as refugia during the late Wisconsin. Based on analyses of aerial photographs, topographic maps, and bathymetric charts, in conjunction with a review of previous literature and reconnaissance fieldwork throughout the region, this study presents data supporting a limited ice extent in the Alexander Archipelago during the late Wisconsin and identifies possible ice-free areas that may have served as refugia. These areas include (1) the Fairweather Ground, (2) the Herbert Graves Island area, (3) the western coast of southern Baranof Island and adjacent continental shelf, (4) Coronation Island and the adjacent continental shelf, (5) the Warren Island area, (6) the continental shelf from west of Heceta Island to Forrester Island in the south, (7) parts of the west coast of southern Dall Island, and (8) lowland areas in southern Prince of Wales Island. The identification of these possible refugia has bearing on the recolonization of the Alexander Archipelago, as they could have served as centers of biotic dispersal upon regional deglaciation and as stepping stones for early humans with a maritime tradition entering the western hemisphere from Asia. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  18. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  19. Geohydrology and water-chemistry of the Alexander Valley, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Farrar, Christopher D.; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2006-01-01

    This study of the geohydrology and water chemistry of the Alexander Valley, California, was done to provide an improved scientific basis for addressing emerging water-management issues, including potential increases in water demand and changes in flows in the Russian River. The study tasks included (1) evaluation of existing geohydrological, geophysical, and geochemical data; (2) collection and analysis of new geohydrologic data, including subsurface lithologic data, ground-water levels, and streamflow records; and (3) collection and analysis of new water-chemistry data. The estimated total water use for the Alexander Valley for 1999 was approximately 15,800 acre-feet. About 13,500 acre-feet of this amount was for agricultural use, primarily vineyards, and about 2,300 acre-feet was for municipal/industrial use. Ground water is the main source of water supply for this area. The main sources of ground water in the Alexander Valley are the Quaternary alluvial deposits, the Glen Ellen Formation, and the Sonoma Volcanics. The alluvial units, where sufficiently thick and saturated, comprise the best aquifer in the study area. Average recharge to the Alexander Valley is estimated from a simple, basinwide water budget. On the basis of an estimated annual average of 298,000 acre-feet of precipitation, 160,000 acre-feet of runoff, and 113,000 to 133,000 acre-feet of evapotranspiration, about 5,000 to 25,000 acre-feet per year is available for ground-water recharge. Because this estimate is based on differences between large numbers, there is significant uncertainty in this recharge estimate. Long-term changes in ground-water levels are evident in parts of the study area, but because of the sparse network and lack of data on well construction and lithology, it is uncertain if any significant changes have occurred in the northern part of the study area since 1980. In the southern half of the study area, ground-water levels generally were lower at the end of the 2002 irrigation

  20. New Faults Map Study for Central Part of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin Fayez, A.

    2006-05-01

    The Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics Research at King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology installed nine earthquake portable stations in central part of Saudi Arabia around Riyadh city to record micro- seismicty that is caused by local faults. Riyadh city and central part of Saudi Arabia are located in the Arabian Plate, which is known as a relatively stable platform. However, we have been able to determine some events that was caused by local faults. Most of these events are not felt. We are using digital recorders (RefTek 72A) for data acquisition and SAISAN software for analyses. The velocity model that I have used in this study is IASPEI model. Currently I am developing a map that shows some micro-earthquake events for that region. In addition, it includes some regional events. The objective of this study is to define the active faults in central part of Saudi Arabia.

  1. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  2. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  3. Fault tectonics and earthquake hazards in parts of southern California. [penninsular ranges, Garlock fault, Salton Trough area, and western Mojave Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M. (Principal Investigator); Lamar, D. L.; Gazley, C., Jr.; Lamar, J. V.; Stratton, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Four previously unknown faults were discovered in basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges. These have been named the San Ysidro Creek fault, Thing Valley fault, Canyon City fault, and Warren Canyon fault. In addition fault gouge and breccia were recognized along the San Diego River fault. Study of features on Skylab imagery and review of geologic and seismic data suggest that the risk of a damaging earthquake is greater along the northwestern portion of the Elsinore fault than along the southeastern portion. Physiographic indicators of active faulting along the Garlock fault identifiable in Skylab imagery include scarps, linear ridges, shutter ridges, faceted ridges, linear valleys, undrained depressions and offset drainage. The following previously unrecognized fault segments are postulated for the Salton Trough Area: (1) An extension of a previously known fault in the San Andreas fault set located southeast of the Salton Sea; (2) An extension of the active San Jacinto fault zone along a tonal change in cultivated fields across Mexicali Valley ( the tonal change may represent different soil conditions along opposite sides of a fault). For the Skylab and LANDSAT images studied, pseudocolor transformations offer no advantages over the original images in the recognition of faults in Skylab and LANDSAT images. Alluvial deposits of different ages, a marble unit and iron oxide gossans of the Mojave Mining District are more readily differentiated on images prepared from ratios of individual bands of the S-192 multispectral scanner data. The San Andreas fault was also made more distinct in the 8/2 and 9/2 band ratios by enhancement of vegetation differences on opposite sides of the fault. Preliminary analysis indicates a significant earth resources potential for the discrimination of soil and rock types, including mineral alteration zones. This application should be actively pursued.

  4. The Van Fault, Eastern Turkey: A Preliminary Geological Slip Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, D.; Elliott, J. R.; Altunel, E.; Kurban, Y.; Walker, R. T.; Parsons, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a preliminary quaternary slip-rate study on the Van fault, the source of the 2011 Mw7.1 reverse-slip earthquake which caused heavy damage to the cities of Van and Ercis, eastern Turkey. From the InSAR solution, we see a strong depth cut-off at 10km depth, above which there was no slip on the fault. We have carried out an investigation of the geomorphological expression of the fault in quaternary material, to determine whether the fault reaches the surface and, if so, whether this upper section could fail in an earthquake. On the western segment of the Van fault, we observe quaternary scarps coincident with the surface projection of the fault segment identified by InSAR, which displace quaternary alluvial fan and lake-bed deposits. These are coincident with the observation of fault gouge in quaternary deposits at a road cutting, providing evidence for a fault reaching the surface and suggesting that the upper section is capable of rupturing seismically. We use structure-from-motion photogrammetry, differential GPS and terrestrial LiDAR to determine offsets on two generations of fault scarps, and the creep offsets from the period following the earthquake. Preliminary radiocarbon and OSL dates from two uplifted terrace surfaces allow us to estimate a late quaternary geological slip-rate for the fault. Following the GPS and InSAR solution of Dogan et al. 2014 (GRL v41,i7), we also present field evidence and satellite image observations confirming the presence of a splay fault within the northern suburbs of Van city, which experienced creep following the 2011 earthquake. This fault is observed to be particularly evident in the early high resolution satellite imagery from the declassified CORONA missions, highlighting the potential for these datasets in identifying faults in areas now covered by urban sprawl. It remains unclear whether this fault could fail seismically. The fault which failed in 2011 is a north dipping reverse fault, unmapped prior to the

  5. Minerals Anomalies and Their Significances in Fault Rocks along the Front Longmenshan Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, J.; Li, H.; Song, S.; Kuo, L.; Pei, J.; Chen, P.; Hsiao, H.; Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    Anxian-Guanxian fault is the front fault of the Longmenshan fault system. In the Wenchuan earthquake (Ms8.0) of 12 May 2008, the surface rupture zone developed along the Anxian-Guanxian fault was also named as Hanwang rupture zone, which was approximately pure thrust, about 80km long accompanied with the vertical displacement of 0.5~4m averaged about 2m, and the maximum 4.2m occurred in the fifth villager group of Shaba village belonging to the Jiulong Town of Mianzhu City. We made several trenches cutting through the Anxian-Guanxian rupture zone. In the trenches near the Qingquan village of Jiulong town, three different colored strata including black, gray green and red layers developed from west to east. The black segment is carbonaceous mudstone and fault gouge, the gray green part is fault gouge, cataclasite and siltstone, and the purple red section is mainly mudstone with a few thin gouge layers at the top. Two continuous U-channel samples collected from the trench have been prepared for the synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements. Viewing from the data, clay minerals including illite, mica, kaolinite and chlorite are more abundant in fine and black gouge than the coarse rocks and purple red mudstone. Moreover, there are significant graphite occur at and near the slip plane. Considering the low friction coefficient and the distinct different features different from the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault, the carbon matter might have acted as lubrication and played certain significant role in the faulting process of the slow angle Anxian-Guanxian fault.

  6. Isolability of faults in sensor fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Reza; Langari, Reza

    2011-10-01

    A major concern with fault detection and isolation (FDI) methods is their robustness with respect to noise and modeling uncertainties. With this in mind, several approaches have been proposed to minimize the vulnerability of FDI methods to these uncertainties. But, apart from the algorithm used, there is a theoretical limit on the minimum effect of noise on detectability and isolability. This limit has been quantified in this paper for the problem of sensor fault diagnosis based on direct redundancies. In this study, first a geometric approach to sensor fault detection is proposed. The sensor fault is isolated based on the direction of residuals found from a residual generator. This residual generator can be constructed from an input-output or a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based model. The simplicity of this technique, compared to the existing methods of sensor fault diagnosis, allows for more rational formulation of the isolability concepts in linear systems. Using this residual generator and the assumption of Gaussian noise, the effect of noise on isolability is studied, and the minimum magnitude of isolable fault in each sensor is found based on the distribution of noise in the measurement system. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to clarify this approach.

  7. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place and Contractor. Part 1. (Alexander City, Alabama-Sevier, Arkansas)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    000000M00000c CI ( .-4 H 1 00)- ൈ #1 E W EU E L EU0 Emo E0000 EU EU EUQ Eវɜ E W H I 0.4N4 H Mill 00 40 04 q 000 Mom0 t0) 0go On ) goC 100000, 4-4 H I 0...NI I 0a-ON 00 4 16vv o-4 Id0N 111.4.444-.4 0-4 00) do00) m0) 0) 0) 4 N I Ca-4mNO is E<< E4< EUQ Eflhifllcflc 20 20000 24U~u Ns I CID 4 C4 N 110o0o S...moo IL- I-. L -1. L- L Co a ) I MrF- 11 (d-4 -4-4--I 𔃺.4-l4----- 10.-4 td -4 N 040 - 10 -. 4- -4 , 113.4 * . 3 I (0( if = ZC" "NNN(4 .CNC4 JN N

  8. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space

  9. Speciation despite globally overlapping distributions in Penicillium chrysogenum: the population genetics of Alexander Fleming’s lucky fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighty years ago, Alexander Fleming described the antibiotic effects of a fungus that had contaminated his bacterial culture, kick starting the antimicrobial revolution. The fungus was later ascribed to a globally distributed asexual species, Penicillium chrysogenum. Recently, the species has been...

  10. Mythorealistic Concept of "Beautiful Lady" in the Structure of the Author's Identity (Based on the Diaries of Alexander Blok)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minets, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The present paper deals with the diaries of Alexander Blok dated 1901-1921 reflecting the process of the writer's self-identification. During 20 years under the influence of various social and cultural situations Blok's "Self-Conception" is undergoing significant changes. The vector of these changes shows the complicated evolution of the…

  11. Growing Community: The Impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the Social and Learning Environment in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K.; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has…

  12. The Four Domains of Moral Education: The Contributions of Dewey, Alexander and Goleman to a Comprehensive Taxonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Ronald Lee

    1998-01-01

    Attempts to place a neglected dimension of John Dewey's work into its proper context. Examines the works of Dewey, F. Matthias Alexander, and Daniel Goldman to create four domains that must be addressed by a truly comprehensive model of moral education: direct external, indirect external, direct internal, and indirect internal. (DSK)

  13. History of quantum electronics at the Moscow Lebedev and General Physics Institutes: Nikolaj Basov and Alexander Prokhorov.

    PubMed

    Karlov, N V; Krokhin, O N; Lukishova, S G

    2010-09-01

    Some moments of maser and laser history in the Soviet Union are outlined, commemorating the work of Nikolaj G. Basov and Alexander M. Prokhorov, who, together with Charles H. Townes, were awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize "for fundamental work in the field of quantum electronics, which has led to the construction of oscillators and amplifiers based on the maser-laser principle."

  14. Behavior of Eupcheon fault Using Fault Monitoring Data in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S.; Hwang, J.; Park, D.; Choi, W.; Chang, C.

    2013-12-01

    In the early 1960s, the Fault Monitoring System(FMS) was adopted in several countries including U.S., Japan and Taiwan, where fault movement related with tectonics have occurred frequently. In Korea, only the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. - Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI) has been managing FMS. The first FMS of South Korea had been installed to monitor the Eupcheon fault located in Gyeoungju city from 2009. The system is equipped with in-situ measuring units including strainmeter, creepmeter, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), seismometer, and groundwater level meter. This paper presents the behavior of the Eupcheon fault based on the monitored data from EFMS in 2012. These data reveal that the earthquakes near Eupcheon fault did not lead to considerable changes in underground stress and displacement as the data in 2011. The creepmeter is sensitive to the temperature so that the data from the creepmeter showed the seasonal variation. The GNSS and strainmeter data have influenced by the tides. For this reason, it is required to employ a calibration system considering the external parameters such as tides and temperature variations. The KHNP-CRI is currently developing technical systems for data correction and analysis to predict the long-term behavior characteristics of Eupcheon fault. It is expected that the enhanced monitoring system contributes significantly in geo-tectonic safety assessment of nuclear plants and other critical facilities related to the national security.

  15. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  16. Alexander Gordon, puerperal sepsis, and modern theories of infection control--Semmelweis in perspective.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ian M

    2010-04-01

    Ignaz Semmelweis, a Hungarian doctor who practised in 19th century Vienna, is widely believed to be the father of modern infection control. He earned this accolade when he showed that puerperal sepsis was contagious and that it could be prevented with adequate hand hygiene. In fact, such ideas had circulated in the medical world for at least a century before Semmelweis' work. Moreover, it is well documented that Alexander Gordon, an obstetrician working in Aberdeen, UK, was the first to prove the contagious nature of puerperal sepsis. He also advocated the need for good hygiene for its prevention in a thesis published in 1795. This work described an epidemic of puerperal sepsis that began in Aberdeen in 1789. Gordon's thesis was reprinted three times in Edinburgh, Philadelphia, and London over the next 55 years, suggesting that Semmelweis (1847) could well have known of his work. Like Semmelweis, Gordon was persecuted for his findings.

  17. Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, David N

    2015-09-01

    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espoused for religious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures--Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain--who found in anthropological analysis resources to bolster rather than undermine faith. In both cases these individuals found themselves on the receiving end of ecclesiastical censure and were dismissed from their positions at church-governed institutions. But their motivation was to vindicate divine revelation, in Winchell's case from the physical anthropology of human origins and in Smith's from the cultural anthropology of Semitic ritual.

  18. Neuromusicology or Musiconeurology? “Omni-art” in Alexander Scriabin as a Fount of Ideas

    PubMed Central

    Triarhou, Lazaros C.

    2016-01-01

    Science can uncover neural mechanisms by looking at the work of artists. The ingenuity of a titan of classical music, the Russian composer Alexander Scriabin (1872–1915), in combining all the sensory modalities into a polyphony of aesthetical experience, and his creation of a chord based on fourths rather than the conventional thirds are proposed as putative points of departure for insight, in future studies, into the neural processes that underlie the perception of beauty, individually or universally. Scriabin’s “Omni-art” was a new synthesis of music, philosophy and religion, and a new aesthetic language, a unification of music, vision, olfaction, drama, poetry, dance, image, and conceptualization, all governed by logic, in the quest for the integrative action of the human mind toward a “higher reality” of which music is only a component. PMID:27014167

  19. Bryan Coast, English Coast, Alexander Island, Fallieres Coast, and Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Antarctica shows the Bryan Coast (lower left), the English Coast (lower central), Alexander Island (middle right), the Fallieres Coast (top right), and the Bellingshausen Sea. The entire continent has been dedicated to peaceful scientific investigation since 1961, with the signing of the Antarctic Treaty.The waters surrounding Antarctica are intensely cold. Salt water freezes at -2C, allowing sea ice to form. The middle left portion of the image shows quite a lot of sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea. During the Antarctic winter, when data for this image was acquired, Antarctica doubles in size to about 28.5 million square km (or about 11 million square miles), and temperatures in the -60C range are common.This true-color image was compiled from MODIS data gathered March 29, 2002. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  20. Fault detection and fault tolerance in robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visinsky, Monica; Walker, Ian D.; Cavallaro, Joseph R.

    1992-01-01

    Robots are used in inaccessible or hazardous environments in order to alleviate some of the time, cost and risk involved in preparing men to endure these conditions. In order to perform their expected tasks, the robots are often quite complex, thus increasing their potential for failures. If men must be sent into these environments to repair each component failure in the robot, the advantages of using the robot are quickly lost. Fault tolerant robots are needed which can effectively cope with failures and continue their tasks until repairs can be realistically scheduled. Before fault tolerant capabilities can be created, methods of detecting and pinpointing failures must be perfected. This paper develops a basic fault tree analysis of a robot in order to obtain a better understanding of where failures can occur and how they contribute to other failures in the robot. The resulting failure flow chart can also be used to analyze the resiliency of the robot in the presence of specific faults. By simulating robot failures and fault detection schemes, the problems involved in detecting failures for robots are explored in more depth.

  1. Silurian trace fossils in carbonate turbidites from the Alexander Arc of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) body and trace fossils from the Heceta Formation are preserved in the oldest widespread carbonates in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. They represent the earliest shelly benthos to inhabit a diversity of marine environments and are important indicators of the early stages in benthic community development within this ancient island arc. The trace fossils are significant because they add to a small but growing body of knowledge about ichnofaunas in deep-water Paleozoic carbonates. Proximal to medial carbonate turbidites yield a low-diversity suite of trace fossils that comprises five distinct types of biogenic structures. Bedding planes reveal simple epichnial burrows (Planolites), cross-cutting burrows (Fucusopsis), and tiny cylindrical burrows. These and other casts, including chondrites( )-like burrow clusters, represent the feeding activities (fodinichnia) of preturbidite animals. Hypichnial burrows and rare endichnial traces reflect the activities of postturbidite animals. Broken and offset traces indicate that infaunal biota commenced burrowing before slumping and subsequent soft-sediment deformation. The abundance and density of trace fossils increases offshore in the medial turbidites associated with a decrease in the size and amount of coarse particles and with an increase in mud and preserved organic material. Although diversity levels are similar in the proximal and medial turbidite facies, they are much lower than in Paleozoic siliciclastic turbidites. This may reflect unfavorable environmental conditions for infaunal biota or paleobiogeographic isolation of the Alexander terrane during the Silurian. A greater use of trace fossils in terrane analysis will help to resolve this issue and should provide new data for reconstructing the paleogeography of circum-Pacific terranes.

  2. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault in an image created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, California, about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. This area is at the junction of two large mountain ranges, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains on the right. Quail Lake Reservoir sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Interstate 5 is the prominent linear feature starting at the left edge of the image and continuing into the fault zone, passing eventually over Tejon Pass into the Central Valley, visible at the upper left.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994

  3. Characterization of leaky faults

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao

    1990-05-01

    Leaky faults provide a flow path for fluids to move underground. It is very important to characterize such faults in various engineering projects. The purpose of this work is to develop mathematical solutions for this characterization. The flow of water in an aquifer system and the flow of air in the unsaturated fault-rock system were studied. If the leaky fault cuts through two aquifers, characterization of the fault can be achieved by pumping water from one of the aquifers, which are assumed to be horizontal and of uniform thickness. Analytical solutions have been developed for two cases of either a negligibly small or a significantly large drawdown in the unpumped aquifer. Some practical methods for using these solutions are presented. 45 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  5. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  6. Delineation of Urban Active Faults Using Multi-scale Gravity Analysis in Shenzhen, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    In fact, many cities in the world are established on the active faults. As the rapid urban development, thousands of large facilities, such as ultrahigh buildings, supersized bridges, railway, and so on, are built near or on the faults, which may change the balance of faults and induce urban earthquake. Therefore, it is significant to delineate effectively the faults for urban planning construction and social sustainable development. Due to dense buildings in urban area, the ordinary approaches to identify active faults, like geological survey, artificial seismic exploration and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides a more efficient and convenient method to delineate urban faults. The present study is an attempt to propose a novel gravity method, multi-scale gravity analysis, for identifying urban active faults and determining their stability. Firstly, the gravity anomalies are decomposed by wavelet multi-scale analysis. Secondly, based on the decomposed gravity anomalies, the crust is layered and the multilayer horizontal tectonic stress is inverted. Lastly, the decomposed anomalies and the inverted horizontal tectonic stress are used to infer the distribution and stability of main active faults. For validating our method, a case study on active faults in Shenzhen City is processed. The results show that the distribution of decomposed gravity anomalies and multilayer horizontal tectonic stress are controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to infer depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4km to 20km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  7. Rough faults, distributed weakening, and off-fault deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. Ashley; Nielsen, Stefan; di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2010-08-01

    We report systematic spatial variations in fault rocks along nonplanar strike-slip faults cross-cutting the Lake Edison Granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California (Sierran wavy fault) and Lobbia outcrops of the Adamello Batholith in the Italian Alps (Lobbia wavy fault). In the case of the Sierran fault, pseudotachylyte formed at contractional fault bends, where it is found as thin (1-2 mm) fault-parallel veins. Epidote and chlorite developed in the same seismic context as the pseudotachylyte and are especially abundant in extensional fault bends. We argue that the presence of fluids, as illustrated by this example, does not necessarily preclude the development of frictional melt. In the case of the Lobbia fault, pseudotachylyte thickness varies along the length of the fault, but the pseudotachylyte veins thicken and pool in extensional bends. We conduct a quantitative analysis of fault roughness, microcrack distribution, stress, and friction along the Lobbia fault. Numerical modeling results show that opening in extensional bends and localized thermal weakening in contractional bends counteract resistance encountered by fault waviness, resulting in an overall weaker fault than suggested by the corresponding static friction coefficient. The models also predict static stress redistribution around bends in the faults which is consistent with distribution of microcracks, indicating significant elastic and inelastic strain energy is dissipated into the wall rocks due to nonplanar fault geometry. Together these observations suggest that damage and energy dissipation occurs along the entire nonplanar fault during slip, rather than being confined to the region close to the dynamically propagating crack tip.

  8. Paleoseismic study of the South Lajas fault: First documentation of an onshore Holocene fault in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Mann, P.

    2005-01-01

    The island of Puerto Rico is located within the complex boundary between the North America and Caribbean plates. The relative motion along this boundary is dominantly left-lateral strike slip, but compression and extension are locally significant. Although tectonic models proposed for the region suggest the presence of onshore active faults in Puerto Rico, no faults with Holocene displacement have been documented on the island before this study. Current seismic hazard assessments primarily consider only the impact of distant, offshore seismic sources because onshore fault hazard is unknown. Our mapping and trenching studies demonstrate Holocene surface rupture on a previously undocumented fault in southwestern Puerto Rico. We excavated a trench across a scarp near the southern edge of the Lajas Valley that exposed a narrow fault zone disrupting alluvial deposits. Structural relations indicate valley-side-down fault slip, with a component of strike-slip motion. Radiocarbon analyses of organic material collected from the sediments suggest that the most recent surface rupture occurred during the past 5000 yr, but no minimum age has yet been established. This fault may be part of a larger fault zone that extends from the western end of the Lajas Valley toward Ponce, the second largest city in Puerto Rico. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  9. Integration of InSAR and GIS in the Study of Surface Faults Caused by Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Olivera, Jorge A.; Farina, Paolo; Garduño-Monroy, Victor H.

    2008-05-01

    In Celaya city, Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes (SCFP) began to become visible at the beginning of the 1980s with the sprouting of the crackings that gave rise to the surface faults "Oriente" and "Poniente". At the present time, the city is being affected by five surface faults that display a preferential NNW-SSE direction, parallel to the regional faulting system "Taxco-San Miguel de Allende". In order to study the SCFP in the city, the first step was to obtain a map of surface faults, by integrating in a GIS field survey and an urban city plan. The following step was to create a map of the current phreatic level decline in city with the information of deep wells and using the "kriging" method in order to obtain a continuous surface. Finally the interferograms maps resulted of an InSAR analysis of 9 SAR images covering the time interval between July 12 of 2003 and May 27 of 2006 were integrated to a GIS. All the maps generated, show how the surface faults divide the city from North to South, in two zones that behave in a different way. The difference of the phreatic level decline between these two zones is 60 m; and the InSAR study revealed that the Western zone practically remains stable, while sinkings between the surface faults "Oriente" and "Universidad Pedagógica" are present, as well as in portions NE and SE of the city, all of these sinkings between 7 and 10 cm/year.

  10. Earthquake disaster mitigation of Lembang Fault West Java with electromagnetic method

    SciTech Connect

    Widodo

    2015-04-24

    The Lembang fault is located around eight kilometers from Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. The existence of this fault runs through densely populated settlement and tourism area. It is an active fault structure with increasing seismic activity where the 28 August 2011 earthquake occurred. The seismic response at the site is strongly influenced by local geological conditions. The ambient noise measurements from the western part of this fault give strong implication for a complex 3-D tectonic setting. Hence, near surface Electromagnetic (EM) measurements are carried out to understand the location of the local active fault of the research area. Hence, near surface EM measurements are carried out to understand the location of the local active fault and the top of the basement structure of the research area. The Transientelectromagnetic (TEM) measurements are carried out along three profiles, which include 35 TEM soundings. The results indicate that TEM data give detailed conductivity distribution of fault structure in the study area.

  11. Earthquake disaster mitigation of Lembang Fault West Java with electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widodo

    2015-04-01

    The Lembang fault is located around eight kilometers from Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. The existence of this fault runs through densely populated settlement and tourism area. It is an active fault structure with increasing seismic activity where the 28 August 2011 earthquake occurred. The seismic response at the site is strongly influenced by local geological conditions. The ambient noise measurements from the western part of this fault give strong implication for a complex 3-D tectonic setting. Hence, near surface Electromagnetic (EM) measurements are carried out to understand the location of the local active fault of the research area. Hence, near surface EM measurements are carried out to understand the location of the local active fault and the top of the basement structure of the research area. The Transientelectromagnetic (TEM) measurements are carried out along three profiles, which include 35 TEM soundings. The results indicate that TEM data give detailed conductivity distribution of fault structure in the study area.

  12. Fault Management Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Haste, Deepak; Moore, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and considerations in the application of metrics to measure the effectiveness of fault management. Fault management refers here to the operational aspect of system health management, and as such is considered as a meta-control loop that operates to preserve or maximize the system's ability to achieve its goals in the face of current or prospective failure. As a suite of control loops, the metrics to estimate and measure the effectiveness of fault management are similar to those of classical control loops in being divided into two major classes: state estimation, and state control. State estimation metrics can be classified into lower-level subdivisions for detection coverage, detection effectiveness, fault isolation and fault identification (diagnostics), and failure prognosis. State control metrics can be classified into response determination effectiveness and response effectiveness. These metrics are applied to each and every fault management control loop in the system, for each failure to which they apply, and probabilistically summed to determine the effectiveness of these fault management control loops to preserve the relevant system goals that they are intended to protect.

  13. Measuring fault tolerance with the FTAPE fault injection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The major parts of the tool include a system-wide fault-injector, a workload generator, and a workload activity measurement tool. The workload creates high stress conditions on the machine. Using stress-based injection, the fault injector is able to utilize knowledge of the workload activity to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio, performance degradation, and number of system crashes are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  14. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1993-01-01

    Erroneous measurements in multisensor navigation systems must be detected and isolated. A recursive estimator can find fast growing errors; a least squares batch estimator can find slow growing errors. This process is called fault detection. A protection radius can be calculated as a function of time for a given location. This protection radius can be used to guarantee the integrity of the navigation data. Fault isolation can be accomplished using either a snapshot method or by examining the history of the fault detection statistics.

  15. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  16. 78 FR 53630 - Airworthiness Directives; Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Sailplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...: Jim Rutherford, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone: (816) 329-4165; fax: (816) 329-4090; email: jim.rutherford@faa.gov... Rutherford, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City,...

  17. 78 FR 30791 - Airworthiness Directives; Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Sailplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Rutherford, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone: (816) 329-4165; fax: (816) 329-4090; email: jim.rutherford@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY... Rutherford, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City,...

  18. Fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley, California - Field survey and fault model test -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, K.; Onishi, C. T.; Karasaki, K.; Tanaka, S.; Hamada, T.; Sasaki, T.; Ito, H.; Tsukuda, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, J.; Moriya, T.

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop hydrologic characterization technology of fault zones, it is desirable to clarify the relationship between the geologic structure and hydrologic properties of fault zones. To this end, we are performing surface-based geologic and trench investigations, geophysical surveys and borehole-based hydrologic investigations along the Wildcat fault in Berkeley,California to investigate the effect of fault zone structure on regional hydrology. The present paper outlines the fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley on the basis of results from trench excavation surveys. The approximately 20 - 25 km long Wildcat fault is located within the Berkeley Hills and extends northwest-southeast from Richmond to Oakland, subparallel to the Hayward fault. The Wildcat fault, which is a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip fault, steps right in a releasing bend at the Berkeley Hills region. A total of five trenches have been excavated across the fault to investigate the deformation structure of the fault zone in the bedrock. Along the Wildcat fault, multiple fault surfaces are branched, bent, paralleled, forming a complicated shear zone. The shear zone is ~ 300 m in width, and the fault surfaces may be classified under the following two groups: 1) Fault surfaces offsetting middle Miocene Claremont Chert on the east against late Miocene Orinda formation and/or San Pablo Group on the west. These NNW-SSE trending fault surfaces dip 50 - 60° to the southwest. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 1 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 60 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault gouge and foliated cataclasite show normal right-slip shear sense. 2) Fault surfaces forming a positive flower structure in Claremont Chert. These NW-SE trending fault surfaces are sub-vertical or steeply dipping. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 3 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 200 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault

  19. OpenStudio - Fault Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Stephen; Robertson, Joseph; Cheung, Howard; Horsey, Henry

    2014-09-19

    This software record documents the OpenStudio fault model development portion of the Fault Detection and Diagnostics LDRD project.The software provides a suite of OpenStudio measures (scripts) for modeling typical HVAC system faults in commercial buildings and also included supporting materials: example projects and OpenStudio measures for reporting fault costs and energy impacts.

  20. The Dakota aquifer near Pueblo, Colorado; faults and flow patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Dakota Sandstone and the underlying Purgatoire Formation consisting of the Glencairn Shale and Lytle Sandstone Members form a board outcrop at the southeastern margin of the Canon City Embankment. The two formations form the Dakota aquifer, which supplies water to many domestic, stock, and irrigation wells in addition to a few municipal wells in the 12-township study area. Five large faults and several small faults, all apparently of high angle, are found in the study area. Analysis of water levels and water quality shows that parts of some of these faults restrict the flow of groundwater in the Dakota aquifer. Lithology of the rocks, particularly in the Dakota Sandstone and in the Glencairn Shale Member, is extremely variable. The lithology appears to affect the flow regime, possibly by determining how a particular segment of a fault affects flow. (USGS)

  1. Mexico City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... Two small brighter patches within the hazy area indicate low fog. In the left-hand panel, the city basin appears significantly clearer, but ... very high altitudes, in contrast to the low-lying haze and fog near Mexico City. When the stereo retrieval determines that a location is ...

  2. Atypical Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary city" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical cities challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…

  3. City Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Today, fewer city blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build cities that are safe play havens. (MLH)

  4. Slip distribution, strain accumulation and aseismic slip on the Chaman Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Chaman fault system is a transcurrent fault system developed due to the oblique convergence of the India and Eurasia plates in the western boundary of the India plate. To evaluate the contemporary rates of strain accumulation along and across the Chaman Fault system, we use 2003-2011 Envisat SAR imagery and InSAR time-series methods to obtain a ground velocity field in radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction. We correct the InSAR data for different sources of systematic biases including the phase unwrapping errors, local oscillator drift, topographic residuals and stratified tropospheric delay and evaluate the uncertainty due to the residual delay using time-series of MODIS observations of precipitable water vapor. The InSAR velocity field and modeling demonstrates the distribution of deformation across the Chaman fault system. In the central Chaman fault system, the InSAR velocity shows clear strain localization on the Chaman and Ghazaband faults and modeling suggests a total slip rate of ~24 mm/yr distributed on the two faults with rates of 8 and 16 mm/yr, respectively corresponding to the 80% of the total ~3 cm/yr plate motion between India and Eurasia at these latitudes and consistent with the kinematic models which have predicted a slip rate of ~17-24 mm/yr for the Chaman Fault. In the northern Chaman fault system (north of 30.5N), ~6 mm/yr of the relative plate motion is accommodated across Chaman fault. North of 30.5 N where the topographic expression of the Ghazaband fault vanishes, its slip does not transfer to the Chaman fault but rather distributes among different faults in the Kirthar range and Sulaiman lobe. Observed surface creep on the southern Chaman fault between Nushki and north of City of Chaman, indicates that the fault is partially locked, consistent with the recorded M<7 earthquakes in last century on this segment. The Chaman fault between north of the City of Chaman to North of Kabul, does not show an increase in the rate of strain

  5. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of California's Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) combined to measure changes in the surface that may have occurred between the time the two images were taken.

    The images were collected by the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

    The radar image data are shown as a gray-scale image, with the interferometric measurements that show the changes rendered in color. Only the urbanized area could be mapped with these data. The color changes from orange tones to blue tones across the Hayward fault (marked by a thin red line) show about 2-3centimeters (0.8-1.1 inches) of gradual displacement or movement of the southwest side of the fault. The block west of the fault moved horizontally toward the northwest during the 63 months between the acquisition of the two SAR images. This fault movement is called a seismic creep because the fault moved slowly without generating an earthquake.

    Scientists are using the SAR interferometry along with other data collected on the ground to monitor this fault motion in an attempt to estimate the probability of earthquake on the Hayward fault, which last had a major earthquake of magnitude 7 in 1868. This analysis indicates that the northern part of the Hayward fault is creeping all the way from the surface to a depth of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). This suggests that the potential for a large earthquake on the northern Hayward fault might be less than previously thought. The blue area to the west (lower left) of the fault near the center of the image seemed to move upward relative to the yellow and orange areas nearby by about 2 centimeters (0.8 inches). The cause of this apparent motion is not yet confirmed, but the rise of groundwater levels during the time between the images may have caused the reversal of a small portion of the subsidence that

  6. James Alexander Lindsay (1856–1931), and his clinical axioms and aphorisms

    PubMed Central

    Breathnach, Caoimhghin S; Moynihan, John B

    2012-01-01

    John Alexander Lindsay was born at Fintona, county Tyrone in 1856, and at the age of 23 he graduated in medicine at the Royal University of Ireland. After two years in London and Europe he returned to Belfast to join the staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital and in 1899 he was appointed to the professorship of medicine. He was valued by the students for his clarity and by his colleagues for his many extracurricular contributions to the medical profession in the positions entrusted to him. He published monographs on Diseases of the Lungs, and the Climatic Treatment of Consumption, but his later Medical Axioms show his deep appreciation of studied clinical observation. Although practice was changing in the new century Lindsay displayed an ability to change with the new requirements, as evidenced by his lecture on electrocardiography as president of the section of medicine of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland in 1915. He was impressed by the way the string galvanometer changed attention from stenosis and incompetence of the valves to the cardiac musculature, but rightly suspected that there was more to be told about the state of the myocardium than Einthoven's three leads revealed. His death occurred in Belfast in 1931. PMID:23620615

  7. James Alexander Lindsay (1856-1931), and his clinical axioms and aphorisms.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghin S; Moynihan, John B

    2012-09-01

    John Alexander Lindsay was born at Fintona, county Tyrone in 1856, and at the age of 23 he graduated in medicine at the Royal University of Ireland. After two years in London and Europe he returned to Belfast to join the staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital and in 1899 he was appointed to the professorship of medicine. He was valued by the students for his clarity and by his colleagues for his many extracurricular contributions to the medical profession in the positions entrusted to him. He published monographs on Diseases of the Lungs, and the Climatic Treatment of Consumption, but his later Medical Axioms show his deep appreciation of studied clinical observation. Although practice was changing in the new century Lindsay displayed an ability to change with the new requirements, as evidenced by his lecture on electrocardiography as president of the section of medicine of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland in 1915. He was impressed by the way the string galvanometer changed attention from stenosis and incompetence of the valves to the cardiac musculature, but rightly suspected that there was more to be told about the state of the myocardium than Einthoven's three leads revealed. His death occurred in Belfast in 1931.

  8. Fault tolerant magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, E.H.; Sortore, C.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Williams, R.D.; Fedigan, S.J.; Aimone, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    A fault tolerant magnetic bearing system was developed and demonstrated on a large flexible-rotor test rig. The bearing system comprises a high speed, fault tolerant digital controller, three high capacity radial magnetic bearings, one thrust bearing, conventional variable reluctance position sensors, and an array of commercial switching amplifiers. Controller fault tolerance is achieved through a very high speed voting mechanism which implements triple modular redundancy with a powered spare CPU, thereby permitting failure of up to three CPU modules without system failure. Amplifier/cabling/coil fault tolerance is achieved by using a separate power amplifier for each bearing coil and permitting amplifier reconfiguration by the controller upon detection of faults. This allows hot replacement of failed amplifiers without any system degradation and without providing any excess amplifier kVA capacity over the nominal system requirement. Implemented on a large (2440 mm in length) flexible rotor, the system shows excellent rejection of faults including the failure of three CPUs as well as failure of two adjacent amplifiers (or cabling) controlling an entire stator quadrant.

  9. Pen Branch Fault Program

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Stieve, A.L.; Aadland, R.

    1990-09-28

    Evidence from subsurface mapping and seismic reflection surveys at Savannah River Site (SRS) suggests the presence of a fault which displaces Cretaceous through Tertiary (90--35 million years ago) sediments. This feature has been described and named the Pen Branch fault (PBF) in a recent Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) paper (DP-MS-88-219). Because the fault is located near operating nuclear facilities, public perception and federal regulations require a thorough investigation of the fault to determine whether any seismic hazard exists. A phased program with various elements has been established to investigate the PBF to address the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines represented in 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. The objective of the PBF program is to fully characterize the nature of the PBF (ESS-SRL-89-395). This report briefly presents current understanding of the Pen Branch fault based on shallow drilling activities completed the fall of 1989 (PBF well series) and subsequent core analyses (SRL-ESS-90-145). The results are preliminary and ongoing: however, investigations indicate that the fault is not capable. In conjunction with the shallow drilling, other activities are planned or in progress. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Historical Seismicity of the Algeciras Fault System, Southwestern Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicangana, G.; Gomez-Capera, A.; Salcedo-Hurtado, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Algeciras Fault System (AFS) is located in the Eastern Cordillera south western Colombia. This fault system has been allocated at least four big earthquakes in the last 230 years. In this work we describe the macroseismic intensities of these earthquakes not only to its epicentral zone but also in others places as Bogotá metropolitan area far from AFS more of 200 km. The AFS is shaped by three thrust faults. From north to south these are Guayuriba Fault with with 160 km of lengh, the Algeciras Fault with 149 km of lengh, and the Garzon - Pitalito Fault with 128 km of lengh. The big earthquakes, whose macroseismic data are analyzed here, its that of the 1785 (M=6.8) event, for which the Guayuriba Fault was related; it caused heavy damage in Bogotá and Neiva. This fault also produced the 1917 (6.9Ms) earthquake which significantly affected to Bogotá and Villavicencio. The 1967 earthquake (7.2Mw) is related to the Algeciras Fault; this event was very destructive in rural villages of Huila Department and caused significant damage in Bogotá and Neiva. With the latter earthquake high vulnerability was evident in the Bogota metropolitan area front to a large event ocurred by this fault system. The 16 November 1827 (M=7.3) earthquake ocurred on the Garzon - Pitalito Fault and was felt throughout the whole Andean region of Colombia. This event produced high intensities both in Bogota like in Popayan, Neiva, Pasto and where today are located the cities of Armenia, Manizales and Pereira toward west of Colombia. These lattest cities were founded in the second half of nineteen century after happened this earthquake. From historical seismicity review, we can determine the scope of seismic hazard for this fault system which not only affects its area of influence but also the center and west of the country, a región inhabited by more than 65% of the population of Colombia.

  11. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  12. Rough Faults, Distributed Weakening, and Off-Fault Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Nielsen, S. B.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.; Niemeijer, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    We report systematic spatial variations of fault rocks along non-planar strike-slip faults cross-cutting the Lake Edison Granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California (Sierran Wavy Fault) and the Lobbia outcrops of the Adamello Batholith in the Italian Alps (Lobbia Wavy Fault). In the case of the Sierran fault, pseudotachylyte formed at contractional fault bends, where it is found as thin (1-2 mm) fault-parallel veins. Epidote and chlorite developed in the same seismic context as the pseudotachylyte and are especially abundant in extensional fault bends. We argue that the presence of fluids, as illustrated by this example, does not necessarily preclude the development of frictional melt. In the case of the Lobbia fault, pseudotachylyte is present in variable thickness along the length of the fault, but the pseudotachylyte veins thicken and pool in extensional bends. The Lobbia fault surface is self-affine, and we conduct a quantitative analysis of microcrack distribution, stress, and friction along the fault. Numerical modeling results show that opening in extensional bends and localized thermal weakening in contractional bends counteract resistance encountered by fault waviness, resulting in an overall weaker fault than suggested by the corresponding static friction coefficient. Models also predict stress redistribution around bends in the faults which mirror microcrack distributions, indicating significant elastic and anelastic strain energy is dissipated into the wall rocks due to non-planar fault geometry. Together these observations suggest that, along non-planar faults, damage and energy dissipation occurs along the entire fault during slip, rather than being confined to the region close to the crack tip as predicted by classical fracture mechanics.

  13. Structure of the eastern Seattle fault zone, Washington state: New insights from seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Pratt, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    We identify and characterize the active Seattle fault zone (SFZ) east of Lake Washington with newly acquired seismic reflection data. Our results focus on structures observed in the upper 1 km below the cities of Bellevue, Sammamish, Newcastle, and Fall City, Washington. The SFZ appears as a broad zone of faulting and folding at the southern boundary of the Seattle basin and north edge of the Seattle uplift. We interpret the Seattle fault as a thrust fault that accommodates north-south shortening by forming a fault-propagation fold with a forelimb breakthrough. The blind tip of the main fault forms a synclinal growth fold (deformation front) that extends at least 8 km east of Vasa Park (west side of Lake Sammamish) and defines the south edge of the Seattle basin. South of the deformation front is the forelimb break-through fault, which was exposed in a trench at Vasa Park. The Newcastle Hills anticline, a broad anticline forming the north part of the Seattle uplift east of Lake Washington, is interpreted to lie between the main blind strand of the Seattle fault and a backthrust. Our profiles, on the northern limb of this anticline, consistently image north-dipping strata. A structural model for the SFZ east of Lake Washington is consistent with about 8 km of slip on the upper part of the Seattle fault, but the amount of motion is only loosely constrained.

  14. Diagnosable systems for intermittent faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallela, S.; Masson, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    The fault diagnosis capabilities of systems composed of interconnected units capable of testing each other are studied for the case of systems with intermittent faults. A central role is played by the concept of t(i)-fault diagnosability. A system is said to be t(i)-fault diagnosable when it is such that if no more than t(i) units are intermittently faulty then a fault-free unit will never be diagnosed as faulty and the diagnosis at any time is at worst incomplete. Necessary and sufficient conditions for t(i)-fault diagnosability are proved, and bounds for t(i) are established. The conditions are in general more restrictive than those for permanent-fault diagnosability. For intermittent faults there is only one testing strategy (repetitive testing), and consequently only one type of intermittent-fault diagnosable system.

  15. Creeping Faults and Seismicity: Lessons From The Hayward Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malservisi, R.; Furlong, K. P.; Gans, C.

    While faults remain mostly locked between large strain releasing events, they can dissipate some of the accumulating elastic strain through creep. One such fault that releases a significant fraction of accumulating strain by creep is the Hayward fault in the San Francisco Bay region of California. The seismic risk associated with creeping faults such as the Hayward fault will depend in part on the net rate of moment accu- mulation (slip deficit) on the fault. Using a visco-elastic finite-element model driven by far field plate motions, we have investigated how the specific geometry of locked and free portions of the fault, and the interactions between the fault zone and the sur- rounding lithosphere influence creep on the fault plane and thus the seismic risk. In contrast to previous studies of the effects of the geometry of locked patches on the surface creep rate that specified rates on those patches, we specify only "creepable" regions and allow the system to adjust the creep rate. With our approach, we can infer fault zone geometries and physical properties that can produce the observed surface creep on the Hayward fault letting the rheology, geometry, and mechanics of sys- tem determine patterns of creep on the fault plane. Our results show that the creep rate decreases smoothly moving toward the locked patches. This leads to "creepable" (low friction) areas that accumulate a high slip deficit as compared to other low fric- tion segments of the fault. A comparison of the creep pattern from our results with Hayward fault micro-seismicity indicates that events cluster in the "creepable" re- gions with a creeping-velocity gradient that leads to a significant strain accumulation rate in the elastic material surrounding the creeping fault. This correlation provides an additional tool to map deformation patterns and strain accumulation on the fault. Micro-seismicity, surface deformation, and geodynamic modeling combine to allow us to refine our estimation of net

  16. Changes in fault length distributions due to fault linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunshan; Nieto-Samaniego, A. F.; Alaniz-Álvarez, S. A.; Velasquillo-Martínez, L. G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J. M.; García-Hernández, J.; Murillo-Muñetón, G.

    2010-01-01

    Fault linkage plays an important role in the growth of faults. In this paper we analyze a published synthetic model to simulate fault linkage. The results of the simulation indicate that fault linkage is the cause of the shallower local slopes on the length-frequency plots. The shallower local slopes lead to two effects. First, the curves of log cumulative number against log length exhibit fluctuating shapes as reported in literature. Second, for a given fault population, the power-law exponents after linkage are negatively related to the linked length scales. Also, we present datasets of fault length measured from four structural maps at the Cantarell oilfield in the southern Gulf of Mexico (offshore Campeche). The results demonstrate that the fault length data, corrected by seismic resolution at the tip fault zone, also exhibit fluctuating curves of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. The steps (shallower slopes) on the curves imply the scale positions of fault linkage. We conclude that fault linkage is the main reason for the fluctuating shapes of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. On the other hand, our data show that the two-tip faults are better for linear analysis between maximum displacement ( D) and length ( L). Evidently, two-tip faults underwent fewer fault linkages and interactions.

  17. Bathymetric gradients within a Paleozoic Island Arc, southeastern Alaska (Alexander Terrane)

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation reflect bathymetric gradients within the ancient island arc exposed in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. These rocks record the earliest occurrence of widespread carbonate deposition in the region and represent the earliest foundation for shallow-water platform development within the arc. The excellent preservation of platform, platform margin, and slope deposits contrasts with the poor preservation of many marine sediments that originated within other island arcs. Hence, these limestones provide important insights into the styles, processes, and bathymetry of carbonate deposition in island arcs. Carbonate depositional sites within the arc extended laterally from nearshore intertidal and relatively shallow subtidal zones of a marine platform, to the seaward margins of a rimmed shelf, and into deeper subtidal areas of a slope environment. Fossiliferous deposits that originated on the platform comprise a diversity of shelly benthos, including corals and stromatoporoids in growth position. Dasycladacean algae, oncoids, and Amphipora also indicate shallow-water conditions. Organic buildups and reefs were constructed by cyanobacteria, massive stromatoporoids, corals, and algae at the platform margin. Deposition beyond the seaward edge of the shelf is evident from the carbonate turbidites that consist of skeletal debris of shallow-water derivation and an absence of coarse siliciclastic detritus. Sedimentation and resedimentation along a bathymetric gradient within the arc is especially well illustrated by the carbonate breccias that are enclosed within these deep subtidal sediments. They comprise detached stromatolites and clasts of shallow-water origin that were derived from the platform and its margin during periodic slumping of the shelf edge.

  18. Death by polonium-210: lessons learned from the murder of former Soviet spy Alexander Litvinenko.

    PubMed

    McFee, Robin B; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2009-02-01

    The medical response to radiation--whether the result of radiological warfare, terrorist deployment of improvised radiation dispersal weapons, political assassination, occupational or industrial accidents or the medically radiated patient remains one of the least taught among all disciplines within medical education. In the aftermath of 9/11 among medical vulnerabilities to toxicant threats, of all the categories of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)--whether using the CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) or NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) acronym--radiation is the least taught in professional schools, responder cultures or civil preparedness organizations. To date, few health care professionals (HCP) possess the fundamental knowledge or skills to identify and diagnose, let alone treat a radiation victim; this vulnerability made even more obvious in the aftermath of the high profile assassination of former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko. He was poisoned with Polonium210. Radioactive substances are ubiquitous with radiation sources being in or transported through virtually every region nationwide. It is essential to increase preparedness among community and rural health care facilities as well as urban and university hospitals. Managing radiation injuries effectively requires access to specialized equipment and expertise. Radiation sickness is progressive and may require acute, critical and long-term care throughout the course of illness. Regardless of the source, preparedness rests upon acknowledging a threat exists and dedicating the resources to address the risks including the enhancement of training and equipment. Mass or individual exposures to radiation present unique challenges to the entire response continuum from law enforcement, first responders and emergency medical care. Increased education about and practice in responding to radiological threats is essential to enhance preparedness.

  19. Neuromechanical interference of posture on movement: evidence from Alexander technique teachers rising from a chair

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W.; Mian, Omar S.; Peters, Amy

    2014-01-01

    While Alexander technique (AT) teachers have been reported to stand up by shifting weight gradually as they incline the trunk forward, healthy untrained (HU) adults appear unable to rise in this way. This study examines the hypothesis that HU have difficulty rising smoothly, and that this difficulty relates to reported differences in postural stiffness between groups. A wide range of movement durations (1–8 s) and anteroposterior foot placements were studied under the instruction to rise at a uniform rate. Before seat-off (SO) there were clear and profound performance differences between groups, particularly for slower movements, that could not be explained by strength differences. For each movement duration, HU used approximately twice the forward center-of-mass (CoM) velocity and vertical feet-loading rate as AT. For slow movements, HU violated task instruction by abruptly speeding up and rapidly shifting weight just before SO. In contrast, AT shifted weight gradually while smoothly advancing the CoM, achieving a more anterior CoM at SO. A neuromechanical model revealed a mechanism whereby stiffness affects standing up by exacerbating a conflict between postural and balance constraints. Thus activating leg extensors to take body weight hinders forward CoM progression toward the feet. HU's abrupt weight shift can be explained by reliance on momentum to stretch stiff leg extensors. AT's smooth rises can be explained by heightened dynamic tone control that reduces leg extensor resistance and improves force transmission across the trunk. Our results suggest postural control shapes movement coordination through a dynamic “postural frame” that affects the resistive behavior of the body. PMID:25085609

  20. Project Alexander the Great: a study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education.

    PubMed

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O

    2008-01-01

    Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering is considered amongst the most reputable fields within the global arena, and will likely be the primer for any future breakthroughs in Medicine and Biology. Bioengineering/biomedical engineering education has evolved since late 1950s and is undergoing advancement in leading academic institutions worldwide. This paper delineates an original study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and bears the name 'Project Alexander the Great'. The initial step of the project was to survey all 10448 universities, recognized by the International Association of Universities, spread among the 193 member states of the United Nations within the six continents. The project aims at identifying, disseminating, and networking, through the world-wide-web, those institutions of higher learning that provide bioengineering/biomedical engineering education. The significance of this project is multifold: i) the inception of a web-based 'world-map' in bioengineering/biomedical engineering education for the potential international student desiring to pursue a career in this field; ii) the global networking of bioengineering/biomedical engineering academic/research programs; iii) the promotion of first-class bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and the catalysis of global proliferation of this field; iv) the erection of bridges among educational institutions, industry, and professional societies or organizations involved in Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering; and v) the catalysis in the establishment of framework agreements for cooperation among the identified institutions offering curricula in this field. This paper presents the results obtained from Africa and North America. The whole project is due to be completed by 2009.

  1. The origin of Rosenthal fibers and their contributions to astrocyte pathology in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Sosunov, Alexander A; McKhann, Guy M; Goldman, James E

    2017-03-31

    Rosenthal fibers (RFs) are cytoplasmic, proteinaceous aggregates. They are the pathognomonic feature of the astrocyte pathology in Alexander Disease (AxD), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the GFAP gene, encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although RFs have been known for many years their origin and significance remain elusive issues. We have used mouse models of AxD based on the overexpression of human GFAP (transgenic, TG) and a point mutation in mouse GFAP (knock-in, KI) to examine the formation of RFs and to find astrocyte changes that correlate with the appearance of RFs. We found RFs of various sizes and shapes. The smallest ones appear as granular depositions on intermediate filaments. These contain GFAP and the small heat shock protein, alphaB-crystallin. Their aggregation appears to give rise to large RFs. The appearance of new RFs and the growth of previously formed RFs occur over time. We determined that DAPI is a reliable marker of RFs and in parallel with Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining defined a high variability in the appearance of RFs, even in neighboring astrocytes. Although many astrocytes in AxD with increased levels of GFAP and with or without RFs change their phenotype, only some cells with large numbers of RFs show a profound reconstruction of cellular processes, with a loss of fine distal processes and the appearance of large, lobulated nuclei, likely due to arrested mitosis. We conclude that 1) RFs appear to originate as small, osmiophilic masses containing both GFAP and alphaB-crystallin deposited on bundles of intermediate filaments. 2) RFs continue to form within AxD astrocytes over time. 3) DAPI is a reliable marker for RFs and can be used with immunolabeling. 4) RFs appear to interfere with the successful completion of astrocyte mitosis and cell division.

  2. Quaternary tectonic faulting in the Eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    City), Lancaster Seismic Zone and the epicenter of the shallow Cacoosing Valley earthquake (Lancaster and Reading, Pennsylvania), Kingston fault (central New Jersey between New York and Philadelphia), and Everona fault-Mountain Run fault zone (Washington, D.C., and Arlington and Alexandria, Virginia). ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fault terminations, Seminoe Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic, J.B.; McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Two basement-involved faults terminate in folds in the Seminoe Mountains. Mesoscopic and macroscopic structures in sedimentary rocks provide clues to the interrelationship of faults and folds in this region, and on the linkage between faulting and folding in general. The Hurt Creek fault trends 320[degree] and has maximum separation of 1.5 km measured at the basement/cover contact. Separation on the fault decreases upsection to zero within the Jurassic Sundance Formation. Unfaulted rock units form an anticline around the fault tip. The complementary syncline is angular with planar limbs and a narrow hinge zone. The syncline axial trace intersects the fault in the footwall at the basement/cover cut-off. Map patterns are interpreted to show thickening of Mesozoic units adjacent to the syncline hinge. In contrast, extensional structures are common in the faulted anticline within the Permian Goose Egg and Triassic Chugwater Formations. A hanging wall splay fault loses separation into the Goose Egg formation which is thinned by 50% at the fault tip. Mesoscopic normal faults are oriented 320--340[degree] and have an average inclination of 75[degree] SW. Megaboudins of Chugwater are present in the footwall of the Hurt Creek fault, immediately adjacent to the fault trace. The Black Canyon fault transported Precambrian-Pennsylvanian rocks over Pennsylvanian Tensleep sandstone. This fault is layer-parallel at the top of the Tensleep and loses separation along strike into an unfaulted syncline in the Goose Egg Formation. Shortening in the pre-Permian units is accommodated by slip on the basement-involved Black Canyon fault. Equivalent shortening in Permian-Cretaceous units occurs on a system of thin-skinned'' thrust faults.

  4. Fault displacement hazard for strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dawson, T.E.; Chen, R.; Cao, T.; Wills, C.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Frankel, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology, data, and regression equations for calculating the fault rupture hazard at sites near steeply dipping, strike-slip faults. We collected and digitized on-fault and off-fault displacement data for 9 global strikeslip earthquakes ranging from moment magnitude M 6.5 to M 7.6 and supplemented these with displacements from 13 global earthquakes compiled byWesnousky (2008), who considers events up to M 7.9. Displacements on the primary fault fall off at the rupture ends and are often measured in meters, while displacements on secondary (offfault) or distributed faults may measure a few centimeters up to more than a meter and decay with distance from the rupture. Probability of earthquake rupture is less than 15% for cells 200 m??200 m and is less than 2% for 25 m??25 m cells at distances greater than 200mfrom the primary-fault rupture. Therefore, the hazard for off-fault ruptures is much lower than the hazard near the fault. Our data indicate that rupture displacements up to 35cm can be triggered on adjacent faults at distances out to 10kmor more from the primary-fault rupture. An example calculation shows that, for an active fault which has repeated large earthquakes every few hundred years, fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in the design of structures or lifelines that are located near the principal fault, within about 150 m of well-mapped active faults with a simple trace and within 300 m of faults with poorly defined or complex traces.

  5. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  6. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  7. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  8. Seismic hazard in low slip rate crustal faults, estimating the characteristic event and the most hazardous zone: study case San Ramón Fault, in southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estay, Nicolás P.; Yáñez, Gonzalo; Carretier, Sebastien; Lira, Elias; Maringue, José

    2016-11-01

    Crustal faults located close to cities may induce catastrophic damages. When recurrence times are in the range of 1000-10 000 or higher, actions to mitigate the effects of the associated earthquake are hampered by the lack of a full seismic record, and in many cases, also of geological evidences. In order to characterize the fault behavior and its effects, we propose three different already-developed time-integration methodologies to define the most likely scenarios of rupture, and then to quantify the hazard with an empirical equation of peak ground acceleration (PGA). We consider the following methodologies: (1) stream gradient and (2) sinuosity indexes to estimate fault-related topographic effects, and (3) gravity profiles across the fault to identify the fault scarp in the basement. We chose the San Ramón Fault on which to apply these methodologies. It is a ˜ 30 km N-S trending fault with a low slip rate (0.1-0.5 mm yr-1) and an approximated recurrence of 9000 years. It is located in the foothills of the Andes near the large city of Santiago, the capital of Chile (> 6 000 000 inhabitants). Along the fault trace we define four segments, with a mean length of ˜ 10 km, which probably become active independently. We tested the present-day seismic activity by deploying a local seismological network for 1 year, finding five events that are spatially related to the fault. In addition, fault geometry along the most evident scarp was imaged in terms of its electrical resistivity response by a high resolution TEM (transient electromagnetic) profile. Seismic event distribution and TEM imaging allowed the constraint of the fault dip angle (˜ 65°) and its capacity to break into the surface. Using the empirical equation of Chiou and Youngs (2014) for crustal faults and considering the characteristic seismic event (thrust high-angle fault, ˜ 10 km, Mw = 6.2-6.7), we estimate the acceleration distribution in Santiago and the hazardous zones. City domains that are under

  9. Fault tree models for fault tolerant hypercube multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Tuazon, Jezus O.

    1991-01-01

    Three candidate fault tolerant hypercube architectures are modeled, their reliability analyses are compared, and the resulting implications of these methods of incorporating fault tolerance into hypercube multiprocessors are discussed. In the course of performing the reliability analyses, the use of HARP and fault trees in modeling sequence dependent system behaviors is demonstrated.

  10. Fault diagnosis of analog circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, J. W.; Salama, A. E.

    1985-08-01

    Theory and algorithms associated with four main categories of modern techniques used to locate faults in analog circuits are presented. These four general approaches are: the fault dictionary (FDA), the parameter identification (PIA), the fault verification (FVA), and the approximation (AA) approaches. The preliminaries and problems associated with the FDA, such as fault dictionary construction, the methods of optimum measurement selection, fault isolation criteria, and efficient methods of fault simulation, are discussed. The PIA techniques that utilize either linear or nonlinear systems of equations for identification of network elements are examined. Description of the FVA includes node-fault diagnosis, branch-fault diagnosis, subnetwork testability conditions, as well as combinatorial techniques, the failure-bound technique, and the network decomposition technique. In the AA, probabilistic methods and optimization-based methods are considered. In addition, the artificial intelligence technique and the different measures of testability are presented. A series of block diagrams is included.

  11. Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex, Alexander terrane (southeastern Alaska): evidence for Early Jurassic rifting prior to accretion with North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Karl, Susan M.; Keppie, J. Duncan; Kontak, Daniel J.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The circular Bokan Mountain complex (BMC) on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, is a Jurassic peralkaline granitic intrusion about 3 km in diameter that crosscuts igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane. The BMC hosts significant rare metal (rare earth elements, Y, U, Th, Zr, and Nb) mineralization related to the last stage of BMC emplacement. U–Pb (zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar (amphibole and whole-rock) geochronology indicates the following sequence of intrusive activity: (i) a Paleozoic basement composed mainly of 469 ± 4 Ma granitic rocks; (ii) intrusion of the BMC at 177 ± 1 Ma followed by rapid cooling through ca. 550 °C at 176 ± 1 Ma that was synchronous with mineralization associated with vertical, WNW-trending pegmatites, felsic dikes, and aegirine–fluorite veins and late-stage, sinistral shear deformation; and (iii) intrusion of crosscutting lamprophyre dikes at >150 Ma and again at ca. 105 Ma. The peralkaline nature of the BMC and the WNW trend of associated dikes suggest intrusion during NE–SW rifting that was followed by NE–SW shortening during the waning stages of BMC emplacement. The 177 Ma BMC was synchronous with other magmatic centres in the Alexander terrane, such as (1) the Dora Bay peralkaline stock and (2) the bimodal Moffatt volcanic suite located ~30 km north and ~100 km SE of the BMC, respectively. This regional magmatism is interpreted to represent a regional extensional event that precedes deposition of the Late Jurassic – Cretaceous Gravina sequence that oversteps the Wrangellia and Alexander exotic accreted terranes and the Taku and Yukon–Tanana pericratonic terranes of the Canadian–Alaskan Cordillera.

  12. Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Mize, Jeffery J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The high frequency switching megawatt-class High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is now in operation. One of the major problems with the modulator systems is shoot-thru conditions that can occur in a IGBTs H-bridge topology resulting in large fault currents and device failure in a few microseconds. The Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis (DFDC) is a fault monitoring system; it monitors transformer flux saturation using a window comparator and dV/dt events on the cathode voltage caused by any abnormality such as capacitor breakdown, transformer primary turns shorts, or dielectric breakdown between the transformer primary and secondary. If faults are detected, the DFDC will inhibit the IGBT gate drives and shut the system down, significantly reducing the possibility of a shoot-thru condition or other equipment damaging events. In this paper, we will present system integration considerations, performance characteristics of the DFDC, and discuss its ability to significantly reduce costly down time for the entire facility.

  13. Fault-Mechanism Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive, simple mechanical model of a fault can be produced to simulate the effects leading to an earthquake. This model has been used successfully with students from elementary to college levels and can be demonstrated to classes as large as thirty students. (DF)

  14. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  15. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  16. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  17. Fault-Related Sanctuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, L.

    2001-12-01

    Beyond the study of historical surface faulting events, this work investigates the possibility, in specific cases, of identifying pre-historical events whose memory survives in myths and legends. The myths of many famous sacred places of the ancient world contain relevant telluric references: "sacred" earthquakes, openings to the Underworld and/or chthonic dragons. Given the strong correspondence with local geological evidence, these myths may be considered as describing natural phenomena. It has been possible in this way to shed light on the geologic origin of famous myths (Piccardi, 1999, 2000 and 2001). Interdisciplinary researches reveal that the origin of several ancient sanctuaries may be linked in particular to peculiar geological phenomena observed on local active faults (like ground shaking and coseismic surface ruptures, gas and flames emissions, strong underground rumours). In many of these sanctuaries the sacred area is laid directly above the active fault. In a few cases, faulting has affected also the archaeological relics, right through the main temple (e.g. Delphi, Cnidus, Hierapolis of Phrygia). As such, the arrangement of the cult site and content of relative myths suggest that specific points along the trace of active faults have been noticed in the past and worshiped as special `sacred' places, most likely interpreted as Hades' Doors. The mythological stratification of most of these sanctuaries dates back to prehistory, and points to a common derivation from the cult of the Mother Goddess (the Lady of the Doors), which was largely widespread since at least 25000 BC. The cult itself was later reconverted into various different divinities, while the `sacred doors' of the Great Goddess and/or the dragons (offspring of Mother Earth and generally regarded as Keepers of the Doors) persisted in more recent mythologies. Piccardi L., 1999: The "Footprints" of the Archangel: Evidence of Early-Medieval Surface Faulting at Monte Sant'Angelo (Gargano, Italy

  18. Paleoseismic investigations at the Cal thrust fault, Mendoza, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Eric; Schmidt, Silke; Hetzel, Ralf; Mingorance, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Along the active mountain front of the Andean Precordillera between 30°S and 34°S in western Argentina several earthquakes occurred in recent times, including a 7.0 Ms event in 1861 which destroyed the city of Mendoza and killed two thirds of its population. The 1861 event and two other earthquakes (Ms = 5.7 in 1929 and Ms = 5.6 in 1967) were generated on the Cal thrust fault, which extends over a distance of 31 km north-south and runs straight through the center of Mendoza. In the city, which has now more than 1 million inhabitants, the fault forms a 3-m-high fault scarp. Although the Cal thrust fault poses a serious seismic hazard, the paleoseismologic history of this fault and its long-term slip rate remains largely unknown (Mingorance, 2006). We present the first results of an ongoing paleoseismologic study of the Cal thrust at a site located 5 km north of Mendoza. Here, the fault offsets Late Holocene alluvial fan sediments by 2.5 m vertically and exhibits a well developed fault scarp. A 15-m-long and 2-3-m-deep trench across the scarp reveals three east-vergent folds that we interpret to have formed during three earthquakes. Successive retrodeformation of the two youngest folds suggests that the most recent event (presumably the 1861 earthquake) caused ~1.1 m of vertical offset and ~1.8 m of horizontal shortening. For the penultimate event we obtain a vertical offset of ~0.7 m and a horizontal shortening of ~1.9 m. A vertical displacement of ~0.7 m observed on a steeply west-dipping fault may be associated with an older event. The cumulative vertical offset of 2.5 m for the three inferred events is in excellent agreement with the height of the scarp. Based on the retrodeformation of the trench deposits the fault plane dips ~25° to the west. In the deepest part of the trench evidence for even older seismic events is preserved beneath an angular unconformity that was formed during a period of erosion and pre-dates the present-day scarp. Dating of samples to

  19. Unhappy Cities

    PubMed Central

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Gottlieb, Joshua D.; Ziv, Oren

    2016-01-01

    There are persistent differences in self-reported subjective well-being across US metropolitan areas, and residents of declining cities appear less happy than others. Yet some people continue to move to these areas, and newer residents appear to be as unhappy as longer-term residents. While historical data on happiness are limited, the available facts suggest that cities that are now declining were also unhappy in their more prosperous past. These facts support the view that individuals do not maximize happiness alone but include it in the utility function along with other arguments. People may trade off happiness against other competing objectives. PMID:27546979

  20. Recent deformation along the offshore Malibu Coast, Dume, and related faults west of Point Dume, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Langenheim, V.E.; Sorlien, C.C.; Dartnell, P.; Sliter, R.W.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wong, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    Offshore faults west of Point Dume, southern California, are part of an important regional fault system that extends for about 206 km, from near the city of Los Angeles westward along the south flank of the Santa Monica Mountains and through the northern Channel Islands. This boundary fault system separates the western Transverse Ranges, on the north, from the California Continental Borderland, on the south. Previous research showed that the fault system includes many active fault strands; consequently, the entire system is considered a serious potential earthquake hazard to nearby Los Angeles. We present an integrated analysis of multichannel seismic- and high-resolution seismic-reflection data and multibeam-bathymetric information to focus on the central part of the fault system that lies west of Point Dume. We show that some of the main offshore faults have cumulative displacements of 3-5 km, and many faults are currently active because they deform the seafloor or very shallow sediment layers. The main offshore fault is the Dume fault, a large north-dipping reverse fault. In the eastern part of the study area, this fault offsets the seafloor, showing Holocene displacement. Onshore, the Malibu Coast fault dips steeply north, is active, and shows left-oblique slip. The probable offshore extension of this fault is a large fault that dips steeply in its upper part but flattens at depth. High-resolution seismic data show that this fault deforms shallow sediment making up the Hueneme fan complex, indicating Holocene activity. A structure near Sycamore knoll strikes transversely to the main faults and could be important to the analysis of the regional earthquake hazard because the structure might form a boundary between earthquake-rupture segments.

  1. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Seismicity and Faulting in an Urbanized area: Flagstaff, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumbaugh, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Flagstaff, Arizona is a community of more than 60,000 and lies in an area of active tectonism. Well documented evidence exists of geologically recent volcanism and fault related seismicity. The urban area is located within a volcanic field that is considered active and the area is also the locus of numerous fault systems, some of whose members are considered to be potentially active. This suggestion of active faulting and seismicity for the area is supported by the recent 1993 Mw 5.3 Cataract Creek earthquake. Chief concern for Flagstaff is focused upon the Anderson Mesa fault which has a mapped surface length of 40 kilometers with the north end extending into the city limits of Flagstaff. A worse case scenario for rupture along the entire length of the fault would be the occurrence of an Mw 6.9 earthquake. The slip rate for this fault is low, however it is not well determined due to a lack of Neogene or Quaternary deposits. The historic record of seismicity adjacent to the surface expression of the Anderson Mesa fault includes two well recorded earthquake swarms (1979,2011) as well as other individual events over this time period all of which are of M< 4.0. The epicentral locations of these events are of interest with respect to the fault geometry which shows four prominent segments: North, Central, South, Ashurst. All of the historic events are located within the central segment. This distribution can be compared to evidence available for the orientation of regional stresses. The focal mechanism for the 1993 Mw 5.3 Cataract Creek earthquake shows a northwest striking preferred slip surface with a trend (300) parallel to that of the Central segment of the Anderson Mesa fault (300-305). The other three fault segments of the Anderson Mesa fault have north-south trends. The seismicity of the Central segment of the fault suggests that slip on this segment may occur in the future. Given the length of this segment a MCE event could be as large as Mw 6.3.

  3. Earthquakes and fault creep on the northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, R.

    1979-01-01

    At present there is an absence of both fault creep and small earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault, which had a magnitude 8 earthquake with 5 m of slip in 1906. The fault has apparently been dormant after the 1906 earthquake. One possibility is that the fault is 'locked' in some way and only produces great earthquakes. An alternative possibility, presented here, is that the lack of current activity on the northern San Andreas fault is because of a lack of sufficient elastic strain after the 1906 earthquake. This is indicated by geodetic measurements at Fort Ross in 1874, 1906 (post-earthquake), and 1969, which show that the strain accumulation in 1969 (69 ?? 10-6 engineering strain) was only about one-third of the strain release (rebound) in the 1906 earthquake (200 ?? 10-6 engineering strain). The large difference in seismicity before and after 1906, with many strong local earthquakes from 1836 to 1906, but only a few strong earthquakes from 1906 to 1976, also indicates a difference of elastic strain. The geologic characteristics (serpentine, fault straightness) of most of the northern San Andreas fault are very similar to the characteristics of the fault south of Hollister, where fault creep is occurring. Thus, the current absence of fault creep on the northern fault segment is probably due to a lack of sufficient elastic strain at the present time. ?? 1979.

  4. City 2020+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C.; Buttstädt, M.; Merbitz, H.; Sachsen, T.; Ketzler, G.; Michael, S.; Klemme, M.; Dott, W.; Selle, K.; Hofmeister, H.

    2010-09-01

    This research initiative CITY 2020+ assesses the risks and opportunities for residents in urban built environments under projected demographic and climate change for the year 2020 and beyond, using the City of Aachen as a case study. CITY 2020+ develops scenarios, options and tools for planning and developing sustainable future city structures. We investigate how urban environment, political structure and residential behavior can best be adapted, with attention to the interactions among structural, political, and sociological configurations and with their consequences on human health. Demographers project that in the EU-25-States by 2050, approximately 30% of the population will be over age 65. Also by 2050, average tem¬peratures are projected to rise by 1 to 2 K. Combined, Europe can expect enhanced thermal stress and higher levels of particulate matter. CITY 2020+ amongst other sub-projects includes research project dealing with (1) a micro-scale assessment of blockages to low-level cold-air drainage flow into the city centre by vegetation and building structures, (2) a detailed analysis of the change of probability density functions related to the occurrence of heat waves during summer and the spatial and temporal structure of the urban heat island (UHI) (3) a meso-scale analysis of particulate matter (PM) concentrations depending on topography, local meteorological conditions and synoptic-scale weather patterns. First results will be presented specifically from sub-projects related to vegetation barriers within cold air drainage, the assessment of the UHI and the temporal and spatial pattern of PM loadings in the city centre. The analysis of the cold air drainage flow is investigated in two consecutive years with a clearing of vegetation stands in the beginning of the second year early in 2010. The spatial pattern of the UHI and its possible enhancement by climate change is addressed employing a unique setup using GPS devices and temperature probes fixed to

  5. Adult-onset Alexander disease: a series of eleven unrelated cases with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Fancellu, Roberto; Mariotti, Caterina; Romano, Silvia; Salmaggi, Andrea; Carella, Francesco; Girotti, Floriano; Gattellaro, Grazietta; Carriero, Maria Rita; Farina, Laura; Ceccherini, Isabella; Savoiardo, Mario

    2008-09-01

    Alexander disease (AD) in its typical form is an infantile lethal leucodystrophy, characterized pathologically by Rosenthal fibre accumulation. Following the identification of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene as the causative gene, cases of adult-onset AD (AOAD) are being described with increasing frequency. AOAD has a different clinical and neuroradiological presentation with respect to early-onset AD, as abnormalities are mainly concentrated in the brainstem-spinal cord junction. We report detailed clinical and genetic data of 11 cases of AOAD, observed over a 4-year period, and a review of the previously reported 25 cases of genetically confirmed AOAD. In our series, onset occurred as late as age 62, and up to 71 in an affected deceased relative. Most cases appeared sporadic, but family history may be misleading. The most frequent symptoms were related to bulbar dysfunction-with dysarthria, dysphagia, dysphonia (seven patients)-, pyramidal involvement (seven patients) and cerebellar ataxia (seven patients). Four patients had palatal myoclonus. Sleep disorders were also observed (four cases). Bulbar symptoms, however, were infrequent at onset and two symptomatic patients had an almost pure pyramidal involvement. Two subjects were asymptomatic. Misdiagnosis at presentation was frequent and MRI was instrumental in suggesting the correct diagnosis by showing, in all cases, mild to severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata extending caudally to the cervical spinal cord. In ten patients, molecular studies revealed six novel missense mutations and three previously reported changes in GFAP. The last typical patient carried no definitely pathogenic mutation, but a missense variant (p.D157N), supposedly a rare polymorphism. Revision of the literature and the present series indicate that the clinical picture is not specific, but AOAD must be considered in patients of any age with lower brainstem signs. When present, palatal myoclonus is strongly suggestive

  6. The Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Richard P.; Dommel, Paul R.

    Over the past two decades, direct payments from the Federal Government to local governments has increased more than sixfold as a percentage of the revenues local governments raise on their own. Both the Ford budget and the Carter budget revisions for 1977 and 1978 contain policy changes with important implications for cities. In this document…

  7. Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

  8. Fault Scarp Detection Beneath Dense Vegetation Cover: Airborne Lidar Mapping of the Seattle Fault Zone, Bainbridge Island, Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Berghoff, Gregory S.

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of a commercial airborne laser mapping industry is paying major dividends in an assessment of earthquake hazards in the Puget Lowland of Washington State. Geophysical observations and historical seismicity indicate the presence of active upper-crustal faults in the Puget Lowland, placing the major population centers of Seattle and Tacoma at significant risk. However, until recently the surface trace of these faults had never been identified, neither on the ground nor from remote sensing, due to cover by the dense vegetation of the Pacific Northwest temperate rainforests and extremely thick Pleistocene glacial deposits. A pilot lidar mapping project of Bainbridge Island in the Puget Sound, contracted by the Kitsap Public Utility District (KPUD) and conducted by Airborne Laser Mapping in late 1996, spectacularly revealed geomorphic features associated with fault strands within the Seattle fault zone. The features include a previously unrecognized fault scarp, an uplifted marine wave-cut platform, and tilted sedimentary strata. The United States Geologic Survey (USGS) is now conducting trenching studies across the fault scarp to establish ages, displacements, and recurrence intervals of recent earthquakes on this active fault. The success of this pilot study has inspired the formation of a consortium of federal and local organizations to extend this work to a 2350 square kilometer (580,000 acre) region of the Puget Lowland, covering nearly the entire extent (approx. 85 km) of the Seattle fault. The consortium includes NASA, the USGS, and four local groups consisting of KPUD, Kitsap County, the City of Seattle, and the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC). The consortium has selected Terrapoint, a commercial lidar mapping vendor, to acquire the data.

  9. Fault intersections along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Johnson, S. Y.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-established that stresses concentrate at fault intersections or bends when subjected to tectonic loading, making focused studies of these areas particularly important for seismic hazard analysis. In addition, detailed fault models can be used to investigate how slip on one fault might transfer to another during an earthquake. We combine potential-field, high-resolution seismic-reflection, and multibeam bathymetry data with existing geologic and seismicity data to investigate the fault geometry and connectivity of the Hosgri, Los Osos, and Shoreline faults offshore of San Luis Obispo, California. The intersection of the Hosgri and Los Osos faults in Estero Bay is complex. The offshore extension of the Los Osos fault, as imaged with multibeam and high-resolution seismic data, is characterized by a west-northwest-trending zone (1-3 km wide) of near vertical faulting. Three distinct strands (northern, central, and southern) are visible on shallow seismic reflection profiles. The steep dip combined with dramatic changes in reflection character across mapped faults within this zone suggests horizontal offset of rock units and argues for predominantly strike-slip motion, however, the present orientation of the fault zone suggests oblique slip. As the Los Osos fault zone approaches the Hosgri fault, the northern and central strands become progressively more northwest-trending in line with the Hosgri fault. The northern strand runs subparallel to the Hosgri fault along the edge of a long-wavelength magnetic anomaly, intersecting the Hosgri fault southwest of Point Estero. Geophysical modeling suggests the northern strand dips 70° to the northeast, which is in agreement with earthquake focal mechanisms that parallel this strand. The central strand bends northward and intersects the Hosgri fault directly west of Morro Rock, corresponding to an area of compressional deformation visible in shallow seismic-reflection profiles. The southern strand of the Los Osos

  10. Holocene faulting on the Mission fault, northwest Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ostenaa, D.A.; Klinger, R.E.; Levish, D.R. )

    1993-04-01

    South of Flathead Lake, fault scarps on late Quaternary surfaces are nearly continuous for 45 km along the western flank of the Mission Range. On late Pleistocene alpine lateral moraines, scarp heights reach a maximum of 17 m. Scarp heights on post glacial Lake Missoula surfaces range from 2.6--7.2 m and maximum scarp angles range from 10[degree]--24[degree]. The stratigraphy exposed in seven trenches across the fault demonstrates that the post glacial Lake Missoula scarps resulted from at least two surface-faulting events. Larger scarp heights on late Pleistocene moraines suggests a possible third event. This yields an estimated recurrence of 4--8 kyr. Analyses of scarp profiles show that the age of the most surface faulting is middle Holocene, consistent with stratigraphic evidence found in the trenches. Rupture length and displacement imply earthquake magnitudes of 7 to 7.5. Previous studies have not identified geologic evidence of late Quaternary surface faulting in the Rocky Mountain Trench or on faults north of the Lewis and Clark line despite abundant historic seismicity in the Flathead Lake area. In addition to the Mission fault, reconnaissance studies have located late Quaternary fault scarps along portions of faults bordering Jocko and Thompson Valleys. These are the first documented late Pleistocene/Holocene faults north of the Lewis and Clark line in Montana and should greatly revise estimates of earthquake hazards in this region.

  11. Paleomagnetism and geochronology of 23 Ma gabbroic intrusions in the Keku Strait, Alaska, and implications for the Alexander Terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Coe, Robert S.; Renne, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of Tertiary gabbro from 24 sites in the Keku Strait, Alaska, help constrain the displacement history of the Alexander terrane. Step heating experiments on a plagioclase separate from these previously undated intrusions indicate a discordant 40Ar/39Ar age of 23.1 ± 1.7 Ma. The characteristic magnetization resides in magnetite, is easily isolated by thermal and alternating field demagnetization, and has both normal and reversed polarities. The mean paleomagnetic pole, with no structural correction, is latitude 87.1°N, longitude 141.6°E, A95 = 10.1°, with N = 20 sites. This pole indicates insignificant tectonic displacement (0.5° ± 8.2° southward) and rotation (0.6° ± 15.2° counterclockwise). We therefore conclude that any northward displacement or vertical axis rotation of the Alexander terrane, and/or tilting in the vicinity of the Keku Strait must have occurred before 23 Ma.

  12. Revision of Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi Alexander (Diptera, Tipulidae), and a short discussion on subspecies among crane flies

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract All available type material of Tipula stackelbergi Alexander, Tipula usuriensis Alexander and Tipula subpruinosa Mannheims were examined. Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi stat. rev. is elevated from a subspecies of Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa Wiedemann to a valid species. Two new synonyms are proposed: Tipula usuriensis syn. n. proved to be a junior synonym of. Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa and Tipula subpruinosa syn. n. a junior synonym of Tipula (Yamatotipula) freyana Lackschewitz. Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi is redescribed, male and female terminalia of Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa are illustrated and discussed. Female terminalia of Tipula (Yamatotipula) freyana are described and illustrated for the first time. A key to both sexes of Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi and Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa, and a key to females of Tipula (Yamatotipula) chonsaniana, Tipula (Yamatotipula) freyana and Tipula (Yamatotipula) moesta are provided. Subspecies are not uncommon among crane flies, but their ranges and traits are poorly known. An interdisciplinary approach (genetics, ecology, taxonomy) is suggested if subspecific ranks are to be used in tipuloid systematics. PMID:22303125

  13. Managing Fault Management Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  14. The metallogeny of Late Triassic rifting of the Alexander terrane in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, C.D.; Premo, W.R.; Meier, A.L.; Taggart, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    A belt of unusual volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) occurrences is located along the eastern margin of the Alexander terrane throughout southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia and exhibits a range of characteristics consistent with a variety of syngenetic to epigenetic deposit types. Deposits within this belt include Greens Creek and Windy Craggy, the economically most significant VMS deposit in Alaska and the largest in North America, respectively. The occurrences are hosted by a discontinuously exposed, 800-km-long belt of rocks that consist of a 200- to 800-m-thick sequence of conglomerate, limestone, marine elastic sedimentary rocks, and tuff intercalated with and overlain by a distinctive unit of mafic pyroclastic rocks and pillowed flows. Faunal data bracket the age of the host rocks between Anisian (Middle Triassic) and late Norian (late Late Triassic). This metallogenic belt is herein referred to as the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt. The VMS occurrences show systematic differences in degree of structural control, chemistry, and stratigraphic setting along the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt that suggest important spatial or temporal changes in the tectonic environment of formation. At the southern end of the belt, felsic volcanic rocks overlain by shallow-water limestones characterize the lower part of the sequence. In the southern and middle portion of the belt, a distinctive pebble conglomerate marks the base of the section and is indicative of high-energy deposition in a near slope or basin margin setting. At the northern end of the belt the conglomerates, limestones, and felsic volcanic rocks are absent and the belt is composed of deep-water sedimentary and mafic volcanic rocks. This northward change in depositional environment and lithofacies is accompanied by a northward transition from epithermal-like structurally controlled, discontinuous, vein- and pod-shaped, Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba-(Cu) occurrences with relatively simple mineralogy

  15. Fault tolerant control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, U. L.; Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the synthesis of fault tolerant control laws to actuator failure has been presented. Two design methods were used to synthesize fault tolerant controllers: the conventional LQ design method and a direct feedback controller design method SANDY. The latter method is used primarily to streamline the full-state Q feedback design into a practical implementable output feedback controller structure. To achieve robustness to control actuator failure, the redundant surfaces are properly balanced according to their control effectiveness. A simple gain schedule based on the landing gear up/down logic involving only three gains was developed to handle three design flight conditions: Mach .25 and Mach .60 at 5000 ft and Mach .90 at 20,000 ft. The fault tolerant control law developed in this study provides good stability augmentation and performance for the relaxed static stability aircraft. The augmented aircraft responses are found to be invariant to the presence of a failure. Furthermore, single-loop stability margins of +6 dB in gain and +30 deg in phase were achieved along with -40 dB/decade rolloff at high frequency.

  16. Fault zone regulation, seismic hazard, and social vulnerability in Los Angeles, California: Hazard or urban amenity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toké, Nathan A.; Boone, Christopher G.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón

    2014-09-01

    Public perception and regulation of environmental hazards are important factors in the development and configuration of cities. Throughout California, probabilistic seismic hazard mapping and geologic investigations of active faults have spatially quantified earthquake hazard. In Los Angeles, these analyses have informed earthquake engineering, public awareness, the insurance industry, and the government regulation of developments near faults. Understanding the impact of natural hazards regulation on the social and built geography of cities is vital for informing future science and policy directions. We constructed a relative social vulnerability index classification for Los Angeles to examine the social condition within regions of significant seismic hazard, including areas regulated as Alquist-Priolo (AP) Act earthquake fault zones. Despite hazard disclosures, social vulnerability is lowest within AP regulatory zones and vulnerability increases with distance from them. Because the AP Act requires building setbacks from active faults, newer developments in these zones are bisected by parks. Parcel-level analysis demonstrates that homes adjacent to these fault zone parks are the most valuable in their neighborhoods. At a broad scale, a Landsat-based normalized difference vegetation index shows that greenness near AP zones is greater than the rest of the metropolitan area. In the parks-poor city of Los Angeles, fault zone regulation has contributed to the construction of park space within areas of earthquake hazard, thus transforming zones of natural hazard into amenities, attracting populations of relatively high social status, and demonstrating that the distribution of social vulnerability is sometimes more strongly tied to amenities than hazards.

  17. Anatomy of a Complex Fault Zone: Land Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Tacoma Fault Zone, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, K.; Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    Preliminary interpretations of new land-based seismic reflection images across the Tacoma fault zone in western Washington State document a complex pattern of faulting and folding. The Tacoma fault zone bounds gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies for 50 km across the central Puget Lowland west of the city of Tacoma, and tomography data suggest there is as much as 6 km of post-Eocene uplift of the hanging wall relative to Tacoma basin sediments to the south. We acquired four north-south seismic reflection profiles to define the character and tectonic history of the Tacoma fault zone. The 6-km long Powerline Road profile, located west of Case Inlet, perpendicularly crosses the 4-km-long Catfish Lake scarp discerned from Lidar data and trenching. The profile shows flat-lying strata on the south, but the north part of the profile is dominated by south-dipping Tertiary and older strata that appear to form the limb of an anticline. There appears to be at least one, and likely two faults in the Tertiary and older strata, although it is not clear these faults penetrate the shallowest Pleistocene strata. The 8.5-km long Carney Lake profile is located east of Case Inlet and spans two scarps imaged on Lidar data. This profile shows a similar geometry to the Powerline Road profile, folded and faulted Tertiary and older strata adjacent to flat-lying marine sediments of the Tacoma Basin. The 9-km long Bethel-Burley profile across the east portion of the Tacoma fault near Gig Harbor shows a significantly different reflector geometry than the profiles to the west. The Bethel-Burley profile is dominated by a strong, south-dipping reflection that becomes a prominent arch near the north end of the section. The strength of the reflector suggests that it marks the top of the Eocene basement rocks. South-dipping strata on this profile match those imaged on marine profiles from Carr Inlet. The new seismic reflection data support an interpretation in which the north edge of the Tacoma basin

  18. Where Does the Seattle Fault End? Structural Links and Kinematic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. L.; Dragovich, J. D.; Blakely, R. J.; Wells, R.; Brocher, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Seattle fault is one of several east-trending compressional structures in the Puget Lowland (PL), seemingly at odds with the northeasterly oriented compression along the Juan de Fuca subduction zone. The existence of these faults is thought to be related to the northward movement of a strong Oregon forearc block. A weaker PL block accommodates north-south shortening between Siletzia and the slower-moving Canadian Coast Mountains to the north. The northward movement of the PL requires either the Cascade and Olympic Mountains to move northward and shorten at nearly the same rate as the PL, or the existence of strike-slip accommodation zones bounding the PL. We use results from three study areas along the Seattle fault to constrain its behavior: the westward terminus at the foot of the Olympic Mountains, its central reach near Bainbridge Island and its eastward terminus in the Cascade foothills near Fall City, WA. Geologic map data, trench observations across faults, Lidar topographic scarp observations, seismic reflection profiles and potential field anomalies are integrated to determine fault structure. These data indicate that the Seattle fault extends further east and west than previously thought. This suggests its connection to strike-slip fault zones bounding the east (Rattlesnake Mountain fault zone, right-lateral) and west (Saddle Mountain deformation zone, left-lateral) ends of the fault. Gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies along the Seattle fault are best modeled by a fairly simple, reverse fault (dipping south 35-50 degrees). The strike of the proposed PL-block bounding faults suggests a kinematic explanation for the existence, position and dip of the Seattle fault and other east-striking compressional structures in the region. An analog (clay) model illustrates the growth of both the Seattle uplift and the Kingston arch resulting from these proposed kinematic bounding conditions. The strike-slip faults form a crustal "funnel", narrowing to the north

  19. Mechanical stratigraphy and normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Hill, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stratigraphy encompasses the mechanical properties, thicknesses, and interface properties of rock units. Although mechanical stratigraphy often relates directly to lithostratigraphy, lithologic description alone does not adequately describe mechanical behavior. Analyses of normal faults with displacements of millimeters to 10's of kilometers in mechanically layered rocks reveal that mechanical stratigraphy influences nucleation, failure mode, fault geometry, displacement gradient, displacement distribution, fault core and damage zone characteristics, and fault zone deformation processes. The relationship between normal faulting and mechanical stratigraphy can be used either to predict structural style using knowledge of mechanical stratigraphy, or conversely to interpret mechanical stratigraphy based on characterization of the structural style. This review paper explores a range of mechanical stratigraphic controls on normal faulting illustrated by natural and modeled examples.

  20. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  1. Investigation of urban faults in Shenzhen using wavelet multi-scale analysis and modeling of gravity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuang; Chen, Liang; Liu, Xi-kai

    2016-04-01

    Urban faults in Shenzhen are potential threat to the city security and sustainable development. To improve the knowledge of the Shenzhen fault zone, interpretation and inversion of gravity data were carried out. Bouguer gravity covering the whole Shenzhen city was calculated with a resolution of 1kmx1km. Wavelet multi-scale analysis (MSA) was applied to the Bouguer gravity data to obtain the multilayer residual anomalies corresponding to different depths. In addition, 2D gravity models were constructed along three profiles. The Bouguer gravity anomaly shows a NE-striking high-low-high pattern from northwest to southeast, strongly related to the main faults. According to the result of MSA, the correlation between gravity anomaly and faults is particularly significant from 4 to 12 km depth. The residual gravity with small amplitude in each layer indicates weak tectonic activity in the crust. In the upper layers, positive anomalies along most of faults reveal the upwelling of high-density materials during the past tectonic movements. The multilayer residual anomalies also implicate important information about the faults, such as the vertical extension and the dip direction. The maximum depth of the faults is about 20km. In general, NE-striking faults extend deeper than NW-striking Faults and have a larger dip angle. This study is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.41504015) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No.2015M572146).

  2. Late Pleistocene-Holocene Faulting History Along the Northern El Carrizal Fault, Baja California Sur, Mexico: Earthquake Recurrence at a Persistently Active Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, S. J.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Gutiérrez, G. M.; Santillanez, A. U.; Rittenour, T. R.

    2007-12-01

    The El Carrizal fault is a NW striking, east dipping normal fault located 25 km west of the city of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico and is the westernmost bounding fault of the gulf-margin system at this latitude. The fault is ~70 km long onshore and ~50 km long offshore to the north in La Paz Bay. As many as three Quaternary geomorphic surfaces formed on the footwall and were identified on the basis of mapping and topographic profiling. In the north, the El Carrizal fault splays into multiple strands and exhibits a pattern of alternating N-S and NW-trending segments. Results from geologic mapping, paleoseismic investigations, and preliminary optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) geochronology provide some of the first numerical constraints on late Pleistocene-Holocene faulting along the El Carrizal fault. A 20 m long, 2-3 m deep trench (Trench 28) was excavated across the fault 23 km south of La Paz Bay. The trench was photographed, hand logged, and sampled for OSL dating. The trench revealed a succession of fluvial and channel deposits of sands, gravels, and cobbles. The main fault zone is manifested by a 0.5 m thick wedge-shaped deposit that consists of silty-sand and also contains rotated blocks of caliche- cemented gravels. Preliminary OSL ages from a silty-sand unit offset 2 m by the fault average latest Pleistocene. A trench 4 km south of Trench 28 (Cuadradito Trench) was also documented and sampled for OSL analysis. Preliminary OSL ages from a fluvial sand unit deposited against faulted bedrock range from mid to late Holocene. Sedimentary comparisons and surficial mapping suggest that the Holocene unit at Cuadradito Trench may be correlative to sediment that overlies faulted units from Trench 28. Such a correlation would constrain the timing of the 2 m offset at Trench 28 to be between latest Pleistocene and mid Holocene. A quarry 10 km north of Trench 28 exposes Quaternary sand and gravels buttressed against a 5-10 m wide bedrock shear zone. Here

  3. Paleoseismicity on the Dense Network of Holocene Submarine Faults in Beppu Bay, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, K.; Matsuoka, H.; Okamura, M.; Chida, N.

    2003-12-01

    Beppu Bay, approximately 30 km by 15 km in size, contains a complex network of Holocene submarine faults whose total length amounts to 230km. They are normal dip-slip fault with left-lateral strike-slip component. The maximum vertical offset accumulated in the past 7,300 years exceeds 20 m. A detailed study on paleoseismicity on one of the faults shows a feature of the time-predictable recurrence, i.e., the larger the vertical offset, the longer the following inter-event time. Branching features can be often recognized near the end of fault and the consistency in branching direction of neighboring faults suggest repeated rupture propagation in the same direction. A detailed examination of high-resolution seismic profiling of branch indicates a repeat of branching and a slow transition of rupture from an old branch to a new one. The central Beppu-Bay fault running WNW to ESE in the center of the bay forms the northern boundary of the major graben structure of the bay. The Asamigawa fault in the west of the bay, running parallel to the central Beppu-Bay fault, has been considered as the southern boundary, but its eastern continuation was not clear. Recent seismic profiling carried out by Chida et al. (2003) showed an existence of Holocene normal fault beneath the city of Oita whose population is 440,000 and interpreted it as a part of the southern boundary. Our high-resolution shallow-water profiling survey revealed the submarine portion of the southern boundary fault, filling a gap between two subaerial faults. We continuously sample marine sediments down to a subbottom depth of 20m by piston coring and correlate specific features of sediment, 20 volcanic ash layers, a few features of magnetic susceptibility and coarse fraction together with C-14 ages of echinoids, pelecypods, and plant remains on the both sides of a targe fault to estimate the date and vertical offset of paleoearthquakes.

  4. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  5. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  6. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  7. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  8. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  9. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  10. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Sibson, R. H.; Renner, J.; Toy, V. G.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we introduce work which aims assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ1 - σ3) and σ3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ3' under constant σ1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ1 , ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we also experimentally explore the reshear of natural pseudotachylytes (PSTs) from two different fault zones; the Gole Larghe Fault, Adamello, Italy in which the PSTs are in relatively isotropic Tonalite (at lab sample scale) and the Alpine Fault, New Zealand in which the PSTs are in highly anisotropic foliated shist. We test whether PSTs will reshear in both rock types under the right conditions, or whether new fractures in the wall rock will form in preference to reactivating the PST (PST shear strength is higher than that of the host rock). Are PSTs representative of one slip event?

  11. Fault trees and sequence dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Boyd, Mark A.; Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the frequently cited shortcomings of fault-tree models, their inability to model so-called sequence dependencies, is discussed. Several sources of such sequence dependencies are discussed, and new fault-tree gates to capture this behavior are defined. These complex behaviors can be included in present fault-tree models because they utilize a Markov solution. The utility of the new gates is demonstrated by presenting several models of the fault-tolerant parallel processor, which include both hot and cold spares.

  12. SEISMOLOGY: Watching the Hayward Fault.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R W

    2000-08-18

    The Hayward fault, located on the east side of the San Francisco Bay, represents a natural laboratory for seismologists, because it does not sleep silently between major earthquakes. In his Perspective, Simpson discusses the study by Bürgmann et al., who have used powerful new techniques to study the fault. The results indicate that major earthquakes cannot originate in the northern part of the fault. However, surface-rupturing earthquakes have occurred in the area, suggesting that they originated to the north or south of the segment studied by Bürgmann et al. Fundamental questions remain regarding the mechanism by which plate tectonic stresses are transferred to the Hayward fault.

  13. Fault-Tree Compiler Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Martensen, Anna L.

    1992-01-01

    FTC, Fault-Tree Compiler program, is reliability-analysis software tool used to calculate probability of top event of fault tree. Five different types of gates allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language of FTC easy to understand and use. Program supports hierarchical fault-tree-definition feature simplifying process of description of tree and reduces execution time. Solution technique implemented in FORTRAN, and user interface in Pascal. Written to run on DEC VAX computer operating under VMS operating system.

  14. Alexander Graham Bell's Patent for the Telephone and Thomas Edison's Patent for the Electric Lamp. The Constitution Community: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schur, Joan Brodsky

    In 1876 Americans held a Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) to celebrate the nation's birth 100 years earlier. Machinery Hall drew the most admiration and wonder. Alexander Graham Bell exhibited the first telephone, and Thomas Alva Edison presented the automatic telegraph, one of more than 1,000 inventions he would patent in his…

  15. The Question of Sign-Language and the Utility of Signs in the Instruction of the Deaf: Two Papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, M.

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3?4 and pp. 38?44,…

  16. Discuss: If Essays Are Dead, Then Where Does That Leave Everything Else? A Response to: Shirley Alexander's "Buying Essays: How to Make Sure Assessment Is Authentic"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, Kelvin

    2015-01-01

    Professor Shirley Alexander is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President (Teaching, Learning & Equity) at the University of Technology, Sydney. On 12 November 2014, an article of hers appeared in "The Conversation": "Buying essays: how to make sure assessment is authentic." That article traverses, in an abbreviated way,…

  17. Prevention and Early Intervention: Individual Differences as Risk Factors for the Mental Health of Children. A Festschrift for Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, William B., Ed.; McDevitt, Sean C., Ed.

    This collection of essays, in honor of child psychiatry pioneers Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas, focuses on their idea that important life outcomes are the product of ongoing interactions between a child's behavioral style and the complimentarity or lack of fit of the parenting environment. Following an introduction, the remaining chapters are:…

  18. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  19. Fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  20. Nonlinear Fault Diagnosis,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Systems, New York, Marcel Dekker, (to appear). 3. Desoer , C.A. and S.E. Kuh, Basic Circuit Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969, pp. 423-425. 130 NONLINEAR...DIAGNOSIS A 7*ssior For 1 MU3 CRA&T IY’IC TAB Ju-st i.cat IC- P.U A: CONTENTS Fault Diagnosis in Electronic Circuits , R. Saeks and R.-w. Liu...Vincentelli and R. Saeks .............. 61 Multitest Diagnosibility of Nonlinear Circuits and Systems, A. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli and R. Saeks

  1. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  2. Integrated design of fault reconstruction and fault-tolerant control against actuator faults using learning observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingxian; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Yingchun; Li, Huayi

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses the problem of integrated fault reconstruction and fault-tolerant control in linear systems subject to actuator faults via learning observers (LOs). A reconfigurable fault-tolerant controller is designed based on the constructed LO to compensate for the influence of actuator faults by stabilising the closed-loop system. An integrated design of the proposed LO and the fault-tolerant controller is explored such that their performance can be simultaneously considered and their coupling problem can be effectively solved. In addition, such an integrated design is formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that can be conveniently solved in a unified framework using LMI optimisation technique. At last, simulation studies on a micro-satellite attitude control system are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  3. AGSM Functional Fault Models for Fault Isolation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janicce Leshay

    2014-01-01

    This project implements functional fault models to automate the isolation of failures during ground systems operations. FFMs will also be used to recommend sensor placement to improve fault isolation capabilities. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators.

  4. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing

  5. The appearance of the artist to the people: the creativity, personality and malady of Alexander Ivanov (1806-58).

    PubMed

    Lerner, Vladimir; Witztum, Eliezer

    2005-02-01

    Alexander Ivanov was an outstanding Russian painter who lived in the middle of the nineteenth century, during the romantic period. He did not accept romanticism but instead tried to create his own original style, an ambitious combination of spiritual profundity and a manner of execution unparalleled in Western European art. Ivanov's intention and style are best reflected in his major work The Appearance of Christ to the People, a picture on which he worked for over 20 years. He painted more than 400 sketches of the picture while attempting to bring his masterpiece to perfection. At the end of his life Ivanov became disillusioned, renounced his strong religious conviction and became suspicious. This study examines the influence of his background, life story and personality on the creative process. From a diagnostic perspective, Ivanov's personality featured obsessive, narcissistic and schizoid traits. In his final years he suffered from a delusional disorder.

  6. Deficits in adult neurogenesis, contextual fear conditioning, and spatial learning in a Gfap mutant mouse model of Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Tracy L; Paylor, Richard; Messing, Albee

    2013-11-20

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament of mature astrocytes in the mammalian CNS. Dominant gain of function mutations in GFAP lead to the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Alexander disease (AxD), which is characterized by cytoplasmic protein aggregates known as Rosenthal fibers along with variable degrees of leukodystrophy and intellectual disability. The mechanisms by which mutant GFAP leads to these pleiotropic effects are unknown. In addition to astrocytes, GFAP is also expressed in other cell types, particularly neural stem cells that form the reservoir supporting adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Here, we show that mouse models of AxD exhibit significant pathology in GFAP-positive radial glia-like cells in the dentate gyrus, and suffer from deficits in adult neurogenesis. In addition, they display impairments in contextual learning and spatial memory. This is the first demonstration of cognitive phenotypes in a model of primary astrocyte disease.

  7. James Sowerby: meteorites and his meteoritic sword made for the Emperor of Russia, Alexander I, in 1814

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    James Sowerby included meteorites in his publications of British and exotic natural history and so raised interest in their nature and origins at a time of much debate and involving the President of the Royal Society, Sir Joseph Banks. The celebrations over the defeat of France in 1814 prompted Sowerby to make a sword from the Cape of Good Hope iron meteorite to present to the Russian Emperor, Alexander I, at the time of his state visit to London in June 1814 and in recognition of his achievements in bringing peace to Europe. The story of its attempted presentation, its final reception and the following response, including publications, all helped to increase interest in meteorites and their properties. The rediscovery of the sword after a lengthy disappearance probably brings an unusual saga to a fitting close.

  8. Map of glacial limits and possible refugia in the southern Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, Paul E.; Ager, Thomas A.; Baichtal, James F.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2003-01-01

    During the late Wisconsin glaciation (circa 26,000-13,000 carbon-14 yr BP) the Cordilleran glacier complex formed vast ice fields and large glaciers along the crest of the Coast Mountains. As these glaciers flowed west to the Pacific Ocean, they were joined by local glaciers originating on the higher reaches of the Alexander Archipelago (Mann and Hamiltion, 1995). This extensive volume of ice was channeled into deep troughs (present-day fiords) that formed major outlet glaciers, such as the glaciers that occupied Chatham Strait and Dixon Entrance. In several places along the coast, deep glacially scoured submarine troughs indicate that glaciers reached to the edge of the continental shelf. For instance, the glacier that extended into the Dixon Entrance trough is known to have extended to the edge of the continental shelf. Its retreat began sometime after 16,000-15,000 carbon-14 yr BP (Barrie and Conway, 1999).

  9. The evolution of ultrahigh carbon steels - from the Great Pyramids, to Alexander the Great, to Y2K

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J

    1999-10-01

    Hypereutectoid steels containing between about 1 and 2.1 wt%C, and now known as ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCS), have both a rich history (dating back to the time of Alexander the Great, i.e. {approximately} 300 BC) and an interesting, recent, technological period of development (from 1975 to the present). The connections between the modern UHCS and their ancient counterparts, and in particular Damascus steels, have received considerable attention. In addition to monolithic products, UHCS have also been used in both ancient and modern times in laminated composites. In the present paper, a summary of the modern development of UHCS and UHCS-containing laminates is given, and parallels are drawn with ancient materials. Also, ancient laminated composites containing other steels are described; controversial issues and a possible solution related to the age of such a laminate found in the Great Pyramid of Gizeh are discussed.

  10. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  11. Non-Euclidean Space, Movement and Astronomy in Modern Art: Alexander Calder's Mobiles and Ben Nicholson's Reliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Vanja

    2013-09-01

    John Keats once wrote that `there is no such thing as time and space' rather, believing that time and space are mental constructs that are subject to a variety of forms and as diverse as the human mind. In the 1920s through the 1930s, modern physics in many ways supported this idea through the various philosophical writings on the Theory of General Relativity to the masses by scientists such as Arthur Eddington and Albert Einstein. These new concepts of modern physics fundamentally changed our understanding of time and space and had substantial philosophical implications, which were absorbed by modern artists resulting in the 1936 Dimensionist Manifesto. Seeking to internalize the developments of modern science within modern art, this manifesto was widely endorsed by the most prominent figures of the avant-garde such as Marcel Duchamp, Jean Arp, Naum Gabo, Joan Miró, László Moholy-Nagy, Wassily Kandinsky and Alexander Calder. Of particular interest to this manifesto was the new concept of the fourth-dimension, which in many ways revolutionized the arts. Importantly, its interpretation varied widely in the artistic community, ranging from a purely physical four-dimensional space, to a kinetic concept of space in which space and time are linked, to a metaphysical interest in a space that exists beyond the material realm. The impact of modern science and astronomy on avant-garde art is currently a bourgeoning area of research with considerable implications to our rethinking of substantial artistic figures of this era. Through a case study of Alexander Calder's Mobiles and Ben Nicholson's Reliefs, this paper explores how these artworks were informed by an interest in modern science.

  12. Relative inactivity during the last 140,000 years of a portion of the La Paz fault, southern Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, B. J.; Hausback, B. P.; Smith, J. T.

    1990-03-01

    Uranium-series dating of corals overlying the undeformed Punta Coyote gravels indicates that the underlying La Paz fault zone has been relatively inactive in this part of the Baja California peninsula during the last 140,000 years, and possibly for a significantly longer period. However, Holocene seismic activities along extensions of the fault zone north of Cabo San Lucas suggest potential seismic hazards for the city of La Paz (population 200,000), which lies about 6 km from the fault.

  13. Structure and flow properties of syn-rift border faults: The interplay between fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration (Dombjerg Fault, Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Thomas B.; Rotevatn, Atle; Peacock, David C. P.; Henstra, Gijs A.; Midtkandal, Ivar; Grundvåg, Sten-Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Structurally controlled, syn-rift, clastic depocentres are of economic interest as hydrocarbon reservoirs; understanding the structure of their bounding faults is of great relevance, e.g. in the assessment of fault-controlled hydrocarbon retention potential. Here we investigate the structure of the Dombjerg Fault Zone (Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland), a syn-rift border fault that juxtaposes syn-rift deep-water hanging-wall clastics against a footwall of crystalline basement. A series of discrete fault strands characterize the central fault zone, where discrete slip surfaces, fault rock assemblages and extreme fracturing are common. A chemical alteration zone (CAZ) of fault-related calcite cementation envelops the fault and places strong controls on the style of deformation, particularly in the hanging-wall. The hanging-wall damage zone includes faults, joints, veins and, outside the CAZ, disaggregation deformation bands. Footwall deformation includes faults, joints and veins. Our observations suggest that the CAZ formed during early-stage fault slip and imparted a mechanical control on later fault-related deformation. This study thus gives new insights to the structure of an exposed basin-bounding fault and highlights a spatiotemporal interplay between fault damage and chemical alteration, the latter of which is often underreported in fault studies. To better elucidate the structure, evolution and flow properties of faults (outcrop or subsurface), both fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration must be considered.

  14. Evaluation of Wasatch fault segmentation and slip rates using Lake Bonneville shorelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Paul W.; Bruhn, Ronald L.

    2013-05-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of Lake Bonneville shorelines using lidar digital elevation data challenges accepted models of Wasatch fault deformation since the late Pleistocene. While footwall deformation of the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault is consistent with back-rotation of the footwall block and greatest displacement rate toward the center of the segment, shorelines along the footwall of the Salt Lake City segment decrease in elevation toward the interior and are highest at the segment boundaries, an opposite pattern of footwall deformation than predicted for boundaries arresting or strongly inhibiting displacement during earthquakes. The spatial pattern of footwall rebound implies that some of the proposed persistent fault segment boundaries do not stop earthquake ruptures that originate on adjacent fault segments, nor constrain ruptures initiated within the Salt Lake City segment. Net vertical fault displacement at the boundary between the Salt Lake and Provo segments is 16-20 m over the past 16.3-18.5 ka, corresponding to a vertical displacement rate of 0.8-1.2 mm/yr, a net fault slip rate of 2.0-2.8 mm/yr, and horizontal extension rate of 1.8-2.6 mm/yr on the 25° west-southwest dipping fault that forms the southern Salt Lake City segment boundary. Shoreline analysis suggests isostatic rebound caused by a drop in lake level was concentrated during a relatively short (~2000 year) time period following the Bonneville flood at ~16 ka. Lidar-derived topography in conjunction with robust geomorphic datums improves our ability to map deformation associated with lithospheric flexure and faulting while demonstrating the limitation of lacustrine shorelines in this type of analysis.

  15. A Growing Anticline in Tainan City, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Lee, C.; Cheng, C.; Liao, C.; Wen, S.

    2001-12-01

    Tainan City has been known as an earthquake prone town since the early immigration of the ¡§Han¡" people from Mainland China about four hundred years ago. For the purpose of clarifying tectonic activity and paleo-earthquakes in the Tainan City area, we have finished the excavation of three trenches and the drilling of four holes at the so-called Houchiali Fault on the eastern margin of the Tainan tableland. We carefully observed the cores and exposures in the trenches, performed a detailed mapping, and took samples for C-14 dating and other types of analysis. The results show the trench sites are located at a flexure scarp without direct evidence of faulting. But, from the fact of tilting of Holocene sediments to about 50 degrees and the development of a fracture system in the sediments, one may realize that this is without doubt an active structure. We have tested many different models to interpret the observed geologic evidence in the trenches and outcrops, finally determined a growing fault-propagation fold model to be the best interpretation for the Tainan Anticline, while the Houchiali fault is a back-kink or a blind back-thrust type. A diapiric fold had been discussed as possible for a long time by many researchers, but a fault-propagation fold in origin does not contradict with a mud diapiric feature, which was formed during the folding. Field evidence shows that the main active phase of the Houchiali Fault and the Tainan Anticline would have been after the deposition of the Tainan Formation about two to three thousand years ago. During the active deformation phase, the Tawan Formation onlaped the Tainan Formation, as well as tilted during the folding, thus, beds on higher stratigraphic horizon show lower dip-angle. Estimated from a detailed geologic profile, the horizontal shortening of the anticline is estimated to be 30 meters. The vertical uplift of the Tainan Formation is also about 30 meters. This indicates that the deformation rate has been about 1

  16. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  17. SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5μs; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

  18. Learning Cities as Healthy Green Cities: Building Sustainable Opportunity Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a new generation of learning cities we have called EcCoWell cities (Economy, Community, Well-being). The paper was prepared for the PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) and is based on international experiences with PIE and developments in some cities. The paper argues for more holistic and integrated development so that…

  19. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  20. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Renner, J.; Sibson, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus, both in dry and saturated conditions. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ_1 - σ_3) and σ_3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ_3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ_3' under constant σ_1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ_1, ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we explore reshear conditions under an initial condition of (σ_1' = σ_3'), then inducing reshear on the existing fault first by increasing σ_1'(load-strengthening), then by decreasing σ_3' (load-weakening), again comparing relative damage zone development and acoustic emission levels. In saturated experiments, we explore the values of pore fluid pressure (P_f) needed for re-shear to occur in preference to the formation of a new fault. Typically a limiting factor in conventional triaxial experiments performed in compression is that P_f cannot exceed the confining pressure (σ_2 and σ_3). By employing a sample assembly that allows deformation while the loading piston is in extension, it enables us to achieve pore pressures in

  1. 75 FR 11580 - Florida Power Corporation, City of Alachua, City of Bushnell, City of Gainesville, City of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Corporation, City of Alachua, City of Bushnell, City of Gainesville, City of Kissimmee, City of Leesburg, City of New Smyrna Beach and Utilities Commission, City of New Smyrna Beach, City of Ocala, Orlando Utilities Commission and City of Orlando, Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc., Crystal River Unit 3...

  2. Recent high-resolution seismic reflection studies of active faults in the Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the past four years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in key gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland, western Washington State. Although extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area, these marine profiles lack coverage on land and in shallow or restricted waterways. The recent high-resolution seismic surveys have targeted key structures beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate, and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. The surveys can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test key elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. Results from these surveys have: 1) documented several meters of vertical displacement on at least two separate faults in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the Catfish Lake scarp and the underlying kink band in the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a first look at the structures beneath the north portion of the western Tacoma fault zone, north of previous marine profiles; 4) documented that deformation along the Seattle fault extends well east of Lake Sammamish; 5) imaged the Seattle fault beneath the Vasa Park trench; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in and south of the Seattle fault zone south of Bellevue. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic investigations of past earthquakes on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  3. Is the Marmara Sea segment of the North Anatolian Fault Creeping or loading ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Emilie; Masson, Frédéric; Duputel, Zacharie; Yavasoglu, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    During the last century, the North Anatolian Fault has experienced a migrating Mw>7 earthquakes sequence that ruptured about 1000 km of the fault westward. The last major earthquakes occurred in 1999 in Izmit (Mw7.4) and Duzce (Mw7.2). Only the segments located directly offshore of Istanbul, in the Marmara Sea, remain unbroken in this series of events. This region represents a major issue in terms of seismic hazard with more than 13 millions inhabitants in the city of Istanbul. However, a strong controversy remains over whether the central segment of the Main Marmara Fault is locked and likely to experience a major earthquake, or not. Recent studies based on geodetic data suggest indeed that, contrary to the Prince's Island segment which is fully locked, the central segment is accommodating the strain by aseismic fault creep. So it has not the potential to generate a Mw ~7 event. These results, mostly based on relatively simple strain accumulation models over infinitely long faults, is contested by a recent seismic data study, which suggests on the contrary that this fault segment is fully locked and mature to generate such a great earthquake. In this study, we revisit the available geodetic data considering a 3D geometry of the fault, allowing to take into account the lateral variations of behavior along the fault. In particular, we evaluate if current geodetic datasets are sufficient to constrain strain accumulation and thus to conclude about the seismic hazard in the region.

  4. Deriving earthquake history of the Knidos Fault Zone, SW Turkey, using cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of the fault scarp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Cengiz; Ersen Aksoy, Murat; Akif Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tuysuz, Okan; Genc, S. Can; Ertekin Doksanalti, Mustafa; Sahin, Sefa; Benedetti, Lucilla; Tesson, Jim; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    Formation of bedrock fault scarps in extensional provinces is a result of large and successive earthquakes that ruptured the surface several times. Extraction of seismic history of such faults is critical to understand the recurrence intervals and the magnitude of paleo-earthquakes and to better constrain the regional seismic hazard. Knidos on the Datca Peninsula (SW Turkey) is one of the largest cities of the antique times and sits on a terraced hill slope formed by en-echelon W-SW oriented normal faults. The Datça Peninsula constitutes the southern boundary of the Gulf of Gökova, one of the largest grabens developed on the southernmost part of the Western Anatolian Extensional Province. Our investigation relies on cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of limestone faults scarps. This method is a powerful tool to reconstruct the seismic history of normal faults (e.g. Schlagenhauf et al 2010, Benedetti et al. 2013). We focus on one of the most prominent fault scarp (hereinafter Mezarlık Fault) of the Knidos fault zone cutting through the antique Knidos city. We collected 128 pieces of tablet size (10x20cm) 3-cm thick samples along the fault dip and opened 4 conventional paleoseismic trenches at the base of the fault scarp. Our 36Cl concentration profile indicates that 3 to 4 seismic events ruptured the Mezarlık Fault since Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The results from the paleoseismic trenching are also compatible with 36Cl results, indicating 3 or 4 seismic events that disturbed the colluvium deposited at the base of the scarp. Here we will present implications for the seismic history and the derived slip-rate of the Mezarlık Fault based on those results. This project is supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, Grant number: 113Y436) and it was conducted with the Decision of the Council of Ministers with No. 2013/5387 on the date 30.09.2013 and was done with the permission of Knidos Presidency of excavation in

  5. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect

    Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.

    1995-04-01

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  6. Frictional Heterogeneities Along Carbonate Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Scuderi, M.; Tesei, T.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of fault-slip behaviour in carbonates has an important societal impact as a) a significant number of earthquakes nucleate within or propagate through these rocks, and b) half of the known petroleum reserves occur within carbonate reservoirs, which likely contain faults that experience fluid pressure fluctuations. Field studies on carbonate-bearing faults that are exhumed analogues of currently active structures of the seismogenic crust, show that fault rock types are systematically controlled by the lithology of the faulted protolith: localization associated with cataclasis, thermal decomposition and plastic deformation commonly affect fault rocks in massive limestone, whereas distributed deformation, pressure-solution and frictional sliding along phyllosilicates are observed in marly rocks. In addition, hydraulic fractures, indicating cyclic fluid pressure build-ups during the fault activity, are widespread. Standard double direct friction experiments on fault rocks from massive limestones show high friction, velocity neutral/weakening behaviour and significant re-strengthening during hold periods, on the contrary, phyllosilicate-rich shear zones are characterized by low friction, significant velocity strengthening behavior and no healing. We are currently running friction experiments on large rock samples (20x20 cm) in order to reproduce and characterize the interaction of fault rock frictional heterogeneities observed in the field. In addition we have been performing experiments at near lithostatic fluid pressure in the double direct shear configuration within a pressure vessel to test the Rate and State friction stability under these conditions. Our combination of structural observations and mechanical data have been revealing the processes and structures that are at the base of the broad spectrum of fault slip behaviors recently documented by high-resolution geodetic and seismological data.

  7. Constraint of fault parameters inferred from nonplanar fault modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Madariaga, Raul; Fukuyama, Eiichi

    2003-02-01

    We study the distribution of initial stress and frictional parameters for the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake through dynamic rupture simulation along a nonplanar fault system. We find that observational evidence of large slip distribution near the ground surface requires large nonzero cohesive forces in the depth-dependent friction law. This is the only way that stress can accumulate and be released at shallow depths. We then study the variation of frictional parameters along the strike of the fault. For this purpose we mapped into our segmented fault model the initial stress heterogeneity inverted by Peyrat et al. [2001] using a planar fault model. Simulations with this initial stress field improved the overall fit of the rupture process to that inferred from kinematic inversions, and also improved the fit to the ground motion observed in Southern California. In order to obtain this fit, we had to introduce an additional variations of frictional parameters along the fault. The most important is a weak Kickapoo fault and a strong Johnson Valley fault.

  8. Large-magnitude, late Holocene earthquakes on the Genoa fault, West-Central Nevada and Eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramelli, A.R.; Bell, J.W.; DePolo, C.M.; Yount, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The Genoa fault, a principal normal fault of the transition zone between the Basin and Range Province and the northern Sierra Nevada, displays a large and conspicuous prehistoric scarp. Three trenches excavated across this scarp exposed two large-displacement, late Holocene events. Two of the trenches contained multiple layers of stratified charcoal, yielding radiocarbon ages suggesting the most recent and penultimate events on the main part of the fault occurred 500-600 cal B.P., and 2000-2200 cal B.P., respectively. Normal-slip offsets of 3-5.5 m per event along much of the rupture length are comparable to the largest historical Basin and Range Province earthquakes, suggesting these paleoearthquakes were on the order of magnitude 7.2-7.5. The apparent late Holocene slip rate (2-3 mm/yr) is one of the highest in the Basin and Range Province. Based on structural and behavioral differences, the Genoa fault is here divided into four principal sections (the Sierra, Diamond Valley, Carson Valley, and Jacks Valley sections) and is distinguished from three northeast-striking faults in the Carson City area (the Kings Canyon, Carson City, and Indian Hill faults). The conspicuous scarp extends for nearly 25 km, the combined length of the Carson Valley and Jacks Valley sections. The Diamond Valley section lacks the conspicuous scarp, and older alluvial fans and bedrock outcrops on the downthrown side of the fault indicate a lower activity rate. Activity further decreases to the south along the Sierra section, which consists of numerous distributed faults. All three northeast-striking faults in the Carson City area ruptured within the past few thousand years, and one or more may have ruptured during recent events on the Genoa fault.

  9. Potential for a large earthquake rupture of the San Ramón fault in Santiago, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Easton, G.; Klinger, Y.; Rockwell, T. K.; Forman, S. L.; Rebolledo, S.; Lacassin, R.; Armijo, R.

    2013-12-01

    The San Ramón fault is an active west-vergent thrust fault system located along the eastern border of Santiago, capital of Chile, at the foot of the main Andes Cordillera. This is part of the continental-scale West Andean Thrust, at the western slope of the Andean orogen. The fault system is constituted by fault segments in the order of 10-15 km length, evidenced by conspicuous 3-over 100 m height fault scarps systematically located along the fault trace. This evidence Quaternary faulting activity, which together with the geometry, structure and geochronological data support slip rate estimations in the order of ~0.4 mm/year. To probe seismic potential for the west flank of the Andes in front of Santiago, we excavated and analyzed a trench across a prominent-young fault scarp. Together with geochronological data from Optically Stimulated Luminiscence complemented by radiocarbon ages, our paleoseismic results demonstrate recurrent late Quaternary faulting along this structure, with nearly 5 m of displacement in each event. With the last large earthquake nearly 8,000-9,000 years ago and two ruptures within the past 17,000-19,000 years ago, the San Ramon fault appears ripe for another large earthquake up to M7.5 in the near future, making Santiago another major world city at significant risk.

  10. Women in Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Liz

    1982-01-01

    Suggesting that women are at a disadvantage in cities and towns, discusses experiences of women at home, working women, women traveling, shopping, and growing old in cities. Includes suggestions for studying women in cities. (JN)

  11. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  12. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  13. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  14. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  15. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  16. Comparison of Cenozoic Faulting at the Savannah River Site to Fault Characteristics of the Atlantic Coast Fault Province: Implications for Fault Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    2000-11-14

    This study compares the faulting observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity with the faults of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province and concludes that both sets of faults exhibit the same general characteristics and are closely associated. Based on the strength of this association it is concluded that the faults observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity are in fact part of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province. Inclusion in this group means that the historical precedent established by decades of previous studies on the seismic hazard potential for the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province is relevant to faulting at the Savannah River Site. That is, since these faults are genetically related the conclusion of ''not capable'' reached in past evaluations applies.In addition, this study establishes a set of criteria by which individual faults may be evaluated in order to assess their inclusion in the Atlantic Coast Fault Province and the related association of the ''not capable'' conclusion.

  17. Why the 2002 Denali fault rupture propagated onto the Totschunda fault: implications for fault branching and seismic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, David P.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Dawson, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of the rupture of the Mw7.9 Denali fault earthquake from the central Denali fault onto the Totschunda fault has provided a basis for dynamic models of fault branching in which the angle of the regional or local prestress relative to the orientation of the main fault and branch plays a principal role in determining which fault branch is taken. GeoEarthScope LiDAR and paleoseismic data allow us to map the structure of the Denali-Totschunda fault intersection and evaluate controls of fault branching from a geological perspective. LiDAR data reveal the Denali-Totschunda fault intersection is structurally simple with the two faults directly connected. At the branch point, 227.2 km east of the 2002 epicenter, the 2002 rupture diverges southeast to become the Totschunda fault. We use paleoseismic data to propose that differences in the accumulated strain on each fault segment, which express differences in the elapsed time since the most recent event, was one important control of the branching direction. We suggest that data on event history, slip rate, paleo offsets, fault geometry and structure, and connectivity, especially on high slip rate-short recurrence interval faults, can be used to assess the likelihood of branching and its direction. Analysis of the Denali-Totschunda fault intersection has implications for evaluating the potential for a rupture to propagate across other types of fault intersections and for characterizing sources of future large earthquakes.

  18. Fault Injection Campaign for a Fault Tolerant Duplex Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Gian Franco; Ferraro, Robert D.; von llmen, Paul; Rennels, Dave A.

    2007-01-01

    Fault tolerance is an efficient approach adopted to avoid or reduce the damage of a system failure. In this work we present the results of a fault injection campaign we conducted on the Duplex Framework (DF). The DF is a software developed by the UCLA group [1, 2] that uses a fault tolerant approach and allows to run two replicas of the same process on two different nodes of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) computer cluster. A third process running on a different node, constantly monitors the results computed by the two replicas, and eventually restarts the two replica processes if an inconsistency in their computation is detected. This approach is very cost efficient and can be adopted to control processes on spacecrafts where the fault rate produced by cosmic rays is not very high.

  19. Granular Packings and Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Herrmann, H. J.; Timonen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The failure of a two-dimensional packing of elastic grains is analyzed using a numerical model. The packing fails through formation of shear bands or faults. During failure there is a separation of the system into two grain-packing states. In a shear band, local ``rotating bearings'' are spontaneously formed. The bearing state is favored in a shear band because it has a low stiffness against shearing. The ``seismic activity'' distribution in the packing has the same characteristics as that of the earthquake distribution in tectonic faults. The directions of the principal stresses in a bearing are reminiscent of those found at the San Andreas Fault.

  20. Method of locating ground faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, Allen H.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1994-11-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  1. Finding faults with the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Rudolph Giuliani and Hillary Rodham Clinton are crisscrossing upstate New York looking for votes in the U.S. Senate race. Also cutting back and forth across upstate New York are hundreds of faults of a kind characterized by very sporadic seismic activity according to Robert Jacobi, professor of geology at the University of Buffalo (UB), who conducted research with fellow UB geology professor John Fountain."We have proof that upstate New York is crisscrossed by faults," Jacobi said. "In the past, the Appalachian Plateau—which stretches from Albany to Buffalo—was considered a pretty boring place structurally without many faults or folds of any significance."

  2. Map of the Rinconada and Reliz Fault Zones, Salinas River Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberg, Lewis I.; Clark, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    The Rinconada Fault and its related faults constitute a major structural element of the Salinas River valley, which is known regionally, and referred to herein, as the 'Salinas Valley'. The Rinconada Fault extends 230 km from King City in the north to the Big Pine Fault in the south. At the south end of the map area near Santa Margarita, the Rinconada Fault separates granitic and metamorphic crystalline rocks of the Salinian Block to the northeast from the subduction-zone assemblage of the Franciscan Complex to the southwest. Northwestward, the Rinconada Fault lies entirely within the Salinian Block and generally divides this region into two physiographically and structurally distinct areas, the Santa Lucia Range to the west and the Salinas Valley to the east. The Reliz Fault, which continues as a right stepover from the Rinconada Fault, trends northwestward along the northeastern base of the Sierra de Salinas of the Santa Lucia Range and beyond for 60 km to the vicinity of Spreckels, where it is largely concealed. Aeromagnetic data suggest that the Reliz Fault continues northwestward another 25 km into Monterey Bay, where it aligns with a high-definition magnetic boundary. Geomorphic evidence of late Quaternary movement along the Rinconada and Reliz Fault Zones has been documented by Tinsley (1975), Dibblee (1976, 1979), Hart (1976, 1985), and Klaus (1999). Although definitive geologic evidence of Holocene surface rupture has not been found on these faults, they were regarded as an earthquake source for the California Geological Survey [formerly, California Division of Mines and Geology]/U.S. Geological Survey (CGS/USGS) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Assessment because of their postulated slip rate of 1+-1 mm/yr and their calculated maximum magnitude of 7.3. Except for published reports by Durham (1965, 1974), Dibblee (1976), and Hart (1976), most information on these faults is unpublished or is contained in theses, field trip guides, and other types of reports

  3. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  4. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  5. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  6. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  7. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  8. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see §...

  9. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see §...

  10. Chronology of last earthquake on Firouzkuh Fault using by C14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, H.; Ritz, J.-F.; Walker, R.; Alimohammadian, H.; Salamati, R.; Shahidi, A.; Patnaik, R.; Talebian, M.

    2009-04-01

    study during last 5 years on Firouzkuh fault (Nazari, 2006) reveal seismic activity of this area and the rate of movement in young event is about 2 mm/yr. The Firouzkuh fault is close to Firouzkuh, Damavand, Semnan and Tehran cities, therefore, gathering information about the geometry, mechanism and characteristics of activity of Firouzkuh active fault, will help us possible to prediction of fault activity and minimize the resulted damage. Therefore chronology of last event is quit important. In this paper to date the last seismic event in Firouzkuh fault. We have used C14 dating on human bones recovered from F2 trench, along with Quaternary sedimentology of young alluvium deposits of eastern Firouzkuh city. Paleoseismic analysis and C14 dating along the Firouzkuh left -Latural Strike-slip fault indicates the central Alborz has been witnessed large earthquakes during the late Holocene. Here we provide data from one of the two excavated trenches with 15 m length, 2m width and 4 m depth dug across the gauge zone in east Firouzkuh city, where we found some evidence for last paleoearthquake associated to seismic re-activity of Firouzkuh fault. The last seismic event is evidenced by cutting young superficial deposits and overlaid by alluvium deposits which yielded fragments of human bones. The generated C14 date from human bones, found at palaeoseismological trench (F2) on Firouzkuh fault, indicates an age of 1131-1187 B.P. year for alluvium deposits bearing these bones since from stratigraphical point view, this alluvium deposits (unit 4) are overlaid by faulted recent sediments (unit 1, and these recent sediments are cut due to recent activity of Firouzkuh fault, which are younger than human bone bearing alluvium, we may come to conclusion that the time event of this earth quake must be younger than obtained C14 date (1159 ± 28). In other hand since the human bones have been found in a place not similar to grave, we may assume that the body was on the surface at the time

  11. The fault-tree compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensen, Anna L.; Butler, Ricky W.

    1987-01-01

    The Fault Tree Compiler Program is a new reliability tool used to predict the top event probability for a fault tree. Five different gate types are allowed in the fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N gates. The high level input language is easy to understand and use when describing the system tree. In addition, the use of the hierarchical fault tree capability can simplify the tree description and decrease program execution time. The current solution technique provides an answer precise (within the limits of double precision floating point arithmetic) to the five digits in the answer. The user may vary one failure rate or failure probability over a range of values and plot the results for sensitivity analyses. The solution technique is implemented in FORTRAN; the remaining program code is implemented in Pascal. The program is written to run on a Digital Corporation VAX with the VMS operation system.

  12. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  13. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  14. Weakening inside incipient thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Oliot, E.

    2013-12-01

    In fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mainly accommodated by thrust faults that nucleate along décollement levels. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that these faults might be weak because of a combination of processes such as pressure-solution, phyllosilicates reorientation and delamination, and fluid pressurization. In this study we aim to decipher the processes and the kinetics responsible for weakening of tectonic décollements. We studied the Millaris thrust (Southern Pyrenees): a fault representative of a décollement in its incipient stage. This fault accommodated a total shortening of about 30 meters and is constituted by a 10m thick, intensively foliated phyllonite developed inside a homogeneous marly unit. Detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses have been carried out to characterize the mineralogical change, the chemical transfers and volume change in the fault zone compared to non-deformed parent sediments. We also carried out microstructural analysis on natural and experimentally deformed rocks. Illite and chlorite are the main hydrous minerals. Inside fault zone, illite minerals are oriented along the schistosity whereas chlorite coats the shear surfaces. Mass balance calculations demonstrated a volume loss of up to 50% for calcite inside fault zone (and therefore a relative increase of phyllosilicates contents) because of calcite pressure solution mechanisms. We performed friction experiments in a biaxial deformation apparatus using intact rocks sheared in the in-situ geometry from the Millaris fault and its host sediments. We imposed a range of normal stresses (10 to 50 MPa), sliding velocity steps (3-100 μm/s) and slide-hold slide sequences (3 to 1000 s hold) under saturated conditions. Mechanical results demonstrate that both fault rocks and parent sediments are weaker than average geological materials (friction μ<<0.6) and have velocity-strengthening behavior because of the presence of phyllosilicate horizons. Fault rocks are

  15. Fault Tree Analysis: A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Fault tree analysis is a top-down approach to the identification of process hazards. It is as one of the best methods for systematically identifying an graphically displaying the many ways some things can go wrong. This bibliography references 266 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts. fault tree analysis, risk an probability theory, in the basic index or major subject terms. An abstract is included with most citations, followed by the applicable subject terms.

  16. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  17. Rupture Process of the 2003 Bam, Iran, Earthquake: Did Shallow Asperities on a Fresh Fault Cause Extreme Ground Motions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, H.; Koketsu, K.; Mostafaei, H.

    2004-12-01

    The Bam, Iran, earthquake on December 26, 2003 caused heavy damage to the city of Bam including the historic heritage of Arg-e-Bam. This Mw6.5 earthquake rupture created fresh faults 5 km westward away from the Bam fault. The Bam strong-motion station recorded 992 gal in the UD component and two directivity pulses in the horizontal components with a dominant frequency of 1 Hz. We inferred the rupture process of the 2003 Bam earthquake from strong motion data observed by BHRC, together with teleseismic data to constrain global features of the source. Waveform inversions using teleseismic data (e.g. Yamanaka, 2003; Yagi, 2003) have suggested the existence of a shallow asperity. Nakamura et al. (2004) estimated aftershock distribution with vertical dipping that superimposed the fresh faults, not the Bam fault. They proposed fault planes consisting N-S alignment with northward branches beneath the city of Bam. Our preliminary analyses show that two directivity pulses are created by northward rupture near the hypocenter and north-eastward rupture beneath the city. Recent earthquakes occurred on immature faults with shallow asperities have also generated localized extreme-strong motions (e.g., 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu, Japan, with Mw6.1; 2000 Tottori, Japan, with Mw6.6). Larger fracture energy is expected for shallow asperities on immature faults than those on mature faults. For example, the 2000 Tottori earthquake has several times larger fracture energy than expected by the scaling between seismic moment and fracture energy. When considering the energy budget, are radiated energy from the immature faults enough to generate the extreme ground motions? Detailed source process inversions might be able to answer this question.

  18. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Frederick W. Smith, FedEx Corporation), with Introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander (TN)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Frederick W.

    2012-04-24

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Following introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Frederick W. Smith, Chairman, President, and CEO of FedEx Corporation, gave the third keynote presentation of the day.

  19. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Frederick W. Smith, FedEx Corporation), with Introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander (TN)

    ScienceCinema

    Smith, Frederick W. (FedEx Corporation, Chairman, President and CEO)

    2016-07-12

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Following introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Frederick W. Smith, Chairman, President, and CEO of FedEx Corporation, gave the third keynote presentation of the day.

  20. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Petricca, P.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  1. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, C; Carminati, E; Petricca, P; Riguzzi, F

    2015-07-14

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors.

  2. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  3. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  4. Software Fault Tolerance: A Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2000-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce error-free software, software fault tolerance is and will continue to be an important consideration in software systems. The root cause of software design errors is the complexity of the systems. Compounding the problems in building correct software is the difficulty in assessing the correctness of software for highly complex systems. After a brief overview of the software development processes, we note how hard-to-detect design faults are likely to be introduced during development and how software faults tend to be state-dependent and activated by particular input sequences. Although component reliability is an important quality measure for system level analysis, software reliability is hard to characterize and the use of post-verification reliability estimates remains a controversial issue. For some applications software safety is more important than reliability, and fault tolerance techniques used in those applications are aimed at preventing catastrophes. Single version software fault tolerance techniques discussed include system structuring and closure, atomic actions, inline fault detection, exception handling, and others. Multiversion techniques are based on the assumption that software built differently should fail differently and thus, if one of the redundant versions fails, it is expected that at least one of the other versions will provide an acceptable output. Recovery blocks, N-version programming, and other multiversion techniques are reviewed.

  5. Fault diagnosis of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Y. ); Akimoto, Y. ); Kunugi, M. )

    1992-05-01

    Fault diagnosis of power systems plays a crucial role in power system monitoring and control that ensures stable supply of electrical power to consumers. In the case of multiple faults or incorrect operation of protective devices, fault diagnosis requires judgment of complex conditions at various levels. For this reason, research into application of knowledge-based systems go an early start and reports of such systems have appeared in may papers. In this paper, these systems are classified by the method of inference utilized in the knowledge-based systems for fault diagnosis of power systems. The characteristics of each class and corresponding issues as well as the state-of-the-art techniques for improving their performance are presented. Additional topics covered are user interfaces, interfaces with energy management systems (EMS's), and expert system development tools for fault diagnosis. Results and evaluation of actual operation in the field are also discussed. Knowledge-based fault diagnosis of power systems will continue to disseminate.

  6. Aeromagnetic anomalies over faulted strata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys are now an industry standard and they commonly detect anomalies that are attributed to faults within sedimentary basins. However, detailed studies identifying geologic sources of magnetic anomalies in sedimentary environments are rare in the literature. Opportunities to study these sources have come from well-exposed sedimentary basins of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico and Colorado. High-resolution aeromagnetic data from these areas reveal numerous, curvilinear, low-amplitude (2–15 nT at 100-m terrain clearance) anomalies that consistently correspond to intrasedimentary normal faults (Figure 1). Detailed geophysical and rock-property studies provide evidence for the magnetic sources at several exposures of these faults in the central Rio Grande rift (summarized in Grauch and Hudson, 2007, and Hudson et al., 2008). A key result is that the aeromagnetic anomalies arise from the juxtaposition of magnetically differing strata at the faults as opposed to chemical processes acting at the fault zone. The studies also provide (1) guidelines for understanding and estimating the geophysical parameters controlling aeromagnetic anomalies at faulted strata (Grauch and Hudson), and (2) observations on key geologic factors that are favorable for developing similar sedimentary sources of aeromagnetic anomalies elsewhere (Hudson et al.).

  7. Coseismic Faults and Crust Deformation Accompanied the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, China by Field Investigation and InSAR Interferogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, K.; Si, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Ozawa, T.

    2008-12-01

    The devastated Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake occurred along the steep eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau in Sichuan, China, on 12 May 2008. Over 86,592 people were dead or missing, 374159 injured, and more than 4.8 million homeless. The ruptures possibly occurred over a length of 285 km along the northeast striking Longmen Shan (LMS) thrust belt. In order to study the oversized fault ruptures, existing active faults related and relationships with the damages caused, we conducted field investigations during 4-15 June and 3-9 October 2008, covered about 140km length of LMS faults, including Beichuan(BC), Anxian(AC), Mianzhu, Shifang, Pengzhou, Dujiangyan, Yingxiu (YX) and Wenchuan. On the field investigation we found coseismic surface faults along several profiles perpendicular to the LMS faults. The coseismic surface faults we discovered were at Leigu(L), Hanwang(H), Yinghua(Y), Bailu(BL), Xiaoyudong(X), and Baiyunding (BYD). Of them the maximum vertical displacement reached 4.6m at L, Beichuan County. The uplifting displacements dominated in the southwestern section of the rupture. Moreover, the northwest-striking left-lateral fault was found with horizontal displacement of 2.8m, and vertical of 1.5m as well, at X, Pengzhou City. The left-lateral fault, inversely under-controlled movement of right- lateral fault in the area, showed the complexity of the fault movements. The field results showed the coseismic surface ruptures locally while the overall faults movements and Crust deformation could be understood by the Interferometric SAR(InSAR) technique (NIED, 2008) using data from the Phased Array L-band SAR sensor (PALSAR) equipped on Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The larger deformation zones detected by InSAR interferogram occurred with a width of ~30 km in southwestern section, and of ~10km in northeastern section of LMS faults. In the southwestern section, the deformation zone occurred mostly within the existing active faults zones: Guanxian

  8. Tutorial: Advanced fault tree applications using HARP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Boyd, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    Reliability analysis of fault tolerant computer systems for critical applications is complicated by several factors. These modeling difficulties are discussed and dynamic fault tree modeling techniques for handling them are described and demonstrated. Several advanced fault tolerant computer systems are described, and fault tree models for their analysis are presented. HARP (Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor) is a software package developed at Duke University and NASA Langley Research Center that is capable of solving the fault tree models presented.

  9. Error latency estimation using functional fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manthani, S. R.; Saxena, N. R.; Robinson, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    A complete modeling of faults at gate level for a fault tolerant computer is both infeasible and uneconomical. Functional fault modeling is an approach where units are characterized at an intermediate level and then combined to determine fault behavior. The applicability of functional fault modeling to the FTMP is studied. Using this model a forecast of error latency is made for some functional blocks. This approach is useful in representing larger sections of the hardware and aids in uncovering system level deficiencies.

  10. Developing Fault Models for Space Mission Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

    2003-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of fault models for space mission software is shown. The topics include: 1) Goal: Improve Understanding of Technology Fault Generation Process; 2) Required Measurement; 3) Measuring Structural Evolution; 4) Module Attributes; 5) Principal Components of Raw Metrics; 6) The Measurement Process; 7) View of Structural Evolution at the System and Module Level; 8) Identifying and Counting Faults; 9) Fault Enumeration; 10) Modeling Fault Content; 11) Modeling Results; 12) Current and Future Work; and 13) Discussion and Conclusions.

  11. Seismic hazard of the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault in Haiti inferred from palaeoseismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Mann, P.; Crone, A.J.; Gold, R.D.; Hudnut, K.W.; Briggs, R.W.; Koehler, R.D.; Jean, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone is recognized as one of the primary plate-bounding fault systems in Haiti. The strike-slip fault runs adjacent to the city of Port-au-Prince and was initially thought to be the source of the 12 January 2010, M w 7.0 earthquake. Haiti experienced significant earthquakes in 1751 and 1770 (refsA, 3, 4, 5), but the role of the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone in these earthquakes is poorly known. We use satellite imagery, aerial photography, light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and field investigations to document Quaternary activity on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault. We report late Quaternary, left-lateral offsets of up to 160m, and a set of small offsets ranging from 1.3 to 3.3m that we associate with one of the eighteenth century earthquakes. The size of the small offsets implies that the historical earthquake was larger than M w 7.0, but probably smaller than M w 7.6. We found no significant surface rupture associated with the 2010 earthquake. The lack of surface rupture, coupled with other seismologic, geologic and geodetic observations, suggests that little, if any, accumulated strain was released on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault in the 2010 earthquake. These results confirm that the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault remains a significant seismic hazard. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural localization and origin of compartmentalized fluid flow, Comstock lode, Virginia City, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, B.R.; Tingley, J.V.; Drew, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Bonanza-grade orebodies in epithermal-style mineral deposits characteristically occur as discrete zones within spatially more extensive fault and/or fracture systems. Empirically, the segregation of such systems into compartments of higher and lower permeability appears to be a key process necessary for high-grade ore formation and, most commonly, it is such concentrations of metals that make an epithermal vein district world class. In the world-class silver- and gold-producing Comstock mining district, Nevada, several lines of evidence lead to the conclusion that the Comstock lode is localized in an extensional stepover between right-lateral fault zones. This evidence includes fault geometries, kinematic indicators of slip, the hydraulic connectivity of faults as demonstrated by veins and dikes along faults, and the opening of a normal-fault-bounded, asymmetric basin between two parallel and overlapping northwest-striking, lateral- to lateral-oblique-slip fault zones. During basin opening, thick, generally subeconomic, banded quartz-adularia veins were deposited in the normal fault zone, the Comstock fault, and along one of the bounding lateral fault zones, the Silver City fault. As deformation continued, the intrusion of dikes and small plugs into the hanging wall of the Comstock fault zone may have impeded the ability of the stepover to accommodate displacement on the bounding strike-slip faults through extension within the stepover. A transient period of transpressional deformation of the Comstock fault zone ensued, and the early-stage veins were deformed through boudinaging and hydraulic fragmentation, fault-motion inversion, and high- and low-angle axial rotations of segments of the fault planes and some fault-bounded wedges. This deformation led to the formation of spatially restricted compartments of high vertical permeability and hydraulic connectivity and low lateral hydraulic connectivity. Bonanza orebodies were formed in the compartmentalized zones of

  13. Shallow Faulting in Morelia, Mexico, Based on Seismic Tomography and Geodetically Detected Land Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Vergara-Huerta, F.; Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.

    2013-12-01

    Subsidence has been a common occurrence in several cities in central Mexico for the past three decades. This process causes substantial damage to the urban infrastructure and housing in several cities and it is a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land-use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies. Since the early 1980's the city of Morelia in Central Mexico has experienced subsidence associated with groundwater extraction in excess of natural recharge from rainfall. Previous works have focused on the detection and temporal evolution of the subsidence spatial distribution. The most recent InSAR analysis confirms the permanence of previously detected rapidly subsiding areas such as the Rio Grande Meander area and also defines 2 subsidence patches previously undetected in the newly developed suburban sectors west of Morelia at the Fraccionamiento Del Bosque along, south of Hwy. 15 and another patch located north of Morelia along Gabino Castañeda del Rio Ave. Because subsidence-induced, shallow faulting develops at high horizontal strain localization, newly developed a subsidence areas are particularly prone to faulting and fissuring. Shallow faulting increases groundwater vulnerability because it disrupts discharge hydraulic infrastructure and creates a direct path for transport of surface pollutants into the underlying aquifer. Other sectors in Morelia that have been experiencing subsidence for longer time have already developed well defined faults such as La Colina, Central Camionera, Torremolinos and La Paloma faults. Local construction codes in the vicinity of these faults define a very narrow swath along which housing construction is not allowed. In order to better characterize these fault systems and provide better criteria for future municipal construction codes we have surveyed the La Colina and Torremolinos fault systems in the western sector of Morelia using seismic tomographic techniques. Our results indicate that La Colina Fault

  14. Using the Alexander Collection to measure the effects of climate change on the grasshoppers of the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nufio, C. R.; Bowers, D. M.; Guralnick, R. P.

    2007-12-01

    The current study utilizes the recently curated and databased Alexander Grasshopper Collection coupled with a new resurvey program to measure the effects of climate change on grasshoppers found along an elevational gradient in the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The Alexander Collection is composed of approximately 19,000 pinned grasshoppers and a series of field data notebooks from a three year 1958-1960 survey project. During these survey years, Alexander processed over 65,000 grasshoppers from repeatedly sampled sites along an elevational gradient from Boulder (1530 m elev.) to Mt Evans (3900m elev.) in the Colorado Front Range. Data from 2006 shows that at mid-elevation sites grasshoppers are becoming adults 15-28 days earlier than they did nearly a half century ago. We found no changes in the time to reach adulthood at the high elevation sites. Preliminary data from 2007 (a year with milder spring temperatures) suggests that unlike the dramatic patterns documented in 2006, that the time to reach adulthood for grasshoppers at low and high elevation sites was not much different than it was 50 years ago. In 2007, several grasshopper species at mid-elevation did become adults earlier than they had a half century ago.

  15. Listening to the whispers of matter through Arabic hermeticism: new studies on The Book of the Treasure of Alexander.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana Maria; Jubran, Safa Abou Chahla

    2008-07-01

    The Jabirian Corpus refers to the K. Thahirat Al-'Iskandar, "The Book of the Treasure of Alexander" (hereafter BTA), as one of several forgeries suggesting that alchemical secrets were hidden in inscriptions in various places. The book was neglected until 1926, when Julius Ruska discussed it in his work on the Emerald Tablet, placing the BTA within the literature related to the development of Arabic alchemy. His preliminary study became an essential reference and encouraged many scholars to work on the BTA in the following decades. Some years ago, we completed the first translation of the BTA into a Western language. The work was based on the acephalous Escorial manuscript, which we identified as a fourteenth-century copy of the BTA. This manuscript is peculiar, as part of it is encoded. After finishing our translation, we started to establish the text of the BTA. At present, the text is in process of fixation--to be followed by textual criticism--and has been the main focus of a thorough study of ours on medieval hermeticism and alchemy. A sample of the work currently in progress is presented in this paper: an analysis of the variations between different manuscripts along with a study and English translation of its alchemical chapter.

  16. Prolonged weight-shift and altered spinal coordination during sit-to-stand in practitioners of the Alexander Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Gurfinkel, Victor S; Horak, Fay B; Day, Brian L

    2011-01-01

    The Alexander Technique (AT) is used to improve postural and movement coordination and has been reported to be clinically beneficial, however its effect on movement coordination is not well-characterized. In this study we examined the sit-to-stand (STS) movement by comparing coordination (phasing, weight-shift and spinal movement) between AT teachers (n=15) and matched control subjects (n=14). We found AT teachers had a longer weight-shift (p<0.001) and shorter momentum transfer phase (p=0.01), than control subjects. AT teachers also increased vertical foot force monotonically, rather than unweighting the feet prior to seat-off, suggesting they generate less forward momentum with hip flexors. The prolonged weight-shift of AT teachers occurred over a greater range of trunk inclination, such that their weight shifted continuously onto the feet while bringing the body mass forward. Finally, AT teachers had greatly reduced spinal bending during STS (cervical, p<0.001; thoracic, p<0.001; lumbar, p<0.05). We hypothesize that the low hip joint stiffness and adaptive axial postural tone previously reported in AT teachers underlies this novel “continuous” STS strategy by facilitating eccentric contractions during weight-shift. PMID:21782443

  17. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 1: formative years, naturphilosophie, and galvanism.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    During the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), who showed an early interest in many facets of natural philosophy and natural history, delved into the controversial subject of galvanism and animal electricity, hoping to shed light on the basic nature of the nerve force. He was motivated by his broad worldview, the experiments of Luigi Galvani, who favored animal electricity in more than a few specialized fishes, and the thinking of Alessandro Volta, who accepted specialized fish electricity but was not willing to generalize to other animals, thinking Galvani's frog experiments flawed by his use of metals. Differing from many German Naturphilosophen, who shunned "violent" experiments, the newest instruments, and detailed measurement, Humboldt conducted thousands of galvanic experiments on animals and animal parts, as well as many on his own body, some of which caused him great pain. He interpreted his results as supporting some but not all of the claims made by both Galvani and Volta. Notably, because of certain negative findings and phenomenological differences, he remained skeptical about the intrinsic animal force being qualitatively identical to true electricity. Hence, he referred to a "galvanic force," not animal electricity, in his letters and publications, a theoretical position he would abandon with Volta's help early in the new century.

  18. Alexander Technique Training Coupled With an Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction in Teachers With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kamalikhah, Tahereh; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Rezaei-Moghaddam, Farid; Ghasemi, Mohammad; Gholami-Fesharaki, Mohammad; Goklani, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals suffering from chronic low back pain (CLBP) experience major physical, social, and occupational disruptions. Strong evidence confirms the effectiveness of Alexander technique (AT) training for CLBP. Objectives The present study applied an integrative model (IM) of behavioral prediction for improvement of AT training. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study of female teachers with nonspecific LBP in southern Tehran in 2014. Group A contained 42 subjects and group B had 35 subjects. In group A, AT lessons were designed based on IM constructs, while in group B, AT lessons only were taught. The validity and reliability of the AT questionnaire were confirmed using content validity (CVR 0.91, CVI 0.96) and Cronbach’s α (0.80). The IM constructs of both groups were measured after the completion of training. Statistical analysis used independent and paired samples t-tests and the univariate generalized linear model (GLM). Results Significant differences were recorded before and after intervention (P < 0.001) for the model constructs of intention, perceived risk, direct attitude, behavioral beliefs, and knowledge in both groups. Direct attitude and behavioral beliefs in group A were higher than in group B after the intervention (P < 0.03). Conclusions The educational framework provided by IM for AT training improved attitude and behavioral beliefs that can facilitate the adoption of AT behavior and decreased CLBP. PMID:28144457

  19. Growing community: the impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the social and learning environment in primary schools.

    PubMed

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-08-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has a positive impact on student engagement, social connections, and confidence within and beyond the school gates. Primary evidence for the research question came from qualitative data collected from students, parents, teachers, volunteers, school principals, and specialist staff through interviews, focus groups, and participant observations. This was supported by analyses of quantitative data on child quality of life, cooperative behaviors, teacher perceptions of the school environment, and school-level educational outcome and absenteeism data. Results showed that some of the program attributes valued most highly by study participants included increased student engagement and confidence, opportunities for experiential and integrated learning, teamwork, building social skills, and connections and links between schools and their communities. In this analysis, quantitative findings failed to support findings from the primary analysis. Limitations as well as benefits of a mixed-methods approach to evaluation of complex community interventions are discussed.

  20. Crossed aphasia in a dextral: a test of the Alexander-Annett theory of anomalous organization of brain function.

    PubMed

    Osmon, D C; Panos, J; Kautz, P; Gandhavadi, B

    1998-07-01

    A case of crossed aphasia is presented in a strongly right-handed 77-year-old white female without history of familial sinistrality or prior neurological illness. She developed a right middle cerebral artery infarction documented by CT and accompanied by obvious clinical signs of a conduction aphasia with some resolution but continuing obvious language defect after 9 weeks in rehabilitation. Comprehensive neuropsychological and aphasia testing suggested anomalous lateralization of phonologic-output aspects of language, emotional prosody, motor planning and body schema modules with usual lateralization of lexical-semantic aspects of language and visuo-spatial functions. Experimental validation of the uncrossed lexical-semantic aspects of language using tachistoscope methods found support for the Alexander-Annett theory that different aspects of language can be dissociated in their lateralization. The subject had difficulty identifying a semantic associate of a picture presented to the left visual field (7 errors out of 10) relative to right visual field presentation (2 errors out of 10). Bilateral free naming errors (6 and 5 errors in the left and right visual fields, respectively) occurred consistent with the aphasic presentation, suggesting phonologic-output dysfunction from the right cerebral vascular accident. Implications of the results for aphasia classification are discussed.

  1. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  2. Critical fault patterns determination in fault-tolerant computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, E. J.; Losq, J.

    1978-01-01

    The method proposed tries to enumerate all the critical fault-patterns (successive occurrences of failures) without analyzing every single possible fault. The conditions for the system to be operating in a given mode can be expressed in terms of the static states. Thus, one can find all the system states that correspond to a given critical mode of operation. The next step consists in analyzing the fault-detection mechanisms, the diagnosis algorithm and the process of switch control. From them, one can find all the possible system configurations that can result from a failure occurrence. Thus, one can list all the characteristics, with respect to detection, diagnosis, and switch control, that failures must have to constitute critical fault-patterns. Such an enumeration of the critical fault-patterns can be directly used to evaluate the overall system tolerance to failures. Present research is focused on how to efficiently make use of these system-level characteristics to enumerate all the failures that verify these characteristics.

  3. Fault branching and rupture directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliss, Sonia; Bhat, Harsha S.; Dmowska, Renata; Rice, James R.

    2005-06-01

    Could the directivity of a complex earthquake be inferred from the ruptured fault branches it created? Typically, branches develop in forward orientation, making acute angles relative to the propagation direction. Direct backward branching of the same style as the main rupture (e.g., both right lateral) is disallowed by the stress field at the rupture front. Here we propose another mechanism of backward branching. In that mechanism, rupture stops along one fault strand, radiates stress to a neighboring strand, nucleates there, and develops bilaterally, generating a backward branch. Such makes diagnosing directivity of a past earthquake difficult without detailed knowledge of the branching process. As a field example, in the Landers 1992 earthquake, rupture stopped at the northern end of the Kickapoo fault, jumped onto the Homestead Valley fault, and developed bilaterally there, NNW to continue the main rupture but also SSE for 4 km forming a backward branch. We develop theoretical principles underlying such rupture transitions, partly from elastostatic stress analysis, and then simulate the Landers example numerically using a two-dimensional elastodynamic boundary integral equation formulation incorporating slip-weakening rupture. This reproduces the proposed backward branching mechanism based on realistic if simplified fault geometries, prestress orientation corresponding to the region, standard lab friction values for peak strength, and fracture energies characteristic of the Landers event. We also show that the seismic S ratio controls the jumpable distance and that curving of a fault toward its compressional side, like locally along the southeastern Homestead Valley fault, induces near-tip increase of compressive normal stress that slows rupture propagation.

  4. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

    2014-06-01

    Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

  5. Fault seal analysis in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, S.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The majority of North Sea structural traps requires that at least one fault be a sealing fault. Over 400 faults from 101 exploration targets and 25 oil and gas fields were analyzed in a regional study of the North Sea. The faults cut clastic successions from a variety of depositional environments (marine, paralic, and nonmarine). The emphasis of the study was on fault-related seals that act as pressure or migration barriers over geologic time. Parameters such as fault strike and throw, reservoir thickness, depth, net-to-gross ratio, porosity, and net sand connectivity were plotted against seal performance to define trends and correlations to predict fault seal characteristics. A correlation appears to exist between fault orientation and sealing, although this is not statistically significant. Sealing is proportional to fault throw norminalized as a fraction of the reservoir thickness. The great majority of faults with throw greater than the thickness of the reservoir interval were sealing faults. The most useful parameters in fault seal prediction are fault displacement, net-to-gross ratio, and net sand connectivity. The conclusions of this study have general applicability to fault seal prediction in exploration, development, and production of hydrocarbons in clastic successions in the North Sea and perhaps other areas as well. 15 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Fault prediction for nonlinear stochastic system with incipient faults based on particle filter and nonlinear regression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bo; Fang, Huajing

    2017-03-31

    This paper is concerned with the fault prediction for the nonlinear stochastic system with incipient faults. Based on the particle filter and the reasonable assumption about the incipient faults, the modified fault estimation algorithm is proposed, and the system state is estimated simultaneously. According to the modified fault estimation, an intuitive fault detection strategy is introduced. Once each of the incipient fault is detected, the parameters of which are identified by a nonlinear regression method. Then, based on the estimated parameters, the future fault signal can be predicted. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by the simulations of the Three-tank system.

  7. PC-based fault finder

    SciTech Connect

    Bengiamin, N.N. ); Jensen, C.A. . Electrical Engineering Dept. Otter Tail Power Co., Fergus Falls, MN . System Protection Group); McMahon, H. )

    1993-07-01

    Electric utilities are continually pressed to stay competitive while meeting the increasing demand of today's sophisticated customer. Advances in electron equipment and the improved array of electric driven devices are setting new standards for improved reliability and quality of service. Besides the specifications on voltage and frequency regulation and the permitted harmonic content, to name a few, the number and duration of service interruptions have a dramatic direct effect on the customer. Accurate fault locating reduces transmission line patrolling and is of particular significance in repairing long lines in rough terrain. Shortened outage times, reduced equipment degrading and stress on the system, fast restored service, and improved revenue are immediate outcomes of fast fault locating which insure minimum loss of system security. This article focuses on a PC-based (DOS) computer program that has unique features for identifying the type of fault and its location on overhead transmission/distribution lines. Balanced and unbalanced faults are identified and located accurately while accounting for changes in conductor sizes and network configuration. The presented concepts and methodologies have been spurred by Otter Tail Power's need for an accurate fault locating scheme to accommodate multiple feeders with mixed lone configurations. A case study based on a section of the Otter Tail network is presented to illustrate the features and capabilities of the developed software.

  8. Quaternary faults of west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.; Raney, J.A. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-04-01

    North- and northwest-striking intermontane basins and associated normal faults in West Texas and adjacent Chihuahua, Mexico, formed in response to Basin and Range tectonism that began about 24 Ma ago. Data on the precise ages of faulted and unfaulted Quaternary deposits are sparse. However, age estimates made on the basis of field stratigraphic relationships and the degree of calcic soil development have helped determine that many of the faults that bound the basin margins ruptured since the middle Pleistocene and that some faults probably ruptured during the Holocene. Average recurrence intervals between surface ruptures since the middle Pleistocene appear to be relatively long, about 10,000 to 100,000 yr. Maximum throw during single rupture events have been between 1 and 3 m. Historic seismicity in West Texas is low compared to seismicity in many parts of the Basin and Range province. The largest historic earthquake, the 1931 Valentine earthquake in Ryan Flat/Lobo Valley, had a magnitude of 6.4 and no reported surface rupture. The most active Quaternary faults occur within the 120-km-long Hueco Bolson, the 70-km-long Red Light Bolson, and the > 200-km-long Salt Basins/Wild Horse Flat/Lobo Valley/Ryan Flat.

  9. Where's the Hayward Fault? A Green Guide to the Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes self-guided field trips to one of North America?s most dangerous earthquake faults?the Hayward Fault. Locations were chosen because of their easy access using mass transit and/or their significance relating to the natural and cultural history of the East Bay landscape. This field-trip guidebook was compiled to help commemorate the 140th anniversary of an estimated M 7.0 earthquake that occurred on the Hayward Fault at approximately 7:50 AM, October 21st, 1868. Although many reports and on-line resources have been compiled about the science and engineering associated with earthquakes on the Hayward Fault, this report has been prepared to serve as an outdoor guide to the fault for the interested public and for educators. The first chapter is a general overview of the geologic setting of the fault. This is followed by ten chapters of field trips to selected areas along the fault, or in the vicinity, where landscape, geologic, and man-made features that have relevance to understanding the nature of the fault and its earthquake history can be found. A glossary is provided to define and illustrate scientific term used throughout this guide. A ?green? theme helps conserve resources and promotes use of public transportation, where possible. Although access to all locations described in this guide is possible by car, alternative suggestions are provided. To help conserve paper, this guidebook is available on-line only; however, select pages or chapters (field trips) within this guide can be printed separately to take along on an excursion. The discussions in this paper highlight transportation alternatives to visit selected field trip locations. In some cases, combinations, such as a ride on BART and a bus, can be used instead of automobile transportation. For other locales, bicycles can be an alternative means of transportation. Transportation descriptions on selected pages are intended to help guide fieldtrip planners or participants choose trip

  10. Reconsidering Fault Slip Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J. S.; Wech, A.; Creager, K. C.; Obara, K.; Agnew, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The scaling of fault slip events given by the relationship between the scalar moment M0, and duration T, potentially provides key constraints on the underlying physics controlling slip. Many studies have suggested that measurements of M0 and T are related as M0=KfT3 for 'fast' slip events (earthquakes) and M0=KsT for 'slow' slip events, in which Kf and Ks are proportionality constants, although some studies have inferred intermediate relations. Here 'slow' and 'fast' refer to slip front propagation velocities, either so slow that seismic radiation is too small or long period to be measurable or fast enough that dynamic processes may be important for the slip process and measurable seismic waves radiate. Numerous models have been proposed to explain the differing M0-T scaling relations. We show that a single, simple dislocation model of slip events within a bounded slip zone may explain nearly all M0-T observations. Rather than different scaling for fast and slow populations, we suggest that within each population the scaling changes from M0 proportional to T3 to T when the slipping area reaches the slip zone boundaries and transitions from unbounded, 2-dimensional to bounded, 1-dimensional growth. This transition has not been apparent previously for slow events because data have sampled only the bounded regime and may be obscured for earthquakes when observations from multiple tectonic regions are combined. We have attempted to sample the expected transition between bounded and unbounded regimes for the slow slip population, measuring tremor cluster parameters from catalogs for Japan and Cascadia and using them as proxies for small slow slip event characteristics. For fast events we employed published earthquake slip models. Observations corroborate our hypothesis, but highlight observational difficulties. We find that M0-T observations for both slow and fast slip events, spanning 12 orders of magnitude in M0, are consistent with a single model based on dislocation

  11. Paleoearthquake recurrence on the East Paradise fault zone, metropolitan Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; Mahan, Shannon

    2000-01-01

    A fortuitous exposure of the East Paradise fault zone near Arroyo de las Calabacillas has helped us determine a post-middle Pleistocene history for a long-forgotten Quaternary fault in the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mapping of two exposures of the fault zone allowed us to measure a total vertical offset of 2.75 m across middle Pleistocene fluvial and eolian deposits and to estimate individual surface-faulting events of about 1, 0.5, and 1.25 m. These measurements and several thermoluminescence ages allow us to calculate a long-term average slip rate of 0.01 ± 0.001 mm/yr and date two surface-faulting events to 208 ± 25 ka and 75 ± 7 ka. The youngest event probably occurred in the late Pleistocene, sometime after 75 ± 7 ka. These data yield a single recurrence interval of 133 ± 26 ka and an average recurrence interval of 90 ± 10 ka. However, recurrence intervals are highly variable because the two youngest events occurred in less than 75 ka. Offsets of 0.5-1.25 m and a fault length of 13-20 km indicate that surface-rupturing paleoearthquakes on the East Paradise fault zone had probable Ms or Mw magnitudes of 6.8-7.0. Although recurrence intervals are long on the East Paradise fault zone, these data are significant because they represent some of the first published slip rate, paleoearthquake magnitude, and recurrence information for any of the numerous Quaternary faults in the rapidly growing Albuquerque-Rio Rancho metropolitan area.

  12. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  13. Jerusalem: City of Dreams, City of Sorrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Jerusalem is more than an intriguing global historical city; it is a classroom for liberal learning and international understanding. It had never been a city of one language, one religion and one culture. Looking at the origins of Jerusalem's name indicates its international and multicultural nature. While Israelis designate Jerusalem as their…

  14. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  15. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 2: the electric eel, animal electricity, and later years.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    After extensive experimentation during the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt remained skeptical about "animal electricity" (and metallic electricity), writing instead about an ill-defined galvanic force. With his worldview and wishing to learn more, he studied electric eels in South America just as the new century began, again using his body as a scientific instrument in many of his experiments. As had been the case in the past and for many of the same reasons, some of his findings with the electric eel (and soon after, Italian torpedoes) seemed to argue against biological electricity. But he no longer used galvanic terminology when describing his electric fish experiments. The fact that he now wrote about animal electricity rather than a different "galvanic" force owed much to Alessandro Volta, who had come forth with his "pile" (battery) for multipling the physical and perceptable effects of otherwise weak electricity in 1800, while Humboldt was deep in South America. Humboldt probably read about and saw voltaic batteries in the United States in 1804, but the time he spent with Volta in 1805 was probably more significant in his conversion from a galvanic to an electrical framework for understanding nerve and muscle physiology. Although he did not continue his animal electricity research program after this time, Humboldt retained his worldview of a unified nature and continued to believe in intrinsic animal electricity. He also served as a patron to some of the most important figures in the new field of electrophysiology (e.g., Hermann Helmholtz and Emil du Bois-Reymond), helping to take the research that he had participated in to the next level.

  16. Alexander Ya. Orolv - Well-Known Scientist and Recognized Organizer of Astronmoical Research. Little Known Facts of His Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.; Vavilova, I. B.; Korsun', A. A.

    Alexander Ya. Orlov is a well-known astronomer and geophysicist as well as a worldrecognized organizer of scientific research in Russia, the USSR, and Ukraine. Orlov has formulated his main scientific ideas during the Odesa's period of life. He studied a tidal deformation of the Earth and its polar motion using the gravity and latitude observations. He has proposed new defenitions of a mean pole and a mean latitude, as wel as a new method for determing the Earth pole coordinates. To the end of 1940-ties, the Orlov's scientific ideas were implemented and stimulated a development of a research field, which is now called as Astrogeodynamics or Space Geodynamics. Among the representatives of the Orlov's scientific school are about 20 Doctors of Sciences and more than 40 Candidates of Sciences, including the members of Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and other countries. Among them are N.Stoyko-Radilenko (France), J.Witkowski (Poland), V.Zhardetsky (Yugoslavia-Austria-USA), D.Pyaskovsky, Z.Aksent'eva, E.Lavrentieva, N.Popov, E.Fedorov and A.Korol in Ukraine. The deserved followers of the Orlov's scientific ideas were also I.Androsov, I.Dyukov, K.Mansurova, B.Novopashennyj, N.V.Zimmerman in Russia and M.Bursa (Chesh Republic), who worked with him, as well as his sons, A.A.Orlov and B.A. Orlov. The Orlov's life and scientific activity were fully described in many articles. For that reason in this paper we will focus on the little-known facts of the Orlov's scientific-organizational activity, for example, the Orlov's appointments as a director of observatories in Odesa, Poltava, m.Pip-Ivan, Pulkovo, and Kyiv; interesesting facts related to his membership in the Academies of Sciences of the USSR and Ukrainian SSR; organization of a large-scale program on the latitude observations and gravimetric survey. We describe briefly his life and his astrogeodynamic scientific school.

  17. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo; Cifelli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. These GIFT workshops represented the first workshops specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  18. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, C. E.; Cifelli, F.

    2014-12-01

    Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. In 3 cases of the 4 cases, these GIFT workshops represented the first workshop specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  19. Clinical aspects and pathology of Alexander disease, and morphological and functional alteration of astrocytes induced by GFAP mutation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2012-08-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is pathologically characterized by the presence of Rosenthal fibers (RF), which are made up of GFAP, αB-crystallin and heat shock protein 27, in the cytoplasm of perivascular and subpial astrocyte endfeet. Since GFAP mutation has been confirmed in reported cases of AxD, clinical or experimental research is being conducted on the relationship between GFAP mutation and the onset pathology as well as the clinical form. We conducted a nationwide survey and a clinical study, and classified AxD into three types: cerebral AxD (type 1), which primarily has an infantile onset with presence of seizures, psychomotor developmental retardation, macrocephaly, and abnormalities in the superior frontal cerebral white matter observed in a brain MRI; bulbospinal AxD (type 2), which primarily has an adult onset with presence of muscle weakness, hyperreflexia, bulbar or pseudobulbar symptoms, signal abnormalities, and atrophy observed in an MRI of the medulla oblongata and upper cervical spinal cord; and an intermediate form (type 3) which has the characteristics of both. A research on GFAP mutations and aggregate formation concluded that GFAP mutations decreased the solubility of GFAP. According to our cell model experiment, the formation of mutant GFAP aggravates depending on the site of the GFAP mutation. Furthermore, there is a possibility that polymorphism in the GFAP promoter gene regulates the degree to which GFAP is expressed; it may have an effect on clinical heterogeneity. Recent research using cell and animal models suggests that the pathology of AxD involves not only mere functional abnormalities in intermediate filaments but also functional abnormalities in astrocytes as well as in neurons. Clarification of the glia-neuron interactions will prove the disease to be very interesting.

  20. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management

    PubMed Central

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems. PMID:27873783

  1. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management.

    PubMed

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-08-19

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE-SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters - standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space - is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  2. Structural controls on the Surprise Valley fault system, northwestern margin of the Basin and Range, based on combined geologic, potential-field, and seismic reflection modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, A. E.; Glen, J. M.; Ponce, D. A.; Lerch, D. W.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Surprise Valley of northeastern California is a major high-angle fault-bounded basin that marks the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province. On the western margin of the valley, the east-dipping Surprise Valley Fault separates the valley from the Warner Range and accommodates at least 7 km of normal slip. On the eastern margin, a west-dipping normal fault has exhumed the Hays Canyon Range, but offset along this fault decreases significantly to the north. In between these two major faults, numerous Holocene fault scarps and hot springs suggest that the area is still actively extending. Previous workers have mapped several NW-SE-trending structures cutting across the valley that control the geothermal system, but the role of these structures in basin evolution and their relationship to the range-bounding faults is poorly understood. The Surprise Valley fault system is of particular interest given its location at the margin of the Basin and Range, its relative isolation from other major normal fault systems, and the recent offset along the faults. Our focus is on identifying and characterizing intra-basin and basin-bounding faults and structures and constraining the basin geometry through a combination of geological mapping, potential field modeling and seismic reflection modeling. We have collected nearly 800 new gravity stations, ~75 line-kilometers of truck-towed magnetometer data, and ~17 km of foot-traversed gradient magnetometer data within and surrounding Surprise Valley for potential field modeling. These data, combined with new 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping and a ~16 km vibrator-source reflection survey collected in the summer of 2004, confirm the importance of the NW-trending structures not only in the distribution of hot springs, but also the location and orientation of accommodation zones between N-S trending, antithetic normal fault systems. The NW trend of these structures, including the Lake City Fault Zone and Fandango Valley, parallels a

  3. Growth of faults in crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The growth of faults depends on the coupled interplay of the distribution of slip, fault geometry, the stress field in the host rock, and deformation of the host rock, which commonly is manifest in secondary fracturing. The distribution of slip along a fault depends highly on its structure, the stress perturbation associated with its interaction with nearby faults, and its strength distribution; mechanical analyses indicate that the first two factors are more influential than the third. Slip distribution data typically are discrete, but commonly are described, either explicitly or implicitly, using continuous interpolation schemes. Where the third derivative of a continuous slip profile is discontinuous, the compatibility conditions of strain are violated, and fracturing and perturbations to fault geometry should occur. Discontinuous third derivatives accompany not only piecewise linear functions, but also functions as seemingly benign as cubic splines. The stress distribution and fracture distribution along a fault depends strongly on how the fault grows. Evidence to date indicates that a fault that nucleates along a pre-existing, nearly planar joint or a dike typically develops secondary fractures only near its tipline when the slip is small relative to the fault length. In contrast, stress concentrations and fractures are predicted where a discontinuous or non-planar fault exhibits steps and bends; field observations bear this prediction out. Secondary fracturing influences how faults grow by creating damage zones and by linking originally discontinuous elements into a single fault zone. Field observations of both strike-slip faults and dip-slip faults show that linked segments usually will not be coplanar; elastic stress analyses indicate that this is an inherent tendency of how three-dimensional faults grow. Advances in the data we collect and in the rigor and sophistication of our analyses seem essential to substantially advance our ability to successfully

  4. The 2009 L'Aquila sequence (Central Italy): fault system anatomy by aftershock distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2010-05-01

    On April 6 (01:32 UTC) 2009 a destructive MW 6.13 earthquake struck the Abruzzi region in Central Italy, causing nearly 300 deaths, 40.000 homeless people and strong damage to the cultural heritage of the L'Aquila city and its province. Two strong earthquakes hit the same area in historical times (e.g. the 1461 and 1703 events), but the main fault that drives the extension in this portion of the Apennines was unknown. Seismic data was recorded at both permanent stations of the Centralised Italian National Seismic Network managed by the INGV and 45 temporary stations installed in the epicentral area together with the LGIT of Grenoble (Fr). The resulting geometry of the dense monitoring network allows us to gain very high resolution earthquake locations that we use to investigate the geometry of the activated fault system and to report on seismicity pattern and kinematics of the whole sequence. The mainshock was preceded by a foreshock sequence that activated the main fault plane during the three months before, while the largest foreshock (MW 4.08) occurred one week before (30th of March) nucleated on a antithetic (e.g. off-fault) segment. The distribution of the aftershocks defines a complex, 50 km long, NW-trending normal fault system, with seismicity nucleating within the upper 10-12 km of the crust. There is an exception of an event (MW 5.42) nucleating a couple of kilometers deeper that the 7th of April that activates a high angle normal fault antithetic to the main system. Its role is still unclear. We reconstruct the geometry of the two major SW-dipping normal faults forming a right lateral en-echelon system. The main fault (L'Aquila fault) is activated by the 6th of April mainshock unluckily located right below the city of L'Aquila. A 50°SW-dipping plane with planar geometry about 16 km long. The related seismicity interests the entire first 12 km of the upper crust from the surface. The ground surveys carried out soon after the occurrence of the earthquake

  5. Oklahoma City Revitalization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Since the beginning of their Brownfields Program in 2003, Oklahoma City has been the recipient of nine EPA Brownfields Grants, creating a new city from the inside out. So far, 45 properties have been assessed and/or remediated.

  6. What Is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean Cities facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  7. A case of paleo-creep? Comparison of fault displacements in a trench with the corresponding earthquake record in lake sediments along the Polochic fault, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, Gilles; Anselmetti, Flavio

    2014-05-01

    The Polochic and Motagua strike-slip faults in Guatemala accommodate the displacement (~2 cm/y) across the boundary between the Caribbean and North American plates. Both faults are expected to produce large destructive earthquakes such as the Mw 7.5 earthquake of 1976 on the Motagua fault. Former large earthquakes with magnitudes larger than Mw 7.0 are suggested from the areal extent of destructions to Precolombian Mayan cities and churches, and both the Motagua and Polochic fault have been suspected as the sources of these earthquakes. The available record, however, is surprisingly poor in large earthquakes, suggesting either that the record is sketchy or that such earthquakes are effectively infrequent. We investigated the activity of the Polochic fault by opening trenches along its major strand in Uspantán, Quiché, and Agua Blanca, Alta Verapaz. Recent displacements are evidenced in Agua Blanca, with soils less than 350 years old disrupted by the fault. We combined the study of the trenches with the study of sediment cores in Laguna Chichój, a lake located 4 km north of the Polochic fault. We had previously conducted an analysis of the sensitivity of the Chichój lake sediments to earthquakes in the 20th century. In the 20th centurey the earthquake record is well known, as well the locally felt intensity of these earthquakes. We found that for MMI intensities of VI and higher turbidites and slumps are produced in the lake. We used this calibration to study the earthquake record of the past 12 centuries and identified a cluster of earthquakes with MMI > VI between 830 and 1450 AD. The oldest seismite temporally matches widespread destructions in Mayan cities in 830 AD. Surprisingly, no earthquakes are recorded between 1450 and 1976 AD. Yet, the trench in Agua Blanca records substantial displacement of the Polochic fault over the period. It seems therefore that this ultimate displacement did not produce any substantial earthquake, and may correspond to a period

  8. The effect of stress changes on time-dependent earthquake probability: an example from the Wasatch Fault Zone, Utah, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Alessandro; Carena, Sara; Pace, Bruno; DuRoss, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Static and quasi-static Coulomb stress changes produced by large earthquakes can modify the probability of occurrence of subsequent events on neighbouring faults. In order to better understand and minimize the uncertainties in this kind of approach based on physical (Coulomb stress changes) and statistical (probability calculations) models, we focused our study on the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ), a well-studied active normal fault system having abundant geologic and paleoseismic data. Paleoseismic trench investigations of the WFZ indicate that at least 24 large, surface-faulting earthquakes have ruptured the fault's five central, 35-59-km long segments since ~7 ka. Our goal is to determine if the stress changes due to selected paleoevents have significantly modified the present-day probability of occurrence of large earthquakes on each of the segments. For each segment, we modeled the cumulative (coseismic + postseismic) Coulomb stress changes (∆CFScum) due to earthquakes younger than the most recent event and applied the resulting values to the time-dependent probability calculations. Results from the probability calculations predict high percentages of occurrence for the Brigham City and Salt Lake City segments, due to their long elapsed times (>1-2 kyr) when compared to the Weber, Provo, and Nephi segments (< 1 kyr). We also found that the Brigham City, Salt Lake City, and Provo segments have accumulated ∆CFScum larger than 10 bar, whereas the Weber segment has experienced a stress drop of 5 bar. Our results indicate that the ∆CFScum resulting from earthquakes postdating the youngest events on the segments significantly affect the probability calculations only for the Brigham City, Salt Lake City, and Provo segments. In particular, the probability of occurrence of a large earthquake in the next 50 years on these three segments may be underestimated if a time-independent approach, or a time-dependent approach that does not consider ∆CFS, is adopted.

  9. An experimental study of memory fault latency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chillarege, Ram; Iyer, Ravi K.

    1989-01-01

    The difficulty with the measurement of fault latency is due to the lack of observability of the fault occurrence and error generation instants in a production environment. The authors describe an experiment, using data from a VAX 11/780 under real workload, to study fault latency in the memory subsystem accurately. Fault latency distributions are generated for stuck-at-zero (s-a-0) and stuck-at-one (s-a-1) permanent fault models. The results show that the mean fault latency of an s-a-0 fault is nearly five times that of the s-a-1 fault. An analysis of variance is performed to quantify the relative influence of different workload measures on the evaluated latency.

  10. Detection of faults and software reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Specific topics briefly addressed include: the consistent comparison problem in N-version system; analytic models of comparison testing; fault tolerance through data diversity; and the relationship between failures caused by automatically seeded faults.

  11. Parametric Modeling and Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N. Eva; Ju, Jianhong

    2000-01-01

    Fault tolerant control is considered for a nonlinear aircraft model expressed as a linear parameter-varying system. By proper parameterization of foreseeable faults, the linear parameter-varying system can include fault effects as additional varying parameters. A recently developed technique in fault effect parameter estimation allows us to assume that estimates of the fault effect parameters are available on-line. Reconfigurability is calculated for this model with respect to the loss of control effectiveness to assess the potentiality of the model to tolerate such losses prior to control design. The control design is carried out by applying a polytopic method to the aircraft model. An error bound on fault effect parameter estimation is provided, within which the Lyapunov stability of the closed-loop system is robust. Our simulation results show that as long as the fault parameter estimates are sufficiently accurate, the polytopic controller can provide satisfactory fault-tolerance.

  12. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  13. A summary of the active fault investigation in the extension sea area of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault , N-S direction fault in south west Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we carried out two sets of active fault investigation by the request from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in the sea area of the extension of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault. We want to clarify the five following matters about both active faults based on those results. (1)Fault continuity of the land and the sea. (2) The length of the active fault. (3) The division of the segment. (4) Activity characteristics. In this investigation, we carried out a digital single channel seismic reflection survey in the whole area of both active faults. In addition, a high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey was carried out to recognize the detailed structure of a shallow stratum. Furthermore, the sampling with the vibrocoring to get information of the sedimentation age was carried out. The reflection profile of both active faults was extremely clear. The characteristics of the lateral fault such as flower structure, the dispersion of the active fault were recognized. In addition, from analysis of the age of the stratum, it was recognized that the thickness of the sediment was extremely thin in Holocene epoch on the continental shelf in this sea area. It was confirmed that the Kikugawa fault extended to the offing than the existing results of research by a result of this investigation. In addition, the width of the active fault seems to become wide toward the offing while dispersing. At present, we think that we can divide Kikugawa fault into some segments based on the distribution form of the segment. About the Nishiyama fault, reflection profiles to show the existence of the active fault was acquired in the sea between Ooshima and Kyushu. From this result and topographical existing results of research in Ooshima, it is thought that Nishiyama fault and the Ooshima offing active fault are a series of structure. As for Ooshima offing active fault, the upheaval side changes, and a direction changes too. Therefore, we

  14. Hydrogeological Studies to Identify the Trend of Concealed Section of the North Tabriz Fault (Iran).

    PubMed

    Rajabpour, Hossein; Vaezihir, Abdorreza

    2016-10-17

    The North Tabriz Fault (NTF) is the predominant regional-scale tectonic structure in the northwest of Iran. In the east side of the city of Tabriz, a portion of the fault trend has been completely concealed by recent sediments and urbanization. In this paper, some hydrogeological methods are used to locate the concealed sector. As is clear from the pumping tests results, despite the fact that the northern observation wells were closer to the pumping wells than the southern ones, they have not been affected by pumping. Conversely, all southern wells were affected by pumping and displayed decline of the water table. In addition, obvious differences in groundwater levels combined with clear differences in groundwater quality within a short distance across the probable fault trend are sufficient reasons for the presence of the fault that behaves as a barrier to groundwater lateral flows. Significant change in the elevation of the bedrock base of the aquifer over less than 200 m suggests that the fault has near vertical dip. These results indicate that the inferred trend of the NTF closely conforms to its actual trend. Therefore, the hydrogeological studies can be complementary tools to determine the position and trend of concealed faults.

  15. Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone in Jamaica: paleoseismology and seismic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koehler, R.D.; Mann, P.; Prentice, Carol S.; Brown, L.; Benford, B.; Grandison-Wiggins, M.

    2013-01-01

    The countries of Jamaica, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic all straddle the Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone ( EPGFZ), a major left-lateral, strike-slip fault system bounding the Caribbean and North American plates. Past large earthquakes that destroyed the capital cities of Kingston, Jamaica (1692, 1907), and Port-au-Prince, Haiti (1751, 1770), as well as the 2010 Haiti earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people, have heightened awareness of seismic hazards in the northern Caribbean. We present here new geomorphic and paleoseismic information bearing on the location and relative activity of the EPGFZ, which marks the plate boundary in Jamaica. Documentation of a river bank exposure and several trenches indicate that this fault is active and has the potential to cause major destructive earthquakes in Jamaica. The results suggest that the fault has not ruptured the surface in at least 500 yr and possibly as long as 28 ka. The long period of quiescence and subdued geomorphic expression of the EPGFZ indicates that it may only accommodate part of the ∼7–9 mm=yr plate deformation rate measured geodetically and that slip may be partitioned on other undocumented faults. Large uncertainties related to the neotectonic framework of Jamaica remain and more detailed fault characterization studies are necessary to accurately assess seismic hazards.

  16. LiDAR-Assisted identification of an active fault near Truckee, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, L.E.; Howle, J.F.; Rose, R.S.; Bawden, G.W.

    2011-01-01

    We use high-resolution (1.5-2.4 points/m2) bare-earth airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) imagery to identify, map, constrain, and visualize fault-related geomorphology in densely vegetated terrain surrounding Martis Creek Dam near Truckee, California. Bare-earth LiDAR imagery reveals a previously unrecognized and apparently youthful right-lateral strike-slip fault that exhibits laterally continuous tectonic geomorphic features over a 35-km-long zone. If these interpretations are correct, the fault, herein named the Polaris fault, may represent a significant seismic hazard to the greater Truckee-Lake Tahoe and Reno-Carson City regions. Three-dimensional modeling of an offset late Quaternary terrace riser indicates a minimum tectonic slip rate of 0.4 ?? 0.1 mm/yr.Mapped fault patterns are fairly typical of regional patterns elsewhere in the northern Walker Lane and are in strong coherence with moderate magnitude historical seismicity of the immediate area, as well as the current regional stress regime. Based on a range of surface-rupture lengths and depths to the base of the seismogenic zone, we estimate a maximum earthquake magnitude (M) for the Polaris fault to be between 6.4 and 6.9.

  17. Hydraulic Diagnostics and Fault Isolation Test Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-13

    and Fault Isolation Test Program was to demonstrate and evaluate the practicality of a fault detection and isolation system on an aircraft. The...system capable of fault detection and isolation in a hydraulic subsystem through the use of sensors and a microprocessor (Fig. 1). The microprocessor...DISCUSSION 2.1 DESCRIPTION OF HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SIMULATOR The fault detection and isolation test arrangement consisted of a high pressure, lightweight

  18. Active Features of Guguan-Guizhen Fault at the Northeast Margin of Qinghai-Tibet Block since Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yaqin; Feng, Xijie; Li, Gaoyang; Ma, Ji; Li, Miao; Zhang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Guguan-Guizhen fault is located at the northeast margin of Qinghai-Tibet Block and northwest margin of Ordos Block; it is the boundary of the two blocks, and one of the multiple faults of northwest Haiyuan-Liupanshan-Baoji fault zone. Guguan-Guizhen fault starts from Putuo Village, Huating County, Gansu Province, and goes through Badu Town, Long County in Shaanxi Province ends in Guozhen Town in Baoji City, Shaanxi Province. The fault has a full length of about 130km with the strike of 310-330°, the dip of SW and the rake of 50-60°, which is a sinistral slip reverse fault in the north part, and a sinistral slip normal fault in the southeast part. Guguan-Guizhen fault has a clear liner structure in satellite images and significant landform elevation difference with a maximum difference of 80m, and is higher in the east lower in the west. The northwest side of Guguan-Guizhen fault is composed of purplish-red Lower Cretaceous sandstones and river terrace; the northeast side is composed of Ordovician Limestone. Shigou, Piliang, Songjiashan, Tianjiagou and Chenjiagou fault profiles are found to the south of Badu Village. After 14C and optically stimulated luminescence dating, the fault does not dislocate the stratum since late Pleistocene (90.5±4.4ka) in Shigou, Piliang and Songjiashan fault profiles, and does not dislocate the cobble layer of Holocene first terrace and recent sliderock (3180±30 BP). But the fault dislocated the stratum of middle Pleistocene in some of the fault profiles. All the evidences above indicate that the fault is active in middle Pleistocene, and being silence since late Pleistocene. It might be active in Holocene to the north of Badu Village due to collapses are found in a certain area. The cause of these collapses is Qinlong M6-7 earthquake in 600 A.D., and might be relevant with Guguan-Guizhen fault after analysis of the scale, feature and age determination of the collapse. If any seismic surface rupture and ancient earthquake traces

  19. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-04-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone is located in the N-S striking Höllviken Graben and traverses the city of Copenhagen. The fault zone is a NNW-SSE striking structure in direct vicinity to the transition zone of the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent small earthquakes indicate activity in the area, although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy and the localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting geometry indicates strong influence of Triassic processes when subsidence and rifting prevailed in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighbouring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg Fault zone. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise

  20. MOS integrated circuit fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three digital simulation techniques for MOS integrated circuit faults were examined. These techniques embody a hierarchy of complexity bracketing the range of simulation levels. The digital approaches are: transistor-level, connector-switch-attenuator level, and gate level. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Failure characteristics are also described.

  1. Deep pulverization along active faults ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Pulverization is a intensive damage observed along some active faults. Rarely found in the field, it has been associated with dynamic damage produced by large earthquakes. Pulverization has been so far only described at the ground surface, consistent with the high frequency tensile loading expected for earthquake occurring along bimaterial faults. However, we discuss here a series of hints suggesting that pulverization is expected also several hundred of meters deep. In the deep well drilled within Nojima fault after the 1995 Kobe earthquake, thin sections reveal non localized damage, with microfractured pervading a sample, but with little shear disturbing the initial microstructure. In the SAFOD borehole drilled near Parkfield, Wiersberg and Erzinger (2008) made gas monitoring while drilling found large amount of H2 gas in the sandstone west to the fault. They attribute this high H2 concentration to mechanochemical origin, in accordance with some example of diffuse microfracturing found in thin sections from cores of SAFOD phase 3 and from geophysical data from logs. High strain rate experiments in both dry (Yuan et al, 2011) and wet samples (Forquin et al, 2010) show that even under confining pressures of several tens of megapascals, diffuse damage similar to pulverization is possible. This could explain the occurrence of pulverization at depth.

  2. Implementing fault-tolerant sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith

    1989-01-01

    One aspect of fault tolerance in process control programs is the ability to tolerate sensor failure. A methodology is presented for transforming a process control program that cannot tolerate sensor failures to one that can. Additionally, a hierarchy of failure models is identified.

  3. Tsunamis and splay fault dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wendt, J.; Oglesby, D.D.; Geist, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The geometry of a fault system can have significant effects on tsunami generation, but most tsunami models to date have not investigated the dynamic processes that determine which path rupture will take in a complex fault system. To gain insight into this problem, we use the 3D finite element method to model the dynamics of a plate boundary/splay fault system. We use the resulting ground deformation as a time-dependent boundary condition for a 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic tsunami calculation. We find that if me stress distribution is homogeneous, rupture remains on the plate boundary thrust. When a barrier is introduced along the strike of the plate boundary thrust, rupture propagates to the splay faults, and produces a significantly larger tsunami man in the homogeneous case. The results have implications for the dynamics of megathrust earthquakes, and also suggest mat dynamic earthquake modeling may be a useful tool in tsunami researcn. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Fault Tolerant Frequent Pattern Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Shohdy, Sameh; Vishnu, Abhinav; Agrawal, Gagan

    2016-12-19

    FP-Growth algorithm is a Frequent Pattern Mining (FPM) algorithm that has been extensively used to study correlations and patterns in large scale datasets. While several researchers have designed distributed memory FP-Growth algorithms, it is pivotal to consider fault tolerant FP-Growth, which can address the increasing fault rates in large scale systems. In this work, we propose a novel parallel, algorithm-level fault-tolerant FP-Growth algorithm. We leverage algorithmic properties and MPI advanced features to guarantee an O(1) space complexity, achieved by using the dataset memory space itself for checkpointing. We also propose a recovery algorithm that can use in-memory and disk-based checkpointing, though in many cases the recovery can be completed without any disk access, and incurring no memory overhead for checkpointing. We evaluate our FT algorithm on a large scale InfiniBand cluster with several large datasets using up to 2K cores. Our evaluation demonstrates excellent efficiency for checkpointing and recovery in comparison to the disk-based approach. We have also observed 20x average speed-up in comparison to Spark, establishing that a well designed algorithm can easily outperform a solution based on a general fault-tolerant programming model.

  5. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  6. Fault current limiters using superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, W. T.; Power, A.

    Fault current limiters on power systems are to reduce damage by heating and electromechanical forces, to alleviate duty on switchgear used to clear the fault, and to mitigate disturbance to unfaulted parts of the system. A basic scheme involves a super-resistor which is a superconductor being driven to high resistance when fault current flows either when current is high during a cycle of a.c. or, if the temperature of the superconductive material rises, for the full cycle. Current may be commuted from superconductor to an impedance in parallel, thus reducing the energy dispersed at low temperature and saving refrigeration. In a super-shorted transformer the ambient temperature primary carries the power system current; the superconductive secondary goes to a resistive condition when excessive currents flow in the primary. A super-transformer has the advantage of not needing current leads from high temperature to low temperature; it behaves as a parallel super-resistor and inductor. The supertransductor with a superconductive d.c. bias winding is large and has small effect on the rate of fall of current at current zero; it does little to alleviate duty on switchgear but does reduce heating and electromechanical forces. It is fully active after a fault has been cleared. Other schemes depend on rapid recooling of the superconductor to achieve this.

  7. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  8. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  9. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  10. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  11. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  12. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  13. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  14. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  15. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  16. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  17. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  18. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  19. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  20. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  1. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  2. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  3. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  4. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  5. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  6. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  7. Measurement and application of fault latency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1986-01-01

    The time interval between the occurrence of a fault and the detection of the error caused by the fault is divided by the generation of that error into two parts: fault latency and error latency. Since the moment of error generation is not directly observable, all related works in the literature have dealt with only the sum of fault and error latencies, thereby making the analysis of their separate effects impossible. To remedy this deficiency, (1) a new methodology for indirectly measuring fault latency is presented; the distribution of fault latency is derived from the methodology; and (3) the knowledge of fault latency is applied to the analysis of two important examples. The proposed methodology has been implemented for measuring fault latency in the Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) at the NASA Airlab. The experimental results show wide variations in the mean fault latencies of different function circuits within FTMP. Also, the measured distributions of fault latency are shown to have monotone hazard rates. Consequently, Gamma and Weibull distributions are selected for the least-squares fit as the distribution of fault latency.

  8. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  9. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  10. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Ground Fault--A Health Hazard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    1977-01-01

    A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

  12. Seismic hazard analysis for Jayapura city, Papua

    SciTech Connect

    Robiana, R. Cipta, A.

    2015-04-24

    Jayapura city had destructive earthquake which occurred on June 25, 1976 with the maximum intensity VII MMI scale. Probabilistic methods are used to determine the earthquake hazard by considering all possible earthquakes that can occur in this region. Earthquake source models using three types of source models are subduction model; comes from the New Guinea Trench subduction zone (North Papuan Thrust), fault models; derived from fault Yapen, TareraAiduna, Wamena, Memberamo, Waipago, Jayapura, and Jayawijaya, and 7 background models to accommodate unknown earthquakes. Amplification factor using geomorphological approaches are corrected by the measurement data. This data is related to rock type and depth of soft soil. Site class in Jayapura city can be grouped into classes B, C, D and E, with the amplification between 0.5 – 6. Hazard maps are presented with a 10% probability of earthquake occurrence within a period of 500 years for the dominant periods of 0.0, 0.2, and 1.0 seconds.

  13. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  14. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  15. Fault tolerant control of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard

    Autonomous multiple spacecraft formation flying space missions demand the development of reliable control systems to ensure rapid, accurate, and effective response to various attitude and formation reconfiguration commands. Keeping in mind the complexities involved in the technology development to enable spacecraft formation flying, this thesis presents the development and validation of a fault tolerant control algorithm that augments the AOCS on-board a spacecraft to ensure that these challenging formation flying missions will fly successfully. Taking inspiration from the existing theory of nonlinear control, a fault-tolerant control system for the RyePicoSat missions is designed to cope with actuator faults whilst maintaining the desirable degree of overall stability and performance. Autonomous fault tolerant adaptive control scheme for spacecraft equipped with redundant actuators and robust control of spacecraft in underactuated configuration, represent the two central themes of this thesis. The developed algorithms are validated using a hardware-in-the-loop simulation. A reaction wheel testbed is used to validate the proposed fault tolerant attitude control scheme. A spacecraft formation flying experimental testbed is used to verify the performance of the proposed robust control scheme for underactuated spacecraft configurations. The proposed underactuated formation flying concept leads to more than 60% savings in fuel consumption when compared to a fully actuated spacecraft formation configuration. We also developed a novel attitude control methodology that requires only a single thruster to stabilize three axis attitude and angular velocity components of a spacecraft. Numerical simulations and hardware-in-the-loop experimental results along with rigorous analytical stability analysis shows that the proposed methodology will greatly enhance the reliability of the spacecraft, while allowing for potentially significant overall mission cost reduction.

  16. The Neotropical tanyderid Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) (Diptera, Tanyderidae), with description of the egg, larva and pupa, redescription of adults, and notes on natural history.

    PubMed

    Madriz, R Isaí; Courtney, Gregory W

    2016-08-30

    Larvae, pupae and adults of Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) were collected during fieldwork in Chilean Patagonia, December 2013 and January 2014. Eggs were obtained from females that oviposited in captivity. Association of all life stages is based on co-occurrence and rearing of individual larvae to adults. A diagnosis for the genus and species is provided. Descriptions of the egg, larva and pupa and redescriptions of the male and female are completed. Eggs of A. gloriosus are the first described for Tanyderidae. Natural history characteristics for this species, including microhabitat, copulatory behavior and oviposition, are discussed.

  17. Alexander Technique Lessons, Acupuncture Sessions or usual care for patients with chronic neck pain (ATLAS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain is a common condition in the adult population. More research is needed to evaluate interventions aiming to facilitate beneficial long-term change. We propose to evaluate the effect of Alexander Technique lessons and acupuncture in a rigorously conducted pragmatic trial with an embedded qualitative study. Methods/Design We will recruit 500 patients who have been diagnosed with neck pain in primary care, who have continued to experience neck pain for at least three months with 28% minimum cut-off score on the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). We will exclude patients with serious underlying pathology, prior cervical spine surgery, history of psychosis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoporosis, haemophilia, cancer, HIV or hepatitis, or with alcohol or drug dependency currently or in the last 12 months, or actively pursuing compensation or with pending litigation. The York Trials Unit will randomly allocate participants using a secure computer-based system. We will use block randomisation with allocation to each intervention arm being unambiguously concealed from anyone who might subvert the randomisation process. Participants will be randomised in equal proportions to Alexander Technique lessons, acupuncture or usual care alone. Twenty 30-minute Alexander Technique lessons will be provided by teachers registered with the Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique and twelve 50-minute sessions of acupuncture will be provided by acupuncturists registered with the British Acupuncture Council. All participants will continue to receive usual GP care. The primary outcome will be the NPQ at 12 months, with the secondary time point at 6 months, and an area-under-curve analysis will include 3, 6 and 12 month time-points. Adverse events will be documented. Potential intervention effect modifiers and mediators to be explored include: self-efficacy, stress management, and the incorporation of practitioner advice about

  18. Novel neural networks-based fault tolerant control scheme with fault alarm.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qikun; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive active fault-tolerant control for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown actuator fault is investigated. The actuator fault is assumed to have no traditional affine appearance of the system state variables and control input. The useful property of the basis function of the radial basis function neural network (NN), which will be used in the design of the fault tolerant controller, is explored. Based on the analysis of the design of normal and passive fault tolerant controllers, by using the implicit function theorem, a novel NN-based active fault-tolerant control scheme with fault alarm is proposed. Comparing with results in the literature, the fault-tolerant control scheme can minimize the time delay between fault occurrence and accommodation that is called the time delay due to fault diagnosis, and reduce the adverse effect on system performance. In addition, the FTC scheme has the advantages of a passive fault-tolerant control scheme as well as the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme's properties. Furthermore, the fault-tolerant control scheme requires no additional fault detection and isolation model which is necessary in the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed techniques.

  19. Crustal structure and fault geometry of the 2010 Haiti earthquake from temporary seismometer deployments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douilly, Roby; Haase, Jennifer S.; Ellsworth, William L.; Bouin, Marie‐Paule; Calais, Eric; Symithe, Steeve J.; Armbruster, John G.; Mercier de Lépinay, Bernard; Deschamps, Anne; Mildor, Saint‐Louis; Meremonte, Mark E.; Hough, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Haiti has been the locus of a number of large and damaging historical earthquakes. The recent 12 January 2010 Mw 7.0 earthquake affected cities that were largely unprepared, which resulted in tremendous losses. It was initially assumed that the earthquake ruptured the Enriquillo Plantain Garden fault (EPGF), a major active structure in southern Haiti, known from geodetic measurements and its geomorphic expression to be capable of producing M 7 or larger earthquakes. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data, however, showed that the event ruptured a previously unmapped fault, the Léogâne fault, a north‐dipping oblique transpressional fault located immediately north of the EPGF. Following the earthquake, several groups installed temporary seismic stations to record aftershocks, including ocean‐bottom seismometers on either side of the EPGF. We use data from the complete set of stations deployed after the event, on land and offshore, to relocate all aftershocks from 10 February to 24 June 2010, determine a 1D regional crustal velocity model, and calculate focal mechanisms. The aftershock locations from the combined dataset clearly delineate the Léogâne fault, with a geometry close to that inferred from geodetic data. Its strike and dip closely agree with the global centroid moment tensor solution of the mainshock but with a steeper dip than inferred from previous finite fault inversions. The aftershocks also delineate a structure with shallower southward dip offshore and to the west of the rupture zone, which could indicate triggered seismicity on the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault. We use first‐motion focal mechanisms to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the triggered aftershocks.

  20. Lithospheric Structure of the Western North Anatolian Fault Zone from 3-D Teleseismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaleo, E.

    2015-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is a 1500 km long active strike-slip fault that spans northern Turkey. During the past century a series of migrating earthquakes have sequentially activated different segments of the fault. The last major events of this sequence are the 1999 Izmit and Düzce earthquakes, which are consistent with a gradual westward migration in seismicity. The next active segment of the fault may be close to the city of Istanbul, posing a major risk for its population. Historically, the NAFZ exhibits a recurrent migrating sequence of high magnitude earthquakes along the fault zone, suggesting that it accommodates most of the plate motion between Anatolian and Eurasian plates in a narrow shear zone. From GPS studies following the Izmit and Düzce events, this motion does not appear to be constrained to the upper crust, and may extend at least to the lower crust. However, the geometry of the fault in the lower crust and upper mantle is at present poorly understood and previous tomographic studies do not provide a consistent picture of the velocity structure in this region. To better constrain the geometry of the shear zone at depth, in particular beneath the most recently active segment of the fault, an array of 70 temporary seismic stations with a 7 km spacing was deployed for 18 months as part of the FaultLab project. Amongst all the events recorded, those of magnitude ≥ 5 and situated between 27 and 98 degrees from the centre of the array were selected to perform 3D teleseismic tomography. Synthetic resolution tests indicate that structures as small as the average station spacing can be recovered to a depth of approximately 80 km. The work aims to provide a higher resolution image of the velocity structure beneath the western segment of the NAFZ, leading to a better understanding of the shear zone in the lower crust and upper mantle.

  1. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modern technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  2. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modem technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  3. Descriptive Case Study of the University of Pennsylvania Partnership with the Penn Alexander School: Understanding Success and Its Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreidle, Ann

    2016-01-01

    With more than half of all higher education institutions in the United States located in or near urban areas, higher education institutions are particularly vulnerable to challenges faced today by cities, such as underperforming public schools, poverty, crime, economic disinvestment and residential abandonment in areas that surround their campuses…

  4. Experiments in fault tolerant software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, David F.; Vouk, Mladen A.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty functionally equivalent programs were built and tested in a multiversion software experiment. Following unit testing, all programs were subjected to an extensive system test. In the process sixty-one distinct faults were identified among the versions. Less than 12 percent of the faults exhibited varying degrees of positive correlation. The common-cause (or similar) faults spanned as many as 14 components. However, a majority of these faults were trivial, and easily detected by proper unit and/or system testing. Only two of the seven similar faults were difficult faults, and both were caused by specification ambiguities. One of these faults exhibited variable identical-and-wrong response span, i.e. response span which varied with the testing conditions and input data. Techniques that could have been used to avoid the faults are discussed. For example, it was determined that back-to-back testing of 2-tuples could have been used to eliminate about 90 percent of the faults. In addition, four of the seven similar faults could have been detected by using back-to-back testing of 5-tuples. It is believed that most, if not all, similar faults could have been avoided had the specifications been written using more formal notation, the unit testing phase was subject to more stringent standards and controls, and better tools for measuring the quality and adequacy of the test data (e.g. coverage) were used.

  5. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  6. Fault diagnosis for magnetic bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; King, Yueh-Hsun; Lee, Rong-Mao

    2009-05-01

    A full fault diagnosis for active magnetic bearing (AMB) and rotor systems to monitor the closed-loop operation and analyze fault patterns on-line in case any malfunction occurs is proposed in this paper. Most traditional approaches for fault diagnosis are based on actuator or sensor diagnosis individually and can solely detect a single fault at a time. This research combines two diagnosis methodologies by using both state estimators and parameter estimators to detect, identify and analyze actuators and sensors faults in AMB/rotor systems. The proposed fault diagnosis algorithm not only enhances the diagnosis accuracy, but also illustrates the capability to detect multiple sensors faults which occur concurrently. The efficacy of the presented algorithm has been verified by computer simulations and intensive experiments. The test rig for experiments is equipped with AMB, interface module (dSPACE DS1104), data acquisition unit MATLAB/Simulink simulation environment. At last, the fault patterns, such as bias, multiplicative loop gain variation and noise addition, can be identified by the algorithm presented in this work. In other words, the proposed diagnosis algorithm is able to detect faults at the first moment, find which sensors or actuators under failure and identify which fault pattern the found faults belong to.

  7. A Quaternary fault database for central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd Alan; Bendick, Rebecca; Stübner, Konstanze; Strube, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic, and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments, and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault traces and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 123 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. All data are accessible for viewing and download via http://www.geo.uni-tuebingen.de/faults/. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  8. Model-Based Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Aditya; Viassolo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Model Based Fault Tolerant Control (MBFTC) task was conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program. The goal of MBFTC is to develop and demonstrate real-time strategies to diagnose and accommodate anomalous aircraft engine events such as sensor faults, actuator faults, or turbine gas-path component damage that can lead to in-flight shutdowns, aborted take offs, asymmetric thrust/loss of thrust control, or engine surge/stall events. A suite of model-based fault detection algorithms were developed and evaluated. Based on the performance and maturity of the developed algorithms two approaches were selected for further analysis: (i) multiple-hypothesis testing, and (ii) neural networks; both used residuals from an Extended Kalman Filter to detect the occurrence of the selected faults. A simple fusion algorithm was implemented to combine the results from each algorithm to obtain an overall estimate of the identified fault type and magnitude. The identification of the fault type and magnitude enabled the use of an online fault accommodation strategy to correct for the adverse impact of these faults on engine operability thereby enabling continued engine operation in the presence of these faults. The performance of the fault detection and accommodation algorithm was extensively tested in a simulation environment.

  9. Alp Transit: Crossing Faults 44 and 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Tani, M.; Bremen, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the crossing of faults 44 and 49 when constructing the 57 km Gotthard base tunnel of the Alp Transit project. Fault 44 is a permeable fault that triggered significant surface deformations 1,400 m above the tunnel when it was reached by the advancing excavation. The fault runs parallel to the downstream face of the Nalps arch dam. Significant deformations were measured at the dam crown. Fault 49 is sub-vertical and permeable, and runs parallel at the upstream face of the dam. It was necessary to assess the risk when crossing fault 49, as a limit was put on the acceptable dam deformation for structural safety. The simulation model, forecasts and action decided when crossing over the faults are presented, with a brief description of the tunnel, the dam, and the monitoring system.

  10. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  11. Multiple sensor fault diagnosis for dynamic processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Chih; Jeng, Jyh-Cheng

    2010-10-01

    Modern industrial plants are usually large scaled and contain a great amount of sensors. Sensor fault diagnosis is crucial and necessary to process safety and optimal operation. This paper proposes a systematic approach to detect, isolate and identify multiple sensor faults for multivariate dynamic systems. The current work first defines deviation vectors for sensor observations, and further defines and derives the basic sensor fault matrix (BSFM), consisting of the normalized basic fault vectors, by several different methods. By projecting a process deviation vector to the space spanned by BSFM, this research uses a vector with the resulted weights on each direction for multiple sensor fault diagnosis. This study also proposes a novel monitoring index and derives corresponding sensor fault detectability. The study also utilizes that vector to isolate and identify multiple sensor faults, and discusses the isolatability and identifiability. Simulation examples and comparison with two conventional PCA-based contribution plots are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  12. Silica Lubrication in Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Rempe, M.; Lamothe, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; White, J. C.; Mitchell, T. M.; Andrews, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Silica-rich rocks are common in the crust, so silica lubrication may be important for causing fault weakening during earthquakes if the phenomenon occurs in nature. In laboratory friction experiments on chert, dramatic shear weakening has been attributed to amorphization and attraction of water from atmospheric humidity to form a 'silica gel'. Few observations of the slip surfaces have been reported, and the details of weakening mechanism(s) remain enigmatic. Therefore, no criteria exist on which to make comparisons of experimental materials to natural faults. We performed a series of friction experiments, characterized the materials formed on the sliding surface, and compared these to a geological fault in the same rock type. Experiments were performed in the presence of room humidity at 2.5 MPa normal stress with 3 and 30 m total displacement for a variety of slip rates (10-4 - 10-1 m/s). The friction coefficient (μ) reduced from >0.6 to ~0.2 at 10-1 m/s, but only fell to ~0.4 at 10-2 - 10-4 m/s. The slip surfaces and wear material were observed using laser confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Experiments at 10-1 m/s formed wear material consisting of ≤1 μm powder that is aggregated into irregular 5-20 μm clumps. Some material disaggregated during analysis with electron beams and lasers, suggesting hydrous and unstable components. Compressed powder forms smooth pavements on the surface in which grains are not visible (if present, they are <100 nm). Powder contains amorphous material and as yet unidentified crystalline and non-crystalline forms of silica (not quartz), while the worn chert surface underneath shows Raman spectra consistent with a mixture of quartz and amorphous material. If silica amorphization facilitates shear weakening in natural faults, similar wear materials should be formed, and we may be able to identify them through microstructural studies. However, the sub

  13. The three-dimensional pattern of crustal deformation associated with active normal fault systems observed using continuous GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Hreinsdottir, S.

    2009-12-01

    Geological examples of shallow dipping normal faults with large displacements are exposed at numerous locations throughout the world and it is widely recognized that extensional deformation at brittle crustal levels is most efficiently accomplished by slip across such structures. It has previously been shown that lower dip angles reduce the regional stresses required to drive large horizontal displacements. Nevertheless, the traditional theory of fault mechanics—based on Anderson’s classification of stress regimes, the Coulomb failure criterion, and Byerlee’s friction law—precludes such faults from slipping at low angle. Observational support for this traditional theory includes the absence of large unequivocally low-angle normal fault earthquakes in the global catalog; all well-determined normal fault earthquakes appear to have occurred on moderate to steeply dipping planes. However, precise measurements of 3D crustal motions based on continuous GPS in central Italy and Utah reveal deformation patterns across active normal fault systems that are inconsistent with active slip across steeply dipping planes. Instead, the combination of observed horizontal and vertical surface motions are consistent with slip across low angle surfaces independently imaged in the subsurface by seismic reflection and other geophysical data. For the Alto Tiberina fault in central Italy, active aseismic creep occurs at shallow crustal levels, most likely within the brittle-frictional regime at which Andersonian-Byerlee fault mechanics should be applicable. The actively creeping portion of the fault inferred using GPS geodesy correlates well with the observed pattern of micro-seismicity, which concentrates along the inferred subsurface fault plane. GPS measurements across the greater Wasatch fault zone in the vicinity of Salt Lake City, Utah, reveal crustal motions consistent with aseismic displacement across a shallow dipping fault or sub-horizontal shear zone at mid

  14. A “mesh” of crossing faults: Fault networks of southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed geologic mapping of active fault systems in the western Salton Trough and northern Peninsular Ranges of southern California make it possible to expand the inventory of mapped and known faults by compiling and updating existing geologic maps, and analyzing high resolution imagery, LIDAR, InSAR, relocated hypocenters and other geophysical datasets. A fault map is being compiled on Google Earth and will ultimately discriminate between a range of different fault expressions: from well-mapped faults to subtle lineaments and geomorphic anomalies. The fault map shows deformation patterns in both crystalline and basinal deposits and reveals a complex fault mesh with many curious and unexpected relationships. Key findings are: 1) Many fault systems have mutually interpenetrating geometries, are grossly coeval, and allow faults to cross one another. A typical relationship reveals a dextral fault zone that appears to be continuous at the regional scale. In detail, however, there are no continuous NW-striking dextral fault traces and instead the master dextral fault is offset in a left-lateral sense by numerous crossing faults. Left-lateral faults also show small offsets where they interact with right lateral faults. Both fault sets show evidence of Quaternary activity. Examples occur along the Clark, Coyote Creek, Earthquake Valley and Torres Martinez fault zones. 2) Fault zones cross in other ways. There are locations where active faults continue across or beneath significant structural barriers. Major fault zones like the Clark fault of the San Jacinto fault system appears to end at NE-striking sinistral fault zones (like the Extra and Pumpkin faults) that clearly cross from the SW to the NE side of the projection of the dextral traces. Despite these blocking structures, there is good evidence for continuation of the dextral faults on the opposite sides of the crossing fault array. In some instances there is clear evidence (in deep microseismic alignments of

  15. Frictional properties of an earthquake fault under in-situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, A. R.; Vissers, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Alhamia de Murcia Fault (AMF) is a regional fault in the Betic Cordillera of SE Spain that forms part of a NE-SW trending belt of faults and thrusts. The AMF is at present a contractional fault with an oblique reverse sense of motion that generated a magnitude 5.1 earthquake in May, 2011, hitting the city of Lorca and causing over € 1200 million damage. The hypocentre of the earthquake was initially estimated at ~2-3 km NE of Lorca between 1-2 km depth but has since been re-located to a depth of about 4 km. Close to the city of Lorca and the epicentre of the earthquake, the AMF is spectacularly exposed, showing numerous fault gouges that anastomose around more competent relics of wall rock consisting of basement phyllite of the Betic crust. Here, we report on friction experiments under in-situ conditons of stress, temperature and fluid pressure on crushed powders of outcrop samples of AMF wall rock and AMF gouges taken in a direction at an angle to the strike of the fault (i.e. in the R1-direction) and parallel to the faults (i.e. in the Y-shear direction) . Simulated fault gouges were sheared both at room temperature and at elevated temperature under conditions simulating a lithostatic gradient of ~30 MPa/km, a geothermal gradient of 35 °C/km and hydrostatic pore pressure conditions (λ =0.33). The highest temperature and stress conditions used are representative of a depth of ~ 6 km. We conducted velocity-stepping sequences to determine the rate and state parameter (a-b). A negative value for (a-b) indicates that samples have the potential for unstable, seismic slip. Our results show that at room temperature the wall rock exhibits only positive values of (a-b) with a background coefficient of friction (μ) of 0.6. The fault gouges show some negative (a-b) values, particularly at low stress and sliding velocity, with a background μ of 0.4-0.5. In contrast, at elevated temperature the wall rock samples exhibit negative (a-b) values for all sliding

  16. Seismic hazard analysis with PSHA method in four cities in Java.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elistyawati, Y.; Palupi, I. R.; Suharsono

    2016-11-01

    In this study the tectonic earthquakes was observed through the peak ground acceleration through the PSHA method by dividing the area of the earthquake source. This study applied the earthquake data from 1965 - 2015 that has been analyzed the completeness of the data, location research was the entire Java with stressed in four large cities prone to earthquakes. The results were found to be a hazard map with a return period of 500 years, 2500 years return period, and the hazard curve were four major cities (Jakarta, Bandung, Yogyakarta, and the city of Banyuwangi). Results Java PGA hazard map 500 years had a peak ground acceleration within 0 g ≥ 0.5 g, while the return period of 2500 years had a value of 0 to ≥ 0.8 g. While, the PGA hazard curves on the city's most influential source of the earthquake was from sources such as fault Cimandiri backgroud, for the city of Bandung earthquake sources that influence the seismic source fault dent background form. In other side, the city of Yogyakarta earthquake hazard curve of the most influential was the source of the earthquake background of the Opak fault, and the most influential hazard curve of Banyuwangi earthquake was the source of Java and Sumba megatruts earthquake.

  17. Slip partitioning on the Enriquillo and Lamentin faults during the 2010 Haiti earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Fleur, Newdeskarl; Feuillet, Nathalie; Grandin, Raphaël; Jacques, Éric; Weil-Accardo, Jennifer; Klinger, Yann

    2014-05-01

    A general consensus has emerged from the study of the 12 January 2010, Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake: the coseismic rupture was complex, portraying both reverse and strike-slip motion, but lacking unambiguous surface break. Based on seismological, geodetic and geologic data, numerous slip models have been proposed for that event. However, using an incomplete fault map, the latter models were preliminary, proposing a rupture on unmapped buried faults. Here, using bathymetric data offshore Port-au-Prince along with a digital elevation model derived from LiDAR on-land, we identified the south-dipping Lamentin thrust in the Bay of Port-au-Prince. The fault prolongs on-land where it deforms active alluvial fans in the city of Carrefour. The geometry and distribution of the aftershocks of the 2010 earthquake and the analysis of the regional geology allow us to place constraints on the connection at depth between the Lamentin thrust and the sinistral strike-slip Enriquillo -Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF). Inversion of geodetic data suggests that both faults may have broken in 2010, consistently with the regional geodynamical setting. The rupture initiated along the Lamentin thrust and further propagated along the EPGF due to instantaneous unclamping at depth. The corals uplifted around the Léogâne Delta Fan, contributing to the build-up of long-term topography between the Lamentin thrust and the EPGF. The 2010 earthquake increased the stress toward failure on unruptured EPGF segments as well as on the thrust fault sitting in the middle of the city of Carrefour, in the direct vicinity of Port-au-Prince, thereby increasing the seismic hazard in these areas.

  18. From Fault Seal to Fault Leak: Effect of Mechanical Stratigraphy on the Evolution of Transport Processes in Fault Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, J. L.; Schmatz, J.; van Gent, H. W.; Abe, S.; Holland, M.

    2009-12-01

    Predictions of the transport properties of faults in layered sequences are usually based on geometry and lithology of the faulted sequence. Mechanical properties and fault resealing processes are used much less frequently. Based on laboratory, field and numerical studies we present a model, which takes into account these additional factors. When the ratio of rock strength and in-situ mean effective stress is high enough to allow hybrid failure, dilatant fracture networks will form in that part of the sequence which meets this condition, dramatically increasing permeability along the fault, with possibility of along-fault fluid flow and vertical transport of fine grained sediment to form clay gouge in dilatant jogs. A key parameter here is the 3D connectivity of the dilatant fracture network. In systems where fracturing is non-dilatant and the mechanical contrast between the layers is small, the fault zones are relatively simple in structure, with complexity concentrated in relay zones between segments at different scales. With increasing mechanical contrast between the layers (and the presence of preexisting fractures), patterns of localization and fault zone structure become increasingly complex. Mechanical mixing in the fault gouge is a major process especially when one of the lithologies is highly permeable. Reworking of wall rocks composed of hard claystones produces a low-permeability clay gouge in critical state. Circulating supersaturated fluids in the fault zone produce vein networks, which reseal the fault zone, typically in a cyclic fashion.

  19. Source parameters of the 2013, Ms 7.0, Lushan earthquake and the characteristics of the near-fault strong ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fengfan; Meng, Lingyuan

    2016-04-01

    The April 20, 2013 Ms 7.0, earthquake in Lushan city, Sichuan province of China occurred as the result of east-west oriented reverse-type motion on a north-south striking fault. The source location suggests the event occurred on the Southern part of Longmenshan fault at a depth of 13km. The maximum intensity is up to VIII to IX at Boxing and Lushan city, which are located in the meizoseismal area. In this study, we analyzed the dynamic source process with the source mechanism and empirical relationships, estimated the strong ground motion in the near-fault field based on the Brune's circle model. A dynamical composite source model (DCSM) has been developed to simulate the near-fault strong ground motion with associated fault rupture properties at Boxing and Lushan city, respectively. The results indicate that the frictional undershoot behavior in the dynamic source process of Lushan earthquake, which is actually different from the overshoot activity of the Wenchuan earthquake. Moreover, we discussed the characteristics of the strong ground motion in the near-fault field, that the broadband synthetic seismogram ground motion predictions for Boxing and Lushan city produced larger peak values, shorter durations and higher frequency contents. It indicates that the factors in near-fault strong ground motion was under the influence of higher effect stress drop and asperity slip distributions on the fault plane. This work is financially supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41404045) and by Science for Earthquake Resilience of CEA (XH14055Y).

  20. Determination of the Deformation along the Tuzla Fault, Izmir, Turkey by Geodetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuncu, A.; Ozener, H.

    2010-12-01

    The Aegean region is the most seismically active domain in Western Anatolia which comprises Greece, the Hellenic Arc, and Western Turkey. The Aegean region is mainly under pure shear stress from an internally deforming counter-clockwise direction of the Anatolian Plate relative to the Eurasia Plate. Izmir is the third largest city in Turkey with 2.7 million population. The Tuzla Fault is lying between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey which has NE-SW lineament trending. It is 42 km long through the land with 3 right lateral strike slip segments. This fault has a great importance as its proximity to the city of Izmir. The study aims to perform a large scale investigation, focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region’s tectonics. A micro-geodetic network with 15 points has been established in the study area. In order to investigate the crustal deformation and relative displacements along the Tuzla Fault GPS and Precise leveling techniques were used. Observations of two GPS campaigns and two precise leveling measurements were performed in 2009 and 2010. In order to process collected data by GPS campaigns, GAMIT/GLOBK software was used. As a result of two GPS campaigns, the velocity vectors of points are rated between 21mm/yr to 25mm/yr. In addition, 6.6 mm vertical displacement was observed between two leveling benchmarks which seems critical and needs further investigation.

  1. The susitna glacier thrust fault: Characteristics of surface ruptures on the fault that initiated the 2002 denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Personius, S.F.; Craw, P.A.; Haeussler, P.J.; Staft, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake sequence initiated on the newly discovered Susitna Glacier thrust fault and caused 48 km of surface rupture. Rupture of the Susitna Glacier fault generated scarps on ice of the Susitna and West Fork glaciers and on tundra and surficial deposits along the southern front of the central Alaska Range. Based on detailed mapping, 27 topographic profiles, and field observations, we document the characteristics and slip distribution of the 2002 ruptures and describe evidence of pre-2002 ruptures on the fault. The 2002 surface faulting produced structures that range from simple folds on a single trace to complex thrust-fault ruptures and pressure ridges on multiple, sinuous strands. The deformation zone is locally more than 1 km wide. We measured a maximum vertical displacement of 5.4 m on the south-directed main thrust. North-directed backthrusts have more than 4 m of surface offset. We measured a well-constrained near-surface fault dip of about 19?? at one site, which is considerably less than seismologically determined values of 35??-48??. Surface-rupture data yield an estimated magnitude of Mw 7.3 for the fault, which is similar to the seismological value of Mw 7.2. Comparison of field and seismological data suggest that the Susitna Glacier fault is part of a large positive flower structure associated with northwest-directed transpressive deformation on the Denali fault. Prehistoric scarps are evidence of previous rupture of the Sustina Glacier fault, but additional work is needed to determine if past failures of the Susitna Glacier fault have consistently induced rupture of the Denali fault.

  2. Fault linkage: Three-dimensional mechanical interaction between echelon normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Pollard, David D.

    1998-10-01

    Field observations of two overlapping normal faults and associated deformation document features common to many normal-fault relay zones: a topographic ramp between the fault segments, tapering slip on the faults as they enter the overlap zone, and associated fracturing, especially at the top of the ramp. These observations motivate numerical modeling of the development of a relay zone. A three-dimensional boundary element method numerical model, using simple fault-plane geometries, material properties, and boundary conditions, reproduces the principal characteristics of the observed fault scarps. The model, with overlapping, semicircular fault segments under orthogonal extension, produces a region of high Coulomb shear stress in the relay zone that would favor fault linkage at the center to upper relay ramp. If the fault height is increased, the magnitude of the stresses in the relay zone increases, but the position of the anticipated linkage does not change. The amount of fault overlap changes the magnitude of the Coulomb stress in the relay zone: the greatest potential for fault linkage occurs with the closest underlapping fault tips. Ultimately, the mechanical interaction between segments of a developing normal-fault system promote the development of connected, zigzagging fault scarps.

  3. Fault trees and imperfect coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne B.

    1989-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for solving the fault tree. The algorithm includes the dynamic behavior of the fault/error handling model but obviates the need for the Markov chain solution. As the state space is expanded in a breadth-first search (the same is done in the conversion to a Markov chain), the state's contribution to each future state is calculated exactly. A dynamic state truncation technique is also presented; it produces bounds on the unreliability of the system by considering only part of the state space. Since the model is solved as the state space is generated, the process can be stopped as soon as the desired accuracy is reached.

  4. Fault Injection Techniques and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsueh, Mei-Chen; Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1997-01-01

    Dependability evaluation involves the study of failures and errors. The destructive nature of a crash and long error latency make it difficult to identify the causes of failures in the operational environment. It is particularly hard to recreate a failure scenario for a large, complex system. To identify and understand potential failures, we use an experiment-based approach for studying the dependability of a system. Such an approach is applied not only during the conception and design phases, but also during the prototype and operational phases. To take an experiment-based approach, we must first understand a system's architecture, structure, and behavior. Specifically, we need to know its tolerance for faults and failures, including its built-in detection and recovery mechanisms, and we need specific instruments and tools to inject faults, create failures or errors, and monitor their effects.

  5. Synergistic effects of the SAPK/JNK and the proteasome pathway on glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) accumulation in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guomei; Xu, Zhiheng; Goldman, James E

    2006-12-15

    Protein aggregates in astrocytes that contain glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), small heat shock proteins, and ubiquitinated proteins are termed Rosenthal fibers and characterize Alexander disease, a leukodystrophy caused by heterozygous mutations in GFAP. The mechanisms responsible for the massive accumulation of GFAP in Alexander disease remain unclear. In this study, we show that overexpression of both wild type and R239C mutant human GFAP led to cytoplasmic inclusions. GFAP accumulation also led to a decrease of proteasome activity and an activation of the MLK2-JNK pathway. In turn, the expression of activated mixed lineage kinases (MLKs) induced JNK activation and increased GFAP accumulation, whereas blocking the JNK pathway decreased GFAP accumulation. Activated MLK also inhibited proteasome function. A direct inhibition of proteasome function pharmacologically further activated JNK. Our data suggest a synergistic interplay between the proteasome and the SAPK/JNK pathway in the context of GFAP accumulation. Feedback interactions among GFAP accumulation, SAPK/JNK activation, and proteasomal hypofunction cooperate to produce further protein accumulation and cellular stress responses.

  6. A geophysical investigation of shallow deformation along an anomalous section of the Wasatch fault zone, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Stephenson, W.J.; Thompson, T.J.; Harper, M.P.; Eipert, A.A.; Hoopes, J.C.; Tingey, D.G.; Keach, R.W.; Okojie-Ayoro, A. O.; Gunderson, K.L.; Meirovitz, C.D.; Hicks, T.C.; Spencer, C.J.; Yaede, J.R.; Worley, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a geophysical study of the Wasatch fault zone near the Provo and Salt Lake City segment boundary. This area is anomalous because the fault zone strikes more east-west than north-south. Vibroseis was used to record a common mid-point (CMP) profile that provides information to depths of ???500 m. A tomographic velocity model, derived from first breaks, constrained source and receiver static corrections; this was required due to complex terrain and significant lateral velocity contrasts. The profile reveals an ???250-m-wide graben in the hanging wall of the main fault that is associated with both synthetic and antithetic faults. Faults defined by apparent reflector offsets propagate upward toward topographic gradients. Faults mapped from a nearby trench and the seismic profile also appear to correlate with topographic alignments on LiDAR gradient maps. The faults as measured in the trench show a wide range of apparent dips, 20??-90??, and appear to steepen with depth on the seismic section. Although the fault zone is likely composed of numerous small faults, the broad asymmetric structure in the hanging wall is fairly simple and dominated by two inward-facing ruptures. Our results indicate the feasibility of mapping fault zones in rugged terrain and complex near-surface geology using low-frequency vibroseis. Further, the integration of geologic mapping and seismic reflection can extend surface observations in areas where structural deformation is obscured by poorly stratified or otherwise unmappable deposits. Therefore, the vibroseis technique, when integrated with geological information, provides constraints for assessing geologic hazards in areas of potential development.

  7. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, Andy; Nelson, Austin; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chebahtah, Justin; Wang, Trudie; McCarty, Michael

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  8. Folding above faults, Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetric folds formed above basement faults can be observed throughout the Rocky Mountains. Several previous interpretations of the folding process made the implicit assumption that one or both fold hinges migrated or rolled'' through the steep forelimb of the fold as the structure evolved (rolling hinge model). Results of mapping in the Bighorn and Seminoe Mountains, WY, and Sangre de Cristo Range, CO, do not support this hypothesis. An alternative interpretation is presented in which fold hinges remained fixed in position during folding (fixed hinge model). Mapped folds share common characteristics: (1) axial traces of the folds intersect faults at or near the basement/cover interface, and diverge from faults upsection; (2) fold hinges are narrow and interlimb angles cluster around 80--100[degree] regardless of fold location; (3) fold shape is typically angular, despite published cross sections that show concentric folds; and, (4) beds within the folds show thickening and/or thinning, most commonly adjacent to fold hinges. The rolling hinge model requires that rocks in the fold forelimbs bend through narrow fold hinges as deformation progressed. Examination of massive, competent rock units such as the Ord. Bighorn Dolomite, Miss. Madison Limestone, and, Penn. Tensleep Sandstone reveals no evidence of the extensive internal deformation that would be expected if hinges rolled through rocks of the forelimb. The hinges of some folds (e.g. Golf Creek anticline, Bighorn Mountains) are offset by secondary faults, effectively preventing the passage of rocks from backlimb to forelimb. The fixed hinge model proposes that the fold hinges were defined early in fold evolution, and beds were progressively rotated and steepened as the structure grew.

  9. Fault Tolerance of Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    Systematic Ap - proach, Proc. Government Microcircuit Application Conf. (GOMAC), San Diego, Nov. 1986. [10] D.E.Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search...s l m n ttempt to develop fault tolerant neural networks. The lows. Given a well-trained network, we first eliminate temp todevlopfaut tlernt eurl ...both ap - proaches, and this resulted in very slight improve- ments over the addition/deletion procedure. 103 Fisher’s Iris data in average case Fisher’s

  10. [Healthy Cities projects].

    PubMed

    Takano, Takehito

    2002-05-01

    This is a review article on "Healthy Cities". The Healthy Cities programme has been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) to tackle urban health and environmental issues in a broad way. It is a kind of comprehensive policy package to carry out individual projects and activities effectively and efficiently. Its key aspects include healthy public policy, vision sharing, high political commitment, establishment of structural organization, strategic health planning, intersectoral collaboration, community participation, setting approach, development of supportive environment for health, formation of city health profile, national and international networking, participatory research, periodic monitoring and evaluation, and mechanisms for sustainability of projects. The present paper covered the Healthy Cities concept and approaches, rapid urbanization in the world, developments of WHO Healthy Cities, Healthy Cities developments in the Western Pacific Region, the health promotion viewpoint, and roles of research.

  11. CONTROL AND FAULT DETECTOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Winningstad, C.N.

    1958-04-01

    A power control and fault detectcr circuit for a radiofrequency system is described. The operation of the circuit controls the power output of a radio- frequency power supply to automatically start the flow of energizing power to the radio-frequency power supply and to gradually increase the power to a predetermined level which is below the point where destruction occurs upon the happening of a fault. If the radio-frequency power supply output fails to increase during such period, the control does not further increase the power. On the other hand, if the output of the radio-frequency power supply properly increases, then the control continues to increase the power to a maximum value. After the maximumn value of radio-frequency output has been achieved. the control is responsive to a ''fault,'' such as a short circuit in the radio-frequency system being driven, so that the flow of power is interrupted for an interval before the cycle is repeated.

  12. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  13. Fault detection using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; B. Jack, Lindsay; Nandi, Asoke K.

    2005-03-01

    Genetic programming (GP) is a stochastic process for automatically generating computer programs. GP has been applied to a variety of problems which are too wide to reasonably enumerate. As far as the authors are aware, it has rarely been used in condition monitoring (CM). In this paper, GP is used to detect faults in rotating machinery. Featuresets from two different machines are used to examine the performance of two-class normal/fault recognition. The results are compared with a few other methods for fault detection: Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used in this field for many years, while support vector machines (SVMs) also offer successful solutions. For ANNs and SVMs, genetic algorithms have been used to do feature selection, which is an inherent function of GP. In all cases, the GP demonstrates performance which equals or betters that of the previous best performing approaches on these data sets. The training times are also found to be considerably shorter than the other approaches, whilst the generated classification rules are easy to understand and independently validate.

  14. Mexico City, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    In this rare clear view of Mexico City, Mexico (19.5N, 99.0W), the network of broad avenues and plazas of the capital city are very evident. The city, built on the remnants of a lake in the caldera of a tremendous extinct volcano, is home to over twenty million people and is slowly sinking as subsidence takes it's toll on the lakebed.

  15. 300 Cities Virtual Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    across line items. These differences will provide local, regional, and national comparison data for the next iteration of the Smart Card , an interface...updated weekly)  Tax actions by line item (annual) 15 Incorporated into the Smart Card will be demographic data for each city, simulated...In addition to descriptive city data as above, the Smart Card will contain informative output from our virtual city simulations, and include possibly

  16. Influence of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence on shallow structure, geomorphology, and hazards, Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hartwell, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    We mapped a ~94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri Fault Zone from Point Sal to Piedras Blancas in offshore central California using high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. The database includes 121 seismic profiles across the fault zone and is perhaps the most comprehensive reported survey of the shallow structure of an active strike-slip fault. These data document the location, length, and near-surface continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergences in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology. The Hosgri Fault Zone is continuous through the study area passing through a broad arc in which fault trend changes from about 338° to 328° from south to north. The southern ~40 km of the fault zone in this area is more extensional, resulting in accommodation space that is filled by deltaic sediments of the Santa Maria River. The central ~24 km of the fault zone is characterized by oblique convergence of the Hosgri Fault Zone with the more northwest-trending Los Osos and Shoreline Faults. Convergence between these faults has resulted in the formation of local restraining and releasing fault bends, transpressive uplifts, and transtensional basins of varying size and morphology. We present a hypothesis that links development of a paired fault bend to indenting and bulging of the Hosgri Fault by a strong crustal block translated to the northwest along the Shoreline Fault. Two diverging Hosgri Fault strands bounding a central uplifted block characterize the northern ~30 km of the Hosgri Fault in this area. The eastern Hosgri strand passes through releasing and restraining bends; the releasing bend is the primary control on development of an elongate, asymmetric, "Lazy Z" sedimentary basin. The western strand of the Hosgri Fault Zone passes through a significant restraining bend and

  17. Fault tolerant operation of switched reluctance machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    The energy crisis and environmental challenges have driven industry towards more energy efficient solutions. With nearly 60% of electricity consumed by various electric machines in industry sector, advancement in the efficiency of the electric drive system is of vital importance. Adjustable speed drive system (ASDS) provides excellent speed regulation and dynamic performance as well as dramatically improved system efficiency compared with conventional motors without electronics drives. Industry has witnessed tremendous grow in ASDS applications not only as a driving force but also as an electric auxiliary system for replacing bulky and low efficiency auxiliary hydraulic and mechanical systems. With the vast penetration of ASDS, its fault tolerant operation capability is more widely recognized as an important feature of drive performance especially for aerospace, automotive applications and other industrial drive applications demanding high reliability. The Switched Reluctance Machine (SRM), a low cost, highly reliable electric machine with fault tolerant operation capability, has drawn substantial attention in the past three decades. Nevertheless, SRM is not free of fault. Certain faults such as converter faults, sensor faults, winding shorts, eccentricity and position sensor faults are commonly shared among all ASDS. In this dissertation, a thorough understanding of various faults and their influence on transient and steady state performance of SRM is developed via simulation and experimental study, providing necessary knowledge for fault detection and post fault management. Lumped parameter models are established for fast real time simulation and drive control. Based on the behavior of the faults, a fault detection scheme is developed for the purpose of fast and reliable fault diagnosis. In order to improve the SRM power and torque capacity under faults, the maximum torque per ampere excitation are conceptualized and validated through theoretical analysis and

  18. A Log-Scaling Fault Tolerant Agreement Algorithm for a Fault Tolerant MPI

    SciTech Connect

    Hursey, Joshua J; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Graham, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The lack of fault tolerance is becoming a limiting factor for application scalability in HPC systems. The MPI does not provide standardized fault tolerance interfaces and semantics. The MPI Forum's Fault Tolerance Working Group is proposing a collective fault tolerant agreement algorithm for the next MPI standard. Such algorithms play a central role in many fault tolerant applications. This paper combines a log-scaling two-phase commit agreement algorithm with a reduction operation to provide the necessary functionality for the new collective without any additional messages. Error handling mechanisms are described that preserve the fault tolerance properties while maintaining overall scalability.

  19. Reactivation of inland normal faults triggered by extensional stress associated with the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, H.; Toda, S.; Fukushima, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The devastating 11 March 2011 Mw 9.0 earthquake ruptured a 500-km-long and 200-km-wide plate interface between the overlying North American plate and subducting Pacific plate along the Tohoku coast of northeast Japan. Because of its large source area and huge amount of slip up to 50 m, the earthquake drastically changed the crustal stress state of northeast Japan and triggered widespread seismic activity as far as 450 km from the source area. There are several areas of heightened seismicity in Tohoku district where there were few earthquakes prior to the March event. Iwaki City at the southeast corner of Fukushima Prefecture is one of the areas with significantly elevated seismic activity after the March earthquake. The most striking characteristics of the seismicity in Iwaki area are that the majority of the earthquakes show normal faulting mechanisms with the T-axes trending E-W to NE-SW. This marks a significant contrast to an E-W compressional stress field of northeast Japan demonstrated by geodetic, seismological and geological data. Therefore, the E-W tensional stress regime is interpreted to be temporal due to coseismic and post-seismic eastward movement of northeast Japan arc. The largest normal faulting event of Mw 6.6 occurred on April 11 and ruptured two previously mapped faults, the NW-trending Yunodake fault and NNW-trending Itozawa fault. Clear surface ruptures ~15 km long along the Yunodake fault and ~15 km long along the Itozawa fault appeared during the earthquake. Seismological data and interviews to the local residents reveal that the two sub-parallel faults ruptured simultaneously. The surface ruptures exhibit predominantly normal sense of slip down to the west although the Yunodake fault has systematic left-lateral component of displacement less than 1/5 of the vertical component. The maximum vertical offset on the Yunodake fault is ~80 cm whereas that on the Itozawa fault is ~2 m. The location of the ruptures and slip distribution by field

  20. Learning and diagnosing faults using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Bruce A.; Kiech, Earl L.; Ali, Moonis

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks have been employed for learning fault behavior from rocket engine simulator parameters and for diagnosing faults on the basis of the learned behavior. Two problems in applying neural networks to learning and diagnosing faults are (1) the complexity of the sensor data to fault mapping to be modeled by the neural network, which implies difficult and lengthy training procedures; and (2) the lack of sufficient training data to adequately represent the very large number of different types of faults which might occur. Methods are derived and tested in an architecture which addresses these two problems. First, the sensor data to fault mapping is decomposed into three simpler mappings which perform sensor data compression, hypothesis generation, and sensor fusion. Efficient training is performed for each mapping separately. Secondly, the neural network which performs sensor fusion is structured to detect new unknown faults for which training examples were not presented during training. These methods were tested on a task of fault diagnosis by employing rocket engine simulator data. Results indicate that the decomposed neural network architecture can be trained efficiently, can identify faults for which it has been trained, and can detect the occurrence of faults for which it has not been trained.

  1. A Quaternary Fault Database for Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, S.; Ehlers, T. A.; Bendick, R.; Stübner, K.; Strube, T.

    2015-09-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for Central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for Central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault segments and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 122 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in Central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  2. Seismological Constraints on Fault Plane Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, K.

    2015-12-01

    The down-dip geometry of seismically active normal faults is not well known. Many examples of normal faults with down-dip curvature exist, such as listric faults revealed in cross-section or in seismic reflection data, or the exposed domes of core complexes. However, it is not understood: (1) whether curved faults fail in earthquakes, and (2) if those faults have generated earthquakes, is the curvature a primary feature of the rupture or due to later modification of the plane? Even if an event is surface-rupturing, because of the limited depth-extent over which observations can be made, it is difficult to reliably constrain the change in dip with depth (if any) and therefore the fault curvature. Despite the uncertainty in seismogenic normal fault geometries, published slip inversions most commonly use planar fault models. We investigate the seismological constraints on normal fault geometry using a forward-modelling approach and present a seismological technique for determining down-dip geometry. We demonstrate that complexity in the shape of teleseismic body waveforms may be used to investigate the presence of down-dip fault plane curvature. We have applied this method to a catalogue of continental and oceanic normal faulting events. Synthetic models demonstrate that the shapes of SH waveforms at along-strike stations are particularly sensitive to fault plane geometry. It is therefore important to consider the azimuthal station coverage before modelling an event. We find that none of the data require significant down-dip curvature, although the modelling results for some events remain ambiguous. In some cases we can constrain that the down-dip fault geometry is within 20° of planar.

  3. West Coast Tsunami: Cascadia's Fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Bernard, E. N.; Titov, V.

    2013-12-01

    The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Hypotheses of the rupture process of Cascadia fault include a long rupture (M9.1) along the entire fault line, short ruptures (M8.8 - M9.1) nucleating only a segment of the coastline, or a series of lesser events of M8+. Recent studies also indicate an increasing probability of small rupture occurring at the south end of the Cascadia fault. Some of these hypotheses were implemented in the development of tsunami evacuation maps in Washington and Oregon. However, the developed maps do not reflect the tsunami impact caused by the most recent updates regarding the Cascadia fault rupture process. The most recent study by Wang et al. (2013) suggests a rupture pattern of high- slip patches separated by low-slip areas constrained by estimates of coseismic subsidence based on microfossil analyses. Since this study infers that a Tokohu-type of earthquake could strike in the Cascadia subduction zone, how would such an tsunami affect the tsunami hazard assessment and planning along the Pacific Coast of North America? The rapid development of computing technology allowed us to look into the tsunami impact caused by above hypotheses using high-resolution models with large coverage of Pacific Northwest. With the slab model of MaCrory et al. (2012) (as part of the USGS slab 1.0 model) for the Cascadia earthquake, we tested the above hypotheses to assess the tsunami hazards along the entire U.S. West Coast. The modeled results indicate these hypothetical scenarios may cause runup heights very similar to those observed along Japan's coastline during the 2011

  4. Relative inactivity during the last 140,000 years of a portion of the La Paz fault, southern Baja California Sur, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Hausback, B.P.; Smith, Joe T.

    1990-01-01

    Uranium-series dating of corals overlying the undeformed Punta Coyote gravels indicates that the underlying La Paz fault zone has been relatively inactive in this part of the Baja California peninsula during the last 140,000 years, and possibly for a significantly longer period. However, Holocene seismic activities along extensions of the fault zone north of Cabo San Lucas suggest potential seismic hazards for the city of La Paz (population 200,000), which lies about 6 km from the fault. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  5. Relation between structure and low-temperature geothermal systems in Fukuoka city, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibi, H.; Nishijima, J.; Hirano, T.; Fujimitsu, Y.; Ehara, S.

    2008-08-01

    The Fukuoka area is located in the southwestern part of Japan. The Yokote-Ijiri area, located in the southern part of Fukuoka city, has several low-temperature geothermal systems, including eleven hot springs. From 1996 to 2008, the Fukuoka area was investigated by gravity survey, using Scintrex CG-3 and CG-3M gravimeters, in an attempt to delineate its subsurface structure. The surveys were intended to improve the understanding of the relation between the geothermal systems and the subsurface structure as well as to locate the active faults in the surveyed area, which are responsible for generating large earthquakes. The gravity data were analyzed using integrated gradient interpretation techniques, such as the Horizontal Gradient (HG), Tilt Derivative (TDR), and Euler deconvolution methods. With these techniques, many faults were detected, including the famous Kego fault, which is an active fault in Fukuoka city. A 2-D gravity model was constructed to show the relationship between the faults and the geothermal systems. The results of the present study will hopefully lead to an understanding of the relationships between the interpreted faults and the location of the low-temperature geothermal systems and possibly aid in future geothermal exploration of the area.

  6. Fault geometries in basement-induced wrench faulting under different initial stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M. A.; Mandl, G.; Supesteijn, C. H. K.

    Scaled sandbox experiments were used to generate models for relative ages, dip, strike and three-dimensional shape of faults in basement-controlled wrench faulting. The basic fault sequence runs from early en échelon Riedel shears and splay faults through 'lower-angle' shears to P shears. The Riedel shears are concave upwards and define a tulip structure in cross-section. In three dimensions, each Riedel shear has a helicoidal form. The sequence of faults and three-dimensional geometry are rationalized in terms of the prevailing stress field and Coulomb-Mohr theory of shear failure. The stress state in the sedimentary overburden before wrenching begins has a substantial influence on the fault geometries and on the final complexity of the fault zone. With the maximum compressive stress (∂ 1) initially parallel to the basement fault (transtension), Riedel shears are only slightly en échelon, sub-parallel to the basement fault, steeply dipping with a reduced helicoidal aspect. Conversely, with ∂ 1 initially perpendicular to the basement fault (transpression), Riedel shears are strongly oblique to the basement fault strike, have lower dips and an exaggerated helicoidal form; the final fault zone is both wide and complex. We find good agreement between the models and both mechanical theory and natural examples of wrench faulting.

  7. Primary and secondary faulting in the Najd fault system, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, John McMahon

    1979-01-01

    The Najd fault system is a major transcurrent (strike-slip) fault system of Proterozoic age in the Arabian Shield. The system is a braided complex of parallel and curved en echelon faults. Complex arrays of secondary structures including strike-slip, oblique-slip, thrust, and normal faults, together with folds and dike swarms, are associated with some major faults, particularly near their terminations. The secondary structures indicate that compressional and extensional and dilational conditions existed synchronously in different parts of the fault zone. The outcrop traces of faults and syntectonic dikes have been used to interpret the configuration of principal compressive stresses during formation of parts of the secondary fracture systems. Second-order deformation was a series of separate events in a complex episodic faulting history. Comparison with model studies indicates that master faults extended in length in stages and periodically developed arrays of secondary structures. Propagation of the major faults took place along splay trajectories, which inter-connected to form a subparallel sheeted and braided zone. Interpretation of the aeromagnetic maps indicates that the Najd system is broader at depth than the outcropping fault complex, and that more continuous structures underlie arrays of faults at surface. The fault pattern is mechanically explicable in terms of simple shear between rigid blocks beneath the exposed structures.

  8. The Energetics of Gravity Driven Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, L.

    2007-12-01

    Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In displacement-bounded faulting, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone. Elastic rebound is an example of displacement-bounded faulting. In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In displacement-bounded faulting the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault. Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the topography and internal stress-causing density variations is equally split between the seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and the increase in locked-in elastic strain. The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on the fault. They must exist if gravity participates in the energetics of the faulting process. From the perspective of gravitational tectonics, the gravity collapse mechanism is direct and simple. The related mechanics are a little more

  9. Surface faulting along the Superstition Hills fault zone and nearby faults associated with the earthquakes of 24 November 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The M6.2 Elmore Desert Ranch earthquake of 24 November 1987 was associated spatially and probably temporally with left-lateral surface rupture on many northeast-trending faults in and near the Superstition Hills in western Imperial Valley. Three curving discontinuous principal zones of rupture among these breaks extended northeastward from near the Superstition Hills fault zone as far as 9km; the maximum observed surface slip, 12.5cm, was on the northern of the three, the Elmore Ranch fault, at a point near the epicenter. Twelve hours after the Elmore Ranch earthquake, the M6.6 Superstition Hills earthquake occurred near the northwest end of the right-lateral Superstition Hills fault zone. We measured displacements over 339 days at as many as 296 sites along the Superstition Hills fault zone, and repeated measurements at 49 sites provided sufficient data to fit with a simple power law. The overall distributions of right-lateral displacement at 1 day and the estimated final slip are nearly symmetrical about the midpoint of the surface rupture. The average estimated final right-lateral slip for the Superstition Hills fault zone is ~54cm. The average left-lateral slip for the conjugate faults trending northeastward is ~23cm. The southernmost ruptured member of the Superstition Hills fault zone, newly named the Wienert fault, extends the known length of the zone by about 4km. -from Authors

  10. Continued fault locking near Istanbul: Evidence of high earthquake potential from InSAR observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Faqi; Walter, Thomas R.; Wang, Rongjiang

    2015-04-01

    A sequence of large earthquakes occurred along the North Anatolia fault in the last century. These earthquakes, including the recent 1999 İzmit/Düzce earthquake, generally propagated westward toward the Marmara Sea, defining the Main Marmara fault (MMF) as a seismic gap. An assessment of the seismic hazards along the MMF is important because Istanbul, one of the largest cities in the world, lies approximately 10 km north of the eastern MMF. A study of fault locking status allows for a better evaluation of the seismic hazard around Istanbul. In this paper, we use combined ascending and descending Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) observations to investigate the crustal deformation associated with the Princes Island fault (PIF), eastern segment of the MMF. After decomposing the displacement signals and minimizing the postseismic deformations, a clear deformation pattern relating to fault locking at the PIF was identified. The strain accumulation rate of the PIF is estimated to be about 20 mm/y. Our results show direct geodetic evidence that the eastern MMF is highly locked. Moreover, even under stress loading of adjacent strong earthquakes this locking was found to be sustained, indicating a continuous build-up of a slip deficit and therefor a high potential of earthquake hazards.

  11. 26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department of Public Finance, Real Estate Owned by the City of New York under Jurisdiction of the Department of Public Charities, 1909.) - Island Hospital, Roosevelt Island, New York County, NY

  12. Fault Model Development for Fault Tolerant VLSI Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    it minimizes the number of bridging 5 % -W V,. Pi’%A faults but because of the ease with which the layout principles can be automated . This implies a...diffusion over a significant portion. Thus, it turns out .. 4 that the layout chosen on the basis of easy automation is also efficient in terms of...34, Proo. 24th ACM/IEEE . Design Automation Conference, June 1987, pp 244-250. 106 ii * . .A 16. [Reddy,19861 Sudhakar M. Reddy and Madhukar M. Reddy

  13. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1990-01-01

    The use of back-to-back, or comparison, testing for regression test or porting is examined. The efficiency and the cost of the strategy is compared with manual and table-driven single version testing. Some of the key parameters that influence the efficiency and the cost of the approach are the failure identification effort during single version program testing, the extent of implemented changes, the nature of the regression test data (e.g., random), and the nature of the inter-version failure correlation and fault-masking. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are discussed, together with some suggestions concerning its practical use.

  14. The 1992 Landers earthquake and surface faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rymer, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Faulting associated with the June 28, 992, earthquake near Landers, California, broke the surface of the ground over a length of more than 70 km, the longest surface rupture in the United States since the great San Francisco quake of 1906. the strongest shaking associated with this magnitude 7.6 (MS) earthquake, the largest in the contiguous 48 states in the last 40 years, occurred in a sparsely populated sections of the Mojave Desert more than 200 km east of Los Angeles. the earthquake began with a sudden slip on the Johnson Valley fault about 10 km southwest of Landers. The initial fault movement probably occurred at a depth of less than 10 km. Surface faulting then propagated over 70 km to the north and northeast. The faulting linked preexisting faults-some previously known and mapped and others previously unknown-into a complex, coherent rupture zone. 

  15. New results in fault latency modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J. G.; Swern, F. L.; Bavuso, S.

    1983-01-01

    Studies carried out by McGough and Swern (1981, 1983) are summarized. In these studies, an avionics processor was simulated and a series of fault injection experiments was carried out to determine the degree of fault latency in a redundant flight control system that employed comparison monitoring as the exclusive means of failure detection. A determination was also made of the fault coverage of a typical self-test program. The summary presented stresses that a self-test program should be designed to capitalize on the hardware mechanization of the processor. If this is not done, subtests tend to repeatedly exercise the same hardware components while neglecting to exercise a substantial proportion of the remainder. It is also pointed out that fault latency is relatively independent of both the length and instruction mix of a program. A significant difference is found in fault coverage assessed using pin-level and gate-level fault models.

  16. A new intelligent hierarchical fault diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.C.; Huang, C.L.; Yang, H.T.

    1997-02-01

    As a part of a substation-level decision support system, a new intelligent Hierarchical Fault Diagnosis System for on-line fault diagnosis is presented in this paper. The proposed diagnosis system divides the fault diagnosis process into two phases. Using time-stamped information of relays and breakers, phase 1 identifies the possible fault sections through the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) networks, and phase 2 recognizes the types and detailed situations of the faults identified in phase 1 by using a fast bit-operation logical inference mechanism. The diagnosis system has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan power secondary transmission system. Test results show that rapid and accurate diagnosis can be obtained with flexibility and portability for fault diagnosis purpose of diverse substations.

  17. Fault-tolerant dynamic task graph scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt, Mehmet C.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Kunal; Agrawal, Gagan

    2014-11-16

    In this paper, we present an approach to fault tolerant execution of dynamic task graphs scheduled using work stealing. In particular, we focus on selective and localized recovery of tasks in the presence of soft faults. We elicit from the user the basic task graph structure in terms of successor and predecessor relationships. The work stealing-based algorithm to schedule such a task graph is augmented to enable recovery when the data and meta-data associated with a task get corrupted. We use this redundancy, and the knowledge of the task graph structure, to selectively recover from faults with low space and time overheads. We show that the fault tolerant design retains the essential properties of the underlying work stealing-based task scheduling algorithm, and that the fault tolerant execution is asymptotically optimal when task re-execution is taken into account. Experimental evaluation demonstrates the low cost of recovery under various fault scenarios.

  18. Holocene fault scarps near Tacoma, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, B.L.; Brocher, T.M.; Weaver, C.S.; Bucknam, R.C.; Blakely, R.J.; Kelsey, H.M.; Nelson, A.R.; Haugerud, R.

    2004-01-01

    Airborne laser mapping confirms that Holocene active faults traverse the Puget Sound metropolitan area, northwestern continental United States. The mapping, which detects forest-floor relief of as little as 15 cm, reveals scarps along geophysical lineaments that separate areas of Holocene uplift and subsidence. Along one such line of scarps, we found that a fault warped the ground surface between A.D. 770 and 1160. This reverse fault, which projects through Tacoma, Washington, bounds the southern and western sides of the Seattle uplift. The northern flank of the Seattle uplift is bounded by a reverse fault beneath Seattle that broke in A.D. 900-930. Observations of tectonic scarps along the Tacoma fault demonstrate that active faulting with associated surface rupture and ground motions pose a significant hazard in the Puget Sound region.

  19. In-circuit fault injector user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    A fault injector system, called an in-circuit injector, was designed and developed to facilitate fault injection experiments performed at NASA-Langley's Avionics Integration Research Lab (AIRLAB). The in-circuit fault injector (ICFI) allows fault injections to be performed on electronic systems without special test features, e.g., sockets. The system supports stuck-at-zero, stuck-at-one, and transient fault models. The ICFI system is interfaced to a VAX-11/750 minicomputer. An interface program has been developed in the VAX. The computer code required to access the interface program is presented. Also presented is the connection procedure to be followed to connect the ICFI system to a circuit under test and the ICFI front panel controls which allow manual control of fault injections.

  20. Performance Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine

    2005-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. In this paper, an FTC analysis framework is provided to calculate the upper bound of an induced-L(sub 2) norm of an FTC system with existence of false identification and detection time delay. The upper bound is written as a function of a fault detection time and exponential decay rates and has been used to determine which FTC law produces less performance degradation (tracking error) due to false identification. The analysis framework is applied for an FTC system of a HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle. Index Terms fault tolerant control system, linear parameter varying system, HiMAT vehicle.